23 Burst results for "Bbc Dot Com"

Pastor Greg Locke's Popularity Has Exploded Because He Speaks Bold Truths

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:23 min | 8 months ago

Pastor Greg Locke's Popularity Has Exploded Because He Speaks Bold Truths

"Pastor greg tell us first of all what. What is the website for your church. Quick before i forget it. Globovision bc bible church dot com global vision. Bbc dot com. How long have you been pastoring. where did you grow up. I grew up here in hometown. A profit not without honor but in his own country led jesus said but it was a tiny little five thousand person town and then it's just exploded. We're kind of like the last bedroom community here in nashville came back home in two thousand and six so fifteen years ago. I started the church from from scratch. And now we're in a three thousand seat tenant and people just keep showing up because somebody saying something. And god's given us a voice to the nation so thank god for it well. This is what. I have noticed that. Those pastors who've been particularly heroic and bold their churches have exploded. Because there's a there's a hunger for this out there even among nonbelievers or among people that they don't believe it. But i don't really go to church. People are really hungry for this. So i find it kind of funny that the free market sometimes does really wonderful things I mean it you know if you have a virtuous population they will choose virtuous and good things and that seems to be what's happening. We know that our friends in california jack hibs and others their churches have gone up. The numbers have gone up speaking a cornerstone chapel in virginia. In a few days they've experienced a similar thing. When did you decide to kinda get bold on. This stuff was there. It was there a moment for you. Was it During the last few years when did you decide to be outspoken. And become a target of people who just don't like bold people the damn kind of broke for me in two thousand fifteen when the supreme court made their ridiculous decision for same sex marriage and so i did a video called. I'm coming out of the closet and that was it. I mean we went from five thousand followers fifty thousand followers to the blue checkmark and pretty soon two hundred and fifty five hundred million and then of i started fighting target over the transgender bathroom nonsense and planned parenthood just back and forth with them and so it just seemed like controversy began to build the ministry and jumped on the trump train literally because i did a couple of bus tours for mike lyndale and some others and so it just seems like every time i would just i would say something people would resonate and they would say you are saying what we are pastors would

Pastor Greg Jack Hibs BBC Nashville Jesus Virginia California Supreme Court Mike Lyndale
"bbc dot com" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

08:44 min | 9 months ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WBUR

"McArthur is an award winning photographer from Toronto, Canada. She tells me she's always felt a deep unease about the way people treat animals. As a child family trips to the zoo left her feeling sad and confused, not excited. So when she was studying university and thinking about her future She decided to become a conflict photographer. But not as we usually understand it. I was completely enamored with photojournalism, conflict photography street photography, but it was also around that time that I had some advice from one of my mentors to shoot what I love and shoot what I know and what I'm most concerned about. And that is animals. We just don't see these stories in the media. They are hidden from view, literally in figuratively. And so I started investigative work, and it snowballed from there. 20 years on. Joanne has documented animals in captivity in more than 60 countries. This work has taken her to meat and fur farms, slaughterhouses, animal markets, rodeos and marine parks. Sometimes I drive around and pull up to farms and say hello. I'm a photojournalist, and I'm interested in how we produce food. And can I come in? Sometimes I have success with that. Often I go in without an invitation. I rather not do it that way. But what I want to see are the regular conditions that animals live in. For the most part, industry and government don't want people like me. They're photographing. And you? You said earlier that you go in without an invitation that you arrive unannounced. Does that mean these assignments can be quite risky? Um, I am at physical risk of injury from Being caught or being beaten up. A lot of my investigative friends have been caught beaten up put in jail and there's also the risk of psychological and emotional injury to us because we go there to witness Violence, death abuse and it certainly does take its toll. I I have even been diagnosed with PTSD as a result of the long term work that I've done. Joan's photographs have appeared in newspapers and magazines all over the world. She makes them available for free to anyone campaigning for animals through her photojournalism agency. We animals media. And funds to work through grants and donations. The images she produces are striking, sometimes beautiful and often disturbing. The photograph we're going to talk about is when I found quite distressing to look at and please stop listening now, if you don't want to hear a detailed description of animal slaughter If you are interested in taking a look at the image, though you can visit our website BBC dot com FORWARD SLASH food chain. It's 2019 and Joanne is visiting a slaughter house on the outskirts of Bangkok in Thailand. The owner welcomes her in but warns she may find the experience grueling pigs clubbed on the head to stun them before having their throats cut with a knife. Thailand's animal welfare guidelines state that the animals should not suffer. But campaigners argue that the slaughter practices are far from humane. Joan's photograph is called Tai Slaughterhouse, and it's been taken in a large barn with stained rust colored walls at the center of the image, a shirtless man, his sandals covered in water and blood. Race is a long wooden club above a pig's head. The animals. Front legs have buckled and her head is upturned her mouth wide open. Three men look on one has his back to us, the other to show no expression contrast with the rest of the graphic scene. The bloody floor and the apparent anguish on the pig's face. The shot is intriguing, dynamic and violent. The focus of the image is a pig who is on her knees. Her eyes are closed. Her mouth is wide open. Her ears are back. What I can't capture with my images are the sounds. There's a lot of screaming from pigs. Pigs have a deafening high pitched scream. You can't hear the water sluicing around and the clanging of metal and chains carrying the bodies into the next room. Can you describe what it was like after that? How you felt when? When that was over. When you walked away. You got your photos. Um, I was certainly shaking and trying not to shake to keep my hands still to get good images. And I would say that for about 48 48 hours afterwards, All of my senses were very heightened, Uh, colors were brighter Smells were stronger. Sounds were louder. And I remember I was in an apartment about five floors above a little pool and I could smell the chlorine and I could smell everything in the wind. And I just wanted to get away from everything. And, you know, just sort of being a dark room and decompress for a while. And so yes, physiologically took me About two days to come down from that there must be a danger that many people will just turn away from these images. They are very, very hard to look at. And some organizations won't want to publish these photos for that reason. People are traumatized by looking at my work, and I absolutely understand that and I don't want to traumatize people. But I do want to make people aware and put a fire under people. Some people are really difficult to reach and will close the book or turn away from the image and block it out. But they may not forget that image. What kind of impact did your series of photographs at the Thai slaughterhouse have? They were circulated a fair bit in Thailand in the media. Temporarily caused one of the government departments to visit slaughterhouses and to close some of them down temporarily. That's exactly the kind of feedback that we want from the images. We wanted to cause a fuss, and we want people to be alarmed. And we want accountability as well. You talked about the horrific conditions that some farmed animals are captain and in some slaughterhouses. But not every slaughterhouse is the same. Not every farm is the same, and there will be some people listening to this. Who will say well Your finding bad examples and you're probably taking photographs. The put these places in a bad light sort of finding the evidence. To back up an agenda that you've got already. How are people to know that what you're showing is reality and not just a reality You want them to say. Um, I guess they can look at the images where there are a lot of people in the photograph. So it's clear that I am welcome there. Er, and in fact, some slaughter workers are slaughterhouse owners have invited me and welcomed me and because they're proud of the farm, and they're proud of the practices. And that's also why I shoot globally and that's why I should constantly is because I want to show that a factory farm looks quite similar, whether it's in Australia, Canada, Sweden, Cameroon. Or Thailand. It must be very difficult for you to, um, to draw a line under the working day. Yeah, when you've seen things that upset you so much. I'm very passionate about my work and I think that a little part of me might die if I turned myself off from my emotions and my compassion. I want to connect with the pig in the crate or the hen in the cage or the calf who's just been taken away from their mother. And I think it's the care and emotion that I keep alive in me. That helps me create these effective and beautiful and poignant images. This is the food chain from the BBC World Service with me, Emily Thomas.

Emily Thomas Australia BBC World Service Canada Bangkok Sweden Joanne McArthur Joan 2019 Three men Cameroon Toronto, Canada 20 years Thailand BBC dot com more than 60 countries one about 48 48 hours Thai
Who Are the Taliban?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:18 min | 9 months ago

Who Are the Taliban?

"Who are the taliban well the taliban were removed from power in afghanistan by us in two thousand one and they have been displaced from power over the last twenty years and obviously they have seized power again taliban or otherwise known as students in the pashto language emerged in the early nineteen nineties northern pakistan following the withdrawal of soviet troops from afghanistan it is believed that the predominantly pashtoon movement first appeared in religious seminaries. I'm reading from. Bbc dot com mainly mostly paid for by money by saudi arabia which preached a hardline form of suni islam the promise made by the taliban in pashtoon areas straddling pakistan and afghanistan was to restore peace and security then enforce their own very steer version of sharia or islamic law. Their political office is in doha right now and they will return back to afghanistan very soon. My head of the taliban is this guy. Holy moly good luck pronouncing this molewa hip. Tula august sokha zodda. He's the former taliban chief. Justice leader since two thousand sixteen. There's a senior judge political. Deputy deputy and deputy and they're from southwestern afghanistan. The taliban began quickly extending their influence. In september of ninety five and captured the province of herat bordering iran now the taliban the actual pashtoon people they have a history going back hundreds of years wallover a thousand years. They own those hills the taliban they have banned music television cinema disapproved of girls over ten going to school. They have been accused of various human rights and cultural abuses and in fact the taliban destroyed the famous byman. Buddha statues in central afghanistan

Taliban Afghanistan Pashtoon Pakistan Sokha Zodda Saudi Arabia BBC Doha Herat Iran Byman
"bbc dot com" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"BBC dot com slash checking must have online banking to participate in BB and T deals. BB and T now truest member F D I. C. What's the recipe for surprising the kids treating itself and ditching disputing? Ordering your pizza Hut babes like original pan? Original stuff? Crust and more water Now at Pizza Hut, calm no one out pizzas. The hut prices of participation bear. What if we just did it ourselves? What if we stopped waiting for anything to change? And instead we pulled each other up hand by hand. Dollar by dollar community by community toward less worried more stability and a better life. What if that was possible? What if there was a bank for the rest of us? Money shouldn't just work for some of us. It should work for all of us. Varro, a bank for all of us, Find out more and borrow money dot com. Borrow bank member F D I C There are people out there worth saving. Critics are going a quiet place part to the phenomenal experience theaters were made for now. 94% fresh and running tomatoes a quiet place poor to PG 13 tomorrow. There's no doubt about it. It's gonna be another hot Washington summer is your residential or commercial cooling system going to keep up? If you're not sure your system will beat the heat Trust the five star cooling experts across Medcalf for all of your air conditioning, maintenance, repair, installation and service agreements needs scheduled today. Call 1 800 Go Crop or visit crop. Metcalf calm and remember Crap Man Cathy's run with last crop Metcalf, home of the five star technician and proud partner of the Washington Nationals. What is the Fisher House? If I had a chance to talk to the Fisher family, I would start crying because I can't articulate how much it meant to us. The Fisher House is to comfort home for military and veterans, families staying at no charge, allowing the family to be together to support their loved one during medical prices. It's enough to help you thrive through.

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now a vast slab of ice is broken off from the edge of Antarctica. Scientists say the iceberg, which is 170, kilometers long, about 22, kilometers wide. Is the biggest. So far. Let's talk to Dr Beth and Davis from Roll Holloway University of London. Welcome to news hour just give us a bit more detail about sort of war happened. Hi. Good afternoon. So this is an iceberg that has broken away from one of the biggest ice shelves in Antarctica to the running ice shelf. Is this big floating expanse of ice this just northwest Antarctica between the Antarctic Peninsula in East Antarctica. And carving of icebergs is one of the main ways in this in the way in which this large I shelf regularly loses mass so it will periodically release big icebergs into the ocean. This is the biggest iceberg that we have seen from this ice shelf. So far. I mean, what sort of comparison is there? Two other ones? I mean, is I'm I was looking at one map that suggested it was sort of his biggest the island of New Yorker, four times the size of New York City. I mean, it really is enormous, isn't it? Yeah, I think it's hard to understand how big thieves ourselves and AnAnd hard core. I mean, you can fit the whole of the United States and to Antarctica and the running I shelf itself is really, really big. So even though this is a very large iceberg, it's only a very small part of the actual ice shelf, which is many times bigger. As he was saying, I mean, this is part of the natural cycle of things, but the fact that this is bigger than any iceberg that's fallen off before. Is that a cause for concern? Well, this ice elf regularly loses icebergs, and sometimes it will carve less frequently. And so you have fewer icebergs for a little while and then it will have a much bigger iceberg. We haven't seen much evidence of thinning. Around this ice shelf. So this ice shelf is not one of the ice shelves that we're really concerned about where much more concerned about the ice shelf surrounding West Antarctica, which is sinning and retreating much more rapidly than the Rani. I show off, so we haven't seen significant changes in the running I shelf. It's not one of the big guy shows that we're really concerned about, Nevertheless, is climate change of factor. E think it's a little bit difficult to say, because I think this ice shelf does lose icebergs regularly and normally, so it's a little bit difficult. Attribute one big carving event to climate change to this ice shelf. If we started to see a succession of very large icebergs in association with thinning, then it would be a sign that climate change has forced it a change in their behavior of this ice shelf. And why is there a difference in the way different bits of Antarctica? And talk to guys are behaving It's all about the ocean currents. The ocean around Antarctica is warming and certain ocean currents are changing this their configuration. And as those ocean currents that changing where they're flowing, they're able to reach the base on the underside of these ice shelves much more so in west Antarctica, we've got this warm, Circumpolar deep water. And under a changing climate that's increasingly able to melt underneath these eye shells. So all the eye shells which are in Western hardcore, which show reached by this ocean, current melting much more rapidly. Thank you very much. Indeed. That was stalked the best and Davis from Royal Holloway University of London on that huge iceberg. This broken off that part off Antarctica. You're listening to news from the BBC World Service a quick reminder that on our top story, which we're gonna be hearing a bit more about later, you can also get the latest developments on the live page. It's up and running on our website BBC dot com Forward slash news.

Antarctica New York City United States Davis Beth West Antarctica 170, kilometers Antarctic Peninsula BBC World Service New Yorker Royal Holloway University of L Roll Holloway University of Lo about 22, kilometers East Antarctica BBC dot com one west Antarctica northwest Antarctica one map four times
"bbc dot com" Discussed on 10 Bestest

10 Bestest

08:26 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on 10 Bestest

"These miners had to deal with and talks about the very first patent in the united states that was signed by george washington to make potash was so important it was holy. Yeah wow yeah. I'd no idea. I wonder if i've ever seen those in. You know if your overhead or whatever you're seeing it yeah you know like just look at the start of this video you'll see and you'll be like. Oh yeah i've seen it or maybe seen pictures. Yeah okay. I'll check it out. Let super fascinating. Thank you so much for all right. My next khushi is a series of videos. So it's a youtube channel in. It's called bbc ideas so i love bbc. I've talked about several different aspects of the website and their youtube channels. But i love because they have different ones so i feel like that can do different cool sheets on each one because this one i just discovered it has two thousand two hundred and subscribers and two hundred and fifty six video. So can't wait. I just discovered it. And now i have so many videos to check out and in fact the acorn video i was while i was researching the word eight corn. I found this video. And then i found this youtube channel and then i went down the rabbit hole. I spent the next three hours just enthralled in all these amazing videos. It's another one where it's all animation. So it's all these big ideas that are animated so it just makes it way more friendly but also understandable like it's easier to picture because in animation you can do all kinds of wild things than just distill it down really easily and make it just so it's really sticks to you and i love that again. It is also has a website. So you can go to bbc dot com slash ideas. But i'd love the youtube channel. And they just. They have so many great topics they have. The power of introverts y people are choosing to quit social media how the luminosity conspiracy theory started five ways to stop getting distracted so a wide range of topics as well. You can just get lost a cure a cure for hair loss question marks. That's a very important part of it. The man who vented algorithms. I mean every time. I listen so some of these are maybe could be considered a little click beatty. But it's totally works. Like i totally wanna watch every single one of these. They all sound interesting to me. And that's what five videos and they have two hundred fifty six that i just started. I cannot wait to keep diving and more plus they have that lovely british accent. I'm in for sure. Checkout bbc ideas. Yeah you know at that. Almost it's like not click bait to me because it gets you to click on it and then you're happy. Did you know. I feel like you. Click on it and then you're like a what have i done officer right and they're not you know they're not like crazy outlandish Just ones that are super curious to me. I'm gonna love this. Yeah and like one this one why we need wasps like 'cause. I never thought we needed wasps. So i really. I probably need to watch that video. And they're short. They're all in the two to three minute rates do so. How wonderful is that muscle very succinct. And i of course loved that because you know our attention span. These days shorter and shorter. But who doesn't have three minutes exactly so and that's why all of you have time to listen to at least one. Cool sheet. yes that's right. We suck you and you have to listen to our. That's great. i can't believe i haven't heard of that actually. Yeah maybe you've seen one of the you know a lot of the times. I've seen a video. But i don't quite even realize that it's a whole channel two hundred and fifty six other ideas. You know waiting for me andrew. And they're still releasing them. I think like once a week. So it's it's just fantastic. Love nice okay. i shall subscribe all right. My last cool she teary-eyed to the end. And this is one of those you know. I swear. I'm going to have one every episode. This is one that my friend von told me about so. It's a podcast. But i'm going to specifically talk about this one episode because i think this could be consumed by anyone because the podcast it's self is called. Hit play not pause and the reason why the host chose that name is because it is about women going through menopause and she's just really all about all right. Let's empower all of these women. Let's not let them get sucked down by any of the negative things that happened with menopause. But rather let's be strong. Stay strong in in every way mentally physically and she has really great guests on there. They are from all walks of life including doctors. And things like that but then A bunch of other people including this physical trainer gail bernhardt that she had on this one episode. That is called become a fat-burning machine. Or that's that's the name of the book that she wrote and then it's sort of jetsons off of that but they have this really great conversation. And so the reason why i felt like i'd inspired me honestly honestly. I'm not sure whether i'm going through. Menopause or not which some people say in peri menopause with they say that means that you're not but i don't know whatever in any case i was super inspired because i was like okay. I haven't been working out in a while and this is totally getting me Just feeling like. I gotta get to the gym. 'cause she talked so much about the mental aspect of it and just how the there's the physically the physical strength and the emotional and how those tie together and the way i feel like the mind body connection is something that is been talked about a lot but just the way she talked about it and also maybe because she is a woman and really strong and so i'm like yes you know so. I just felt so inspired. And there's so many cool nuggets in there. Great conversation really loved it on the podcast. Hit play not pause Okay first of all. It was funny. Because i think i joked about you when we were talking the other day about prepping for the show. And i'm like. I'm going to go talk to deb just as a joke. And you're like no she's mine. Coveted resource of ours now and i was totally. Jokic did get another. What's maybe i do need true. No she's just like boom boom boom like so cool. She's got so many so i think i have a list of five or something that will probably appear in the next ten episodes from hers from her. I need a secret weapon of yes you do. Oh my gosh okay. And the other thing this cushy very very cool and. I don't know if it's just as i'm getting older now. I'm and i'm paying more attention to older people like doing. These amazing things are happening more often. My guess is that when i was twenty. I just didn't listen to people in their forties fifties and sixties. 'cause like like they were so old so old and i'm in my prime and now or there maybe it's both but there does seem to be this shift power of like embracing your age and you can do more and live longer and live healthier and i love it. Yeah especially because. I am getting older. And it's so nice to have these really cool role models is that's neat and you think about it. Okay so imagine a triathlon. And you see you hear a story about someone who's twenty three who did a triathlon. You're like okay cool and then you hear about someone who's seventy nine who did a triathlon. You're like oh and you want to hear about when they started and what they did. You know it's just way more inspiring. Yeah yeah for sure no. It's very cool and yet it gives us all hope that we can. We can do anything we all right. Well my last sheet is going to be a recipe and this is four guacamole. I very often. If i go to my dad's house he asked me to bring.

george washington gail bernhardt youtube two thousand von five videos twenty five both two bbc two hundred bbc dot com Jokic three minutes twenty three andrew ten episodes first patent three minute
"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"C and w BBC dot com 9 33 back to Mark and Rob. You are back with Rob and we were just talking in the last segment. I was once again expressing my irritation at something. This being the fact that our country seems so completely inept when it comes to doing something that sounds like it's pretty basic, which is to count votes. Now I will give Indiana props because it seems like our state has got this figured out. We do this pretty well were among the first to report I mean, granted were among the first to close our polls. But even so, were among the first to report our results. And I feel like we've mostly got this under control. I know we've got a couple of races still outstanding. Help us understand, Rob? Because you said that you know how this works. What do we do? Well, why do we still have a couple of races outstanding? What's going on? Well, the only reason it doesn't work is if you don't want it to work. I'm I'm very seriously. This is not rocket science. The on ly reason. What do all these states where it doesn't work have in common Democrat run. They're not only Democrat run, but for the most part, they are Democrats Secretary of State. And most people because it's an off year election. The state you just gloss over the secretary of state. It is so vitally important for reasons like this because the secretary of state You ever see a whole bunch of things, but they oversee elections. And the on ly reason This doesn't work is if you want to give yourself another wiggle room to cause chaos and uncertainty. And you know, I hate doing this wants to say something nice about Todd Rokita. Todd Nikita did a very wonderful job when he was secretary of State of reforming that office, and I wish that the rest of his political career he'd been that guy because he did a good job of secretary of State at one of the things he did, and Connie Lawson has continued this in many ways, and I hate saying nice things about her, too. But it's streamline voting to make it efficient. Make it fair, make it transparent. So on Election day. What will happen is inside these machines. There's a tape that records every vote that is cast and throughout the day, you will see it actually happened to me. When I want to vote yesterday, they will actually pause voting for, like, five minutes to say, OK, everybody stay in line. We're gonna pause for five minutes. They will run the tally of the machine against the tally of the clerks who have signed in So throughout the course the whole day, multiple times. Okay, we have 256 votes counted. Yes, we have 256 people signed in. So throughout the whole day, they are tabulating the vote price. Check, making sure the judges and the clerks are making sure that they are the inspectors or whatever they're called, are making sure they tally up. Then, at the end of the day, that machine has a physical tape. That tape is printed out. It's locked. It's secured in each voting machine, and then it is taken to the county headquarters to be tabulated. I believe in and someone correct me if I'm wrong on this, But there's a chain of custody. So like multiple people are watching that thing get deliver. It's sealed, but even after sealed, multiple people are watching it. The entire trip to the voting center. That's part of why the camera for the inspector, I think it's the inspector gets paid Mohr because they're in charge of delivering that voting machine back and that tally so it should be being bang. Boom. This is not hard collect tally throughout the day. You make sure they line up. Take it hand it tabulated. Put it on website. We have a Republican secretary of state. That's why that's why But, yeah, I mean, it's still It's still a complete disgrace to me that this isn't something that's universally and efficient, easy to do process. But here's the thing Mock if you stopped 10 people on the street How many of those could tell you who our secretary of state is? Well, that's absolutely true. There's not very many people that are paying attention of that in these blue states, which default, But they have no idea what the secretary of state does the average person who knows who a lot of their elected officials are. Don't know what the secretary of state does. So while I'm a Democrat, so I just go, you know, click. No, you need to vote for competence on the secretary of state Secretary of State should not be political at all. It should be about competence because this is one of the primary functions of what the secretary of state does. All right. Well, that's helpful. But I'm still mad because it doesn't. It doesn't fix the over the overarching issue, which is just that. This is America. Like we've sent people to the moon. We have done amazing things. There is no reason there's no excuse for state's not being able to sort out something this basic. Is fundamental to our entire democracy. But what they've recognised the left has recognizes. If you create chaos, then you can put it in the hands of the court. And look what happened in Pennsylvania. You got uber liberal three uber lives, and Roberts, who's basically done the full turn at this point. And they got a federal judge in a lower level to say Okay, you can break the law and a 44 timings tie goes to the runner, which is the lower court ruling, So they recognize there's no wood Senate for the left to do it right. Just create as much chaos as you can. And maybe you'll get some sympathetic judges which, in the case of Pennsylvania, they did. Yeah, you get the government you deserve. It's true. It is absolutely true. The other frustrating thing I think to just aside from the fact that we can't count votes right is that there's still this unknown. That's that we don't even know if it's going to get the unknown will be solved by counting. Or if it is going to go all the way through the court system because of it goes to the court system, Man. This is gonna last forever and I am going to need doughnuts. Okay, Remember, we talked about preparation in our first segment. You ought to just you ought to just be prepared that this is going to end up at the Supreme Court and multiple you really like. No, No, no. Down your mind This to me is going to make Florida look like a walk in the park in 2000. It was Corey Lewandowski. Who I heard on Fox News earlier this morning. On my way in. Who was they were asking him? Okay, So you know, given the sort of state of flux that we're in right now, When do you think this election will be decided? And he was like today. And I was like Corey, but they're not. They've stopped counting in six states. They're just pausing the counting. So I mean, this is that you're right, Rob. I think you're good. This is absolutely not going to be something that we're going to know about for weeks and weeks and weeks, and that is not good for the country now, quick, remember? Corey Lewandowski and I are buddies. Right? That's right, Corner said, was going to call and say Rob Kendo is a great guy who's on the Trump train early and I'm so happy that he is on that idea..

Rob Kendo Corey Lewandowski Indiana Todd Rokita BBC Pennsylvania Mark Connie Lawson Fox News Senate Todd Nikita Supreme Court Mohr America Corner Roberts Florida
"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Reade filed a lawsuit against MPD shortly after her son was killed. Old by an officer back in May, a federal judge in Indianapolis has now weighed in on that lawsuit, The judge dismissed. I am PIAs, a defendant, saying claims can only be filed against the city of Indianapolis and not the department. The ruling also dismissed excessive force complaints against I MPD chief Randall Taylor, I MPD deputy chief Kendall Adams and officer Stephen Scott. The judge did, however, allow wrongful death claims to continue against Taylor and Adams. Questioning whether they were acting in the scope of their employment when they started chasing Read on. I 65 John Herrick 93. WNBC Mobile News 3649. That's the number of positive cases reported in Indiana on Thursday, smashing a new daily high the first time with more than 3000. The Indiana Department of Health also says more than 4000 Hoosiers have now died from Corona virus If you haven't voted already, the Marion County Public Health Department has a few tips for you to stay socially distanced, where a mask and sanitize if you have to take it off, for some reason, avoid close contact. Even if you're wearing masks and clean your hands with either soap or hand sanitizer after you vote also so you don't have to spend as much time at a voting location. They suggest making sure you're registered. No, the candidates. And check location hours ahead of time. Madison Miguel 93 WNBC Mobile news on the level on the go on Twitter at 93. W. A. B, c and w BBC dot com. Now the forecast from the American Standard heating Weather Center still bit breezy in the overnight hours, temperature's falling to the upper thirties. Tonight, Broady afternoon will dry out. Clouds will decrease making way for a little afternoon sunshine temperatures in the upper forties till low fifties I'm some track a.

Indianapolis Randall Taylor Kendall Adams officer MPD Indiana Department of Health WNBC Mobile Marion County Public Health De Reade John Herrick Indiana deputy chief Broady Stephen Scott Madison Miguel Weather Center Twitter W. A. B BBC
"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Is back. You as Borat. This time he stars in a movie that may have the longest titles in the history of movie titles by the Way, bore at subsequent movie. Film. Delivery of Prada Just bribe to American regime for make benefit once glorious nation of Kazakhstan. He says. He gets people to lower their guard and let their prejudices slip out. It just came out on Amazon Prime. I'm John Herrick on the level on the go on on Twitter at 93. W A. B c and w hy BBC dot com. Yes, sir, We're going to keep doing this. Okay? We're going to keep celebrating John Herrick. For the best newscast in Indiana. The Spectrum Awards Radio awards television awards going on yesterday. Our very own John Herrick best newscast. In Indiana. WNBC best local reporting Local impact reporting The leadership award went to our news director Chris Davis and a program director David would and one of our key imaging guys, Sean Matthews, Oh, and WDC Station of the Air Station of the year. And I believe the direct quote from from Eric Berman in the W. ABC newsroom is suck on that haters. I don't think he said that, but I don't think he said I'm sorry. I'm sorry. That was Nigel. I had written down. That was not Eric Burman. Can I tell a story? I know. I know. I know what kind. I love your stories. So I'm on Twitter yesterday because on and I'm done. And someone is yelling at me and screaming at me and calling me they're going after me. They're crazy. They're out of their mind. And all I'm doing is like retweeting like what's happening here? And at one moment this guy says you and all your followers are just druids. I'm like Druids, right? Drew it. Stan Lear gets it slides right in. Yes. Oh tells a story. Matt Bear. Listen to this. I know we got the traffic. Wait. We do traffic. Then tell the story. God go ahead. We do traffic and then tell the story. Matt Bear with traffic on the fives. Stay right there. You won't believe it. Average road closed, and Greenwood right now, Horse Ville rode up to Smith Valley Road. That is a multiple vehicle crash that has both directions Right now in the V P get a vote tend to City County Council building downtown Andy. Be prepared for closures like Illinois story shutdown is South right now. That's because of the increased security detail and you're gonna have that downtown. At least I'd say through 8 30 this morning and maybe a little bit longer. So just watch foreclosures give yourself plenty of time or a traffic sponsored by being window thinking about a window door, Citing project the window can design and price your project without ever coming in your home with their satellite technology visit, be window dot com. Today I'm mad Bear with traffic on the fives Follow us on Twitter, A W IBC traffic. In his 63 degrees and the American Standard Cooling Weather Center, the American Standard Heating Weather Center. Who the time is 7 36. My crazy Alright. You still there? John? Eric, I sure am. I put away to hear this. Tony Katz 93 wnbc so again. Crazy.

John Herrick Twitter Matt Bear Eric Berman Eric Burman Indiana Kazakhstan Amazon Chris Davis Tony Katz Eric Stan Lear Nigel ABC Greenwood City County Council Sean Matthews WDC Station program director director
"bbc dot com" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For the latest sports news with James. Thank you very much. Italian giants A C Milano looking for you A for Europa League success to complete the set of major European football competition that they have one previously started off on match Day one of this season's tournament with a very comfortable 31 win away from home, But the Scottish champions Celtic tricks Yussef Saki GII as Leo beat Sparta Prague and for Uruguay and Darwin Nunes has been Feca defeated left. Al Kemal had 13 players ruled out with their game it Napoli through Corona virus, But the Dutch team was surprised one nil winners. Danny DeWitt, another wins for English sides. Arsenal spurs unless the city The Arsenal boss Mikel Arteta was thankful for good bonds. Pierre Emerick, Obama ain't coming off the bench to school, the winner in there to one victory at Rapid Vienna. He also heaped praise on his need. Garnett and signing Thomas Party who impressed all chatter really solid, really costs a vault and I think she hold me chilled by himself in the second half as well when we were living more often, and we started to take more chances in the spaces with someplace, but I think he was fantastic tonight and there's much more to come from you now have a listen to this scheme are roof scored a spectacular gulf Scottish side ranges in that sooner when it's standard Liege, these authorities at the moment we still managed to hold onto possession launches a long lunch from battery. Just what it's sensational. 49.9 m out. He was That's the Europa League record for you. Steps fans should mention as well. These Pele's 80th birthday today is Brazil's old time leading goal scorer. The former strikers, one of sports, most revered figures, murals and tributes to him being paid all around Brazil and still smiling as well. 80 years old elsewhere will tennis number one Novak Djokovic said he still prepared to defend his Australian Open title next year. But you still have some concerns over the cove with 19 measures. That that that could happen. Pays preparation. The first Grand Slam tournament 2021 gets underway in Melbourne in January right now is off. Now we have the two weeks quarantine and Wei are able to travel and were able to participate in the tournaments on the Australian soil. But I understand that because Australia is such a such a big country that also Nationally between the states. They also have some restrictions. And I don't allowing people to fight from one state to another, which creates, of course, on issue for us in the tennis world. On in baseball, the world Siri's continues in there. The eye was of Saturday morning with Game three between the L. A Dodgers and the Tampa Bay Rays. It's all square at the moment of one match and eats more sport can be found as ever. But BBC dot com Forward slash sport. Thanks very much, James. Now an awful.

James Brazil Novak Djokovic Europa League Garnett Arsenal Mikel Arteta Australia Thomas Party Al Kemal Danny DeWitt Sparta Prague Darwin Nunes Corona tennis Uruguay Leo Feca Pierre Emerick
"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"W Y b, c and w BBC dot com Teno four back to the chicks and one introducing touch free payments from papal a safe way for your customers to pay simply download the papal app and display your own unique You are code for your customers to scan Whether you're a market seller, poodle, pamper piano tuner or plumber signing up to accept touch free payments for your business is easy Touch freak your code payments. No cellar fees until 2021 not applicable to pay back your transactions. Other fees may apply shop safe with PayPal. Minute. Interesting times. Indy. It's good to know Rhino shields helping folks in there painting worries like they did with Terry. I've got a long home and every three years that have to stain it, and it would cost me around pretty close to $1000 each time our crews always following the guidelines on social distancing, we work outside. Why you're safe inside. A friend of mine heard about rhinos killed and he said, I should give him a call right now is the perfect time to get 20% off. The 25 year guaranteed protection of Rhino shield. I would say that the best thing that you could do is have the rhinos she'll put on because of the excellent warranty that they offer called today for a free virtual presentation and ask for our showcase homes near you where you can see our finished product firsthand from the safety of your car. Here's Rhino Shield. Shane Smith called me at 888 Rhino 41 888 Rhino 41. Don't find go. No, She never ate your house again. Thiss hour on 93 WNBC is powered by BMW plumbing, heating, cooling and drains your American standard air dealer..

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"To take this seriously. Th president John Auerbach, You can read the full report at T F h dot or GE Ahh, month long outdoor celebration is planned at new fields. The 30 Acre property in Indy will hold harvest days and harvest night from October 2nd to the 25th. I'll be over 10,000, Indiana, Growing pumpkins and Gore's displayed and harvest nights will be a 90 minute spooky experience, including a trail and ghost train on the level on the go on Twitter at 93. W A. B c and w BBC dot com. Hey, it's the chicks here and our pals at transitions of Indiana. The place that helped us restore our hair has a message for you at Transitions of Indiana. We're here for you. We're here to give you something to look forward to. The hope of restoring your hair for over 20 years. We've been one of the largest clinics and hair restoration be rest assured, we will meet and exceed all guidelines for your safety. Call 3175 to 2 to 991 or go to transitions indeed dot com For your free virtual or in office evaluation call now and we can restore your hair transitions has a fantastic staff, awesome solutions and proven results. They'll take care of you safely and confidentially do what we did Find out of laser hair therapy, hair transplants, or P r P can help restore your hair called 3175 to 2 to 991 to schedule your free virtual or in office consultation right now, 3175 to 2. 2991 that's 3175 to 2 to 991 or visit. Transitions indeed dot com and grow your hair back Benny Smith for sundown Gardens, their annual fall open houses this Saturday. 10 a.m. to 4 P.m. Shop for fall favorites like pumpkins, mums and mohr food trucks on site, Lost Tortugas and wily Pelusa ice cream. Ride the mobile ZIP line and the Uno Gold band will be playing midday Westfield Zone Field Brewing will be there to the BBC Home and Garden show will broadcast live and enter for a chance to win a $500 gift certificate. This Saturday. It's sundown Gardens Annual Fall open house 186 and Spring Mill Road 10 before thie pain is really getting your.

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Undergo and on Twitter at 93 W. Y b c and w BBC dot com Teno four. Back to the chick, it's Jamie Progresses, Employee of the month, two months in a row. Little message. Hi, Jamie Hit me, Jamie. I just had a new idea for our song with the name your Price tool. So when it's like, tell us what you want to pay me A trombone was blah, blah, blah. And you say We'll be fined Carthage options to fit your budget. Then we just all do. Finger snaps will acquire goes Steven's coming at your savings Coming out job. Yes. No. Maybe. Anyway. So your practice tonight I got new lyrics for the Rat Break, Progressive casualty insurance Company and affiliates. Bryson coverage match limited by state law. How do you encourage over 74,000 teenagers to sign a safe driving pledge? What about teaching 43,000 people about ways they can utilize public transportation? And what's the best way to inform 17,000 people about lifestyle changes? They can prove their city's air quality. These are just a few examples of the way that insight uses advertising for good. We're a dedicated group of people that create Local marketing campaigns that leave a big lasting impact. Tell us how you would use advertising for good at insight impact dot com. Thiss hour on 93. WNBC Power by Pierce Jewelers, Carmel's family owned diamond engagement Ring store. Man. It's about time we have some estrogen there, right. Conservative estrogen giving conservatism home Makeover Guys. Chicks on the right on 93 W..

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Twitter at 93 W, c and w BBC dot com 9 33 Back to the Chicks back with chicks Way talked a lot on this very programme about how people keep leaving liberal places like California, for example, New York as another example. And they flee, do tow restrictive taxes or due to crazy, right. Rations or, for whatever reason, they flee to more conservative states where they may not pay any income taxes. State income tax is, for example, and they then take all of their crazy liberal ideas to those conservative places and then turn them. Liberal. In other words, they're they're escaping places for a certain reason and then just continuing to vote in those exact same reasons that they left and the latest example of that. Is Joe Rogan, who, of course, is in California right now in L A and has announced in a Friday interview with the CEO of Spartan and Death race that he is good. He's heading to Texas. I can't with this guy. I knew you would not be above just I cannot with him, But I'm gonna vote for Bernie Sanders. Yeah. Okay. Socialism. And then he's like, okay, I'm gonna I'm leaving. I'm leaving because I want more freedom. Yeah. Oh, Texas is Buck Wild, bro. That was an exact quote. Uh, Texas is Buck wild. You can bring a gun. That's what he said. This guy and people listen to his podcast like crazy is like millions and millions of people are like 02 Rogan is great. Yeah. This is another quote. When you look at the traffic when you look at the economic despair when you look at the homelessness problem that's accelerated radically over the last 67 10 years. I think there's too many people here. I think it's not tenable. I don't think it's manageable. I think every every mayor does a bleak job of doing it because I don't think anybody could do a great job of it. I mean, this is the thing he's talking about, Ella. And how much l A sucks. Why do you think it sucks? Joe? Yeah. Because they vote for people like Bernie Sanders. I mean, he doesn't see the Disney now that's what's amazing to me is that he's just absolutely clueless about his own. Disconnect about his own politics. He has no idea and then he's going to bring that crap to Texas. Yeah, so he wants to bring his gun. He wants to have more freedom. He wants to remove himself from an anyone make an economically despairing place and he wants to. He wants lower taxes. He wants no taxes. Be. Eddie wants to vote for Bernie Sanders. Yeah. Are you out of your freaking mind? And the answer is yes. Good lord, because this is crazy, And this is just so typical of his so death Typical liberals because they have no idea what will act. What actually saves economies. What makes them thrive? And instead they're like I got to get out of here, man and begin tax like crazy around my gun. You're burning? Yeah, because you know, he says all the right things would attacks you at 70%. Many more more. Yeah, 70 was his low, low side. I mean, good Lord. Yeah, These people just have no idea what they're doing. None. Just don't bring your crazy to Texas. Well, that he's bringing it. He's not saying where exactly. He was very well go to Austin, where they all go any might. I don't know, because he was asked about it and he was and he just wanted to stay. He wanted to stay quiet about exactly where He's going, but it is somewhere in Texas. So brace yourself Erickson's Beta tau and and all of them and just it's just crazy. They just have no idea. California, my Texas Um, speaking of crazy, we need to also addressed the situation that's happening with Kanye West and his wife, Kim Kardashian all over Social media. Because, of course, they've made all their dirty laundry public, and Kanye has now decided that he needed to apologize publicly to his wife and said. In a tweet. He said. I would like to apologize to my wife Cam for going public was something that was a private matter. I didn't cover her like she has covered me to Kim. I want to say I know I hurt you. Please forgive me. Thank you for always being there for me. It's like they don't know that they could just call. He just could call her. The whole thing about this is I didn't cover her like she covered me. Well, maybe you should do that. Now You're just you're still doing still doing it doing it doing it publicized. Always shut up and go talk to her, and like, be with her and do it in private, like you'll just be private. And can you just do that? And I'm fair. I mean, they can't right now. She's busy filming their reality. I don't think any of these people Man. They're incapable of doing anything. Private. Yeah, it's it's good Lord. Now you know, we've talked last week. It seemed like he was Well, it was. It didn't seem like he was having a meltdown. He was having a meltdown like there's no question about with the bipolar and he was on a tear s. So he decided that he he went to a hospital near his ranch, which isn't Cody, Wyoming for anxiety, so he was feeling anxiety. He went to the hospital. He stayed about 10 minutes left. And then an ambulance went to his ranch to check his vitals. And they were like you're fine. You're good. You're fine. Great shape You're doing June just checked him physically, and they were like physically, you're great. I mean, maybe there is a vital check when it comes to mental health..

Texas Bernie Sanders Joe Rogan California Kim Kardashian Twitter Buck Wild Kanye West BBC New York CEO Disney Wyoming Ella Eddie Erickson Austin Cam
"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

08:36 min | 2 years ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"B, c and w BBC dot com Hammer and Nigel believe these characters weirdoes on 93 WNBC. You know, I was really bummed yesterday. When I heard the news about Students Washington Township and how they made the decision. Officials made the decision to do online classes only to start the new school year. Washington Township North Central High School all the feeder schools and that bum me out I don't have you know I live in Boone County, but it would bum me out because I thought, okay. Other schools take notice of this, And this could spread and other superintendents and other districts could follow suit. And I was just like man. You know, this is just the first domino of this. You know, students aren't going to be able to do in person learning five days a week. I believe they should. I believe I want my kids in school five days a week. But then I saw the the zoom meeting last night with GPS. And then they explained their decision to reopen classrooms this upcoming year that was a positive step forward, the superintendent. Was joined by Dr Virginia Kane, the director of the Marion County Public Health Department, and they're using data. They're using science to say it is okay to open schools if we take some some safety measures, and I was encouraged by that, because, Wow, what a novel idea using science and data to make a decision here in this case. And how about I P s taking the lead on this, right? So you got the Marion County health director, basically saying, it's okay to wreak reopened, which I took from that. Here's a slow middle finger toe Washington Township. And as I didn't take what I do know, I did in my mind the marrying County health director. No one in their hand. And did the crank wind up thing with middle finger slowly goes up like I'm doing to you right now. I don't I don't think that I think she's using science. And data. I think she looked at the Academy of PT Pediatrics recommending opening schools and they're saying that I act actually, in fact, keeping kids at home isolates and increased risks of depression and suicide. That's not me saying this or pulling something out of my rear end. That's the Academy of Pediatrics saying this and this is something that's been around for a couple of weeks, not to mention all these studies from other countries. And studies from right here in the United States. Believe it or not, there have been daycares there have been Daycares open this whole time for Children of frontline workers. So there had been kids. They've been able to go to daycare and have be social and the numbers are so low and minuscule. It's it's it's eye opening to think that the kids it's ridiculous to think that kids can't go back to five days a week in person. In this zoom call Last night, Superintendent Alicia Johnson was joined by Dr Virginia Kane, the director of the Marion County Public Health Department, and Dr Kane said, quote we feel it's okay for school to re open based on the current data we have. And then Superintendent Johnson says, quote if data points us in a direction that says we need to do something different, then we're currently doing We will not hesitate to respond to that. And I'm good with that, right? If something changes over the next couple of weeks where we really hit a rocket ship going up, right? Okay, fine. We'll make that adjustment. On the floor. But when you look at the numbers in Indiana, for the most part, we're doing a pretty solid job here. I'm looking at the numbers that came out today pretty much flat from yesterday, which means most things. Are down from last week off the infection rate 9.1 flat from yesterday, down from last week. Ventilators being used for covert covert purposes only 2.4%. So if all the ventilators that are available in the state of Indiana right now, according to your Indiana State Department of Health on Ly, 2.4% are being used for Covad related illnesses. Better flat from yesterday, too. Okay, That's fine, And we've been steady here in central indeed, but say positive cases do go up the study studies everywhere across the world still say that kids are not a threat. Not only are they it's not a threat for them to die. They're not major threat to spread it in their own house. Australia has a hole because I know somebody's going to tweet at you. Well, there is a story about a kid from New York story. Of course, yes, out Liars everywhere. But you go to Australia, The department chief medical officer published an open letter to the public that Cove it is not the flue number of transmissions from kids to other kids and kids do adults is far less than the flu. This guy was an infectious disease expert, Germany in May open schools for Major medical association. Into Germany all called for the immediate opening. No restrictions. Ah, Sweden never closed schools Singapore, Australia, Finland, Denmark. I'm just this is not me pulling stuff out of my reader here. I'm not making this up as I go along. This is science, its data and it's really and the risk is far more severe for kids that are staying at home, especially since teachers can't spot abuse, sexual or otherwise they risk of staying at home are incredibly high, the risks of going to school incredibly low. For kids. And I'm looking at this story from California here from the OSI as the kids used to call it. Remember that show on Fox? The O. C. I didn't want them. Sorry, but yes. In Orange County, the Orange County Board of Education has voted for tow. Want to reopen schools next month within person instruction. Now this is in California. OK, good. That comes from common sense coming out of California. Students and teachers can choose to attend classes without masks, and no social distancing has required so they're going big out in the ocean in California, which I'm surprised Governor Governor Newsome. Hasn't said them a cease and desist letter before his head spun all the way around. Not going to be able to do anything about that. And the reality is Donald Trump can't do anything about these giant school districts in San Diego and L. A county that are have already made the announcement. No, we're just doing virtual learning. There will be no in person learning, Andi, I think I think more and more big picture. This is a shot at Trump you. Keep parents at home because their school their kids can't go anywhere and that tanks the economy. It's a huge problem, especially in California. Right now that economy is just going to tank. Isn't it a shame? We're talking about kids going to school and Donald Trump's name comes into this. Isn't it embarrassing that this is where we're at as a country right now, the things air so politically divided. It's all about the election. And if you don't think it's about the election, you're being naive. This is totally about Donald Trump. It's about the White House and it's about the election you It's such a great point. I hate agreeing with you. All I heard in March was. Kids are going to go hungry without school because so many kids get their only meals and they're only interactions and social Of interactions and meals and health from a school lunch. You fast forward to this month, and we now have determined the cove in 19 is more dangerous than childhood hunger to kids. So are we going to Go back down. The Trump couldn't contain the virus. And now the kids are starving. And yet trump is begging schools toe open. The cycle to me is starting to repeat here a little bit. I'm telling you, man, This has been just a crap crap here, and I think that's the understatement of the year. So I felt inspired here, Nige. I wrote a song. This is about my personal experience this summer. Maybe it's somebody else's as well. But this is about my personal experience. And I know I'm not a good singer. But I felt if this song is going to be about me or not, I need to be the one to perform this head. So this is another hammer and Nigel Records released. It's about what I'm experiencing this summer. And before we play this, I have to warn you guys. I was kind of going through a little bit of a Bryan Adams phase. When I wrote this,.

Donald Trump California director Marion County Public Health De Dr Virginia Kane Australia Indiana Nigel Records Washington Township North Cent Boone County Students Washington Township Superintendent Alicia Johnson Marion County Orange County Trump superintendent Academy of PT Pediatrics BBC Washington Township Academy of Pediatrics
Has Canada reached Peak Craft Beer?

The Big Story

10:25 min | 2 years ago

Has Canada reached Peak Craft Beer?

"Do you know how far away from you your nearest brewery is. I have no idea where you live of course but I'm willing to bet. The answer is a lot closer than it used to be. No matter where you live in Canada and this goes I. Small towns of like three hundred people in cities of more than three million there is a craft brewery around the corner over the past decade. The rise of craft beer has actually been one of Canada's biggest entrepreneurial success stories but how long can that really last as an example? There are four cool little India Breweries within walking distance from my house. And I love it but I would have to be stupid to expect them all still be thriving and five here. Wouldn't I I mean there has to be a limit to how much Canadians love their beer. Right Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the Big Story Stephanie. Marotta rights for Global Males Report on business. Hey Stephanie thanks for having me no problem. We're talking about one of my favorite topics. We had to do something. That's when I picked up the phone and said I'm calling you to talk about beer. Nolan's hung up on me amazing So start by putting into perspective. I guess because we're GonNa talk about this whole industry just how fast and big the rise of craft beer in Canada has been. It's been incredible. I think one of the reasons the story is resonating. So much with people is because no matter where you are in the country. It seems like there's a new craft brewery opening every month. Almost it's just skyrocketed so the number of breweries over the last five years has more than doubled so in two thousand fifteen. We had three hundred and eighty breweries across the country. That is now almost a thousand. It's crazy it's been astronomical and really that growth looks very different depending on where you are in the country so in Ontario British Columbia and Quebec. Those have the most mature. Craft Brew Industries at the moment and the between those three provinces they make up more than seventy five percent of all the craft breweries in the country but that growth has really caught up in other regions as well so last year. New Brunswick and Nova Scotia saw some of the fastest rates of newbury openings in the country but really Alberta led the charge on they saw sixty percent increase from seventy breweries. Two hundred and twelve breweries. Year-over-year year over here. So it's been an incredible amount of growth and when you have so many players coming into the market over just half a decade. The growth is just astounding. So how does that happen? A part of that a small part of it may be is the cool factor. No no that episode of high met your mother when Ted and Barney say that they want to open up a bar. It seems like a really fun place to be. But what's really interesting? Is that when you actually get to speak with these brewers? They have the most incredible stories. These are lawyers and engineers nurses and former Labor workers who are leaving their careers to come into this burgeoning industry and they're starting off by brewing in their garages before they scale to larger brick and mortar institutions. And they're starting off in these communities. That are really hungry for some economic development. So they're creating jobs and they're bringing money into the area. That's an attracted a ton of investment so from government investment arms like the BBC to private equity investors. A ton of money has been flowing into this because everyone wants a piece of this pie of on one end the success story of of creating jobs in an economy. That looks like what we're in right now and then on the other side have being able to say that Own a piece of a brewery. That's something really fun to say right. Answer the government gets into it then because these are popping up in neighborhoods that could use sources of jobs and economic development and so they will give them start up money essentially. Yeah through a couple of different methods. So we've seen a lot of investment from from governments into the sector so last year we saw the federal government and the government of Ontario Invest One Million Dollars Into Twenty craft breweries in Ontario. And that's in addition to a one point six million dollar investment from two thousand sixteen now while that sounds like small amounts in isolation. We're seeing a number of provincial governments across the country. Do exactly the same thing and further that we're seeing economic development arms like the BBC and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency investing in in Craft Breweries and providing them with start up loans. When you put all of that together with a national scope that's a ton of money going into opening new breweries and then on the flip side. We've seen a lot of private equity go into this as well so often times when breweries can no longer access government funding for whatever reason it seems like a pretty easy thing to go out and find an angel investor venture capitalist. Who who wants to throw a million dollars into into a berry so this growth is still happening this year as we're talking. Yeah so the growth is expected to continue to climb. I was chatting with the Canadian. Craft brewers association and they expect another two hundred craft breweries to open up this year alone. That's a twenty percent increase year over year compared to the thousand that we currently have so. It's it's just going to continue to rise but there's gotta be a tipping point right like how much beer can Canadians reasonably consume. And I mean that seems like a funny question but it's not like at some point we're going to saturate the market right. I don't doubt the Canadians can drink their fair share of beer. Sure at all But I've seen a number of industry watchers trying predict this tipping point. And this moment where we're going to hit peak craft beer and I've had a lot of conversations with Roy Moore is the people who fund And Brewery Associations and from what? I'm hearing across. The board is that we are at this tipping point so we're seeing a number of craft breweries closed. Get put up for sale or diversify away from craft beer altogether and a large part of that is because Canadians are drinking less beer really. We're seeing it in the numbers so fifteen years ago. Canadians drank so much beer. That beer sales made up for fifty percent of all alcohol sales in the country. Now it's at a point that's only nine percent and that gradual decline is quickening now. It's not all doom and gloom. Canadians are still drinking beer. Just in different ways so one bright spot is that comedians do seem to be drinking more craft beer even though beer sales are declining overall. So if we look at the L. C. B. O. Just to is late that as an example last year craft beer sales increased twenty seven percent year-over-year now that is slower than the forty percent increase in. They saw the year before in twenty teen while. They're still seeing a spike. It's beginning to slow down and despite that big surge in people buying craft beer. It's still only accounts for ten percent of total beer sales at the L. CBO. It certainly accounts for more than ten percent of the shelf space. It does luckily for grab brewers. It does a lot of liquor. Boards have been increasing. Their shelf. Space Craft Breweries little bits every year. Like Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation. They've increase their craft beer shelf space from twenty-seven percent last year to thirty two percent this year so we are seeing marginal increases and even at the L. C. B. O. I think is about eight years ago. They they listed thirty three different craft breweries and now that's increased to one hundred and eighty. The issue is that that falls far short from the three hundred breweries. That are in Ontario alone. There are one hundred twenty breweries that can't get listed and even if you are listed that doesn't mean that you're in every store across Ontario depending on how much beer you produce. You might only be able to get listed in two or three Elsie. B O's within a certain distance from your store so that speaks to something that I wanted to get out because you talk about. How startups for Craft Breweries are exploding? And everybody wants to get into it. And it's not that hard to get funding and get going. How difficult is it to sustain a craft brewery as as a business you know how many of these Newbury's actually break even Make money statistics. Canada says that only fifty percent of the small to medium size breweries in the country are profitable and from speaking. With brewers. It takes about five to seven years to start turning a profit now. We're at an point in candidates beer industry because craft beer really started to grow about five years ago. So we're just now hitting that point where craft brewers are starting to figure out whether they're able to make ends meet and what. I'm seeing a lot of something that I'm hearing. That crafters trying to do is they're trying to get in on different segments. That are growing faster than craft beer so at a point where consumers are moving away from beer and drinking more wine. They're drinking more spirits more ready to drink products. So I'm hearing. The brewers are getting into distilling. They're getting into some of. Those funds Seltzer products. That are more low calorie and speak to a healthier lifestyle. So you're starting to see little tweaks and you're also seeing some brewers start to realize that maybe they can't make this work after all this podcast will be right back after a really quick message. Can you guess the average dollar amount Canadian households have in savings according to the most recent data? It is just eight hundred and fifty two dollars now. The recommended rate of savings in Canada is ten percent and traditionally Canada's historical rate has been around seven point five percent last year though. It was one point seven. That doesn't sound like a lot because it isn't it can be hard to save today for people who are often carrying debt. It can be even harder in fact thirty nine percent of Canadians right now of all ages. Don't think they will ever save enough for retirement. So how do you save when there's not much there to start with? Well you need a plan and we'll be back after this episode to you how. Rbc's my advisor can help you get started even if you only have a little you can visit our BBC Dot Com slash advisor to find out more right now or enjoy the rest of this podcast and we'll be there at the end to tell you more.

Craft Breweries Canada Space Craft Breweries Brewers India Breweries BBC Craft Brew Industries Ontario Jordan Heath Rawlings And Brewery Associations Stephanie Nova Scotia Liquor Corporation Federal Government Ontario British Columbia Nolan Atlantic Canada Opportunities Advisor L. C. B. O. Just
"bbc dot com" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Source BBC dot com that's career source BBC dot com are you looking for something fun and exciting don't miss football in paradise faqs stadium the action kicks off on Saturday September seventh whatever you football takes on the UCF knights guarantee your seat for that class against UCLA and all home games with season tickets starting at just sixty dollars get your tickets and experience football in paradise visit FAQ tickets dot com or call one eight six six FAA you owls see you at faqs stadium hi it's Jennifer also name with doctor Richard Cartledge the chief of cardiovascular surgery Boca Raton regional hospital you can now eliminate the need for blood thinners for patients with a fifth that's right Jennifer it all starts with the area of the heart called the left atrial appendage and for patients that have a fib or history of a Feb this can become a reservoir of blood clots form and ultimately they can migrate flick off and cause strokes rather serious problems that's why I ate that patients require blood thinners that while effective can significantly impact the quality of life so how can you help them we know that the lead teacher appendage is analogous to your appendix it's something that you don't need but can kill you so we eliminate the appendage we eliminate the need for blood donors and how do you do that I'm one of a select group of surgeons internationally performing what's called ultra minimally invasive ligation of left atrial appendage I seal off the appendage and close it from the circulation to the clots can no longer be formed in that structure in the results no less danger appendage no risk of forming clots no need for blood thinners it's that simple the technique provides added benefits to right absolutely Jennifer I perform the surgery through incisions that are only a fifth of an inch as compared to traditional minimally invasive visions that are two and a half inches or even larger for most patients that means that require only over the counter pain medication no post operative gestures or trains and they go home the next morning that's.

football paradise faqs stadium UCLA FAA Jennifer Richard Cartledge Boca Raton regional hospital BBC UCF sixty dollars
"bbc dot com" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Continue your calls and thoughts you may take control of the airwaves here. So in the early portion of the show, we had Lenore skinny Zeon with us. She is originally from free range kids. Now, let's grow blog or let gross gives me let grow dot org. And that led to conversation about some creepy or Weli in a hook Cillian news out of Oregon state where they might be having bureaucrats come into every newborn child's home to inspect as well. As dumpted children inspect the house talk to the families. And that is the thing. Now, apparently that's coming soon in Oregon, Mark you had a related story out of Scotland. Yes from BBC dot com. It's BBC dot com. This reputable the reporting on their own government, which they're not reputable. This is this is their own government. So what is the named persons scheme? They don't mind using the term scheme over there. You know, here it always has an area sound to it. But they down the Scottish government wants to appoint a named person to monitor the welfare of every child in Scotland the scheme was due to have been rolled out across Scotland by middle of twenty sixteen but that timetable was delayed after the supreme court ruled that some of the proposals around information sharing breach the right to privacy and family life under the European Convention on human rights, the Scottish government has vowed to amend the legislation and hopes to have it introduced by August of this year..

Scottish government Scotland Oregon BBC us Lenore Cillian Mark
"bbc dot com" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:46 min | 3 years ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News. I'll Brexit and the political impasse in Westminster continues and over in Brussels. The European Union's patience is being sorely tested here in the studio with me is our political correspondent, rob Watson. Rob let's start first with the the application for an extension gives some detail on that. Perhaps the first thing I should say as an extraordinary tweet from one of my colleagues are political editor, Laura coons Burke is quoting an insider was obviously the very very difficult meeting of the cabinet. Inside a practice that it's the last days of Rome, which I think gives you the sort of sense of the sort of crisis. The building crisis inside the British government. I mean, we understand that. There was no agreement on precisely what are the next steps. But what the prime minister wants to do what she's planning to do if she can get the other ministers to sign off on it is to send a letter to the European Union saying, look come. We have a short extension up until the end of June June the first youth, but with the proviso that could be extended for a further two years. Okay. And and that would allow the prime minister to do what that would allow her to do what has been a preference all along which is to somehow have another go at getting that deal that she reached with the European Union in November two getting MP's to pass. That's, but I think she's also recognizing and this was something that was also discussed and voted on in parliament last week. The fact that there may have to be the possibility of a longer extension, of course, in many ways, she wants that prospects of a of a long. Extensions of membership and the just the horror of explaining to the voters. I'm going to take part in Euro-elections. She wants us to sort of threat against those who've been voting against her deal. So far just remind us of the drama yesterday with the invocation of an an act of sixteen o four just take us back to what the speaker, John Burke has been saying, let's you know, that was my favorite moment. But I'll come to that in a minute. So we will washing. And essentially what the speaker ruled was that look it dates back to the seventeenth century that a government cannot just keep coming back to MP's with the same laurel proposition hoping that they will change their minds. But for me one of the most extraordinary moments when he said that dated back. So that's a sixteen. Oh four, but all these. I'm pays one. Yeah. Yeah. Most extraordinary roar of approval. It wasn't ironic. It was the idea that thank goodness but going back to laws based in the seventeenth century heavens. Goodness for that. I'm mean, I should say by the way that the what the speaker ruled. I think makes things more. Tricky for the prime minister. But the, but the underlying problem is not a constitutional crisis. Some people have been suggesting it's political. It's the so far she has not been able to get a majority in parliament for her deal or any other kind of deal, but just briefly rob what about Europe I said that the patients is being sorely tested. Does it feel as though Britain is just living in a bubble? And they're not really taking that on board. I think they are. But the domestic crisis here is just so so deep that while the prime minister is aware of what the European Union Phil's on the rest of the world feels it's all hands on deck for the crisis here. Rob Watson, our political correspondent joining us live here in the studio. Lots on Brexit. Needless to say on our website, BBC dot com forward slash news. You're listening to NewsHour from the BBC. I'm Russia Exxon. Let's head to New Zealand now and the country's prime minister cinder are done who has been widely praised for how she has shown dealership and compassion since the tragedy at two mosques last Friday in which a gunman killed fifty people praying speaking in parliament, she said she will never refer to the man accused of the Christ Church mosque attacks by name during speeches of condolence for the victims in parliament, she urged others to do the same. He sought many things from his act of terror, but one was notoriety. And that is why you will never hear me mention his name. He is a terrorist. Here's a criminal. He's an extremist, but he will win. I speak be nameless and two others, you speak, the names of those who were lost rather than than nine of the man who took them, then he's as prime minister just into are done. Meanwhile, preparations are underway for the burial of the victims. Phil Musser is our correspondent in Christ Church. He says the government is helping the families with funeral arrangements. But we hear that quite a few dozen relatives coming from overseas will have their visas speed up their visa applications speed it up given the the victims the fifty victims came from a range of countries from India, Somalia, Indonesia, Fiji, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Turkey and other countries. There are would imagine quarter lot of relatives overseas who would want to try to get here in time for burials and. Funerals. And we know that the first of the bodies have been released to the families. So those funerals could be taking place as soon as tomorrow, certainly we expect them in the next few days, the delay in handing the bodies over to the families by the authorities is according to the police because of the slow identification process. They say, it has been very complicated, and they certainly want to get it. Right. So that explains the delay. But now the post Mortensen over the bodies can now be handed back to the family for the next chapter in their grief film..

prime minister European Union rob Watson MP political editor Laura coons Burke Rome British government Brussels John Burke Westminster BBC Europe Euro-elections Russia Phil Musser Mortensen NewsHour New Zealand
"bbc dot com" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"bbc dot com" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"It from BBC dot com. According to this story. In a statement. The a spokesperson said that during the flight or flight from Saudi Arabia where he had gone for a day. He had. Call race or something like that. Okay. During the flight way. He went to see a car. Varies Arabia been wheel and whatnot. Yeah, we love that. So it was tough. Yeah. I don't have a social calendar. I'm just telling you the story he took a prescribed amount of sleeping tablets mixed about going. And consequently was disoriented on a rival he was approached by police who arrested him on a minor misdemeanor. He paid a twenty five dollar fine ninety one dollars court costs and was sent on his way, they knew it was bad. When asked him where he was when he got off the plane. He said he thought he was in Tigers car. So you know, that's a bad comedy. I think interesting I think he's sobered up and then gathered up his family and flew to England that same day at the very core travel. To go to Shortland part. I believe it. 'cause nigel. This ended on a rivals a good band name too. By the way. That everybody in Dulles is drunk at at that terminal. Yes. It is true. I flew out of there at like seven o'clock in the morning, and they have the bar opened. People are sitting at the ball drinking because when I say this. Baby for a long flight a full day of traveling. You're gonna end up halfway around the world, and the time is you don't know what it's not crazy to want to self medicate a little bit. Wait till wheels up. Let's get out of here. Let's get out of here. He was getting off the plane to clarify. He was not drinking to get on the plane pilot now, I don't drink take drugs. But I'm so take a break. We'll come back with old guy radio when we return in which we will talk about the upcoming games in the NFL. I'm Tony Kornheiser. This is the Tony Kornheiser show. This is a pre crude at you know, what smart kicking off two thousand nineteen by planning out, which rose your business needs to hire. For figuring out who you need to hire to take your business to the next level.

Tony Kornheiser Saudi Arabia BBC Dulles Tigers Shortland nigel NFL England ninety one dollars twenty five dollar
Putin's annual press conference to focus on domestic economy, official says

BBC World Service

01:19 min | 3 years ago

Putin's annual press conference to focus on domestic economy, official says

"That when Vladimir Putin holds an interview news conference, it will be long very long President Putin's big press conference as the Kremlin calls. It has in previous years gone on for more than four hours. And if you're in Russia, well, it's hard to miss really the event is carried live by four TV channels and three radio stations as Russia's leader prepares to sum up the year. There is a lot, of course to talk about from the Salisbury poisoning to cyber attacks from doping in sport to the dangers of. A new arms race Russia has been front and center of some of the biggest new stories of twenty eighteen oh and don't forget the football World Cup which Russia hosted crumbling watches in the west will be following closely for any hints as to whether twenty nine thousand nine will bring an easing of tension with Moscow or a further deterioration in relations, Steve Rosenberg there on the expected year end press conference to be delivered by the Russia's President Vladimir Putin he'll do that in Moscow later today. We've been listening to the newsroom from the BBC World Service with me Reggie domino. Don't get much more on our website for all of our top stories, BBC dot com forward slash news. And also our podcasts bbcworldservicEcom.

President Putin Russia BBC Moscow Steve Rosenberg President Trump Salisbury Reggie Domino Four Hours
OnePlus 6 gets Android P beta release

Geek News Central

01:53 min | 4 years ago

OnePlus 6 gets Android P beta release

"Message saturday morning officials if officials say the threat was concerned with a store removal kiosk where the game series superman super mario brothers and why and why pd spokesman says threat was written in april but was discovered on saturday the nypd says an investigation is underway so wow i mean for someone to be that upset over removal of over game that's i i mean i was thinking to be upset you know and going to be you know be mad and and what have you but i wouldn't recommend threaten to blow up a store over a game that's that's not worth it it's not worth it at all honestly it's not worth it at all now as i mentioned the top of the top of the interim my intro gnc team has written up articles coming from from three twenty which was held this past week on the bbc dot com there was an article on about ea excuse me eight three twenty eighteen there is it's a great article on that on different seventy the games are out as a great so if you're a game or knows someone that is a game where there is a great round up on e three twenty eighteen speaking of the android and what's going on in that neck of the woods well android p beta lands on the one plus six with new pictures andrew android p beta to excuse me is available android pay developer preview to is now available for one plus six andrew he beta for the plastics nounce by both one plus in google during google i o and following.

Nypd PD GNC Developer Google
U.K. Medical Staff Who Treated Ex-Spy And His Daughter Did Not Expect Them To Survive

Len Berman

02:58 min | 4 years ago

U.K. Medical Staff Who Treated Ex-Spy And His Daughter Did Not Expect Them To Survive

"That was retired south korean lieutenant general in bonn shown speaking to us from seoul now hospital staff who treated the poisoned russians sergei and yulia scrip hall have been speaking to the bbc about the incident the father and daughter were found on a bench in the city of salisbury and taken to salisbury district hospital senior sarah clark was one of the first to treat them i was this is in charge of the shift the evening fats and circe were admitted point we were let's believe that they had taken an overdose so there was no no mention of nerve agent poisoning they were needing the support was breathing and support with their cardiovascular system i did have concerns because always see when they first came in there was no indication of the fact that that was an agent and therefore we take our normal protection when any patient comes in but would have not at that point taken any extra precautions in terms of protecting ourselves senior sarah clark will nursing director lorna wilkinson said the scale of the threat became a concern when a policeman who had helped the script halls was admitted with similar symptoms i suppose a key marker for me was when the pc was admitted with symptoms there was a real concern as to how how big could this get have we just gone from having to index patients having something that actually could become all consuming and involve many casualties because we really didn't know at that point well doctors took expert advice from the nearby porton down research facility dr steven dukes and intensive care consultant at the hospital said that this made a difference the expert advice we had outside the hospital would it was very clear that the clinical decisions were ours but we weren't being foolish not to take their advice which we did and i think that helped and we were dealing with unknown i believe this was certainly in this situation the first of its kind i think we'd all agree that we were exceptionally surprise pleasant surprise to see the recovery happen and at such a pace when it did happen is explain that was dr steven jukes in intensive care consultant at salisbury district hospital you can hear more from the hospital staff on the bbc news website bbc dot com forward slash news the.

Salisbury District Hospital Dr Steven Jukes Dr Steven Dukes Director Nerve Agent Yulia Scrip Hall Sergei Consultant Lorna Wilkinson Sarah Clark Salisbury BBC Seoul Bonn