17 Burst results for "Baylor College Of Medicine"

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:36 min | 3 months ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KTRH

"Expect stop traffic back from business. Like 15 minutes in that area. I'm generals in the ktrh Gulf Coast. Unos dot com 24 Hour Traffic center worrisome areas of dense fog to start off this Saturday, then a party cloudy afternoon of the high close to 80, which is almost 10. Degrees above average clear this evening with patchy fog overnight and a low of 57 temperature stay above average tomorrow. Plenty of sun with a high of 81 slightly cooler Monday, mostly sunny with a high hitting the mid seventies. Meteorologist Jeff Mar from the weather Channel 67 into dnm auto leasing dot com Ktrh 24 hour Weather center 9 30 to our top story, Michigan and Georgia say they're certifying their election results in Houston, H E B Food Bank city of Houston right now handing out 5000 boxes. A turkey dinner makings. That includes the full turkey, a ham cranberry stuffing energy part going on now in lieu of the city's Thanksgiving Day parade. It's going to be going on until two this afternoon. They're also handing out masks and hand sanitizers but be aware around and RG arena. There is a lot of heavy traffic, so if you don't have to be in that area, you might want to avoid it. Baylor College medicines Dr Peter Hotez, suggesting Le Bic could be one of the worst affected large cities in the nation, surpassing El Paso with the daily average of 151 new cases a day. For the past week. News on demand at ktrh dot com. We're gonna have another updated 10. I'm Nikki Courtney on Houston's news, weather and Traffic station news radio. 7 40 Ktrh hang tight, and I want you to see something but give me a second to post this. This. I did this on my personal, uh, Guard line page,.

Houston ktrh Gulf Coast Nikki Courtney Ktrh Weather center RG arena Peter Hotez Jeff Mar El Paso Le Bic H E B Food Bank Michigan Georgia
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

08:30 min | 3 months ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Houston Matters

"This is houston matters. Michael hegarty filling in today for craig cohen. The biotech company moderna today announced. It's experimental covid. Nineteen was ninety four point five percent effective according to analysis of its clinical trial. That news comes on the heels of similar news from pfizer but those are not the only potential vaccines being developed. So where do the rest of them stand in. How would they work to find out. We're joined now by dr maria elena tozzi. Who's the co director of the center for vaccine development at baylor college medicine. Doctor potasium welcome back to houston matters. Yes good morning. Mike always is very nice to be with you today. Because we've heard some very exciting news all over including the an anew from our own vaccine made in houston that he's already now in clinical trials. I'm excited to be with you this morning. Yeah lots lots of news on this front and we'd love to welcome your questions and comments about the vaccines Questions you might have about. How the potential covid nineteen vaccine of vaccines of different sorts would work. You can join our conversation at seven three four four zero eight hundred seventy or talk at houston matters dot org so We've been hearing the news about moderna this morning on npr and last week. So let's bring things locally. Tell us The news about the vaccine being worked on here in houston. Yes absolutely so you mentioned that to vaccine that have been announced which are moderna advisor. They use my rene technology. The vaccine that we developed a baylor and texas children's uses us a recombinant protein technology which is the same technology has hepatitis. B vaccine so category so vaccine are slightly different. ultimately the intent is the same I think the vaccine we're developing has a very long vision towards global access because we can make them In much higher scale that there's maybe a little bit more understanding of the cold chain of how you're going to distribute them and of course they can also be quite affordable as we know it's the case with the hepatitis. B vaccine so we're very excited that biological e e our partner has already scaled up up to one point two billion dollars assists and they've already started a multi center phase one phase two trial in In india with the expectation that we also eventually entering into these large face retrial. Such as the one that modera nine five announced today so overall. I think it's all good. News was news because we're starting to see some good indications of efficacy and safety from the large clinical trials in the us as well as in other countries plus new ones that are coming into the landscape which probably will also not only compliment. Come in Assist this notion of Having vaccines for around the world so your partner as you said biological e. s. initiated phase one to clinical trial. Can you remind us would phase one two trial. What actually goes on. Yes so phase. One and face to clinical trials are initial trial that Basically you do first safety and you get some indication of Basically You know how much doses how much scheduled should look like It's already done enough quite large enough number of people you know. This trial is around. Three hundred and sixty people that of course as you say. Three trials in large trials more like done thirty thousand or forty thousand number so i think that he's a good start. It gives the indication of how well You know we're gonna have safety. And should she matters michael hegarty. We're talking with dr maria elena tozzi. She's co director of the center for vaccine development at baylor college about potential covid nineteen vaccines and how they might work. And we welcome your questions and comments to talk if houston matters dot org or something one. Three four four zero eight seventy dr patel. Getting a lot of background noise. They're able to find somewhere quieter to to chat with us. I wanna make sure we can can hear you okay. It's one of the challenges of covid. Nineteen th these vaccines are will be great when these roll out in we can get back to life as normal and have gifts back in back in studio. That'll be a fantastic thing. Cha apologize and i think resolve some of the background noise. Thank you so much for the opportunity. No problem so. I don't want to make this too complicated but just in layman's terms i guess can you help us understand. First of all how this vaccine might work the one that you're and baylor college of medicine in biologically dynamex are working on. Yes so this vaccines Work with the same it's to try to induce high levels of neutralizing antibody are the same time With partnership with dynamex as you mentioned it's a formulation system that also will allow us to balance in response to include. Also some good cellular responses the intent as you know it's to ideally reduce severity of the disease. Make sure that we get some high level of protective Neutralizing antibodies and the hope is that. We don't only do dude reduction of the severity of the disease but also That can we protect against people. Getting infected and transmitting the virus back to you michael. Yeah so that can actually help. People help prevent people from getting obviously getting the vaccine of getting the virus. Transmitting it to begin with. How is this vaccine How that one different or similar to the ones that we've been hearing about from pfizer and this morning from modern. Yes so that we all have the famous spearation again. The way that we produce that axioms are different. You know the rna. Vaccines require that. Your body process them and makes the rna into a dna into a protein. And then of course that's exposed to your immune response. We of course with the protein were practically immunizing directly with the target that makes your body practice and The intensive pretty much the same. I think the distinction is that the platform that we're using is also one that has been used before like i mentioned other licensed vaccines It has the opportunity probably be scaled up in many locations around the world Aron vaccines are still experimental. And hopefully we will definitely see them approved. So i think overall They have pros and cons pros and cons because of the type of production systems. The cold chain requirements But at the same time. I think all of them have the same intent which is to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies. And at the same time a balance Cellular immune response such that. You can not only reduce the severity of disease and hopefully also that we can interrupt transmission of the virus. All this important however requires that Individuals eventually use that exceeded that we have some very strong delivery. practices such as the vaccine can reach the populations in need these different types of vaccines. Is there one that can be scaled up faster or manufactured faster distributed faster than another kind. So we've been hearing that at least the modera nine pfizer vaccine. They have some The production scale ability. I believe i've been hearing that the moderna they're gonna initially have twenty million doses available. And then they're going to scale them up to five hundred good to maybe billion doses in that twenty twenty one Timeframe that difference is that a vaccine that we work on again this recombinant protein based vaccine there.

houston pfizer dr maria elena tozzi baylor Michael hegarty director craig cohen baylor college medicine partner dynamex us texas baylor college Mike dr patel advisor npr Cha india
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

07:48 min | 5 months ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"The. Michael Berry show. Yeah. One of these turns on City Council. It was a five four vote. I'm not I'M NOT GONNA. Let Steal my joy. Much Mickey's happy. Drill. Happy. Then the Christmas parade we'll. Start. Making. Killing. Boulevard. Can be a great day. Can Be. Great. Great. Day. I WANNA. Thank Mayor Jeff Wagner. Mayor Pasaden-. Because like Donald Trump that man when he says he's going to do something he'd by does it Can. You believe they put him through the ringer five four vote But I'm not I'm not focused on that. We got five out of nine mayor did what he promised he do. Kelly Boulevard and Mickey will get to see I hate to his wife did not get to see it. See that. That makes me sad. Is, a great day. I was Jerry clower was here to enjoy. He could've told that story about big, John. She appear amongst. Dr Kara. Yes sir. Okay. So last segment. and. I went on a close with you taken about two minutes to talk about overall good health for everybody. But I get a cup of coffee in Lock Down Ramon so I don't accidentally drop it. Okay. We're GONNA make these quick questions and answers John Alvin go ahead. John. I'm sorry I quit. So the question is goes testosterone caused problems for the prostate. Great Question. So there was a belief that testosterone in the past used to cause prostate cancer in two thousand, Eighteen, the American urologic association put out a statement stating that test there's no data to suggest testosterone increases the risk for prostate cancer. So that's that's important. There's also some belief in the past that testosterone may make it harder to urinate, but there's not very good data to support that either and there are some studies now showing that long term use of just automate actually make urination. Better. So our concerns about this Austin of prostate in the past really are not as big of a concern today. Let's go to Bruce Bruce, make it quick please. Yeah. You're rea- pleasant twenty five year old girl otherwise healthy very active headed for two years and bought. It's off and on rid. So there's a couple things you can do if you if you can't find the right bacteria, there's new ways to look at your now looking at DNA, and a company called Mycogen can actually take the urine instead of putting on a plate in growing it. We now look at DNA in the urine and pick up numerous more bacteria. So it may be more bacteria than we are trying to deal with. So I would get a mycogen DNA urine culture on the Asian. I wanted to get one more in that I want your general. Advice Sam it quickly he's. Already Forty five years old type two diabetic since I was twenty six. started experiencing rectal dysfunction around thirty seven to thirty eight years old and I have several bombs particularly with leakage as well as not completely being the bladder. Among other things with diabetes, be the ultimate contributing factor to all those issues. Did you hear that? I hear the second part of that Michael, who diabetes be contributing ultimate contributing factor to that. Yes so diabetes increases your risk for Ed by four fold four four right off the Bat and patients with diabetes longtime diabetes, and get something called neurogenic bladder and neurogenic bladder can. Cause bladder to have problems such as non-functioning or increase leakage. So yes, the diabetes is a culprit or on as a risk factor. All right. So I want you to take a couple of minutes, Dr Cara, Baylor College medicines, our guests, and talk about overall. Good urological health and overall good health. What what what is a takeaway for every single person man or woman any age to be healthier? and Michael I will push this over and over again it is diet exercise sleep and stress. There's not a pill on the planet stronger than Diet Exercise Sleep and stress and I hope that every day patients affects. What did I do to make each one of these better and if you do you'll notice that many conditions such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes cardiovascular disease actually can significantly improve or reverse, and so that is the main takeaway. From prostate health just want the men to make sure to remember to check their PSA between fifty and seventy for infertility just remember that testosterone can cause infertility in men and if you're having a these men should be evaluated. Seventy orders Fifty five. Five or seventy. Remember reptile dysfunctions gets worse as we age it's natural aging process and so there are things we can do to help improve. when we talked about on the show female sexual functions forty, two percent of women over the age of forty will suffer from some degree of sexual dysfunction and many treatment options, and then I just think it's important. A patients understand the the symptoms of low testosterone, which are you know low energy low Libido electile dysfunction, decrease, muscle, mass increase that depression poor sleep. If you have these symptoms, it's important I think to check your testosterone level just to assess where you are. What foods did you say a no drinking water is a big issue for you. But what foods would you say try to eat every day? I I'm a big proponent of the Mediterranean Diet in the Mediterranean diet there are different types of dives Michael there's diets to lose weight and you can see that many patients are low carb Kito died, and then there's diets are actually healthy diets and that training Diet you are supposed to eat whole grains, wheats pastas but focused more plant based foods and you have a moderate consumption of fish and chicken in a very small consumption of red meat and those diets. I think are the healthiest And can make a big difference in many patients. When you say stress everybody says, stresses is bad. So how much stress? How do you limits wrestler? So I, think that everyone responds to stress differently and some patients thrive on stress and so but there's a breaking point for everyone everyone's GonNa have a breaking point and the more you put on their plate at some point, the break and I think that there some stresses healthy. But for those patients who are processing stress unhealthy is starting to causing detriment in their lives. I think they need to simplify and for those patients who are finding the Raj overwhelming too much stress. It actually impact their health cortisol goes up and I tell them you know make a list of all the things that you have to do every day and the things that you do that. You don't have to do the things that you have to do every day I, want you to do because you have to do but I know that many things in your life that you are doing that you don't have to do and those are the things you need to eliminate. overstressed. I just blocked people that he retained me so. That's one option. Cara thank you very much for taking time out of your busy. Michael All. Right? Let's Dr Mohit Cara at Baylor College of Medicine. And Lots of you will be listening that aren't in Houston and can't get to Baylor College of Medicine. Get yourself a doctor that you trust that you can be open with that. You can be honest with that. You can get access to when you need to see them take good care of your health I. Love You guys keep you around a longtime..

testosterone Michael All diabetes Dr Mohit Cara John Alvin Mickey prostate cancer Michael Berry neurogenic bladder Jerry clower Mayor Pasaden Donald Trump Bruce Bruce Baylor College of Medicine City Council Mycogen Michael I Dr Kara Jeff Wagner
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

02:49 min | 7 months ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Houston Matters

"Early. Changes in fetal development that happened when the baby is still unborn through the action of one hundred two genes involved in early fetal brain development in the CORTEX. And, in fact, we did whole exon sequencing object genomic sequencing with. With Rachel and my wife and I. We've uncovered a gene that looks pretty similar to the ones reported by the Harbour Road Institute. In the Department of Genetics Baylor College Medicine. with Brendan Lean Doctor Close Ian and so this is is one of the great things having the Texas medical, center here, we. We can do those sorts of things. And and and that is the basis of autism it's. These are your hundred plus jeans and will be many more found that all involved in early fetal brain development totally unrelated to vaccinations your vaccines when argument that factors anti vaxxers make is that all of the other things that are in a vaccine and they'll point to the PRI-, the most common one is there's formaldehyde in it and things like that. What are all the agents in a vaccine four? Well there trace amounts so for instance with formaldehyde. What happens is to make a tetanus toxoid. You want to enact to beat the protein, so the vaccine actually is comprised of a a protein made by the bacteria that induces an immune response and you. It's too toxic to give the protein in its regular form cu inactivated by adding formaldehyde, but then they. Wash away all the Formaldehyde, but there's look could be trace amounts of it left, but the amounts are trivial in I forget the exact numbers, but no some point that it's less formaldehyde than naturally found levels in the blood. Anyway, because Melda Hive is an organic chemical that's made as part of our Matab metabolic processes are the modern from aldehydes founded in apple, and and what the the EMT vaccine. Vaccine Lobby does is it takes various facts factoid, and then it will put it together in a false narrative over to give the impression of vaccines earn safe when we have massive studies and literally hundreds of thousands of kids showing there's absolutely no any vaccine and autism and oil, or all the other things that they allege recently I worked with the New York Times back in January to. Use of Jim Marshes. One of the. Have you ever seen the Sunday Times you know time Stella's is graphics, and when he the James is behind this bill marsh. Who put it all who helped me?.

Vaccine Lobby Melda Hive Stella tetanus Department of Genetics Baylor Rachel Harbour Road Institute PRI Jim Marshes New York Times Brendan Texas Matab apple James Ian
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Houston Matters

Houston Matters

06:41 min | 8 months ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Houston Matters

"This is Houston matter special. Edition I'm Craig Cohen. We're talking with Dr. Jill weatherhead, infectious disease, expert and Assistant Professor of Tropical Medicine and infectious disease at Baylor, College Medicine Fielding Your Corona Virus Questions at seven, one, three, four, four, zero, eight, seventy, or talk at Houston matters, dot, Org. Let's go next to Mike Mike has a question related to new. York City Mike go ahead. Looks like maybe Mike is still on, so that's all right Dr. weatherhead will return to you, and there are some you know. What if you don't mind I have a question for you. That has nothing to do with covert nineteen. For Change of pace. Are you ready? Are you excited I? AM excited. That's a fresher fresh air. Okay, here's my question. I heard about a report about bhubaneshwar plague. We need to worry about that. Yeah that that I saw that in the news as well so there is some cases in Asia. Play which is caused by a bacteria call- of yours in the past so we're GONNA be. This is going to be happening now. We're all on heightened alert anytime. We hear a rare disease. An emerging diseases is going to be all over the news and I want to make sure everybody knows. You should not be fearful here in Houston. at this time so. surprisingly people may not know. We actually have active transmission in the United States already. So this is a disease that we see in Western states for two thousand eighteen. There was one case reported in the US fighting two thousand fifteen. There are actually sixteen cases reported in the United States, so it's typically a rural disease when you're in contact with with rodents like prairie, dogs and squirrels and chipmunks less likely to occur in urban areas that. That has has occurred, and you know the reason. It's a serious disease you know if you have these symptoms, you come in right away. to get checked out, but the difference between when the Bouba Plague was making big headlines You, know hundreds of years ago is that we have antibiotics to treat this bacteria so This is not something we don't know about infectious disease. Doctors are well aware of this infection. We know how to treat it. and it's it's nothing new I guess. From our standpoint, you certainly don't want to huge outbreak of this. needs to be controlled and handled when there are cases reported but nothing to be fearful at this time. All right back to covid nineteen. Let's go next to Allie. What's Your Question Ellie? Okay my question was I just had the coronavirus days, so they stayed that he's GonNa. Take anytime between twenty four hours to seven days. You know for me to get my result that I just I received an email from the hospital today. They said he's GonNa. Take about NBC dates. The meantime I'm waiting to get these. Also. What am I supposed to do? So. And great question in the meantime while you're waiting for your testing results. You need to assume that you have it, so do the activities that you would do if you knew for sure that you had so staying home. Certainly do not go out into public spaces, and wear a mask around your family and friends or other people who are living in your household. Try and stay away from them as much as possible and then monitor your symptoms, so if you're having symptoms, you need to make sure that you're. You're staying on top of them. Getting rest, your thing hydrated, and if your symptoms are progressing that you get to a hospital to be evaluated. Lee thanks very much for the call and pleased to say we found Mike. Go ahead. What's your question? Sorry about that. It's raining so I got cut off so. The WHO the hundreds of scientists are writing a letter. It seems like the virus floats like a butterfly and stings like a bee into your lungs, and so that's why they wanna add their everyone should be thinking about it and ninety five mask, and the other thing is New York Times why they had to sue. The Centre of Disease Control to find. That three times more people color getting the virus in two times. More people have colored dying. So why? Why are they suing to get transparency? yeah, so we talked about the airborne invasion. A little bit a few moments ago in this as I mentioned, there have certainly been. Reports case series, suggesting that this could be a contributor as I mentioned to. Without a doubt is spread through respiratory droplets on whether the component of airborne transmission is under investigation, certainly needs to be investigated to help know what role that airborne transmission the small droplets that stayed up in the air for a longer period of time. What role that plays in transmission currently but even with that even without knowing that the intervention that you can do that, the public can do. To avoid even the airborne transmission is the same as what we've been talking about so staying home. Don't go into areas that are overcrowded that are indoors with insufficient airflow. You want to be you know. At home as much as possible if you're outdoors, the risk is going to be much lower, so there needs to be sufficient efficient than elation to where you're. You are so those same precautions that you would do if this were. ENDED UP, being airborne transition are going to be the same things that we're talking about right now, so yes, this needs to be investigated for sure. in terms of the the. DC and new your times. You know that's that's a above what I know. It's certainly needs to be public knowledge particularly when it's affecting vulnerable populations like people of Color. We need to have that information to address these. Issues within our healthcare system so. I I'm not sure why that happened, but certainly something that needs to be figured out what's trying get in one more call. We have surely on the line. Surely what your question. High. Question.

Mike Mike infectious disease United States Dr. Jill weatherhead Houston Craig Cohen York Assistant Professor of Tropica New York Times Centre of Disease Control Baylor Asia covid NBC Allie Ellie Houston. Lee
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

12:37 min | 10 months ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"The latest medical technologies and answers with Doritos Donna. Ville and Kristen. Bob Hope you enjoy five county. We Dad's jury and Kristin thanks so much for coming on the podcast today. Thank you my pleasure to be here. It's a pleasure so trish I like saying Trish because it sounds like another person but it is an organisation Doreen. Why don't you tell me what Trish is and what you do? Yeah I know it sounds like a Texas mom right driving driving a mini van Yeah it's it's hard to take us seriously but that's okay because they're all about having fun with the work that we do So it's the translational research institute that was the original name but it's so generic and there's so many out there and it doesn't really tell you what the institute does so. When I became director I changed the name to Translational Research Institute for Space Health. Which is unfortunately. It was very close to being trashed. But it's actually Trish now. I'm glad you stayed away from track. we're just so happy and to be a partner with NASA. We are a standalone research institute that essentially functions through a cooperative agreement with NASA. We work very closely with human research program and we trusted to basically Go out there and find what NASA is not already doing In terms of reducing the risks to human health and performance in deep space. So we're very Mars. Forward were very Focused on on the future. Those missions that haven't yet been scoped out Our job is to connect with the most innovative technologies companies researchers all over the world but really funding things on on US soil And bring them forward to NASA to take a look at to see whether they can integrate them into their current research portfolio. Yeah because sometimes you can sort of get caught in the regular routine of research. You're not really looking out for some of those latest and greatest technologies that might fit the needs What we're looking for all the time. Yeah in finance people tend to get silo date. They tell you have a favorite hypothesis or a certain way of thinking about things. And and they do work that takes decades to come to fruition. And and sometimes you're blind to what else is going on in the outside world. And so that's precisely why NASA needed an external organization to got there and look at things from a new perspective and to help them sort of realized if there's a better way of doing things so how is Trish integrated because I see there's Baylor. College medicine is sort of intertwined with all of this. What's that relationship like? Yeah so the cooperative agreement was given to Baylor College of medicine delete institutions. So it's a grant. It's a large grant from NASA through a cooperative agreement. Unlike contract a contract though were very free in terms of we have a lot of autonomy but in addition to Baylor College Medicine. We've pulled in two of the most premier technological institutes in the country on the east coast. Mit and one. On the West Coast Caltech and so we have people embedded in those communities that are working with us and those institutions are also mandated. Through the relationship with the consortium with Baylor to Go out there and find things for NASA and to help build this program together with US okay. So it is. It's a even broader team than even just you guys across the nation. In fact Kristen. I've been working on building a and Rachel. Our communication and education lead a building a community. That's one of the mandates that NASA wanted is for us to build a community of experts that they can NASA DIP. Its fingers into when it has a need. Okay so yeah. Chris told me about this committed in this in this is absolutely needed because we ourselves even though we are constantly seeking disruptive technologies or paradigm shifts in how we do science we ourselves don't know what's going on out there. And so we need our reach to be expanded across the entire country so that we have a good sense for some of that that really cool cutting edge science and technology that we don't know about yet but we were looking for them and we want them to know that we exist because this is this is the challenge is is being able to t- to actually understand that into to invest in it to implement it and then bring it to NASA So we ourselves are always having to to force ourselves to not comfortable and how we think that we're constantly pushing ourselves to think outside the box. Well tell me about how you think. Tell me about a little bit about your your background and what you've worked on before and how that kind of translates to what you're doing now. Sure so my background I. I stumbled into radiation biology research. At first I was very interested in cancer research and so I was at Colorado State University Looking at breast cancer research but there was an emphasis on radiation induced breast cancer. And so I had to understand about radiation and and learn about the biological damages that it does to tissue so that I can understand how that connects to carcinogenesis So when I I was ready for my post doc I actually went to a national cancer institute. Nci and looked at radiation mitigators. And so things that can protect or to sensitize radiation. So can we use radiation as a tool for example for cancer or can we find approaches to protect against radiation At that point I realized that I I wanted to be more involved in communication and problem solving working. The problem for higher level I would talk to my cells and unfortunately they wouldn't talk back. I wanted to to have conversations about science and so I went into The national institutes. The National Institute of Health has a great program for for trainees for fellows And they have these these the extra program which is essentially how NIH funds all of the research across the country. And so I became a program manager looking at these these micro physiological systems or organs on chips or tissue chips whatever you WANNA call them. But they're basically these human complex in vitro models that mimic The micro environment of of an organ or tissue of interest Because of that Effort that we pull together at the National Center for advancing translational science or in cats I I was pulled into Pharma Because they wanted to look at these types of technologies on how they can use these tissue chips or micro physiological systems for drug development Trying to either identify new targets. Or how safe is drug going to be And because of all of that background it really put me in a very unique place for for really helping to read and the Trish Mission on how we can use our public private partnerships how we can look at funding agencies how we can look at pharmaceutical companies and industry to really drive the mission Ford. What a whirlwind of PAT. I have no idea honestly what I like about. Your path is is. You're saying you were. You were passionate about cancer research. Then you see you know through this research you get pulled into these different next thing. You know you're working on these tiny little technologies for drug development. But you started all the way back here with cancer. You just allow yourself to go with the wind. Yeah I love it now. It's space space actually funny enough. We actually have had lucy low on the podcast to talk about chips. And what a fascinating technology and I guess that's why is it was through tissue chips that you got involved with space. Health and SPACEX applicability start. I think that's probably what piqued your interest in my background. That and The industry and government experience Looking at you know being a part of a funding agency myself having that background I searched high and low for just the perfect person and here. She is just like with a path like day. How can you not say yes? Please come so you're the director the director. So what's your background? Well I have a very old background. I'm older much older the Christian. Yeah I also never thought I'd end up in space. They actually was doing a lot of genetic engineering and in mouse embryos and making genetic models for Disease Diseases at lexicon pharmaceuticals before I came to Baylor and it was once in a lifetime opportunity when people say you know come work with the Space Program? Combine your love of science and biology and medicine and apply it in a whole new way off the planet. I was like okay. Let's try this for a while. It's just turned out to be the most amazing experience and just just blows your mind. The kinds of things you see and learn is every day is something new delightful work with people like Kristen and others is just a joy. So what about what is it about the space? Applicability that sort of surprised you when you start getting entered into. This is a great question. Probably the most important question you're gonNA ask today because for your audience people. Just don't don't understand it until we explain it so number one. I always say that if you can do it in space you can do it anywhere in other words when I say do it. I I mean healthcare a healthcare okay. There was recently article directed at other ways. But the so if you're able to keep a human healthy and thriving on the way tomorrow which is a really long trip and bring him back safe and healthy. You can do it anywhere on earth which means seniors in the home not having to go into managed care facilities you can do it in. Third World nations you can keep people healthy In in remote places that they don't have access to doctors so that's one so we have a whole new model for healthcare in thinking about that mission to Mars. Because there's so much there's so much autonomy you don't have the doctors. You don't have the right facilities. It has to be compact so all these issues and all these problems. You have to address space flight. Yes it would. It would be applicable to remote areas to that level of autonomy as a matter of fact every project that's in our portfolio. We have an impact for space in an impact for here on earth And Lot of that is how to how to reach the patients. That are hard to reach. How do you get that autonomy? How can you make this easier for people to grasp so that we all have a chance to have a good treatment and and Good Monitoring Diagnostics With types of technologies that we support and it's generally about prevention. You Never WanNa get to a point where you have a major medical event. So it's monitoring and predicting and preventing and that's the model that should be there for healthcare because we we intervene. Too late by the outcomes are too late for healthcare. So you know who's interested in working with us are the payers insurance companies because they're trying to reduce the cost of healthcare and they're wanting to move away from hospitals and a lot of you know expensive procedures and experts into the home and to prevent. So that's WHO's talking to us and that's great for NASA because we're able to make those connections. We just don't have enough money like you know the the budget for for the health related research within NASA is much smaller than the NIH. And so we need somebody to come behind us and continue to support a lot of the things that we're investing. Yeah you're they're interested in the healthy now and exercise so you don't have to deal with it later but for spaceflight the second point I wanted to make about. Why space is such an important model for us to US here for Earth. You know all the applications because people ask me all the time. Why should we spend all this money on four people who were going to live? You know What does that have to do with me here that a lot? Yeah well space is an accelerated aging model. And so everything that we see here on. Earth would probably the exception of diabetes. Although we have seen in prolonged zero-gravity people becoming less sensitive insulin You know. The astronauts generally are healthy people..

NASA Trish Kristen Translational Research Institu US cancer Baylor Texas director Bob Hope NIH Baylor College Medicine Kristin partner Mit Ville Nci SPACEX
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

COVID-19: What You Need to Know

05:04 min | 10 months ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on COVID-19: What You Need to Know

"Is offering free household management and tutoring services for local medical workers and their families. The company was founded by to Baylor College Medicine. Students who are with me right now. We have meduse Reseau. Pay An entre FIDANI. Thank you both for being with us and I want to ask you both as medical students. What inspired you to do this. Basically we had we had spent some time watching our mentors in our teachers. Do these really incredible things on the front lines and with our medical education taking a little bit of detour. Right now We were looking for ways that we can start with them and help them ever and so the household management stuff was definitely a need that we saw that we could feel. That's beautiful and I understand. Your volunteers are all graduate students in the Houston area. Can you talk a little bit about the work that they're doing? Medusa of course so they are actually providing childcare services pet sitting services. They also volunteered to help out with like pharmacy grocery runs. One of her classmates has reached out to us and she actually helped co found. The tutoring branch organisations were providing online tutoring for all the Houston area children who are currently out of school for the semester. That is incredible. I want to hear a little bit about what you're hearing. What's the response been like from those healthcare workers sore and it's been super supportive Our our teachers in our mentors have seems really grateful for what we're doing. They've reached out to us with ideas and encouragement and have helped us. Sort of get the word out the more if their peers. The more of their colleagues as well. And what do you hope? Where do you hope this leads to do you? Are you going to continue doing this? For how long? And what do you hope the outcome is? So we're GONNA try and keep going as long as we a strong volunteer base as long as our Clinical schedule so far permits us to continue volunteering with the healthcare workers community. I think in terms of long term outcomes regardless of what time point we end at. It'll be helpful to kind of establish those relationships between the student body and the healthcare workers in the Houston area. I think that's going to be valuable networking community going forward. Well we are certainly indebted to you and I know a lot of us feel so hopeful with the people like you in the medical field coming up knowing what's important giving back and volunteering your services. Despite how busy you are both right now. Meduse resort pay on the Donnie. Thank you for all that you do and thank you for being with us today. Yeah thank you for joining us. We're GONNA turn now to Dr Jen Ashton for some final thoughts on this Monday. I WANNA take you back to medical school in some ways and and learn how to think like a doctor and what I mean by that is as we look to reopen nail salons camps beaches colleges down the road. How do you learn to stratified risks so in medical school we're taught? Is You have to ask for key questions. What's the risk of doing something? What's the risk of not doing something? And what's the benefit of doing something? And what's the benefit of not doing it? And in some cases you can plug in actual numbers to that answer but that really helps you make a medical decision. Based on fact not fear an evidence and not emotion and this is something though that people have differing medical opinions on different studies. Say Different thing right. And so everyone's trying to interpret these politically as well. In addition to medically. How do we make that all work? Listen this is a complicated process. But if you learn to think like that and think like a doctor in terms of straffing risk usually it leads you down a path where you can make an informed and educated decision because it's not just what's the risk of doing it and what's the advantage of doing it. You really have to tease it out to those four parts and when you do that then you can see for example you know going to the beach. What's the risk of not going to the beach? You're going to miss out on some fun. But what is the risk of going you may yourself get sick or infect other so when you go down these difficult decisions that we're all going to be making in the next weeks months and possibly longer I think if you learn to stratified risk versus benefit versus any option or alternative You can think like a doctor and usually make an informed choice not just in medicine public health but sometimes in life as well what about mental health you know that has to be factored in because in medicine. We don't make a decision in a vacuum so we don't treat a body part. We treat a whole person. We're not treating an individual. We're treating a community here. So that's part of the risk stratification and again. It's a very important habit that we are taught in medical school and should be continued. We need now more than ever. We certainly do. We also need to understand that we're in this for the long haul. This is something that's going away in a matter of weeks or even months at this plane. That's right we're going to be living with this virus and it is going to be living with us so how we do that to minimize risk. We can never drop the risk to zero in life in medicine in science. That is never possible. So it's had lower the risk to an acceptable level. That will be key Dr Ashton. Thank you.

Houston Dr Jen Ashton Baylor College Medicine meduse Reseau
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

The Joe Rogan Experience

12:20 min | 11 months ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on The Joe Rogan Experience

"That transmission is going out for several weeks only when a lot of ICU. Patients started hitting the door. So this is what happened in New Orleans is what happened is probably happening in Detroit mayor of Atlanta said you know all of a sudden we found all of these people show up in the eye in the ICU. So that's a nother lesson. Learned we really not only doing the the diagnostic testing. But the social distancing is really important and I've been on calls with the leadership of people in Houston. Because you know you're right it's it's it's hurting the economy and so many ways But you know if you WANNA prevent Houston from replicating the New Orleans experience. I've been saying to the to the mayor and everyone else in Houston. This is unfortunately what we're going to have to do in. The models are showing now Oregon Institute At at in Washington Seattle Washington called the Institute for Health Metrics and evaluation. And it's they've now been Looking at this they do all these amazing things to look at the Not only epidemic diseases but also chronic non communicable diseases diabetes and Heart Disease Mental Health issues. But they've been all hands on deck at this covert epidemic and they've just put it out on their website. It's health data dot Oregon. You go to the CO vid snipe side and what they're showing is that they anticipate the peak of this epidemic in the US is going to hit about the middle of April. So we're not even at the peak yet Answer another two weeks of this is going to continue to go up and in some places like in Texas is going to be delayed. It's probably going to be around around many second. And I think California was was around there as well so their numbers say it's going to be the next two months that are going to be the crunch time when it's going to start really going up and then as we move into later in. May It'll start to go down and may be really bottom out by by June. Of course again. It's a model. It's a new virus pathogen. But what I've been saying. Is You know the president yesterday or the day before said okay. I understand I said Easter. Now we're GONNA go to April thirtieth and my point is well April thirtieth. Things are still gonNA be peaking in parts of the country. Let's use April thirtieth as a time to reassess and then make a decision whether we go another month. Let's go a month at a time for now until we know where this is heading. How long can we go? I mean wh wh if you if let's take economics out of it what would you think if there was no concern whatsoever about economic loss and the damage to the economy? What would you recommend in terms of just from clearly just purely from medical perspective? Well the problem is from a medical and public health perspective. We don't really know where this virus is heading. Let's Figure doctor found. She said the virus makes the decisions. We don't make the decision so Although not entirely true because we can make. We can enact in intervention so Hopefully by the summer this is not going to be a huge problem. But but we don't know and then we also don't know if this thing's coming back so what did the out years look like is this does that even if it goes down this summer does it. Does it come back up again in the fall. Does it come back again early. What's that why would that happen? Why would it come back? Why would it? Why would it go away and then come back in the fall? Well a few things that are happening one. All the social distancing potentially could interrupt the transmission We use this number called the reproductive number which describes the number of people that get infected if a single individual has it so the number right now is between two and four depending on whose numbers you look at the ideas you bring that below one. By the social distancing. There's also the question of whether their seasonality to to this virus and again The skymark lipset. She has done some studies. Show that There there seems the virus. Infection doesn't seem to be as severe in areas that have higher temperatures in in greater humidity. It's a bit of a soft call. But maybe there's going to be some seasonality To this as well and then and so. Let's use an example of another seasonal virus influenza. Which of course in the winter then goes down in the summer months and never really disappears but it it it goes down but then in the southern hemisphere is the opposite so in the southern hemisphere peak. Flu Season is our summer their winter in places like Australia and then in the tropics. It's about the same all year round so we don't really understand seasonality. Potentially the virus could show starts showing a pattern like that and then the question is does come back year after year after year. Like flu does Or or an has show some kind of seasonality. These are all scenarios that are being looked at so for instance. Our our vaccine. If it's used in goes you know goes through all. The clinical testing hurdles probably is not going to be used for this twenty twenty epidemic. If it's used at all it's going to be used the out years If this virus starts to come back on a regular basis. Is there any other way to handle this in terms of Quarantining or social distancing like is there would there. Would it be possible to quarantine the people that are at most risk instead of the general population? Well well again. The problem gets to the fact that You know again there's this I. This is only among older Americans and people over the age of seventy diabetes hypertension but now we as a as the Centers for disease control has been reporting of. We've had this big flux of young adults getting very sick and in the ICU. So what point do you say pretty much? Everybody potentially rick then among the children. Even though the the children generally our children adolescents seem to do pretty well with this virus now we realize from studies coming out of China that was published in the Journal. Pediatrics put out by the American Academy Pediatric Thought. About ten percent of infants are getting very sick with this virus. Infants are at risk. So you start adding it up okay. Older people Those underlying diabetes hypertension younger adults and forty and fifty year olds as well and we're hearing all these stories on CNN and elsewhere about you know valued colleagues you know in their fifties and are kind of thing getting really sick or even even dying than infants after a while and it's just it's you can't you can't slice it that fine it's it. It becomes impossible to do it. Is it one of the things that's come up about? This is people are now aware. A people like myself for aware of the number of people that die every year in the United States from the flu. Which is staggering. It's a lot more than ever thought before I'm like. Do you know the numbers. So a seasonal flu is really bad. It's An varies year to year. Different variants of the flu so it usually goes between twelve and fifty thousand. People die every year of influenza and the vast majority of those by the way are not vaccinated so even in years where there is not a good match between the flu vaccine in the flow. It could still reduce your likelihood of hospitalization and Desam important message to get out the numbers here. Unfortunately looking worse I positive for second house. How does that work? How even if it's not matched up to this the correct seasonal flu? How does it prevent you from being hospitalised because it is partially protective? So if you imagine a virus that has all of these different pieces to it and And the and all the antibodies each reacting to a different piece of the virus and a perfect match all of the antibodies target the virus in a in a less than perfect match only some of the antibodies target the virus and therefore it's partially protective and have a partial effect and so on and so the the into now the numbers of the of Americans who are dying are all over the map. So if you if you believe the number saying that. They're between four and ten times. The number of Americans under US forget about Mary. Four to ten times cove. The SARS virus cove in nineteen is four to ten times more lethal than regular flu. So that'll keep you the bracket so if the minimum of twelve thousand from flew the minimum. That's GonNa die from cove. Nineteen around fifty thousand and at the High End Times. Ten could be between five hundred thousand. So that's where you're hearing those numbers from the White House press conference today saying maybe one hundred to two hundred thousand Americans could die. I think it's probably I I like the Institute for Health Metrics numbers that just came out. They say eighty four thousand. Americans will die in that peak season. Going from April may May and June and then but we don't know what will happen again in the the point is a lot of Americans are going to die I don't I'm hoping it doesn't get as high as two hundred thousand and again the model there is a really looking at this. The way those numbers that I gave you that estimate is this sort of simplistic version at. There's much more sophisticated models but again. They're models based on assumptions. But the new virus pathogen. It's hard to get off of the assumptions. Right at the point is many more people will die of this virus than even in a bad flu. Sees I think people are concerned that this is kind of setting a precedent and that this is going to be something that we have to do in the future. Is there a way to prevent something like this Full shutdown of the of the country to happen in the future. As you know we. You know we've got this incredible scientific infrastructure in America right the best research universities and institutes in the world and and I work at to them but Baylor College Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital and And now doing things with Texas A. and M. University and Baylor University as well and and rice and so the The the answer is this is why we have the budget to the thirty. Six billion dollars annually. We need to have a pipeline of technologies getting ready for this Epidemic we should have You know if we had you know all the funding we need it for Virus Vaccine Program. We would have had several cord of our respect scenes in clinical trials and potentially we could have combine them in a way to be ready to go now So having figuring out a way to support organizations that dull are that are looking at vaccines another countermeasures. Not In terms of products they can sell. That are going to help the help. The health security of the country. I think is is really important. So one of the books that I wrote is called blue marble health and it finds this unusual and we spoke a little bit about this last time. The unusual number of Illnesses from emerging infections like this one and poverty related neglected diseases. Actually in the G. Twenty countries the G. Twenty Connie's the twenty wealthiest economies especially the poor living in those actually for most of these diseases and the problem is the g twenty economies that are not stepping up to support these technologies. We still rely too much on the US and the UK and the European Union. We've got to do better with China and Brazil and some of these countries to help fund these global health technologies..

influenza United States ICU Houston Epidemic Institute for Health Metrics Texas New Orleans China flu vaccine Oregon Institute Heart Disease Mental Health California CNN Detroit president Atlanta
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

10:53 min | 1 year ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Short Wave

"Okay so Maria just before we get started we should say that everything is changing super fast and as we learn more information about all of this stuff things will change. So this advice is based on interviews. That you shortwave team and other. Npr folks have had with public health officials and doctors as of Thursday march nineteenth correct. And you know if you hear deferring advice. Part of the reason is because the advice changes a situation on the ground changes. But what? We're GONNA talk about here. Are Some of the best? Practices THAT EXPERTS. We talked to agreed on and again. Remember listen to your local public health officials because the situation where you are might look a little different. Yeah absolutely and those public. Health officials have been talking about how social distancing can quote flatten. The Curve Mario. What does that actually mean? Okay so this is really important. This is why I'm sitting in a closet with a blanket over read. The idea is that social distancing can help slow the spread of the virus. So you're not getting this huge spike in the number of people getting sick all at once if our to happen they're just wouldn't be enough hospital beds or mechanical ventilators for everyone who needs them and the US hospital system would be just overwhelmed. You Know Fox News this week the. Us Surgeon General. Dr Jerome Adams. He said we could be on the same track. As Italy. We're at critical inflection. Point in this country people. We are where Italy was two weeks ago in terms of our numbers. When you look at the projections every chance that we could be Italy. Yeah and we do not want that. Italy was slow to stop. Mass gatherings and get tested started and now a lot of Italian. Hospitals are totally overwhelmed. Yes it's it's sad but the good news is that we have some power to try and slow down how hard this pandemic hits us here in the US right now by practicing good social distancing. Yeah Okay so real talk Kadoorie. I've talked to some of my friends and they're like you know I'm not that worried about getting sick. It wouldn't be that bad but the thing is is that people my age can get really sick and sometimes when your symptoms aren't so severe. You're more likely to go out in the world and infect other people right right first of all. I'm GonNa slap your friends who aren't worried but you are making a really important point. Public Health officials are worried about young people going out especially to large gatherings because they think they're invincible and even if they get sick it's not going to be bad for them but in fact new data from the CDC shows a sizable percentage of people. Who are getting sick enough to need to be hospitalized in the US are young. They're not just elderly. Okay so let's do it. Let's go through some scenarios based on the guidelines from the White House. This week we should not be eating inside restaurants and bars even if you live in a place that has no confirmed cases. Right you should not be dining in at any restaurant but if that restaurant is doing pickup or delivery you know that's a good option if you are picking up food make sure to wash your disinfect your hands. If you're doing delivery online. You can often leave delivery instructions. Just having them drop it off outside and you know there are a lot of service industry folks right now. Who really are struggling. If you and tip the restaurants tip the delivery people to well There's also people urging folks to buy gift cards to their favorite restaurants so they can support them. Now give them cash to pay workers and then they can use those gift cards later. Okay but is there any way for us to still eat together? Can I have a few people over to my house? Plague SPREADER NO. You are so the new. Cdc Guidance is to avoid social visits for now especially during this fifteen day period that started on March sixteenth. You basically you should be thinking virtual. Why are we doing this over? Facetime we should be facetime. Jetting should be having a video chat dinner party. You can see me and my sleds okay. But there is an interesting idea going around Maria. And that is this idea of essentially having a pact between two households for example two couples who agree to socially distance from everyone but each other like going pandemic steady with each other and to make steady. Yeah Yeah I heard of that and Marie I just. I just wanted to ask you a question do. Does Your Family. WanNa go study with my family Mattie you're really more my side you don't have kids sir. Honestly I do not trust you not fool around on me how well okay. That is fair. Plus we actually talked with Caroline Bucky from the Harvard School of Public Health about this and she agreed with you. She was like no. That's too risky. That is way too many exposures for each household. A totally agree plus. I'm a genius. Yeah well okay all right. I promise this is my last question about food because you know that's always my main priority. What about Grocery shopping? Okay so this is one of those chips you have to make. It's not discretionary. We all got to eat and the experts. We talked to say. Try going to the grocery store during off peak hours. You're not one in a million in line Right now some grocery stores are offering wipes that you can use to wipe down the handles on the cart or basket You should do that when you get there or you can use hand sanitizer if you have any If I don't have either I've been using paper towels I take with me to cover it. obviously wash your hands before you go wash your hands when you get home and it wouldn't hurt. Wash your hands after you and pack and then you know wash them again for fun because we are washing all the time now If you're a high risk group like the elderly or immunosuppressed you probably should ask someone else to shop for you or have groceries delivered instead. We've actually We're helping our senior neighbors. Showed them how to use online delivery so I think you can reach out. We show them over the fence at a six foot distanced while we were chatting in the yard. I really liked that. That's a really good idea. Yeah so let's talk about. Childcare is daycare a no go so interestingly the new CDC Guy Lanes haven't really tackled that question yet but we know that there are parents who are serving critical jobs who need daycare. They don't have the option to stay home. And in that case appeal tradition named Andrew Toney crews from Baylor College medicine suggests try to find a daycare setting with a small number of kids. So don't send them in if they're sick and make sure kids have gotten their flu. Shot and just declared that's not going to protect them against corona virus but it is still flu season and you basically want to avoid having to see a healthcare worker for any reason right now so you're not overwhelming or system. She also says daycare providers should wipe down toys especially plastic ones often with disinfecting cleaners such as clorox wipes or a bleach solution. Okay so Maria. The one thing that bummed me now I mean besides the pandemic general is that we shouldn't be traveling pretty much at all. I mean I knew were not good but I thought like driving to a secluded place could be fine but it's not the. Cdc is telling people to avoid discretionary travel so yeah there are a lot of cheap flights right now. I wouldn't do it but even if you're going to drive the whole goal of this fifteen day hunkering down period to keep your germs to yourself and that means minimizing contact with other people outside your immediate household. That's hard to do when you're traveling because he got to stop for gas etc. Okay so Marie this has been a like lot of. You can't do this kind of talk myself. I do have a nice thing to share with you L. A. What the public health expert we talked to you last night Who said we couldn't enter into a relationship with each other? Did say that it was okay to meet somebody outside to hang out a little bit like. Little Walk Outside. No touching six feet away from each other but you know you can see a person. That's Nice Yeah that is nice you know. Get some fresh air and you can still see each other just you know. Don't come too close okay but Maria on a serious note how has reporting this affected your life. I mean after working on this story I started feeling bad about all the places I went like one week ago. Have you felt anything like that? Do you think that's normal? Oh my God yeah. I totally think normal. I've been thinking about that and last weekend. I went to like a crowded high school musical and a bounce house birthday party. Like one of those places where there's millions of kids and you go from room to room and bouncing they touch everything in sight. Yeah I've been feeling guilty Like maybe I shouldn't have done that but we can only change our actions from today on right. We can't change the past. We can hopefully change the future by staying home. Okay Maria bring home for us. Any lasts social distancing thoughts. Yeah you know I guess I would just say that I know a lot of people might feel like all of this is a total over-reaction. You know especially if you're someone living in a place where there haven't been any corona virus cases yet but people are worried about young people going out but I also know a lot of my friends are having trouble convincing their parents that this is serious but we have learned from other places like South Korea and Singapore and Hong Kong. That acting early on in this pandemic has a massive impact on how quickly it grows for the people in charge of our healthcare system. That means we need adequate testing so we know how many cases are out there for the rest of us. It means social distancing we get to be heroes by staying home. I mean how is that in a way. Think about it. Okay Maria Godot. I from my recording closet to yours. Thank you so much you got it. Mattie issue this episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez edited by Vietnam. In fact checked by Emily von. Thanks for listening to shortwave from NPR. Stay away from each other out there but we can do virtual goodbye kisses.

Maria Godot US Italy CDC NPR Mattie Marie I Fox News Harvard School of Public Healt flu Dr Jerome Adams clorox Hong Kong Andrew Toney White House South Korea Caroline Bucky
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

14:45 min | 1 year ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"We don't know for sure. This is a new virus but that is the consequence of the failure that our government has had in terms of getting testing available and Peter. That's a really important point that I just don't think can be overstated. Which is coming back to this. Point of the importance of social distancing now to buy time because if we could do anything at this point there is no stopping this. The opportunity to prevent this virus from entering this country or reaching a sufficient number of the population seems pretty slim. At this point it's a question of if one hundred thousand people are going to be infected and it happens over a year versus a month that has enormous consequences. Do you think there is still an opportunity to shift that curve if we can get a big order of magnitude level of testing in the next week and we can see which communities have significant levels of transmission. Potentially we could intervene so yeah we still have to try but boy it would have been nice to have that three or four weeks ago when there was. Maybe just a handful of communities that have transmission. We have focused all of our energy on that and so we did lose an opportunity. I think to prevent this becoming a large epidemic and I get asked about this a lot differences. I got Allison Cammarata on. Cnn asked me this morning. Whose fault is this. And I think my response to her was surprising. Said look now's not the time to start signing fall. There's going to be time for that later. And we can have a federal investigation of where the breakdowns occurred. But I think right. Now we've got to focus on what the task at hand is and I introduced this new concept this morning both on CNN and and on Fox News. And I did it after calling my friend and colleague Archer AKASA divall. Who's a professor at Johns Hopkins has been pushing this idea for a few weeks that there is a low cost intervention that we could apply right now and that is identifying patients who've been infected recovered and looking at their convalesce and Cirrus in other words people develop antibodies and antibody response to varying degrees collecting sarum isolating antibody and then using that as a treatment? Because that's all we're going to have right now. I already think the window is passed when we're gonNA start having significant numbers of people sick from this virus in hospitals in intensive care units and this is the one thing we can offer them given the fact that we're not likely to have any effective antiviral drugs for a while and it can be very effective based on what we learned historically from things like the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic the Spanish flu or even from experiences that we've heard about from SARS mayors or even this virus in Wuhan both as a treatment which require large amounts of antibody but also as prophylaxis so you can give small amount and keep healthcare workers and first responders on the job because it's preventing them from potentially from getting sick Peter when it comes to convalescent serum I want to make sure I understand something which is from a technical standpoint this is easy obviously from a theoretical standpoint. It makes sense. This is as you point out. Not a new trick however when we start to think about bottlenecks in the supply chain does require a farinas correct. Yeah it looks that way and so we really need the help of blood banks than any Out enough he do this. Only in academic health centers or whether every community hospital would have this capability and we would need some guidance from the Drug Administration from Sieber the Center for biologics Evaluation Research. So this is kind of a thirty thousand foot view of the problem are speaking to Arturo. He thinks putting together a federal task force to really look into this and to help us standardizing it and figuring out what we can do but it has if we have wind up having a situation similar to Italy in the United States of the United States. Having this at our disposal is going to be really important because otherwise got nothing. Otherwise we go back to the fourteenth century in terms of using quarantine methods and that kind of thing and we see what happens on. We have to do that. It's not a good look for our country. Peter we have a sense of how many individuals could be helped by the serum of one convalesce patient. How scalable is it kind of numbers? People are throwing out or three hundred mils three to six hundred mils for someone who's potentially seriously ill so that's looks like a one to one donor patient but for the prophylaxis. If we're talking five miles a single donor could potentially prophylaxis dozens or maybe even one hundred individuals and who knows how off my those numbers really are but given the fact that it's relatively low technology doesn't need to bring in a lot of specialized equipment. I don't think I think it's something we need to look into. And and Arturo gave me the permission to sound the alarm Cnn and Fox News. And we'll see how resonates in the coming days weeks and see if it catches fire whereabout rimmed severe which seems like one of the more promising things that could be re purposed. Do you buy that argument that says drug which has been developed by. Gilead for Ebola is potentially. I mean it's being used now on compassionate exemption. We have a sense of its efficacy. A too soon. I haven't seen those numbers and so will require a clinical trial and whether you use combination therapy certainly antivirals will go a lot faster than vaccines and we've developed a recombinant protein vaccine. But it's you know we'll see how quickly that can come up. Speed in terms of clinical development. You've said in the past vaccine is is really not something we're going to have in the next twelve months and it. It might even be longer than that. Can you just explain to folks two issues one? The technical challenges of vaccinating this corona virus per se versus say an influenza man. The lessons we've learned from say RSV viruses and then secondly the logistics of getting a vaccine tested vetted from a safety and efficacy standpoint to be used on a symptomatic people. Those seem to be two separate issues. They're both stacked against us well. Yeah I mean. Vaccines are about the highest bar. There is in terms of testing. Because you're essentially typically your well individuals are healthy individuals so you have to be pristine in terms of its safety and historically has been very difficult to compress those timelines too something quick so it's not unusual for clinical development plan for a vaccine to last year to year sometimes three years to go through the series of phase one trial for safety and then greater trials for phase two to show that those are expanded. Safety Studies may be getting a hint of efficacy. And then the face re pivotal study for licensure in Inari of transmission so even under ideal circumstances that will take time now. I think there are opportunities to streamline this so my colleague Greener Rep Yolly. Who's one of the real thought leaders in vaccines? He's GlaxoSmithKline has drawn up a lot of interesting roadmaps for doing more things in parallel rather than serially and Nick. Celebrating those timelines. And I think that's just a lot of interest in applying that for this vaccine but I've made the statement that I'm not sure this is the one you want to do it with even know. There's so much urgency and the reason I say that is corona virus vaccines have at least in laboratory. Animals shown that they could create a problem known as immune enhancement where the vaccine could actually make things worse. This is a phenomenon that was found originally with the system virus vaccine the RSP vaccine. That was a killed virus. Vaccine a formal and inactivated vaccine that was tested by the National Institutes of Health at Children's Hospital in Washington in the nineteen sixties where vaccine recipients actually did worse than the non vaccine recipients after they were exposed to the natural virus living in the community and the mechanisms not still entirely clear but those who were vaccinated had more hospitalizations than they were even two deaths and there was the added layer of complexity that this study when you look at the paper. I only realized this recently done among us all African American kids as well when it was done done in Washington. Dc in potentially two deaths so this squashed enthusiasm for our vaccines appropriately. So for a long time and the question is was this unique to respiratory virus or is there others that do it well. After SARS in two thousand and three there was initial effort to again develop killed virus vaccines to test in animals. And unfortunately after virus challenge those animals also exhibited a lung pathology that bore some resemblance to what we saw in the kids with. Rsv in the nineteen sixties. And we said Oh no this is. Are we going to be faced with this again? And so the thinking was well okay. Maybe that was unique to a killed virus vaccine. Let's do this with the whole spike protein. So if you look at a cartoon mccrone avars looks like you always see these. Little spikes all around it. That's the part the docks with the receptor so recombinant protein vaccine was made with the whole spike protein. Sure enough we also saw meaning hospital. There was more in the liver that in the lungs but the thinking was. Can we get around? This isn't going to be impossible to develop rotavirus vaccines while then our colleagues at the New York Blood Center. She began landing do found that if they only use the receptor binding domain the smallest part of the protein docks with the receptor the. Seato colonies to receptor in the lungs. They seem to get protection in laboratory. Animals without all the immune enhancement. That was pretty exciting. And that's the concept that we partnered together to write a granted the NIH together with the Galveston National Laboratory where they had the virus for potentially doing preclinical studies and while Torino we wound up making a vaccine manufacturing it that show pretty good levels of high levels of efficacy and seemed to get around the problem of immune enhancement. And that's why we got so excited at the prospect of maybe we could develop. This receptor binding domains. Vaccine will be dead we got funded by the. Nih took US several years to do it to show all of the safety none of the immune enhancement and the efficacy had it manufactured but after then by then nobody was really interested in corona virus. Vaccines Anymore couldn't attract any investment in moving into clinical trials. We kept it on stability studies but that the project more or less was done until the few weeks ago when this new coronavirus emerged and we began look in the Chinese really good about putting up their dad everyone says how non transparent they were but I disagree. They were very transparent. They're putting up all their data on these pre-printed servers like bio archive met Archive. We're able to see that. The SARS to corona virus for a lot of resemblance to SARS one was about eighty percent similar in terms of genetic code bound to the same receptor. We realized Oh my God we might be. We might actually have a vaccine that we could repurpose for this epidemic. In the meantime we also started trying to make a new one is well the receptor binding domain for the new one but this was already manufactured and now we've been in this hunt to try to identify perspective donors to see if we can not move this into clinical trials. That's been a few weeks now. You know it's sad to report. We still not able to raise the money to move it into clinical trials which is really tragic. It's already manufactured. We can move as fast as anybody but this really goes to show you the problem of dealing with vaccines either for neglected diseases. That I've devoted my life to we've made vaccines for schistosomiasis hookworm disease for Clinton and moving them into the clinic through our National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development taking on this corona virus. But you'd think people would be pretty eager to support us to move this forward but so far it has knapman. Should that change? I assume people can pretty easily get a hold of you. If there's interest in this what's the easiest way for people to get a hold of you at this point in time I assume just through the university? Yeah just send me an email. My emails pretty public is just the whole test last name at for Baylor College medicine that Edu and we can do this through the college or Texas Children's hospital fantastic. What do we know about the ace two receptor and its role here? Certainly a few weeks ago. I remember seeing a paper that discussed this in the context of the first SARS outbreak. Because it was a two thousand five paper and that got us very interested in looking at Nj attention receptor blockers and things like that but is the following still our understanding which is at the virus gains access to these cells in the lung the type to Numa sites that makes her fact and probably through this as two receptor. Though there may be a co receptor once the Numa site is infected. It reduces its capacity to produce surfactant which is one of the more telling pieces of the pathology is still largely accurate to understanding. Well I think there's a couple of things I think. First of all the receptors not only in the lungs it's also found in the intestinal track. And you can see intestinal pathology with this and that may even uneven myocardial potentially and it's an into filial cells as well and that may partly explain. Some of the divers pathology that we're seeing so for instance patients who are very ill with this..

SARS Peter Cnn Fox News United States Arturo Baylor College Medicine Texas Children Hospital Center for Vaccine De Washington Allison Cammarata Nj NIH influenza Archer AKASA National Institutes of Health Ebola professor RSP
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"It's well known that BPA Orbis venal a chemical that is common. In plastics is title whole bunch of bad stuff from diabetes, heart disease. And now we've found out how early that can start researchers at Baylor College medicine in Houston, exposed mouse pups. They call them pups Mao slits to the chemical BPA for only or only five days after birth, which is the time at which their livers develop and as long as the BP Expos, mice eight mouse child for the rest of their lives. They were healthy. But if they switched them BP exposed mice over to a high fat diet, as adults, those mice got larger livers higher cholesterol, and more metabolic problems in mice who ate a high fat diet, but weren't exposed to be as pups. I just like to point out here that high fat mouse, diet is not high healthy fat or on inflamed fat. It's actual high crappy fat diet, which is a problem in labs. I'd also like to went out that all mouse studies or suspect because the big variable that no one controls for is that when women feed. Mice they behave differently and have different study outcomes, then when mid feed them hoops, no-one forgot when they say we control variables that one, they missed and this is kinda interesting because we're learning more and more every day about plasticizers doodoo and bottom line is they suck but for babies, they're even worse. So splurge on the glass baby bottles already. Today's guest was on episode one hundred and thirty six of bulletproof radio. That's almost five hundred episodes ago, which is kind of mind boggling in and of itself. And one of my favorite of Lucien airy biologists. And her name is Nora ca Dowd, does gig. I've never said your name properly say it one more time Gaddis good gout this and that is tough. Knowing people just David spray, and I got over that in seventh grade, but I can see you're still struggling with name every possible permutation of pronunciation of my name, that you can imagine my apologies average actually read your books if that counts and I have to say early on for get into your bio on my wife. Dr Lana, Caroline's, good trains, Dr co author of the better baby book with me about what we can do before, and during pregnancy to have healthier, kids Connectix. She's like Dave. You're talking to Nora. She's my favorite author in the field. And so she's a huge fan and just ask that I call that out. So there go on, I did it. You can check off Thank you. your checks. In the mail. Nora's pretty well known in certain circles and biohacking and paleo and things like that as an early adopter of a low carb high fat diet. And she looks at blue canary physiology, biochemistry metabolism, nutrition, and on top of that, she's a neuro feedback specialist with twenty years of experience,.

BP Expos Nora diabetes Baylor College medicine Orbis Houston Mao Gaddis Connectix David spray Dr Lana Dowd Caroline twenty years five days
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

04:48 min | 2 years ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KTRH

"Still trying to find her musher seven eighteen now here in Houston's more news. But I think one of the big stories, obviously in the last twenty four hours is this big fire at Notre Dom. I mean, everybody who's ever seen it? You just I don't know. You just have this. Because it's so so, yeah massively. Have some audio to share cover the history of Notre domino? Of course. We have footage of the fire. If you missed it somehow, I don't know how you could put if you missed it somehow you can check that out KTAR H dot com. All right. Let's talk we've got the doctor. Let's talk about the measles. We've got a major outbreak going on in this country. We're we're seeing a lot of cases here in Texas is well, if you were born between nineteen fifty seven in one thousand nine hundred nine and you gotta measles shot that may not be enough because nineteen fifty seven they started giving you one shot is to join us to talk about it and talk about the I think what he would concern me the insanity of being an anti vaccine, Dr Daniel musher distinguished service, professor medicine at Baylor. College medicine. Doctor. I know your bottom line kinda guy. What do you think of people who are not giving their kids, those kinds of vaccinations? Well, sir. Percival good morning. They've been calling the vaccine choice advocates. So or vacuum sexing choice activists. Now, we have people who think the holocaust didn't happen. We don't call them holocaust. Choice activists. We call them holocaust deniers. These people are vaccine deniers the evidence is perfectly clear vaccines. Protect the evidence is clear that the not harmful measles is a terrible disease. And frankly, it's just playing stupidity. You know, so many of us of a certain age. I guess we had measles children. You know before vaccines were even being given. And we think of it as just being a natural part of childhood tell us, what is the devastating consequences of measles. Or when it can be HOGAN, first of all, I didn't think you were old enough that you had means listening. Thank you. You're very sweet. Meals meals can lead to simple complications like middle ear infections, but the Monja is a frequent complication measles. And it's a bad case of leaves the lungs damage permanently. And they're even cases of instead of lightness, and it's a highly contagious disease enormously can take. And it's just bad, and we basically eliminated in United States fifteen years ago. It was just about gone the United States. And now some of these people who either on we haven't seen Texas on the west coast. They somehow considering fringes on their rights insist that they evacuated. We have emergency. And I'm sorry to say we have phonetics I'm Jewish apparently some of these people are Jewish that. I don't know why I think that's vaccinated. They believe that there's a divine providence, and they should believe God told us have to make vaccines to protect people from careful diseases. So I'm pretty unsympathetic to understand. Of course, part of the problem, too is is we have people coming from other countries in many cases illegally across their border. Who have not been vaccinated for measles. And they sometimes bring the disease along with them. Don't they? This is a very important point. Actually, I will tell you to my knowledge I have not heard of cases being brought in like illegal immigrants. They're being brought in by folks who are just flying back from other countries where they've had the exposure they've had these and they brought in the United States. And of course, it's very devastating for adults to get this disease. I mean, we were talking about children as even worse when get it that that is absolutely true. And is Sarah said earlier if adults have been vaccinated when they were. Yeah. If they've been vaccinated anyone is vaccinated twice who's received. The full Senate vaccines is very very unlikely to get the disease and anyone really had measles in jail. It is very unlikely to get measles. But there are people who've had neither and they are at risk, and it's a bad disease. All right. Thank you for joining us this morning. Good here from you, Dr Daniel musher distinguished service, professor medicine at Baylor. College of medicine joining us, a NewsRadio seven forty KTAR H time for traffic.

measles United States Baylor Texas Dr Daniel professor Notre Dom College of medicine Houston Senate Percival Sarah twenty four hours fifteen years
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KTRH

"Is the biggest issue heading into the election next year, but Breitbart spa price told Houston's morning news. You shouldn't expect Washington to listen there attacked as congress doesn't want to do anything about this. This Democrats wanted to keep the issue alive. Republicans wanna keep the chamber of commerce people happy few says the most important issue for Democrats is Medicare for all voting along party lines. The house has voted to subpoena Robert Muller's full uncensored. Russia report. More theaters are showing the movie unplanned this week the pro-life movie debuted last weekend with an are rating Heather Gardner with the central Texas coalition for life told Houston's morning news. That's okay. It's simply given an r rating for quote, unquote, disturbing images and. That's me. I thought to myself. Well, that's good. The NPA is recognizing that abortion is violence. The movies Twitter account, though, lost half of its followers under suspicious circumstances. Katie rich news time ten oh three. We could see a vaccine for colon cancer in our lifetime. Over a million Americans have Lynch syndrome, which gives them a predisposition for colon cancer vaccine has had positive results in sixty percent of the lab, mice Dr David Murdoch at Baylor. College medicine says study could have far reaching benefits you could potentially advances to really any kind of inherited predispositions to cancer. But this would be years away. Aggies have reportedly found their new head basketball coach CBS sports reports. Virginia Tech's buzz Williams. Fresh.

colon cancer Robert Muller Houston Breitbart Heather Gardner Washington buzz Williams Dr David Murdoch Twitter Katie rich congress NPA Russia Aggies Virginia Tech CBS basketball Texas Baylor Lynch
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Three of his five children have this condition. So do they only have seven percent of their vision? Yes. So they actually blind right? They usually present as close to legally blind. So it depends on how many cones they have. So without getting scientific about it. It it goes from anywhere from twenty to twenty five hundred vision. So my kids are so shepherd is about twenty one hundred twenty one fifty Jameson is about twenty eighty and then John Mark is twenty one fifty two twenty two hundred. So it can be done to help correct or assist nothing. So the glasses don't help that. Because that only changes the image that that comes to your is this is about the. Retina in the back, and and there's just no sales there to perceive generative or just where we're going now. It's static. The only thing that could be degenerative just like anybody else your retina gets gets weathered over time. And so just there there's are working overtime. They have to do precautionary measures by wearing sunglasses and stuff like that because bright sunshine, really affects them. Okay. Big time affects them as an it hurts them or it's called Botafoga is just things become invisible. And then also they're just very colorblind like red and black or the same or blue marker on a whiteboard is invisible things are very very small for them. So they can't you know, if they're gonna go to play or something they can't they can't that to be close up. They won't be able to drive. You know baseball. I would say baseball's a pretty dangerous sport for A B C M kids. So anchors him to go and other things during the gym, not gymnastics and stuff. Idiot is not Baylor. College medicine. I'm sorry. I'm sorry. I did not realize that was how you abbreviated it. Right. So what adjustments are made in school? Well, we go to a private school in which they are not able to make any kind of adjustments say don't have any accommodations there. But we go to home school three days a week, and then a regular classroom setting today's a week. So Leah teaches them at home s right? But the two days a week. They don't get any accommodation since. So it's it's tough. They have to sit close to the board. And and just going be life to right. Exactly. I mean, there's not going to be there's not any any accommodations in life. Really? I mean, I know that there's the and and things like that. But but the people they don't really think about people's do you worry that in trying to accommodate them because it's your child you wanna make everything perfect. You might go too far and leave him soft. Oh, yeah. I mean, we we all sure at times, I think we we certainly do things because it's easier. I mean five kids, I mean, that's full contact sport even with perfectly healthy kids. So. Oh, so on any given day, if I'm you know. Half decent one of them to file out. Now. I cannot and and and so I'd say for sure we think about that as a problem. So, you know, we we encourage creativity a shepherd he wanted his own stark stock portfolio. He's got his own start stock portfolio. He also has a little entrepreneur, you know, he and I are starting little business. We do a little mission work down Nicaragua. He's been down there with me. And so we're starting to to buy some things done from from Nicaragua, like handmade guitars and stuff like that. To to to bring back here. And so he wants to sell them. And and you start portfolio more, NASDAQ oriented or is he own gas. Well, you know, I mean, he's kind of anti oil and gas, which I take issue with that coming, but he's he's leverage. And he's he's hedging here. Right. He's hedging he's he's into Amazon and Sony, and he's he's he's he's doing okay. Still actually flat. Even though we've had kind of a market route here lately, he's done pretty well. He's still up. Thank five percent for the year. So he's picked some pretty good stocks. But he told me that it worries in during the day at school. So he'd like to convert everything to cash, and I'm not I did not know those terms when I was ten so so hopefully liquid in this economy. That's a good thing to be right. When you're going to need to make a quick exit. How does this change your life as parents compared to other families, and what do you want folks BCM families, I guess as a resource to famous have this rare condition? How many kids have this one out of one hundred thousand and so there's only a few thousand in the world that had like all rare diseases for treatment there. So we go to to ophthalmologists here. Texas children's is a great place. Oh, we're so lucky to have it. Absolutely. And that's ultimately where we got the diagnosis. It actually the scientists that created the the the whole pathway to do the genetic testing is at Baylor College who is a doctor Lewis, and and he is he's a fantastic physician, and and really smart guy, and but that was done years and years and years ago decades ago, so they're a breakthrough. We're waiting on if they could just figure this. Yeah. You know, this is gene therapy is is is really on the up and coming and you've got a couple of different gene therapies out there that have been approved by the FDA. Fortunately, that's within the treatment disorder. You know, a Chroma and others are are being treated by gene therapies right now. Because I mean, they package the genetic information into a virus. And then they send it in to the retina. And then it's it kind of helps Recode those jeans and then over time it grows the right cells that make. We're doing that. We well. You know, there's been an animal model created, and there's been some tests done in the animal model and some improvement in the in the I there so the science is there for cure. I mean, it's a miracle cure. It is one in which that they could ex we can expect in the next. I don't know. Is it five ten twenty years that the disease will be at least less impactful than it is right now. So. But I think that the goal is that at the same time the goal has got to be to you to quip them. Because if it's not this handicap, it's some other a life lesson. Right. Good for you. John Cabot is the CEO of covenant testing technologies, and he's the chairman of the ambassador committee at BCM families. What's that website, real quick monochrome ac- dot org? Oh that is easy to find. Now. It's it's it's hard. We need to work on our marketing.

Nicaragua baseball Baylor Jameson Leah John Mark John Cabot NASDAQ Texas Baylor College chairman CEO Amazon FDA Lewis Sony five ten twenty years seven percent
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

07:14 min | 2 years ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"But no matter what you do to get ready has everything you need. We haven't been talked about their razors and shave butter, which they are famous for right now, you can get a Dollar Shave Club starter set for just five bucks a piece they've got a shower set toothpaste and toothbrush set or they're famous shave, butter and razor any one of those sets five bucks. The best way to try out their amazing products after your starter set products ship at regular price. Get yours today at dollarshaveclub dot com slash Ben. That's dollarshaveclub dot com slash Ben. So there's a fascinating article in the New York Times, I want to talk about because it speaks to the lack of objectively when it comes to the intersection with politics, the article from New York Times is titled why white supremacists chugging milk. And why geneticists are alarmed, then here's what they say was from Amy Harmon nowhere on the agenda of the annual meeting of the American society of human genetics being held in San Diego. This week is a topic plaguing many of its members they're occurring appropriation of the fields research in the name of Premacy sticking your neck out on political issues is difficult said Jennifer, Wagner, a bio f. Assist. And president of the group's social issues committee who had sought to convene a panel on the racist misuse of genetics and found little traction. But the specter of the fields ignominious past which includes support for the American eugenics movement looms large for many geneticists in light of today's white identity politics. They also worry about how new tools that are allowing them to home in on the genetic basis of hot button traits like intelligence will be misconstrued to fit racist. Ideologies is an argument that I have on a pretty frequent basis with a friend of mine costing over vox, Jane is black. And and I think rightly has great sensitivity and the Emirates should have great sensitivity. But I think Jane would suggest that her background contributes to the sensitivity with regard to the racist past of the United States and the and the racist association between politics and bad science. And so this has led to some serious conversations between the two of us about political correctness about whether in fact, there's an appropriate time to talk about IQ, for example, or standardized testing, for example, or. About the natural differences between men and women like one can you talk about biology without being condemned sexist or racist. These are real issues that we have to discuss and take on head on. Unfortunately, the scientific community has decided to quash a lot of actual science because they're afraid that people who are racist are going to take that science out of context and then use that to club into submission a minority group. And that's basically what this near tens articles about says in recent months. Some scientists have spotted distortions of their own academic papers in right internet. Forums. Others have fielded confused queries about claims of white superiority, wrapped in the jargon of human genetics. Misconceptions about how genes factor into America's stark racial disparities have surfaced in the nation's increasingly heated arguments over school achievement gaps immigration and policing instead of long discounted proxies, like skull circumference and family pedigrees. According to experts who track the far-right today's proponents racial hierarchy are making their case by misinterpreting research on the human genome itself and into base that have been largely limited to ivory tower. Forums, the scientists whose job is to mind human humanity's genetic? Variations for the collective good are grappling with how to respond. Here's the real way to respond to all of this put out the science, and then defend the science. That's the way to respond to all of us. Instead, the scientists afraid that there are scientists going to be misappropriated misinterpreted or used for bad reasons, they've decided that they are going to simply quash all of this discussion internally John November is university of Chicago biologist. He says studying human genetic diversity is easier in society, where diversity is clearly valued and celebrated right now that is very much on my mind. One slide. Dr November has folded into his recent talks to picks a group of white nationalists. Chugging milk at a two thousand seventeen gathering to draw attention to a genetic trait known to be more common in white people than others. The ability to digest lactose. It's adults. Also shows a social media post from an account enter called enter the milk zone with a map lifted from a scientific journal article on the traits evolutionary history in most of the world. The article explains the gene that allows for the digestion of lactose switches off after childhood, but with the arrival of the first cattle herders in Europe some five. Thousand years ago, a chance mutation the left it turned on provided enough of nutritional leg up. The nearly all of those who survived eventually carried it. And then the post shows snippet of hate speech, urging individuals of African ancestry to leave America saying if you can't drink milk you have to go back. Well, I mean, so what their idiots in one of the great ironies of of white supremacists. They're the stupidest people on the planet constantly talking about how white people are superior, and they're just dumb asses. That's one of the things. That's so funny. It's like if you're going to proclaim white superiority, and you really should send your best is in a commentary that accompanied the paper in the journal genetics. Dr November warned that research is wrapped in numerous caveats that are likely to get lost in translation because people are flaunting ancestry tests indicating exclusively European heritage. But the problem here is that we actually have to look at what science does have to say because it is a con founding factor when you look at attributing racism to America, so take for example, racial disparities in education. So there's a lot of talk these days about affirmative action, and whether people are performing at certain levels eligible to get them into college. And the suggestion is that it is historic American racism that has led to that has led to the education gap in America's higher education system in alternative would be the test scores do not wind up equally among various ethnic groups, and that's true. Not just with a guard to black and white. It's not true with regard to white and Asian white people score lower on the SAT's that Asian people do as general matter in the United States. How much of that is genetic how much of that happens to be environmental? We don't actually know the answer to that. That's a hotly fraught question in science. But suggesting that racism is to blame for everything without looking at other confounding factors like, for example, test scores is a mistake and leads us to the wrong outcomes and leads us to the wrong measures to deal with those outcomes. Genetics is not the answer to all of these disparities. But neither is racism. Now, these are questions we have to be very careful with that. Because obviously, you don't want to give material to people who are suggesting that people. Some people are inherently are inherently worse or more evil or more violent or stupider because of the color of their skin genetics doesn't line up that way. But. You also have to look at questions of science because you're a scientist. So it is it is fascinating to watch this debate play out in real time. So there are doctors who have who have organized meetings of social scientists to discuss the social implications of the fields newest tools, David Nelson, Baylor College medicine geneticists, who's president of the human genetic society says it will not stay completely quiet on the issue. They said there's no genetic evidence to support any racist ideology, which is true because racism is a moral view and genetics is a scientific view and scientific racism is the use of science in order to be racist. It is not the use of science in order to pursue good ends. So if you're silencing research because your people are gonna use that research, then I would suggest that you're misusing science. We need to have some very hard conversations about actual science actual problems in actual solutions without falling prey to the idea that because bad people are going to miss us. The information we have to quash the information itself. Okay. Coming up a bevy of actresses now. Say that Disney princesses are very very.

scientist America United States New York Times president John November Amy Harmon Jane San Diego Disney Jennifer David Nelson Europe Baylor College ivory tower Wagner university of Chicago
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Well, she apparently has a new boyfriend and that boyfriend is Andrew Wakefield. Our old friend Andrew Wakefield. Great. Wait for the antitax Andrew field, the Andrew Wakefield. So for listeners who may not remember twenty years ago, Andrew Wakefield was the UK physician who at the time created a stir by linking 'em are to autism, which was totally debunked. He was actually lost his medical license as a result of this, but as on gone on on a crusade saying that, yes, there is a link between vaccines autism where there is none. I thought he had fallen into irrelevance irrelevancy at this point. I mean, it's been twenty years. The pushback from the media has been extreme, and even though there's been pockets of, you know, like a documentary came out about him. I haven't heard much about Andrew Wakefield in recent years, and it made me wonder, what is the state of anti vaccination in this country? And recently. He came out imposs- from Jacqueline olive from the Baylor College medicine who looked at what's called n m es non medical exemption rates in eighteen states that allow it in those eighteen states. Twelve of them have seen those exemption rates rise and this is the kind of exemption on philosophical or religious grounds that you have to file for your child. Not to get this vaccination before they enroll in kindergarten and seeing that it was on the rise was I opening because I thought we had actually crested a hill here and there is to surprising results. One that there's a great deal of growth in anti vaccine. Invacc- exemptions amongst rural counties. There is a county in Idaho where it's almost thirty percent of the population doesn't have vaccinations for a mar, but also that we have pockets of this growing in. In big urban centers. And that's a probably a bigger concern because that's where something like measles can really outbreak and cause a whole cascade effect where thousands of cases can emerge. Yeah, that's that's amazing. Even the thirty percent number, it's shocking because you know what? We, if it's just a, it's like a few percentage points then maybe you could still say that the, you know, the vast majority of kids are vaccinated, so you can rely on some herd immunity, but not if thirty percent of the kids are not vaccinated, and this isn't just a US problem. There is twenty thousand cases of the measles last year in Europe alone, so much so that the Royal College of nursing in the UK has warned people going to music festivals this summer to get booster shots for 'em mar, because those places where lots of people are in a tight location is exactly the kind of place where measles can spread very easily. So there's a lot of work to be done. What. Is hopeful to me about this study is that it pinpoints on the county level where more exemptions are happening. So it gives us at least a place where we can focus efforts or policy to make these changes here in California. There was a repeal just put in place around exemptions for vaccines that makes it base much, much harder to get an exemption for vaccines, and that has proven very effective at increasing the overall vaccination rate in the state. Well, that's good news for California, but what are we going to do about Idaho? Well, I guess I'm just not going there on vacation because I don't want to get the measles. Well, that sounds that sounds wise, but you know, if you're gonna if you're not gonna go to Idaho, maybe you could go to Portland instead. And before you go to Portland, of course, you have to get up on the culture and so maybe a watch the show Portland. I remember that show of course, but a bird on it. Yeah. So do you remember the episode in which the couple of Goto a..

Andrew Wakefield Idaho Andrew field Portland California Royal College of nursing Baylor College medicine Jacqueline olive Europe UK US thirty percent twenty years
"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"baylor college medicine" Discussed on KTRH

"Your your initial conditioning and helps you stretch a little bit to start with and then you start water jogging there while you're while you're at it let's go back to swimming let's go back to stretching for a minute if we can how much how often and how how limber should i be i i want to interview a former olympic gymnast for golf store she played golf and i was writing for the chronicle at the time and and i went to meet her at the golf course you showed up late she i guess i better stretch i and she bent at the waist and put her head between her knees out of the car for forty minutes and did that i i have a hard time i'll just say i can't go that far it where do we need to be fifty sixty so stretching stretching lightly to start with he certainly don't want to overdo it if you haven't been stretching for a long time so he wanted to make sure that you start gradually so so you don't overdo it and then gradually work your way up so start off with light stretching of the calf muscles the hamstring and hip lectures and then work your way up and in terms of how long you're holding up stretch how many repetitions and it's always good to warm up and then have a cool down after exercise so you don't necessarily have to be able to contorts your body or be like the gymnasts olympics but it is important to to stay to stay nice and flexible once you are getting ready for competition let's go back and talk about not overdoing it early because if we do injure ourselves which a lot of old people are inclined to do they think they can do things that they can't it's gonna take longer to heal why don't we take so long to heal when we're old so when i got older the lex ability starts decreasing muscle master it's decreasing and because of that the muscle tendon unit becomes a little bit more stiff richard and so it's more easily injured and with loss of muscle map there's less of the there's less of socalled here at warriors to hold the area nice and strong so then it makes you more prone to injury and therefore it also takes longer to to recover and heal about an on that note restorative sleep is actually very important to an adult start sleeping less as the age and also the cells had go through a natural gradual ageing processes well and that's the natural progression that is inevitable but certainly can be halted or reversed with exercising reconditioning so that you don't have that muscle mass loss or that loss of flexibility conditioning it's all downhill from here and you're not talking about a ski race are you mercy not downhill at all in fact when you when you look at the the marathoner you have thousands of marathoners even have the houston marathon who were in their over forty fifties forty kids to this audience that okay i gotta run dr went thank you so much i truly do appreciate your help absolutely i'm happy to be here thank you thank you bye bye dr rosalyn win from baylor college medicine when we get back we're gonna talk a little bit about striking up the band more fifty plus coming up right after this.

forty minutes