38 Burst results for "Bates"

Fresh update on "bates" discussed on Lance McAlister

Lance McAlister

00:49 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "bates" discussed on Lance McAlister

"Jay Morrison for fantastic stuff on a daily basis. So then, having said all of that, how important are the final 10 Games to Zack Taylor and his staff's standing for the future? I mean, your huge heart looking for sitting here. And you're tryingto sell 3 12 and one upstairs. After two and 14 you know, even to the most patient ownership group in all of professional sports. Like you Only thing you can sell at this point is wins. Thie. Only thing they have They sold progress. They've sold culture. They sold your future for a year and a half now at some point You got a sellable is and you gotta go out and win some games. And you know, that certainly starts Sunday because, with the five Titans and Steelers, often the horizon the next two weeks You know you're staring 17 and one of the face. You can't find a way to beat the Browns. At a certain point. You gotta win a game. Or else Yeah, it's really hard to see the staff coming back intact or what? It looks like a total final. Thought you alluded to Teo to it in your ear piece after the game at 21. Nothing on Sunday, with all that had gone right in the manor was going right. If they hold that there are so many new narratives and feel good things that come out of a win if they'd held onto it. I mean, you think about just put yourself in that situation if they hold on where you're talking about the emergence of tea Higgins the return of a J. Green, the star in the making of Jesse Bates, the first road win the statement culture turning the corner. All of that stuff is what you would have been reading. And hearing about all week about the team that was saying it was coming and going to turn the corner, finally turning the corner. But what happened was the latest heartbreak and showing that they don't know how to do it yet, and that's Sort of the point of the piece was because it goes back to what I just said. Is that they? You know it's coming and that progress and moments like that have been on the horizon before they've been in there grass before, and they could continue to prove that they can't Finish the job. And until that happens, that's just going to be this pipe dream. And at a certain point you aren't deep enough into a 17 and one type situation here this year. It's hard to believe you're going to keep the players on board. Start turning that corner. He's Paul dinner, Junior from the athletic ease on Twitter at Paul Dinner, Junior. You know, I love your work. I always enjoy the conversation. Thank you for making time. Anytime. Thanks,.

Browns Jesse Bates Zack Taylor Jay Morrison TEO Steelers Titans Twitter
Fresh update on "bates" discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

02:06 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "bates" discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"There are number black men who listened on a daily basis and reach out on a regular basis to me about their voting for Donald, trump their families rooting for Donald Trump. And the reason is all about their take home pay and their jobs and the economy in. That's stuff matters. They don't particularly like Joe Biden and they don't trust the democratic policies on the economy again I I'm sound like a broken record I realized that I got a text refer to mind you're repeating yourself. Yes. I am because it's worth repeating. It's worth emphasizing and this is the last time I'll do this right now is to tell you yin you Republicans it's happening. It's a real phenomenon. But it's still a minority. It's just happening with an increase pace. Hello there it is here sit here. All right here. Here is your crazy crazy story of the day that I think we need to discuss. y'All know who Phil Collins is. The you know who feel collins is well. Here's crazy story for you. Here's the headline. Phil Collins ex wife has allegedly taken over his mansion with armed guards. Former genesis. Frontman Phil. Collins met Aurion seavy. In. Nineteen ninety four when he was on tour in Switzerland, she was twenty one, he was forty four. They got engaged in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seven. They got married in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine they had two kids and they got a divorce in two six where she received a record setting forty six point seven, million dollar settlement. Ten. Years later. The couple announced they were back together living with the kids in all was well, then in August. CV broke up with Collins again via text message. Informing him that she had gone to Las, Vegas and married a businessman fifteen years her junior. No Charlie no don't go there. Inside joke, and now according to a lawsuit filed by Collins. Cvs Her new husband are allegedly living in his thirty three million dollar mansion in Miami on the beach, and they've hired four armed guards to protect them according to the Miami Herald. The new couple are quote threatening implicitly and explicitly to prolong their unlawful occupation of the property through force and injunction is urgently needed to end an armed occupation and takeover of the Phil Collins home by his ex girlfriend and her new husband the defendants in the action. In the Complaint Collins also is concerned about his memorabilia including multiple awards, instruments. He believes that there is a substantial risk that Mr or Mrs Bates Oh Bates. Now, the the husband's first name James Norman. So don't worry about that or their agents will remove, conceal or destroy valuable and replaceable Personal Property Geoffrey Fisher Collins Attorney gave a statement says Miami Herald Mrs Bates. She's now known as trying to shake down Phil Collins for money and as his attorney and former federal prosecutor zero tolerance for this type of behavior I'm gonNA use every legal remedy to get her out of the house. Sees lawyer Freight Maistre did not respond to an email. Friday. But told the Miami. Herald earlier this week that they had no comment about the case. Whoever who wrote, the story ends it with I can feel something coming in the air of the night. That's for sure..

Phil Collins Miami Herald Geoffrey Fisher Collins Donald Trump Miami Mrs Bates Oh Bates Joe Biden Aurion Seavy Mrs Bates Freight Maistre Switzerland Charlie James Norman Attorney Vegas
Fresh "Bates" from One Bills Live

One Bills Live

01:28 min | 7 hrs ago

Fresh "Bates" from One Bills Live

"Retired 17 of the final 18 batters he faced. Leading the Dodgers two and a three game one victory over the Rays. That is your sports update. Chris Brown, Steve tasked with you Our number two of the Wednesday edition of one Bills live and the News of the Day is Quintin. Spain is no longer a Buffalo bill released by the club last hour. It was confirmed by the team and Quinn, Spain had lost his starting job on the offensive line. I think was largely considered a steady player for this team last year at the very least, and now not even on this roster, which which may have been due to The fact that they saw Brian Winters as a viable asset to and to this roster after he was released by the Jets, and then we saw the roster change. In the starting lineup, with Cody foregoing a left guard Steve and Brian Winters moving into the starting lineup at right guard and Spain off the field and also in the background. Jon Feliciano. Getting healthier. And so you've got those three guys standing there being able to ready to play guard and Quinn, Spain. Aah! Is the last guy there? So they're not gonna not gonna keep four guards on their roster. And they've also got you know, with Ryan Bates Ryan bait like bugger height, but her anger flares and insect key as the swing tackle, so You know we got you know they got They activate nine guys on game Day, and Quinn, Spain got squeezed out of that. I think it's that simple. Yeah, I just think it's surprising for fans because They? You know, we just re signed this past offseason after having a pretty good year in 2019 for this club, and he didn't give up a sack last year. No and started all 16 games. That's and that's for some fans. They're going. What are you doing that you know, but This is a coaching staff. This is what have you done for widely operation here. You earn it every day and Certainly there are guys who have earned enough to get you know, maybe maybe you do earn a little slacker. You learn whatever slack you get. But ah Clearly that was a precipitous fall from grace. I mean, The guy. The guy won the Iron man competition that this team has in the off season, which basically involves being the most ardent participant in The offseason conditioning program. He won that outright. Think about this, and it's always said, and I'm sure Quinn in Spain, it had a great time here in Buffalo, and they and they appreciated him and it's not like they dislike him as a person. But there Ah They're moving on moving on. And here's this is what I see. Remember when they said they told Jordan Phillips and go out and check if you want. Give us a chance to match the offers or whatever he goes and gets an $11 million a year deal from this Arizona said that we can't do it. They said Great. He said, Fine. Thank you. Appreciate it. Good bye. Quentin, Spain did that and the Bills said, this is our offer. It's not going to be on. You know that kind off for five years, and he said I'm taking it because he liked it here. Hey, said I wanted that That's two guys who made the decision. That we're in almost identical situation's made very different made different decisions. I think Quentin, Spain felt like and probably could have gotten more money. Had he gone other places than the Buffalo Bills. Maybe. I don't know. Certainly a nautical, I read hinted at that. But Quentin Spain said no eye goes. This is my spot. I want to be here and Lo and behold, he comes back and can't hang on to that spot. So he, um The bills had him in a number, he said. I'll take that number and they're here. But it didn't last long. Back to the phones at 80305 50. We lead off this segment with Tom in Spencer. Poor Tom. What do you have for us? Welcome the one bills live. Hey, broadsides of going today. Good stuff. Good, thank you Just want to make a observation or a point about our defense. Um, I mean, it's been a long time since I've played ball, but One thing that hasn't changed in defense is instilling your will against the team you're playing against. You know, I punched him in the nose, making the bleed and making them respect you when I watched the bills. I see too much backpedaling at the very snap of the ball. So they're not staying in their place and, you know, reading and reacting there already backpedaling already given up turf. And you could have the best 11 defenders in the league playing for you. And if you're just backing up right away, you're already given space. You know, I watch I watched the safety, which is what I played as a young guy. Then they're 15 yards off the ball, and the second that ball is snapped their backpedaling already, so the robbers were last week. They were. They were in this last game, for sure. Yeah, and they have been and they were the game before too. And you know if you're gonna backpedal your already given up 345 yards or in the safe, the free safety you know you're giving up 15 20 yards. And that's why all these quarterbacks or finding a room in the middle wide open spaces, you know, you really least need to hold your ground for when the ball is snapped. Read and react and then go. All right. I'm gonna hang up, love. Listen, you guys, uh, love to hear your opinion on this? Yeah, sure, Steve. That was that was largely what the game plan was this past week. Keep it all in front of them. Don't get people running behind you for 40 yard touchdowns, right? Yeah,.

Spain Quentin Spain Quinn Buffalo Bills Bills Steve Brian Winters Dodgers Jon Feliciano Rays Chris Brown Cody Jets Buffalo Ryan Bates LO TOM Jordan Phillips Arizona Spencer
Judge Partially Blocks Trump Administration From Enforcing Visa Ban

NPR News Now

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Judge Partially Blocks Trump Administration From Enforcing Visa Ban

"A federal judge has ordered the trump administration's law enforcement commission to halt its work as NPR's Ryan Lucas reports. The judge has also barred the group from releasing its final report. The ruling from US District Court Judge John Debates comes less than a month ahead of the law enforcement commission's deadline to wrap up its work although it reportedly has already submitted draft to the Attorney General the end of Lacey Pe- filed suit in April it. Argued that the panel violates a law that requires among other things that a federal commission include a diversity of viewpoints in his ruling Judge Bates found that the law enforcement commission is made up entirely of current and former law enforcement officials. It also has violated the law by conducting much of its work behind closed doors. The judge ordered the Commission to halt its work until it meets the requirements under the

Law Enforcement Commission Judge John Debates Judge Bates Ryan Lucas Us District Court Lacey Pe NPR Attorney
Judge halts Trump, Barr law enforcement report

NPR News Now

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

Judge halts Trump, Barr law enforcement report

"Federal judges ruled the trump administration's law enforcement commission violates the law NPR's Ryan Lucas says the judge has ordered the group to stop it's working bartered from releasing a final report the ruling from US District Court judge. John debates comes less than a month ahead of the law enforcement commission's deadline to wrap up its work although it reportedly has already submitted a draft to the attorney general. The end of the Lacey Pe- filed suit in April. It argued that the panel violates a law that requires among other things that a federal commission include a diversity of viewpoints in. His ruling Judge Bates found that the law enforcement commission is made up entirely of current and former law enforcement officials. It also has violated the law by conducting much of its work behind closed doors. The judge ordered the Commission to halt its work until it meets requirements under the law.

Law Enforcement Commission Judge Bates Ryan Lucas Us District Court Lacey Pe NPR Attorney John
Experts: This is THE MOST unequal recession in American history

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

03:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Experts: This is THE MOST unequal recession in American history

"Look at the economic collapse resulting from the Corona virus Pandemic shows what has become the most unequal recession in American history Economics reporter had the long takes a closer look for the Washington Post and talked with comas. Bill O'Neill. The recession's typically hits some harder than others. We know that but the difference is in this one are pretty stark. It was God smacking when we ran the numbers. Ah, low wage workers. So we're talking about people earning $13 or last were lost their jobs that eight times the amount of higher wage workers. And here we are. Seven months into this recovery and low wage workers are basically still in a depression like state with huge job losses. Meanwhile, spokes in the top 25% of the income distribution. So a lot of white collar workers they basically fully recovered. Now, why are certain groups recovering more slowly than others here? It's really the nature of the Corona virus, and we can all see it is be drive around our town. This is just so decimated the service sector generally a low pain jobs that Aaron Hotels Hospitality and restaurants, and many of us can name those types of industries. Not to mention a lot of people who are paid in cash, Maybe clean homes or take care of our baby said or nanny. Those types of jobs and those jobs are overwhelmingly held by black women, for instance. Blackmon and people without college degrees. Now the federal government, of course, was quick to step in and help out when the pandemic began lately. Not so much has there been any kind of talk of assistance for these groups in particular. Well, everyone is watching the White House and Congress with bated breath and the latest tweet. The latest information coming out is they still don't have a deal on some sort of further stimulus bill And that worries me a lot in this story. We we did a huge amount of data analysis. To show that this is the most unequal recession in modern history, more so than the great recession we all suffered through, but we also talked to a lot of unemployed workers. And I just think about talking Teo, a single mom that Tasha Smith, who used to work in a casino in Louisiana, that casino Eyes, not just shut down. They've decided they will never reopen. Her job is totally gone, and I asked her. You know what's in your refrigerator, and she opens her refrigerator. And she said, I've got a pack of wings and a pack of size And that's you know, obviously, the impacts of a recession on any particular group can drag the economy down as a whole. Even if your group has recovered. How much of this? Does this impact our overall recovery? When we look at it that way? Obviously we're a consumer driven economy, So not only are these people live Being decimated. We have people falling from the middle class into poverty, like Natasha Smith were just speaking about. But this hurts the recovery in the sense and the overall economy because obviously these people do not. Have money to go out and spend. They don't even have enough money to go out and buy food or pay rent. A lot of people we talked to our unemployed are no longer pain ran. Several of them are no longer paying their car payment. One of them was behind on their electric bills. And no wonder those landlords going to do what are those car companies going to do? It starts to impact the whole economic change. That's Heather Long read more online at washingtonpost dot com.

Tasha Smith Bill O'neill Washington Post Aaron Hotels Hospitality American History Economics Reporter Federal Government Depression Heather Long White House Blackmon Natasha Smith TEO Congress Louisiana
"bates" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

The Path Distilled Podcast

03:21 min | Last month

"bates" Discussed on The Path Distilled Podcast

"Mention Jer ad you just turned forty eight when you when you search your name a, it says Brian Bates. Comedian Age is one of the auto fills. Do you know why people are so curious about your age? Now, I didn't even know that. I'm curious. Is that maybe that's like that for a lot of people I don't know. Is it not I don't know I. Should probably, in performance. I can't imagine anybody's really curious how old I am but. I don't know Google people before where things will pop up like a I. Don't know why for whoever? Agai. Many people really. Question. The Standard. I'm not as wife alive down, it'll come on. And so you were mentioning the advice for young younger or at least starting comedians yeah. A lot of the focus is whether or not people. nature versus nurture debate whether people are tend to be born more. I guess born with greater abilities to do things right than they don't necessarily have to cultivate that. That's. On one end the other side of that is there really born with no natural ability and they have to cultivate all of it and everything in between who what is your stance on that continuum. Okay? That's a great question. I really thought about that but I would say it's a little both. I would say nature in the sense that I unnoticed more comedians are left handed. I'm left handed. That generally means that means the right side of your brain is creative side. So I feel like there is something to that as far as the white you're born. I would say majority though is nurture because. So much of the you could just tell by their material life experiences is what's led them down this path. And I'M GONNA generalize here. But there's not a lot of good looking people that are doing stand up comedy. Their life is different than the rest of us that maybe hasn't stopped. We use our sense of humor as a defense mechanism or. Is Our way to deal with the world and take it a step further? You know there's not there's no as as many women stand up comedians. COMEDIANS. And it's not because I think they're born less funny. Just I, think society mold you to work on certain things in women are told or taught to should do this. You should do that with man it sit to humor or something that's embrace more I feel like king and. Use It to to try to watch the woman are so to speak and so. I just feel like a culture and society has more to do with. US like women as far as how many on pursue stand up comedy and things like and. I would say the majority is That'd be nurture right nurtures your what happens to your life. There's not a lot of comedians again to get there who have great lives I mean don't get integrated lives but..

US Brian Bates Google
Activists demanding justice for Breonna Taylor protested on Kentucky Derby Day

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:01 min | Last month

Activists demanding justice for Breonna Taylor protested on Kentucky Derby Day

"The first Saturday in May. But this is Kentucky Derby Day after the postponing of the race is just one reason the 146 Derby is one for the history books As W. F B L Stephanie Wolf explains. Security often referred to as the two most exciting minutes in sports. The Kentucky Derby is also a marquee social event days. A fanfare Parties parade, a massive firework show. Ah, a lot of that is gone this year due to the global pandemic and even more notable None of 155,000 plus fans in the grandstands a revision Churchill Downs, the home of the Derby made recently. That's not all That's different this year. Louisville just marked 100 consecutive days of protest against racism and police violence and demonstrators plan to make Derby 101 days. Several groups held a press conference near Churchill Downs Friday. This's Ehren Jordan of No justice, No peace Louisville. We have several black organisations behind us, and we have full intent to black out their happened demands to cancel dirty something that's never been done before. Haven Harrington is CEO and host of main event sports radio. He's covered the Derby for years. He thinks it should be run. It's the city's signature event. But while the horse racing industry doesn't often weigh in on social justice issues, Harrington says, Now is not the time for silence in this town, you know, which is still waiting on bated breath for what's gonna happen with You know Briana Taylor and the officers involved can't just be big hats in pretty dresses. You have to say and do something to acknowledge the situation. Churchill Downs did issue a statement Thursday afternoon, acknowledging how black jockeys once dominated the race, but were then excluded and acknowledging the pain community members feel right now as they wait for the state attorney general and FBI to conclude their investigation into the police, killing a Briana Taylor. It's important to carry on, says Churchill Down CEO Bill Car Stange in here he is talking on CNBC support for hewing important are our traditions and culture in our community. Tell me how this will unify the community. The running of course, poet activist Hannah Drake lives near Churchill Downs. She's had a simmering frustration with the Derby for years. Even more. So, she says, as she faces arrest for obstructing the highway by protesting in the streets. But I for Darby, too inconvenient me and block off street, not let me pass that fine. Drake, who is black, recently wrote a letter to the CEO asking for some self reflection of the institutions, lack of black representation and a lack of in her opinion, compassion. This is the institution that can redeem itself and they need to start by asking himself. How can we be better neighbors? So this Adjacent community and to the very one way she thinks they could do better is by dumping a tradition, she says, is rooted in racism.

Kentucky Derby Churchill Downs Haven Harrington Hannah Drake CEO Briana Taylor Louisville Kentucky Bill Car Stange Stephanie Wolf Ehren Jordan Darby FBI Cnbc Attorney
A Conversation With Rob Feakins

The Candid Frame

05:09 min | Last month

A Conversation With Rob Feakins

"First off. Welcome to the show from joining my pleasure. I. WanNa start off with your career before you photographer and filmmaker when you were into marketing and Tell me tell me about what led you into that career. Yeah. So when I was in college there were there were no ED schools or schools for for creative people there probably art center back then but I was on the East Coast and I was in English Major. When I got out of college I thought, I would probably be I wanna be documentary photographers slash journalist because I was interested in photography from high school on. As a member of the Camera Club in college, and there was a dark room back when we were dealing with film and whatnot. and. I was doing a few journalistic pieces for the Dartmouth magazine of different people and I really liked that combination photography and journalism. So I got out of college at what to do. I went down back to New Jersey Right GROWNUP and I slept on my brother's apartment, which was above a garage and I slept on a sleeping bag for close to a year on his floor and I got a job as a as a journalist for more the Morris County daily record, which is a big kind of suburban newspaper in New Jersey and I started to you know because. I was low on the totem pole was going to PTA meeting meetings on a hot July tonight being the only person in the audience. But I got a nice little piece where I used to write about the manufacturing jobs and business jobs, and I kind of tried to turn into like a human feature piece. So I would write about the world's largest ecclesiastical garment designer. Was Morris. County. So I did in article on that and then there was an article on I did on the guys who did the macy's fireworks parade were in Morris County and so back then that. Their entire sales were once a year for the July and that was kind of an interesting business article but it was tough going. You know I was again I was sleeping on my brothers floride a sixty four Volkswagen bug that was breaking down and someone said to me you know you could be a copywriter in advertising. Nice. What's that and so? They told me what it was a copywriter in advertising talk about old school this how I put my portfolio together, there was a huge stack of national geographics in the basement of his or in this garage Saab go down there I would go to the national geographics in I would clip out photographs that I thought were appropriate in right headlines to them. And taped the photographs to the bond paper in Rhode headlining copy beneath the road some campaigns and put a book together and guide offer at Ted Bates as a junior copywriter which doesn't exist anymore to base fun to backer joined back Spielvogel than they went out of business years ago. But they were a big agency back then and I thought Big was good. The United Thought you know whether baked or solid they'll. They'll be good agency and then I was there for about a year or two when I stumbled across a one show book and I saw what worked could be in advertising and I was kind of blown away. I was Kinda like, wow this tremendous work. This is really what good work is. What what did you see in that work that you weren't seeing where you were I thought the thing that struck me even back then was that the best work for me wasn't necessarily the most clever or most clever headline but it was work that made me think differently about a brand or made me think differently about what they're trying to communicate that I actually Kinda learned something from the ad or the commercial and I was totally struck by because I was in a huge package goods agency and there was no attempt on many of those accounts to make you think differently about the product versus tell you how efficacious case it was. From then on I try to do very different kind of work I got into the did get into the one show about a year or two later than I, think some the first time agency have been the one show since they could ever remember in I slowly clawed my way out of that agency to other agencies and then found my way too shy in Los Angeles around Nineteen in the mid eighties, and that was amazing to me because that was the first time I felt like I had been with a company or a group of people that were just. Everybody was everybody was just impressive. I mean the receptionist was impressive and later on became the head of our buying they just hired people regardless of position who were thought differently or incredibly intelligent. and. I loved working there I worked there for. Close to ten years of not more, and I really enjoyed there in that was. Probably, you know I think a lot of guys who go to shy day or worked at shy can look back at those years is maybe their their heyday right in any event. That's how we got into advertising

Morris County New Jersey Morris Dartmouth Magazine Macy Volkswagen East Coast PTA Camera Club Ted Bates Rhode English Major Los Angeles Spielvogel
Navalny’s team sees Kremlin behind attack

Inside Europe

05:08 min | Last month

Navalny’s team sees Kremlin behind attack

"Activists in. Russia. Say They will not be silenced despise the apparent poisoning, their most prominence leader Alexey navalny he collapsed after drinking a cup of tea an airport cafe while campaigning in Siberia. If he was poisoned, it's the latest in a series of attacks on Kremlin critics. Journalists both inside and outside the country and European leaders are threatening a robust response. Our Moscow correspondent Lucy Taylor reports at the budget logger staying. Agents ability. To Christ his four million Youtube followers Alexei navalny has the loudest voice speaking out against the Kremlin Russia. Deborah wound. He exposes corruption and embezzlement and rallies crowds of young protesters in Russia's cities another newsletter rob discussed they didn't really. In this video a few weeks ago he tells them to believe in themselves and the power to change the country. But for now, at least that voice is silent. Nevada. Collapsed screaming on a plane and Siberia. His team immediately blamed a cup of tea. He drank in an airport cafe. The only thing he had to eat drink that day you. Russian doctors in the city of oems said, there was no trace of toxins move in. I can say for sure oxo Bates and barbiturates of not being found the research is going on, but those agents not in Nevada his body. This was the chief doctor, the hospital Alexander Murkowski. Already, working diagnoses. The main one we leaned towards most his carbohydrate balanced disorder meaning metabolic disorder. It might have been caused by a rapid drop of blood sugar in a plane which caused him to pass out. Novon. These family insisted he was airlifted to Germany to doctors. They trusted to be independent, and by contrast the team Berlin Scherzer's hospital say that's s syndicate that he was poisoned. They say they found evidence if Colin stays inhibitors which affect the nervous system and could cause long-term deal. The German government has kept Navalny unto tight. Watch. This is the Foreign Minister Heiko Mas. Differ. Suspicion is not that Mr Navalny poisoned himself, but there's someone poisoned misdemeanor felony and there are unfortunately one or two examples of such poisonings in recent. Russian. History it was clear that after his arrival security measures had to be put into place, we are dealing with the patient to likely the targets of a poison attack. So the pressure is building on Russia to investigate what happened. The Kremlin says, it's offended by claims of a cover up and says, there's no need for an investigation until it's conclusively proven poison was involved but analysts abroad say the case follows a pattern of attacks on critics including the Salisbury poisoning of the former spy, Sergei scruple in twenty. I share ran gap from the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs Gail University. The fact that this may be poisoning. This is a part of a pattern that the Russian government has engaged and you all know this just from the nerve Asian. That was used in this cripple poisoning, other Russian spies, both in Britain and elsewhere been poisoned. It's a really that's not something that one that is a common way of attacking someone so I think there's sort of a signature here that suggests that this is a Russian government, probably a GRU intelligence operation. The Russian government denies any involvement in Alexei navalny illness saying the accusations can't be taken seriously and it denies that there is any trend of attacks on anti-government figures. Russia's State Duma is looking into whether they're foreign links to the attack on. Novelli. But his friends say is the third time that he's been poisoned in Russia. This is his friends surgery of it is very important to remember. It's not the first attack on Nevada using chemical agents. He was attacked in two thousand seventeen. The video cameras actually identify the man who executed the attack. This man was not investigated interrogated or prosecuted. The second time was attacked last summer. When he was detained in. Moscow. Prison and was actually administered within the prison within the prison cell. So it was also very easy to investigate. It was not investigated as well. which kind of tells you how the Kremlin treats people who Tacna Botany Moose Women Somewhere Bolshoi. Kremlin says it doesn't want Nevada illness to damage ties with Western countries. Assist supporters prepare to fight regional elections without navalny. The case could have wider geopolitical consequences. The United States said it would endorse the European Union led investigation and German Chancellor Angela Merkel said those responsible should be held to account. See. Taylor d-w Moscow.

Alexei Navalny Russia Nevada Kremlin Moscow Russian Government ROB Siberia Lucy Taylor Alexey Navalny Novelli Berlin Scherzer Deborah Alexander Murkowski Youtube German Government Oxo Bates Germany Angela Merkel
The Summer Deck

Fix It 101

05:27 min | 2 months ago

The Summer Deck

"How're you doing this morning? Good Morning. Pan Jeff. How are Y'all? Man. I'm doing wonderful good for you. Good for you. Listen I. Took my dogs for a walk this morning and I didn't sweat and it's August in Mississippi. This is awesome. Really. Honestly I didn't even know Java. You're saying, yes. That's that was a big thing. This morning for you to yet today's morning time temperature was not in the nineties so. Welcome to Mississippi. So So Jeff Forty working on today. Well. We have picked up some new, some new projects which are Nice we've got A. Pretty unique situation going on in North Jackson to where we're taking any existing. Deck that is in very poor condition, and we're coming off the house with a brand new screen. I call him a Florida room or something, but it's not. It's not cold is just screen and. wicker furniture. Move. Exposed rafters and stuff. It's a, it's a neat little. Project, you know. It's. It's fun. To do something different from time to time instead of the same old? You know. Everything all the time. I can always tell when you get a different. because. It has definitely what's on your mind. I remember I remember I. Forget how long ago it was but. I, think all of us followed with bated breath. What you're going to say next about the pool project when you're building the poolhouse. So. Anyway. So, Pam, what are you got mixed up in this week? Well I was called demented because I got so excited. About this horrible situation. Jeff. Here you go. What do you get? When you combine an old house and oversized air conditioning system and duct work that was not sealed over you get microbial growth. All boy. was. Awesome Opened up the closets and the ceilings were all green and fuzzy. Paul. You know, and so the client I worked at them a couple of years ago to buy a house and they hired a company. Come in and put in air conditioning system and I asked her I said it will send me the receipt. Alma see what they said. They were GONNA. Do Right. They were GONNA put in a system put rigid. What is rigid me? Bridging. Bendit. Can't it? Right. Now. There's a difference between rigid and flex right. You've got with that adjective and it kind of gives you an idea of what you should have an expectation for. So. Rigid insulated donkey. All sealed. That was on the receipt. So they never sealed the ducting. Well, like quit in a unit that was a ton too big. And then I go over there and I had on my own respirator. Cousin like a sailor when I got up in that attic, I was so mad. What you say. You're GonNa, do you say you'RE GONNA? Sale. It. Turned over and I put my hand and I, just I squeeze that insulation on that duct work and it just poorer longer. Horde will act could have filled three water bottles up in one location while. It was so frustrating. You know it just, but you know what I have to go back and say is that you know what that does. It keeps me in business drew. True 'CAUSE I get the phone call. There and then try to help these folks and I really had to It's GonNa be an interesting project because we're going to have to go back on the contractor, the company and tell. Liam. And then there was a bunch of flex out there. They put in a metal supply with all this stuff and none of the flex was sailed either and it wasn't strapped off and it was all. Tell you what you know what this reminds me of a good point to make on this show every time you try to negotiate. Your price down with your contractor if you're beaten up on them. was remember that they're going into places where you don't see a lot. And if they've got to cut corners because you beat them up on the price so hard. I mean I'm not saying that's the contractors. I mean the the homeowners fault at all. The the contractor they said, they did it. They should have done it. But but. That's just that's

Jeff Forty Mississippi North Jackson Florida PAM Paul Liam
Trump Wants to Ban TikTok, NASA-SpaceX Mission Success, & Unemployment Benefits Expire - Monday, August 3rd

Rob Talk Podcast

09:57 min | 2 months ago

Trump Wants to Ban TikTok, NASA-SpaceX Mission Success, & Unemployment Benefits Expire - Monday, August 3rd

"It's Monday August third president trump wants to ban TIKTOK. Info on the NASA spacex mission success plus unemployment benefits have expired why trump's team is interested in Biden's VP pick and more. Welcome to Rob Song, podcast where I bring you the latest Progressive News and politics and ten minutes or less I'm Robert Cunningham thank you for tuning in. Let's get informed. So president trump announced on Friday night that he wants to ban Tiktok Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said that trump would be making an announcement on these matters in the coming days he said this on Fox News Sunday morning futures where he also said that Tiktok, the Chinese owned short form video APP needs to be taken down via executive action in addition to Tiktok. Mike. POMPEO. Pointed to we chat, which is a Chinese messaging APP saying that both of these are feeding data directly to the. Chinese Communist Party quote for a long time a long time. The United States just said well goodness if we're having fun with it or if a company can make money off of it, we're going to permit that to happen president trump said enough going on the secretary of state added and we are going to fix it and so he will take action in the coming days with respect to a broad array of national security risks that are presented by software that connected to the Chinese Communist Party. Microsoft has emerged as wanting to potentially by all US operations of tiktok accents reports that trump does have a deal on his desk where Microsoft would lead acquisition of the US operations of six talk and Microsoft seems to believe that it's possible that a total separation can happen from tiktok parent company by Dance. It's important for you to understand that presidents normally can't just order a ban on individual companies like this but the fact that Tiktok has a foreign owner allows the Treasury Department to have broad. Authority over it. Now, at this point, it's unclear whether trump is going to allow Microsoft to buy it or if trump is just going to push for an all out ban, we don't know. But what we do know is that this is super weird coming just months before an election six does have one hundred, million US users, and so it is rather strange move it could alienate some I mean granted I don't know if it would make much of a difference, but it just seemed strange. NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Bankin are safely on earth after a historic flight to and from the International Space Station provided by SPACEX Axios says on Saturday afternoon both astronaut splashdown into the Gulf of Mexico after about two forty, eight PM eastern time a space x vessel was able to recover both astronauts from their crew, dragon? Capsule. Hurley in bank in two month mission was the first time that people have been launched into orbit from the United States. The end of the space shuttle. Program in twenty eleven. This new move of partnering for Space Exploration, with private companies can allow NASA to act more of like a buyer instead of a provider of these services now and will free up NASA's budget to focus on things like getting people to the moon and eventually other planets in the future. In fact, NASA and SPACEX already have another trip planned this time for six months with multiple. NASA. Going up to the International Space Station, this will take place around late. September. So be on the lookout. Additional unemployment benefits of six hundred dollars per week expired on Friday July thirty first and reportedly the White House Senate. Republicans and Democrats are all know we're closer to a deal? Apparently, all sides are on board though for another twelve, hundred dollar check like was done with the cares act earlier this year the main point of disagreement is the additional unemployment benefits six hundred dollars extra. A month is what people have been receiving since the cares act was passed Democrats want to continue at that rate while Republicans want to. Bring that down to two hundred additional dollars per week while eventually moving holy to seventy percent of lost wages Republicans additionally wanted to get a one week extension on the six hundred dollars per week of additional benefits passed quickly. But the Democrats are refusing because they think that the Republicans are just GonNa. Use It as just a quick win and move on. But the Democrats are saying that they want a full robust bill. Now, the Democrats have proposed a three trillion dollar deal while the Republicans are looking to pass. A one trillion dollar deal, and as of yesterday junk Schumer the Senate Minority leader said that there were significant divisions remaining but good progress is being made quote. We made good progress. There are lots of things we are still divided on and we're not close to an agreement yet, but we are making good progress and I'm hopeful that we can get to an agreement. Now they're going to resume talks today. Okay. But do not be fooled. The Republicans are trying to place the onus here on Democrats but Democrats came. Up with a bill back in May the bill back in May like I said had a three trillion dollar price tag. It was approved by the House but then has not been voted on in the Senate and Senate Republicans want to have a one trillion dollar bill that does not do nearly enough in my opinion. So but as of right now you know who's GonNa Suffer America, the American people that are unemployed we just had on Thursday. One of the worse GDP records for quarter ever if not the worst. The percentage of GDP lost was close to thirty three percent. I hope we get a deal soon things are super hard to pass in Washington obviously, and I'm glad that the Democrats are sticking their feet in and trying to get this thing passed the Democrats are not perfect and I fear that they're going to cave too much here. But we've got to get something done because there is an eviction crisis looming we need to renew the moratorium on fictions. Now CNBC just posted a study recently that twenty two to fifty nine percent depending on the state that you live in of renters may be facing eviction as a result of the corona virus economic circumstances these numbers are horrifying and I'm sure this isn't the last time you'll be hearing about it. Trump's campaign paused ads over the weekend, which is really weird because they wanted to rebrand their messaging and new ads launching today are going to be depicting Joe Biden as a puppet of the radical left. This comes from two senior campaign officials but the most recent internal polls show that the puppet of the left's attack on Biden is going to resonate with voters and speaking personally in someone who lives in a very heavy trump territory. The this is the talking point that I've heard Oh Biden's not the problem it's. Going to be the VP you have to look out for as if Kamla Harrison. Some sort of crazy radical assuming he chooses someone like her speaking of the VP spot trump's campaign is very interested in that because the quote unquote radical left thing that they're going to be using their ads is a placeholder for whoever Joe Biden ends up picking. By the way, we will learn who Joe Biden is going to pick around on tenth multiple sources have suggested he said now he pushed back his self imposed deadline from. The first week of August to the second week and one source has said that it's going to be August tenth now. So be on the lookout here. No matter who Joe Biden picks. I think that Joe Biden is well-positioned. Of course, we all have to go out and vote that. This is not a matter of that we have to vote even if we live in California or Massachusetts or Oklahoma Even for God's sake, we have to vote for Joe Biden, but it doesn't really matter as much who he picks. Think this go around because trump's campaign is reportedly very upset that Biden doesn't have the unfavorability rating that Hillary Clinton did in two, thousand, sixteen, all of this trump at drama gotta be Biden's campaign to respond Andrew Bates. Director of rapid response said quote the American people know Joe Biden and after seven consecutive months of failed leadership during the worst possible health crisis in generations they know that our nation's capacity to join the rest of the world beating back cove nineteen has been crippled by one overriding burden donald trump. Representative James Clyburn of South Carolina said on Sunday that he believes trump is trying to put a cloud over the election and that he does not plan to leave office. If he loses Clyburn told CNN that the American people had better wake up to trump and he compared trump to Mussalini and said Russian President Vladimir Putin is akin to Hitler further representative Clyburn said quote I don't think he plans to leave the White House. He doesn't plan to have fair unfettered elections I believe that he plans to install. Himself in some kind of emergency way to continue to hold office. Now, all of this is to say everything that Clyburn is saying here means that we have to so overwhelmed the vote that trump cannot cheat. We have to force him out of office because on January twentieth at noon no matter how hard trump tries he will not be the president if we overwhelmed the vote and like Joe. Biden. So that's what we have to do. If you need help getting registered in your state, go to vote Dot

Donald Trump Joe Biden Democrats Nasa President Trump United States Tiktok VP Mike Pompeo International Space Station James Clyburn Chinese Communist Party Microsoft Pompeo Fox News Rob Song White House Senate
Desk Shields Are Part Of Salem, NH Schools’ Reopening Plan, Boston

WBZ Afternoon News

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

Desk Shields Are Part Of Salem, NH Schools’ Reopening Plan, Boston

"Says it's got a plan when it comes to schools and Salem. Deaths of Children and teachers are being surrounded by a clear shield. The kind you see in a supermarket checkout now, says Assistant Superintendent for Business operations Debbie Pain. She says. The same deal is happening in the lunch room with Touchless payment systems. Every kid in Stanford, we'll get five cloth masks, and if a family is still uncomfortable, remote learning is an option with a three sided shield on their death or table. If there at a table some rooms student Senate tables instead of the individual student desks, and the teacher will also have a shield to be behind when students or staff are behind those shields. They are able to remove their masks. Otherwise, students and staff would be expected to wear their masks in the hallways when they get up from their seats when they're moving around the class Karen Regal W B Z Boston's News radio over Main Bates College

Debbie Pain Assistant Superintendent For B Karen Regal Touchless Main Bates College Salem Stanford Senate Boston
House to Vote on Removing Confederate Statues From Capitol

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 3 months ago

House to Vote on Removing Confederate Statues From Capitol

"The House is expected about today on a proposal to remove Confederate statues from the capital. It's singles out people who voluntarily served in the Confederacy. As well as three statues of men who defended slavery, segregation and racism. Republican controlled Senate has pushed back on such efforts throughout the capital. There are a dozen statues honoring the likes of Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee. Summer depicted in Confederate uniforms. Every state sends two statues of prominent residents to the capital as part of the National Statuary Hall collection. Several states have already been planning to make changes. For example, Arkansas is pulling both of its controversial statues and replacing them with statues of civil rights leader Daisy Bates and singer Johnny

National Statuary Hall Daisy Bates Jefferson Davis Senate Robert E. Lee Arkansas Johnny
Plucky Watson, Serena's Escape

The Tennis Podcast

06:39 min | 3 months ago

Plucky Watson, Serena's Escape

"And welcome one last time this fortnight to the tennis podcast and Wimbledon relived on. What would have been men's Finals Day of the twenty twenty championships have finally. The Sun is out. It's been a frankly miserable. What would have been Wimbledon fortnight, which is made the the pain of? Missing out on Wimbledon slightly easier to bare certainly for me personally, but it's A. It's a lovely summer's day today. And it would be a nice day to be enjoying. The men's final especially is the The flying ants have the memo that Wimbledon didn't happen. they are out in force which is. A Wimbledon tradition. Hadn't done well, that's. Today's the first I've I've probably missed it and I think maybe the weather is part of that. And we've we've just watched a match with an amazing atmosphere which I think probably also stirs that feeling a little bit, and probably because it's the last day of what would have been Wimbledon and us is the last day of Wimbledon relived for now. What a pointed addendum to that sentence David. Wouldn't next one planned for us. When should we brace also? Developing! Certain Olympic week looming on the horizon A. I feel like I. DO actually need a week off now. I feel like doing relieved of all of the sports. The Olympics will be doing archery relived. Staging two thousand eight. She's just ain't doing on this fate going. Stop the Autry podcast. Doing the end is near. You can have asleep seen. Yes well I'm going to hold David to even I want a week off now that is that is is not my writing, but if it said. We need to on that. You know it doesn't apply to middle of the night. What's absolute? There's a moratorium on on that. today, folks. We take you to the year. Twenty, fifteen. And a third round match between eventual champion Serena Williams, and then British number one had the watson a much which ended up defining that Wimbledon Fits Serena in in some ways defining the extraordinary and dramatic year that she had on tour in twenty, fifteen and much that kind of. Defines Wimbledon in some ways we'll certainly encapsulates Wimbledon the the sun, setting over just resplendent center court with. British ten tennis fans out in force getting behind a plucky Brit that half in the mid never heard of that morning. It's. It's Wimbledon all over. Isn't it? And I think I don't WanNa. Put words in your mouth David. That's probably what made you miss it because what we've just watched so sums up so many of the things that we love about tennis I would say that's true. I also think it's it really does encapsulate the the Wimbledon that I knew as a kid, and as a teenager before Tim Henman came along when British though there was a big gap where? I had not known British contenders for the title. In on the women's side in before my time to be non-journalist Virginia, Wade and Sue Barker, won the French Open, but would never really perform to that level at Wimbledon. So, Strapped my formative years following the sport, Jeremy Bates had a good run in ninety two got to the second week had match points didn't manage to tighten them against gay full Jay. And there were a lot of those sort of moments. There are a lot of single standout moments of a player. Would make them. National News as back page. front-page news even plays like Andrew Castle. You got to eighty in the world that had a match against mats. Wilander that back then was hyping him to to a level. The even he didn't think was was appropriate. Time member in in the Post match press conference that that he did he. He guys this great line. After losing the final against Philander, he was two. It's one up for landing world number, one, nine, thousand, nine, hundred sixty, says he said. Let's just take it easy here I. Mean I lost and. That's that says a lot. Ready I think you know he. He was realistic enough to know and I remember Chris Bailey in nineteen ninety-three. Playing Goran Ivanisevic and the whole nation just stopped, it was nine seven in the fifth set twenty tonight night, the whole nation, stopping for about four hours just to watch this moments, and and he became a national celebrity in a single day. People had I mean it's way more than what Heather Watson inexperienced here in terms of going from somebody nobody had ever heard of Watson was on the map to some degree. This took it to another level question, but Bailey was an complete unknown and then suddenly. I remembering, going on BBC grandstand the next day with death Lynam the presenter who? Asking about his life and said, what did you go friend thinkable list and he said. I'm. GonNa go. I haven't got a girlfriend. And then suddenly the BBC was just inundated with letters from people offering their services his girlfriend. Services! Okay maybe that wasn't quite. Home. He told me he told me because he covered the Australian. Open with us for BBC radio for number years, and he told me that that night he went into Wimbledon village walked into a restaurant with a friend of his and the entire. Pub and restaurant just stopped what it was doing and turned around and just stead at him. and. He'd never experienced anything like like not at all until. Four ask before he'd never been heard of by so many people.

David BBC Heather Watson Olympics Chris Bailey Serena Williams Tennis Tim Henman Goran Ivanisevic Autry Wanna Virginia Jeremy Bates Philander National News Andrew Castle Sue Barker JAY Wade
Duchess Meghan Releases Statement Supporting Friends After British Tabloid’s “Vicious" Attempt to Expose Them

The HeirPod

05:30 min | 3 months ago

Duchess Meghan Releases Statement Supporting Friends After British Tabloid’s “Vicious" Attempt to Expose Them

"Week. We also saw the Duchess of Sussex released a statement supporting five of her close friends. Friends after the Mayland Sundays, in her words, vicious attempts to expose them. It was an eye witness statements legal document that was filed at the High Court here in London, on July ninth have a copy of it here where the Duchess accuses the Mail on Sunday of trying to create a circus with a friends real lives now these of course are the five friends gave interviews to people magazine in early twenty nine teen in her defense after a barrage, all particularly unpleasant commentary and obstacles in says an areas of the precision press. Megan says an has said already in this case in previous statements that she had no idea that the article was happening until it actually hit newsstands. But the mail, on Sunday, half these five friends names because they have been entered into. The case confidentially by the Duchess of Sussex's is legal team by request of associated newspapers. The argument here of course is the man on Sunday saying that they should be in the public domain, and the Duchess of Sussex's legal team is saying that these are private citizens. Young mums who do not need to be part of this circus. The paper is clearly trying to create. Making writes in the statement. She accuses the publisher of trying to expose the friends in the public domain for no reason other than Click Bates and commercial gain. She goes on to warn that the action is vicious poses a threat to their emotional and mental wellbeing. Of course it will be some time before this actually goes to trial among Cadogan that releasing the name so early in the process when they could potentially act as witnesses important witnesses. In this case, is not going to do any help for either party. But of course, the argument from the Sussex side is that the male really just want to create headlines? Ounce of this other than at sort of do this for any benefits of the case for either side. Megan's already repeatedly stated and ego responses to the publisher. They're being three. That, she knew nothing. If these five friends is cooperation with people, magazine, and effectively, it doesn't affect the grounds of which cases based on which is copyright infringement, an invasion of privacy Megan goes on to say these five women not on trial, nor am I the publisher. If the Mail on Sundays, the one on trial it is the publisher that acting unlawfully, and is attempting to evade accountability to create a circus and distract from the point of this case that the Mail on Sunday unlawfully published my private latter. It's. Very powerful statement I think what's been really interesting about this case is the clearly. The Duchess is not afraid to hide anything. We've actually learned a lot of private information In case it must be quite difficult to sort of be going through these issues with her father again so publicly, and there is no doubt about it that when this does go to trial, it will be a circus whether people want to avoid. That's unfortunately. That is the sort of what we're building up to here. But you know I've spoken to sources close to the Duchess and their legal team, and they're clearly very confident in the purchase. They're taking to this and you know they. They believe they're standing on a very good case a moment as I said earlier. The Mail on Sunday does deny wanting to actually print the names of the five friends, tellingly in their statement that was obtained by C. News. It says to set the record straight and Maryland. Sunday had absolutely no intention of publishing the identities of the five friends this weekend. quite telling that it really specifies this week and. It goes on to say you know this is why. We told the Duchess's lawyer last week that the question of that confidentiality should be properly considered by the courts. Sources actually told me that it was Megan's lawyers doubt sent that they will put on notice by the Mail on Sunday's lawyers, just on Mondays. This is just a few days. Before Megan's witness statement at basically telling them that the males confidential filings should be properly reportable by the media. That's their words. They warned that if Megan's legal team did not apply to the core by July, the ninth, then they would simply assumed the names of the women were no longer confidential, so this situations actually quite contradictory to the statement released by then, and it gives an glimpse of what goes on behind the scenes in a case like this, we all sort of in somewhat unprecedented Tarik trae. with a case against the tabloid by member, the Royal Family because. Sifi! We haven't even gone to trial yet. And it's already unveiled quite a lot, and will no doubt be a difficult situation for the Sussex is to go through. They've. Already well into the next chapter. And this will of course be a heavy burden of for them to deal with a as it. Looks to continue for some months CONSI. See this going to trial until. Late in the year or early next year and

Megan Duchess Sussex Publisher People Magazine High Court London Associated Newspapers Cadogan Maryland Bates C. News Tarik Trae.
Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

Between The Lines

28:17 min | 3 months ago

Muscling up to China and 25 years since Srebrenica

"Tom Switzer, he and welcome to another episode off between the lines now today on the program will be commemorating the twenty fifth anniversary of Europe's worst massacre since the Holocaust in ninety, ninety, five more than eight thousand people died in Shrimp Nitsa. The town was supposed to be a U N protected safe haven in the vicious civil war that tore Yugoslav apart instead the civilians ended up being massacred by Bosnian Serbs. Were lightning fast with their superior weapons. They easily overran the lightly. I'm Bosnian government troops and the token full civilian peacekeepers. The UN's Valley to protect the civilians inspired Washington to launch unilateral action against Serbia and end the civil war. Would things be the same today now? That's later in the program, but first defense. Last week the Morrison. Government launched a defence strategy and force structure review now the move signals a major shift away from the strategy outlined in the last defence white paper. Remember that just four years ago in two thousand sixteen. It plotted out Australia's strategic costs for the next decade. But that White Paper has as we know been rapidly overtaken by Vince covert China or that now the new review has promised two hundred and seventy billion dollars over the next decade to enhance Australia's defence capabilities with renewed focus on areas like Saba and spice capabilities and the possible development of hop sonic weapons will be fitting aircraft with long-range anti-ship missiles, increasing underwater surveillance and boosting fuel ammunitions reserves. Now, underscoring the seriousness of the shift, the Prime Minister even drew comparisons to the nineteen thirties and the lead up to world. War Two that period of the nineteen thirties. Is Been Something I've been revisiting on a very regular basis and when you connect by the economic challenges and the global uncertainty. It can be very haunting, but is the money too much or not enough is going to all the right places, and we'll do enough to safeguard Australia from China's increasing assertiveness and is rapidly growing military capabilities. What's the role of Australia's diplomacy? And all of this will joining me to discuss this at three distinguished guests. By skill is professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University Holiday Bites. Thank you good to be here Melissa Conley. Tar is a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. Hi There Melissa could to speak again Tom. And Pay. The Jennings is executive director of the Australian Strategic Policy Institute. Tom No. Can you talk us through the top of scenarios and potential conflicts that the defense review is preparing us for the scenario that the review is focusing on is one involving a high end conventional conflict, so I've gone to the days of stabilization operations in t more Counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan This document is preparing foresight on onsite conflict. Involving countries that have sophisticated military forces. And, of course, the document doesn't say. I don't think it would be reasonable to expect it to say. That China is the problem. But let me tell you China is the problem that is the now neoplasia competitive that way of thinking about when we think about what's adequate in terms of the topic of military capability we need to have. and to does reflect to change. From past years Tom I recall when I started by defense career, we were thinking much more about the risks presented by Indonesia, and the so called low level in cushions in the northwest. Of course, that's no longer features in anyone's strategic thinking. Really it's about China and the risks that the People's Republic is presenting to all of its neighbors in abroad since in the Indo Pacific region and beyond I cabinet crudely putting it some sites laying the groundwork for fortress Australia US sign. This is preparing us to join a potential use LID. Containment slash war against China for example to protect Taiwan Peter Jennings. I think that is it covers a spectrum of possibilities. One possibility which I think is Epson you were in terms of language of the document is that we might conceivably end up having to face military conflict without being able to rely on the direct combat support of the United States, and that's what leads to discussions around extra stockpiling munitions and fuel insightful. But I think in general terms. Yes, the expectation is that Australia. Through its history has been a country that forms coalitions usually have like minded partners, the share the same types of objectives. And the the plan will design the Defense Force. Really gives us the capacity to do that with Rachel Ellis lecture, example, Japan but also with our traditional ally the United States okay bates skill. You've recently completed a review of China's defense capabilities and its recent military modernization, specifically looking at the implications for Australia Wind you expect the Peo- The People's Liberation Army and its navy. When do you expect them to have the capability to project power as far as Australia annual Pacific knives, well in many respects Tom, they already can I mean they have the long range missile capabilities to do that? Know as a from a standoff position launched from their own from their own homeland against hours. But what I think, the the new strategy is looking at is really the development of capability over the next ten fifteen twenty years, and that's by the Chinese own own acknowledged calendar that they would be able to by that time of mass, a large enough capability, both in terms of its long range strike, you know striking from their own homeland, but also bill to project. Project Power passed the so-called first and second island change and being a position to more directly threatened through those platforms Australian security. So you know we're talking ten or fifteen year window here and I think given the time it does take to try and respond to develop the the deterrent and defense capabilities for Australia. That's that's you know that's in some ways a short window. for Australia to be mobilizing in reaction Melissa Tali. What's the role of a strong diplomacy and all these well I think it needs to be growl. And one of the concerns when we look at the deteriorating strategic environment is we think all that's a defense problem? And so when the prime minister launches the strategic update with those comparisons with the nineteen thirties. It pushes US toward seeing in purely military terms but we don't just want to say things in that security lands, we want to think about all of the parts about national power projection, so that's diplomacy and development as well as defense I think if if people thought about it I think what we invest in all three strongly, but that's not where it is if you look at federal budget fifty. Fifty nine billion to defense and less than seven billion to diplomacy and development together the lowest point with ahead in our history and I think we missing that opportunity. If we don't take US seriously, the way that diplomacy and development can shape things in the world so I was struck. Today was a defendant looking at the latest poll on what are the major concerns that Australians have at the moment of the top threats in the world and the first five, a role nontraditional that drought, environment, disaster, climate change, pandemics, and downtown, global economy, and those places where you know military spending isn't going to help shape that environment. So we need to have an effect on those. We need to be thinking much more about what we can do in the diplomacy and development to mind Peter Jennings. What would you say in to Melissa's observations? Because they reflect a certain mindset that that perhaps we should be focused more on non state actors rather than say China for instance well, I think all of these you know threats that have to be taken seriously. I'm and simply because we're living in the middle of a pandemic for example, doesn't the climate change is gone away in this no longer going to present a problem to us. I guess what I'd say. Is that the you know the five things Melissa listed? That were in the featured in the low e Poland terms of popular concerns. Are also the things which could. In different ways late to the risks of conflict escalating in the Indo Pacific region generally so You know my my view, please while I would like to see spending on diplomacy increased. While I. Say Development Assistance is being something which is effectively the United soft in of Australian power, and the military is the hot end of Australian power. I think. The message against all of these areas is that we have just been underinvesting for decades underinvesting for decades, so we're we're all. High fiving ourselves at just reaching about two percent of gross national product, being spent on defense, but that is compared to what we spending in cold or years, which was sometimes between three and a half percent in four percent of rustic product. So what we have grown used to Tom I would say is. Free written on the United. States code tiles of security for for decades. We've dramatically under. Invested in the things that we need to do to strengthen Australia's position, not just militarily, but also diplomat. A now. We're rather surprised to hear the news that Gosh the bill is a lot more expensive than we really thought. It was only if you've got that confidence in the US. and. In fact, the whole trump stories, the story of the Americans really big being fed up with the rest of the world, thinking that the US can fund the bill for their security, so we're going to have to do more and I think we're going to have to do it against multiplicity of areas not. Justin sought the defense organization. We'll some scholars such as you want and James Current from the University of Sydney. They say that this document sounds a lot like an acknowledgement that the US might not always be there to help us out. By are we starting to plan for more independent Australian defense posture I think it would be a wise move to keep that option open when you think of the capabilities that the Chinese developing in which do have a direct pose a direct threat to Australia or could do so. In many respects, the I think the types of threats that you might not expect an immediate or even timely response on the part of the United States what I'm thinking here. Cyber capabilities is a huge priority for the Chinese. We already know what they see the sort of capability. They can wield against Australia and that's not the sort of thing you can expect a kind of cavalry to. Lead the charge from from Washington to come to Australia's defence slowly long range strike capability on the part of the Chinese capability. They already have in which are going to continue to develop. which could threaten Australia down the road now? These are capabilities that I think that Australia's going to have to develop their own defenses for. They can certainly do that with United States, but again it's not necessarily the sort of threat that we would expect some sort of traditional ally joint response not to make it well. Some of are in listeners will email me and they'll say that if Uncle Sam struggles to police. It's own CDs. Melissa. How on Earth Can Uncle Sam Police? The Asia Pacific region in the face of a rising China. What's your sense about us staying power in the next decade or two in look? It's difficult One of the things that strategic update looks at is more threats to the global rules order, and unfortunately the you know, the US is part of that. the US is not along with the strategies interest on things like global trading system, and a number of international issues like global health where we would say you need to be supporting. A Global Response that said I don't think the strategic update will be read negatively in. Washington, it's my guess. it very clearly couched in terms that I think the US will lock about Australia contributing more and having more self. that could be seen as a statement that we think that the US might not have outback, but can also be seen as something that the US has been for for a long time. I particularly liked a few elements of the update things like making sure that we have. You know material ammunition You know that aren't going to be disrupted. Buckle supply trying having more capability eight industrial cut suffering capability here antiques fuel reserves, which is not as long sane as an issue for us, so I mean those are things that are worth investing in. Regardless of US resolve because as we've seen from COVID, we know that supply chain can be disrupted very quickly and easily, and it's worth having eligibilities. Cepeda Jennings bite skill and Melissa Conley Toilet and Melissa. The Pacific step up last year. That realigned Australia's development budget to deal with some of the strategic challenges posed by China in the Pacific Do you think it goes far enough? The step up was followed recently by strategies new International Development Policy Partnerships for recovery, and that's made it very clear that strategies focus should be on the Pacific and also southeast. Asia including. Indonesia and team August. I think that has a very clear statement about what we want. In the region of being entrusted trusted development partner and influencing those societies that we think positive for four region. Again you're going to. You're going to say you. Hear this from me all the time, but again the problem is that we not really making much invasive lunch, so partnerships for recovery head no new money it talked about the massive challenges that covered as as creating for for the for the Pacific, and for for our region broadly, and the only funding announcement was that we're going to repurpose the money. We would have spent on sending Australian. Volunteers in scholarship holders. And we're GONNA use that so I I suppose I. Feel a little bit with all the areas, not actually include district update in that as well that what we've seen through the foreign policy, White Paper and International Development Policy through to to the defense. Strategic Updike is. We talk about how. how? What a time! These these frosty leaving a contested difficult awful environment that we've now got to leave in and the Dow L. Easy Times over, and then we say, and we're not gonNA. Give any new money so I mean the defense announcement is essentially just that we're going to continue to you know, extrapolate out the money that was planned to be spent in the twenty twenty six, and we're going to extrapolate that out to twenty thirty terabytes skill. Do we risk getting into a bidding war for influence in the Pacific? I don't know if it's a risk. If it is a risk worth worth taking. I mean obviously the Pacific region is so extremely important Australia's future. Both for for defense reasons for regional engagement for diplomatic reasons, developing reasons and the like. so It's quite possible that we're entering in a more competitive phase with China in this. SITES WRIST BYTES I'm talking about more the budgetary concerns he because in the wake of the Corona Virus Crosses. There'll be serious limits on how we can spend on these things scholley. Yes, there is and party left to be be developed for that, but you know when you're talking about your own backyard. I mean I I. I don't think it's the kind of country that can simply. Pretended it's by itself getting back pay to Jennings to the region, generally in the rise of what. Angus Campbell is of the Defence Force he's talked about the rise of political warfare, the idea of grey zone warfare things like cyber attacks, economic coercion influence operations that fall below the traditional threshold of war. He says we need a whole of government response to it. I, you seeing that whole of government approach happening in Campbell, or is this Manley focus on defense and the spy agency so far Peter Jennings. It probably is focused on the national security agency's Tom. That's not too surprising because you'd expect them to sort of pick up on the risks I. But General Campbell is right. It does need to be all government is. There's a whole lot of things happening there that simply cannot and should not be done by defense organizations. and. I think that realization is slowly dawning. Along as both of the speakers have said that actually ladyship comes with cost of infrastructure is going to play that role, but you know, give you a small example of this we. We have lost the ability to broadcast into the South Pacific and Southeast Asia. In a way that we used to very successfully over over decades to give us the capacity to do that. We're probably talking about you know that. He million a year forty million a year, which sounds a lot of defend. It's nothing if you're in the Defense Department. Let me tell you. But you need to be able to do things like that. To be the truth teller in the region to actually tell the region that there are alternatives to Chinese Communist Party authoritarianism I think that's what's needed with responding to this grey zone on threat. Is Actually to be the truth teller. In this part of the will and getting our system in Cambridge used to that reality to understanding what needs to be done. To starting at different type of conversation with our region. With our own people for that matter that that is a sort of a psychological change which I can see happening, but we're not quite yet. There's a bit of work still to be done to get to that point Melissa. Conley Tyler. Is, just responding on that. I agree entirely with what pitcher saying on on broadcasting. It's a small investment, such a an increasing influence. It should be Brian and I hope that did that's being seen. I think having defense voices. I will help a lot in a banks, seriously I'm but just went. When you ask Tom Balaton host government and what's happening there? There are some really good examples, so for example win. This Pacific step pop started an office of the Pacific was established in that apartment and tried and each job. He's to be that coordinating body, and it's bringing together the. The defense, the development and the diplomacy in a way that he's gone to maximize our influence. and I've noticed this a lot more discussion about that that three. How do you bring defense development diplomacy communities together? I'm involved in initiate the Pacific. Four Day and I think a lot of people not talking about what more we can do for that that joined up coordination to make the most about national instruments by skill. You're an expert on China. The elephant in the room of course is China doing need to be careful not to overestimate China's military strength. What about the weaknesses? Exactly right I mean you have to know your enemy's weakness as well as their strengths in the case of China, they are undertaking enormous reforming organization effort. They're pouring billions of dollars into new capabilities, but there's a lot of things we need to recognize I. Mean One is that the Chinese have not fought a shooting war and more than forty years. They are have no. They have zero experience in high end combat against a serious. Adversary, scenario, so that's not to downplay them, but to understand that they've got enormous obstacles to overcome that day. Themselves acknowledge that they themselves. No, they have to overcome, and that's why we had this window that we've been talking about. A fifteen to twenty years. to try and develop capabilities to get in front of the kinds of things that the Chinese want to bring to bear around. Around, twenty thirty or twenty, thirty, five, twenty, forty, paid-up Melissa to be continued. Thanks so much for being on our in. Thank you, tell my pleasure. Thank you, Tom. That was paid jennings. He's executive director of the Australian strategic pulsing suit by skill professor of Asia Pacific Security Studies at Macquarie University and Melissa Commonly Tyler. She's a research fellow at the Asia Institute at the University of Melbourne. These between the lines with Tom Switzer. Coming next, we're going to replay a version of a segment from between the lines. I 'cause commemorating the massacre of Bosnian Muslims at shredded Nitsa on the eleventh of July nodding ninety. Five twenty five years ago this week. More than eight thousand people were killed by Serb forces. It was the worst massacre. Europe had seen since the Holocaust. Serve softening up Trevor Nature for the army's final push into the town. Town of course was supposed to be a safe haven protected by the United Nations, but the civilians ended up being sitting ducks as I woke Larry. Hollingsworth Remembers I. Myself Feel Devastated and ashamed I was there with them? When we told them that it was a safe haven I watched. Many of these people walk in with the minimal possessions into shreds, knowing that it was a safe haven, and now they're fleeing out because we've let them down, let them down to the extent that within dies. About Twenty three thousand women and children were deported, and about eight thousand Muslim men and boys left behind where executed and buried in mass graves. Now, reports from the time described, frightening scenes stiffen overawed from medicines on frontier. Speaking he. Loading some of the children and women into buses, but there's no indication as to where it was buses, going with seen some horrifying streaming, going on women and children going into the buses being taken away from their family This was going on with a lot of crying a lot of panicking. The slaughter had been planned carefully and executed with precision. All the wall Dutch. Pace is literally stood by, and did nothing indeed even when the Serb assault on Srebrenica was imminent. in-command is still rejected Kohl's racetracks. Positions. Pope John Paul. The second declared ribbon Nitsa a defeat for civilization as media reports begins to reveal the scale of the unfolding tragedy. The UN says nine hundred thousand people are still unaccounted for. About some became clear as government soldiers emerging from the forest in central Bosnia, told of horrific massacres at the hands of the Serbs one young. People executing them on spot, but this didn't come out of the blue. By the time this massacre took place the civil war that tore the former Yugoslavia. Repot was heading into its fourth year. More than a million people have been displaced, and the world became familiar with a new term ethnic cleansing. So? Who is to blame for these well? Let's start with the United. Nations from ninety two to ninety, five shrivel Nitsa was the world's first union declared civilian syphon. It was supposed to to her aggression. It was supposed to aggression and set the scene for political negotiations to end hostilities between the Bosnian Serbs, and Muslims, but the UN soldiers in the SIPHONS. They were bedeviled by problems. If you declare an area safe haven in the name of the United Nations. Nations if you tell the people if they are safe in the name of the United Nations you have got to put the troops on the ground, and it's no good for politicians say yes, we go for safe havens, but we're not gonNA put the troops meanwhile the Europeans vacillated and equivocated failing miserably to cope with across at its own back door. America was also reluctant to get involved as then President George Bush senior explained in Nani Nani to. I? Something because I learned something from Vietnam. I am not going to commit US forces until I know what the mission is to the military. Tell me that it can be completed until I know how they can come out. You have ancient rivalries that have cropped up as as Yugoslavia's dissolved or getting dissolved, and it isn't going to be solved by sending in the eighty second airborne, and although on the campaign trail that Ye Bill Clinton pledged to reverse the appeasement of that bushes of Belgrade as President Clinton allowed the Balkans to bleed for three more years. French President Jacques Chirac was moved to declare quote, the position of the leader of the free world vacant. Trinite Sur changed all that having done nothing the before during the mass killings in Rwanda Clinton was galvanized into action, and crucially he cut the United Nations out of the Decision Chine on August thirty Washington led a night bombing campaign against the Serbs the NATO action began early this morning. The harsh light of fires and explosions coloring the night sky. Some people watched the bombardment from their houses, but after more than ten thousand deaths here in the last three years, most Sarajevans had given up any hope of outside intervention. Last night it came on a scale which could yet change the course of this war by the end of not ninety five sixty thousand nine hundred troops, including twenty thousand Americans were on the ground in Bosnia. Pace was declared. The BOEKEN's wars ended only because the US finally acted. He's President Clinton in November ninety five my fellow Americans in this new era there are still times when America and America alone can and should make the difference for peace. The terrible war in Bosnia is such a case nowhere. Today is the need for American leadership. More stark are more immediate than in. In Bosnia in the years since the Mexica Europe inaction was heavily criticised, and the US was held up for its global leadership in particular for its unilateral humanitarian intervention. This is when the US secretary. Of State. Madeleine Albright said America was the indispensable nation, and that idea would fade into the justification of the Iraq invasion in two thousand and three as a war of liberation, but he's a question with the US intervene. If the shrivel Nitsa massacre happened today from the standpoint of twenty twenty, we might ask if the era of US unilateral humanitarian intervention is well and truly over. Well, that's it for this week. Show remember if you'd like to hear the episode again or download segments since two thousand fourteen. Just go to ABC. Dot Net dot US slash aren and follow the prompts to between the lines, or you can listen via the ABC. Listen APP, or wherever you get your podcast. You can even subscribe, so you never miss an episode. I'm Tom Switzer continue next week.

Australia China United States Melissa Peter Jennings Pacific Tom Switzer Washington TOM Bosnia UN United Nations Prime Minister Europe Melissa Conley Professor Of Asia Pacific Secu Indonesia Asia Institute
1 suspect dead, 1 arrested in disappearance of Fort Hood soldier Vanessa Guillen

WBZ Afternoon News

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

1 suspect dead, 1 arrested in disappearance of Fort Hood soldier Vanessa Guillen

"A new criminal complaint accuses a soldier at Fort Hood in Texas of killing Vanessa again and hiding the body with the help of this girlfriend he and has been missing for more than two months. Those people who's opposed it did it did that to my sister. They're just grace of humanity give sister Loop and her family are distraught, wondering how she was put in danger on Bates. Army investigators still have not confirmed if the remains found Tuesday are Vanessa gins? But their investigation is also focused on whether she was sexually harassed before her disappearance. Gideon's family, says Robinson, who died by suicide Wednesday morning, sexually harassed her and accuses the army ofthe covering it up.

Vanessa Gins Sister Loop Fort Hood Army Gideon Texas Bates Robinson
No. 1 high school basketball recruit Emoni Bates commits to Michigan State

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

No. 1 high school basketball recruit Emoni Bates commits to Michigan State

"Michigan state gets a commit from Ypsilanti Michigan's Emoni Bates the number one ranked high school player for the class of twenty twenty to him the first sophomore ever to win the Gatorade national boys basketball player of the year last stammer in April and is considered one of the best prospect since lebron James it's very possible we can jump right to the

Michigan Emoni Bates Lebron James Ypsilanti Basketball
Front Line Mom - Dr. Hina Talib

Mom Brain

05:40 min | 4 months ago

Front Line Mom - Dr. Hina Talib

"Name, is he natale? I'm a pediatrician here in New York City and I am an adolescent medicine specialist so I. Only. Take care of teenagers I do everything that a teenager needs and before Kobe before this pandemic I would see patients in person in an outpatient clinic, and then I also attend to patients who are admitted so hospitalized, so if they have something that's significant enough in a teenager there in the hospital I might take care of them there, so those are the physical faces Ri- would get to see patients and get to see families and. And then everything you know January we started to hear about news mostly on social media from other countries in the doctor, mom groups on facebook and other places were kind of paying attention to it, but kind of also not because it was far away and then it just got closer and closer, and by the time March hit. You know it was sort of like waiting that like anticipation for we know what's coming, but. But you're not hearing it to the extent that we WANNA be hearing it from the city and the state and the government, and our even our hospitals in, and and then when it hit, when when everything basically shut down, it was very jarring. It was very jarring and so I, actually had the experience of as pediatrician being deployed to be hospital to take care of adult patients who were who were suffering from Kobe. And that's really remarkable and a lot of feelings about that and that deployment lasted just a short while because ask after new. York City shutdown. The numbers went down a few weeks later. It was an imminent. Americal that our numbers went from horrific in the Bronx to still bad, still awful, but at least they were going down for the first time. And so then they were able to take people back. Who aren't? Trained to be adult doctors back to where they were, they were practising in so for me. That means now. I'm seeing patients on telehealth. I've never done that before. and it's been wonderful. It's been new and I also still see patients in person who needs to be seen whether they have covid nineteen or not. If they're a teenager that has something that needs to be seen. It needs to be seen in, so we still see patients. In the hospital in out of the hospital on a limited basis, what did that deployment look like in terms of like logistically Did someone call you night by the way tomorrow? Please report to the hospital. We're GONNA. Show you. What even? What did they show you? What did they tell you? How did they prepare you? Yeah I, mean there were so many it was email, overload and memo overload to the honest. Build up towards that and. We could have predicted just being in the hospital in seeing the numbers every day that they were sharing with us. and it went in phases so I. They weren't deploying people who are say dermatologists or gastrointestinal doctors, but still adult, and so that was more you know closer to them, and and then when it got to the point where they said to our children's hospital that we need your help and. And in our children's hospital changed call signs from being a children's hospital to being a children and Adult Care Hospital I. Mean I've never heard of that happening in this country? It was amazing but it happened in in step, so it wasn't a total surprise because we saw what was happening in the greater monitor health system, so we we saw the numbers, and it was kind of sort of At some point we're going to have to be called to help in. EITHER BATES SPLIT US up and send us off to different units or areas of the hospital or we stay as we stay as a team. Where we know everybody, we know our nurses. We know our patients. We know our staff and we work as a team to take care interest. Expand what we normally used to do. Other parts of the phase for example we started taking care of thirty roles, and so we never did that before, either, but that was kind of early phase to try to offload some of the adult medicine. overload that the the serves that they were seeing. How different is the care of teenagers from the CARE OF ADULT? What does that look like? Yeah, I mean it's. It's a steppingstone, so I was really afraid I mean I. was afraid on so many levels. We can talk about all the mom reactions to, but I was. I was afraid in terms of that question. I was afraid like imposter. Syndrome visited I couldn't do it. I was afraid I didn't remember how to take care of an adult. I was afraid I. Don't you know and that initial fury? Fury Action I can't do it like I. Don't know what I'm doing and you know maybe would I cause more harm than good and and then very quickly once you start to read about Cope Nineteen. It kinda comes back I. Mean Medicine is medicine is sort of a language that we speak and it's kind of like spent Even if you haven't spoken in a long time. If you had to learn really quickly, and if you if you're motivated, you could. It's just it just. Getting over that Hump, so the first adult patient that I took care of. Nervous and nervous and sweating 'cause you're covered head to toe in all this gear and you're not used to that in the nervous. Suggest just nervous, and then I realized. Wait a minute I've been talking to adult adults my whole life. I've been talking to the parents of my patients, my whole medical life in, so it wasn't like the alien being that I didn't. Didn't know how to touch. Take care of it was it was basically the families of the patients that I've been taking care of and I felt very at ease as soon as you had that conversation with them I mean they're grateful. You're grateful that they're doing better and that you're having a conversation and and so it. Kinda just comes back

Adult Care Hospital Kobe New York City Facebook RI Bronx York City
A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

Short Wave

05:54 min | 4 months ago

A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

"Family of Kentucky Woman, shot and killed by police is demanding answers. The former, his son both white are accused of killing the unarmed black man again with the breaking news for Minneapolis violent protests raged for a second straight night, following the death of George Floyd after being arrested by a Minneapolis police officer last night, protesters turned their attention to the city's. The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news stories about police killing black people. And what is sick is that these stories have become the kind of news that we in the business call evergreen their stories that are always relevant and always in season, these calamities are so familiar. This point they're details have begun to echo each other July. Twenty fourteen, a cell phone video captured some of Eric Garner's final words as New York City Police officers sat on his head and pinned him to the ground on a city sidewalk. I can't breathe. Or May twenty fifth of this year those same words were spoken by George Floyd. Just before he died, he pleaded for release, as an officer kneeled on his neck in pins of the ground on a Minneapolis City Street, so we're at the point with verbiage, people used to plead for their lives can be re purposed as shorthand for completely different stories and part of our job here coast, which is to conceptualize and make sense of news like this. But genus is hard to come up with something new to say you know things we haven't already said or things we have already recorded protesters saying when we were both in Ferguson in August of twenty fourteen after Michael. Brown was killed by the police or when we were in Baltimore after Freddie Gray's death. I spent the day with junior. High school kids in West. Baltimore where Freddie Gray was from on the first day. Let kids return to school after all the protests and I will never forget the eighth grade boy who raised his hand to ask. Why have white people been killing us in slavery and they're still killing us. He said that on Wednesday April Twenty Ninth Twenty fifteen. Since it's so hard to come up with any fresh insights about this phenomenon. We thought we would look back to another time. When the nation turned collective attention to this perpetual problem. Jamile Smith Senior Writer for Rolling Stone magazine. In when I was at the new republic. wrote an article entitled. What does seeing black men die? Do for you. It was published on April Thirteenth Two Thousand Fifteen. We get to see black men tortured or killed by police a lot more often these days. So, it's worth recalling why a generation ago. It mattered so much to see what happened to Rodney King. Now the story that might never have surfaced if someone hadn't picked up his home video camera. We've all seen. We have certainly seen the black and white photographs and videos depicting police abuse of African Americans. And we'd seen the grainy images of lynchings passed. But the conventional ignorance was that this wasn't the America. We lived in now. Officers beating a man they had just pulled over. This was the early nineties after all. This was in America that viewed law enforcement in the context of the popular reality, show cops, and were Morton Downey Junior tabloid television style made uncensored aggression a form of entertainment. But when George Holidays video surface chuck him with batons of between fifty three and fifty six times signal to a lot of citizens, just how bad police violence visited upon marginalized communities, actually was six kicks and one officer one kick people either didn't know what was happening. or willfully ignorant of it. They needed to wake up. Say The Los. Angeles Police Department has a history of brutality and misconduct that goes back a quarter of a century day. We are not sure that the police is there to protect us. The fear of becoming the next Rodney King is still here. But what has changed is how often we are viewing that fear being realized. Jamal goes on to write that the ubiquity of cell phone cameras and dashboard cameras means this uncensored horror has become available on demand. He says he watched twenty two year old Oscar grant get shot and killed by a police officer on Youtube before it made it to broadcast news. That happened in Oakland in two thousand, nine on New Year's Day. And it really marked the beginning of this grim genre, in which the slain become memorialized as Hashtags Hashtag justice for Oscar grant and remember Walters Gun Eric Harris, Jomo rights videos of them, being killed became public almost back to back in two thousand fifteen. Both men were running away when the shots were fired. Walter Scott Fifty was trying to escape North Charleston police officer Michael slager. Who Shot him eight times in the back? Before planning evidence near his body to support a false account of the incident. Eric Harris was running from a team of Tulsa County deputies when Elderly Insurance Executive Robert Bates. WHO's donations to the SHERIFF'S OFFICE IN MODICUM? Training earned him the title of Reserve Deputy. Shot him dead.

Officer Rodney King George Floyd Minneapolis Michael Slager Angeles Police Department Eric Garner America New York City Freddie Gray Kentucky White Walter Scott Fifty Baltimore Rolling Stone Magazine Eric Harris Oscar Ferguson Morton Downey Sheriff's Office
Aerobic Adaptation & Facebook Live

Live Your Own Fit Podcast

06:48 min | 5 months ago

Aerobic Adaptation & Facebook Live

"Welcome to leave your podcast. Something different today I recorded facebook live last night. And this is a audio of that so it's GonNa be a bit hit and miss. There's going to be big twitter on looking at other things or entering questions from comments But hopefully you get something out of these cover. It's all about aerobic adaptation and increasing your fat burning and oxygen burning capacity so that you can produce energy with less oxidative stress so basically using you'll Arabic system much more than your anaerobic system. I mentioned this many Tom so I want go over it again. Here it is. I've enjoyed all right. So really WANNA get into aerobic capacity and what that is all about because there's a lot of confusion a lot of basic principles that pay a aware of but they don't know what they're actually doing when a do it. So let's say something like a base face so when you're building base a yeah you just gotta go long and slow and that's what we've gotTa do and people do that but Moto told about the adaptation that happens and then how you progress that adaptation to benefit you Particularly told me into age-group who are training full long distance triathlons a anything half on man up to a non man or even ultras longer events like that. Because that's way aerobic capacity fat adaptation. Really coming into the at sign where it's really important that we minimize the stress by using more oxygen and Moffat for fuel and kate the stress levels low so that we're feeling strong towards the end of the rice still so Jamie's distracting me day by myself in the background But she's telling me it's working so that's good so what we need to be thinking about is what's happening with something like that. Vice building face. I was going to look at some not. The base building is is that aerobic adaptation. And what's happening when we do math so everybody a lot of people that are way of math principles. Maximum Aerobic function developed by Dr Phil. Matheson back in the late seventy s and hey laws and trained mark Alan using this method. That if you build up your aerobic capacity then your ability to perform over endurance events increases greatly. And the reasons that I'm going to go through he that they increase performance increases is through These count myself anyway. So what's happening so aerobic means using a lot of oxygen and technically pretty much everything that we do other than about like a seven second. Spring is aerobic because we are using oxygen. It's just this ratio of using more oxygen or our using less oxygen less oxygen using other pathways such as glucose dominant pathways and less oxygen. So we know that things like lactate produced as that ratio changes so as we use less oxygen from Ireland and all the one that can say and he me. Thanks God so let me not so. That's one thing that's happening building these pillories. We have building the ability of Amata to be more aerobic so the CA- pillories increasing in number and volume to take more oxygen out of the blood. And then the oxygen from the blood into the muscles the muscles and then into the next lower level down right down into the Mac- Andrea so then in the Monaco Andrea. If there's more oxygen in there they can use more fat for fuel so this is a two part answer where fat burning and oxygen usage go hand in hand so staying at that lower level and building a base phase where increasing oxygen carrying pillories which you can do through the O. Two Max efforts and that sort of thing as well which is why they are good have their place and people get results and then not something to never do but then when it comes to the fat burning aspect of this study other side of the coin what needs to be done is optimize the monarch Andrea where the energy made full burning fat to do that. We need to stay in a very aerobic state and so basically we need to be using a lot of oxygen not using the ANAEROBIC system as much so always still using oxygen. It's always aerobic by the air ANAEROBIC system as much by using more glucose. If we're going harder which is wine that base phase. You WANNA use Cape Too hot right. That you know is staying aerobic which is around your maximum aerobic function. So that's math. Hundred and Eighty Monitor. Age Is your base starting-point heart rate number for you to then decide if that is a good point for you and fills just put out a book yesterday which I recommend you go and check out. And he's written plenty of things about one hundred ninety monitor age as a starting point. But that's what it is. It's a starting point. And he's written about how their variables if you've been seeking injured then you'd probably need to take a few bates off that if your if you have a big deficiency syndrome which is a phrase that Phil coined a longtime ago as well With basically you have done so much anaerobic work. Let's say you've done so much work using glucose in low oxygen state that you have trained your muscles day trained your muscles to using fat for fuel. So therefore if they using more glucose there's more biproduct more stress you can't go as long as efficiently

Dr Phil Facebook Twitter Monaco Andrea Ireland Eighty Monitor Andrea Moto TOM Jamie Matheson CA Mark Alan
"bates" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

08:34 min | 6 months ago

"bates" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"A man stepped into Gordon. Police station he had long hair and spectacles but was otherwise an unremarkable looking person seemingly nearing middle age. His voice was steady as he spoke to the attending officer his name was James Patterson Smith and he was there to report a horrible accident. He explained to the officers that earlier in the day he had an argument with his girlfriend. Kellyanne and had shoved her head under the water in her bath when she resurfaced discovered that she wasn't breathing. Smith claimed that she often pretended to be unconscious to toy with him but after checking he realized this was no act. He was unable to resuscitate her. He said I've killed her. I know I have police. Officers immediately departed for Mr Smith's house the sight that greeted them within Mr Smith's Gordon residents was like nothing. Any of them had ever seen Kellyanne. Bates had indeed been drowned. But it seems that Mr Smith had left out a few key details about the state he had left his girlfriend in. They found Kellyanne body in the upstairs bedroom of Mr Smith's House. She was emaciated and horrifically mutilated. She'd been stabbed scalped beaten. Earned hobbled had her hands crushed and both her eyes gouged out. Forensics identified one hundred fifty separate injuries. All over her body on top of that her emaciated frame show that she had been starving. Kellyanne 's blood was found in every room of Smith's house. It appeared that James Smith had been systematically torturing her for almost a month James Patterson Smith was immediately arrested for the murder of Kellyanne Bates. The facts of the case were already proving to be extremely distressing from the gruesome mutilation of the victim to the thirty year age. Gap BETWEEN SMITH and seventeen year. Old Kellyanne everything. The police found in Smith's house painted the picture of a man who had groomed and then imprisoned teenager for his own sadistic purposes when they informed. Kellyanne parents of the tragedy. The family confirmed that their daughter had been distant since she moved. In with Smith in November of nineteen ninety-five. She quit her job in December and since then contact had been sparse. The last message they received from her was through a greeting card for their anniversary in March of nineteen ninety six one month before the discovery of her body the card was not in Kellyanne handwriting. They buried her may seventeenth nineteen ninety-six one day before what would have been her eighteenth birthday. James. Patterson Smith would go to trial in November nineteen ninety-seven though he claimed to be innocent of torturing his girlfriend one of the arresting officers quoted him as saying sometime during the initial investigation. I know I'm going away. I know there is no point. I'm going to get found out anyway. We'll discuss the history of James Smith's abusive behavior after this high listeners. The launch of our new podcast series supernatural with Ashley. Flowers has been an incredible success. Were so happy to welcome to the podcast family and can't thank you enough for checking out the show. If you haven't had a chance to listen yet I highly recommend you head over to the supernatural feed and subscribe today every Wednesday Ashley. Flowers takes on a different crime or mystery or the most fitting theory isn't always the most conventional the first episode has been my favorite so far. Were the deaths of two Brazilian men a result of making contact with spirits on Mars. Get closer to the truth than ever before. Regarding the mystifying lead masks case but you'll also find some other fascinating stories. Did four friends have a highly unusual encounter during a camping trip in Maine. Sort through the out of this world circumstances surrounding the allegations incident was Italian. Theoretical physicist et CETERA. My Arana's disappearance caused by his discovery of time travel or was it something more sinister. Each week Ashley takes on the strange and surreal to explain some of the world's most bizarre true crime occurrences. If you're the kind of person who questions everything you'll love this show. Follow supernatural with Ashley. Flowers free on spotify. Or Wherever. You get your podcasts now. Back to the story on April Sixteenth. Nineteen Ninety six forty eight year old. James Patterson Smith walked into Gordon Police Station in Manchester and confessed to accidentally drowning his seventeen year old girlfriend Kellyanne Bates. When police entered his house however they were horrified to discover not an accidental drowned woman but evidence of unimaginable abuse Kellyanne Bates had been brutally tortured for up to a month before her demise. Her body showing signs of every possible form of mutilation Smith was arrested on the spot and charged with her murder at the trial. Prosecutors dug into Smith's history with domestic violence a divorced man. He'd recently been in a relationship with a woman named Tina Watson who he beat throughout their two year relationship from nineteen eighty to nineteen eighty two later in nineteen eighty two. He was seeing a fifteen year old who he attempted to drown then in nineteen ninety three. He met Kellyanne Bates who was babysitting his friends child. She was fourteen. Tommy and Margaret Bates wouldn't learn about their daughter's boyfriend for two years until she introduced them over the phone. They had no idea that the man their daughter was seeing was almost their age. He introduced himself to them as Dave Smith and said that he was thirty. Eight Kellyanne moved in with him after graduating from school at age. Seventeen after that. Her parents started seeing bruises. Appear on her face during one visit. Margaret recalled seeing Kellyanne with a black bruise covering almost half of her face. Then they stopped seeing her at all the forensic pathologist who examined Kellyanne Betas body said on the stand that he had never seen such a horrifically mangled body one with so many wounds of such varying age. It was abundantly clear. Kelly was subjected to unimaginable torture. While living with Smith Smith defense was that Kellyanne taunted him into hurting her and that he didn't do anything to her that she didn't ask him to do. The prosecutor claimed that her pain would have been intense quote to the point of mental breakdown and collapse on November Nineteenth Nineteen ninety-seven James. Patterson Smith was found guilty of murder. He was given a sentence of twenty years to life. Due to the upsetting nature of Kelly's injuries. All members of the jury were offered counseling after the trial. All of them accepted Margaret. Bates later claimed that when she heard a minimum of twenty years. She wanted to stand up. And say don't worry Jimmy. I'll wait as far as we know. James Patterson Smith now seventy three years old is still in prison. One month from this Saturday would have been Kellyanne. Betas forty second birthday..

James Patterson Smith Kellyanne Bates Patterson Smith Kellyanne Smith Smith Ashley murder officer Gordon prosecutor spotify Gordon Police Station Tina Watson Margaret Kelly Maine Arana Jimmy physicist
"bates" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

05:10 min | 9 months ago

"bates" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"Double double mastectomy and they remove lymph nodes and in my case the lymph fluid built up in my arms and I had seen my mother go through this but I didn't know what it was. It was in your family. Yup and I went to a doctor who helped me with manual lymph drainage and pomp and I had to go several the cost. CALL LYMPH DIMA ten million Americans suffer from lymph Edina and that's more than a LS muscular dystrophy. MS Alzheimer's Alzheimer's and AIDS. It's horrible Parkinson's in age. Excuse me and you're a spokesman for I am a spokesperson for it and it's so if you ask me how I'm doing. It's a perfect balance in my life. I've got this career that I still feel strong in and then I've got the opportunity to live in the real world worked with the NIH the CDC now has a video of me talking about Olympic team on their cancer website. which is something we really fought hard for and and in New York We passed a bill so that it's mandatory for clinics and hospitals to provide information to cancer patients Because anytime the limb system is damaged people at risk and the sad events though. Is that like a swelling of the lymph and if the limb system backs up the legs or the arm swell doctors spent in four years of medical school. Fifteen minutes on the entire lymphatic system. Oh what is that about ten million and fifteen minutes and so if you go to your GP and you've got a problem. He'll say we'll go home and eat salads and unfortunately it's progressive progressive and incurable and many people can't afford adopted doctor shop so they go for years without getting helped. In fact I met Sam Rockwell's uncle and his mom had a swollen arm and didn't know what it was and they saw. Yeah he's she saw one of the programs that I've been unable to do and she got to a doctor and got treatment. And she's better. Do you do when it's an incurable. There's not much we can do except for me go. Oh for manual lymph drainage and then they put one of those moms. It's in both my arms. But here's the thing too. Is that you get an infection often called cellulite as bacterial bacterial infection. That has to be treated with antibiotics. And if you don't then you could go into sepsis and occasionally people do die from it. Well good for you for going out there. I'm pissed that I had breast cancer and Olympia Dima no kidding now I'm actually happy because I can do something and in the real world that means something that can help people. When Chris told me that last night I was like this is the best day of my life? You know to to understand that I really helped someone because you don't always get that feedback. I think it's very rare where that happens. Also you were able to listen and say it could be this. And he didn't know me I. That's what I mean but you were introduced and you could see something great so yes when you get a cancer diagnosis. It has to do something to you. Yeah well at that. Particular summer was hard. Because of my show Harry's law I had just been cancelled and that was a mistake yes and it was a gut punch hand I wish that NBC had taken. You know better had focused on our show more and So then I discovered I had breast cancer and Peter. I swear to you that that moment I thought my career's over and Then God bless Ryan Murphy. He came along and my friend Jessica Lang and He changed my life. He opened the Third Act with a bang. You know said come on there are yeah I have to let you go but this is the first time you've been on this show. Yes it is. I hope it's not the last last. Please back with bobby and all of that would be great. Be We ended song. And you're a musician well way back while it's not I don't care when want one person sings sin. He did a great. I can't get started with you really. Yes but I'm just. It's not looking for a false song just a little bit of I'd Septa say they're singing songs Alone but not for me and I think that's all the lyrics. I remember how I was a singing waitress in the catskills hat skills. We'll see that's a whole other. We come back. We're going to begin in the cats absolutely and see what other jobs that you took power. That led you to all of this but Kathy your delight always thank you so are you just endorsed great together. Just take on the role. We make sure we have.

Ryan Murphy Chris Alzheimer Parkinson Olympia Dima Sam Rockwell cancer CDC AIDS NIH NBC Kathy Jessica Lang New York bobby Peter Harry
"bates" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

15:32 min | 9 months ago

"bates" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"Everybody. I'm Peter Travers and and this is popcorn where we tell you what's happening at the movies and there's a great movie for you to see right now called Richard Jewel based on a true story but my guest today Kathy Athey Bates who you know from so many things I could mention them but then the show would be over because she has too many credits too many awards but she plays the title character's actors mother in this and she will break your heart six ways from Sunday. But today we're GonNa be having fun are absolutely welcome to the first time you've done done. This popcorns yours get no no. I've lost sixty pounds in managed to keep it off the last three or so I've been on. They sell popcorn pretty okay at least and we're smelling as Peter Stocks. The top doing this so you just got of course all the awards you have. Now you have a new nomination as best supporting actress for Richard Jewel for me. Ah The best award for this movie has been the fact that bobby jewel richards mom who's still alive Loves the movie. Because if she didn't now I know Gosh 'cause in the movie you know how she got Tom Brokaw. I know I know I know. We don't want her to be getting mad. Now you know and also You know there have been Statues in Centennial Park and young and Billy Payne who brought the Olympics to Atlanta. And finally there's going to be a a plaque with Richard's name and what did he say. Oh well that's a good thing should set that up or you should. Why should I work really really? Yeah that's it no Richard Jewel. That's the name of the movie. Clint Eastwood directed at but a true story. Can you tell us a little about Richard J. Just absolutely Richard had been a cop for a few years and then resigned or was fired depending on how you look at it. And then he we went to become a guard at at A college nearby and he got leftover the the thing with Richard that I found so tragic about this whole story story is that he was this hyper vigilant person. Ever since he was a kid at nine of the police the police even as a kid eight in church he wanted to help people And even in Turkey would run around and make sure everybody had a program and then later on when he was a cop he carried like one one hundred thirty pound you know battering Ram but he also had beanie babies for the kids who he might find who had been in accidents so he could give him he was is just this generous simple humble kind man who wanted to help everybody and it was that vigilance that Helped him in his job. He was hired to be a security guy for the Olympics. They were calling everybody in and he was at the sound and light tower and and he'd gone off to the restroom and he came back and there was a bench there and he noticed right away there was what they call an Alice. Pack this big military pack the officious very suspicious and so he told the sit idle like that and they say oh. Come on Richard he said no no I have a bad feeling and they so they brought in the bomb guys and he described it that the the guy went underneath and looked at it and then he just froze and he just back very slowly out and he told his buddy to turn turn a cell phone off and they tried to get everybody back as many people back but through a series of mishaps and nine one one calls and not being able to get in touch touch with people Eric Rudolph who actually planted the bomb and was not caught until like six years later Had this phone message You know there's going to be a bomb in Centennial Park in thirty minutes and thanks to Richard got all that is out of the tower. He was running up and down with doing everything everything a hand and suddenly he became this hero in and then for three days three days and his mother was all got that three day. Yeah my mom his his mom he's on TV. He's bets right he's on. TV is the hero of the day if CNN wanted to talk to him and what turned out was there was a leak from the FBI to Cathy scruggs at the Atlanta Journal Constitution and they decided to break the story and overnight they everybody turned against him and said he was the he was the guy he exempts Mama Except Momma. She was there for him she was they were very very close. She had two miscarriages ages and Richard was her only child and Both his real dad and his step step dad banished from their lives for various. The reasons and So he was her child her boy you know and she knows she knows how he can be be overzealous knows the things that he shouldn't be doing. You trust the police so much too much that it cost him by they use. This is what was so cruel colon. I remember when I started out working with Clint. We were all there to meet with him and I said why do you want to do this movie. And he said because I think it's an American tragedy and he said this is a story that people need to see Jon Hamm was down in Atlanta and people said well what are you doing down here. And he said Oh it's about the bombing and Oh yeah that guy. Richard Jewell who was the bomber summer. Because there's some suspicion and for eight days without any evidence People camped out you know media the FBI suspected in even when they brought him in for his first interview they already had a cell for him. Yeah we like him for this. That's what they always say. Yeah because the public. Everybody's demanding to know who did this. There's that desire. Why are to get somebody up there and say he did it well? There were millions and millions of dollars resting on this because of the Olympics and they had to get it sorted say it's nineteen ninety-six on this is happening so we weren't even in the big cellphone period of the everything was just taking off and don't forget we'd had waco the Federal Building we had Ruby Ridge. We had ninety three Truck Bombing World Trade Center so it was the beginning of the new normal ordinarily of this terrorism. And and it's that going. That's that seesaw. From we love you to stay away from us. I think that the real tragedy and I'm sure that this is what bobby default is that the very quality that enabled him to find that bomb his vigilance. They turn that into a liability And they beat him up with it that to me I think is just the tragedy of all. We'll one amazing scene that you have among renting in this is when bobby went on national. TV making a plea to President Clinton at the time yes to see what's happening and do something for some. Yes so let's look a little bit attack okay. My son is innocent. Richard is not the Olympic the big park bomber. He saved people's lives. Please hear me Mr President and help me. My son is a hero. If they do not intend to charge my son. You please tell us. Please tell the world Mr President. Please clear heartbreaking. Breaking it is is really is. I don't know how many times you had to do that. Well actually we got it in the first take. That's so clint into eastwood is fresh and real. Whenever I've been on a set of this it's always let's move on now but you know people say that the do said I J do when you're always think it's going to be quick but it's not that he takes his time and he leaves it open and it so efficient that he doesn't need need to do more than a couple of takes? Is this your first time with Clint Eastwood. Absolutely absolutely what was that like was a nervous wreck I was a nervous wreck. Check it I I and I think we all were because we all wanted to just I mean we all WanNa do our best all the time. But when you're with someone like client or Mike Nichols just you really and I think we also felt a real responsibility to bobby she survived. Of course she's still alive. And and Richard passed away ten years later he was thirty three when this happened and He got some money CNN NBC you know. They sued them and but the Atlanta Journal Constitution never accepted responsibility for it and the real. FBI Guy who's played by. I Jon Hamm went to his grave saying this guy did it. We see that teen in the movie where he says I still think yeah even when somebody else has confessed knowing it. That's the kind of thing. Well it's a movie that is pretty hard basically on the media and on the feds. It's really saying that in a world where we're supposed to trust certain things we've lost it you know that was nineteen ninety. Six things are worse now. Well and I think it's important to realize is that they just got it wrong and they were in such a rush to try and say the Olympics. That had really. This was only the second day I think it'd be Olympics and and So that was really driving it. And I don't WanNa paint it with two broader brush because look more than ever we need the truth from the press more than ever we I need the truth from the FBI. You know the government we depend on those institutions so that was very specific to this case and I hope people people don't feel that we're just trying to malign those institutions. What does Clinton do when after take? He's happy with it. Well this is what I love of about him and and I didn't realize this is that he just lets the camera. Keep going and we just keep going The scene may be done. I mean our lines. May It'd be done. But we just keep improvising and just continuing to live in that situation and he gets a lot of great stuff that he can use and it's also an opportunity for us to have more time together to experience the chargers together especially nowadays when you don't have rehearsal time you're you'd have your as my friend. Jessica Tandy God rest or used to say your kitchen work nowadays. You have to do your kitchen or in your kitchen you know at at home alone so it's great to have that it's been working. Well when he was when Clinton was here last he was saying that he hates movies. Where the director will say? Hey you know because he said I'm really quiet about it. I just go go when you're ready when you're ready. Just do something I also heard about. I don't know if this is is apocryphal. Or not was when he was doing Spaghetti Westerns and they would scream action the worst would at all also in TV. You know it's just also crazy. The and I think that's when he he developed his style he thought you know. Wait a minute. Everybody's just rushing in and getting it wrong and rushing and getting it wrong again and he just wanted to keep it real simple simple. He says when you're ready people going like this and I remember the first time adequate seen merge running downstairs in Iran into the sound guy who are really liked and I was was trying to speak French Dami said and I thought I thought the scene was over. You know and then that's when I realized it's not over till it's over it until he says it's yeah that's got it he also has. Can I just say he has an amazing cameramen Stephen Campanella he's he's been with them for twenty five years like many of the people on the crew. It's like a family and he just knows how to tell that story with the camera and one of my favorite shots and Clint's to win when the FBI are there. And you see Richard putting his blue gloves on and we've been telling him and telling them not to help the police and then it pans over to salmon. I just standing there looking at him. Like he's never gonNA stop. You know you just wants to throttling. But whatever he's doing he's doing great eighty nine now. Yeah he's still sexiest. Hell you go see. And you've turned that he is. He is sexy telling you. Imagine what it'd be like when he's ninety at like good wine. Everything is perfect to do. Well you you've worked with so many people you know Mike Nichols and primary primary colors. He's somebody I missed tremendously. He's not only a great director but he's just one of the smartest most fun people people that ever lived on this earth. Yeah I agree I remember. I was at an awards thing I think it was the EMMYS and and I lost you know and like about half an hour later. I get this text for Mike. Saying you're among one of my favorite actors I've ever worked with and I thought well that's it dude. I know it's like how lovely of him to do that. In that moment it is but he was right well he was well. It was one of the high points of my life to work with him. I and with that task and yet you had women your Oscar movie misery where I'm looking at you and I could still hear any wilkes saying he didn't get out out of the car. I didn't do that. And yet it to me in terms of the Stephen King when you did Dolores Claiborne like four or five years later. That was just as good time. Now Tony Gilroy adapted tapped novella that Steven wrote and which we I wished the film had gotten more attention that year but I think people go watch it now. Yeah go watch it now after we finish. It's a great cast Christopher plummer and Jennifer. Jason Leigh and Taylor Hacker did an amazing job and talk about lead time. That's what I'm saying. He understands what actors need and because I had to play a woman in different points of her life I had amazing makeup and hair and dialogue and all of that so I had all the tools at my disposal. And that's why I wish people would see it because I'm very proud of that but there's so much I mean it's an incredible career. I remember seeing you for the first time on. stage vanities that Oh you did did. I was four years old but I loved it. Great thanks it was great. So how are you feeling now about your life and career. I'm feeling well. I was sick with breast cancer in two thousand twelve.

Richard Olympics FBI Richard Jewel Clint Eastwood bobby jewel Mike Nichols President Clinton Jon Hamm Atlanta Journal CNN Atlanta Richard J. Tom Brokaw Peter Travers director Peter Stocks Billy Payne Centennial Park Kathy Athey Bates
"bates" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

28:29 min | 1 year ago

"bates" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Most important things that you could understand as a leader who's interested in actually having your people feel loyalty feel trust and take action it's totally did that you and your podcast right literature that you learned up all the hard way still to this day it's like okay I'm going to outline what I'm going to speak about then I'm GonNa Hap it and I'm going to offer it again then I'm going to offer to get there's certain things that I want to say to the audience and that is you may be very knowledgeable you want it you want to share that you may as you said interesting at least one to impress right and that's natural and normal and that's okay we've all got an ego and then on top of that you may genuinely want to make a difference and you feel like you've got a chef so much but tell tell us this is important because I think you know for the lead is watching they maybe have to up and do a presentation tell tell us how to help them get to the point because it seems like well yet I'm not sure this is equally the point to that and they all kind of go this you know what I mean you know exactly what I'm talking about so how do we help them please help our audience to go presentation do next week they've got a five thousand steps I think they should do delivering how do we get them to come to the point how do we get them to find the point the this is one of the core things and you know this is why that the rigor of doing Ted format is so powerful for leaders when they have to go through that exercise so first thing is I have noticed that it is really easy to make something super complicated even more complicated but as you go right it but it's much harder to make something complicated simple yes and that's the goal and so what I do is I give everyone a poetic license at my trainings and in fact anybody who hears this we're going to create a virtual poetic license for you in the cloud through the magic of magic and you'll have it so you know and that poetic license says that this person is now authorized to use their poetic license you know they don't have to tell the whole story only things that matter to the audience not in service of their ego in service of the audience and even the rules of grammar are malleable and you know if you think about just imagine going into a grocery store and looking at one of those big huge shelves just filled with everything imaginable k. that's everything you know and here's the point I don't want to know all that I knew all that we'd be you right and I would be trying to do this podcast right and you don't want me to know all that anyway so that's everything you know all I want are the treats dove where are the treats you know okay John that Middle Shelf in with the red packaging knowing what I know about you and your taste you go open that puppy up you're going to want eat one hundred of them and they're actually not that bad for you so it's fine you know you're gonNa love that and now I'm like thank you and I go get it and I'm done but that's you know these people these huge executives they're getting paid the big bucks because they know all that but they don't nobody else wants to know all that and the real reason they're getting paid the big exes because they can look at this and figure out what of this is important the people I'm talking to now I know all of this but they don't you know so but that's still brings you know because I'm trying to put myself into the space of leaders going but how do I boil it down to two because as you said it's about the audience yeah yes help deleted a to to get to how do I know they want because you know we we can't serve a generally speaking we can't serve the audience well what would you like to know I do before going to do a presentation I wanNA know that but but most leaders who are going into speak you know they really need to know how do we as speakers leaders get to refine and say okay what is it they really need to know because I can give a list of seven things they need to know yeah choose the one and make the others lineup right so you know there's a few there's a few things I think that first of all if you're really going into a ted format talk then I think the question becomes given who this audience it is is this a customer audience is this your team you know whatever it is but if you've been asked to do something in that kind of format think about this particular group of people everything you know about them employ all of your mirror neurons ability to put yourself in their she just pull out all the stops in a real ted format setting I say if you knew do that this audience would listen for up to eighteen minutes and really really really listening get get what you had to say what is the number one one thing the most important thing that you would want them to get and you know when you're doing a real ted talks for Ted or I mean I work with people for six months and sometimes it's an agonizing first month or two just to get that yeah exactly but then you know the the but that's not that's not every leadership opportunity right like you're going in and you're GonNa talk to the team about this upcoming week okay well you know as a leader I think it's important for you to be clear what is the most important thing you want from them this week so what's the most important thing that you could offer to them or how could you set this up for them to make that happen this week as you said Ted is about a single idea and one of the things that I've used as a disciplined for myself both I actually learned from listening to Oprah and you know I'd watch the Oprah show years ago and she was amazing the man who who whether you like or not she is damn good speaker but one of the things she said is and it was kind of thrown out and Ooh that's good and she said what will they talk about on the drive home well said wow that's it because immediately I said well they could be talking about this that and the discipline myself and go well no let's say one person talks about another one talks about that okay seem to be equal what's going to dominate yeah yeah right and then this is that same principle right wants to talk about on the way home no that's really that's a great way to think of it you know it's really really good and it goes to one of the other things about that dove just I fired it off my mind one of the things I talk about with people when it comes to their speeches is I think that the the most important part of any speech is the opening and people say what wage on it's it's what about the content I'm like well listen if you blow the opening and they check out they never get to the content your second most important part is the ending and that's exactly what I go for in the ending is what are you going to say at the very very very end that's going to that they're gonNa that's what's going to be in their minds as they walk out of the room make sure you reiterate at the end what you want them to talk about on the drive home so is is the from your point of view because I see different formulas in lots of different people doing different things and many great speakers do you think that you know seeing that people open with a stat I'd say Osam hones as an eyebrow raising stat yeah some people will start with an emotional story what do you think is you know for the images because or even for professionals is what do you think is the the the opening that should be that what should what should it I should happen in the audience is my point well so let me start if I may by saying so what not to do in my opinion yeah and then I'll tell you what to do 'cause that's what a good coach does right doesn't leave you with what not to do so I think that you know start like everybody else then they're gonNA expect you to be like everybody else and everybody starts My name is John Bates with executive speaking success in than if you just I said please welcome John Bates of executive speaks as I walk out hi I'm John It's like please come on you know and when people see someone come on stage and they say hey thank you for having me it's a pleasure to be here my name's John Bates on with people just go to sleep right they're gone so don't do that I think even if you need to introduce yourself what I recommend is think about what is going to be that I really interesting really grabbing super great thing out of your mouth when you walk their start with that why wouldn't you why would you start with anything less careful than that and then after that little bit of an intro if you still need to say your name or you really feel like you've gotta thank them for having you do it Kazan it'll mean something to them could you'll have had a little bit of relationship with them already questions like Simon Synnex starts with those great question about why or why Martin Luther King why the Wright brothers how did they knew that why apple really interesting questions great way to start shocking statistic excrete way to start really super bowl promise you know great way to start but I think the most manageable way to start it unless you come up with something really great and one of those other categories is a real genuine story and you know I just recently did a big GIG and I learned a lot it was really a got really clear on a lot of things but I worked for a very very very large fortune five company that makes amazing hardware that's like it's from the future and you know they're there our people were super super brilliant and they all want to get up and established their credibility and you know what we're not gonNA do that because you've got the card that says you're running this division for this gigantic global company in your on stage they chose you your credibility he's already assumed we're not GonNa do that I wanNa Start and I have a thing I call your superhero origin story and it's about your origin and when we get those things right it has an unbelievable effect on how everything else people say lands so I worked with everyone these people on finding one of those origin stories that we could weave into their talk most of them started with a story and now they all said but you know John I mean if we all start with story I mean are people going to notice and I said Yeah they're gonNA notice they're gonNA notice in they're gonNA love it they're gonNa notice this is better than anything ever been to before everybody started with a good story no one would mind it would be awesome so this is what you just said those really important because leaders struggle with impostor syndrome and the problem with struggling with imposter syndrome is there is a tendency to want to prove yourself over and over again I always say to the leaders I work with stop interviewing for a job you've had ten years yes that's really really good for a job you've had ten.

eighteen minutes six months ten years
"bates" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

Leadership and Loyalty

13:39 min | 1 year ago

"bates" Discussed on Leadership and Loyalty

"Thursday all the way from Georgia to Colorado Springs and even in Washington DC and the Quantico area also China's on Roku TV whether it's over one hundred thousand subscribers if you're a regular listener regular viewer thank you we really appreciate it because of you we are the number one podcast globally for fortune five hundred listeners with a potential reach two point five to four million listeners for every single show we honored and grateful to be cited by INC Com as the number one podcast and make you bet Alita and did you know you can also catch on spotify Google Home Alexa by simply saying play Dove Baron podcast can you share in the show with everybody you know all right let's strip it down and die right in as Alito whether you are a CEO someone in the C. Suite sales leader a leader in any capacity the lead being a leader today is no longer about barking out orders from behind closed door leaders today must become masterful communicators and storytellers who can emotionally engaged not only their organization but potential business partners shareholders customers how do you do that. We'll stay tuned because our esteemed guest is a master at showing you exactly how to do just that Jumbos John Bates why is is what is finding out what is awesome bringing out what is awesome in every person so that you can live in a world and the real difference. John's background was a founder and CO founder a very early stage employees at Internet related startup companies like big woods dot com which flamed out in the DOT COM dot com crash he was also with Goldstar which is still rocking and rolling today John would always end up with the title of evangelist under why he has raised several hundred million dollars for his various teams in Silicone Valley beyond today John Trains and coaches the NASA astronauts top leaders Johnson and Johnson where he is right now as we're about to record accenture any other leading communicate leadership communication he is one of the most prolific tad format trainers in the world is completely and totally blue totally you blew it the first time he stepped on this stage at Ted so ladies and gentlemen please help me to welcome the most prolific tag format speaker trainer in the world today now that is better than you it sure that's one of the better intros I've ever gotten who's Yasim to have you on I'm so sola component to this conversation can you and I met years ago never actually gotten to new show together so this is all and we've got so many friends in common least of all Wendy Keller and and Mike as we were just talking about but I want to stop the show where I I always like to show here because I think that we're all influenced and you know you're in the business of influence we're all influenced and often times we like to cite these famous characters or famous people who've influence does but oftentimes I think that we are impacted most often by people who otherwise wouldn't know so who is someone we likely wouldn't know wouldn't suspect who has been a major influence on you and on your life you know you just gave me goosebumps to my wrist in my ankles because you made me think of a guy that I talk about sometimes in my trainings but no one would know his name is deal Smith and he was my debate coach in high school so I went to high school from ninth grade through twelfth grade it was for your high school and he was a world class debate and public speaking coach at my public high school in Salt Lake City Utah and because he was just so stark raving mad in just the best way he was crazy he was a little bit like you super super intense you know off I remember a time he he he got mad at somebody and through a cake all the way across the room and it just splattered on the wall sometimes he'd throat staplers I mean you know and you just have to duck but he was so dedicated and such a brilliant guy that I did anything he ever asked me to do so it was one of my early leadership lessons actually because it was but it was purely by accident much later I was taught don't make yourself special make the process special so I look back on some big victories in high school I won every contest I ever entered for second or third except one contest and that judge found me two years later and apologized and told me I should have won he made a mistake and he was just glad you could tell me now I used to think that's because I was so good uh-huh and it's not because I was so good I was just another freaking total dork on the debate team my had deal Smith and the one thing I did different than anybody else's did anything he said he said jump I said how high on the way up so both of those things were totally by accident that guy they believed in me before I even knew anything about anything I mean look you know freshman in high school I did not know anything about anything but he believed in me and he really worked with me and if I wonder state till midnight he'd stayed till midnight I mean he was a schoolteacher getting paid what the teachers get crack he would buy his bias are trophies if we won a big event he would buy us the trophy and I never know that 'til later but that guy changed my entire life he just absolutely completely alter the trajectory of my life in the best way possible you know Oh interesting John I'll tell you why because you know you just you kinda hinted that teaches us so poorly paid yeah holy respected in our society yeah so often a leader I speak to will say to me it was this teacher that teacher and for me being a leadership guy being an influence of being a speaker all the things that I am I still see myself as a teacher yeah it's fascinating me because when I hear like his teacher working for crap pay out of his own pocket staying till midnight if you need it believe giving you before you can believe in yourself and I think they're great leaders and great teachers seeing you what you can't see in yourself and lift you up I know you do this in your in your trainings is that you can see something in somebody they can't seem themselves in and I always say as a leader it is your job to hold the dream for the other person until they can carry it themselves that is a great way to say it that's a great great way to say it fascinating and you know the just to go along that theme one more step I am here at Johnson and Johnson and specifically at Johnson and Johnson's new J. labs which is one of the most innovative things going on in any fortune five hundred company today they started these no-strings-attached incubators in all the major life sciences hubs around the world and I'm here at the one in Manhattan and the woman who runs that whole thing if you haven't talked to her you you should her name is Melinda Richter and she's the global head of J. Labs and Melinda is the person for what I do now who did what the L. did for me back in those days after my first talk with her she said she was this really big deal and I was just starting and she looked at me after our first hour together having come in sure she didn't need to talk to me but you know Ted ex. AFC Made Her do coaching with me so she had to at the end of our our together she looked at me and she said you know what John You are way more than a speaker coach You are absolutely amazing you look inside my soul I am going to be friends with you forever and I'm going to introduce you to all of my network because they all need you and we are going to make a big Prince together and of I mean almost peed my pants like I like I was so floored and I I'll tell you on those days in the early today's when I wanted to give up and just quit I would play that tape and I would say no she thinks I have something I'm just going to keep going you know 'cause there were certainly those days when I was like Oh man maybe this is not what I'm you know maybe actually just give this up here but this this is the point isn't it I mean this is it great leadership as I said it seeing in some something in somebody that they don't necessarily see yet and they don't believe yet and hold it for them yeah you know in my speaker training Nestle essays obvious to hold a vision of you that is so big you can't possibly cope with it and hold it and I'll keep pushing you into her until yeah era yourself and that's what she did for you that's absolutely the L. did for you and Yep you know an and I know that that's what you do for the people you work with however you know on the other side of that I mean you of this like you said you are the most prolific trainer in the Ted Format I know you're very highly respected across the board in that world yet as I said in the intro you bolted up I used it on stage the first time and you sucked tell us a little bit about so so you know I never worked for Ted but I have been the speaker our coach and trainer for over thirty five Ted ex events also I do train the for volunteer for the Ted Fellows and where I get all this experiences from large corporations because now every leader gets asked to Ted talk so they bring you that and then so I got on stage at Ted for the first time and I think it was twenty ten and dove I made three mistake in the book every mistake in the book and it's probably why I'm pretty good now because I just ran into that walk him off so maybe highlight a few those number one and the absolute worst one not just for Ted kind of anywhere but especially for Ted is I went in and I did it for me I did not go in I of course I had the audience to mind it's not like I was pure evil but I went in and really secretly the thing I wanted to do was establish my credibility among these really all people and really impress them with what I was doing and have them go check out my company just everything that and of course look I rolled is now but it's it's natural to want that from Ted we'll tell you what if that is why you do a Ted or at Ted ex talk you will l. so miserably that you will not even want to crawl out of your whole you know like I on it really has to be from your heart lovingly given to people to make a difference for them and if you do that you don't even have to talk about your business or say anything about your business they'll check it out themselves right but I didn't get that and then the other big thing from a guy named Craig Valentine he says when you Cran your information in you cram your audience out and boy did I do that I tried to fit in all these things and instead of landing three points maybe I landed zero points because I tried to land too many and one of the things that is a demento piece of coaching from the Ted side is even if you're giving an eighteen minute to talk on the main stage what is your one idea worth spreading not your two or three best your top five what's your one idea where spreading everything else the lineup behind that like the shaft behind the Spear Point and boy did I not do that I remember you and I talking long time ago about about that that you and I both I mean I've been speaking to thirty five years and you know it's still Yeah I've got four hundred seventy two points to get across in ten minutes yeah and I think that that's you know I think the.

John Bates China INC Com Georgia Google AFC Colorado Springs Dove Baron John Alita Alito John You Washington CEO founder CO founder hundred million dollars thirty five years eighteen minute ten minutes
"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Based ones ones this office that you've just identified really couldn't do an investigation you can't go out and talk to neighbors talk talked to relatives because you're going to tell the target that they're going to be under surveillance so there's no real way to explore those facts through America's or a permanent office like that and that's most of the applications Sir Fundamentally our court are supposed to a separate and equal and autonomous from the legislative and and from the executive branch is there something inherently flawed ought in this system of judicial compensation by the legislation relation or the legislature I would say no. I don't think that really has anything to do with the Fisk specifically but the judiciary generally unruly article three branch I think the protections in the in the constitution for judicial independence include there are not many of them but they include salary protection for federal judges. The judiciary is subject to a budget process with the legislature just like all other parts of government. You couldn't have the judiciary so free standing that it would just say all right we we want ten billion dollars and no one can ask any questions so it goes through. Congress fortunately right now and it has been true. Generally generally congress has enough respect for the judiciary for that independent branch that we are treated pretty darn well in terms of the budget and individual judges of course with the salary protection in the constitution. Their salary can't be reduced so I I do think there are lots of issues with respect to the judiciary and whether it really is an equal branch in all respects because it really has less clout historically than the political branches but I don't think having to go through the legislative process for the budget alleged is a big problem. We're going to have to leave it there. Please join me in thanking Judge Bates. The law fair podcast is produced in cooperation with the Brookings Institution. Thanks this week to John Bates coming on the show and.

Judge Bates Congress Brookings Institution Fisk America executive ten billion dollars
"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

14:04 min | 1 year ago

"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"I believe it's I think it's rule thirteen of the of the requires the Justice Department Department to inform the court when there's a material misstatement of fact or a material mission in in the application in some application and so my question is how common is it for the Justice Department to having submitted an application find out. Hey we made a material misstatement of fact on some point or we left out something that turns out to be significant and come back to the court and and amend the record that happens. It's really something else. That happens more often. I I'll say a back in the late nineteen nineties into due early two thousand there was an incident if you will with the consistency in terms of the validity of certain representations being made out of some parts of the FBI and the court worked on that and and the FBI was very responsive. I was really on the tail end of that but to the extent that I dealt with dealing with Bob Muller on those was he's a joy it was very conscientious and cooperative about those kinds of issues that have had risen there were compliance issues while I was there of a bigger nature that were more in the technological arena and more focused on NSA than on on the FBI but some also with the FBI over the course of time the Department of Justice Informs the court on a monthly basis of compliance issues a lot of them are just little ticky tack things some little thing that needs to be corrected nothing of any concern concern but every once in a while there's something of great concern and sometimes it's on the programmatic collections rather than an individualized collection and I think of one that occurred during my watch I issued over two hundred pages of opinions a year of litigation nations year you're more than litigation was a year of litigation but there's also a year of having the director of the NSA the deputy the director of the NSA and other senior people in the intelligence community and the Department of Justice coming into the court and meeting with me when almost almost a monthly basis to review these issues some of it was they had to explain some of them to me in terms of the technology to me and the lawyers working with me but also to try to work out solutions and it was a years worth of litigation a years worth of hearings as part of that litigation. That's a big compliance issue and there've been some other big ones but they're little ones as well it's sometimes they're focused on individual cases with the facts facts not having been accurate either because a mistake was made by the government or because by continuing to push which they found out that a source wasn't reliable or had in fact been mistaken in what they said so there are all sorts of things that can happen that would be compliance compliance related issues all right so. I want here I want you to sort of put on your politically savvy guy hat and just don't have any political savvy uh well all right how much a savvy and you know and you know the bureau you've worked with the Bureau and so in two thousand sixteen the fall of two thousand in sixteen when this application goes forward the Justice Department and the FBI is super super aware of the political context in which they are asking for this this surveillance and when these applications are renewed which is after the two thousand sixteen election. It is really really unambiguous what the political context is so in your experience with the Bureau and the Justice Department. How much internal attention do you you think this this application was likely to receive relative to the norm. I would say it should have received a of pretty hefty amount of internal attention on the weather did or not. I can't sort of course so we we have this pattern. Where like any pardon me any idiot would know to pay a lot of attention to this application in which the application application is advanced and is granted in which there are serial renewals and in which notwithstanding standing the intense political blowback that has happened the court has said nothing and has given no indication that it regards there being any problem with this surveillance activity so my question is should? I read anything into that as as the courts is it the court saying this is between the Justice Department and the Congress Send Fox News and the New York Times or is it the court saying actually we don't have a problem with what the Justice Department did here or is it. The court is the court. We're doing something else. I can't answer that question because I'm not the court. I'm just a judge who used to be on the court. It may be that they court doesn't have sufficient factual information to really do anything at this time or it may be that the court thinks that the downside of saying something and taking some involvement in in a highly partisan political issue is just too great and that they just need to stay silent. I'm not saying that that's that's what I necessarily would do on the court what I understand that there are some reasons that could without indicating stating that the court has taken a position it might be that the court either feels it doesn't have sufficient factual information to reach any conclusions lucians or that it just thinks the political touching us at this is too great now if the issues the report and the report factually based and concludes that the court was misled that there were failings then I think the the the court is going to have to look at it and see what if anything it needs to do to improve the system for the future. I'm I'm not sure that Senator Graham's idea of the chief justice should hold whoever is responsible for this in contempt is really a viable idea. I have some a little bit of jurisdictional issues starting matter. What are you expecting from the I G I mean and so for those of you who are not privy to the Washington rumor. Mill everybody expects is having had we'll have critical critical things to say and yet the a lot of the facts that we've just describe. SORTA suggests that if there's if there's a big problem certain indicia of regularity and kind of the way the thing was conducted and so I kinda scratch my head and say okay. I people everybody seems to think Michael Horowitz. What's is GonNa find something unpleasant here but how is it that if Michael Horowitz is GonNa find something so unpleasant. It wasn't discovered at any step along the way and so I'm just wondering what you expect. I think that's an excellent question. I expect a very thorough report very fair report from Michael Oh Horowitz. He's a good inspector general. He's careful now what that means. I don't know the rumor. Rumor mill has been says in Washington mainly coming from the right side. It's the right side rumor mill more than anything else slows the ones who are talking about it insane that there's going to be something you could look at the hearing that took place last week on renewal matters which turned into a hearing in part on this US Chairman Nadler saying. I haven't seen anything that would indicate there was any problem so I'm not sure what to really really expect but I expect a pretty lengthy thorough report at the very last minute. Some witnesses were made available including steel to who all Michael Horowitz. I don't know if that you know change the direction of anything but I don't have a prediction for whether he's GonNa find fault and mistakes or worse and at what levels because remember that the sign offs on these applications occasions in the Department of Justice and the FBI were pretty high levels. I mean you can look and you can say that Jim Komi McCabe ebb Rod Rosenstein. They all signed Sally Yates. They all signed off on these applications now how close scrutiny they gave to them. I don't know all right. We have time for a couple of questions hi. Thanks for explaining all this because it's Kinda hard to follow if you're I'm not an attorney but you know you just talked about this inspector general report that they're doing that. The Attorney General has commissioned him to do. How how do you feel about that. Though how do you feel about the attorney general coming in and saying we're GONNA look at the FBI. We're going to look at the Pfizer Court. We're going to you know does is that is that a problem is that does that cast some sort of doubt over our system of justice. The Inspector General's report is not really commissioned by the Attorney General the two investigations going on of this general subject one is the Inspector General's report or investigation leaning to report and the other which was commissioned by Attorney General Bar is an investigation being conducted by the sitting US Attorney in Connecticut. He's someone who's been used for these kinds of things before so. I don't think that we really can be critical of the current attorney general or really any attorney general for the inspector general looking at this subject. That's really what the Inspector General is therefore so I don't have any problem inspector Victor General examining. Do you worry though that the the kind of serial retroactive after action reports in high profile political cases has a sort of chill on investigators. Yes so I think we need to be careful about that. Just as I would say from a prior experience that I had in an independent counsel office. Sometimes independent independent counsels don't have a broad enough perspective and the focus is so much on one thing that it's more likely likely they're going to find something. I think that tends to be true. Sometimes with these big items than Inspector General's look at they're. They're not going to give a clean bill of health to every aspect of it. They're gonNA find something and I do think those after action reports can be taken to an extreme sir hi I spent six years as an air force cyber intelligence analyst and I'm now practicing attorney any given that our American jurisprudence system is inherently suspicious of experts say proceedings. Would you be opposed to creating a special office. That would always always oppose the government still in secret. Do you think that would ameliorate some of the concerns that we've been talking about and bolster the court's credibility. I actually actually have been opposed to that. After I left the court post snowden there were some legislative changes and a lot of controversy and the chief justice asked me to sort of be the point person because I was no longer sitting on the court but I was in another position as the director of the Administrative Administrative Office of US courts and I did take a position on for the judiciary on the issue of an Mikus curiae. My position basically was alright a mickey or good to have a cadre WHO's available eligible for limited types of cases one request of the court and that's what went into effect to the legislation but I was opposed host to a general office that would be interjected into every application. The reason is more pragmatic than anything else. There's a structural reason even even a constitutional reason to oppose that but the real reason is pragmatic ninety percent more than ninety percent of these applications are fairly fairly routine and or totally fact based you can't have someone involved in every one of those without out slowing the system down dramatically and leading to a delay in approval of these applications and with the fact.

Justice Department FBI Inspector General Justice Department Department US Attorney attorney Pfizer Court Michael Oh Horowitz NSA director US Washington Michael Horowitz Bob Muller Attorney General Bar Fox News New York Times Victor General Senator Graham
"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

15:25 min | 1 year ago

"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The government is the only party appearing before the court. They're normally is no one on the other side. That makes sense. If you think about it you can't identify gentrify to anyone who the target of their surveillance is going to be. It needs to be secret surveillance otherwise it's no use whatsoever so you do have to have a system that is not adversarial. There have been some changes made to the statute. They think I've been proved the statute in some ways a lot of them have to do with transparency that was a positive changes a one of them has to do with the adversarial system and having a Mickey Amicus curiae representation on some issues issues that involve a novel or very important a legal or nowadays often technological issues and the court can get assistance from the Miki on those issues. I I want to push back a little bit on the idea that there isn't a sort of substantial political shift and you know I agree with you that the sort of left's anxieties are still there and they will resurface whenever there's a renewal but the center of gravity of the courts and the the support for five has always been the center and the right and now we've taken a chisel and lopped opt off the right and every day on Fox News there is an attack on the FBI's use of and I don't believe for a second and that if you criticize the FBI for its use of five every day for a very long period of time and the judges of the courts attitude is in this application you know complied with the law eventually the right will adopt the exact same attitude toward the judges and the court court as an institution that the left has which is this is an instrumentality of power that we object to and so my question is aren't we seeing in the poll in contemporary political polarization a running away from on both left and right left was never there but now the right is really repealing off hard the core support for institutions like the Pfizer fear that we are. I don't disagree with that that as a comment on what may be happening not limited to Fiso and the Fisk for instance there's criticism from some quarters with respect to federal judges generally and that can have an impact. I think that that can have an impact in many areas there is including an impact on judicial independence and I fear for the permanent effects of those not individual the criticisms of cases judges should be subject to that. First Amendment protects criticism of judges dislike. It does anyone else but I mean institutional criticism and that's a problem with respect to the fisk. I think the biggest threat to that may be what comes from the I G and the Connecticut. US Attorney and their investigations respect the Carter page applications all right so let's talk about that before we do just want to get this on the record. Were you still on on the court when any of the activity in question happened no. Did you have any involvement in any of the activity that we're about to discuss no do do you know anything of any of the stuff that you're about to say that we're about to talk about based on non public information that comes from your service on the court no all right well except maybe once experience with how the court operates okay so in other words what we're about to do is talk talk on the basis of general experiential intimacy with the Pfizer process and to make inferences and speculation and based on that about events as publicly reported is that fair that is fair okay so the criticism of the FBI in the context of the Carter page fi is a first of all this was opposition research from given to them split spoon fed to them by Chris Steele and that this pervasively affected the FIS applications so my first question is if that were true how big a problem would that be as in how common is it for the FBI to show up with the FIS application that is pretty pervasively provided the information from which comes from a single source that happens. I I don't think every application or even most applications fit in that category so the single source is an issue for the the judges of the Fisk when they see a single source. They're going to explore that with the agents that are bringing the case They're gonNA want to know if there's anything else. If there's something more from that source they're going to have some questions about the source so all of that is exacerbated if it's a single source right but there's no there's no kind of rule that it a single trusted source and by the way. I'm not saying at the Carter page. Fiso was in fact based on a single source but that's the allegation if it was there are circumstances in which a single trusted source could generate probable cause for a warrant right sure there are there error sources that are paid sources the generate information for warrants just like they're paid confidential sources on on which a criminal cases rest so it's not rare that that would happen. It's not common but it's not rare what about sources with political critical interest. I mean the the suggestion is i. I've always sort of scratching my head at the FBI takes information from mobsters terrorists and and you know all kinds of criminals there's there's something seemingly so disreputable about taking information from somebody who was hired by indirectly by the Clinton campaign what is the obligation of the FBI in a situation where it's taking information that's kind of indirectly generated rated by a political campaign or its agents. How much effort do they have to make to bring that to the attention of the court and what what would be an appropriate manner in which to bring it to the attention of the court. I think they would agree that they have an obligation to bring that to the attention the court I would step back and say as far as I know with respect to the Carter page applications and there were four that were approved by the court there was a footnote that did at least a Lou that I'm not saying that it was full and forthcoming but it certainly certainly gave some information as to the source and that's something that I think that the court the judges on the court if I we're on the court I would certainly believe this but also the FBI and the Department of Justice believe is the responsibility of the FBI and the Department of Justice to reveal to the court any concerns that might exist with respect to the source. I also will step back and say I'm not sure well. I'm I'm not convinced that this was a single source application. Oh to be clear. I'm not suggesting that at all I'm saying saying the allegation and Devon Nunez the then chairman of the House intelligence committee set it in public right that this this application pervasively depended or was it almost exclusively dependent on the dirty dossier right and so I'm saying assuming that's true. How big a problem is that necessarily. It's a little bit of a problem but that's a big function. We'll see but but I'm not of the view that it likely was a single source both alcee okay so let's talk about that footnote. If you were still the presiding judge of the court the FISK and the somebody came the government came to you with that application you approve that application and then it turns out that the reality that we now know Oh to be the case which is that Chris deal is hired by fusion. GPS which is hired by Perkins Coie which is working for the Clinton campaign. Would you feel that that that was an inadequate disclosure of the possible political bias or the actual political bias of the source or would you say hey. It's there it. It was kind of my job to to read it. It's quite quite open and by the way to the extent. It doesn't name people that's 'cause. We're trying not to name. US persons in in in applications hindsight is twenty twenty but I would like to think that if I were the judge and it were a single source or or a fundamental part of the sourcing that I might inquire having seen what was in the footnote I might inquire further to get the best information I could with respect to that source so that I could factor in whether I thought there was some bias in the source or some reasons not to put full confidence in the source again and if it was one of four or five source items for the application it would have been perhaps a little less important important and I might have seen that and said okay so I'll put a question mark next to this item but you've got these four other things and that convinces me that the fairly low standard for probable cause is met in this instance and I'm only approving the application for a limited period of time because that's that's what happens with all applications so whether it's ninety days or one hundred twenty days or one hundred eighty days it's only for a limited period of time and it has to come back for renewal and it did on three further occasions. All four of the judges who looked at it approved the applications. I WANNA come back to the judges his renewals and the judges but I want to focus on what you just said about probable cause being relatively low standard for those who are not lawyers in the room probable causes this is sort of it's not the lowest standard in federal law but it's but it's pretty close. How often did it happen when you were on the court for that. You see an application and you say well. There's probable cause here which means sort of like there's likely a good reason to do this surveillance but then the premise of the surveillance actually turns out to be wrong as in you know there's probable cause at this guy's an agent of a foreign power so you authorize the surveillance and then it turns out that he's not an agent of a foreign power and so that the probable cause standard was met but the premise of the surveillance is actually incorrect. It happens on occasion. I can speak from my personal experience and say that there were occasions where I thought the probable because the termination was a close call and I even in a couple of occasions said okay government what I'm GonNa do is. I'm going to authorize arise this for just sixty days and you're GONNA have to come back to me not to another judge for renewal and you're going to have to show me what you've discovered through the electronic surveillance in that sixty days sometimes they would come back and I would say okay. I'll renew it based on that further information. Sometimes they came back. There was no information that really supported the application any further and I would say no. We're not going to renew it any further. So it happens that that's part of the process that it does sometimes the probable cause determination while made legally turns out that the person either is not. They're doing what the government is concerned about or is not doing it on those methods of communication because on occasion and this happened quite frequently I would approve an application that was made for three phone numbers and an email address address but I'd only approve it for two phone numbers because they didn't think the problem was finding was made as to the third phone number or the email all right. So how many times has it happened in your experience or to your knowledge that the application is approved the first time it is then renewed nude one two or three times and then the premise of the original application turns out to be inaccurate. I would say that would be exceedingly fittingly rare. I'm not aware of any instance but that would be exceedingly rare. So is it fair to say which is has been my assumption for a while that the fact of the renewables it is itself probitive to some degree of the underlying integrity of the original order. I think it is because you further information that is developed because you have electronic surveillance on that target and that further information will either be supportive of the application or undermine the application and gives the judge and the executive branch in the first instance in deciding whether to continue to seek the approval level of the application but it gives the judge the ability to decide whether that applications that surveillance should continue K. Lindsey Graham that chairman of the the Senate Judiciary Committee recently sent a letter to the Justice Department asking for the declassification of a whole bunch of documents including a letter that I or any letter but I take it that he probably has one in mind find that informs the court of an error or an omission in some of these applications or renewals car paycheck yeah that was the implication of the letter and so my question is i..

FBI government Carter Fisk chairman Clinton Fox News Fiso FISK US Mickey Amicus Connecticut Perkins Coie US Attorney Department of Justice Miki K. Lindsey Graham
"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

13:18 min | 1 year ago

"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"It's an agent of that foreign power and that's basically the probable cause determination that the court makes there some other things involved alternate. Sometimes you have to find that. There are sufficient safeguards on minimizing dissemination of information a lot of other possibilities. The core probably caused the termination for the title one cases which is still by far the majority of the applications that are made to the court is that finding gene of probable cause that target is a foreign power or an agent of a foreign power all right so in the years after nine nine eleven congress gave the Fisk this other job which you know grew out of you know what sometimes called the warrantless wiretapping program or the the Bush administration sort of post nine eleven. NSA activities Kennedy's well Congress didn't give the court that job no no no no excuse me. I didn't go to Carter's right so I grew out of that. Then eventually eventually congress comes in and kind of regularises this whole system eliminate some components of it authorizes some components seven the result is what's often called 702. It's a whole different area of fiso broadly speaking at a high level of altitude. What is the court's sports role in in in that kind of programmatic surveillance which is wholly unlike title one activity that surveillance once is overseas and not dealing with us persons and just think of US persons has basically citizens or people who are we're here? Legally that is a program that only deals 702 aspect of those statutory changes only deals deals with oversea surveillance of non. US persons and the problem of course finding there is even less. It's just some generalized showing that the individual is overseas. It's not much more to it than that. That is required but again remember. It's not a US person person. It's not a citizen of the US and it's not surveillance being conducted here now and the here is a little bit difficult in modern times because as you know who knows where the server that people's information might be located etc etc etc but basically it's for surveillance overseas fees relating to non US persons all right so five has always had its detractors and people who had civil liberties anxieties about it I until relatively recently I have thought of the suspicions of FIS as largely coming from from the sort of civil libertarian left and to a lesser extent from the sort of certain corners of the libertarian right but mostly it's kind of a of a left if civil liberties anxiety and the argument has always gone something like this the court is really a rubber stamp it in in fact it always involves the words rubber stamp. I don't know why it's like you know. Prosecutors can get a grand jury to indict a ham sandwich. It's never a grilled cheese sandwiches. It's always a ham sandwich. The FIS accord it's always a rubber stamp and so you guys are a rubber stamp and the government gets whatever it wants because it comes into a secret secret proceeding and it never has to show the warrant application to a defense attorney as it would ultimately have to do in in in a criminal context I in a different in that other system and by the way the government almost never gets rejected although more recently it's actually been been losing some cases and so that the system is a bit of a fiction. It's an elaborate paper trail designed to validate power or is that a fair characterization of the critique or about nine things in that question that you mentioned let me start with something you didn't mention and that is the original concern about the statute back in the late seventies really was coming more from the Department of Justice. I N in conservative forces who thought this was a mistake because it would engage judges in an area that they a didn't know what they were doing. They just had no expertise they had no business in this arena and it might even draw them into having to be involved in policy issues sensitive policy issues as it's turned out. I don't think there's been any real risk of judicial involvement involvement in policy issues. Perhaps the time that that was at greatest risk was in the aftermath of the disclosure of the president's President's Surveillance Program Prison Bush surveillance program post nine eleven and maybe nowadays with the Carter Page political critical battle going on and I think that the judges on the expertise side have really developed the necessary expertise pretty well and there's a set of seven lawyers who are permanent lawyers for the court who are very very experienced and assists the judges so back to your rubber-stamp question that also raises questions about the workload of the court that I want to address but I on the rubber stamp. That's been an accusation. I don't think there's been much truth to it. Ever recently starting about two thousand fifteen the court published sticks showing the number of applications the number that were a modified in some significant way and the number of that were denied or withdrawn and withdrawals would be because the court had some concerns and the Department of Justice often those contexts instead of moving forward and getting a a denial will withdraw the application in the last three years of statistics if I can remember them and there are no statistics yet for two thousand nineteen but for calendar calendar year sixteen seventeen eighteen. I think the percentage of applications that have either been modified denied in part or full or withdrawn the three years. It's twenty two percent twenty eight percent twenty five percent so it's an average about twenty five percent of the applications actually get some serious change either a denial or modification. Most of the these are modifications indication's not denials but this this past year two thousand eighteen. I believe there were thirty applications that were denied in full out of thirteen hundred and eighteen. I think applications in two thousand eighteen just for perspective if you go go to the domestic criminal law enforcement context and title three and the applications that are made to federal judges for wiretaps taps mainly in drug cases but in other cases as well there have been years that there have been no oh denials for several thousand cases that were brought during that year the reason it's pretty careful system the executive accurate branch really responsible for there being no denials is pretty careful and does a good job that some of those might be modified oh by questions or concerns that the judge raises in the FIS area I think is even more care given to those applications a start in the field they go through a lot of examination in the FBI field office then they come to headquarters and are reviewed they then go to the Department of Justice which is the litigating arm that brings them to the court and are subject to further review there and then the review by the court art so it's a pretty careful intense process and I don't think it's surprising that there wouldn't be that many denials but there are enough that I I think it's unfair to say that the court is rubber-stamped. Let me just make an observation on the workload. Since thinking of Statistics I said thirteen hundred applications last this year the year before there were sixteen hundred twelve I think about sixteen hundred and the year before that there were seventeen hundred and fifty that that breaks down if my math is right that last year was about twenty five applications per week for the court to deal with the year before about thirty one applications per week near before that thirty seven when I was on the court and I left the court in two thousand thirteen so it's been a while since I've been on the court but when I was on the court we have over two thousand applications a year and it would be between forty and fifty every week so the workload of the court I e the applications brought to the court has really gone down. I don't have an explanation but I think it's something to not. Do you think it's because the world is getting safer. I I hope that's part of it but I think it's probably more complicated and is a combination of factors all right so in in the last three years the political anxiety about the court have flipped almost entirely whole bunches of people apple on the political left on the centre-left have discovered that you know counterintelligence is really important and then they've always really really believed in those legal institutions that enable robust counterintelligence and a whole lot of people on the right have discovered that the FIS accord award is a rubber stamp that doesn't protect citizens against a rapacious. FBI that's out to get involved in the political system and retaliate against people because of the exercise of their constitutional rights. I guess I'm I have been surprised at you know having spent twenty years kind of writing about these issues and thinking that the sort of landscape of political support for and opposition to things like five and authorities like the ones that it contains was fairly stable at the degree he to which it sort of suddenly up ended and I'm just curious for your thoughts as somebody who kind of sat on that court what what has the last few years of kind of Pfizer in the news. How is it hits you. It's politics. That's how it hits me. basically. I mean it depends whose ox is getting word. What you're what you're what. The view of some people is. I do think that the court has been thus far fairly immune to that the FBI and the Department of Justice is not immune to day to those criticisms I I. I don't think the criticisms or concerns from the left have gone away. I think you'll see them. As parts of the statute need I need to be renewed because most parts of the statute need to be renewed. They all have sunset provision in them and there are a couple of parts that are being that are up for renewal in December some are not controversial one is a little more controversial but I think you'll hear from in the legislative arena some concerns there a recent hearing that occurred was interesting because it does put particularly on the right in a little bit of an awkward position because they want the provision of the statute renewed and continued but yet they have a lot of criticisms to lodge against the court some degree but more against against the Department of Justice in the FBI in its relationships with and litigation before the court now one of the big things that I didn't mentioned a moment go that is important to consider and is a legitimate concern unlike almost any other kind of matter in federal court ort. These applications usually not always but usually are not in the adversarial system..

Department of Justice US FBI congress Carter government Kennedy FIS Fisk Pfizer president apple attorney executive three years twenty five percent twenty eight percent
"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

13:36 min | 1 year ago

"bates" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"I'm Benjamin wittes and this is the law fair podcast our immune festival in Austin Texas and I have here with me. A real live finds as a judge or rather to be precise former real live former five the judge. John Bates is a senior judge on the DC the District Court in Washington. DC where he has served us since two thousand one that is correct and in that time he was appointed to be the presiding judge of the foreign intelligence surveillance court which as is now commonly known as the Super Duper super-secret court that approves wiretap warrants in national security cases and does some other really interesting stuff and we're going to talk about at all so so but jump into it but I'll call it the fisk instead of that long series of words that Ben just us yeah so let's let's start with that everybody in the world except the people who actually have intimate experience with the FIS court call at the Pfizer court the people who who have served on it or practice before it call at the fest explain the nomenclature differential. This is just the acronym Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Surveillance Court this the odd thing is that there is a court of review and it is called the Fisker F. I. S. C. We are at an entire history of the fisker. How many cases has it heard. I can't tell you how many cases it is heard. I think there are now how five published opinions from that court so I I did my first story about the FIS institution back doc in the mid ninety s the fisker had heard zero cases and it was famous for having heard zero cases and one of the judges who had served on it said to me on the record. This was not a a confidential conversation and said yes the greatest job I ever had the chief. Justice called me up and said it's great job job. You get a title. You're an appeals court. Judge and you never have to do any work. The FISK is different right. You guys actually do work works so first of all tell us about how you came to be on the fest and the presiding judge of the Fisk and secondly what the nature of the work is before I do. There's another court shorthand alien removal court that has never heard a single case and eventually they did they mean the chief justice and those who work with them was just say okay. The fisk court of Review judges will just be that court court as well because it didn't make sense to appoint judges to a court that actually did zero the foreign intelligence surveillance court more like a trial court. It does do a lot of work. The work has changed over the years and of course nine eleven was a big event for the judicial system in terms of National L. Intelligence surveillance just as it was for the intelligence community but that court nowadays consists of eleven district district judges from around the country and the chief justice chooses the judges who go on the court and he feels quite strongly that that's an important function that he has in putting experienced judges. Hopefully you have some experience. That's relevant. That's sometimes hard to find on that court which is really the only National Court. I suppose you could call the soup the Supreme Court National Court but as long as it's mainly oh you graduates of Harvard and Yale Law schools from the eastern elite that might not be possible all right so when you say the chief justice likes is to choose people with relevant experience. The presiding judge of the Fisk is always from your court the US District Court for the District of Columbia. What was your relevant experience. Why why you why did you pick up the phone and say hey do you wanNA spend the next. What is it seven years. Seven seven year term one term can't be reappointed so like what was it about your background that that sort of screamed fisk presiding judge I suppose I have been in the military I've been in the US Attorney's Office for many years and done a lot of fourth amendment work and in that capacity the city I had actually done a fair amount of national security work working on some cases going all the way back to CBS's defense search of the case involving General Westmoreland and Vietnam War. I represented the CIA in that context. So actually I'm sort of the exception I did have some relevant experience but many of the judges don't have much relevant experience except being judge which does bring you into contact contact with some of the issues that you face on the fisk not all by any means you don't get much of a grounding in the statute which what is the most important part of the work but you do get some grounding in fourth amendment work and you get the experience of being a judge dealing with some some complex and sometimes difficult all right so we're going to get to why you keep reading about the fisk and the Pfizer as is an institution in the news and in the context of the sort of Russia scandals or Russia investigation in a little while l. but in order to set that up I want to talk about the various baskets of activity that feige judges are actually asked to think about five as a really complicated statue and it actually authorizes very different categories of surveillance and and asks for judicial review of a very disparate type of thing or types of things and so I wanna start by saying like what is this statute and what does it ask judges to do the statute came him about in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight seventy nine and it was really a result of principally to events one was the supreme court's decision in the Keith case. That's the name of judge the case title formerly is United States United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan she can and in that case the court dealt with domestic foreign intelligence surveillance and and opined on whether warrantless surveillance could occur in certain settings but didn't get to and only sort sort of a made some observations with respect to foreign intelligence surveillance generally some extent what they did was send a message to Congress sane nine. This is an area that you want to do something about they had done that. The prior decade. I guess in the Cat's case on the fourth amendment a really encouraging Congress to take up what turned out to be titled. Three which is the domestic wireless surveillance surveillance for wiretaps for drug cases etc in Congress took it up and pass tile that case by the Supreme Court pushed Congress a little bit to to look at this issue for foreign intelligence surveillance that would happen domestically and that was the focus primarily initially ultimately the statute has gone much further than that the other impetus was what I would still call the model Waddell for congressional investigations and that was the Church Committee and the Church Committee looked at some activities of our intelligence community some abuses by our intelligence community and investigated thoroughly wrote a series of reports. It's really chastising some of the activities of the FBI and the intelligence agencies and that to lead to passage of the statute the the Justice Department and the administration resisted for a while but after a couple of years what came about was the foreign intelligence surveillance act focused initially on electronic surveillance for foreign intelligence purposes taking place domestically okay so let me stop you there because this is the core four of the the main part of the statute and the certainly the one that's at issue in when people talk about the Carter Page Fiso or the Russian investigation. They're talking about this title one of of Fiso Nine hundred seventy eight the government want to conduct surveillance of me. Eh for being criminal you don't use the statue. What do you use this statute for nowadays. what most people think of is terrorism they think of a counterterrorism efforts by the United States so that's in the foreign foreign intelligence arena it may or may not be connected with criminal investigation but it's looking at the foreign intelligence now when it first came about the focus was much more on espionage now because back in nineteen seventy eight there really wasn't a terrorism focus some domestic but not the kind of international terrorism that we think about these days so the focus then was espionage that still part hard of what the statute deals with it deals with counterintelligence it deals with counter-terrorism it deals with terrorism in all all its forms not just the terrorism that we think of on nine eleven or bombings in Bali or events in London or Paris but also economic espionage. That's very important subject so that the statute covers a lot aww different things for you been probably most of those would be relevant and so any judge would sign off on the application. I'm that dangerous. Why do you need a separate court for this. I think for two principal reasons one is you. You do need some expertise. The judges don't start with that expertise but as time moves on to a seven year term it has developed secondly. Currently it's good to have the consistency that you get with a single court. Even though there are multiple judges on the court if this was being decided all across the country every time an application was made by the intelligence community through the FBI these really come from the FBI. It might be a different venue and should get a judge who had no idea even what the name of the statute was much less how it operated so I think practically speaking it makes sense to put it all in one place. Not The federal system doesn't operate that way generally really we're much more of a what's called Trans substantive system where each judge handles all different areas are rule all system that I'm very involved in is supposedly for all cases not for specialized groups of cases but this is an exception all right right and there's another highly exceptional thing about this court which is that while it grants requests for warrants on the basis of probable cause as do all courts of general jurisdiction it also it operates on the basis of a different probable probable cause standard than the normal criminal warrant talk about the standard that the government has to meet when it comes in to the fisk there are multiple standards depending upon the kind of case it is what section of the matter happens to be under principally. Ben Referred to as title one. That's that's where most of the cases are and that's the normal electronic surveillance the statute and thus the court deals with the probable cause determination there is basically just an associational determination that the target is an agent of a foreign power or a foreign power so it could be as a foreign power not just a nation state but also an international terrorist organization started boarded out post nine eleven really focused on al Qaeda but the target has to be just identified as connected with.

Foreign Intelligence Surveilla Fisk Supreme Court National Court District Court fisk court of Review Supreme Court Pfizer court US District Court National Court United States United States Di FISK fisker FBI National L. Intelligence Ben Benjamin wittes DC Austin Texas Congress
"bates" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

Phil in the Blanks

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"bates" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

"Hello. Well, hello. How are you? Very well. And I'm so happy to be here. I'm thrilled to death to meet you same here. How in the world are you? I'm really great. I can't tell you they'll help the I am for you to be here. I guess they probably already told you. You are my absolute number one actress in the entire world. They didn't tell me. Get that wanna play that. No, I'm serious when I started do this. They said all right. And we're talking about actress Hollywood all of that. If you could talk to one who would it be said, Kathy Bates, I have been your biggest fan forever. Well, same hearing about me say of your number one fan. But seriously, it is an honor to meet you just can't even believe I'm sitting here talking to you same here. I have I watch you on you to. Great not as subscriber yet. But I I watch because I learned. I learned a lot. But also for character studies. I love to see real people with With you. you can find it on. My does not exist. Providence you. So we'll hell are you? I'm really good. I'm lucky I'm been working allied. I'm doing American horror story season aide. Am also doing a big bang theory. Hang my MBA, Alex, mom and tellers playing my husband her, dad. So I'm, you know, I'm finding that I'm working and working and working, and I'm really grateful for every day that I get up desert surprise, you that you're working so much. Does it really? Yeah. What do you say to yourself about? Well, first of all I feel real lucky to be alive after the last few years because I had breast cancer about six years ago about this time. So every day, I get up. I'm just grateful that I get to do everything that I love, and I don't take anything for granted. And I just thank God for everything will before we finish a want to save time to talk about all of that. I wanna talk about lymph Dima. Chanqi? I'm sorry that you've been through all of that. I have a sister that's been through that as well. And so I know that it's it's more than a bump in the road. Doing. Okay. Yes. Good. But I want people to get to know you. Okay. Cluding that you were born in Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee, or did, you know? You know, I was thinking about this. It used to be when I go home. If I hit baggage claim southern accent would come out the truth. But I knew when I hit your driveway. That's all. Come out again. Some you hear my accent? Oh, yeah. But use more, Texas, Texas. Yeah. I would still in Texas. You went to media. You went there for one reason in finished for another. Yeah. You know, everything. You know, I'm telling you, I'm a huge fan. So I've followed all of this. But you're SMU girl. I am I think it shocked my dad because he was in his late sixties about my age early seventies. And it was turned out to be very expensive school which we couldn't afford that will those expensive. Well, it was it was expensive for him. And I am always I appreciate so much. My parents did to get me there. I just guess growing up in the south, you know, growing up especially with two sisters who were nine in fifteen years older than I thought that you could only be a secretary or a teacher or something like that or a nurse..

Texas Memphis Kathy Bates SMU secretary Hollywood Alex Tennessee fifteen years six years
"bates" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

Phil in the Blanks

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"bates" Discussed on Phil in the Blanks

"I watch you on YouTube great, I really love watching people's expressions. What they don't say. And that fascinates me. Other more misery scared when I was married. My ex husband said after he saw misery that he didn't say anything unusual up there. Lamb working on American horror story, and I never dreamt that I would have the opportunity at this age to play roles of that magnitude and depth. And Ryan Murphy brought me back to life. You can't tell from listening that was Kathy Bates. And I've gotta tell you. I don't get starry eyed very easy. But when I started to do this podcast. I was asked if you could talk to somebody in Hollywood and actress that you just really really admire who would it be? It took me about a nanosecond to say, Kathy Bates. I'll tell you why I've never been able to catch her acting you watch her, and she just becomes the character. And this is a woman that I have admired for a long long time when I sat down with her a found out she went to SMU now, you know, southern boy, southern girl, we just really kind of had a vibe a found out that she really watches doctor Phil she studied some things on YouTube about her characters. I couldn't have been more flattered, but you'll you always wonder when you meet somebody are they going to let you down or are they gonna be the real deal. Let me tell you when I walked away from this. I admired her even more than a minute. I met her. So let's stop talking about her and start talking to her. That's going to happen in less than one minute Herschel,.

Kathy Bates Phil YouTube Ryan Murphy SMU Lamb Hollywood one minute
"bates" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

Now What? with Arian Foster

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"bates" Discussed on Now What? with Arian Foster

"Podcast. I'm your host as usual area foster, and I have another special guest in the building. Brandy Bates we are. I'd say, right, right. My memory is very short, but we, we're Twitter, Twitter, friends, laflin following you for for years now. Yeah, yeah. And I don't know how long you can follow me. But if I were you for your and. You, you peaked my interest because you were extremely poetic with the way that you send your messages out and it really caught my interest in is this beautiful writing. Thank you. And I just recently found out that you're an author, right? So I didn't even know that my work is kind of it is strong. So welcome to the podcast glad to be here, so. So what is your? So you're at sign is Soledad's Frank Francis, and that I just recently found out was a character when your novels. Absolutely. All right now, right. Tell me about yourself or Sola day I whatever you want to know about the tell me about yourself first. So again, I'm brandy. Al Bates, author, I'm an entrepreneur, my mother and yet. So Twitter is one of my stronger platforms, but just the characters pr-. Much, you know, like a doormat into the world egos ally, deeper, the rabbit hole goals. The dude I took the the ripple. So you you're a writer, and what what is your? What did you, what do you focus on? Because the the reason why, like I said, the reason why I wanted to have a conversation because the way in which you view the world is extremely unique. It's extremely. I would say optimistic, but I think there's layers to it. Absolutely. All right, so so so it is interesting to me to to meet people that have that view of the world because like I've been back, I've been on both sides of optimism and pessimism and I'm currently residing on the pessimism. Sure. I love to meet people from the opposite end of the spectrum to bring me back. Yeah. I mean, I try to stay. I'm like, you are believed that pessimist pessimism. That's just another word for somebody that's real and we need that. But I try to stay more optimistic because you know, that's the power. Your mind is whatever Lind's you choose to see the world through is what will become your reality, what will become your day in. So I just try not to focus on, you know, the so-called negative because I mean, we have enough of it inundate you with it regardless whether you think about it or not, we are going to grow. Try to create beautiful thing. I agree with that. And you said the the way which review the world, our perception kind of creates our own reality. I'm I'm stuck right there right there currently in my in my life because I'm not current. I'm not. I'm not convinced everybody lives in the same reality. Like what I mean by that is I mean, I think we share the same space in time, but. The way in which everybody views the world is so vastly different that that's where my pessimism reside this. That's why I'm a pessimistic because I, I'm not convinced everybody can take their worldview off of. I'm not convinced that everybody can kind of like peel back the layers of their worldview and realize it's not a part of them. Does that make sense? Yeah. So like the way people interact nowadays, it's like the way you think is a part of you and can't disassociate yourself with a lot of our ideologies. It's it's damaging to any kind of social relationships were having. Absolutely. Because you're indoctrinated from very young from even the very youngest ages, you're being indoctrinated constantly from the television to the radio, and now with social and even, you know, the children are born with devices in.

Twitter Lind Brandy Bates Frank Francis Soledad Al Bates writer
"bates" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"bates" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"In my heart was pounding out of my chest. I was walking room for probably full of eight or ten people. So I tell that story only because you know now like you, I'm invited to speak all of the world and two big audiences. But you have to start somewhere and you have to, you know, I think you have to push yourself. You know, you have to challenge yourself to stay. On a bigger stage. As I often say, I mean that there's a, that's the metaphor. And then the real aspect of speaking in front of our audience is leaders have to learn to do it too. But in order to stand on a bigger stage, you gotta go stand on bigger stages, learn how to do it, do it right. There's a doing part of it. Just brought up the idea of the global aspect of your work. And I'm curious about that because, you know, I, I've been speaking on my topic for a decade and I know that now when I are, you know, I I run masterminds that I was just in a mastermind, and there was someone from like the UK, Australia, Canada, and the US. And it was so neat, you know. And I was like, I had no idea that my work would resonate, you know, with people all over the world. And in fact, I would say ten years ago, I would have thought it wouldn't, you know that felt so like localized my specialty. How did you think about executive presence on a global scale? I mean, culturally there must be such differences in. How people rank what's important, you know, when they look at somebody and what they value. So was there a challenge in making this shifts cross culturally around the the Bates model? Yeah, that's a great question. The model that we developed is meant to be a multi grader assessment, which means that it's contextual for that later in that organization. So we looked at literature from around the world in order to draw from all of that so that we could be asked culturally agnostic as possible. Now, that doesn't mean that there are differences between business cultures as well as a country cultures. But at the end, there even differences within businesses in the IT group is different from the sale scripture officer to some degree in almost every organization. So the way we designed it was to be context civic. So the person getting feedback, it's getting from his or her stakeholders, their peers, direct reports, maybe they're bored. Navy outside influencers, but it should be relevant to them. And as far as it being global, I think we now use the they'd sex PI assessment in model in seventeen countries. I think the reason for that is because executive presence is actually a hot topic globally. Communication is generally, and it's only becoming more so because we are living in a global world where we gotta be communicate with one another office certainly are struggling with this spot. Even companies like yours and mine, smaller boutique companies can be an almost half to be global. It's really exciting to, because as I know you discovered with your mastermind groups, you aren't so much whether you're in a mastermind group or whether you're working ci- globally. It's so much fun and and you're right. That wouldn't have happened ten or fifteen years ago, but technologies Nikki. Awesome. Yeah, I think that might have been part of his the idea of how to. Bring people together in a in a room, a virtual room, just get ten years ago. It wasn't even the thing and now it's an everyday occurrence. So I can see how once you've developed a model in one area, people hear about it and they wanna bring it to their own company. It's not as much of a heavy lift to do that these days, but you also have to be ready to do it. And it sounds like you were like, yes, this is the topic where we're digging deep. So I'm I'm wondering how you balance all of this, and Dallas is sort of always misnomer here. It's maybe it's the word integration, but the hard part I know that being an entrepreneur and and I also young kids. So I have that extra challenges that you never really off the clock like, like, you know, you don't have a clock into work luck out of work, sort of way of approaching it. So how do you know when you're not on on the clock? Like how do you

executive Dallas Nikki officer UK US Australia Canada ten years fifteen years
"bates" Discussed on Countermoves: An ERLC Podcast

Countermoves: An ERLC Podcast

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"bates" Discussed on Countermoves: An ERLC Podcast

"A lot of the debate around the transgender movement is the bates over terminology there's an ever expanding lexicon terms associated the transgender movement i don't want to spend a lot of time on all of these but just for to to make sure that every listener is on the same page is as we're talking about this the terms biological sex and gender ryan when we say biological sex versus gender what those terms mean sure so to understand what's going on here sex is a bodily reality on sex is a biological reality in its discerned it's recognized based upon a bodies organization with respect to reproduction there's a male way and a female way of being organized with respect to reproduction an organism's our systems of organs that are or organized in certain ways on so this is how we tell the difference between different species different organisms in terms of like canine bovine in human those are organisms that are organized in different ways but then so true the way that within a given species we can determine the male and the female of the species whether it's the bovine species canine species homo sapiens human species is looking at how that organism is organized with respect to reproduction gender than is held we manifest our bodily sex in ways that matter right insurance sexist given reality were each conceived with a sex born with extra conceived at conception this imprinted in our dna it will then influence our development in the womb along either a male or female organizational trajectory upper.

bates
"bates" Discussed on Snoop Dogg's GGN Podcast

Snoop Dogg's GGN Podcast

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"bates" Discussed on Snoop Dogg's GGN Podcast

"I see in our which fucking gatherings performer tonight but i'd like to be aware at the fucking roxie man she's not going to out i'd like to be as tall as you she could be me there beaming there and rock out made me but forming live are flocking banned kathy bates yeah changed my name fought no so bucking square no it works it works it works i'm telling you were you gun flocking kathy bates isn't down the night what i bought four tickets already the holiday inn leone chase two oh man two more to more to do more meanwhile we almost hit me my favorite position is bono what you want me to say why dole i may say what is your favorite position in life in sports insects in i don't know where it is mm come on let me think about this is your position in no life babe position it all my favorite position is in the bathtub superfly seen what to bubbles and stuff remember that same was superfly baby in the bathtub anyway anyway rolling around eighty thousand a nice lecico away to do go away candy show up with that when i never heard that as it down in the bafta will bob walsh who palmolive really.

kathy bates bob walsh palmolive