22 Burst results for "Basso"

"basso" Discussed on The Authority Project

The Authority Project

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"basso" Discussed on The Authority Project

"I mean linda word for word the exact same thing so you're getting taught by somebody. Obviously that's fine. You can tell by approach whatever but is that how you usually talk or you. Just give me a script. That's right so they haven't digested it to make it their own. So i talk about this in my book that there's nothing original anymore that's the original. There's no such thing as original. It's all been done when i was in art school. We were actually taught. We had to spend a whole unit copy masters like okay. I'm painting picasso will. I'm not picasso. Why do i have to do this. I wanna do my own thing. Well because i was learning the the set of decisions that he was making. I was learning from a master how they did it now my job. I couldn't sell those copies. That would be illegal but learning learning's fine but then you have to digest it and you have to make it your own. So what. I get a script. I learned from all kinds of professionals in people who know more than me. But then i have to digest that and safe. What in that works for me. What in that is true from me. I love it. 'cause it's like people should understand like how would you say it though 'cause you're not going to say like him how would you say it. How how would you approach somebody. If it doesn't feel like you do. Is the problem there. I mean it's going to be a problem eventually but we can talk about other a good question. I feel like a lot of people are not comfortable with being. They are unsure how people will react. Linda get out there. And how i've been this way for so long now. This person that they might be thinking..

picasso linda Linda
A Lonely Olympics for Athletes Competing to Be Champions

Morning Edition

02:09 min | 1 year ago

A Lonely Olympics for Athletes Competing to Be Champions

"The Olympics are going to turn into a covid super spreader event. The city is under a state of emergency, and athletes say it all feels a little lonely. Here's NPR's Leila Fadel Emiliano Basso is a reserve field hockey goalkeeper from Argentina. He's in the hallway of his Tokyo hotel. This is where he's staying separated from his team in the Olympic Village. It's just him the reserve goalkeeper for the women's team and a couple Argentinian handball players. We took a bit it we don't have a more interactions. Between as they're confined to their rooms when they aren't at practice to limit possible infections. So this is his day, wake up in the morning and get very fast and it's inside the room. And they get taxi to go to a practice. Back to the hotel and get psyched to go to practice. I'm like silica gel and then the same. Well, today's you eat dinner were am dinner inside the room. So everything by yourself? Yes. Despite the difficulties, the separation from his team the 25 year old is ecstatic is fair Olympic. It's fantastic. Are you excited? Yes, yes, I'm really happy. When we finished chatting, he walks to his room with a Japanese newspaper and a translation app to keep him company for the night. Being an Olympic athlete this summer means little fanfare and lots of isolation. Foreign Spectators are banned. Japanese fans whose tax dollars largely paid for these games can go to events either Save a few venues outside Tokyo so athletes will see selfie videos of fans at their competitions. And here recorded sounds of cheers like this from the first U. S women's soccer match with Sweden this week. Echoed in a cavernous, empty stadium meant for tens of thousands of cheering supporters. When the sweets walked off the field winners, there was silence except for the applause of three team officials holding a Swedish flag.

Leila Fadel Emiliano Basso Tokyo Hotel NPR Handball Olympics Argentina Hockey Olympic Tokyo Sweden Soccer
Dan Gurney of NASCAR, F1, and Indy car fame

Past Gas

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Dan Gurney of NASCAR, F1, and Indy car fame

"Dan gurney was born on april thirteenth. Nineteen thirty one the son of john gurney and roma sexton the to admit at oberlin college in ohio where they are nicknamed the golden couple for their good looks and talent. Wow that's pretty sick. yeah. I wonder if it was sarcastic. Go here comes the golden couple. Yeah like john. Gurney was like really into musical theater and could sing kinda well but land gurney johnny dead. Oh his dad and his mom were the golden couple. Yeah sorry guys come on. I'm just going to move on. it's my birthday. i'm already drone. Dan wasn't born with a silver spoon of privilege. But rather a gold star family achievement. His dad was the lead basso at the metropolitan opera of new york. And also saying on broadway. I nailed it. I was totally guessing that his dad was a way. You weren't even guessing you were joking. Joking oh my god. I love it. I have a lot of respect for people who can just stand up and sing in front of people. Because that's like my biggest fear. I can't do that one step ahead of the bad guy and the square deal only one. I can't afford my god level. Respect level just went through more. That came from go up after the pod. Wanting a simpler life. John relocated the family from new york to riverside california buying an operating a citrus orchard. And giving up the opera for oranges

John Gurney Roma Sexton Gurney Johnny Dan Gurney Oberlin College Gurney Ohio DAN John New York Riverside California
"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"77 Bill anyway, ABC. I'm John Baxter. This is the John Basso show Mark Twain. Samuel Clemens. The funniest man in the 19th century is so deep in debt, he decides the only way to get out of this is a speaking tour. We're going to charge a dollar a seat on a dollar 50 if you sit close, and I'm going to tell stories For 90 minutes and we'll test at all across America, and then we'll go to Australia will go under India, South Africa and back to Europe and I'll pay off my debts. That's the theory. We have to plunge immediately because Richard's axe takes us around the world. This is west to east. So we're going west, now to California, but to a British man, British Columbia, But first we're going to go to Great Falls, Montana. This is the beginning of the tour. But Mark Twain is working out his presentation and he's talking to small towns. Great Falls, Richard. I have as $100 Bute was 150 a comic in huge sums. There's no air conditioning in that era, so no one wants to sit in a hot theater in the summer. Luo lie in August, so they're just getting small amounts of money as they travel through America, and there's the joy of your book. We're taken on this travel tour with Mark Twain, who's cranky and ill and blame shifting and smoking cigars. And around him. Is America very busy, And this is the robber Baron era. So we feel them. Extracting the resource is that's building America and Twain is cranky about it the whole time. Well, Yeah, he had a boil on his leg That was, you know, it didn't heal for the whole part of the American trip. The good thing for me was the notebooks haven't been published. The Berkeley's only gotten up to 18 91. So I got to read all these Mark Twain observations about, you know, taking steamers and train rides and all the rest of it that basically hadn't been red. So it it's it's It's You're absolutely right. Fascinating to travel with Mark Twain across town, and it's It's wonderful to have you as a guide, because I can see how much material there is. And you have I make decisions all the time. Remember that Look advice. The Twain has the reason book's successful is because of what you leave out right now. What's in it? So my editor, by the way, put the marching underlined, like nine times. Thank you very much. Oh, this could have easily been a much longer book. I appreciate the willpower and the footnotes and all of that, But in any event, we go out West. Where what we learn is that the audience knows about Mark Twain. But he has a set period piece of stories. And one of the themes in his life with Livi is that Livy and his daughter, Clara, who's traveling with them, Susie, the eldest daughter, and Jean, the youngest daughter of stayed back in New York with their relatives. Clara's with them with a box camera. She's taking pictures and notes on her father. The girls and Livy want Mark Twain to be serious. What did they mean by that, Richard? Well, it's interesting because Twain was considered one of the funniest travel writers believe it or not innocents abroad and roughing it. A lot of modern readers don't remember that he broke in as a travel writer, Funny travel writer and then he did funny lectures basically stand up comedy based on A travel book. So this is what his his usual material. What were these funny travel stories in these anecdotes from the books and his wife and daughter? They wanted him to be a literary writer. They wanted him to be Henry James. They just here they have the funniest man arguably used almost ever lived, or certainly of the century. And they want him to be something else. So his wife suggests that he do the scene from Huck Finn, where Huck and Jim are on the raft, and they're floating towards Cairo, Illinois, and Tuck is the slave hunters want Huck to turn over the slave? Jim, the runaway slave Jim and the first twin thinks that's a terrible idea because he had seen how people are laughing in this material is going well. But then he finally agrees in Minneapolis, and it goes over so amazingly well, it would become A story that everyone spoke about twins entire voyage around the world. It resonated everywhere. Except for South Africa, which you can guess why. Because of the attitude towards blacks there, but everywhere else. It was his most powerful story. He mixes the stories because he does tell really funny stories. Hey, does he had a Rooty had 30 different stories varying in length from about seven minutes to 15 minutes. I mean, I swear he would seem like Modern standup comedy. I mean, the six out of seven were always funny, somewhere even almost straightforward jokes. He does this thing called the whistling stammer or where he where a guy who stand has a stammer has to whistle instead. And when every time he's about just stammered twin would whistle and it comes off like he's cursing you just your brain wants to insert curse words. And I mean hey was doing stand up and and it's amazingly and it it stands the test of time. It's a little hard to get across sometimes because his delivery was so unusual. I don't know if modern audiences realized he talked incredibly slowly and he didn't smile and he had this little twinkle. I mean, I could only think of like Steven, right? That comic. They're mean there are others, but he his delivery was just very unusual. And you had a wait for the punch line, and he talked about the pauses being the most important part of his speech. And that's today We would call that comic timing off two on literally time the audience off to Australia. They sail on the war Amoo, which they both where they all declared, looks, dinging and smelled oiling and musty. But this is this is a credit to Liv E and Clara because they They're they're taking care of Mark Twain. He's a very, very high maintenance child. This is true. I mean, he goes into a whole tantrum about smoking because he wants to smoke. And the captain is rule that you can't smoke inside the state rooms. The only place indoors you Khun Smoke is in the smoking room, which is way up across two decks across the slippery place by the pool and the rest of it, And then Twain discovers that there's a little pug dog on the ship. It's allowed to, as he put discharge. It's inexhaustible bowels everywhere between vows that he's going to break every rule in the ship until that dog is his force to stop, you know, doing its business everywhere. I mean, he is high maintenance. No doubt about that. They they do arrive in Australia. There is a wonderful stop in Honolulu. Where's there's a quarantine so they can actually seek a lot. Honolulu. They could just see it from the from the water. They can't land on it, and now they had to Australia. The Australians have heard about Mark Twain. He looked, it looks as if he's very well received Richard right away..

Mark Twain Australia America Richard ABC Livy Clara South Africa John Baxter Great Falls John Basso Europe Bute Honolulu Henry James California Huck Finn Luo writer
"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Leaving Dawes and his officers with their arms full of swords. Which is very awkward. I'm speaking to Alan Girls. Oh, Gettysburg. The last invasion the first day of the first chorus standing up against on an overwhelming force, But coming from the North is another core. The union is about to spend the day of Turmoil and defeat that at the end, a miracle saves. I'm John Bass, for this is the John Basso show. Can the daily recommended servings of fruits and vegetables fit into just six capsules? Yes. We start by sourcing organically grown whole fruits and vegetables. We ensure they're picked at peak ripeness. All of our produce is third party tested for pesticides, heavy metals, bad bacteria and nutrients. There, then washed, cut and put through an advanced vacuum cold process which removes the water using pressure. This maximizes the nutritional value while preserving the color, smell and taste of the fruit vegetable. The freeze dried food is then ground into a fine powder without adding any additives, fillers or extracts. These powdered foods are then mixed in our proprietary blends and encapsulated, locking out air and moisture the capsule's air than bottled and shipped directly to our customers. Balance of nature is now offering 35%.

John Basso Dawes John Bass Alan Girls Gettysburg
Navigating The Future Way of Cruising with Emma Cruises

The Cruise Dudes Podcast

07:48 min | 2 years ago

Navigating The Future Way of Cruising with Emma Cruises

"How you doing today I am doing good. I'm still in my pajamas. I have a nice shirt on and we are going to be recording another show from the couch. That's right cruise dude studio here in Santa Monica California Nice Quarantine. Day How you doing. I'm getting ready to go cruising a Ken. I can't wait. I'm watching all the videos on Youtube. I'm checking out all the INSTAGRAM'S. Everybody is very encouraging. Just cruising is coming Basso. Speaking about videos we have a special guest. We Have Amaafuza. And she has a website called cruising is not just for old people and she put out the nine things. They're going to be changing because of Cova nineteen in the cruise lines and we're going to discuss her findings and some of those things and we're going to go into some details and share our thoughts. Sure she'll share her thoughts and I think I don't. I'm ready to go you know. She's already had thousands of hits on this one video and it's only been out for like four or five days. It's incredible so. Let's get right doer. All right here we go. Well we have a friend EMMA FROM MMA CRUISES. Low Low Emma from home cruces. Just old people throw people that's me we're all cruising from our couches right now. Are you cruising from your couch undoing? My best is the food isn't as good and entertainment is not the same but trying what do you mean isn't Hudson providing new show every night now? I was really excited to work from home and see what Hudson doesn't the daytime. He doesn't nothing absolutely at least though. Because we're all zooming. All we have to do is put on a shirt and have our pajamas on the bottom. My right that's that's pretty much the Slo move version of what I wear. If I'm wearing like me dressed up for the day it's not. It's just in pajamas. Would everyday Yup Yup and all we're waiting for is to get back to cruising and that's why we're here. Hey so tell us. Let's just let's go back. What was your last cruise My loss cruise on the Norwegian spirit. My favorite cristobal time. Just before Christmas was decorated for Christmas it was was fantastic. Reading Ice Really missed that cruise ship. She had a massive refit. Just after I came off and I was hoping to get back on board But yeah that plans been delayed for now for a little bit just for a little bit. Oh well you. You produced a video Couple of days ago and and it's titled Nine Ways Your cruises will be changing after Kovic nineteen and we thought that it was just so timely and so informative. We decided to have you on our show to share with us. Some of the things that you have discovered here. Can you tell us? Where did you find? These proposed changes coming to cruising a case. So there's there's a company who genting Hong Kong who owns three different cruise lines They own stalkers crystal cruises on dream cruises. I'm not sure how much you guys know about them because they mostly in hr but they came out with. You're familiar with crystal crystals pretty much. When I know dream all they did have something to do with Norwegian for awhile so the ships are pretty much. I think of them as being the Asian versions of the Norwegian cruise ships. If you look at them you would think that they were Norwegian cruise ships but then but they release these guidelines. That said. This is what we're GONNA do when we get back to cruising and it goes through everything from cleaning how they're going to change on the buffets in the main dining rooms how they gonna Change. They're expecting changing the way people book things And I think that the first cruise line. That's come out with this. They're not going to be the last one. They all based in Asia so when Corona virus hit they one of the first ones that were affected. We didn't really hear too much about it at least in the UK but they did have positive cases on board one of the cruise ships so they were quite badly affected. I kind of I think they just the forefront with these guidelines everything. They've said I think makes perfect sense to me and it's kind of just an extension of what they already do. I hope the day GonNa do some of these things anyway. even if it wasn't in this situation some of the things like they want to remove service buffets and have other people serving you. I'm quite happy for them to do that anyway. I wish that they did that from the beginning. Wow Wow so before we start all of these. Can you go down the list of what are the ways? And then we're going to go back and talk about them. I've got my. My list is much more than nine now. Await breaking news breaking news. You're on the cruise dudes podcasts. And so the things that are going to happen. Some of them are. I think there's more than nine because I've said I think a few things as well join my. I think so just as I said. Let's go for the time. And they were going to go for the Emma. I think's I so ankle fitness to travel certificates for anyone. Who's over seventy Norwegian did do that for for? Why didn't they before they come with us? And they gonNA carry on with that in the future. I think I think that they're going to ask for three of travel insurance for pretty much. Everybody I think that makes makes sense. It's perfect yes. Yes very good sense so Actual proof that you just you just have to show it. I've been on cruises before. They also might travel insurance information so some cruise lines probably already do this. They've talked about doing heat scams on people when they embark unnatural. How this is GonNa work in reality because some some people might just have a hot flush. Some people won't have a fever with they do have the current virus so this this may change but they all talking about having scans when people doing balk. When I took a cruise in Japan. They made us all get off and they scanned all of us in a little stock on which at the time I thought was very very strange about year and a half But the they do already have away to you know. He'd scam evolves amount of people in this saying they're gonNa do that when they embark. They also might tryin. Stagger embarkation. Because at the moment you can get a lot of people. Can't you just line up and get on board so they might make people stick to those times when they say you have to get one at certain time and I'm supposed to pull it out. I have to admit I want to get onto soon as I can. But that may become an actual. They have said that. They they getting rid of the self service buffets. So I'm sure they'll still have some of buffet but they're just going to have Someone serving it to you which I would like that. Anyway is just a question of more staffing. Isn't it. So yeah but the they have said that they're not GonNa do soap service anymore. They've said they're GONNA put Disposable cutlery for people who don't have disposable cutlery which I think seems quite quite. Extreme doesn't it. Cutlery should be clean. You would hope but Exact if people requested they said that they're going to have disposable cutlery viable which I don't think has ever happened before I've never tried but I don't think that's happened

Santa Monica California Crystal Cruises Genting Hong Kong Emma Asia Cova Hudson UK Kovic Fever Japan
"basso" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"basso" Discussed on KGO 810

"I'm John bachelor this is the John basso show to the moon Alice that's one of the favorite phrases from the twentieth century of course we're talking about Jackie Gleason and the Honeymooners not quite to the moon but to low earth orbit why because it's cheaper than buying a burial plot especially in and around Manhattan I learned this from look Malone who reports on culture provocative look a very good evening to you it doesn't occur to me that I need to Barry Pat sue but if I did you have some prices here how is it to add that you approach these prices and what happens when you purchase a Pat former pad in outer space good evening to you Hey John how the going deer with a company called solicitous pets just announced a new service that allows you to get your animal generally dog or a cat cremated and then have you remained shot into space for an X. crazily check them out of nine hundred ninety five dollars crazily cheap amount and last week we need to know the market here look okay that sounds like a lot of money because I remember back in the twentieth century one time I had a dear friend who lost a Pat and I said well what do I do I'm in Manhattan I took it to this veterinarian on the east side and he charged me fifty dollars that was the end of it so fifty sounds pretty good from nine am when I'm out of date but didn't even shoot the remains into space I have tried to tell I don't know but nine ninety five in comparison to what so what does a plot because there's a good a photograph accompanying your wonderful piece of a burial plot a Pat funeral burial plot I guess this is a pet cemetery what does that cost yes I can only show how much it costs because I think with in Manhattan that actually have something today okay basically unfortunately and many people from the city it is like a dumpster or incinerator all you know if you're lucky enough to get down to the bed and get the dog cremated and put into a little on in this company offer offering another option the people who kind of both space and perhaps Aston again that's the kind of shoot your pet's remains into space all right let's follow through on the comparison to forty nine hundred ninety five dollars for a pet cemetery which would be in New Jersey problem but if you want what happens after they actually reduce it to you know the remains what does it go who's actually doing the shooting do we know yet his company today could have got three tiers which I find kind of interesting so the kind of the entry level is the nine ninety five and said that they kind of put the remains in you know but the rockets and they you go up the kind of pet remains experiences you know some kind of a zero gravity and it comes back down to the but full four thousand nine hundred ninety five it would do a few laps around the a or you can do more payment option and the twelve thousand five hundred it can be shot into space have they done this already or is this prospective launch into lower floor but I mean there's a lot of junk up there I could see people actually objecting but I'm sure they're regulated lower Thor but yet especially if you're going to launch enough so that it comes back down to earth but still you know to have a fight crashing in the ocean it's it's still help is this is this a prospect or is are they doing this now at the moment the prospect was interesting is that this this company selected has actually been doing that for human remains and they have done this in the past with you know yeah human ashes so they know what they're doing and is there yeah there's a website I'm presuming and you can sign up and they'll collect the remains they'll you take it to them do we know what happens practically yeah I think you take it to them because all of the pre arranged it I must be of a maybe people who died in a previously next to cut the ashes nice when it kind of gives you a pet I know it tends to explore the other realms and so yeah I think that those guys in the flood the moment I think there a few months off before they start the path of this the website by the way is very attractive and the cell last pets the most unique pet memorial service in the universe I would say that because your love to explore honor your best friend with the journey to the stars on board the world's first Pat memorial space flight service it's a business plan look Malone for vocative I'm John bats or this is the John Batchelor show hi it's Jamie progresses employee of the month to month in a row leave a message at the hi Jim hit me Jamie I just had a new idea for our song with the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay the problem was what wine you say will be found coverage options to fit your budget then we just all the finger snaps will acquire goes he was coming after they've come at jet yes no maybe anyway see a practice tonight I got a new there so the referee to cancel the insurance company affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law with the G. O. C. they can go listen it's like a big deal after fourteen years of the real housewives of Orange County she's bringing her brand to the podcast were very busy and very full mother grandmother and an entrepreneur and that's the.

Jackie Gleason John basso
"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:18 min | 2 years ago

"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The John basso show we last left Sydney with Marilyn both of the miserable lots of money by no possible way out for Sydney he's nearing forty years old and he's going to spend his life as a failure but he chooses in nineteen oh nine to go to London and he turns up at the opera house the royal opera I think they're doing la boheme who see me Stephen well he goes with his with his sister his sister knows one of violence sisters and they are in their family box and his sister tasks city over the box to meet violet sister who moves so she knows and and and violence is there and is presented to set the is well they have this brief conversation in the box between acts and something really really clicks between these two certainly over the next couple weeks pays two very brief visits to violet and during this short time together they decide that they belong together but given the temper of the times it is necessary for them to put it off and violet is very insistent about this until he is able to secure a divorce she says I will marry you but I will not see you again until your divorce is is complete this takes two years and the divorce decree finally comes through and three days later the two of them were married at this point it's nineteen eleven nineteen eleven when they merit may of nineteen eleven at that age her surname is Beddington at James by her father who is a very prosperous man she has many brothers and sisters his surname a shift they are both Jewish heritage is that important in London in nineteen eleven that to just add that to Jewish children who were well she was an old maid and we could call him an old maid at the time because of a failed marriage is is that the part of their star crossed in this did they talk about that he well they don't talk about it it's important but but they never talk about it just to provide a little bit more background violence family although they went by the name of Bennington were they her father and mother were Jewish they had a long and interesting family history the going back to to seventeenth century Spain and violent was was raised in a family where her father read the Old Testament after dinner but came away with I I think no real sense of of Jewish identity your religion Sydney was half Jewish his father was Jewish his mother was an Anglican and he was actually raised in the Anglican church but because he was half tuition because his membership from because he married you clearly the two of them were identified in the in the circles very moved in as Jews they seem to do this without much problem at all from their perspective although they were Lee sat arise by Wyndham Lewis eventually in his book the apes of god and a lot of the satire was anti semitic Elliott so before getting to know them really wrote a note to his mother saying that he just been to visit to new friends so very nice shoes he wrote to his mother and there was always something that of that in in the background and in in that environment in which they live and in their letters because you've constructed this from Sydney's autobiographical novel and from the letters is there discussion about Jewish heritage in Victorian or at this point you have say pre war London none whatsoever in their letters and and and so it doesn't emerge at all I'm trying what what's what's exciting to me Stephen is to peer into a period that it's exposed to see if we were there with the television camera and it's hard to hear it's hard to see the dog that's not barking that's what I'm looking for what's really it was really odd years are you take Wyndham Lewis Wyndham Lewis was the authoritarian he was yeah I think it's fair to say a fascist sympathizer he wrote a book that came out in nineteen thirty one in praise of Hitler he tried to back off from it with another book in nineteen thirty eight or nine and called the Hitler called but it just made it worse and then he tried to disown his anti semitism in the book that had a title that only Wyndham Lewis or doubles could have come up with the Jews are they human and this is somebody with whom they were able to have a a warm relationship over a long period of time how is that possible it's absolutely unclear how or why about work but I think again in those times people made exceptions they didn't necessarily become anything other than what they were and and again in one of Lois's case a hi I think at times rather vicious anti semite Elliott the story was a little bit more complicated I think Kelly it was also an authoritarian he was raised as Unitarian but because of a subpar tarian personality he was much more drawn to were religions like Catholicism he didn't object so much to choose as what he thought were free thinkers and he thought that an awful lot of Jews were free thinkers they didn't follow rules they were were on governable and that was that was really his view point and so for him I think the ships did not represent a problem in any way that related to their disease they set up house at Cambridge square in London and they furnish it very excellently and immediately plunge into what you have to say is the lawn keeping and dinner gatherers and they become extreme only popular with all the young celebrities of the period you mention TS Eliot he appears Wyndham Lewis as well and there are assembling a crowd is that what London was like right there before the war you you you ran with a pack well you know there were there were basically two packs in London and there was the base for attacking the blooms very pack and the ships were drawn to the base water pack which was younger wasn't at this point Stephen because the blooms very was there was a little there was a little bit we're talking and and base water we're talking about Elliott and as pounded wouldn't Lewis and that was for the core in in Beijing water or the wolf's Bertrand Russell and and cars bell in their international balance for her turn Russell abuse both taxi to eve used everyone he wondered around and then we had we had lady online morale she was the Garsington pack that was the country house they all played in and then made fun of her right arm and that was that was basically the the country half of the country outpost for for at this point they are set up in Cambridge square the world falls apart with the first World War but Sydney and violet have found an occupation which is they are extremely generous and their literary when we come back Sydney inviolate write novels their life with TS Eliot proves joys and excruciatingly irascible Wyndham Lewis Steven Clyde minutes.

Sydney Marilyn John basso forty years three days two years
"basso" Discussed on Growing Higher Ed Leaders

Growing Higher Ed Leaders

07:22 min | 2 years ago

"basso" Discussed on Growing Higher Ed Leaders

"Greatest opportunity to to grow is to help. Professionals connect the dots to the impact. That they are having because it's not realized yes the idea of someone coming into an office and starting out on a front desk and realizing that you are having an impact you are the first I face that they see. You're the first first piece of information that they're going to get. And that does have an impact and I think we have to to help young leaders and young professionals in this field not even just young but just new folks coming into this bill to just understanding that impact in that we all all do. Have that Impact I think that's really critical mean examples. You know after you Lacson submitters. I'm sure you get notes from former students. You know that. Just make your day when you have them in the file cabinet in particular file that you go to when you're having feel feel good file the longer you do the work the more that gets filled up but I remember it was longtime before I had anything in my file and so I think that's our jobs to write is to say I think that's another part of the transparency. It's it's for me anytime ever that I get an email from somebody complementing somebody hey orientation wet bell or a I really WANNA meeting and they say I had a really ah helpful experience with my student Peer Tutor. That really was game changer for me. I'm writing that note the next minute you know. Hey the students said really the things about you. We need to pass on that love because sometimes folks don't get it directly and so. I think that that's really important. You're hitting on a really important thing. Yeah and that's A. That's an absolutely great point getting enough from you to do this. I'm like this is an amazing experience for me to have reconnected with you in this absolutely absolutely so let's talk a little bit now about. We talked about new administrators. Let's talk about you. Know folks that are our mid career kind of progressing up the ladder. What have you seen as some of the career derailed for higher ED leaders? I think one of the things that and it may just be the new normal but I think understanding that folks want to move up the ladder so to speak But one one to happen happened quickly and when it happened right away and I still think no matter what the best way to get that promotion is to do your very best in the job currently have And you know having your eye on the next prizes important but not to the cost of not doing you know like the knock it out of the Park Eric and people will see it realized So I think some mistakes made could be. Hey I been doing this for two years. I WanNa be this next layer so I'm going to start doing some things that are going to get me there and it's misread sometimes I think I think the field We all would say this. I think young professionals today. I mean the pay is it's it's not new I mean. Let me thirteen thousand dollars in. It's difficult for really good people to make really good money in this field. That's not why you do but yet it would still be nice to make a little bit better compensation I think some of the challenges for young professionals if you can't provide live on housing opportunities you know. How do you work two jobs? You can't and do do it. Well so I think we have to find ways for that to be better for for young professionals. I think the idea of self care is getting a lot of in writing being done on it and a lot of really is I think it's different for everybody at an I think that language which is being thrown around a lot and so I think having conversations with young professionals and mid level professionals I think one of the hardest moves. WHO's a made in my career was mid level when I started supervising people That was really hard. I wasn't prepared for it I didn't really know how to do it. I apologize to all my former people that I was surprised back then and I think we need to give more help to the sixth for me level professionals. Yeah it seems like that's a great opportunity for for higher education in many ways as where that providing those opportunities to learn some these skill sets. You know we often promote the doers right and now all of a sudden it's a matter of like. Hey you really great. Whoa you should be able to supervise ten people now right And we kind of make that mistake sometimes And so that that becomes a bit of a challenge for sure. Okay so last question. We're going to wrap things up. What would be your advice to someone who is just starting starting out now in a higher education? I think I would say Ask a lot of questions I think one of the big things are that will be well. Let me transition from graduate school and book learning and were diving in ready to go One of the things that you can't learn graduate school because you're never really hardly ever working for you ended up getting degree but I think learning the institution to Shen and the environment and the ethos is probably one of the first things I would tell any professional by the way. That's even switching colleges so I had to do this for years go right. I've had thirty year career. I kind of know how to do stuff that I sure as heck didn't know how to do it. In a consortium model innate shirts heck did not have to do at Claremont Mckenna College because had to learn the place and I think that's a really really important point. You know you might know what you think you need to do. You know how to run an orientation he should program possibly How do you run back your college or university So ask a lot of questions about that. Would we trying to do here. What are we being about the students students get to know your students ask them questions and that should absolutely informed? Inform your work at that particular place so everything you've learned up until at that point. It only matters if you understand the patient work pretty deeply as what is one of the piece I would say well great advice Sharon. This has been absolutely wonderful to reconnect. I want to thank you. Thank you so much for taking the time to join the show today and sharing your story in insights. Thank you J. P. and I'm happy to have if an even wants to email me any questions. They can do that as well. Happy to go off mine and talk with some folks so I could be helpful. Excellent I will include. Sharon's Camille address in the show notes for this episode. Well that.

Sharon Claremont Mckenna College Park Eric Shen J. P. Camille
"basso" Discussed on Growing Higher Ed Leaders

Growing Higher Ed Leaders

16:35 min | 2 years ago

"basso" Discussed on Growing Higher Ed Leaders

"Here's JP welcome back to the show. I'm speaking with Dr Sharon Basso Vice President of Student Affairs at Claremont Mckenna College here and I want to give it a little bit too leadership when you think back on your career. Is there a leader that sticks out in particular that really influenced you in your path in your leadership style. I yes I would say that. There's a couple of folks uh-huh I think kind of coming in my identity was re wrapped up in from high school on up in being a student athlete and so one of my early early connections I think with a leader were were actually connections with a now deceased coach John Wooden at Ucla I remember reading his. You know his. They call me coach book when I was in high school basketball coach recommended. I read it and why I think I gravitated towards that light resonated with me was because he super successful leader eater but when you read his works some of it's about basketball but most of it is about Values ethics seeing the big picture. Understanding he was forming The lives of young men at that time and that was the priority And so the how. Oh he did. His job really mattered. He could have been A successful coach by just focusing on basketball but he really wanted to make sure his athletes have character and integrity equity and faith and and so for me that was an early resonating experienced Germany and continued throughout. My career is readings in his writings I I would say The other person weirdly not in the field. That really influenced my style. If you will Was My my grandmother. She I would say I got it from her admired it in her The sense of congruence genuineness mislead. You are who you are And project that in all environments I found that early on in my professional if I had a real kind of. I've recoil from folks who I felt. Were putting on right. But they were one way in one environment and then another one another environment. And I thought that's very interesting. And it takes a lot of energy. And there's trust factor there and so I think the congruency and transparency part of who I am Mike Province say it traces back to her and then of course I had had the privilege of working with a really amazing Moral Compass John smeaton he was the Vice President Student Affairs when I was the dean of students at Lee High and just incredibly solid Fellow in the field but also just as a human being really calm kind of steadying force. When I would like to run into someone's office and go what the Hell just happened? It'd be like well. Let's talk through and it calms down. And so he was actually very very very intellectual smile. I guess just finally I would say on that front Many of the students that I worked with actually have influenced me tremendously including yourself. I think I learned how to lead a by seeing how it was going right. And so you know when you were student. Student government president. And you'd come in and we talk and you know I could tell I'm like wow. What does he need today actually knows what he needs to do? He just needs to be reassured that that's it's the right path or and then when it wasn't working in student you get this reaction or you get a sense. I really wasn't that helpful in that meeting. What is that about you and it just reflecting but students have been really really helpful in that journey to what's great insight especially the The the influence that your grandmother had on you and This is idea of being genuine for good and for bad right. It's it's her and we'll talk about that a little later in the in the show. But that's that's quite an interesting perspective. How how would you define your leadership style? I I think you know I think authentic comes to mind a lot Before the term authentic self was in the thing I think I thought of myself as authentic and a work in progress progress to your point just now I feel like my staff knows that I'll make ten mistakes day so therefore they can make a mistake and so I think authentic I I think transparent If it's okay like to spend just a second on that transparent comment I think what people say that were. I'm transparent transparent or I'm a transparent leader transparency. I think for a it's worth to finding a little bit. I don't mean that that that that means I share every piece of information You can be transparent leader and still maintain appropriate confidentiality And I think that's that's a really important distinction. Had it hard balance and a hard balance exactly and so what I think about with the transparency. Is I want folks students staff whoever faculty to know me well enough to understand kind of I want the process could be transparent. I think the prospect counselor. The process is almost as important as the product. So I want folks to understand what what I'm thinking with the processes hostesses. What may be sick? Values are what we're trying to accomplish so that when decisions happen they may not know all the input information but they may know. Oh I understand stand white. We got there because these were the values. This is what we're trying to accomplish and it makes sense to people So I think and I feel like I am a transparent leader because I feel like I need that in others but I also have giant aversion to secrecy just for Secrecy Sake. So and it's I found in my career. It's The Times where I it was not able to be transparent. Maybe because of external pressures or what have you those have been the most difficult conversations with students and staff because I I haven't been able to expose them to all all that really was going on and so I really feel very committed to. I want the folks that work with every day to feel committed to that too I think students are bright eight and they know it anyway. So why aren't we talking about it with them. So yeah and if you could reflect a little bit on the the human human side of the leadership you know it's When you find yourself in those situations where there is information that you have that you oh you know would be incredibly beneficial for your teams to know but you just? You just can't talk about it right and then you know information comes was to light or something like that and you get the questions of. Why don't you tell me about that? And there's a human side of like you feel awful. You feel guilt built about that but it's part of the job and talk to me about how you deal with that kind of you. You know that kind of issue of finding this balance of Hey i. I know my team needs this but I really can't talk about it and I'm going to have to live with the consequences of that I you know I think those the conversations that happen not in the moment are the the answer to that. I think you know when you're forming a staff or every time you're you're having a conversation I think having you know discussions with staff about what that's going to look like in those difficult times right saying Fra I'm going to share with. You always much information as I possibly can so that you will understand understand There will be times when I will be asked. I expected not to share some details of information and therefore I won't in those instances but again. I'm hoping you know if you have questions you'll ask him. I will simply have to say that when I can't answer And so then we talk about like what would be those ones we cancer right and so when you define it ahead of time when you're not in the middle of an instance they can draw back on Same thing with me. I'm in the middle of hierarchy to so my president for example. I'm sure there are things that he can't tell me I am. And then I'll you know I'll go and then I'll put the pieces together but what I can do is say. Oh I understand what he was thinking. I do not know the details of this situation but I do know that. He's you know or she is generally spoke about you. Know those values and principles levels So I think part is setting that table early on and also having them then understand that they're doing that and their worlds to write How do students same same breakpoint there are things we need them to know? In order to understand and then there are things Furka firpo protected things right take a deck too simple thing where their student might have a conduct violation on. That's pretty visible on a residence hall but for whatever reasons that play out in the process they're not suspended so they're on campus and you can't really say much about that. But what can you Zeh ready. You can talk about well. Generally speaking here are the things we would consider such a decision so I think mostly you know you. Can't you have to walk the walk all all the time. Like thirty years of blocking walking decide to turn it on and off consistency. People need to know so earlier later on we talked a little bit about staying true to self genuine good times and bad leadership is messy It can be hard But one of the things that I think is is really important. Is that As a leader we have to learn learned from those messy moments. Those mistakes You know as you said you know your staff knows you're GonNa Make Ten mistakes in a day and it's okay for them to make a mistake. Is there a particular time or an incident or something that kind of you call back to in those moments that you see as a pivotal moment in your own career as a leader that you continue to to kind of Harken back to or call back to As a as a guiding point of like okay. I'm GonNa remember that moment and I can't fall into that trap again and we. We don't have to name names here. We went to protect the innocent. But there's some incident of of our turning point moment. That has really been a centering. Compass true north type of moment. That's a really good question. Tough one. I feel there's been many of those moments actually.

The Times basketball Claremont Mckenna College John Wooden Dr Sharon Basso Germany Lee High Mike Province John smeaton
"basso" Discussed on Growing Higher Ed Leaders

Growing Higher Ed Leaders

13:48 min | 2 years ago

"basso" Discussed on Growing Higher Ed Leaders

"Those things The colleges share so it's it's been a great environment for me. Incredible staff here I think one of the things that really really made it a a slam dunk. Choice for me was Our president is really visionary. Really Amazing really understands student life and the position addition reports to the president here and sits on the executive cabinet which is also really a different experience than Being in a Student Affairs Division that reports up through a different layer so I really feel that The college benefits benefits from having students represented at decisions all the way through. So so. This consortium is quite fascinating assassinating to me. And and the the notion that each of them has their own governance structure. But you're part of this group and the the students will interact with others across the campus. Do find each campus also has sort of its own culture as well and and how does how does that get managed. You know and I I can. I can only speak from the schools that I've been to and I know that there's different cultures within the university. versity at different colleges let alone at you know full on different colleges so how various stupid question and observations you know. I'm in my fourth year here and still figuring that out but yes very distinct cultures. It seems very weird And not believable but it is the case And so how that comes into play is our students are very You know very very permeable for them. They're in and out and about and they know they have relationships chips with folks from other campuses but they have a very good every strong sense of our own campus community But what some examples samples of the nuances are if we have a situation on a protest or student death or You know a difficult situation going on at one of our five campuses are we all have to stay in very close touch because that may be a best friend of someone else over here race versa. You know even something like illnesses you know that travel You really have to have your head on a swivel a bit. And because they're independent colleges Free speech for example Claremont McKenna College very deeply values dialogue debate discussion You know and so what goes on on this on. This campus may not be value ethos at another campus or vice versa. And so our students having to navigate that as well in So we we have to keep your head on a swivel and the impact so we're constantly our counterparts in residents lay for talking to each other counterparts in student activities. We're talking to each other on one campus. But you have to kind of be dialed into all campuses so interesting. These issues are challenging on any college. Campus into imagine kind ended having to coordinate across different college campuses. That's absolutely fascinating and I and I think it's actually a great segue. You brought up a couple of these. He's already but You know there's there's really no doubt that as you look at college campuses and the students arriving on our campuses this year. It's all seems to be changing and for someone like you. That's been instant affairs for over thirty years now. How have you seen things change since entering this this field of Student Affairs and Higher Education? I think I think there's there's been some sameness as well as some change I think one of the things that I would say. I'm really Thinking about a lot these days in exploring Want to open some dialogues with folks across is the concept of our student affairs professional professional work in. How really you know for decades? You know for me. It was never an eight to five job it was you know. Pick a number right and I think from any of us still earn that experience. It makes me think now with kind of a collision of that that deed in that necessity folks being more dialed into self care and balance in life and that sort of thing I feel like our field is going to need to start thinking about that. Maybe you know. Maybe we're talking about shifts. Maybe were doing shift work these days right because I can't expect my case manager to to work a full all day around difficult mental health issues and then also six or seven hours happiness among them signing them into a mental health facility and being back at it the next stay and That goes far student activities. Folks are resins life folks. All these areas in in the rain is that we're in so I'm kind of meant mentally playing with the the idea of. Do we do literally shifts do we do. We have a night shift in the day shift. What does that Look Lake? How do we maximize that? You know Students or do we dial back on what we can provide and maybe in. I think that's the other thing I've seen is in a we're doing more and more and more What is realistic? You know the price attack of colleges or high Alex a lot. Now I get that. So that's one thing. I mental health is a big issue. Accessibility and affordability for for colleges are big issues. I think the the whole the whole landscape has changed around that you bring up a great point. The idea that a- As students are entering our campuses are coming to our campuses with more and more expectations. We how do we balance that with the High Price Tag And how do we dress a lot of these. These needs What are some of the other biggest big challenges? You're seeing students face on today's campus. Um I think the career I mean you you have a ton of experience in career career yourself and I think that that landscape skip his changed a bit too for careers career paths. You know no longer do you. Can you expect to have the same career little Own Job five seven careers over the course of your time here so how to best prepare when you're in college for those Still seeing seeing a lot of students who graduate first job and then call us you know in the first year and say I cannot do this accounting thing you you know. And that's more common than you would imagine or not for you. Imagine but in so how to have you know. I think a challenge for our students is really how to navigate eight. This workforce that they're going to have to dive into the pressures around. That is one thing I would say I think the technology is another thing. I think it's amazing. Think And I also think it's got it stark side for some students the anonymity of it the the lack of connection hello with others. However I'm you know that's coming for me pushing sixty years old so you know who knows better or worse? Maybe it's different but you know and I enjoyed actually being around a college. Campus talk kind of stay current with all of that but I think it has having an impact on our students abilities to manage manage situations With each other inter personally and I imagined that as we see more students coming coming to campus with previously diagnosed mental health issues a greater number of students receiving classroom accommodations as for learning disabilities. No couple that with social media and technology and the ability to cope with situations situations. How is that playing out on your campus and in your World Student Affairs and well I think I would add one more to your your really good good list is you know parents rate Parents are always always have been in the picture What are the what are the roles of parents these days as and And that adds to all of those things you talked about with resiliency and all those sorts of things so I You know on our campus the you know again. Blessed we were top. Ten Large College Incredibly bright students and and we also have really good you leaders and So I feel fortunate right now. I'm in zone in my career in the folks that work with me on my staff We are able to I think have our students for the most part. Do that work kind of with US coaching rather than doing four four And that's where you wanted for me. That's the sweet spot and student development. His can get to a place or situation or an experience where you're coaching and guiding in holding the mirror up making helping students make meeting with these moments and then they feel like they've owned the accomplishment so but that work takes longer than transactional right you know I can spend five minutes handling someone's problem for them But two hours may maybe helping them walk through how they're gonNA handle that themselves So that's kind of back to the challenges if you want to do that. Work and here are staff here is really committed to doing work transformational way more than transactional as much as we can. So that means more hours and more time but I do see students feeling really thriving when they they can work through something on their own and know how to do then in the future. Yeah and I think as you said that just helps them as go into their next stage of of their their professional and personal personal lives to talk to me a little bit. I mean you you mentioned this briefly as you were talking about. The the notion of the consortium free speech is a big issue on college campuses today and Balancing you know the notion of free speech versus hate speech and those different types of things and they're playing laying out differently across campuses. What's your what's your view on on this this particular topic and especially in someone in in your role that has to kind of meet both sides of the argument the needs of of both constituencies that might be impacted by you? You know particular speaker that might come to campus or something. That's going on so talking a little bit about how you feel about that particular Issue you know I think the paradigm for me with free speech is one that can be applied to almost any challenge. We're talking about in the health of of AF- access affordability so the paradigm I'm talking about is free. Speech cannot in my opinion. Free speech. Kit Dot P.. He's successful as successful on a college campus. If it's just the purview of student life I think that a campus has is to figure out what its values are around discourse dialogue respect and lay giant framework and then and student. Life is a part of that right That's the experience I'm having here. Is that the college has much like the Chicago principles. We know you. Claremont McKenna is becoming more and more known you know through the Heterodox Academy. We wanted to work from that group. Because we're more and more. The college is in notes dating back to its founding. Principles is a place where our faculty members in the classroom are teaching not only Content but also how to develop arguments rate. And what's in service to for me. The free speech is The concept works really went in search of the Truth Ray. I need to deeply understand the other person's viewpoint in order for me to kind of formulate my own and so you don't understand someone else's viewpoint by just splashing speech out APP them You know free speech. I wish we could call it something else. Because it's also listening listening component to free speech and so I think when done that well that the entire kind of college is valued than it doesn't become a gosh for having a protest test here right now. That's violated our rules. It's sort of what context does that. Sit if it sits on a campus where everyone is valuing and students are learning how to have respectful dialog. You disagree then. It's like a game changer. I'm not saying we have that all figured out. We all at least earned that same conversation So I think it's actually very very healthy. If students can learn how to disagree respectfully but it does get difficult difficult when speech turns hateful. And then what you know people are always looking for. What bucket does that fall on? Is that a violation of something that this is that that. And then we're already you know in a different compensation well very interesting stuff about Your role your pathway When we come back we'll shift.

Claremont McKenna College Higher Education Large College US Look Lake Chicago Alex Claremont McKenna Heterodox Academy
"basso" Discussed on Growing Higher Ed Leaders

Growing Higher Ed Leaders

08:50 min | 2 years ago

"basso" Discussed on Growing Higher Ed Leaders

"Of Student Affairs at Claremont Amonte McKenna College in California and before joining Claremont Mckenna College in two thousand sixteen. She spent much of her career at university where she oversaw eighteen departments in student affairs and was responsible for the management of nearly sixty professional administrative staff. Please welcome to the show. Dr Sharon Basso Sharon. It's great to have you hello. JP likewise great to see you and it's absolutely wonderful to connect with you. And as I said when I invited you to the show I wanted you to be my I guess because I owe my entire career and this whole path to you And from our work back at Lee high and I think it's a great place place to start the show by just having you talk a little bit about your path higher education. And what led you there perfect. I think I wanNA start start just with complimenting you a bit on first of all the idea for the concept of this podcast I think I hope it'll be very valuable. Valuable for a lot of professionals in the field entry level mid level and beyond I am because I think it's a gap You know having those conversations in having the ability to talk here listen so Kudos to you for that. I think that's really wise. I'm not surprised at all. Your Owl's innovator. So thank you for the opportunity. Thank thank you So my career path into higher education maybe for some listeners out there they'll feel a little bit of kinship but it's not When I would say typical in that Many times you'll hear that students as undergraduates who really involved in student government or where are as or somehow however connected in with The student life experience on their campus. I was an undergraduate in nineteen seventy nine to nineteen eighty three. So I think I think the temporal nature of that is important What was going on in Student Affairs as a field in that time period very different than what was going on? What's going on? Now what's what's been going on in the last two decades We had a dean of students there. and the director of student activities. But not much else as far as infrastructure especially at a small private Liberal Arts College But it was a great experience for me as an undergraduate. I was a student athlete. I was on the women's basketball team And I was a psychology major and Those were my two main affiliations. I would say I also was. I went to college. which was predominantly a predominantly Greek eternity sorority college? At that time as well I think maybe forty percent of students were involved in Greek life and I was not a Greek life student. I was filleted again as a student. Athlete and not Not as a student fraternity organization. And so I. That was my sort of student experience experience and it was not very involved with student affairs at all as a concept but I was very passionate about My psychology major and really over the four years of my undergraduate experience really started to develop a desire to go into counseling. Profession realizing need a graduate degree for that I graduated from college. I needed to work. Earn some money and ended ended up working as a payroll manager in Human Resources Department for a construction company. My first job out of college and that was Literally there was a very very difficult job. Nineteen eighty-three when I graduated in. It was literally the the only thing that I could find. That was even remotely in the field of sort of Psychology if you will in the human resources arena So I worked for about a year and a half in that role while I was applying to graduate schools to go for my counseling also degree. The first time I really Understood I think this profession of Student Affairs was when I entered my Counseling Masters Program at Shippensburg University. Actually it was at the time in nineteen eighty three it was one of the few accredited counseling programs on the East Coast So that's why I chose that school and courses that I was in in my masters in Counseling Program Had other students in them that were in this masters in Higher Education Administration or student personnel program. It was called back then and I literally really realized. Wow there's hall directors. There's people that for a living do this work And as a result ended up doing a double masters a Ah took some overlapping courses practicum. And did my masters in counseling and my masters in Higher Ed Administration at the same time with additional courses And my first job than Was a counselor a psychological counselor in a counseling center on the college campus at Fairleigh Dickinson University New Jersey And then from there we can talk more about my path from that first job. It was a living job because they could only pay thirteen thousand dollars so they provided of housing and as living in I got some experience also with the resident slave in some exposure to the student activities in the evening. Because you're literally on the campus The Dean of students there the time also our director student activities left and after about a year and a half into the counseling. Counseling GIG I was asked if I would wanNA come over and services shooting activities director and so I made that jump across from the counseling degree To these universal and then from there I and then I ended up Lee for quite a long time about twenty twenty twenty eight twenty nine years and in that time I served many capacities in the student affairs. One three content areas of academic success Conduct students with disabilities services student activities advising student government. Which is where I came to you the best And eventually dean of students in that spot. So that's kind of path through to student affairs kind of a little bit by accident through the counseling process but the council degree has surgery every single day. I'm sure especially in a row like a special enrolling well for those that don't know Claremont McKenna. College is a private the Liberal Liberal Arts College located about thirty minutes outside of Los Angeles. You enroll approximately thirteen hundred undergraduate students on your particular campus and I know there's quite an interesting story about Claremont McKenna. In the consortium you belong to and hope you'll talk a little bit more about that And currently serve as the vice president of Student Affairs talked a little bit about your role on a campus like CMC for sure. Let me talk a little a little bit. About the the consortium Claremont McKenna College sits continuously located with four other undergraduate took colleges Mudd College Scripps College. Pomona College Pitzer College those four along with Claremont McKenna college makeup. This consortium of the Claremont colleges each of our five colleges is an independent. College has their own board of trustees their own president thrown governing body. Their own students thrown admissions process. So do they are a typical liberal arts college but they are located sharing boundaries if you on the same footprint and Our our students said each of those five colleges have really the benefits of being at a small private Liberal Arts College with the advantage of having Five that those together so for example they can eat it any of the dining halls on five of the campuses They can take courses at each of the campuses and still have a home. Campus mm-hmm. So that's a really fascinating experience. I have four counterparts. Have four other vice presidents that I can work with regularly and we do meet every two weeks so I have a little bit of a professional support network right here. Each of the colleges has a little bit of a niche even Liberal Arts Harvey Mudd the Science and engineering in stem fields and Claremont McKenna. College where I am really has a significant amount of majors in economics international relations government Psychology to its liberal arts but it has some focus shirt science program. But it's an amazing place it's been really energizing and my role. Here is a combination of a.

Claremont Mckenna College Claremont Amonte McKenna Colle Liberal Arts College Claremont McKenna Liberal Liberal Arts College Claremont McKenna college Pomona College Pitzer College Scripps College Lee Claremont Dr Sharon Basso Sharon California Harvey Mudd Higher Education Administratio Higher Ed Administration
Box Office: ‘Ford v Ferrari’ review

All Things Considered

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Box Office: ‘Ford v Ferrari’ review

"Movies about car racing sound like operas scored entirely for basso's and Ford V. Ferrari is no exception but it also has significant things to say about art V. E. commerce the cowboy ethic VI corporate caution and friendship V. everything else it's a new model of an old fashioned audience pleaser with wonderful performances by Christian bale and Matt Damon and a resonant sold to go with the smarts story grows out of a battle of corporate Titans in the nineteen sixties Henry for the second Titan bug birds he's played

Basso Ferrari Christian Bale Matt Damon Ford Henry
Blood pressure pills 'work better at bedtime'

BBC World Service

00:55 sec | 3 years ago

Blood pressure pills 'work better at bedtime'

"Suggest delete blood pressure drugs would give more protection against strokes and heart attacks if taken at night rather than first thing in the morning but experts say patients should make a change without consulting their doctor Michelle Roberts reports bodies have a natural twenty four hour cycle with them that could also how well we respond to medication according to experts many different drugs including home pills might work best when taken at specific times of the day the Spanish trial is the largest safe also look at the phenomenon and included more than nineteen thousand patients diagnosed with and given pills the high blood pressure in the study fewer patients who took the medication in the evening rather than the morning had hasta axle strokes over a five year period the researchers believe bedtime dosing synchronizes basso with the body to bring and keep blood pressure down to safe levels

Michelle Roberts Basso Twenty Four Hour Five Year
"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:27 min | 3 years ago

"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm John that Sir this is the John basso showed Steven Budiansky it in a very well written and well argued book has taken on the scale of the transformation of the slaughter of the first war into the industrial mass murder practiced by the **** and the Soviets eventually in the second war and intervening here was science science is practiced by British scientists to win Nobel prizes and have research that goes into subatomic physics and the triumph of the twenty first century follows on Mister Rutherford and Mr black it when they were at Cambridge and their colleagues with a conquering the Adam and and more however when it came to fighting the war nineteen thirty nine outbreak of phony war nineteen forty one America's attacked Mr black it wrote a page a wrote a paper that became extremely when flew Angela and Stephen features that in his book we've talked about deserves committee in nineteen thirty five all the preparations that build radar and improve the air fleet of the fighter but a command and the Bomber Command but black it sees that gizmos and super super machines and amazing death ray inventions are not what scientists are for how does he put it Stephen what does black it see that science should do it more. his crucial argument was that the traditional view of the military services was that science and scientists role was to develop new weapons develop new gizmos new airplanes turn the tools over to us the professional military men and then you stay out of it black it said well the decisions made by military commanders in how to use these tools are every bit as much scientific questions as is the production and invention of these weapons and he said the tools of science of looking at data analyzing decisions on what we would now refer to as game theory figuring out how the enemy might react countermeasures all of this our scientific questions and we have scientists with the scientific training understanding of statistics can help you in this now that was this is commonplace now I was talking to a guy the other night who works in the Pentagon he said oh yeah I know what you're talking about he said every three star general as a couple of these civilian scientists like attached to him these days but it was revolutionary in nineteen forty and nineteen forty one military men in those states typically I think in Britain also in America had the view civilian intellectuals can't tell us how to run a war commanding armies and navies is an art it's something that so the result of years of experience people like me with our intuition that judgment make these decisions and we don't want a bunch of civilians but in their noses. but black it almost immediately I think change their minds by producing these prodigious results. again not by inventing new weapons or new gizmos but by doing often very simple calculations do you cluster a bunch of anti aircraft. or do you spread about let's start with his first because he before he takes on submarines and proves himself with something as mundane as anti aircraft command where he's now the scientific adviser to the commander in chief and the aircraft command the battle of Britain came within days of being won by gatherings Luftwaffe as they were pounding fighter command and destroying the ability of Britain to defend itself out of frustration and despair during who wanted to win badly to prepare the invasion fleet of for Hitler switch to bombing the cities to punish them by the way the Churchill then answered by bombing German cities and that's part of the debate we started this conversation with because Churchill and Lindemann were wrong and pounding the submarines with long range flight of planes was right the same argument happened between Hitler incurring Goring one when after the cities so to attack black it is asked how do we stop them how do we use a anti aircraft and what's his answer statement. well you know that. the radar defense system integrated with fighter command which really I think the crucial defense that helps defeat the little or hold off the loose Wofford during the battle of Britain but if you're crap weapons were also very important and there were lots of operational questions that black it saw had simply been answered by tradition or sort of intuition or seat of the pants judgment it had seemed like a very sensible idea to spread the limited number of big antiaircraft guns in a evenly spaced perimeter around London but he did a fuel literally back of the envelope kind of calculations and showed no you would actually be more effective far more effective to leave what seem to be gaps in this cordon and concentrate the weapons you had in it and batteries with multiple cuts and by the time he left it here craft command in the spring of nineteen forty one he had increase the effectiveness multiple times simply by doing these sorts of calculations in general pile who was the commander of AA command I think gave the greatest testimony to this change in military mindset that had occurred when black it left to go to the Admiralty he said they've stolen my magician and that settles the officer and Erica any aircraft command said of black it after last I'm so glad you explained to me all about probability as soon as the war is over I'm going straight to Monte Carlo and then I really will win so black. that was one of the comments that made black it sort of terror his hair out that was a a junior officer had a a command said that identifies how to use probability and to study all results in order to focus your ability to defeat the enemy he then is drafted into fighting the submarine war and now this is the heat of Stevens book because the submarine war in early on nineteen forty and nineteen forty one is all about the U. boats and slaughtering the fleet because the idea of convoy although it wouldn't was known was not much use nor did they know how large the convoy should be nor do they know what escort craft were successful with the convoy nor did they know how to fill the so called air gap in between which is about five hundred miles in the north Atlantic the Germans had called happy time the first time which was shooting and slaughtering human beings civilians every kind of ship around Great Britain and then when the British were successful putting their fleet out there and after the battle bridge of the bat the invasion plans were called up by the **** early on when the Americans enter they switched turn it sent his fleet off the American shores and that was the second happy time in Steven I started a conversation about that but now black it and his team black at circus because he has astronomers mathematicians biologists primatologist all of them together thinking about plans are brought in to fight the U. boat and certainly the contest is over using aircraft but Stephen tell the story about how an aircraft is painted in white black it sees as that is profound for fighting the U. boats. in the spring of nineteen forty one and again just let me back up to set the scene here the United States was not yet in the war at this point Churchill it's the end of nineteen forty Britain had staved off immediate defeat within and the threat of invasion was receding they had won the battle of Britain there in the air against loosed wafa but now they were faced with this slow gnawing threat as Churchill called it of the constant fear that Britain's vital ocean lifeline bringing these necessary supplies even food to keep the population a lot was going to be cut by the U. but it's Herschel road to FDR at the end of nineteen forty he said the decision for nineteen forty one we'll be at sea everything depends on the outcome of the battle of the Atlantic in the spring of nineteen forty one it was really a crisis the sinkings of merchant ships by U. boats were at a peak Churchill formed what he called the battle of the Atlantic committee and declared he of course church was grating pointing these phrases that he coined the phrase the battle of the Atlantic to focus the attention on this crucial theater. right at this point black it is brought into coastal command which was jointly operated by the RAAF and the royal navy to figure out how to increase the effectiveness of the air patrols against the U. boats. one of the first things he did was again who literally a back of the envelope calculation he was at western approaches command which oversaw all of the convoys they had this huge wall map plotting the suspected location of all U. boats at sea and blankets said well I knew how many ours our patrol planes were flying I knew how many U. boats they were actually citing here I had a right in front of me all the data of how many U. boats were actually at sea I knew how much of the time they spent on the service I did a little calculation how many U. boats they ought to be siding and it was the number was twice what they actually were. we don't know what's going on here and he started looking into this and finally one day he was speaking to an aria for a week commander and disco explain the problem the wing commander civil what color our coastal command aircraft well it turned out to be the answer the question was most coastal command aircraft were painted black because they were night bombers that were pressed into service for these air patrols over the Atlantic now black is a very good color if you don't want to be spotted by a searchlight at night it's about the worst color you could choose if you don't want to be seen against one of the gray skies of the north Atlantic by day. was happening was the U. boats were spotting the approaching patrol planes before the patrol planes could spot the U. boats and then diving and evading detection. black it said you got to repaint the undersides of the wings white they did so and the sighting stumbled I mean it was an extraordinary piece of sore again almost like magical result even imagine if you were a inventor and you came to the already after the set I have this new wonder weapon that will double the number of U. boats you can detect you probably would have.

John basso Steven Budiansky one day
"basso" Discussed on Pop Abroad

Pop Abroad

12:03 min | 3 years ago

"basso" Discussed on Pop Abroad

"All right. I'm here with Roberto. Say Hello Roberta Hi Hi Michelle happy to be here. Thank you for joining and so tell us. How did he pop abroad so I went to. I started my master. I I was studying in Italy. I'm Italian myself and I went to Netherlands because I got TA scholarships who I've been of course before. Netherlands have broiled well before buffalo stuff but I think the biggest experience because I really moved there. It was myself with studying and a beginning was tough. I will say and I thought I really don't like it here. I really don't like Netherlands extremely cold and again I come from the south of Italy. I moved to Netherland it was February was freezing cold. It was Liden. Oh I've been there you beautiful. It's a small town. It is what what year did he move to the Netherlands. When was if two thousand it was two thousand five two thousand six so you were a student in the Netherlands. Of what were you studying. I was doing my masters so I was studying South East Asian Studies and politics my Chinese guy it was yeah you're right and choose. I really wanted to be together with that Chinese. My Bachelor is in Chinese right so I didn't want to lose the chance to practice this Chinese and such and I asked to be together with that. She needs and I was leaving together with this. China's guy in the same room in the same apartment to it later turned into a boyfriend. It was a lot of fun so his name is top home. It was a student at that time it was doing a PhD peace of mind and the deal. Was You cook I do. I love Chinese food that I can't cook so cooking and cleaning basically it was it was a Lotta Fun. Oh Wow okay so then after the Netherlands what's next after the Netherlands. I was supposed to move to Indonesia because one of the languages that were starting and one of the countries I was starting was Indonesia right. Something really fortunate happen. I got a scholarship Super Shaina so I gave up Indonesian plan crazy. I am no oh great. China's get eight so yeah. China's always been my big name so as soon as I got this call shape that I just moved to China and I went to another Nordic city. I went to it was to tell Jin contingent. When was this year it was two thousand two thousand six and this tangent is like north north China and it's a factory city you write with GDP. What's the what's the big market there yes so attention is a very fascinating cities very close to Jean. Well now always closest twenty minutes by how strain before you have to take over two hours the main indust you have a few factories and south. She's very famous concession. You don't have the French concession to German concession and Italian. Concession is a beautiful city. It's a lovely place a lot of development detail. What did he do there. I studied Chinese. I studied Chinese on the Tingey Normal University for one year so and then I moved to Beijing. And what did you do there. You'd be Gina was working for our software company House. Doing Project Management for Software Company and kind of being in between between the customers all look the customer foot on US companies for sure and then the the Chinese employees and I was helping you know so you are working in primarily in a Chinese environment working with Chinese in it was mainly mainly met as well FRAC back yeah. I was the only woman I think this is my car massar. Most of the time I'm the only woman in the room and not the time for sure it was the only foreigner and the only woman in the room and most of my customers were full donors and men and all of people working in the team that were engineers and that what man and you're you're managing. MEN ENGINEERS WOW food product belly. I understood that time I mean it was softer her and my degrees in Chinese Indonesians. You was quite the event here but I learned a lot. It was a lot of fun and Regina time was simply. Amazing really had the best time of my life. I still love very much meat team but at that time it was fantastic it was around the time of the Olympics and everything thing right so that's kind of went. Beijing Beijing boom like it hits boom and actually had that'd be a good time. It'd be there. Wow Okay so then. How did you end up in Shanghai. There was a lot going on actually after that so I changed my job then moved back to Rome. I was doing marketing my the marketing and marketing so I was basically Rome and was working in solar and that was yeah. I was on this project between Oman Mine Germany and my very same company actually offer me the opportunity to go back to Beijing to start another project for them and again China. Hi Nice is my house always been my big name so I say yes of course and I moved back to Beijing. Then what happened is that I was really thinking. What what I went onto next what I want to be an accident how improving my career what I want achieve and that's when I started looking into. MBA's and I decided to go for run. Mba that basically took me to Shanghai because the campus in Shanghai and that's where I still am now literally yeah. Oh Wow oh so you would to halt. Yes you have for your. Mba Program you graduated went back started working again in another profession that was male dominated needed right and Chinese so again one of the few women and you're in a leadership position yeah so what happened is I moved to Shanghai with new Roland. Your company nostrand affirmation which is clearly sounds. Boring is very exciting. Actually it was doing a lot of strategist stuff but industrial automation is madly. men dominated and also the time. I was working with engineers and I was again in the only one known engineer known man in their own for me was a lot of the learning curve was crazy and I had to really catch up so much with the product the markets and stuff but I think personally and professionally I really have been good old so was on amazing experience. I was in Shanghai. which is the best city in the world or one of the top five? Okay so you are back in Shanghai. You have another other job when another very crazy as industry how how did that lead into Leinen since you are the Leinen China manager you're. I'm assuming that you know that progression was kind of natural. You kind of saw like okay you know. I need to start community that empowers women because you are one of those eleven you wanted to empower yeah. I will say it was certainly natural because I was every day dealing with prejudiced and every day dealing with the challenges that women we do have at work and we do especially have dominated industry so all you know all the things that you wish you never had to deal with. Were happening to me like you walk in a meeting room and people know necessarily WanNa pay attention to you because you don't look like yeah and then it's one at by chance to the book Linen Boom Hamburg right leaning book so you read the Book I and what was is the process the steps like what was the first step to start the it was initially Alina Shanghai circle is that how is the formal name. Yes Gigi Geoghegan was pretty national is at the book and I say you know I think all of us we do have to take ownership on just on carriers but also some of our own lives say there is nothing that this community specically no in China we do happen in China but is primarily looking Chinese women and I want to be really space where I call connect ten. I is myself so I said there is no shopping leaning China intonation also both Chinese. He's an international of foreigners. Women and men less just stopped trump. They're all ascetical and that's what I did wow and wouldn't what year was this in the years ago so I was two thousand sixteen and he started a community and what was the initial response when you you know of your first event I group. Hal is that how did that go. Yes thanks for the question. It was quite an interesting. beginning of the old communities community is so actually as started together with the French woman the how to leave the very same week or few weeks later. She's like I'm so sorry area to go back. I really need to go back to France cycle promotion so I will really sorry and I say okay now. I have two choices either. I don't do this anymore. Just keep going and I see what will happen. At the beginning. It was really few of the Frisk to meetings. We were who I two people. Then three people than five people gould anthem people and then the community slowly start growing today. How did how does it work. Do people have to go on the website or did you use we chat because they're in China or how did you get the girls to congregate together doors EP. I guess if you want us to so beginning was primarily through the plot affirmed leaning was offering so you have to go to the website. At least one does hit goal that you will like to join and sign up register there. There is a very big change leaning last year well actually beginning of this year and the really the structure and and the behind is to give a lot of autonomy to the local communities so they basically are telling us you really can manage your community in the platform we disown media that make more sense to you to the place where you are and what I'm doing today because of all VPN actions and stuff and also because honestly actually which helped is the tool in China absolutely so now primarily do manage the community. which aren't we have which help grope we also have official count? I have to say we are not several fancy and we work so hard at it. We really focus a lot on content our or even more than promoting that even itself for the heart. Would you say that the heart of the community is offline. Yes honestly yes in the heart of the community is really will happen to every participant doing the workshops for the kind of insight that we learned from ourselves and such if you are enjoying the topic of life abroad definitely have listened to migratory patterns another pod part of the migration media network host. Mike shot loves to deep type with his guests about where's home what drives them to move abroad. What makes them stay overseas and how life overseas has changed them as an expert. Who's lived overseas for for over a decade? Mike is no stranger to the migrant lifestyle and his passionate about exploring the reasons why people are moving learn more and hear the latest episodes at migration media. Dot Net research search migratory patterns wherever you find your podcast. Can you.

China Netherlands Shanghai Beijing Michelle Beijing Beijing Italy Roberto Indonesia Liden Rome Leinen China TA Tingey Normal University Mike shot Alina Shanghai US Olympics
"basso" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:02 min | 3 years ago

"basso" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"M. I. L. so this is the John basso Sean speaking with Seth Jones who at the rand corporation is now publishing punching in the shadows of percent about cars since nine eleven far more complicated than he got his man with the death of bin laden Faisal Shahzad a character who's fallen below the radar now that he is he is self conviction and sentencing for an attempted mass murder at Times Square within these last years but Faisal Shahzad at demonstrates what Seth I think I read correctly is the end of the third wave this a lone wolf operation pickup game that Zazi represented Shehzad did as well trip to Pakistan a quick training build a bomb park the S. U. V. and then lose the keys of a lot of clumsiness how lucky is part of this is well and a lock is death does that also in the third wave that they've lost their interlocutory to recruit Americans with American passports who will do murder. yeah by two thousand eleven I think out they did the third wave really begin and al Qaeda gets picked apart in Pakistan their range of senior officials that are killed including bin laden himself Awlaki is killed in yeah man by a increasingly lethal drone campaign and the al Qaeda attacks like is out of the like Mar for will come to will call out the underwear bomber never quite go off but with with a little troubling during this period I'm worth noting that is Faisal Shahzad the Times Square bomber who did get his S. U. V. explosive device in the Times Square with not actually trained by al Qaeda in Pakistan he was trained by another group the to Ricky Taliban Pakistan what's important about that is that you're beginning to see by two thousand nine other groups interested in targeting the United States so this is expanding from just the core out hi to group to a range of other organizations still though by two thousand eleven al Qaeda has been put pushed back on its heels in similar ways to what we saw al Qaeda face in the two thousand three period as well as in the two thousand seven in a period of yearly weekend the fourth wave you close your book with the fourth wave question mark and here we come up as much today as we can nine eleven two thousand and twelve protests over of video that no one is seen and then suddenly a series of attacks at the consulate in Benghazi developing intelligence no confirmation yet but there is evidence that al Qaeda has a hand in some of the operations all cut is black flag is raised at the embassy in Cairo and in other embassies but especially I'll cuddling to organizations are now..

Pakistan Awlaki murder. John basso Sean Cairo Benghazi United States M. I. L. Shehzad Zazi Times Square murder Faisal Shahzad rand corporation Seth Jones
"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:20 min | 3 years ago

"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"This is the John basso show different warrants here and is about to take us into a war fought the German way against the Russians with their Austrian allies and they're going to use interior lines that's an advantage the Germans have Jeffrey you tell a wonderful story however the German troops are far more better trained far better artillery better machine guns better generals and the Austrians and the Russians both of whose armies will fall apart in the course of the years but there's that story that is just compelling to me Jeffrey all of us to either wanted to read Greek org can read Greek can identify with this Manisha a German soldiers so shell shocked by his fight in the west that when he's transferred to the east to fight again against the Russians you observe in this a source material that he sits there staring at the ground reciting long passages of the Odyssey in Greek is that typical story of the shell shock in the front is just to stand out among all the other sources well I I got that in a girl from the memoirs of Harry Kessler and Kessler observe that and Kessler wrote that down and he said it was emblematic of the difference between the fighting on the western and eastern fronts in nineteen fourteen he said that with the western front so much for industrialized so much more intense the concentration of of men machines artillery what was so it's so much more lethal than the Eastern Front or things were spread out quite a bit more the armies were less heavily on the view the offer on your and I was very deficient artillery the Russian army was better than the Austrians but compare the Germans quite efficient as well put the spaces were much just much bigger so you have fewer you if your men and guns per square mile a kilometer so you the the the concentration of fire was was actually mind bending on the western front and and Kessler was what was saying you know when they got replacements on the western front when they moved divisions from the western front to the Eastern Front in nineteen fourteen to bolster the to bolster the Austro Hungarian war effort these guys that showed up were you know they had a much higher percentage of shell shocked guys and then German or Austrian used in serving throughout on the Eastern Front but this explains why Hindenburg and Ludendorff thought that it made sense to try to win the war in the east not in the west and they were always disputing with mocha the younger than Falkenhayn about the focus of the war they've into burger lunar thought it was impossible to win on the western front because the British and French which is to industrialize the the the the British industry and subsidies were creating you know incredibly solid trench works lots of artillery lots of shells yes there is a shell shores began the war but the correct this and then they become stronger and stronger throughout and in the Bergen Ludendorff said we can't break through on the western front because these western allies are so well armed the Russians on the other hand we could break through there because there's more space with more space for maneuver and the Russians are pathetically armed versus the the British and the French they were they were fairly well armed at the outset but then they're blockaded throughout by the by the Germans in though in the Baltic to close the Baltic ports in the Turks who joined the central powers they close to the Black Sea ports of the Russians so the Russians aren't able to get in any machinery not able get any artillery but not able to get in the shells or or or or bullets for the rifles in fact that throughout the war about one third of the troops in any given Russian unit have rifles two thirds attack without rifles and pick up rifles from that was the reason for the Germans to launch the war in the first place I believe if I read you correctly they knew the Russians eventually would be better armed and so they had to move now before it became impossible yeah and they probably in the and they didn't they didn't realize just how badly they were on that they didn't realize it was as bad as it seemed and so in nineteen fourteen fifteen and then the nineteen sixteen seventeen eighteen as well or Hindenburg Ludendorff say look we have to seek decision on the Eastern Front because the US the Russians are big but their ramshackle we kicked the door in the whole thing will fall down where is we can't punch through in the west once we take the Russians out we are they conquer them all together or we force them to make a separate peace with us we can then focus everything on the western front we can defeat the French the Hindenburg and Ludendorff these to work together and they will take over everything eventually and seventeen and eighteen but here they build an office chair in eastern army of twelve course six more coming and they attacked the Russians and roll up enormous numbers of prisoners Dayton at dead and wounded and killed and five hundred thousand they just roll right through the Russians and they want Conrad to work with them to attack from the south Ludendorff is furious at Conrad because he won't he's ineffective and at this point is Ludendorff thinking about taking over Conrad's army he will will eventually but he did he think it this early in November well they didn't object the Germans were at war effectively taking it over in the sense that they were increasingly coming up with ideas and increasingly compelling Conrad to execute those ideas going over his head to the emperor in Vienna if he refused but the the problem the problem was is that you know you have the Germans on the left and center and then you have the Austrians in the center and all the way down the right so if you're going to have a big operation where you try to roll up the enemy flank the Austrians really have to participate does the Austrian in because the Russians are so numerous and but it's the the Austrians just that whenever they attack their blown back by the Russians and they and they lack the artillery they lacked the infantry tactics to actually launch an effective attack and get through the Russians so they make these half hearted efforts to join the German offensive in the east but every time there stymied thrown back in and the Germans are left fighting alone without a full flanking Austro Hungarian army to a system a side bar to what's going on and the battle fronts in the enormous casually numbers Jeff introduces me to what looks to be a fresh information about what happened to the Jews in the Austrian Hungarian empire that by the nineteen thirties nineteen twenties nineteen thirties they were scapegoated by such as the national socialists the dislocation of the Jewish villages and Alicia is coterminous with these offensive actions the enormous numbers of armies marching through although blasting and the threat those Jews are what they're they they travel naturally to Vienna for support is that correct Jeff and that's where the Jews I have to live again having been driven out of their villages and they participate in the black market in Vienna yeah the the coalition was the most was the most densely settled part of the Habsburg empire this is little by Jews there were three nationalities living their poles Ukrainians inches but there was a large very large Jewish presence is extended from Galicia northward into Russian Poland which is why the Holocaust is is focused principally in Poland and Ukraine when the **** come that way that was the old Russian pale of settlement which extended down into our strong during delicious as well and so what happens is the because of the Russian tradition of pogroms and because of this intense Russian anti semitism and the Russians musiques the Russian peasants soldiers whenever they came into contact with Jewish temples or villages they would you know rape and plunder steel and harasser bully the inhabitants and so in in as many examples in the book right talk about their their treatment of of of Jews at the front and so that the Jews would just gather up what belongings they could take in they would take to the roads and head west and they had to get out of Galicia and then once they get over the Carpathians in in the Austria hungry they just March on the Vienna in most cases and they take over the second but feared the the Liverpool stock part of Vienna and which which if you go there today it's it's incredible because it was this really thickly settled Jewish part of yet and there's there's placards on almost every apartment building that this was you know Jews were interned here during the the third Reich and they were all sent to Treblinka or should serve to raise interest out and and exterminated so it was it's a very sad story but they they end up in Vienna because of this war so the the the Jews of Galicia felt very threatened by the Russian advance felt cold very let down by the Austrian collapse and they fled into the interior of the monarchy changing the demographics of key cities like Vienna and setting up the problems of the future the Jews were tree the right of the Russians are over run by the Germans the Austrians do not attack and what about our hero Conrad he goes to a villa in passion and he has a tennis court any carries on his leadership as if the war is on another planet was this acceptable conduct a conduct by the general staff over which is unknown at the time it's it's a it's a leap into a war a a sense of morality I don't understand well it's it's yeah I talk a lot about that in the book and I have pictures and I I talk about the the you know Conrad daily calendar kept by his adjutant Rudolph Clinton and you know you know who is with the daily you know there's really not much happening there you know they'll put you know all the army is being pulverised at the front by by Russian artillery but also by the elements as soon as we get into fall and winter people are dying of all sorts of diseases and freezing to death and and getting frostbite and amputations and and you know you look at Conrad daily routine and he he gives for excellent briefing and any use of that yeah there there there there headquarters is one of our street Friedrich's own palaces in Austrian Silesia this place called session and it's in a neighboring high school and they go into the geography class Germany pulled the maps and give them a briefing everyday the rest today he goes for walks to take snaps you read the newspaper he goes to the coffee house right says ina he always writes to you and he's writing in his writing to gene and he's running to his mother and it's so it's not it's not entirely unusual that you have a relatively remote headquarters I mean whether you're looking at the Germans and the French or the Italians they they all have a a supreme headquarters behind the lines to sure it's not over run by an enemy offensive what was different was the you know it was the utter incompetence of this headquarters and the passivity and the torpor I mean they just aren't getting anything done and you know couldn't run in his own diary the act you know comrades engine is saying I can't believe relieving these wretches out there at the front freezing and here we are back here you know sitting on our hands basically so Konrad and and and a lot of this a lot of this became more and more noticeable and was remarked upon and and Conrad was increasingly lows it inside the army for removing himself and again as we talked about earlier he only made three this is the front of the entire war in other words he huddled in this headquarters far behind the lines in perfect safety Conrad will finally be dismissed in March seventeen but there are some important events we need to turn I would need to check off before we get to March of seventeen such as the the death of the emperor and his replacement by a man named Carl the first and then there also is the matter of the capture of Serbia and what story are the leaders of Osterholm hungry telling the man at the front what did they say we're fighting for Jeffrey water as the author a mad catastrophe the outbreak of World War one and the collapse of the Habsburg empire.

Jeffrey John basso
"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:28 min | 3 years ago

"basso" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Yes Sir this is the John basso show I'm speaking with Graham far mellow who's done prodigious research to assemble and write romantic the story of the war in the back drop the second world wars in the backdrop of the story of Churchill's bomb what the man the physicists the scientists the military man even the pilots flying back and forth they weren't following what I'd sell a was a careful secret hygiene at this point because people were talking all the time you know physicists when they come together they have T. they are they light up their pipes and they start speculating in any event Leslie groves general is now in command of building the gadgets for the war or is it Graham at this point it's forty three Churchill's of where our he's been briefed at this point that the Americans are going in a direction to build the bomb for themselves or for Great Britain how does he tell himself because he's going to meet Roosevelt's again and again through forty three what did he and Roosevelt believe is going on well this will result had the thing dedicated right and and he he had a first rate team the and I did I did we need to be detained by that because say but he was going swimmingly from that point of view from Churchill's point of view all I think that at eighty accurate to say that Churchill took his auto the bold here he took virtually no initiative to toll and we when he found in the early months of nineteen forty three that Harry Hopkins to be light that was basically what we would now say not returning his call he was not playing pool is such a way that the project would would would that would be a collaboration as Churchill it would be and he got very very frustrated with this until April nineteen forty three this is critical I've been very carefully through the archives here you could see Churchill's patience in that month and he then becomes the prime minister that at the we had his is that with that of of the pie we that we revere now of somebody who takes the bull by the horns and he commissions Ripoll he then the right excellent stuff on on the palm sends inland of any sends Lindemans at to find out what's going on he does he does but but Churchill was it was extremely concerned that that Britain was that what was was being sidelined a brief brief project was was very very weak at that time and the the British should be but the shot held all the American project something that was it that was that what what was with CD gregis inside the the the British scientific ranks and let's let's do the lan the Lindemann meeting with bush I can imagine what I wish we have you to those of all this all of a sudden Linda than shows up remembered Lindemann is eccentric even by English standards okay fine I I I imagine him listening to operate in his are hot hundred and four degree bath six inches of water only is not limited does that yes yeah and at at is remade rooms at church of Christ Church a driving being driven everywhere by Harvey is show for in his rolls Royce he comes to America he asks what's going on and Lindemann says who where where is the cooperation and bush does bush lied to it does it does he mislead him what is it what is bush do for Lindemans direct questions I I think strung along with the term I would use I I I think it's accurate to say that that that bush in Carmel played a very neat game from their point of view I wish I could say with hard I could see with the collaboration of the Roosevelt use it we do we we also want you to go to see what I see all really full because we have so many different views on things that is he was the classic juggler and but it was only in August nineteen forty three the Churchill cleaned at Roosevelt down with a agreement right let's go through the agreement the bomb would be billed as a joint venture another country would use the weapon against the other neither would pass information to other countries good heavens they've okay that was between the prime minister and the president did they write it down yet it was written down by their official to be hammered out in Washington shortly before but it it was signed in a brief I did with the ceremony but it was fine very briefly in a in the wings so to speak all the quote at the Quebec conference in August nineteen back agreement that they kept secret yeah that was and that I might die this is a big part of the story John because needed that neither Churchill knoll Roosevelt told they'd get beat is about this both the deputies were kept almost completely in the dark about this they treat he'd issue Churchill and Roosevelt the the new the new tape according to the kind of personal fiefdom you know it was there saying Basil or it's something that they would work out if you know and and and and thank them and governments will have you could do that you know could could got their own sweet when eaten often sells about there is a garbled cable from the president written to bush who was in London after this and apparently they garbled was very convenient to the White House I wonder if it was on purpose instead of saying that they renewed their a ground it said they reviewed their agreement to we believe that was done on purpose or was it a genuine accident all right mind you it was an accident but it was a lease yeah I I honestly I think it illustrates the Kael cease to strong but you know it was such a such a such a mess it was always like afraid of false you know even at but the but the main thing was that the the the bush and a Cola would determine that chip to was not going to believe so to speak his way into what they saw as as fundamentally an American rat run around Churchill recognized at this time grab that the Americans had switched from winning the war against Germany to dominating the world because that's a question you ask how do we have evidence that Roosevelt had talked to anybody about if we have this weapon we win everything I didn't think that was true at that stage I think that came at a good deal later when the secretary of war Stimson we using the language that you just use that with secretary of war he was very much against the British participating in these in this collaboration right he wanted the bomb for America because America was going to save the world did Roosevelt signed on to that before be any time do we have a document I I I I don't know for certain I don't believe he did but I wouldn't like to say definitively I that was Roosevelt's way wasn't ground official about that all right I know it's a good place to hesitate because we're about to reintroduce a hero his name is Neil's bore he's going to escape from Denmark and make his way to Great Britain to meet with the prime minister they call him the great day bore and Churchill in a room together imagine that Churchill's bomb is the book how the United States overtook Britain in the first nuclear arms race Graham far mellow is the author I'm John bachelor this is the John Bassar show.

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"basso" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"basso" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

"But I it makes it look like I I knew his glass when it happened. Crying people thought that I left the glass there someone to come along. I was I was the orders that were giving me were never mind. Don't worry about the broken glass. Channels clean it up go inside and get on yester- this. So I did. And by the time, I saw will master piercing. Pimples, wasn't crying. I'm totally fine. Bright. And of course, I I feel terrible. I'm sure anyone who's you know, or whose children before they know that awful feeling when they're when an accident happens that they're responsible for a child get hurt. It's crushing. And I I was I was just trying not to buy shit. So the parents have been any better Albert father, don't even worry about it. Just show me where the bandages are pure and happy to have a battle from. Nobody deal were tough. Where's the bar? I was very very grateful. They were so understanding, but that. I got a lot of shifts that a lot of shit, and I. On Twitter when this woman was just badgering me. This is before I learned how to deal with troll. I was responding her. And just got to the point where you know, you purposely drove glasses and currently allowed child to himself. And I lied. Do it. How broke loose? I mean, people are just like the girl out of a mind. Scott things you comments like that. I'm like, you guys gotta understand you're gonna keep throwing this shit at eventually. I'm going to say fuck it. And I'm going to give you a respond child in deserve. Like do. You think? I am. So in the after Basso than while, they're filming the next day is when you I guess have your your conversation, and then you decide to leave right? Yeah. That was right. That's right. And so then after you left how much time between you leaving that boat and the airing of the season. That was. Either early March can you remember late February early March, and then the show started airing in October. In the meantime, did you have any contact with any of the producers of the people or the cast members from the below deck? Official contact with Chandler Riley Roth Ashton a little bit Josie. But I..

Chandler Riley Roth Ashton Twitter Basso Albert Scott Official Josie
"basso" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

02:55 min | 3 years ago

"basso" Discussed on Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

"But I it makes it look like I I knew his glass when it happened. Crying people thought that I left the glass there someone to come along. I was I was the orders that were giving me were never mind. Don't worry about the broken glass. Channels clean it up go inside and get on yester- this. So I did. And by the time, I saw will master piercing. Pimples, wasn't crying. I'm totally fine. Bright. And of course, I I feel terrible. I'm sure anyone who's you know, or whose children before they know that awful feeling when they're when an accident happens that they're responsible for a child get hurt. It's crushing. And I I was I was just trying not to buy shit. So the parents have been any better Albert father, don't even worry about it. Just show me where the bandages are pure and happy to have a battle from. Nobody deal were tough. Where's the bar? I was very very grateful. They were so understanding, but that. I got a lot of shifts that a lot of shit, and I. On Twitter when this woman was just badgering me. This is before I learned how to deal with troll. I was responding her. And just got to the point where you know, you purposely drove glasses and currently allowed child to himself. And I lied. Do it. How broke loose? I mean, people are just like the girl out of a mind. Scott things you comments like that. I'm like, you guys gotta understand you're gonna keep throwing this shit at eventually. I'm going to say fuck it. And I'm going to give you a respond child in deserve. Like do. You think? I am. So in the after Basso than while, they're filming the next day is when you I guess have your your conversation, and then you decide to leave right? Yeah. That was right. That's right. And so then after you left how much time between you leaving that boat and the airing of the season. That was. Either early March can you remember late February early March, and then the show started airing in October. In the meantime, did you have any contact with any of the producers of the people or the cast members from the below deck? Official contact with Chandler Riley Roth Ashton a little bit Josie. But I..

Chandler Riley Roth Ashton Twitter Basso Albert Scott Official Josie
"basso" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"basso" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Just do mailbag. The doctrine mailbag. We've got the mics Facebook messages and emails we've collected from the weeds. All right behind the scenes. It's not yell at each other. Like, Kamala, Harris, it's my name on the marquee. So I'll have to accept the responsibility for was yelling at me. Okay. So. All right. What she got in the mail Basso people want to they want to correspond with their favorite radio way in. They just find the von Hessler doctrine Facebook page, our Instagram page, our Email, or they of course, download the WSB radio app, and they can leave open mics there as well. I try to run from the listeners, but Eric Clive. No, not me. You can't avoid them. My radio consultant tells me you have to engage at correspond so on Sunday restroom. Ed like like, you took your kids to play video games have one of these places. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You gotta the restroom and a guy dumpsters. Oh, you gotta say, yes. Let me wash my hands. And I'll I'll give you a fishbowl. Fist-bump rally. You don't wanna get germs ever? See me in the bathroom. It's fist-bump done. So. So. Yeah. So a call off the dogs opened the gates and let the people in struck a nerve with some people here. This is over what over this. I'll explain it to you. This is from Laurie here on our Facebook page. She says play that shark. Tune one more time, and I will stop listening with a monkey.

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