20 Episode results for "Basf"

EP69: More than just a Therapist with Kati Morton

Let's Talk About It with Taylor Nolan

1:02:49 hr | 2 years ago

EP69: More than just a Therapist with Kati Morton

"Hello. And welcome to. Let's talk about it with Olin before. I get into what we're going to be talking about today at just wanna give a reminder that on April thirteen I will be hosting a live podcast here in Seattle. I like, let's talk about it event. And obviously hoped to come different cities and meet you guys. But for now just kinda start in Seattle, and you guys can use the code tame Ohka ten or tame Ohka five for discounts on VIP and on general admission I'm really really really looking excited to looking forward and very excited obviously for this event. Just because it's a little isolating during podcasting. And I really just want to connect with you guys and invite you all into this conversation and guy's face to face. I mean, I love your emails that I get and I love your reviews on itunes, but it's going to be so much more wonderful. To like, see your guys as beautiful lovely faces and person and feel the fields together. So the link to buy tickets is in my bio on Instagram at Moga, and it's also going to be in the absurd notes for this episode. So you can check it out there in April thirteenth. But now today we are going to get into therapy and mental health, which we kind of talk about every episode, but this episode we're going to get much more in depth say we're going to talk about having a brand as a public therapist. And also how does he kelp I'm very very happy to have our wonderful guest on stay who you might recognize from YouTube. Her name is Katie Morton, and she's a Elham FT who started her career over a decade ago with the hope of helping people who were struggling with mental illness her career choice. Just so happen to also kind of coincide with this shift in the way that people were communicating about mental health and the a lot more of that was happening online instead of face to face. So katie. Has been creating these mental health, but he goes on YouTube for over seven years, and she just has was goal of making formation readily available to all today. She's made over thousand videos addressing various mental health, concerns and shells as a book called are you okay? Which do how to know how to know if you need help. And then where you can find it too. She also has a patriot community that she has built up. So so many different ways you can check her out and she's been doing amazing work some super super excited her here and to get into some of this. So thank you so much Katy for being here. And welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. Yeah. I I want to start off with my supervisor Dr Condie. He's a professor here at Antioch said that he very much respect your work and was excited that I was gonna be chatting with the. So he says alot. Yeah. We've we've had a lot of conversations just about being therapist. And what that means to also have this presence on social media. And so when I told him having you on he was like, oh, yeah. She'll be good person to consult with. Happy to help. Yes. And so you've been you kind of started doing therapy back in two thousand eight is that right? Yeah. That's when I started when I was in graduate school, still like your practicum. I started my practicum. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And then how long after that like you've been making videos on YouTube now for about seven years, right? And so that kind of started shortly after you'd started practicing. Yeah. Thank god. My supervisor speaking supervisors, my supervisor Patty was super supportive because I wasn't licensed give as as you know, it takes and California's three thousand hours every state has different amounts. But it just takes a while to gather those hours, and so she was all for it. She was like this is great way to use these tools, and I support it. And so I started when I was I was a head graduated, but I was still an intern. And I was working in eating disorder treatment center and a hospital. You know, how you like a bunch of different hats, always had like some private practice patients. But it's never it was never like my full thing. 'cause it's hard, you know. But yes, why was doing three things at my private practice? The hospital rounds I was like per diem. So I'd flown between hospitals and then even disorder treatment center. Thanks. Yeah. And I mean thinking back to then to any part of you have any idea that it would kind of blow up how it has. And that you'd actually be like building public brand around being therapist. No. It's kind of funny because I never even thought it would make any money because back then you couldn't make money on YouTube. I don't know if people know that back in the day, there was no like, I'm sure people were making money, but there was no like veil ability to monetize right away. Like, I don't know what the threshold was. But I had not met it. And so it was really just a way. For me to educate about what I knew because an entry way too. But as there, we tend to get these Nisha. So like, okay, I work with anxiety. I work with a addiction and for me. It was I work with eating disorders, and every time at the end of impatient clinic that I worked every time. We try to refer someone who I feel like I had no one to refer to because nobody really understood and a day were full on. And so that's really how the channel started was just a way to educate about what I knew. So that it wasn't like hidden. You know, that it was only available to certain people who lived in my area and Ford, and so yeah, that was how started. Yeah. And I mean, it's that's you know, as as has many negative and kind of obstacles internet can bring at least does provide us a platform where we can kind of expand this community and make these kinds of resources available to everyone as opposed to just a small kind of small community that. Needed or has been court ordered to receive this kind of education. Exactly, it's also like sometimes people just don't know what they don't know. And so it's a nice. Yeah. I think the internet or just any social media in general gives us the connectivity. Empowerment that maybe people been craving, but just didn't even know how to seek it out. Yeah. And so I guess kind of going backwards a little bit even more. You started off working primarily kind of it sounds like with eating disorders, and what kind of got you into being therapist in the first place and wanting to pursue this kind of a career. A couple of things. I I always enjoyed being the secret keeper. And I I love give on his answers. I love that. It was like I took such pride. You know? I'm volt lock it up. You tell me your secret, I won't tell anybody. And I also just enjoy people 'cause between you, and I look I get super super board like every other job. I just once I like mastered it on board. And so I- this is the only job that I could do because patients change and people change change. It's it's always ever-evolving and always a challenge. So always fulfilling ano-, so. Yeah. That's that's what kind of started midwives continued. Yeah. I totally agree. That one thing that I always say is like, it's it's every day can be different. Every client story is gonna be different. And not only are you seeing them grow on your helping them grow. But through them you learn so much about yourself. And so on like, I love just doing the work. Like, I love doing the work personally. I love sharing that space people to do the work. And it's like, it's just it is so fulfilling. Yeah, I yeah. It varies than any other kind of career. I think that it offers that one hundred percent. Yeah. Yeah. And so then you as you were starting with creating this kind of content on YouTube for people, and you're kind of filling all these different hats. I'm curious for you, like how did that start to impact the work that you did like how what's that kind of threshold or time line like how that started to impact the work that you were doing I think there's a couple of ways it's impacted the first time that something was just talking husband about yesterday where I was like I reached a point where I feel like it's I'm time poor. Yeah. You know, like, I only so much I can do and also just only so much. I can focus and take care myself. I'm very aware of like when I need to get back in therapy. When I need to take a break. Like this week is kind of a slower week for me. I am enjoying. That's why I was like try this request for better for worse almost killed me. But I'm okay. And so the time constraints has been a definite impact because for instance, like four years ago, I quit working at the eating sort of treatment center in hospital. I just have private practice patients while you're doing all five four of those four years ago. Yeah. Yeah. So it was a lot. And it was a challenge sometimes people out and also putting out five videos a week for while people are like, how'd you do that? I honestly, I don't know if I like dissociated or just forgot about it. But I'm like, I don't know. I don't remember. I've know like it just happened. I don't know. That's a lot. Yeah. It was a lot in the thing. I think it was enjoyable. It didn't feel like work in the when it started to feel like work is when I was like, thanks to change. Like, I've shift what I'm doing. So that's definitely impacted just might availability for time. And then the second thing that's been an impact that I I didn't. I mean, if I think about it. Looking back. I should have been like. Yeah. That could I could see that happening. But it never crossed my mind was just the challenge to get out of my comfort zone. And learn about things and miss speak say things that are men. Learn along with my viewers. I think the challenge for me to be better. And to learn more and to reach out to other colleagues to have been share own that has really been the biggest it's had the biggest impact on me as therapists in person. All right. It's time for a small break here. With a message from one of our lovely sponsors. Honestly, I have walked downtown to my office to record this episode today and on my way down here. I actually found in my backpack, my old wire headphones, and I'm so happy. I didn't have like fidget with them bunch because honestly two thousand nineteen and everyone needs a great pair of wireless. Ear buds just really gotta get with the times here and rake on actually has ear buds. Start at about half the price of any other premium wireless ear buds on the market. And they sound just as amazing. So, thankfully, I didn't have to worry and struggle with my old headphones and just walks downtown with my lovely wireless headphones and just felt like about. So you guys go to buy rake con dot com and use promo code tailored twenty to get twenty percent off of your order and like get with the times like stop hassling with the wires of your headphones. Again, that's promo code tailored twenty at by recon dot com. For twenty percent off Ray con wireless ear buds if you've been I on a pair. Now is the time to get on this amazing deal when we're time. That's by Ray con dot com with promo code Taylor twenty. So I hope you guys get with it. Take advantage of this wonderful offer, and we can get back to mental health and the show now. One thing that I know I experienced so much of is just like, well, you know, I, I don't know. How old you were? When you finished your master's. But yeah, I mean twenty five or twenty four. Yeah. Yeah. And that's I mean, I'm twenty five now. And even even now, I still get that of like, well, you don't have enough experience yet to even speak on these things, you know, some review even that I get are like Taylor needs more experience before she can talk about these things and for you to be so young and be. Creating this content and then also working in these different kind of populations. Like, how did you go about handling that like did you ever get that kind of feedback online, even it's funny? I think because online is so young I mean, not anymore. But when I started it was definitely younger skin like chains. And so I didn't because I was ready older than them. But I have gotten that feedback in practice. Sometimes I'm sure your supervisors of told you the same that they told me, which is like, what would it mean to you? If I was younger than you. What would it mean him? I was older. So I think I think that thing that hopefully, people will realize is it's not just experience that makes us good therapist in. Also, I mean as so I'm thirty five now. So I've been practicing for a long time, and I prefer personally, I love to see someone who's just out of school cause they are like fresh. Yes, they they know what's new they know how to utilize CT like to. Whereas I mean as we get more comfortable, we lose an edge. I think in not to say that we can't, you know, regain that through seeing us and just challenger assaults. But I almost prefer a younger therapist because I feel like they're freshman wine. Yeah. No, I actually very much. Appreciate that approach because I was just having that thought process I've been having a lot of like neck pain. And so I was like, oh like I should maybe go get acupuncture and BASF year here, which I'm sure, you know, bass DR in Washington, they're a great school. And so they're also a clinic and you can go in and get acupuncture from students and they worked with a supervisor on one hand my brain was like, oh, wait do. I maybe want someone that's more experienced, and you know, all this. And then I was like actually not like I'd rather see student because they have a lot to like right on this. They're not only are they is it all fresh in their head and they're like working their asses off. But like may also. Are they have a lot to lose like they're working, really hard? Even as young therapist. It's like, yeah, you're actually really working your ass off. And you are like trying to pay super close attention to everything you're saying and trying to make sure you're getting everything right? And speaks a kind of way said learning even sometimes you don't say the right thing. And how you deal with that? I think there is so much pressure for that, especially as therapist, and I'm curious how you've how you have handled that like emotionally when that's happened for you. Whether it was on YouTube, and a video of you saying something that you needed to correct or with a client and how how you've dealt with that. Yeah. I mean, it's been different different ways, depending on the medium. I guess so in practice, I think it's a little bit easier. It's like more of a gray area. Right. Like, you're working with one. So if a patient tells me in session like well, that's not what it felt like for me. And I can say oh sorry. Let neat than how does it feel for you? We corrected immediately. When it comes to things online. It's out there, you know. And like for instance, I did miss speak about there's two instances. I remember I was painted by polar video, and we ended up having to reshoot that day at it and get it out because I misspoke were said that mania has to last for two weeks, and it only has to last one. I could've put text on the screen, but I didn't want anybody listening to misunderstand. And I and my husband is the one that does the editing seventies. Like, we should have caught this way before. And he's right. You know? And so we've we've changed how we add it and how add content stuff like that. But so there's that word didn't go out. And then there was one about selective mutism where I misspoke, and so I just took the video down, and I remained it. And as in video that I remade I said to them like I'm not perfect. I never I never pretended to be. Thank you for letting me know, you know, that I said some didn't agree with and citing references if things showed a front end. So here we go Solomon. We think about this. And so that was kind of how I dealt with it because I felt like if anything as they're part of our role is to like don't mimic, but given example of a healthy communication in relationship. And that you can tell me you. Agree. You can be mad. You can get angry. And that doesn't mean that I'm gonna go away or that? I'm gonna punish you. It means that we're gonna talk about it. And we're gonna come to a resolution, and so I think when it came to me misspeaking. It's obviously, I'm wrong. And so I have to admit I'm wrong criminal perfect. I don't know everything in that scenario. It's kind of funny because I read I talked to a colleague, and I just wrote it down wrong. And so in that's my fault. And so it was, but yeah, it was a learning for me. And I think we're always learning. I'm sure it'll happen again. About person. Does it make you about their best? I think those ravens some of the negative thoughts that we might end up telling ourselves in those kinds of situations. You know, I I know they're definitely been things that I've said on the podcast where I'm like. Yeah. I you know, where I've had to go back into that. Oh, it was actually this thing not that thing, and you know, my bad, and I think I actually end up overcompensating in that way. And so I try to speak very tentatively about things. Thing. Then I struggle with that too. Because it's like, no, I'm not perfect. But I do have an expertise. We did go to school. We are. We are licensed therapist that says something in part of it. I wonder like any part of it's a female thing. I'm not saying male CMO. But definitely let that whole imposter syndrome of like who am I? Yeah. I don't know. And I've definitely like even to this day when I go to speak at conventions, and there's other keynote speakers from my mic God like I who am I yet. I don't even know what I'm doing. I still feel that like. I don't know if it'll ever go away because like I'm thirty five CM borough for a long time for ten years over ten years on. And so it's like, I don't know. It's just an interesting battle because I don't pretend to know at all. But I don't I don't think either of us needs to discredit the work that we do. Yeah. Yeah. You know? And it's weird balance. Totally an I don't know if if there's been anything in your life. That's maybe exacerbated that kind of thought, but I know for me at least, especially as on the bachelor, and there's a lot of like negative feedback around just being therapist mean. So young as well. And so it was a lot of like, you know, you think, you know, everything been so it it did really thinking for me this, you know, almost shaming like acting and the confidence myself and knowing like, well, yeah, I did go to school. Like, I do know these things like this is just what this is like not saying I'm better than anyone else. I'm just saying this is this. This is what it is. And. It's been an interesting process kind of get some confidence back because think that is something that especially women can struggle with just being like confident in their intelligence. And I don't know why it's so difficult. But it is you know, and like I think part of part for solves. Yeah. I always tell people online and even like, even my friends in like, patients and stuff. I'm always like don't think therapist have all my shit together. Yeah. It just means. I know better, which is almost worse. Yes. Because when I do something that I'm like, oh, or I think poorly about my smell from talking nastily to them. I just know. It's not good. Yeah. But and then I think that's where it is important to remind yourself that like, yes, you know, these things. Yes, you are therapist. But you're not a robot. No, you're exactly which I think is really important. And I think that's what makes therapy. So Beneficial's of great as it's a human connection. 'cause for I'm sure there's some AAI that could like take your symptoms like women. Yeah. Take your thumbs. Tell you. You know, you have depression and send you on your way tell me what to do. But that's why we know the research at the best outcomes come from the therapeutic relationship that we need that connection. Yeah. And I think I did an pretty on. My friends is very like involved in tech actually was telling me that there was a article about the all these things are transforming into a I and being robotic and that like the one career that like computers are never going to be able to take being therapist. And I'll be safe. I want to ask a little bit about just kind of balancing you still are working with your private practice. Yeah. Just two half days a week in. It's a little tricky. It's been tricky over the years like having to let go patients that are higher needs. Just because I travel more patients right now are pretty high functioning just ethically. I mean, yeah, anybody authors therapist, you know, it's ethical dilemmas win. You wanna keep seeing them? But you know, new aren't the best fit anymore. All right. It's time for a little break. I have messages for you guys from our lovely sponsors. And you heard me talk about pup, oh before, but I want to share with them again. 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It gets delivered right to your door. It's super easy to use. You guys can visit Pepo dot com slash Taylor to get fourteen days of personalized dog food delivery for only nine dollars. Again, that's pup O P U P P O dot com slash Taylor to fourteen days of personalized dog food delivery personalized for only nine dollars. So make sure you guys check them out, and we can get back to the show. I so many questions around this notion, and it's something I get a lot of questions about as well, and I've talked a little bit on the podcast about. But there really aren't a lot of people in situation similar to us where your therapist, and you have this like public platform on social media. So it really is kind of like the small little niche, but I'm curious if you've had any like how you go about explaining that with clients if most of the clients that you've had you've had since the beginning. And so they kind of get it or you know, how you go about getting new I have a ton of question. Okay. So for and that's a totally. I've had it depends on the patient. Some of my patients, I just let them like graduate from therapy. Yeah. Like, I knew I was whittling down my practice a little bit from like three full days and just as like, they graduated from high school and went onto college as they, you know, we're joined better just gonna take a break than I let them know that you know, I am lowering them out of hours. So if you call, and I don't have have availability, I have here some referrals in those weren't so difficult those were just kind of like timing like wedding than roll out as as they won't it, which is the ideal scenario. Yeah. And that was maybe like four or five patients over a year. And then there were probably another four or five that were like higher needs, you know, in and out of the hospital, or you know, I was seeing two or three times a week. And so those were more like just finding a good fit and transitioning slowly for better for worse. You know, some throat get upset and throw tantrums or never coming back. Yeah. Or like, you know, Cussing you out totally fair. It's gonna part of the process. Yep. I've been there. Hopefully, my hope is that they had that healing experience where I did not react was a conversation. I understand you're upset. And that's okay. You know, all that. And so there were definitely some of those. So that's kind of how it happened. And it was it was slow over. Honestly, if I'm being completely honest probably took about two years, which I feel like is a ample amount of time end. Like, do you have a kind of like disclosure statement to our conversation initially when you start with a new person of like that you know, that you do have this presence publicly or that they bring that to you. A little bit of both. It depends like some of my older patients aren't online often. They don't really care, and I may mention to them I use it kind of a resource like let's say a patient was just newly diagnosed with bipolar one. And then I'll say, you know, I have a video on YouTube explaining what it is. It kind of helps him with the psycho education component like I want you to understand what the diagnosis you've been given is. And then I want you to come back. If you don't agree or if you have follow up questions to it. And so that's kind of how I usually try to manage it in use it, but younger people almost always, no. And so with that I have to be very careful about what patients I take. So the referral resources are like I only take patients from a few of my colleagues who I know like because I can't and this is like might be offensive to some of my viewers, but it can't be a fan because in the relate. Ship is off. Yeah. That was going to be one of my questions of like, gee, you get people that try to come to you because they've followed your videos, and like how you how you deal with that. Yeah. All the time. And it's I mean, it's not the I mean, I have taken a few of them mainly based on need or a functioning or whatever. But for the most part, I don't because you need to see me as an equal note is a celebrity at all. Yeah. That's the really tough part. It isn't I I don't really talk about it online openly because I don't I don't get mad or upset or whatever. But also, I think it's like it. It's hard to explain it's hard to explain how their view of me. And my presence online could just how therapy goes. And it's really again back to ethics right? It's like it's unethical for me to have someone in my practice who sees me as some all-knowing celebrity online or. Something because at the end of the day. I'm still regular person, I'm sold therapist in. It's about you. Not me, you know, that dynamic can really shift mess it up. Yeah. I've I've gone through the process of writing like a full out like media disclosure statement for my practice. And have had several like ethics consultations with ACA. And I spoke with Dr Jen man, who's also in California. And she hosted features ones couples therapy and worked with all kinds of celebrities and whatnot. And one of the things that that she said to me was, you know, she only sees clients at our practice that she knows through referrals for that specific reason because people would, you know, drive really far something or just have these kinds of things where it's like they're going above and beyond to have this therapy session. And and it it throws off the power dynamic which throws off the entire relationship which throws off the entire effectiveness of the work. One hundred percent, exactly. And I think it's something that I never thought about at the beginning. That's why on-scene a few patients. Those patients did. Well, like one got a higher level of care, and then life that therapist so much. It was easy transition out. Yeah. But it is it's it's all about the dynamic involvement that relationship. I think we have to protect it as much as possible. And like like, I'm always telling my viewers like on the responsible party in that like it's my ethics. It's my legal responsibility. And so because I know that that's not okay. Audible relationship that. Yeah. Through media, you have to protect the patient. Yeah. And I be curious. I almost I wanna send you my disclosure and see what you think of it because I think it is so difficult to talk about and you don't want to offend anyone. But at the same time it is so important to someone's treatment and to release someone's whole concept of therapy. You know of someone just wanting to come and see you for therapy. Because of who you are. And it's like wall will know like this is about us too. So, you know, what do you actually want to be getting out of this, exactly? And like am I the right fit? I don't know if they'd be able to properly judge that if they see they had me on a pedestal. You know that really I don't belong on. And just they're just comfortable with me. 'cause they've seen me online. It's it's not about me. Like, you said it it's like the one time. I'm like, it doesn't matter who I am matters. How you feel when you're with me? And if you feel the connection, you know, so do you how then do you go about kind of establishing boundaries with with new people or or with with with clients that you've had for awhile who, you know, if they bring in stuff about your videos, when I think one of the big differences that I have to consider when I think about putting myself in your shoes and asking some of these questions is a lot more of your content is very brand specific to being therapist and not so much of your personal life and curious how that's even been free. Oh, because there are some things personally that are out there like on your Instagram and stuff less than your videos. I think, but yeah, I don't know of boundaries. Are so important when we think about the money think about like being a therapist, but also having social media, and like how what those boundaries of looks like for you. Yeah. It's been back in the day. It was very rigid. I am do DBT dialectical behavior therapy and CBT which are very boundary and and therapy in general, you should know much about your therapist. Yeah. And so for years and years and years, I think because I was doing so many things and seeing so many patients like thought that something good out that could change the jamming of a relationship. I was very, and I still in very protective people don't really know that much about me like they kind of do but not really in the by design because. I feel like it would solely my my ability to be ineffective, therapists, potentially. Right. Because of what people would know. And so I don't share much about myself in videos. I don't show much. Instagram's probably the most personal in. It's really just kinda me up through my day. It's not that exciting as talking to Cameron. Unlike aliban today's like to emails and doing the research, I don't really have anything to share with you. And so I think it's I've tried to hold that to a pretty pretty stricter restricted, you know, but I'm not perfect either in. I don't I never shared anything that I regretted don't really I don't really share to be. I mean, that's the thing is like, but I try to keep it. So that if someone else like if a patient of mine saw they would have any thoughts about about that or any, you know. That's something that we've with my supervisor and other clinicians that I talked with that we kind of go back and forth on of like, you know, I feel very strongly wanting this boundary on my social media to be like, this is my personal social media like I can say an act how I want, and I don't want to be second guessing everything I do in the back of my head and thinking, you know, well, what would what would a client? And it's it's difficult because you're kind of torn like as a professional. Yes, you do consider that. But you also are not only professional like you have many other parts of yourself. So weird. It is. And I for a while Instagram private. But then it was like, why am I doing that? I don't know. I totally understand. And I totally feel you on this. Because it is it is tricky. And and they're tons of things. I don't I swear to God there's not a week goes by the I don't want to vent about something say something on Instagram. But I won't because of what that could be interpreted as yeah. And do but I'm fine with that. You know, now, there's like your close friends. So technically, I could like still send me venting about some to like my close friends. But also I like whenever it is something like that it tends to be. Something that I'm it makes me consider like why not proud or think? It's okay. That I think this way, you know, it like challenges me is it me judging how I feel am I not allow him to feel how I feel or is it that I'm being negative, and I don't want people think I'm not gonna person. Yeah. But it so it's almost like they're approach that I don't share. Why don't I wanna put that out? Yeah. Yeah. It's an I totally see an I've had these kind of moments from with myself as well where you know. I definitely could take more of that kind of approach and. Make my brand more specific to being therapist. And for whatever reason, I'm very stubborn. And I just I wanna fight again. That's so hard we like in the box of being therapist like visit one of who. I am. And I'm gonna show these other parts, but it is this like, you know. You know, especially when it comes to how you're personally failing and higher personally what your personal experiences. You know, there are times run like I'm having a really shitty shitty week. And I'm like, I really feel so low when you know, you're through social media, and it's highlight. And you're like like I wanna spice it up. And you know, maybe if I share how I'm feeling I won't feel so alone. And maybe someone else won't feel so alone. And so, you know, I'll take that risk to share something. And there is always this big fear of like off shit like people are going to come after me of like a while. You're there past and you know, you shouldn't be thinking like that. Or like, I wouldn't wanna see therapist that, you know, deals with back kind of struggle and. Ridiculous things. But I think it's good like, I think that's something that I've tried to fight against it's the same way. Like that with my channel is it's important for people to know that therapists are people to and I think that I don't know. I like I've joked we've even created these hats a little while they impact badass because I definitely like feel things and I can get like a vibe from a room in it can ruin my day, or you know, and part of that's like healthy boundaries in meat is having my guard down. Yeah. But I think it's important for for everybody to know that we're people too. We have bad days to just because I know better doesn't make me immune to it. Yeah. You know? And I think there is some it's kind of like within therapy as a whole we talk about how you can share a little bit about yourself. And it helps your patient know that you understand. Yes. In like, you can empathize with their situation in. So I think we could treat it in the same way we would treat that like. Yeah. I share online like lost my daddy. Died when I was in grad school, and that was really hard for me. And I was in therapy lot. It doesn't. I don't think that makes makes people Quique. I don't think that changes the dynamic might don't think that you know, I think it's okay to share a little bit. And to be like, I'm not just the therapist. I'm a human to an agile that you know, I also enjoy outdoor activity. Maybe I'm a fashion east. Maybe. There's we are people. That's my job in a love my job. But it's it's just one part of me. It's like one of the many hats that we wear. Yeah. Yeah. And one piece actually that I've included in my disclosure statements is where you know, part of what I do share is. There is somewhat of that thought process of like will this be beneficial for people and even in sharing, you know, like I commented on like our Kelly documentary, and you know, I've talked out. You know, Trump occasionally, and these things that are very sensitive and that with clients obviously in session, I wouldn't be like, so what were your thoughts on our Kelly like not a conversation that we're having. But that's part of our duty as there is to advocate for marginalized groups, and to support communities of people who are underserved and. You know that in part of my sharing while it may be things that not every client would agree with? But that not only is that a important to me personally. But be it's also it actually is somewhat in alignment with my professional values having that whole, you know, having to explain all of that is can be a little bit tricky. Yeah. Because it it's it is easier, and in one sense for people to make sense of you as just therapist, but what I've actually been finding more and more through social media. And I'm curious what kind of feedback you've gotten about this? But we're people actually for the most part what I've seen actually really enjoy when they're able to learn more about their therapist. Like, I'm sure for some people the fact that you have social media presence is like comforting to them, and they feel like they can see you as a person whereas someone who has no presence whatsoever. That they might feel like this person. Relate to me. And you know, I don't really know anything about them and is interesting because even in my my current partner now sat in a personal therapy session. And you know, he had all these questions for my therapist and really wanted to learn about her, and I could tell it was like that was a part of before he put that wall down that he like wanted to feel like there was a connection. Yeah. Yeah. I think I think there is something to to because I mean, for instance, I have tried to help mom find therapist for years and some of them have worked for a bit. And then they've retired or a good fit in how much information you find out about their online like nothing like, maybe if you're lucky they're super savvy, and they have their own website. And you get to see a photo in a bio, but it's so cleaned. So I don't know like you don't get personality or anything. No, not at all. And so I think. Own. I think that being online does lend itself to that. It allows us to give them a little bit more of the personality that maybe they've been craving. And so I think that it's kind of a it's a tool, and it can be really helpful it can allow people to feel more connected more quickly, which I think is great obviously again, it's like we're not over sharing. Yeah. But, but we are you know, giving a little bit of ourselves. So that they they feel like they can get it that's important to feel. I mean, I I have a specific type of therapist. I always look for. And I think it's because I feel it has to be a woman has to be kinda hippyish, you know. And I think it's like something about that. As makes me feel like she won't judge me. Yeah, he's totally relatable. And she's casual I never see someone who suit or talk really stuffy, I think the people can judge a spaced on the the bare bones of things. Whether they have like certain specifications that maybe they didn't even know like preferences. They can see it online decide from selves before having invest hundreds of dollars in sessions. You know? Yeah, now, and I think it's these are, unfortunately, all the things that prevent people from getting help in the first place because it can feel like there are so many different things to account for in all vying of not knowing what the person's going to be like that. It's almost easier sometimes to just be like, you know, what I'm just going to tell this myself because this all seems very scary to deal with especially we're like at our worst than right when we need therapy is usually because something's going on. And if if the I don't know it's like anything when you start something new or you're gonna try something evenly getting into your doctor have to if my doctor doesn't take my insurance anymore to call measures that get this. Listen, I have to call to try to make this appointment at fitted. My schedule. And that's an easier thing than therapist because you don't doesn't really matter. If you feel connected in really like your doctor. Yeah. So it's like the entry is really can be challenging for people. I think. Yeah. And that's also I believe part of why you wrote your book, are you? Okay. To help people along with that process. And I'm so happy that you did that because so many of those questions I feel like I get on a daily basis. So I can't even magin how much you get them on a daily basis with your public brand being specific being therapist. So the great school that you've that you've developed for people thinks that it is just like that where to start what to ask about. Because I think back to what we talked about the very beginning. Like people don't know what they don't know like often, we don't even know what questions to ask because we're not aware what the processes or maybe we're not even aware that therapists have specialties or that there's different types of therapy. Like, yeah. I don't think people talk about that stuff enough in or I mean, I asked all the time like when how bad does it have to be before the so on and I'm like, it doesn't at all. It doesn't have to be bad at all. Everybody can benefit. But, but those are just things that I feel as a therapist. I take for granted that I understand that. But I know how it works. And and why should we be the only ones that know? And understand that, you know, the book it allows people to to feel empowered to make decisions, you know. Yeah. And the link for that will be put in the episode note, so listeners can check that out. But then you also developed this community on patriot. And you've moved from YouTube over patriot. And some curious for you like how that content or community differs yet patron patron they have been I love the people at patriot. I love the idea feature on for those who don't know matron as a way for people to support YouTubers who wouldn't be able to support themselves otherwise. And so because my content isn't really like a. There's not going to be a viral hit not getting like four million views of video, do you know, it's it's a little different. It's a lot of us a video though. Don't discredit yourself. But it's like it's been a slow grow. You know, like most people have been on YouTube for seven years have very different look in than mine dozen educational. Yeah, I have a really close connection with my community. Manzo patriots allows them to support what I do. So that I can keep doing it and pay my bills, you know, imagine that ended also gives them access to like get some questions answered on livestream every month or get a thank you card from me or get to hang out with other community members and me in like just talk about how Therapy's going or questions they have. And so we think it's it's been it's been a great resource for me. It allows me I couldn't have kept doing what I do. Go continue working. I don't know if I could have I probably would have burned out, you know, but Petri doesn't it's just it's another layer or level of connectivity. And I think some people really really crave that in in. It's also like a low bar entry like you could. Just give five dollars. You know? Yeah. And I've I seem at least on on Instagram a little bit and a little bit on YouTube how closely kind of gotten with this community and how like while you may not be like sharing as much personal information in stories or experienced about yourself that people do still have such a personal connection to you. And that you're able to like experience that in different ways than you are when you're in your therapy hat, like I saw even how you just mentioned of like fitting a handwritten letter from you, and I saw that people just like send you gifts all the time. I was like wait what? That's so cool. And like, it just it just shows like this sense of community that you've developed, and I'm just curious what that's free because it's it's very different than how you would handle it as a therapist. Yeah. It is very different because like having connection with therapist outside of session, isn't I don't think it's appropriate and most of the time unless there's an emergency. And so I think I think that's where it differs like because I'm not there faira past. I'm just a a resource I'm a supportive person in their life that hopefully encourages them to make good decisions for their own mental health. They do they send me gifts to my PO box. And we do hang outs. And and I it's funny because I've gotten to the point with a lot of my community members viewers where like I've known them for years. And and so I think that I think there is something to be said for like the difference of relationship between me being a therapist again. That's why like someone who was a fan couldn't be patient of mine because the dynamic off. But there is a cool thing to to feel like we're in it together, we've been doing this thing together for so long. I think may drone gives that other layer where they feel like they're part of it more because because they're supporting the channel like they're part of it. They're like, my my investors kind of. Yeah. Because they're like like, I even have one one. Patriot. Who's been on there since probably the first or second month I ever opened it because her two daughters like my channel. She doesn't watch any of it. Really? I don't believe. So because she was like they find it helpful in. So I wouldn't I support you, you know, now this. Yeah. I mean, they're all the way in Switzerland. It's just cool like the internet is amazing beautiful place. I think the connectivity that we get within our community is really great anything kind of. Because of what I talk about it. So. Honest invulnerable. I think that's it. Just lends itself to feeling more close, you know. Yeah. Definitely. I've I've definitely considered the idea of patriot in just like him growing the podcast in that way. You should do it and do it. No. I literally have the Pab pulled up on my laptop like they've been sitting in the tops for like two weeks. Now. But like, it'll definitely be something. I get to. But I think that that such a beautiful thing to be able to do because it's, you know, yesterday, therapists, you have -education you have these tools, but then you're also making all of that so much more accessible to people, and normalizing it and developing such a community around it like, even though you're not the viewers or the communities therapist. I'm sure that some people can see it as as sort of substitute or supplement. And I'm sure that just having that person having nothing is like, very, very helpful. And you know, you've you've mentioned a few times of like of your therapist or how you've seen therapist. And I'm I don't know if that's that. You've talked about publicly and kind of what your what your experience has been as therapists and therapy. I know there's stigma around that. But it's very common and very much. Courage d-. Yeah. I I mean, I've talked about publicly a lot because I think it's important. That they know that it's okay for like, I honestly think therapists should be therapy. I mean, it doesn't have to be all the time. Like, definitely take breaks. I've taken years off. And now, I'm back. But I think I think it's important for me to know what it's like to be on the other side. I think that is key to learning education better having compassion for your patients. So there's that then I think it's also important that I have a place to go to vent about things too. I can be the secret keeper for everybody not have anywhere to take that you know, as therapies a nice safe place for it. And it also just keeps me in check because we all have bad habits and things that we've we've done or learn when we were growing up or we learned as an adult that we don't like, and we want to alter or, you know, do better with XYZ and so- therapy reminds me of that. That's a good chicken. You know? I think I don't know. I just think it's really important, and I feel like it should be a requirement. Yeah. I don't know. Yeah. I mean, I think. When is always on my favorite little stories to tell because it equally frustrating as it is just like, I Rolla Abol, which I guess could be the same thing. When. When I first went on the show on the bachelor just when they announced the cast of who was going to be on that season. And literally before anything of me was even shown on air. They've just had the cast photo and my age, and my occupation. And it was mental health counselor. And so much of the media was like even literally I remember watching Jimmy Kimmel, and he was like, oh, we got a mental health counselor. I don't know if you're going on a reality dating show. I think the mental health counselor might need a majority of counselor. And there was like this like that was such a comment that was like, no like your therapist. No. I think you you're the one that needs therapy, and it was in such this negative tone that like so much me was just like your. I am also in therapy. And what it have been. Yeah. Like would you want to see someone who's also making sure their own shifts in check? Yeah. I mean, I I don't know about you. But I would never want to. I would never want to see a therapist who said I'd never been in therapy. Yeah. That got I've actually never even considered that thought before and like thinking about that as a real life possibility is no, thank you. And I mean, like, I'm sure they're out there like one hundred percent. I mean, I even had people that I went to graduate school as who'd never been in therapy and didn't plan on it. And I'm like. Yeah. You know? I don't know. It's like we all have so much work. We can we can do. And even when things are just going fine. And you know, we feel generally happy. There are still things that we can check in with ourselves on. And even when we when we feel like we're in a good place. Life is always happening like life is. Shit at you, totally. We're not infallible. It's like you think I mean, I like to think of physical health say way, I think about mental health. And would you think your doctors ridiculous for having his own doctors? He can't be himself. Like, I can't fair pies myself. No that that wouldn't benefit me. And so I think that like the stigma around us getting help needs to end because we should begin like shouldn't we practice? What we preach isn't a whole phrase we use like I just feel like I prefer I personally would prefer to see therapist who. I know has been in therapy ninety five feel fine. Have even asked therapists in the past if they've been there. So I think that that's a completely fair question. Yeah. I think it is too. And really important to a feel that kind of like relate ability with them that they can empathize with your experience in some way. And so so I'm assuming that's that has been a part of yourself care, but I'm also curious in and as we wrap up here. I just want to a good takeaway points for people of just kind of what yourself care does look like. And it sounds like therapy is a big part of that. Didn't know if there were other things you could share with people of how you take care of yourself. Yeah. I mean, it changes all the time. I think is kind of important to people to know that like something stops working for you. You can change. It don't have to keep doing that thing. There's quite a few things. I do I take breaks because I can't I'm not I'm not a robot anonymous seen so like throughout my day. I'll take little breaks. Whether that's to call, my mom, who's a supportive person in my life. So that's a total positive or if that is to catch up with an old friend definitely connection with people socializations really important to me. So making time for those conversations and getting together for dinner. Those are all things I've always incorporated a naming to do that. This is the like created this community online also having that community in your personal life and in real life is so important. Yeah. Exactly. Agreed. And so that's something. I take a lot of time to do. I also go on walks a tuna three times a week where listen to podcasts the crime podcast. I love Harmon mystery illness. So that's like a break for my brain. I don't know beholden to anybody engaging with anyone else. It's like my because I am definitely more of an introvert than an extrovert. And so even though I need that socialization do need my alone time. So that's how I find that. I do yoga like not hot yoga like usually Ray, gillary regular temperature yoga, and I've been my goal has been to go twice a week. Just because I think it's just good for my body and mind, I also journal sometimes it's changed over the years. I used to write it out by hand because I felt better more cathartic now type things out and then delete 'em. Sometimes when I'm just angry or overwhelmed. So I definitely do that. Yeah. And then you know, every so often like everybody else will take vacations when I can afford them and take the time off or just go get a massage or pedicure depends on what I can afford the time. I have you know, the the journal in one is one I've talked frequently about on the podcast in that a lot of people in inquire an ask about on social media that it's a very difficult thing to start and to maintain. And I think I appreciate the the process that you just shared increase, if if you have any other tips regarding that like, I know for me, I try to journal one page and by the time, I get to the end of that page. I've kind of wrapped it up with an optimistic viewpoint. And usually always start with my persons. I feel insert an emotion and just go from there. Yeah. I mean, there's a lot of ways I think people often think that when you say journal, it's like how do I start? What do I even say? And also keep in mind that if you are a ruminating, if you're one of those people that really struggles to let go of things that happen journaling might not be the best for you. You might do like me where you write it, delete it where you tear it up something. And so that can be kind of cathartic and feel good as well. But for used to write like a ton. I used to almost keep a diary pretty much. Yeah. But but now a more what I do is during the day try to just pause, even if my car in traffic, I live in LA some all the time. Trying to think of two or three emotions that I've experienced that day because otherwise we cut his white knuckle it we don't pay attention in. That's I think that is a form of like checking in journaling, it's like helpful in the neck and write that down later or a convention out or it can bullet point a lot of people prefer bullet points today was shitty because blank blank blank tomorrow. Could be better. This is what I'm you know, these are things I'm gonna try to do whatever you wanna say. I write letters. I don't send I irate letters. I do send when they're filled with love. And I want to share that with someone. I think are the journal in can be a lot of different things. It doesn't have to be. It isn't a looker fuel like someone else's does. It's like your process. So just kind of let it take shape because like I said over the years mine's changed a lot. Yeah. So so yeah. Those are just some of the ways you can do it. Yeah. No. Thank you. That makes sense. I think that the that the leading part could be very very cathartic. Yeah. That's like and I'm moving on. Yeah. 'cause I'm definitely more of a ruminate or so. And I've gotten it out, and it's putting it away yacht Boba sometimes you just gotta get it out. Like a real verbal person. So I'm like, okay. Who can I call right now? Because I got to get this out same same an alternative, my mom, if she's unavailable calling my friend and then my husband. Yeah. Until I can somebody. Yeah. One hundred percent. I wonder if this is a just a average symptom of being a therapist that your big talker. And gotta talk about. Maybe maybe that's why we're like we we know gravitated towards that. Yeah. Talking things out feel so good. Yeah. Awesome. And so just I mean, we've talked a little bit about some of the ways where people can find you. But do you want to share like what your YouTube channel is? And where where they can find patriotic and all include the links to all those things episode note. So everyone can go find you. But if you just wanted to share what all those pot for platforms are with everyone. Yeah. Of course, I'm pretty much Katie Morton, K A T I M O R, T, O N across all social media. That's where you can find me my book. Are you? Okay. Is available wherever books are sold. Whether that's Amazon is probably the easiest, but you know, burns a Noble's wherever even your local library. If you can't afford it. You can go ask if they'll pick it up for you. Because then that makes it accessible to everybody in my patriot. Just Katie Morton as well. Awesome. That that was very easy anymore. Just for me. You'll find me awesome. Well, thank you so much. I mean, I very much enjoy talking with other, therapists and. Kind of you know, being able to speak some of this language, again all of your input in terms of being a public person and working as therapist is duper insightful. And I think just really helpful for not only students and people becoming therapist and people that art, therapists. But also people that have no idea, even what there'd be looks like. And I've never been to just kind of have a better understanding of like what it can be like to be a therapist. And what that what that can look like for people. So. Yeah. Yeah. This is great. And it is interesting to talk people don't usually ask me about this side of things more like how like more prescriptive than the nice just to share the behind the scenes. Well, thank you so much, and hopefully, maybe we'll having on again, another time in can be the opposite of of this. Thank you so much. Yeah. Thank you. Thank you so much for tuning into this episode with Katie. And I hope you guys really enjoyed it. I so so happy that got the chance to talk to her about some of this stuff, and hopefully answer some of your questions that you've had a to me about being a public their best and also just learning awesome things from Katie. And I definitely hope you guys check out her channels, and she has so many resources available and herself as a great resource. So make sure you check her out. And then also I love getting your guys reviews on itunes. So if you wanna head over there and leave a review or a rating envy of topics or guests that you want to see on the podcast, you can send those to ask dot let's talk about it at g mail dot com. And that doesn't for today. And thank you guys so much for listening and being a part of this with me, and I hope you have a wonderful rest of your week. And I will talk to you in time. This podcast is brought to you by we've podcast network. Check out all of our shows, including the brain candy podcast. I don't get it coffee condos. And let's talk about it.

YouTube Instagram supervisor private practice Taylor California Seattle Katie Morton Olin Katy intern Antioch professor Switzerland Ohka Solomon BASF
#173: How to Get High-Cost Treatment Cases to Say Yes

Dentist Money

43:57 min | 2 years ago

#173: How to Get High-Cost Treatment Cases to Say Yes

"Welcome to the dentist money show. I'm your host Reese Harper. And today, I'm going to introduce you to a special interview. I did with Dave. Roar Dave's the CEO of proceed finance. It's a company that he started after having helped Cabela's grow into one of the country's largest outdoor sports retailers. I thought the Dave had a really interesting perspective on patient financing. He had a really good experience at Kabila's being able to develop their consumer financing product. And I think that the advice he'll offer you today puts you in a position to succeed when it comes to financing a lot of your patients in any kind of treatment that they need. Thanks again for tuning into the interview. I hope you enjoyed the show make sure and visit us at Dennis advisors dot com and check out our education library, you'll find a lot of videos podcasts at new articles that were releasing every week. Also when you go to the website. Don't forget the book free consultation clicking the book free consultation. But while you'd be paired with one of our dental specific financial advisers on a day that works for you. We book appointments on off days lunches eat on some Saturdays. Just check out the calendar and find a time, that's convenient. Call us anytime at eight three three DDS plan. You can also text us at the same number. Don't forget to submit your financial questions on our free. Facebook group at Dennis advisors dot com slash group. We take the questions from the Facebook group and use them in the podcast. Thanks again for listening and enjoy the show consultant advisor conduct your own due diligence when making financial decisions general principles discussed during this program. Do not constitute personal advice. This program is furnished by dentist advisors are registered investment advisor. This is Dennis money. Now. Here's your host Reese Harper. Welcome to the dentist money show. Where we help. Dennis makes mart financial decisions. I'm your host resurface here. With a special. Guest today has a unique background that. I think will be particularly helpful to our audience. I'd like to welcome Dave roar to the show. Dave, welcome to the Dennis money show. Hey, thanks for having me on today. I really appreciate that. And, you know, look forward to to talking to your listeners, and hopefully at the end of this the, you know, help some of their financial perspective and grow their practice. And you know, the end of the day make more money, and you know, create success. Yeah. Man. I think you've got you've got a really cool background that when I saw your career history. I thought man that'd be a really interesting guest partially because I have an interest in Cabela's one of their big flagship stores is actually just up the road from my house, Q miles. And I take my kids there to look at the fish in the fish tank. You know every few. We'll thank you get a free zoo. All right. There was some logic in that was I can explain that real real simply, but we'll thanks for being cabals customer. Yeah. For people who don't know Cabela's is a really big Outdoor Retailer gear brand. Product vendor to a huge brand they distribute and have some of their own products. But they distribute other products as well, it's a fishing hiking. Anything outdoors hunting being you name. It and Dave's background actually. You know is in the finance industry, but before getting into dental with his current business. Proceed finance actually, had some really interesting experience around credit and extending credit creating credit programs at Cabela's. And so I to kind of get your background a little bit, Dave, and maybe share it briefly. And then we'll jump into the applica- -bility to your current venture. Sure. Well, thanks. Yeah. I describe it. I've had three careers. My first career was I'm a CPA. I have a master's degree in tax law and spent about fourteen years in public accounting, and it was a partner grant Thornton. So in that whole thing I learned a lot about banking, my my industry special specialization was financial institution. So having said that I moved into my second career, which basically I was hired away by largest client Cabela's. I was started as their CFO and you had a great run with them. It was in ninety four when I joined them, we grew the company significantly. But what I probably did that I guess I was most proud of other than having a lot of fun grown. You know, an opening retail stores all over the country. Bene- blast doing pig. All open. Yeah. Showed up doing see stores. You know, they were destination stores that you know. It was really a retail taint, we call it. My whole thing with Kabila's too is I started their credit card bag. That's how I got into this unsecured credit world. Yeah. It was a denial. We didn't have any court holders that really took off nicely with the Cabela's credit card. You know, we ended up chartering our own Bank. So we owned our own Bank. And you know, grew that is kind of loyalty customer loyalty product where you'd use points in use those for Cabello products in all of that. And it worked very well. But when I left there, we we had about two and a half million cardholders. So we grew from nothing to two million cardholders in had well over six billion dollars in receivables front or cardholders. But it was it was a very successful programs. Yeah. Huge product. So let's get into how this comes across to the dental market. Right. So what? Lead you? I mean, it's really cool to hear your background and people appreciate knowing where your perspectives coming from. So what you know at this point, your what did you make the how'd you make the pivot from Cabela's to proceed finance? Sure. After the credit crisis. I retired from Cabela's, and I was bored to death in couldn't stand retirement and was not happy. So I wanted to do something different. And what I learned just from you know, using credit cards is way to finance people. I looked at it in got very interested in in the the the dental and medical industries as far as what products out there, you can finance things that people need in one, you know, you can start with elective type procedures uninsured type procedures, but what type of products exist in that market that 'cause it's getting so big, and, you know, the insurance companies are paying for less and less, and I think there's a huge need. So that that's. That's really what got my interest in. I did a consulting project in in the space in and really got me interested in it. So what are the results of the consulting project show you that after the credit crisis? There is really not a lot of good alternatives for for providers in particular to get patients into you know payment plans for expensive procedures. So we saw that in which industries were the biggest kind of was I guess was it the medical side an elective procedures. Plastic surgeons was a dentistry and cosmetics. Like, did you was able to kinda see which markets where the biggest sure did a bunch of studies for that my consulting project was actually in dentistry. So I learned a lot about, you know, cosmetic dentistry, and you know, in particular dental implants and just the whole progression of the science behind it. And how you know, it's, you know, the solutions that people can offer for for people that that need dental implant. And you know, there's a huge market of of you know, I think the statistic I remember hearing is there's currently thirty billion people that are in dentures in this country. And would they be boomers getting older and older? You know, there's just a lot of demand and need for that. And stood. You know that, hey, this is a huge area. So what what I learned is, you know, it's all uninsured in general. So, you know, dental insurance is really not paying for anything over a certain amount of money. Then you got your dental insurance plans, but, but when you get into the larger cases, which people need in one is you know, there's a percent of the market that can pay cash, and there's a huge percentage of the market that want to pay the dentist for this this treatment. But you know, they can't afford to pay it. Now, they need help. They need some kind of a a quality payment plan to to be able to access the the. The treatment plans at people are presenting to them. So that's what got me interested in. I looked at the landscape. And there really wasn't a lot of good product out there that did this in the product that was out. There was not pasted friendly. Yeah. Sometimes not provider friendly in wasn't really buying for the market. So that's what got my interest in. That's what we founded proceed finance to to address that issue. So what would you say it wasn't patient friendly? It wasn't provider. Friendly, what did you start to notice? Well, what was happening especially like enlarge cases in dentistry. We'll just you know, kind of stay there with with dental implants, for example, you know, the full mount Archie where you go upper lower those cases can run sixty thousand dollars for full mouth restoration in those cases, you know, started maybe tan and anywhere in between. So what products out there? Well, what you know? It was finding is is afford ability just was up there. You have to make these these procedures of Ford -able for patients where they feel comfortable that they're gonna Ford this. If you're going to get them converted to actually say, yes. In an access your treatment plan. It has. Affordable and the product at there wasn't affordable. What you'd see? I I will call it with with a lot of the products, especially with the higher in cases in the larger amounts is the things that looked like house payments and not car payments. I mean as simple as that when when you present a patient with her another house payment, they're gonna say we can't afford it. I'm not interested. I don't wanna do that. I see that won't work for me when you can get it reduced to something that looks like a car payment. You know, they can usually find a way to to put that in their budget. You know, Matt's. There's been studies on all of this. But the the the psychological impact of presenting somebody with a reasonable payment plan that you know, is another car payment that they can fit into their budget. You know, they'll figure that out and comfortable so you have to you have to have product that does that. And there really wasn't anything out there that was even coming close to it. So so how do you do it? So, you know, it's it's. Really a matter of okay. You know, the patient interest rates have to be low or affordable. This is unsafe financing. So you have to really create a interest rates as probably below market, and you have to extend the term. So you have to go longer. And that's that's what proceed finance does. So we can buy low interest rates with like an eight year payment plan, you know, a twenty thousand dollar financing product, we can do that payment. You know, this lowest three hundred bucks a month. So when you have that people will say, I you know, I can afford that I need in what what you have. Because I want to change my life. You know, especially with people in implant cases, where you know, it's a life changing event that you know, they want affordability in and they want to do it. But it has to work for them. So you have to create product, and what I've learned also is that, you know, you you have practices that wanna do large cases. While if they're relying. On the percent of the market that can pay cash, you know, those people that have the money in their checking account or savings account or you marketable securities or have, you know, access on their credit cards. They have large credit limits in that sort of thing can pay cash you that might represent about fifteen percent of the country. You know that have that sort of liquidity the the rest of the country. You know, you know, there's a really sad statistics out there that show that like seventy percent of the people in this country paycheck to paycheck is like sixty five percent of the people in this country. Have do not have five hundred dollars in liquidity or their savings account for an unexpected expense. You know, they're, you know, they if you're going to reach that market, which it's it's the largest segment of the market is you have to have you have to create a Ford ability, and you have to have a payment plan that that that everybody's comfortable with. So that's what we try to do. So. Let's just say we're trying to general survey of the options available, and then we'll talk about how to implement this in your practice in a second. But you're only I've got some financing option. I've got the ability to, you know, sell finance it. And then my question, I guess is. If you look at all the options, if I'm a dentist, I've got his options to pick from out there. How do I narrow down providers? Should I have multiple options for my patients to pick from or should I have one try kind of go go to proceed that I stick with and understand better? Help me understand the marketplace itself, and and how I would narrow that down. And maybe why I would choose to bring in a financing partners question. Sure. Great question, here's patient financing landscape. And I usually recommend that providers have more than one option because they're going to need it. You know, there's different lenders do different things. Okay. For patients. Overall, general that you know, I'll call it. There's funded models in unfunded models out there. Unfunded models are hate the dentist or the doctor finances the receivables themselves, so when somebody you know, has a thirty thousand dollar treatment plan, and they want they need a payment plan. You know, the doctor does have the option to, you know, seller finance that or take on that that debt into it themselves. I highly recommend a don't because they're not good at it in. They don't understand right this stuff. And you know, in most cases, the doctor doesn't wanna do that. Anyway, because they can't afford to cash flow. They need their money out of the procedure. Now, you know bills to pay and they've got you know, they just can't afford to sell her finance a large amount of patients. Yeah. It doesn't work for them. But you know, they can do that themselves and their their models out there that will manage all of this for doctors and dentists, you know, compassionate, finances, one of them, and you know, they have a model where you know, the doctor takes the risk. It's their money, but they'll, you know, help underwrite it, and they'll manage the receivables for the doctor, and then it's a page, you go model the doctor gets paid when the patient pays. And then you know, they get some kind of a fee for doing that. All right. So that's typically in my experience, even with very large companies in other industries. We'll call that in that you're saying it's an unfunded models. What you call it the right? Yes. In even another industries, you'll see very large companies. They don't want to it doesn't really become sustainable for a small business to to operate that way. Because you're constantly building up a larger a are balance, especially if you're a dentist that doesn't have if you're gonna make cosmetics Beal. Part of your practice. And and have a large volume of cases that you're going to try to market for becomes less and less. They can't afford to do it. That's exactly right. So so they, you know, most most, you know, I don't really think it's a good idea for a lot of Dennis to get into the financing business. Just because you know, one it's not whether good at that's not what why they went to school. They have a little bit of a conflict too. Don't they? I mean 'cause you love that patient. And now you've got to collect money from them when they don't pay on time. I mean, who, you know, managing all of that is just kind of not a good idea. Just because of the the cost of it, even if they want it you wanted to do it that way, you know, you're going to have to add people that just do nothing. But but bandage makes sense counts receivable. So so the that's unfunded. But you know, that that does play a role in it's out there, and you know, tied together here in a second. But the funding model is where the dentist will get paid up front for the procedure and most of the models are non-recourse. So the finance company will take all the risks with the patient. So the patient doesn't pay that doesn't, you know, the doctors out of the business of of risk, and then all of that's the managed by a third party. So the servicing of the accounts and all of that. And it just. Distances the dentist from from the lender. Now, I will caution that there you got to be a little careful on selection of a lender. Because you don't want a lender to abuse patients where aggressive predatory they they have a lot of hidden fees. Because what happens then is the patient will feel like, you know, the doctor put him in this finance program that ours. All of a sudden is not a great program for the patient. And what happens then I see here from doctors all the time is they'll never see those patients again, and they get no referrals. Yeah. Is you were associated with that transaction even though it's was third party? So so you want a good reputation with somebody that takes care of your patients and treats them with dignity and makes it a pleasant experience for the patient in the financing, you know, a product was quality. So so that that's important. So so if his model, and let's talk about selecting the go go ahead if you wanted to finish your thought there, let you, but I want to talk about comparing the landscape a little bit, which I'm assuming you're. There's a lot. There's not a lot of us out there. The honest with you care, which is a credit card now, that's a model. It's going to spend a little bit of time on that that is is like a credit card. So that particular lender will give the patient a credit card in a line of credit. It's usable, you know, their whole network of providers. They're the largest in the country. But remember, it's a credit card with a credit line and the credit limits usually are not very high, but they do financial on medical procedures. And I recommend that providers have something like that for the small cases. 'cause they're said up to, you know, a crown bridge, you know, a thousand dollars procedure that works really. Well, okay. Yeah. So for the normal, you know, tra- traditional dentistry, you know, that where people need a help with with financing, you know, that sort of a product works really, well when you get into cosmetic dentistry in large cases. You know, that's kind of where they end because you know, they don't that's not their business. Yeah. They don't give a lot of lot line of credit. And if they do, you know, they want to be paid off shortly. So there for the affordability problem comes into play. Yup. But you need a term lender for large cases. And that's that's what we do at proceed finance. So we make term loans, and you know, to try to create that lowest possible payment for Ford ability. So the patient will will say yes to a treatment plan, and then back that up with you know, a quality product. So so that that's the term lender for large cases. So when I see a practice that I get this question all the time is, you know, have one lender for the small cases, usually that's a care credit type model an inter for the law. That specializes in large cases in term loans, which is what we do. And then if you want to for example, roll the dice on some receivable. In finance them yourselves. There's a model to do that as well. And some some doctors like that. Because for example, I, you know, not everybody's going to be approved for our product. You know, you're you're a high quality product. Yeah. And we do we underwrite very aggressively. You know, but but we don't approve everybody. I mean, there's a certain segmentation of the country. That's just not credit worthy for for this type of product. So where do you guys kind of go to in your general underwriting guidelines credit scores in general range from three hundred eight fifty okay and prime is probably any credit score over seven hundred super prime is anything over seven fifty you know, and, you know, exceptional credits over eight hundred, but when you start dipping below six fifty six hundred then you're getting into subprime, and that's where the credit worthiness issues come up where people, you know, have already proven that you know to. To the world because of the credit score that that they've got problems paying their bills, and sort of those sort of things that are high risk. So you'll our average loan, for example is just north of twenty five thousand dollars. That's our average our average credit approval when we have a credit apply with this is about forty four thousand. So we play in that range from twenty five hundred dollar loan as our minimum up to sixty thousand UN's. Okay. So that's that's, you know, we specialize in in large cases in dentistry in particular because all of that market is uninsured. You know, you need a great solution for those cases if you want to your conversion rate of people that come into your office to access your treatment plans. And if you wanna do the high end large casework where the water rates range from depending on credit and detail detained comes scores. We will we do is is and terms and how to terms are. Absolutely. Are we? Range from twenty four month loan as our shortest to all the way up to ninety six months, which is eight years. And so they'll get an increment of twelve months in between. So they get to pick and choose. But so when you go with an eight year loan, for example in our rates for patients start at three ninety nine which is below prime and our highest risk category goes to seventeen point nine nine. So you know, we will not go any higher than than than seventeen point nine nine percent loan in its anywhere in between based on their credit profile, and how arm and the term. So if they've got the highest possible score the credit score. And they went the shortest possible term. We might be close to that four percent or a three point nine nine long yet, you know are highest risk category. You know, would be someone. That's right at our cutoff for credit and wants the money for the longest term that we offer. Yeah. And they would pay the highest risk. Now. So, but you have to stand. This is insecure credit. Yep. This is below market. If you price this credit market, we are below. And you know, when you combine that with a long term. That's what creates the ability for patient yet. I mean, that's pretty critical. I mean because a lot of people get as an when you're doing any kind of financial decision making or financial planning. I mean, having a long term can be the reason that you either are able to do something or not. And it doesn't mean that they'll carry it the whole term. You want a product to like with a you know that. Okay. You want to have make sure your patients are treated fairly, honestly and with dignity. So, you know, our product we don't we don't have any repayment penalties. So if a patient takes out a loan in and wants to prepaid early or refinance it with a with a secured loan, a lower cost, you know, we don't care, and, but you know, we try to give them complete flexibility. So you want that is far as, you know, the the no hidden fees are stated rates on our our loans or the same as the APR's in. So it's it's it's a real honest fair product what about you know, an origination. Or, you know, a setup cost of some kind is that normal to see that. I mean to get a little bit of buy in from a patient as a lender or do you guys? Not have we don't have that either. No. It's a straight loan legacy. There's no origination. Costs. There's no fees is just a it's a term loan that looks like a term loan with no cost the only fee. We have the whole thing is a late payment fee. I don't really want to collect. Because you know, we we it's more of a punitive thing. But it's a loaf. Hist ten bucks or five percent of the costs more to collect that feed than it does to charge. You you got that one right? You have to have that to encourage people as as a, you know, an incentive to make payments on time. But you know, that's us as a lender. We take that risk are good at servicing or loans, but that's awesome. Tell me a little bit about the market real quick. In terms of how many? I mean, how many options are there for Dennis to pick from that have long terms and kind of competitive rates because I do think for the most part the majority of the options that I that I see that address the market are either card based or they're smaller quantities. Not as long a term. And I'd call the. A lot of people are interested in getting into this industry. Lot of my friends are interested in getting into the citizenry because they can charge. You know, a lot of money to people that are in a tough situation. Right. Where this product is very different than that in that you're trying to credit quality product for. Credit worthy customers to to take on. Usually do a large case, right? And and have some proactive elective care. But how many guess give me a sense for the competition that market and the size of the market, you know, and kind of how you guys have grown and where you're at in that space. Absolutely, the market is very large, you know, especially in in implant holiday now, I've heard different numbers. I imagine they move around. And it depends on you know, what what what is counted. But the implant Margaret alone is four billion annually annually for people who don't know that that means four billion dollars per year of implant services that are being transacted in the United States, and yes and growing and just the market the there, you have thirty million people, and you have five million people. I understand a year that are baby boomers that are going to have the problem. That will need to address implants or dentures or missing teeth, you know, at some point of life. So the market is huge. So an implants are just, you know, today, a small fraction of the total market. But you know, it's it's the obviously best solution for people with missing or or losing their teeth or those types of dental problems. There were a lot of it's caused by not because people take care of their t-the it's caused by genetics. And they're just in a gene pool where the if they live long enough they're gonna they're gonna lose their teeth. You know that that's that that's a huge market. So when you talk about four billion, you know, that's today in that. We're not reaching the everybody in a lot of it is for to Bill. I mean, how many people can afford a thirty or forty thousand dollar treatment plan and want to say yes to that. And we'll look for other alternatives. But you know, with you know, the investment they're gonna make themselves in their life. Changing event that happens is they want to do. So so you get it to that point. Now, it's just a matter of how do you get financed and make it affordable? So you know, that that's what our product tries to do. That's kind of our core value. We wanna make a good experience for people, you know. So they say, yes in, you know, the, you know, I'll talk about the dentist that wanna do implants. Or large cases, though, spend a lot of money on marketing and trying to get people in the door, you know, and let the market know that they do imply do that service. And if they don't have a quality product, you know, to help people afford this, you know, people are not going to do business with them. They're going to try to go somewhere else wore, you know, they just haven't worked where you know, the treatment plan is is accepted by the patient. So so that's what I see in. No, I'll divided America. Like this probably out of a hundred people, and this is just averages twenty five out of. Hundred aren't credit worthy for our product or any type of quality term loan for affordability? Those are people that have to repair their credited. That so but seventy five percent of the people are in of that seventy five percent, you know, maybe the top fifth of that can pay cash, you know, they have alternatives, but the rest of them, you know, don't have the cash to pay for your treatment plan up front in need need a financing product in the, you know, I describe it as easy as they wanna pay you. They just can't pay you now so help them out in put them in a plan. And if you're good at this, and you know, that's another rule for dentistry that you need treatment coordinators that understand this that are trained that know how to help people in work it out with them on a payment plan. Don't let them leave with say I can't afford this sticker prices too much. You know, I just can't do this. The there is a way to get it done if they're credit worthy, and you know, the treatment coordinators need to be trained on how to do that. And if they're good at it, which is what I recommend, you know, practices making investment in a. Great treatment coordinator that is well trained because the conversion rate of you know, you spend the money on marketing you get into your practice. And how do you get them in the chair where you're actually doing the work in say yesterday's large cases is it's the conversion rate in. If you know your practice is good at that. You know, your conversion rate, you move that needle, you know, based on the ones that come in in your start converting fifty percent of the people that come in seventy five percent. I mean, you could you can imagine the financial impact that does to a practice. Yeah. I feel like that's an area in a lot of services. I mean, you probably saw this intact selling tax services. You probably have seen it in dentistry. Now, I've seen it in a lot of other industries the way you present information to people. Has a huge impact on whether they'll move forward or make a decision, and I don't think we spend enough time on that in dentistry, Kate to especially when it comes to making the right type of care some of these larger elective procedures are the right type of care for a lot of people. It's the best long-term investment they could make and it's it's actually in their best interest. But depending on how you present the information they'll either be likely to adopted or walk away. And I just think that man, the the it's it's really is a skilled treatment coordinator or skilled dentist takes skilled team to be able to present information in a way that gives people choices people they want choices. Now, they don't want to be pigeonholed into one option. And so people want choices they want like they can pull the lever and hand, I just I think that this can't be overstated. How important it is to get this down in your? Practice. So let's talk a little bit about the focus of the mistakes that you see a Dennis making. When it comes to case presentation comes to financing presentation. Are there any tips or guidance? You could say that really these are things that are really important to do that we've seen works. Imagine you've had to put on some C E around this and coach people on this squad. Really one of the things we do is is part of our on boarding. We don't charge for for putting a new practice in our systems because I I only wanna make money when the dentist makes money, you know, that's where they actually get a treatment plan accepted in a lowest taken out. So but prior to that to answer the question is is we have to let types of training one for technology training, which everybody has to go through. But we have what I call a level two training, which is consulting on how to convert cases. So that's kind of some of all of our best practices. We see out in the. Marketplace practices that are very successful. Doing this. You know, very financially successful in doing doing a doing it the right way. So tips on that is you know, I think when you get a patient in the door. Okay. And that could be from a marketing campaign, it could be from data mining your own dental records in terms of who could be candidates for implants at needed. You know, there's a lot of ways to get leads. So when a lead comes in okay in a they are absolutely, you know, medically determined that implants are solution for their problems is, you know, the first thing they yet to start with getting the patient to want the treatment plan. Don't talk about money talk about the benefits to their health talk about the change in their lives. Because now they're going to be able to smile now. They're going to be able to to you know, apply for. Positions in in their career that couldn't otherwise they're not going to be embarrassed anymore. They're going to improve their social life. You know, all of the positive things that that that can happen. Just from from the psychology of a patient, and then just the medical benefits, you know, this is going to make you healthier. This is going to you know, do all of these benefits. So you get him to the point where you know, they want and need this procedure so start with that. So once they're there. Okay. Now, we have to talk about how you're gonna pay for this. And know, the sticker shock could be, you know, a thirty thousand dollar case forty thousand all depends on the treatment plan. I give him some options, you know, on the different types of things that can be done. But built let him, you know, walk out by saying, you know, that's I can't afford that. There's no way. So so you were gonna put if you're gonna put three choices in front of somebody for thirty thousand dollar case. You know, three options for people to pick from what term would what terms would you pick a to put in front of somebody will I would start with this. If somebody said, okay, I'm the treatment coordinator, for example. And we're you know to the point where the patient wants to do this, you know, wants to benefits in the street and plant. Yeah. Okay. And it's thirty thousand dollars and you start with that. Okay. That however we're gonna afford this. Well, you look for the patient to say, look, there's a lot of different ways, we can put this deal gather, you know, you start with you know, how much cash can you put into this without affecting your life? You have saved you have some some resources there. So you get it to where. Okay. You know? We we have some money that we can we can start with. Okay. And then we can look at a financing product supply into your eligible for their in a lot of cases are credit will take care of the whole treatment plan. So they can basically finance aren't percent of it. But, but if it isn't you know, and they don't comfortable barring. That much money. Well, hey, how much are you comfortable with on a monthly payment that you can afford? Okay is two fifty a month fine that work three fifty four hundred. So you kinda work to give their comfort level on affordability that can fit in their budget. And then you can really matched up the financing with that. Because our our platform all allow a practitioner to do that. And you you you put the deal the gather. So at the end of it, you know, they don't feel like, you know, you figured it out for them. I mean, others other things you can throw into the mix, you know, on finding money. You'll comfortable with an eight year term my Madge. I would imagine that the what's the most likely term that selected. What's the average term of all of your loans? We did like a weighted average, usually they go along around you because they want the lowest monthly payment, you know, with the idea that I give him complete flexibility because if they have extra money they can pay extra or they can pay it off. Now, we also see shorter ones where people really want rate, and they'll they'll, you know, shorten it up, and they feel more comfortable with the larger loan and our our financing. The other thing you have to understand where this is it's hassle free. You know, it's an instant decision platform for patient is beautiful because their credit is good in their approved. We print loan docs. It's signed it's fun. And it's over. They don't have to go to the Bank the entrepreneur their credit union to fill out forms. They don't have to produce paper and all the hassles of a traditional loan. You know, it's done. It's there, and and then if they want to go through that process later, you know, maybe get a better rate because they could do a home equity loan or something like that. This a secured low, you know, they're totally free to do that. But but this gets done, you know, at the point of sale. So my whole theory is I want to create win win win. I wanted to win because they get the treatment. They need them. What I want the provider to win because they now do be able to perform the work and get the treatment plan people, and then I wanna win because I to facilitate this and make the economics work for me as well. But everybody, you know, wins in this deal are provider fees are very transparent, you know, the the high end it looks like a credit card. Yeah. You accept plastic while there's a merchant fee. You know, that's about what he is take more risks. You know, the Figo's up in our fees range from the three and a half to I think our highest risk cat. Category. If the provider wants, it is fourteen point nine those are those are loans that I will tell Harry, very low credit and no one else would take him. So it's it really comes you want. The you want eighty five cents on the dollar or as you went. You went zero cents on the dollar and with the margins in these procedures, you know, and it's an incremental case, they're usually only have a lab fee. They're still making a lot of money on the case. You know, the other thing I will stress. His know what we do is a highly regulated consumer finance product. We follow all the rules. That's another important thing. You don't want, you know, to get a provider, you know, in trouble with a compliance issue because they did they didn't tell the patient something, or, you know, presenting something wrong or advertise something that they can't, you know, the type of thing. So we help them with guide them through that. But, but, but you know, our our product is highly regulated there's a lot of consumer laws. They've been you know, enacted over. The years to protect consumers. So we follow all of that in. You know, we take on all of the that complaints burden as well as part of the deal, but but that's important too. Well, David spending, credibly valuable man, we've talked about behavioral issues with consumers types of credit options talked about the industry we've talked about best practices. I think you've really giving people a lot to take home. I'm you leave some parting thoughts with people before before we let them go. Sure. Well, you know, I think when I wanted to do is is. When when practices what to do large cases, or, you know, the more expensive procedures, and you know, I I see a lot of practices out there that you know, general dentistry is is becoming corporate. I mean, I'm gonna tell your audience, you know, forty percent of the market in today's world is corporate dentistry. And you know, who they are the big DSO's, you know, you're fighting them. So a lot of there's a lot of dry to for practitioners to do larger cases. 'cause you know, they make a lot more money doing that. And they can distinguish themselves. They don't have to fight everyone else. So you have to go where the market is unwilling to go, and you know, for the most part large specialized services, are it's a significantly better way to enhance your practice than continuing to compete at a lower and lower and lower price for commodity services. It's I call that the race disea- row. Yeah. Because that's really where it's going. And you know, an interesting fact, I'll just share this as I see doctors and dentists, you know, becoming implant holidays or adding that to their practice getting the training and getting skilled at and then, you know, letting the market know, they're a player in this market. And then doing what they need to do. But if they do it, right? And this has been studied the average dentist that can make that transition, and this is average will add to their net, take home or their bottom line two hundred and fifty thousand the first year and up from there. Yeah. You know, that's more than they're making general dentistry and average good at it can even be more significant, but but they need help. And they've got to do it. Right. And they've got, you know, be a little business savvy here, and they've gotta get if they're unwilling, you know, to present financial products to patients than they need to hire somebody that can. Yeah. All right man with take so much. We look forward to a next time. I'm. Are you still out in the West End in Nebraska, then or are you are you moved into? They can understand. So I'm right in your wife. Make you BASF years. Yeah. We're next to the university of Nebraska. So yeah, I can almost see the stadium season ticket holders. Oh, yes. Okay. Right on K. So we'll have to appreciate it and the invite to be on here. And if anyone has any questions just either Google a proceed, finance or give me a call. And we'd be glad to talk to you and help you, and, you know, love your listeners if they're interested in our product were were would love to try to take their business. Well, we'll all your information and contact and website and everything it'll be in the show now, it's and people will be able to dig it up as well. So thank you really look forward to enjoy the time. Thank you talk to say. Thanks again today, or I really appreciate a Dave coming on and sharing a lot of his background. I love to storytelling. I loved his ability to be able to relate to patients and be able to relate to Dennis. And I hope you're able to take away from that interview. Just as much as I did.

Dennis Cabela Dave coordinator Ford Kabila Facebook Reese Harper advisor CEO Nebraska applica- -bility consultant BASF
James Bond of Birds - or the Penguin of the North

Earth Rangers

24:25 min | 7 months ago

James Bond of Birds - or the Penguin of the North

"Hello and welcome to be Earth Rangers podcast. Ranger. Coming to you with a brand new episode, well, enjoying these days. Rain. Well. Is a strong word. Actually waiting caught for comfort if like thirty degrees centigrade outside which means that here in the podcast studio probably about a good two degrees. You. Don't what let me see if I can plug in an extension cable this microphone. Deal I can hit outside and see if I can find a nice shady spot. By the way I am super excited to tell you that we will feature upper end new science later on this show. Right here. It's so much better. Is. Okay. You can probably hear some buzzing in the background. nope. Not My microphone cable that's an animal pretty loud Investigate or better yet let's play. WHO Amazon. Okay. With quote as good to this critic. Down by ready. You go six You guys know what animal made that sound. Dayton until the end of the episode to find out. Things, we need this meat. Oh, we're back on here, sir. I was just checking my profile in the earth rangers APP. I just adopted a new animal since I was looking for something. Cool. I went with a thick built Moore named him. Stewart. He is so cute. Thick. boomers are an amazing species of Arctic bird just imagining them chilling on the ice cold cliffs swimming the frigid waters of northern oceans is really helping me cool down right now. I'll put a picture of my Stewart on the show notes, check it out. What you think you look like a penguin. Fair enough I guess but there are some very important differences. Soon I think it's time for a showdown. ooh. What? WHO DRESSES BETTER? that's hard to tell. I. Mean. Both look like they have a Tuxedo a look. So similar the thick billed Moore. The penguin could definitely because it's Actually they're not related at all. Build merced belong to the family family of seabirds that reside in the northern hemisphere and are more closely related to seagulls than the penguins. Penguins live almost exclusively in the southern hemisphere. Except for Galapagos. So they literally live on opposite ends of the glow but no, one can deny that they look similar but why? Both needed to adapt to bury cold temperatures and the black colored their plumage might just help them keep themselves. Warm. Round. WHO DIVES DEEPER They are both excellent swimmers and they can both dive deep into truly waters to catch dinner. The thick billed Moore can dive of to two hundred meters that sounds like a lot with the emperor penguin. It can dive to five hundred meters. Clear winner for this round. Fine all round. Victory American do something a penguin jest can it can? Now to be fair. Murray isn't a graceful flyer. It's really awkward when it takes off, but the penguin can't fly at all. Well I think that settles it the thick billed Broadmoor wins this showdown. A bird that is as soon as he dresser an excellent swimmer, a diver and can fly. Like the Byrd equivalent of James Bond. You're probably asking yourself why have I never heard of this awesome `but I mean everyone knows what penguin is after all. Off. Good question I, one would love to learn more about the Mur. Let's talk to a real life. Arctic Bird Research to see which tells about her work here. Let me give her a ring. Hi Is this Dr Emily Choi Yes. This is emily speaking hi, my name's Emma I'm working on a podcast about Arctic birds and my colleagues. Earth Rangers told me that you would be the right person to talk to food. Sounds Great. Awesome. So could you tell me what it is? You do. So I'm a scientist that works on Arctic Sea Birds. So I look at the effect specifically of climate change on Arctic adapted birds. Well that's so cool and so important. So I believe you're studying thick billed murs at the moment. Is that right? Yes, I am. Can you describe how it works when you're out in the field studying them? Oh So, when I'm out in the field sending them typically I'll begin my day by going down the cliffs. So we all have our specific spots in our class, and we will do account of all of the ness of the merged is check for new eggs and we'll just basically sit and watch the birds. So we'll watch them for about an hour and we'll watch and see whether the birds get up sometimes they like to change position, and then we'll be able to see the ache. So basically, you just have to look very carefully, and that's how you can check to see if there's an egg on enough. That is some elite level bird-watching. If they if they live in cliffs, does that mean that you have to do a lot of rock climbing? Absolutely. So before I went to my field site I actually took a course for claiming training. And then onsite, we actually have an expert who's a rock climber who helps us manage our climb the cliffs. Rock climbing for science. Very cool I'm kind of curious though why did they nest in such dangerous places like what happens if it falls? Do they have to learn to fly on the first try? No signaled murs. So they actually have kind of an interesting life cycle. So when the chicks fledge, they actually don't fly immediately, but they actually jump off the cliff with their dads and their does actually raised them at sea. So. They enter the water and basically either dad's Razman feed them until they're old enough to fly. So they fly actually from the ocean. Execute. What do you love the most about your research on Murray's Well, I, think that they are quite an amazing bird and they're on mazing divers can dive up to two hundred meters in a couple of minutes. But they also will fly up to four hours a day during the breeding season, and it takes a lot of energy for these birds to fly because they're very, very big or about those one kilo. So they're quite big birds but they managed to do it all both fly and I've. Seen these sound like super talented bird athletes almost exactly what they are. You said that they can dive up to two hundred meters. Why do they have to dive so deep? So these birds prefer to feed on Arctic cod an Arctic cod like the school. So they like to swim in big groups at about two three, hundred meters. So that's why it's to reach their prey, which is the Arctic card, which is a little Arctic fish. Oh, so they're going where the food is got you. I'm really really curious to know how you track them because it seems like they're diving in the water and flying in the air. I, read about these little things called bio loggers is that what they're called? Yes. So we use via loggers via loggers are little tracking devices that kind of fit like backpacks on the backs of the mirrors and they can pinpoint their exact location, but they can also tell us a bit about the Mary's Movement. So based on the via lagers, we can tell whether the birds are flying whether they're diving whether they're sitting for. That gives us a lot of information. Do they look super cute with their backpacks. that. You look super cute. With their tax they all look like they're going to school I guess school being fish. But yes, they look really cute but they're black backpacks. Very, NEAT. Now has a just a few questions on Arctic birds in general. would. That be cool. Oh, yeah. No, that would be great. Awesome. Are Arctic birds less colorful than tropical birds? Well, about of Arctic birds like the mirror are well adapted for cold climates. So you can see the murder is black and color, and that might be an adapation for basically warming up in the sun. So in general, a lot of Arctic birds are less colorful than tropical birds. Some birds can migrate halfway around. The world. I'm kind of curious. Why would she still leaving the Arctic? That's a very good question now, like the Arctic particularly during the summer, cliffs are a very safe spot to raise chicks. So there's not a lot of predators for instance, snakes. There's no snakes in the Arctic. So the birds don't have to worry about many predators that may feed on their checks. The Arctic is also a very productive environment, which means that during the summer, there's a lot of pray a lot of fish species that will basically school in the waters of Hudson Bay that provides a lot of food or energy for the parents and the chicks. So it's a a prime real estate certif- thing then. Yeah. Definitely. Which bird do you think is the toughest like which bird lives in the most northern reaches? How `bout razorbills they sound like a mean gangster razor bill. How that's a hard question. There are a lot of tough burs in the. Arctic. Another group that is looking at basically affects of temperature on the snow bunting and they nest as high as alert. So that's one of the highest cities alert but yeah, like overall I would say all of the Arctic birds are tough because they're so well adapted to cold temperatures and just extreme conditions of the Arctic. Very, cool. When's your next trip to the Arctic? Well, my next trip in the Arctic should be next June. So June two, thousand, twenty one, I will be going back up to code silence and possibly Middleton Island in Alaska. That's very neat. I hope trip goes amazingly. Thank you. Thank you so much Dr Choi. I feel like I know so much more about Arctic birds that I didn't know before. That's great. Now they're they're pretty amazing animals. Well. Thanks a happy bird-watching. Thank you you too happy birdwatching by right? That's amazing. Art Birds are so interesting and you heard emily, they are really tough dealing with the harsh Arctic. I really thought that razorbills would be tough, but apparently, it's the snow bunting. Hey, make sure to check out the show notes for some cool. Spoiler. Alert. A Lot cuter than you might expect for such a tough little bird. If, you want to help Emily Research Arctic birds, and how climate change affects them. There is a super easy way to do just that you can adopt your very own nickeled Mer plenty or virtual companion in the earth rangers APP don't have the APP. No worries. You can find all of our pussies at www dot, the earth render shop dot com. Oh. Okay so you already know that it's my passion to learn all about animals into unlock the mysteries of nature. A lot of what we talk about is considered zoology and biology, but there is another nature science that we haven't really focused on all that much and I think it's high time we changed that because we can use this field of science to help environment and save the planet and that's exactly what I'm talking about chemistry. And that's why it's time to present a brand new segment to explore the secrets and wonders of chemistry with help from our friends. It'd basf it's time for Emma's chemistry corner. The. All right. Welcome to our lab. I'm so excited I've already got some Bunsen burners going, and my first experiment is in full swing. With the help of our friends at. The largest chemical company in the world, we're going to explore some of the cool things you can do with chemistry and I'll even show you some experiments that real chemists do experiments you can do at home. So let's put on your coat and safety goggles and get started. What you're having? No worries in our at home experiment, we won't do anything dangerous. Jets me I know what I'm doing. Well, maybe every now and then we will need help from grown-up but I'll tell you when that happens. Okay one. I. GotTa Check on my experiments Real. Quick Or? visit the be curtly. Start again. Eleven. That'll do it. I'm making glow in the dark gel to help with my next overnight research excursion fingers crossed that it will work. Okay. So What start with a short introduction to chemistry. Chemistry is the science of matter and what's matter you ask what everything is made of and I mean everything what you're sitting on right now and the floor below you everything touch the air that surrounds you even giving body all of it absolutely. Everything is made of different materials and these materials or matter are made of tiny tiny tiny particles called atoms how tiny. If you were to take one single hair, there could be about two million, the smallest Adams along with that's really small. And Adams can bind to other atoms and form something called molecules. Most molecules are also really really tiny but the properties of these really tiny particles gives the bigger materials, their properties properties. We can see your feel how hard or soft something it does it feel wet or dry even. Is, and how it smells or tastes. So yeah, that's what chemists do. They study these atoms and molecules and think about ways that we can use them to create new materials like medicines to cure diseases or to find cleaner safer more efficient and environmentally friendly waste produce the materials we meet. It'd be cool. Let's finish today's corner with a small chemistry. Fun Fact. Okay. Guys pop quiz what do diamonds and graphite have in common? That's the reason through. One is transparent and shiny the other grand powdery. Diamonds are really hard so they can. Even cut medals, but we use graphite pencils because it's soft. So can leave marks on paper. So. What could they possibly have in common? Well, despite all these differences, diamonds graphite have much more in common than you think, do you know what it is? They're actually both made up of the same type of atom. Carbon. And both diamonds and graphite are pure of carbon meaning. They only contain carbon. What makes them so different is just the way that these tiny atoms are arranged connected to each other. This really shows how important chemistry is both diamonds and graphite are made of the exact thing carbon atoms. Tiny differences can completely change look or feel. NEAT All right before we go, I just want to dig plan sick and check in on my experiment. Let See. Seems that I've created some. Purple. I guess. You Okay I think next time I'll check in with my friends at BASF before him I know they are experts in all things slimy hey you can even check the show notes for linked tweet. COOL BASF kids left to learn about tiny things called polymers and make your very own slime. Speaking of next time in the next chemistry corner, we'll examine how chemistry related to biology and how some creatures us very unique chemical processes to their advantage. Now before we move on that's why not which animal we heard earlier. Let's hear that sound one more time. Off. The answer. The painter. Are winged insects who exactly known for their quiet demeanor their loud. There are several thousand species of CICADA and some of them are annual meeting they turn up every year and some a periodical meaning they appear in thirteen and seventeen year cycles. The CICADAS that only pure every thirteen or seventeen years are kind of cool. The female lays eggs in a slit in a twig or branch, and the eggs hatch into nips. Juvenile insects think of as the baby bugs. Nips fall out of the tree and bury themselves in the dirt for thirteen or seventeen years. In case, you're wondering what's on the menu for all that time. They drink the juice of the plant roots by. Then when they're ready to emerge, they dig out the dirt climate tree and shed their skin and they're adults finally. Now, you must be wondering what their lifespan is above ground, right? It's only four to six weeks. Yep not super impressive. I'll tell you what is super impressive though the amount of stories we've received from you listeners telling us your favorite Adl encounters and I am pleased to announce that our contest is finally complete. Drum roll please. The winner of Earth Rangers prize pack containing Earth Rangers Shirt, a water bottle and surprise plenty. Lunka, from northern Virginia for her story the Scorpion scare. Amazing. CONGRATS. Mica your price is on the way. Hey, let's listen to the story everyone. Hi. My name is Monica and I live in northern Virginia and my story is called the Scorpions scale. One time when I lived in Arizona, I woke up and my pop and my little brother was sleeping downstairs and my Mama was sleeping room with the white noise on I was playing with a dull when I felt something crawling on one of my feet. I thought it was a homeless ill illogic when I looked down I saw himself and then a sting. It was a scorpion. Heard of how to handle. Scorpions. So I held very still that way it wouldn't sting me. then. I yelled for help. Help. My Papa Houdini and ran upstairs. I have a Scorpion on my foot I told him. He gasped the Scorpion had cooled up underneath my foot. I guess it liked to me. My pop afflicted off. And scuttled away. Lido he caught it. My mom came out of whom will and I told her what happened. And that's my story of the Scorpion scale. Thanks spy. How. Great jobs thinks so common that situation Monica that was exactly the right thing to do I don't know if I'd be able to be honest. Now, for everyone who didn't win don't sad if you would really like to get an earth shirt water bottle or silver other awesome merch. Why don't you ask your parents to go to the earth fringe shop dot com to check it all out. If you use the CODE MSNBC or one word, we'll give you ten percent off anything in the store. Okay okay fine. I think I can do better. Since you guys clearly have so many more animal encounters stories to share. We're running the contest again like right now, send us your new animal encounter stories between now and December fifteen and every story we receive we a chance to win an earth Rangers prize pack this time containing a water, bottle a surprise plessey and a limited edition buttons that what are you waiting for good at www dot. Dot Com slash podcast and click on the leave us a message button to record your story or you can always email us at podcast at Earth Rangers Dot. com. I. Would Love to hear all your fall in winter adventures. Well that's all from me today take it easy and keep. Ranger. Hey. It's Chris Terry sneaking in at the end of your show to let you know that we have a new website for Gen Z. media GM shows dot com is our new home on the web were you can listen to all of our podcasts by scripts, t shirts, mugs, and more. You can even hear trailers for upcoming releases months before they come out check out the new site. SHOWS DOT com. That's the letter G., the letter Z. Z. you're Canadian like me and the letter M. shows dot com. Thanks again for listening. Ex.

Arctic Earth Rangers Dr Emily Choi Moore Arctic Bird Research Stewart Murray razorbills Monica Dayton Amazon Broadmoor MSNBC BASF murder scientist Razman Virginia Papa Houdini
Environmental Chemist Training Workshop

Earth Rangers

40:00 min | 3 months ago

Environmental Chemist Training Workshop

"Hey it's chris terry. Have you been to the new. Jen's emerge store if you haven't got to check it out with so much cool stuff from all your favorite shows like six minutes. Mars patel becoming mother nature and more. Check out the store on our website at g. z. M. shows dot com. Have you heard the rally cry. Climate change is a manmade problem with a feminist solution. So good right. It's the action inspired call of mothers of invention a climate justice. Podcast like you've never heard before joined former irish president mary. Robinson comedian maeve higgins and series producer. Tamale coda kara as they celebrate black brown in indigenous leaders all over the world fighting from the front lines. Find mothers of invention. wherever you. Listen to podcasts. Hello and welcome to the earth. Rangers thought cast iron three inch. Emma and today. I have something special for you science buffs out there if you missed any right chemistry corner features. Were you know war today. We are presenting all five episodes back to back. Welcome to the environmental campus training workshop. Honor walk book anything away. Wander in the point. Where a mind. My life i heart start started. Show story sorry. I was just listening to all the incredible animal encounter stories we received as you may know the story contest just closed on december fifteenth. And i wanted to make sure. I listen to all the amazing submissions before we announce the winner in the next episode. They are all so good. Don't worry i'll play as many as possible throughout today's episode but for now let's begin. This is the environmental chemist training workshop. Practice with help from our friends at via bsf and we are going to be doing some experiments so make sure you use this chance to follow along at home. I'll put all the instructions on the show notes at. Www dot earth rangers dot com slash. Podcast oh and make sure to share pictures of your results with hashtag. Emma's chemistry okay. Lab coats on here. We go okay so you already know that. It's my passion to learn all about animals to unlock the mysteries of nature. A lot of what we talk about is considered zoology and biology. But there is another nature science that we haven't really focused on all that much and i think it's high time we changed that because we didn't use this field of science to help the environment and save the planet and that's exactly what i'm talking about chemistry and that's why it's time to present a brand new segment to explore the secrets and wonders of chemistry. It's time for emma's chemistry corner all right. Welcome to my lab. I'm so excited. I've already got some bunsen burners going and my first experiment is in full swing with the help of our friends at basf. The largest chemical company in the world record to explore some of the cool things. You can do with chemistry. And i'll even show you some experiments. That real chemist do experiments thing you can do at home so let's put on your coat and safety goggles and get started quick. You're having no worries in are at home experiments. We won't do anything dangerous. I know what i'm doing. Well maybe every now and then. We will need. Help from a grown-up but i'll tell you when that happens. Okay one sec. I gotta check on my experiments real quick. Fix be studying. That'll do it. I making glow in the dark gel to help with my next overnight research. Excursion fingers crossed. It will work okay. so what. Start with a short introduction to chemistry. Chemistry is the science of matter. And what's matter. You ask what everything is made of. And i mean everything what you're sitting on right now and the floor below you everything. He touched the air that surrounds. You even giving your body all of it absolutely. Everything is made of different materials and these materials or matter are made of tiny tiny tiny particles called atoms. Tiny if you were to take one single hair there could be about two million of the smallest atoms aligned along its width. That's really small and adams can bind to other atoms and form something called molecules molecules are also really really tiny but the properties of these really tiny particles gives the bigger materials their properties properties. We can see or feel heard or saw something is disappear wet or dry even color is and how it smells or tastes so yeah. That's what chemists do they study these atoms and molecules and think about ways that we can use them to create new materials like medicines to cure diseases or find cleaner safer more efficient and environmentally-friendly waste produce the materials. We meet know it'd be cool. Let's finish today's corner with a small chemistry fun fact. Okay guys pop quiz. What do diamonds and graphite having common Let's the reason through one is transparent and shiny. The other is grand powdery. Diamonds are really hard so they can even cut medals but we use graphite pencils because it soft so can leave marks on paper possibly have in common well. Despite all these differences diamonds graphite bites have much more in common than you think. Do you know what it is. They're actually both made up of the same type of atom carbon and both diamonds and graphite are pure glimpse of carbon meaning. They only contain carbon. What makes them so different. It's just the way that these tiny atoms are arranged connected to each other. This really shows how important chemistry is both diamonds and graphite are made of the exact same thing carbon atoms but tiny differences can completely change her. Feel all right before we go. I just want to dig one sick and check in on my experiment. Let's see below. That seems that. I've created some purple. Gu i guess you okay. I think next time. I'll check in with my friends at. Sf before him. I know they are in all things. Slimy hey you can even check the show. Notes for linked tweet cool. Be kids left to learn about tiny things called polymers. And make your very own slime. Speaking of next time in the next chemistry corner will examine. How chemistry is related to biology. And how some creatures us very unique chemical processes to their advantage all right. I think it's time for a short break with today's i. Hannibal encounter story. Our first story comes from earth rangers. Evelyn at elvin hello. I'm i ranger evelyn. Hello i'm earth's ranger alvin. We live in coquitlam canada. High earth ranger emma. So i'm going to tell the story of when our dog saved us. We were in the kitchen. Play the my brother alvin. Then our dog started barking or we looked outside so huge bear. We called our mom. Then everyone in. The house came my grandma and know that so. She opened the door to go outside and see what was happening then. Our dog raged outside. He chased away the bearing. Save us all. That's our animal counter story ends. Well i must say. I was a little worried there for a second encounters between dogs and wildlife can sometimes be dangerous for both sides. Luckily the baron away but that it is better not to let your dog outside when a bears around. Thank you for this story. Evelyn in elven. Okay let's continue with our chemistry workshop number two. Welcome back to emma's chemistry corner okay. Last time we talked about chemistry and learn the chemistry is the science of matter. And because you listen to this podcast you probably heard the word biology quite a lot. I all aji is the signs of everything. That's alive from bacteria so tiny. You can't even see him to the trees in the park to the giant blue whale. Neil sheehan. Did you know that life couldn't happen without chemistry. It's to no creature would exist. If it wasn't for chemistry why is that well because all of the processes that happen inside all living creatures are actually chemical reactions. And what's a chemical reaction you might ask. A reaction is when material changes usually because it encounters other materials who remember the adams we talked about last time teeny tiny particles that all matter is made up of a chemical reaction is when atoms bind to each other to create molecules or the opposite when the bonds between atoms break. You can think of it kind of like lego pieces. Each piece is adam and when you put them together you create a molecule and the action and putting them together or breaking. The molecule apart is called a chemical reaction so back to why chemistry is so important to life. We'll sorry my stomach making noise. Wait that's a great idea. You can just think of what the food we eat. Adjusting requires many chemical reactions. That happen inside your body. But he's been chewing. It requires chemical reactions. That happened inside your muscles and the oxygen you breathe. That makes those muscles function guess. What eating chemical reactions for the oxygen to get to those muscles. And what's really amazing. The coolest thing of all is that many of these reactions are very similar in all living creatures. Doesn't matter if it's a mosquito or ben elephant so in a way when we look at living creatures we can imagine that in them. Millions millions of tiny chemical reactions are happening all the time without ever stopping. That said there are some living creatures that have taken chemical reactions to the extreme like next level and they can make unique chemical reactions. That can't creatures like chameleons octa pine squid in quickly changed their skin colors helping them to hide from predators. Hunt and communicate chameleons have these special crystals in their skin and if they changed the way these crystals are arranged their color changes heels in. Some fish have special organs. They used to create strong. Electric fields like batteries or generators a use electricity. They make two hundred offend themselves and just last year. Researchers found the strongest electricity generator of all animals. It's a type of in the amazon and it can generate an electric shock of eight hundred sixty volts and about one ampere. which is. It's a lot it's very sappy. It wouldn't cause harm to humans but it can definitely stun its prey. Ooh and then there's this beetle called the bombardier beetle that want it feels threatened. It creates a chemical reaction in its belly. That causes a splash of boiling. Smelly liquid. to come out of its rear as a defense. Look if you are an insect you sure wouldn't want to attack this beetle. And did you know that some creatures can create light and can actually glow in the dark for real. This is called bioluminescence bio for biology. And luminescence means light so i- logical liked. I mean you've probably heard firefly's bears so magical. But i have a really cool story about glowing. Bacteria you heard me right. Bacteria inside of squid fish. Why would they do such a thing. Well gives them protection. From the outside world squid's body becomes their own private habitat. But don't worry they don't cause any disease. Squid is actually really happy to have them. Because of these bacteria make the squid glow at night and allied a scrutiny. To glow you ask good question you see these squids hunt for small sea creatures at night but when the moon shines they make a shadow on the seafloor so they you can see their shadow and escapes if they have going bacteria inside of their own shadow disappears because of the glow so they're actually much less visible and then they can catch their prey. How cool is that. I wish i could go at night on working okay. Those were some really neat examples of cool chemical reactions that give some animals their special powers and it just goes to show you to really understand biology. We have to know our chemistry and time. We'll talk about one. Really cool chemical reaction. That happens in many creatures but doesn't happen in any animal. When i guess what it is stay tuned. Oh almost forgot next time. We'll do a real chemistry experiment together. Check the show for list of items. you'll need. Don't worry it's all stuff. You probably already have at home so now you know what atoms molecules and chemical reactions are. How cool is that. What's another quick break and check out. The next animal encounter story coming to you from earth ranger henry. Hello my name. Is henry. And i saw cool in a couple weeks ago. So l started when threads were forced of north carolina a break for lunch then yard and then a couple seconds. Later we saw oss bright line of fish in its claws. Wow an osprey catching a fish. What a magnificent sight to behold sounds so exciting or and henry. Thanks for your story. All right onto our next episode of emma's chemistry corner will come back to 'em chemistry corner. Welcome back to ms chemistry corner less than we talked about how chemical reactions occur in all living creatures all the time and how different use different chemical reactions. But today i wanna talk about one. Really important chemical reaction that happens in many creatures but in no animal. So in which creatures doesn't happen you ask. oh implant. algae and some bacteria that's right. I'm talking about photosynthesis photo photo. Synthesis synthesis his photo means light and synthesis means creation so the weird photosynthesis describes the way that plants can use like coming from the sun to create the food. They need to grow najib. If you could just sit in the sun and get all the energy needed chilling would be eating and eating with the chilling. It's perfect anyways. Besides all the foods that plans make by photosynthesis. There's another super important by product of this reaction. Do you know what it is is the oxygen we yup without photosynthesis we wouldn't have oxygen and that would be a problem so i think it's fair to say that this is a really important chemical reaction so how to plants do it. I mean how do they use light to make the food they need. They have special molecule in them called chlorophyll and that's the molecule that gives them the green color we see on leaves clear means green. Bt doubts in biology coa molecules are called pigments and chlorophyll is a type of pigment with chlorophyll is are able to absorb light energy and converted into telugu energy. Do you wanna see chlorophyll well. It's impossible to see molecules. Because they're so tiny. But today. I'll show you how we can separate the chlorophyll from the other materials in the leaf and check out all the different pigments in the leaf including chlorophyll so roll up your sleeves for our first experiment. It's called chromatography. You'll need a coffee filter a pair of scissors rubbing alcohol jar a pen or pencil abol with hot water and different types of leaves to be spinach or lettuce. Spinach leaves actually work really well but really any type of leaf you want is okay. It can also be really cool to compare between the pigment of different types of leaves. If you wanna compare between differently you'll need a few jars one for each type of oh and instead of rubbing alcohol you can. Totally use nail polish remover. Also please ask grownup to help you. Find her. Handle these materials. You can hit pause right now in order to get them and i'll wait for you here. Waiting for science is fun science with the gro- but talk the talk. The we're gonna find out what's in leaves. Oh you're back okay. Do you have everything cool. let's begin. Tear the leaves into small pieces like really small as small as you can. You can use a kitchen knife but careful or ask a grown up to do it for you. if you want you can also crush with your fingers. Put the pieces of leaves in the jar and poor a bit of rubbing alcohol or nail polish remover on top. So cover them completely. But you don't really need much more than this and then closed the chart carefully. Put the jar inside a bull with hot water and let it sit for half an hour. Lift the jar and sturt from time to time. If the water gets cold you can replace it fast. Forward to the future. After about half an hour liquid jars to become greenish or even dark green depending on the type of leaf. You're using using the scissors a rectangular piece of coffee filter paper. It should be a little longer than the height of the jar and his spot as possible. Wrap the tip of the paper over the pen. You can use tape to hold it in place and place it on top of the jar so only the bottom of the paper touches the liquid in the jar. Careful not to touch the jarwal and then just let it sit for an hour or two. You can keep watching it from time to time. Because like every scientific experiment the results can sometimes be unexpected. Paper should soap the liquid immediately but after an hour to you should start seeing stripes on the paper all the pigments from the leaf are in the liquid and when the liquid through the coffee filter paper pigments get stuck at different spots according to their chemical properties. So after enough time you should see you separate stripes on the paper. Each strike should have a different color. Ones should be greener yellow orange. You may see other colors too. It just depends on the type of leaf you used. The colors are all different pigments. The color molecules center inside the leaf and the green line is chlorophyll the pigment molecule that plants used for photosynthesis. This experiment was hard work. But how cool is it to see what things like. Leaves are made of and what enables plans to use light in order to make their food. And did you know that. Real chemist use chromatography experiments. Like this in their labs all the time it's true. Chromatography is a really useful method to separate materials from each other. If you wanna find out what something is made of. So it wasn't just a fun experiment to do but something that's really useful in chemical research and i'd even say that once you do this experiment you're well on your way to becoming. Chemistry sells well next time. We'll talk about one of my favorite topics in chemistry chemistry and the environment. How do use chemistry to protect the planet like we're rangers do and we'll definitely do another experiment. You won't believe the cool thing that we can do with red cabbage. Check out the show notes for all the ingredients. You'll need our next animal. Encounter story is from earth ranger amir and it arrived via email. Here let me read it to you. It says hello. Earth ranger emma. That's me i am. An animal encounter story to tell you today. One night my dad my mom and me were driving back from grabbing food at a restaurant. We were driving next to a field on the way back to neighborhood. When we saw a bunch of free little creature scuttling around on the road they ran into a ditch. And at first we thought they were a bunch of ninety cats on the road but it further inspection. We saw that. It was family of raccoons a large raccoon. Didn't look still pcs. And there were four youngsters. It may be four or five months old still with their mother. The mother started squeaking growling and two of her babies ran back door while the other two were hunting around for grubs and stuff. It was so cute and i will never forget it baby. Raccoons are so cute. I'm glad that you let them be and didn't disturb them any further. We need to give wildlife animals their space especially when we see them with their cubs. Thank you for your story with ranger amir. Okay back to our workshop. Welcome back to emma's chemistry corner in today's episode will become environmental scientists. environmental scientists. Study how we can protect the environment. Many environmental scientists are chemists because chemistry can really help us to understand ecosystems and look for ways to protect them. Chemistry also plays a huge role in creating materials. That can help. Protect the environment like Plastics or new kinds of equal friendly fuel. One important thing. Environmental scientists often do is going to different locations to take samples of the water or soil and measure. Different properties of them. Over time it can tell us how healthy ecosystem is a aquatic. Ecosystems like lakes swamps rivers and oceans are really sensitive to pollution and other changes in the environment and one of the major threats to aquatic ecosystems. Is city what city what when something is acidic. It can tastes sour. Like lemon juice or vinegar. Also in our stomach are really strong. Acids that help us digest our food so the opposite of acidic chemistry. It's called basic or alkaline. But there's not many outgoing foods we can eat. So it's hard to describe what it tastes like a good examples of alkaline materials. Daily life would be so aching soda and laundry detergent. Maybe you've heard of the term. Ph ph is a measure of if something is acidic or alkaline. Seven is right in the middle. It's neutral any number. Below seven is in. Any number of seven is alkaline. What's important is that a city level is really crucial for the health of aquatic ecosystems. Why well because many aquatic animals like algae coral and many other organisms can only live in very specific conditions so when the water around them is different than what they're used to it can get sick or die and when the water and aquatic ecosystems becomes too acidic many animals that used to live. There can't survive. It's true for small lakes and ponds but also for the oceans. Environmental scientist take water samples from aquatic ecosystems. Over the years to check how the acidity changes over time and they do so using something called an indicator. an indicator is a thing that tells them. How acidic or alkaline. The water is and in today's experiment. We're going to do similar thing we'll check. How acidic or outgoing different materials are using a very special indicator one that he's stupor high tech in various scientific and it's it's cap cabbage. Red cabbage wait a minute. What yes yes. Red cabbage really. I mean that's what it says here. My nose varies a mistake. I don't know you just going to have to try and see okay. So yes for this experiment. You will need one red cabbage and a big part of role. That contain boiling. Water will also need a few more things but for now. Just focus on the cabin. Take it out and tear a few leaves off into small pieces with your hands and put it in a big potter book for this part duly gronau. Ask them to pour boiling water into the pot and let it stand into. The water is purple and cool down. It can take an hour or so for it to cool so patiently. In the meantime you can prepare all the other materials you'd like to check. They have to be liquid or water. Soluble so you can dissolve them in the water. You'll need a few transparent glasses as well for each of the samples that you wanna check okay. So the first you put one teaspoon of each of the materials in a separate glass and then add pulled water to fill it up to the half the knicks you can leave the teaspoon inside the glass because we'll use it later. Ask to help you preparing these glasses with different materials because some are not so healthy. I recommend lemon juice vinegar. Salt egg white liquid soap and laundry detergent. You can also test other materials if you'd like remember one teaspoon of each in each separate grass add water up to the halfway mark and knicks. Just remember to label each glass what you put in it and be careful that no one drinks it by accident. Just stay close to your experiment. Hey oh it. Will you prepare everything. But i mean you can also pause. Wait wait wait any way. Well he gets up stuffing glasses glasses and stuff thapa deputy Everything ready cool. If the one of the cabbage leaves is nice and cold and purple uniform. That's great use labeled the poor some of the purple water without the leaves into each of the glasses and fill them then use a teaspoon to mix it and watch the magic happen. You should see the color of the purple water change. If you've used vinegar lemon juice chick turn pink if you use laundry detergent. It should become blue green in the salt liquid soap. An egg white. It should still be purple but a bit more blue in the glass containing the editor. So why is that. well remember the acidity. The red cabbage contains a molecule called anthocyanins. And it's a good indicator of a city which means that it changes its color. According to how acidic or alkaline something is the lemon juice and vinegar are sick so the anthocyanins and the cabbage water becomes pink. The laundry detergent is alkaline. So the anthocyanins becomes blue and the saltwater is neutral not acidic or alkaline so it remains purple environmental scientists use acidity indicators like this to examine water samples it helps them to know if an aquatic ecosystem is healthier. Not so we can understand it better and know how to protect it. But in any case it's nice to have this rainbow of colors one more thing. Don't forget to clean up your experiment. Every chemists knows the importance of a spotless lab. Stay tuned for our next chemistry corner. Will we'll talk to a real environmental scientists just a small reminder that if you did the at home experiments in one is share your results with us. Just ask your parents to follow earth rangers on facebook instagram or twitter and take the photos with hashtag. Emma's chemistry. I am really excited to see how your experiments turned out. Okay how about one more story for today. This time from earth rangers analogy from juno alaska. Hi my name. Is earth rangers and ali. I come from juneau. Alaska and my animal encounter was one time. It was at the glacier. We were heading back down. The ramp in on the side of the ramp was a big boulder like a big stone. And i was like look. Mom bear but momnents until the momma bear started. Walking across the ramp was her three cubs. They are big black bears and the cubs were absolutely indoor ball. Such a cool story a family of bears and they can look like big stones especially if they don't move that much and bear cubs are adorable. Thank you earth ranges analogy. Okay rangers ready for one last round of chemistry fun here we go. Welcome back to ms chemistry corner. Okay remember last time. We took the first step towards becoming environmental scientists environmental scientists as you already know or people who use science like chemistry in order to better understand our ecosystems and think about new ways to protect them similar to what we earth rangers do with blab coats and safety goggles now. After the coup experiments we did in the last two episodes. I started to ask myself. Is this actually. What real environmental scientists due to figure it out. I talked to professor hint. Who is a real chemist and environmental scientist and. She shared some of the secrets of her work with me. Let's turn to the call. I'm speaking with hynde alabama ashley. She's a professor at the wolford loria university and head of the environmental physical and inter facial chemistry or the epic lab. I things are speaking with us today. Thanks for having me all right. So i usually more of a biology gal but i just recently discovered my love for chemistry and now i know just an amateur bit. You're the real deal. Can you describe to us what you do sure. I built a chemistry lab at laurie to study chemical reactions in the atmosphere soil and water. I teach courses on these subjects and help students get an appreciation for how human activity affect the chemical balance of natural systems. Whoa that sounds really important. How did you become a chemist. Were you always interested in chemistry. Yeah i think you know. My exposure to science came through my teachers. I had outstanding science teachers in highschool the chemistry teacher in particular inspired me to ride research paper on the different types of pollution since then desio revolution. I found chemistry to be unique because it explained everything i was curious about. I remember the chemistry teacher in high school showed us an experiment called dancing spaghetti dancing spaghetti. What she brought a very long bicker and she ad in it baking powder and vinegar and she broke different spaghetti pieces into smaller ones that can fit and she added a food coloring to the mixture and then we saw the bubbling happens because of the action between vinegar baking soda. I've been spaghetti. Started to float around and she told us. Yeah this is the biggest. Do still in your heart. And so i so much fun to watch. That's wild. can you describe how chemistry lab looks like are. There are a lot of explosions going on well. The health and safety of anyone in give us the allowed is our top priority so there is no explosion. We had a very strict hilton safety protocol before going into the lab on hand on chemicals or starting january actions and we have to follow that for the call with our most senior person in the room. And that's usually me or another student that i trade. Oh fair enough safety measures. We talked about chromatography to episodes ago and did an experiment using a coffee filter. Is this the kind of thing that you would really do in the lab. Of course chromatography is a powerful separation tool that helps us isolate chemicals in mixtures with so cool. Okay before we get to the real important stuff. I got a trick question for you. What's the dullest element on the periodic table Let me think news think a line but interesting that you mentioned this one because not all elements and dictate able found in nature. This element is made in the lab and mostly used for research purposes and it is actually named after a scientist very neat. So let's get into some more serious stuff. What are the ways. We can use chemistry to help the environment. Chemistry is the science that help us make sense of the world. We live in the level of electrons. Atoms and molecules chemistry. We know what chemicals in the air we breathe an how much why again like carbon dioxide can trap heat through chemistry. You'll know how actions in the atmosphere captains chemicals and if these new can cause with mick climate change better or worse also chemistry you will know why. The oceans are getting more acidic because of carbon dioxide build up in the atmosphere at how that increasing acidity is affecting the chemicals in the ocean. That's uses to build their shells. Chemistry really helps us know. So much. And just talked last time about the problem of acidity in aquatic ecosystems. Now can i ask how your research helps to fight. Climate change in air pollution. We'll fix what asking me that solving climate change and air pollution and quiet data from experiments in the lab and the field and the use of powerful and super fast computers. So in my lab. We study the actions that we suspect could happen in the atmosphere and we provide data on half as these actions go and how they could affect atmospheric temperature done so interesting. Okay one last question for you. I usually my interviewees what their favorite animal is. But since her chemists. I'm kind of curious to know. What your favorite atom or molecule or chemical reaction is. Yeah i mean. That's that's a lovely question. I think my favorite three action is photosynthesis. How trees take cups you to water and use light from the sun to make oxygen and sugars. This action is opposite to what we do when we stuff to get energy to view our economy so plans do what we do but then reverse. That's right well professor. Think you still went for speaking to me. This was a great interview. I think you could say that. The two of us had a lot of chemistry. I agree thank you thank you i. That was so cool. If i wasn't a wild. I've researcher already. I'm pretty sure that i would have been a chemist. I hope you enjoyed emma's chemistry corner. If you'd more questions about chemistry you can leave a message at. Www dot earth rangers dot com slash. Podcast or you can email us at podcast. At earth rangers dot com. I would love to hear your questions. And hopefully i can answer them and if your episode well listeners. I hope you had fun. Learning about chemistry and doing the at home experiments with me. Now that we've finished our workshop. You're ready to start your journey as environmental scientist. I'll see all of you next year when we announce the winner of the pounder contest. I am already so excited for some brand new animal adventures in twenty twenty one. Thank you so much for listening and until next time stay also stay warm and keep frame brain. Hey it's chris terry sneaking in at the end of your show to let you know that we have a new website for gen z media. Gm shows dot com. Is our new home on the web. Were you can listen to all of our podcasts. By t shirts mugs and more you can even hear trailers for upcoming releases months before they come out. Check out the new site at shows dot com. That's the letter g. The letter z. Said if you're canadian like me and the letter m. shows dot com. Thanks again for listening x.

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Mike Naig Addresses 'Unsolicited' Foreign Seed Deliveries

The Big Show

49:23 min | 9 months ago

Mike Naig Addresses 'Unsolicited' Foreign Seed Deliveries

"In. Lebanon even on the big show clock by Quin, and the big show back in your radio today after being on the road yesterday. Yes as in your radio as well. Just not starting out in the same place, we were celebrating the Morgan good farm neighbor award with the Swanson Family Near. Galt. Iowa hats off the Swanson Family they're doing a wonderful job up there and what a day we had with those folks visiting with them. Big. Thank our Secretary of Agriculture Mike Nag for joining us as well. Coalition to support Iowa's farmers are presenting sponsor. What a day well coming up eleven. Oh, eight on the big show clock Andy. We had a wonderful day yesterday and I, know you had some things up on the website, some pictures and whatnot, and some things from the presentation of the organ good. Farm. Neighbor Award. So another thing that I sent over to you and I. WanNa talk a little bit about here before we get started by the way, we're going to be talking with Megan Anderson coming up here gets him a boots on. On the ground eyeballs out in the field, and then we'll be joined by Secretary of Agriculture. Mike. Coming up after twelve hour from now, and we're going to catch up more on these mysterious packets of seed. They're showing I haven't heard of from any of our farm folks that have picked up any I, think the main target has been gardeners You know with with these. So going to find out now about that. Well, they want back, right? Yeah. Yeah. China would like to have those back I'm not sure if they're like Jack, and the beanstalk type seeds where they send him to yen, you grow monster cropper or or and that's what the US is trying to find out Apparently, it is against rules and regulations to send she seeds on authorized through the mail and China Post happens to be a part of that organization. So they would like to find out who was responsible for that as well. we have a situation coming up at the fairgrounds. I don't know whether to call it the state, fair. The State, fair twenty twenty or the state. Fair Limited a limited edition. Is that what the official name limited edition in other words, people can't go to the state fair and observe and and walk around and and get the deep fat fried everything on a stick but the livestock competition is going to be held and a lot of these four H. FA youngsters have been working hard all year to be able to exhibit livestock. They're going to have an opportunity to do that, and you'll be able to listen in and and find out what's going on there, and also celebrate their livestock projects with them on the radio on the big show because big show's going to be at the What would you call it the Iowa, state. Fair. I. Believe it's special especially in special special edition issue with the four H.. FFA shows that We will have an opportunity to to hear all about in the comfort of your truck or home, right, and that's right in a home state. Fair experience. We deliver it, show you delivered to wherever you would like and you. You don't have to worry about tossing them in in the compost pile because it won't grow the. So we're going to be there and we're GONNA be talking to these young folks and celebrating with them in, it's going to be a Thursday, Friday Saturday event. But here's the deal a I think we have the website up for volunteers. mindy has contacted me and there is an opportunity and a need for some volunteers to help out and You can do everything from direct traffic to let people, in gates, and be in charge of that for a shift or to or how about this one, and this was We had our our young intern with, US yesterday Lydia. And she's she's wonderful. She did a nice job But she was reading the volunteer list and get this one Andy. You can sell state fair cookies. out of the member of the Barksdale Cook stands. Cookies by the the Cup there. You can volunteer and be in that and Lydia thought she'd do that for every day of the fair. or eat them well. Quality control is important. You're saying is that the position and so? I think there's opportunity to even work in the cookies State. Fair cookie booth there as well. So lot lots of things you can. You can volunteer for, and we'd sure like to direct you to the website and I, think you have that posted I and I believe on that website, they have all the different shifts times available. Yet. They do not give you a few more specifics to it's I was state fair to volunteer local DOT. COM will get you directly there or you can go whol radio DOT COM. You can hover over the menu icon. You know the three little dashes in the upper left hand corner, click on the big show, and we'll get you there and fixed up with the volunteer ship because you know what the requirements that are in place Bob and It actually is more labor intensive to try and do these shows than it used to be in the past. So any all help is certainly appreciated. You Bet, well, we appreciate the what the fares doing in getting these young folks recognize being able to display their their livestock short of the state fairs. Big Deal I. Mean, I don't care what you say at. That is a that is a big deal and we're happy that We can be part of that as well. coming up Andy when you find out right now, three big things we need to know. Well, you just mentioned one of them asking volunteers as we're right around the corner from special edition of the Iowa State Fair, they're looking for folks to help out put on these shows as it's going to take quite a bit of labor for those three weekends. See An August. The Marketing Director Mindy Williamson, says that they are quote grateful for any volunteers we can get and would like you to go to Iowa state fair dot volunteer local dot. com to sign up for a shift. Deserving the voice when it comes to milk pricing, it's kind of interesting. We're talking about fair and transparent cattle markets. Well, American. Farm. Bureau Chief Economist John Newton says they've got some policy recommendations out following a year long working group. It would bring the same thing with the milk marketing delegates. Pass January adopted many of those policies including giving farmers, an opportunity to test and. And individual a confidential ballot improving the price discovery in milk pricing formulas improve the risk sharing between processors and dairy farm first, and then more uniformity in how bill pricing and pulling provision operate around the ten federal milk marketing orders So committed to make things fair. He says is the overall goal. He adds the outside of the two thousand, eighteen farm bill there. Are a number of challenges, some related to Covid nineteen others unrelated to Covid nineteen that highlight the need for reforms. receive. One of these packages unsolicited in the form of jewelry or at least labeled as jewelry coming from China. I Would Department of AG and Land Stewardship has put out a phone number can find it on the big show website five, one, five, two, eight, one, fifty, three, twenty, one, and officials say do not open the CPAC. It don't plant the seed or attempt to destroy it as all of that would be biosecurity violation. Now, we'll talk with I was secretary bag Mike, Nag about this a little bit later on But he says, they'll handle all of that in a safe manner interestingly enough now, the reports out of China are they're not quite sure where these things came from either and would like them back for testing. So it's an evolving situation that we've covered and are covering here for you. Today on the big show eleven fifteen reads the big show clock and those are the three big. Today's top stories in agriculture and the analysis you trust. This is the big Joe. Eleven, twenty on the big show flock. Bob Quinn here in the big show, you know I was thinking the other day. who in in pondering this, who might be my favorite agronomist of all time and it it? It came. As no surprise that Megan. Anderson is in a class all by herself. You See. And and that that's number reasons is Megan's smart knows all this stuff. But she also picks up the phone when I call her and she she even let me send her pictures of things I see in the field and she identifies him for me. So Meghan, welcome back the big show how you doing. Man I'm doing really well after that introduction Oh. Yeah. Well, well. You do a wonderful job out there and I do appreciate Say. I, have sent. And I'm not kidding. You hear it could. You could verify as me. I've seen pictures of bugs and things that I I have no idea what they are and you. You've identify them and send them send the picture back. So that's good stuff. Now. What's going on I was corn and bean fields boots on the ground eyeballs out in the field here for the next four minutes or so central Iowa area rainfall are are we doing? Okay? Are we catching up? How are we looking? we are certainly not catching up for the most of us if anything people seem to be following falling further and further behind and fortunately. Except far southern Madison County, I hear that they are taking the reins from everybody. Well, there seems to be a gentle slope. Yeah. We have been blessed. Go Go ahead. Yeah. So we they're they're definitely been some pockets that in the last week have gotten maybe an inch to an inch and a half of rain across the area. Most people caught at least a little bit, but it seems like. We're seeing that kind of dry area creep further and further east. Even as we look toward, you know this kind of forecast of not getting much rain in the future. So let's You know, I'm hopeful. But the forecast is wrong like it's been so many time this summer that maybe we will get some rain. Well you're you're making big time friends with Jerry and ridder right now. Jerry has our meteorologist. Now Megan, let let me ask you this We're. We're seeing a lot of undecided applications out there. What are you? What are you saying? I would say that Greenlee spot his definitely picked up in the lower canopies and some of these areas that have caught more of the rain. So Kinda, might you know what? I thirty five isn't a real great Designation. Kind of the eastern part of my territory has caught some more rain thinking more of the leaf spot I've seen just a little bit of southern rust. down in the canopy, and of course, as we all know, there was just a little bit of tar spot found here in central. Iowa, they're all mostly sticking to the lower canopy, but I wasn't a field earlier this week where that Greeley spot had made it. Maybe a couple leaves above the year lease. So so there are some diseases on the move for sure I haven't been very much. Field though I will say that. Yeah, had Megan. Are you out in the field today. I, am about to head out in the field. What I get off the phone with you guys, GonNa. Go look fighter might send some of our drier areas. So I I've gotten a couple of phone calls about that and gotten some suspicious descriptions of. Of Soybean plants that maybe you're starting to take on a yellow or even kind of a rusty color from far, and people are worried about spider Mites, kind of been that Western Dallas, southwest Boone County area at least in my area where we're drier and then further west, of course, whether even drier yet. To aphids all this dry weather. That'd be fairly common past without any rain, right? Yeah, and I heard from some folks mostly, you know Brian laying up in northeast Iowa he keeps a pretty close eye on. And he has seen increasing infestation. And then increasing numbers as well. the really hot temperatures aren't great for the kids though but we are going to get cooler here. So so those will probably be some better conditions where we've got the combination of the dry and more moderate temperatures for this aphids to to take off. So we'll want to be keeping an eye on them for sure won't make. Make it again. Thanks so much for joining us and when when we call you, we like to have you on the radio here. Not I've got about a minute and a half left and I'm asking for a friend here. This isn't the anything that's on my farm, of course. But what can you tell me about these apple trees? It's picking up the Cedar Rust. I've got a tree. It looks like an old old rusty piece of machinery and I've been told that these cedar trees which I love anyway are is causing my apples to my apple trees to get rusty. I cannot tell you anything about that. Bob. But I did sure fine to contact for you to talk to you about your apple tree asking somebody else here now. I mean, we really do have a great Hort line on campus who can answer really fantastic horticultural. But. That is absolutely not my area of expertise. To try. These Cedar Cedar Trees Apparently, they cast something out and they turn these leaves the look like they're all rusty and I I I'd like to take on a statewide eradication of Cedar trees to begin with. You talking about an invasive we? Owe. Invasive. Species. Hall my goodness gracious well. Hey take care of yourself. We'll talk to you again. All. Right. Good. You Bet make it. Anderson She something else Megan Anderson joining us here. State University. She's our extension agronomist and voted by Andy as the best in the state. So eleven thirty here. Andy we have a special guest ahead. Joe Merson will be with us as we'll find out what he's seeing. Southeastern Iowa versus seeds, a West Point great tractor key big should record closer next on big show. Eleven thirty five on the big show clock. We are cranking up the big show machine today by win with it back from a whirlwind tour of north. Central, Iowa yesterday where we celebrated with the Swanson family. The latest winners were good farm neighbor. Award. WE'RE GOING TO BE HEARING ANDY coming up here with some insight and farm news and Mike Nags going to be joining us here. But Oh, half hour or so away, we're going to kind of dive into what's going on with these seeds showing up in people's mailboxes. But right now, Andy we have on the telephone line number one, one of our good and longtime tractor cade sponsors and not only tractor, Kate? Kate sponsors, but tractor cade hosts from time to time I have eaten brought worse right off the loading dock there with the folks from seed. But you talk about a pioneer in seed and in soybean seed research, these guys are at I was telling somebody the other day says, These folks are House of new varieties out there the you could hit with everything except blow torch and they're going to stand up So talk about tractor, Kate first off Andean Tell us what's going on. Yeah, absolutely. You're talking about Bra brought worse to Joe who's with us. Now, you could probably Joe lay claim to the the best meal ever had on. Those things are amazing. Andy well I all I first of all Bob to Kinda. Okay. A little bit of an exaggeration. Maybe they're a little bit, but we appreciate it. But Andy, when it comes to rottweilers, what's points noted for Sonny's homemade brought worse right here in town and they're they're awful. Good. They certainly are, and we've had the pleasure of experiencing a few times. So what are you seeing out in the Field Joe, when when you're out and about some decide applications going on I would imagine. Farmers never have a day off and they're worrying about the weather. The markets are out there in the field taking care of that crop. So Y-, the crop down here, it looks good to rain. We just recently got. You know we're we're on target for above trend line yields in southeast Iowa and if I've been over was over to Springfield Illinois here on Monday and they look like they have a great crop trauma coming onto. So everybody's optimistic and we hope we can keep those exports going and move that price up a little bit but. I, we gotta fill the bins and you know then we'll worry about the price leader I assume. You've always Bob and mentioned. You've always got some cutting edge research going on. So what are you looking at this summer? What trials are you working on what you're testing? Well. There's there's a fundamental uncertainty going on right now when it comes to soybean seed and particularly when it comes to traits. With the the dike Campbell, able vacated here. right at springtime puts a big question mark about you know what farmers GonNa us as their major weed, killer next year, and your soybeans, and obviously mercer seeds have a front row seat when it comes to enlist e three soybeans and that's the two four D product combined with glufosinate and of course, Liberty Link, GT, twenty seven, which is Libyan link. Also, we fascinate and life to say, so we feel we're in a good position to farmers an alternative to die Campbell solution. So we're looking forward to talking to them about that and give them giving them that option. And I would imagine that's a conversation that. Maybe ought to be had sooner rather than later as. Those supplies. Maybe could be an issue if there's a big rush in that direction. That's a possibility, but I I can tell you a Muslim seeds. We anticipated stronger demand. So our supplies are good, but yes, it's always smart to or receipt early and to to get the right variety. They want a new and one of the things that. Muslim. Seats we don't believe in the cell and substitute method I mean, we just don't believe in it. We believe deals deal. So when you order your seat from us, you're GonNa get delivered what your order and I would definitely think about ordering my soybean before harvest this year. Well. Tell you what thanks so much for what you've done here with tractor. Kate over the years. We really appreciate really do I. I gotTa Ask you one final question here though last time. I, was down at your place the all had this the Herkie, the Hawk Guy. And he was kind of a big mosaic of seed of corn, you still have that. Yes her hawk, actually a special arguing, hawk? It's an F. Erkki Hawk Mitch's American needs farmers, and it's made out of corn and soybeans, which is were glued to fiberglass pose superman pose, and it was from the hurricanes on parade in Iowa. City here which they do every ten years, and then they auction them off and the and the proceeds went to united way in, and that's where we bought it. How well I have my picture taken with it so. Oh. My thanks a lot. Joe, we'll be talking to you again. Thank you Bob. Thank you, Andy. You Bet how about that? I like those folks and either? Good? Picture that you've ever had taken with herkie right. Grad. Now. Here's the deal. You may call Iowa state and they may have to look long and hard to admit that I'm an Iowa State Grad but. I'm. Not. GonNa say I was one of their star cast of students coming out of there. But Yeah, I did I modeled my way through is State and I appreciate the folks that they're putting up with me as well. we'd find out three big things you need to know right now being brought to you by your Iowa soybean farmer. Help, wanted for the twenty twenty special edition, Iowa State Fair trade around the corner actually begins a week from tomorrow. Be Three weekends showcasing the hard work, superior showmanship and dedication. If I was four H. and FFA youth, it'll follow all. I would department of public, health, and CDC recommendations for distancing hand washing and sanitation. But there are nita some gate help in need of some traffic direction and even cookie sales people. If you can believe that you can find a link to get signed up for a shift or several on the big show website. Looking. For fairness, we talk about this in transparency that Kennel markets quite a bit but also they're looking at this for the milk markets. American Farm Bureau, Chief, economist, John, Newton says, they've got some policy recommendations that would do just that after a year long review by a farm bureau working group. Are Voting delegates. This past January adopted many of those policies including giving farmers an opportunity to task the individual confidential ballot, improving the price discovery in milk pricing formulas improved risk sharing between processors and dairy farmers, and then more uniformity in how bill pricing and pulling provision operate around the ten federal. Milk. Marketing. Orders. Now. He also says that outside of the twenty eighteen farm bill, there are some substantial. Challenges some related to Covid nineteen and others maybe not so much. But all highlight the need for reform. You're not open if you get seeds from China, the Department of Agriculture releasing guidance on how you should handle these things which show up. In a package claiming to be jewelry, they say, don't open, don't plan them and certainly don't try to destroy them. That would be a biosecurity hazard since the unknown origins of these unlabeled seeds good being dangerous. USDA considers this practice unsolicited seeds through the mail to be illegal and I was secretary of Mike. Next says, if you get one of these things, call five, one, five, two, eight, one, fifty, three, twenty, one, and they'll handle the pickup and the destruction in a safe manner. It is eleven forty, three, hundred big show clock, and by the way, Mike will address this with in about twenty minutes on today's show. Those are the three big thing. Ought. To the minute commodity prices and market analysis that make sense. This is the big Joe. Eleven fifty five on big Phil Walk a day. We had yesterday celebrating with the Swanson. Family. You talk about a great family there that doesn nice job producing agricultural goods fact and before I get too far along here is telling you story about Iceland and going up there and seeing the northern everything. It jogged my head here. Andy is I got a note from a fellow who said I heard you talk about Iceland says I was there as he was serving in the air force and he signed the name and I kind of thought. Maybe I I recognize the name, and then he said I drive the nineteen eighty John Deere tractor, the Nineteen Eighteen John Deere tractor and Bang Immediately. Who It was isn't that weird. Yeah. We've been on. So many of these tractor extravaganzas that I can identify people more by the tractor they drive than anything else. So big shout to young Mike there in Marshall. Town. But again, with with the Swanson Family I was talking to them, they have Four daughters and They're. They're blessed with some very bright young young children there, and they're going to be involved in agriculture, and of course, we like to see that But was Talkin Johnson's like it sounds like the if you if you no matter what major egg company you're. To learn about all you gotta do is go up and see STU and Laurie and family, and one of their kids works for now you. May Tell you a little secret. This is This is this is a behind the scenes piece that no one else is ever going to know about except you and me. And all those folks listen and then from from central Nebraska. Kentucky. But you see the the young ladies They're all three of them. one young lady, high school, and three of them are working like you say in the industry, well, they they were all They're at home to celebrate because they don't live at home So they all came home celebrate and they were all. Working. From from home farm there. Who and they all happen to be apparently on conference calls. At the Same time. With a different different big time outfit. So they said we had to find some areas where we could close the doors you know and. Concentrate. So yeah, that's and we're just having some fun with those folks I. I was going to mention though that stews Dad Ron. was leader of the corridors here Few years back. So strong strong representation there of of agriculture, and you know he he mentioned a couple of things that didn't sink in on my way home. But. He said within a mile and a half. you can see almost a, you know a big part, I'll agriculture. What did you say seven and a million laying? Chickens. Thousands of pigs being raised here of course, acres and acres of corn and soybeans. So. Hey. We're GONNA to talk with our secretary, of agriculture, I guy of agriculture here in the state of Iowa coming up on the big show. Live from the hy-vee Studios. This is newsradio Ten, forty W. H. O.. Well twelve on the big show clock Bob Quinn, the big show today, and we're GONNA. Be talking about some seeds that are showing up in mailboxes. With some folks, Secretary of Agriculture, Mike Nag Joining us on the telephone line today secretary nagging I were part of the celebration yesterday at the Swanson Farm. Board we have a good time. Mike. I gotTA. Tell You I. I. I like it when we can be out in the countryside I mean, if I could do that every day. Oh. Man. That'd be that'd be great stuff that that really is. That's that's big time stuff for me. There's something going on here and we're trying to get the bottom of it and I know you guys are as well. But some folks have been getting some seeds in the mail unsolicited. The pictures I've seen just kind of showing up with the person's name and address on it and people are thinking that they're coming from China and they look like they could be some kind of a vegetable cedar tree seed or something like that But really it's it's probably something that people ought to not not try and plant. So tell us what's going on. What do you know? You Bet in her small good to be back, and we did have a wonderful wonderful visit with the ones in family yesterday now, I not to make you jealous. But I am on the road today again, I'm up in hardened and and Grundy counties look looking around. So we're we're out doing a rain dance right now but yeah. The the seed situation, very, very interesting. It's happening really all across. The country we're, getting. Reports. Multiple States. And here in Iowa, we're asking people. If you do receive unsolicited package of scenes something, you didn't order We want you to call or what asking you, the call I would department of Agriculture so weak and get your information, and and we'll be like we need to get those teams into our possession working with USDA to find out just what exactly is going on here and I think a couple things that I'm thinking about one in. This is probably most likely a consumer protection issue first, and foremost, which is a brushing scam and. The away for online vendors to increase their their positive customer reviews what they choose. They send these unsolicited items of no value. They stolen your identity, they then right a false positive review of the customer experience, and then that allows them to do more business online. We think that follows this. Kind of pattern however from the environmental side of this. Regardless we don't. We're GONNA, assume that there's things in those packages that we do not want planted in Iowa or released in any way shape or form, and so again, that's why we're asking folks. If you've got one of these packages that you've received please call us and we'd like to connect with you and get those seeds in in our possession. So we can investigate further. Yeah. Hey, Mike it's the in that What you just said, sort of reminds me of how say Palmer Amaranth came to be a resistant wheat into a certain extent water in this state, also, it just takes. A couple of seeds in these things can multiply very quickly. They can, and that's why. We won we wanted to confirm want to know what it is, and so that's why we're working with US and other states to collect the get them to USDA laboratory so that work can be done and in the meantime because of that point that you just made, let's assume that it's something we don't want to even if it's not an various, you know. effort to get something here. Intentionally, it may unintentionally some of those seeds. Because by the way we're seeing all kinds, shapes, sizes, manner of speed FACEBOOK page Agriculture Department of Agriculture facebook page. We've got some pictures there of some of the packages if you've got questions, but you can see from those pictures that there's a variety, it's not just one kind of seed that we're seeing. This is This is crazy there any. A have you been able to determine Mike who who has been targeted like saint say gardeners. It doesn't seem like maybe full-time farmers necessarily have gotten many of these. But doing know who they're primarily going to at this point. Now, at this point I think it's too soon to say, we don't believe that we've identified any particular targeting again, it aims the. Broad. Broad Swath of just folks You know that are all all walks of life and all backgrounds and locations that are were getting, and again, we've only received about one hundred, fifty phone calls to the department. Now, we we do despite that number will go up as as media reports are a little more widely circulated but you know again, that's part of. Gathering information doing the investigation and working together with states across the country to figure out what exactly going on. Yeah. Talking with the Secretary of Agriculture. Mike Nag Being brought to you by the folks that hurts real estate services farmland auction brokerage evaluations. Big. Thank. You. To hurts real estate services hey. sector got as far as these seeds though and we're talking about going what's going on here in Iowa I. Mean that's that's our home court, but we've had reports from California all the way to Virginia of people getting these Seeds in the mail. So I would say if they have a mailing list, it is a pretty big one. Yes and again. We, don't believe that that. Obviously, we're not just being targeted here. This is happening in as I as I've interacted with my colleagues across the country, lots of departments of agriculture involved and and certainly USDA as well and. It's just an interesting interesting situation because of course, this may give us an opportunity to take a closer look at how do things arrive in the United States and and do we need to be looking a little more closely at more things like this, and so I I think you know we'll have an opportunity here to learn something, and maybe that makes them adjustments. But yes, it's the bar. As we can tell, it's widespread across the country. Well, secretary. Thank you so much and we're going to keep updated with this, and we'll probably check in with you again here next day or two because we want to kind of get a handle on this stock was Mike. Thanks. You Bet Secretary of Agriculture Mike Nag. Joining us today boy, Andy, that has a head scratcher. of You know you think you might know how they get a mailing list. But we have heard reports so like I say everywhere from California all the way to. Virginia. So I think twenty nine states maybe now on the. List that has been received. So this isn't what you call. Just your typical run of the mill mailing lists. These folks have gotten a hold of. So we'll talk markets coming up here on the big show. Nate, we need to find out what's going on Nathan. Fisher? By the way is the guy that we call nate and he's the fellow that follows weather for us as well. He also pushes all the buttons out there and he has tremendous ability to make us sound real bad if he wants to. So we we thank him for not doing that. For. Even, if he feels like it so. Again. Thanks for what you do for us here on the big show, we need to take a look at what's going on with whether though and the soybean belt. We talk about, of course, stretches from the DAKOTAS through Minnesota all the way down to the Delta, week pretty much got a handle on what's going on here in the Upper Midwest. What's going on the southern part? Talking about the Delta region assure seeing some heavier rain across Missouri. This week, and that's going to stretch down into the Delta right now, seeing heavier showers move across northern and central Arkansas, another band coming through into. into the state here in the next couple of hours, and they will have scattered showers of rain expected all the way into the weekend, some of those heavy at times more in the northern areas of the Mississippi Delta against stretching down from the system's going through Missouri and even stretching up here into southern Iowa here throughout this week with. Yes. Isolated showers expected all the way into the weekend temperatures there near normal all the way until Friday, then dropping down to just near to below normal over the weekend starting into next week back up to normal by the end of next week in the Mississippi. Delta? Bob. Yeah and you know that that rainfall. Looks like we may get brushed up against it in. Southern. Iowa. We'll take. We'll take that thinking back to this past weekend. We did pick up some some fairly decent rain we're, and we're grateful for we needed it in sections of southern I. We need a lot of sections state of Iowa. So splash water would not hurt most places. Now, there's some folks that are sitting on a lot more water than others, but for the most part, we could certainly use rainfall and it's nice. We have had a cool down a little bit in temperatures anywhere as we're moving through pollination season pass pollination season for the most part in Ohio fields going to talk with the folks from BASF BASF. Wednesday were celebrating coming up on the big show. Twelve, thirty, five on the Wednesday. Big Show. And I say Wednesday. Because it is be a SF Wednesday with US and mark store is on the telephone line with us. Mark B ASF started off on our Wednesday agronomy talk back in April. You took us through planning time. You took us through the early growth stages in through pollination also into Fund aside treatment time. So big thank you to the folks from BASF. Let's talk about what's going on right now, kind of fly a fifty thousand feet. What's things looking like in your neck of the woods? With a look, really good right here in Story County in Nevada. So we've been very very fortunate here, but you don't have to go too far west to me, and that's when the draft kicks in. So we still have that pocket and West Central Iowa that continues to grow. And Last night, check. Bob. senator grow, really good corn. You need a minimum of about. Anywhere from nineteen to twenty, three inches of rain are a water. I should say realizing that half of that can come from the subsoil, but we've been We've been really parched in some of these areas of the state so. Could definitely putting on things. and. General, crop, development. Market, it looks like in some areas were as much as what eight ten days ahead of where we normally are. I think we did do do catch up I made didn't help us out. We did plant timely. But. We kind of You know we're spinning our wheels there for a lot of May when we didn't get the growth degree days. But then we've had some excellent growing conditions after that or we're just again shorter rain and some of these areas. But I guess the benefit, the good side as we did have a full tank going into the season. So you know we know a good soils can hold up to about two inches of water per. So again that top five foot can provide ten inches of rain. The growing season. That early planted corn was allowed to return deep. So it's made use of that and so It's to tap the profile out, and we're at the point where we're going to need some time, raise finish off, but it's going be I. think a big balance some really really good yields and some disappointing yields in some areas. It just Kinda depends on how mother nature treats us from this on this time out. But the good side looks like some cooler temperatures imminent. Maybe we're GONNA shower tonight. We'll take that and we'll take the cooler temperatures as well. Hey, we're seeing some planes flying out there. fungicide application. What are you saying? Well. A Lotta guys wrapping up soybeans. That's really kind of the key time. I think on beans. If you're applying a full refund, your side the generally the bang for the buck is that at are three timing we basically say our to our four. But if I had to pick a specific timing, I'd say are three and a lot of our beans are right there. Now a stage beans last week, and they were just closing in on our three and I think that's a pretty common staged throughout at least a lot of central Iowa and against Northern Iowa. Maybe some areas of southern whether they're pushing a little further along than that. But. Generally, you know we're trying to prevent for from late season, diseases. Spot is creeping in some areas. It's story. Brown spot is here every year, and so those are diseases that we don't normally think of diseases is being you know causing catastrophic losses in Iowa, but they do add up and that's where we see a benefit of the fully fund side where it's not uncommon with products like Valentim to get that five Bush perimeter yield increase or rep attack or or or for that matter. So A, lot of good products. Hey, any anytime we can. Get more yield right now is is big time stuff. So what you're talking about real important Sydney tar spot in your neck of the woods. I haven't found any in in the corner Ben in Then monitoring our research plots and story city we do have A. Continuous corn there. We inoculated for some disease and we've seen a fairly good take on northern corn leaf blight I. Know in Eastern Iowa. There's been a lot of talk about grief spot kicking off there as well. So that's normal. Bob Anytime, we start to see corn tassell out We're generally going to run the conditions like we've. We're going to have some heavier news in the evening, we get a little cooler evening temperatures, and you know something like northern currently white loves that sixty four to eighty degree temperature and You know six hours of a high relative humidity leaf wetness that's easy to happen overnight. grey leaf spot typically likes warmer. You know eighty degree range. So we get into those warmer nights. Again, it requires a lot of humidity. So do is come into play there and make the plant susceptible, but realizing the plants could be infected. It's. Inoculation takes a couple of weeks before anything shows up, and so that's why we like to make those funders had applications preventatively to prove to keep those diseases from attacking the corn altogether. Hey Mark. Got About thirty seconds. Left here in our visit today look on your radar screen. What do you think we ought to be talking about looking for the next couple of weeks? keep an eye on the bugs. You know right now we should be passed foundation for most of our corn. So you don't really worry about cutting anymore, but definitely keep an eye on the beans. We've got a lot of That's caterpillars. numbers have increased in some areas of the state Japanese beetles continuing to feed as well. remember looking at twenty percent. At least after flowering of soybeans. Before we consider being a treatment levels while mark, sure have Look forward to our visits on Wednesdays. Thanks. A LOT OF FOLKS BASF. We'll be talking to you again. All right. Thanks. Bye. Have a good one. You Bet that is mark store mark wraps up our series with folks from BASF, SF Wednesdays. We started Andy Way back it planning time with these folks, and they got us all the way through pollination. How about that? Well, we need to take a look at what's going on three big things. We need to know being brought to you by your Iowa soybean farmer. Volunteers needed for the twenty twenty special edition, Iowa State Fair, which is right around the corner. Actually starts a week from tomorrow goes three weekends in. Showcasing the superior showmanship, hard work and determination of Iowa's four H. INTO FFA youth. Now, this special edition will follow all Iowa Department of Public Health. CDC Recommendations for social distancing in Washington in sanitation, and they are in need of some help whether that be ticket takers, admission help traffic directors, or even help in the cookie. The. Those famous Barksdale Cookies, get signed up on the big show website and find a link at whol radio, DOT COM or W. MT radio DOT com hover over menu icon and click on the big show. Looking for fairness in the markets, talk a lot about that when it comes to capital markets that our friends at the Aba cattlemen's association going on right now. But milk market also American Farm Bureau Chief Economist. John Newton says that farm bureau has been looking at this a year long study or review by working group, and he says they've got some changes that need to be made in order to increase that fairness in the market are voting. Voting delegates is pass January adopted many of those policies including giving farmers, an opportunity to test and the individual, a confidential ballot improving the price discovery in milk pricing formulas improve the risk sharing between processors and dairy farmers, and then more uniformity in how milk pricing and pulling provision operate around the Kim. Federal Milk Marketing Orders. Now, he does say that there are several issues outside of the twenty eighteen. Farmville, some covid related some others that Continue to provide challenges and require. Some. Policy updates. Unique situation to a certain extent. Unsolicited seeds from. China. Showing up in mailboxes, not only across the state of Iowa. Across the country I was secretary of Egg. Mike. Nag telling the big show just a little bit ago that if you receive one of these things, they need a phone, call us open it certainly not to planet not to try and destroy it because nobody knows what those seeds are at this point. He says just get in touch with the Department of AG and they will handle pick up and destruction of those particular seeds. At this point, he says, they're leaning towards this being somewhat of an economic scam for people trying to increase their online approval and sell more products. But again, the investigation is ongoing. You can hear the full conversation with Mike in podcast form on the big show website to twelve forty four now on the big show clock, and those are the three big. Twelve fifty here on the big show clock young, Andrew, we are winding up another day and in central Iowa southern. We're starting to see some puffy clouds start to form a little bit Those look like they may grow into some rain now that Maybe just my. Hopeful wishful thinking on that, but we might. Might be able to squeeze a couple drops rain out as interesting. We're talk with. Mark Store there, and he said that you know some areas of the state. Are Eight to ten inches. Short I. Believe if you look at the records that in central I, we are probably seven eight inches short on rain, but some of us have been getting just in time rainfall I. I. would say that the crops south central looks really good. Remarkably good. In fact, the amount of water we've had just been spread seemed like at the right time. Yeah. What was making sense saying a little? Crooked deal going on here. What unfair connection in? Madison? County. Thought. You WANNA share why we'd be fine with that I. Know a lot about her until that. Same. Did Mark, Mark Takeover Dallas. Your favorite. Shows choose moving along pretty good. Then she had mentioned that part of other Madison County that maybe had been luckier than others and it's no, it's no secret to you live. Right? Eat the right things. Good things. Happen to you see and know we have been lucky with some rainfall though and like I say it's been just in time just things start to curl up a little bit with with that I, WanNa mention again as well. That, we are planning a special vacation towards end of the year November seventh through the Thirteenth and the folks from holiday vacations are teaming up with myself an here, the big show to Iceland, and you say Iceland in November. What are you thinking about? Well, it's actually a pretty good time of the year to be there, and also one one of the things you wanna see. Were there the northern lights and there? There are a whole lot easier to see when it's starts to become wintertime. You See here in the Northern Hemisphere, these northern lights start lighten up and and we'll be able to see that and spent some time in the blue. Blue. Lagoon. You know and stay warm. Those naturally a heated springs there. So We'd love to have you long and again this is one of those things that I know the folks at. Hanalei. been working hard on and if anything should come up that you know things don't work out, they sure take care of their folks real well. So they need to worry about that. They'll. They'll be able to take care of you and they have some special guidelines to follow. You want to check it out at the with the folks that holiday vacations and if you look over their shoulder on their website and attend one of these Online travel shows you get a hundred dollar, a certificate towards trip coming up with holiday vacation. So thanks those guys, thanks. Dante. For three big things today for nate for keeping us on time and update on weather.

Iowa Mike Secretary Andy China Mike Nag Bob Megan Anderson Joe USDA Secretary of Agriculture Bob US John Newton FFA American Farm Bureau Mindy Williamson BASF
Ep105: It's Bigger than the Job Description

So, Here's My Story...

25:27 min | 1 year ago

Ep105: It's Bigger than the Job Description

"For many organizations for mine. I know in order to perceive, the value accurately, I've got to get input from other people in the organization. Business is messy and unpredictable, sometimes lonely so low. And inspiration can often come from really weird places. We pick up where the bullet point blogs and highlight reels. Leave off we start with stories. Welcome back to. So here's my story. I'm Jodi, can we have two quick, announcements one if you are anywhere in the area of Baltimore on July. Eighteenth, we are having our first annual or I ever numbers annual I ever. So here's my story. Happy hour, so details to be announced. We're not sure exactly where yet, but it will be July. Eighteenth roughly happy hour time of the day. So it's probably not gonna be ten in the morning. Isn't that when you start drinking will, but for everybody for audio I'm trying to read the room? Secondly, we as we said, last episode just a quick reminder. We want to hear your thoughts your feedback little things that you would have chimed in on the conversation if you around and your stories, if you have them, so you can either call or text. Colleen voicemail to our storyline, which is four one two zero five six zero five five or you can just record a little voice memo of any kind an emailed it to us at talk to us at. So here's my story dot com. Okay, I'll forget, so we're going to talk about Jodi tells a story that I, I love it starts out with a performance review, which which I think listeners of the show know that, that we both find meaningful and cringe and all that stuff. And we delve into we start with word choice, but we really get into a conversation of the different things of value that people bring to an organization that may not quite be in their job description. So here's my story. There have been a number of conversations in the last month or two have reminded me of what is now has sterile story from my earlier career at the time, it was not very hysterical, as, as many stories to pass. So, so I was with I was with this is probably come up before, but I was with the architecture firm that I was with for sixteen years, give or take a little and over that time, a lot of things change we grew from, like, ten people to close to fifty my role kept changing, and, you know, now I know that's just who I am you I make things better. And then once they're kind of fixed and better than I need to move onto the next thing. And that was why state songs I got to try on all these different hats. And, and what I thought was very unique story to me. But now that I spend a lot of time with my fingers and other businesses. I actually hear this law, which is why I want wanted to bring it up. My role took this very like me shaped kind of shape. It was very unique to me, like take on things that were just sort of suited my skill set or whatever. And as I think, happens a lot of times, I, I had a sort of a job description of tangible things this checklist of like actions. I did. I don't know quite the right words, there were things. I did the doing of my job. That was very clear, then there was this whole other. Amorphous at almost like sort of the white of an egg like there was this very clear at yoke. That was my job description technically what I was hired to do or tasked with. And then there was this sort of, like oddly shaped, the white of the egg around of a fried egg of these things that were not in my job description, never would be a job description, but yet everyone valued them, not just me. It's not like I made them up, but they were this more amorphous kinds of things that nobody knew what to call. I didn't really have a title for a long time to say that this is a theme that runs through your entire professional career because you have a hard time describing what you do now. That's not as much not as much different episode. So this is a time where everybody knew that there was this joke that I was like didn't have a title, she who doesn't have a title 'cause they couldn't name it. But so this all. Team to pass in this review. And one of the principals at the time a review the principal's performance or once a year kind of talk about what you're doing or whatever. And the funny thing about this is I knew he valued the work that I did. But this was just kind of person, he's one of those people that you have to brace yourself because the way the words come out sometimes can be painful and a little like, oh my God. So what he said, was really putting me at ease something to the effect of what exactly is it that you do? Nice. It's always. I was like, I'm sorry. I'm sorry. What? And then he tried to clear it up tried to make it better. And he said, it's just that it seems like a lot of what you do is superfluous while so. Precision that gets branded on your brain, not years later. He and I have joked about this many, many times, he swears that he did not use the word superfluous. And I was like, oh, yes. No, no. I remember going back to my desk, and that word was like branded in my brain. So we'll never every time I hear that word I'm like, like internal shutter. And interestingly, every all the other principals of the table, kind of jumped in, when he said that in horror, and they're like, no, I mean, we value, the things, and he goes, oh, of course, we value him. But just and his point was, and this one's going to get to there. There was this whole like morpheus. I didn't want to call it a skill set, because they were so hard to like name and put your finger on that everyone. Agreed including him had enormous value to the firm, but they weren't things you would hire someone for and in this case. And what's interesting is where I've seen this come up a lot is the same same kind of powder with somebody, but where it came up a couple of weeks ago was someone for whom that the F yoke, the checklist of the job that somebody was hired to do. They were actually kinda crappy at that part of it. And they, they kind of wanted there like I could get somebody better probably less money, but they were hesitant to get. Rid of them, because this person the white of this person's egg white around it. Whatever you call that. That amorphous part the circle around. It was so valuable that I didn't know how I'd find somebody else who could do those things. And I need those things that is fascinating to me that there, I think it happens. A lot probably where there are sort of like the job description, he's like a checklist to me. Don't think dunk done. That's often like I could find other people to do that thing. But then there's this like weird amorphous glue that people bring or sometimes it's a cultural like an something they bring to the culture. Or maybe it's in my case, it was what ended up being a lot of what I do now, sort of the facilitation of the leadership team use the coaching the sort of like paying attention to the culture, and the people and all that stuff was kind of weird inbetween random projects of their other things besides those, but it does remind me of certain of the sport shows, I listened to they come up with their for could be NBA could be hockey could be whatever but they have they're all glue team. And they, they identify these athletes who they don't fill the statue sheet with you. The highest scores or the this, or that, whatever it is. But they just they make things better by being there. And it reminds me there is, as you know, I, I went to Duke basketball fan, and there, we just lost half of our listenership. But there was a guy named Shane Batty on duke's championship teams back in the nineties, and he had a good NBA career. And I remember commentators talking about him because they would say, you know, he's not the best score and he's not the best this and he's not the best that, but the thing about Shane is every team. He's on winds. And he was interviewed I was listening to him. And he's he was very smart. Great student of the game. And he would break down he was talking about going against some of the greats like LeBron or something. And he realized that, well, this person is just not really as good as the if he has to go to his. Right. And so he would know these little things and he would just he wouldn't block the shops. You wouldn't steal the ball, but he would just make it. So his team has a much better shot of being successful adjusting certain little things he can see a weird thing. And he positioned himself to make everybody around him better on the opposition, and that to me, I know it's that says what I'm hearing really? It's really interesting. I, I mean it feels weird to like take it back to talking about me, but that's sort of what like in my years, there that is sort of what it felt like felt like I was good at making everybody else better. And but, but in weird in different ways that, you know, sometimes look like a spreadsheet sometime looked like a hard conversation. I mean it was that's why it was so hard to put in a box is like some, what was left brain right, brain summit was this, and, but it all came back to, to that kind of leg seeing things that other people didn't see or didn't care to put energy into and making the better so that things got easier and smoother and better. Do you remember you'll be f? Now. Okay. So, so, yeah, we're going to have to get into this Christie, Cade older than me. So just so this, obviously, came from Missouri ten years, but. So Kristie BASF classic ATs. And what, what they said, was, we don't make the tires, we make tires idea better, and it would have other examples. Probably one of the engines, we make the engines run cleaner. And so they were really describing that niche. You can't even say what they did in essence. But, you know the effect of what they did. Here's my I wanted to bring this topic up because every time it comes up. I mean, even just now when you were describing that guy, the, by the time you get to the end of the story. Thank you. I'm just gonna call him back. I should coming that guy even when you're describing it I was a managing even him hearing this even knowing that he's highly value person who the teams he's on wins like it's such a high thing, but having to hear you know he's not the greatest this, he's not the greatest did Maddie's. He's kind of mediocre is pretty good looking, but he's got this thing. And it's. This after. And that's what was so interesting. Is that the reason because I would go back to that, that review I was sitting in that particular principle. I know for fact he valued me immensely. But what he the reason it came out the way it did was that he was feeling almost it. These are way too strong words. But like almost guilty for valuing this amorphous undescribable like tough to put in a box kind of thing. And that's what I see happen all the time. And so it there are two conversations here stick with that sort of a checklist kind of thing. It's very different if somebody's good at the job they're doing. And they also bring this other, that's I mean this guy the Shane what's his name. Not going to remember it to stop saying. I just remember, it's got a lot of constants. He was competent enough. I mean, they wouldn't have kept him around for another stone if he was like a klutz or whatever. So like competent enough. So there's a continuum of this conversation changes about how much you can put, you know, invest in that amorphous bit that surrounded if the person's completely crap at their job than it has. Although, but those are some of the conversations I've had though, like there have been times where somebody is bad at what they do. But the thing that they bring that feels irreplaceable, I could I could never find somebody who brings that level of trust or whatever for that thing this thing that I need. And so it's still worth it to me, and it's, it's just fascinating. I think that there's a part of the job that feels like take tabby stick and slaughter, you could probably find anybody to do certain things. And for me the way that all panned out was over time the things that were actually my job description, like the gum lost it. That's that. I'm lost its flavor for me. And I was so and I ended up taking all that egg way. And that's now the business that I do like that is what I go and do. And that is the value that I bring outside of it, and I left those other things behind, but, but it doesn't always work that way. I think what he was what he was really getting to is one of the issues that I see with a rigid job description, and maybe in his mind he had a rigid job scripture for what you, you're supposed to be in his mind. And then you start describing people in the negative, like, well, she doesn't do that, and he's not the best at this, and she doesn't do this. Okay. So what is it because all you're doing is you're using some, some description in your head, whether it's a job description of formal, John description, or just what's in your head, as a reference point, and then all the a joke that may be incredibly valuable outside can only be defined in the negative. Well, it's not really what she was hired for the yellow part, though. White whatever metaphor. Shame. So all the Hague light is, is just. Well, it's not, not this year's it's fascinating. Stick with Shane Shane guy that his his. Stop it. His the skill set. The had was like an. To me. It's almost like if you have that goose that lays, golden eggs. They, they have the skill set that they wouldn't have necessarily asked for you. Didn't even know thing. It's almost it's not magic but it sort of feels like magic like we wouldn't be able to go. Hire a guy to do what he does this thing. That's like whoa. I didn't know that was a thing. And so it has enormous value. And yet it be like describing this goose that lays golden eggs, starting with, well, you know, she's not great, applying flying, and makes a little tough. But why can't it's interesting business at there are these things that when you find that a person who has these kind of magic qualities that, that are different that don't fit on a sheet really? Well, then why is there such hesitation to just value that I think part of it is that those things don't typically go together until fulltime job didn't spend all day long doing those things you have to have some sort of other value, I guess, but pardon me wants. Say why like part of it is not just I think whether or not it's a fulltime job. I think part of it is also that it doesn't fit in the system. You know, if you if you have a process, where you've hired people for x and you're going to have to evaluate people to determine how well they do that for, which they've been hired you're gonna have to figure out how well they do axe. And because, you know, X fits into your whole organization, chart, whatever, well, the more rigid your process. The more unforgiving, your process, the less room leaves for the white the less room, it leaves for people who stray outside and really discover what their gift to this organization is right? And just imagine the way that you framed it if if the whole point of the team is to win and you've got a guy who in ways you don't quite understand when he's on a team they win. Do you really need him to, like check the but I mean, that's sort of rigid thing like if you had rules in place where? All you have to, you know to be on this team. You have to make X amount of baskets, you have to be able to do this, and he's falling short on those things. If you're so rigid that you let them go. You're missing to me. It's the whole forest trees thing to, like, if, if having this person around helps us win do I really have to hold them like? Books, huge value that on its in its own mayor. I mean that's a huge part of it because you can say, yes, we wanna win. But if you say we're only going to win if we make fifty seven percent of our three point shots, then you're looking at everybody against that standard. Not great three point shooter, so we're not gonna have you so in, in my world, there's an orthodoxy about hiring lawyers. Once you hire a lawyer if they've got a certain amount of seniority, if they've gotten five or six years, ten years whenever they not only have to be good lawyers. But now they have to be great at business development. And if they're not good at business development, and they don't have their own practice and we're going to have to let them go eventually because we need in order to win in order for our firm to p successful. We need the lawyers to be good at business film. And, and we've talked about this, and it's a self evident point that not everybody is great at business development. We have lawyers here who are fabulous lawyers. They are great at what they do, but they're not networking, people that sell what they want, and it doesn't make that problem. Away that you need the business development. But it just means that, that's not the only way to solve it having everyone also be a good business element like be great if it works that way, hats off, but there are other ways to, to meet that need that don't have to look like that. The other place this shows up that I think, is so interesting. Is that all this egg way that we're talking about is never easily put on a resume for that person at the next place? So, you know, you could be looking at somebody, and that resume or the ask them certain kinds of questions, you're only going to hear about that Eggy. Okay. Job description easily definable part, and finding ways to capture that thing because I think a lot need these magic skills as much as they need. If not more than they need some of the check the box skill sets, but it's it's tough to define them. It's certainly tough to hire for them. And a lot of these cases, I don't even know that, you know, you need that thing until it's there. But I think once it is there, I think there should be less guilt around valuing. It. And keeping it and cutting the suit to fit the cloth around that thing if, if, especially if it falls into a category of leg. Gosh, when this guy's on a team we win. No. And that's true. But when you're talking about the resume where my mind naturally goes is also the personal development so that when I was looking at continuing education and things that I want the people in my firm to get better at into develop skills in it's very easy for me to find continuing education opportunities for them in that a yoke sphere in their job description. Yes. But there's certain people that I've worked with who are incredibly gifted, not necessarily at, let's say their job was in accounting or whatever they did fine. But what they were really good at is spotting holes in the whole process. More in making things more efficient. Well, it's harder to find professional development opportunities are continuing education on. I know you have. This gift. I wanna get you better at what you really enjoy what you're good at. So let's find something that trains you better in finding holes in processes, and making them more efficient. I was just thinking, like Harry Potter kind of sort of like this Hogwarts school of leg. It's not the normal school. It doesn't. It's not like go take those classes at the local community college. They are these off the wall, not easily defined skills. My friend, Lisa bowls. Has this great way, the first time I saw her speak, and I may have mentioned this before on the show? But first time I saw her speak. She was talking about the word weird and that the word weird originally is derived from and I might get this. I think it's Celtic. I can't remember which exact language it comes back to I think it's Celtic in. It's w y RD, and it, it actually translates back to something meetings, destiny and her whole concept and everything that she does is what makes you weird is like, what you're here to do. And that. The things that you see that others can't is your like magic sauce thing. You're bringing to the world and it just I am so often struck by how bad we are because we do need things to be systematized. We do need to be clear, roles and responsibilities. I when there are not clear, roles and responsibilities. All sorts of other problems happening organization. So that is true and equally. True is that if you can find the ways to bring out people's magic sauce, and, and it's a magic sauce that you need in your organization, and nurture that and even just maybe it's not a continuing education. Maybe it's just more space and permission to spend time doing those things. I mean much to the credit of, of the architecture from the reason I stayed was they allowed me to keep putting on different hats and try on new things and they allowed me to allow me the space to make things better. And they never gotten my way, mainly because they wanted to just go architects, our out, great. But I was I was given the space to, to flex those muscles and develop those skills. And I think there's, there's a lot of there's a lot of value in that there's a lot of value in the but one of the things that I think is important is that for many organizations for mine. I know in order to perceive, the value accurately, I've gotta get input from other people in the organization. In other words, I've got a talk to people because I might not see everything that x person is doing that makes G center for everybody. And so, I have to have a culture, I have to have a culture of communication conversations where it comes to my attention as the owner that, hey, you know, this is getting done because so, and so was able to do that or jeez. I'm glad that. So, and so is here to do it because I never would've thought of that, and to have those conversations in the hallways. You know where it's not just in the conference room with an agenda, but you have those kind of discussions, and you, you are able to take the temperature. Of your entire team had, I think that's were for me personally. That's where I've learned, I had no idea she was doing that time. It's funny I do this. I made it up on the spot. This one time it has become one of my most repeated facilitated conversations for team. You can't do it for like twenty people. But, but any smallish size, teen, you can do it for, and I use those vertical flip chart pages. Straw, wine across the middle. So there's a top to bottom and above the line is anything that, that person is amazing at doing it. It's their superpower and things that they can do that. Nobody else can doing things they love doing and below the line is stuff that, you know, if it was possible, they would never have to do again and stuff they hate doing maybe stuff, they're bad at doing revoke doing whatever I have them fill out that list. And then I have the other people on the team. Chime in on like, yes, I know you're fine doing XYZ, but that is waste of your talent. Somebody else could do that. And it's I don't think that's a good use of your time. And that kind of goes to the bottom bar versus and what almost always comes out is. When when we talk about, what is this person? Superpower. What is what is it the thing that they can do that? Nobody else can do. That's like so unique to them often these are the kinds of things like they'll say things like you're the person that I come to when I'm not sure the right thing to do. And I can just tell you a couple of things, and, and you just have some sort of insight or like you make things clear for me. So I can keep moving. I don't get bogged down rain. Often the person is shocked to hear. It's really interesting. This just goes back to another thing. I believe it is a lot easier for people to like this is not what people think, but this is the truth. It is a lot easier to get people to sit still to hear where their weaknesses are, and what they're bad at than it is to get them to sit still and take in. And I just what they're really good at doing hit those. I know you your, your skin is already boilers across through. And so getting them to sit still it's often very motion thing for people to hear what is valued about them. And what is so uniquely them? And it's, it's a fascinating, you, I wish it was easier to do with, like twenty people. There's just too much time. But even small teams to hear from other people like this is this is why this is what I value about you, and it often brings out some of those like harder to describe, but really important key things that people bring to the table does, and as cringes those conversations and the reason that we don't have them often enough. Is because I think they are very difficult to go through. I know for me they, they are very difficult, but they do highlight some of the greatest possibilities in your organization. You can't just eat eggs. So that's our story, but the discussion doesn't have to end here, does not actually don't want it to know. We don't that is why we actually have our private Facebook group, which we started to make sure that we could get your comments. Your rants, your thoughts stories, your stories can find links to that group as well as show notes and links to subscribe, the Email and how to find us just about anywhere you can possibly find podcasts at. So here's my story dot com, and you can also find us on Facebook and Twitter at this H podcast. And since we know it takes a village. We'd like to thank our village are super talented incredibly patient team usually snorkeling in the best of win waste Marcos, good mockery, so huge show to the people who actually help us producer show. I are sound engineer Tom Hansen, thanks Christie Shamir for our brilliant show notes, and all the other fantastic writing she does for us to Taylor math or for doing. Just a little bit of everything, including wrangling us, including, which is no small feat. This is Jody Hume. And you've been listening to, so here's my story.

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HR, Performance, & Attention to Detail with Chris Denny #33

The HR L&D Podcas

37:21 min | Last month

HR, Performance, & Attention to Detail with Chris Denny #33

"Okay, we identify the mistakes we have now what kind of systems can we put in place to automate attention to detail to remove the human error and put it into a system. It could be something as complicated as long as she Nuri or the way Machinery works retooling. It could be as simple as let's increase the font size and the instructions or the checklist. It could be that you just need a process in place. You know, sometimes people rely on knowledge they say well we have good people in place and they can check the system or they can review the papers or documents or whatever and they will knock out that error, but if you can apply a template or a checklist or some system maybe software is needed. You can reduce that to a greater degree and save everyone a lot of time and headache. Welcome to the heck. LED podcast with your host Nick day CEO and founder of JGA recruitment specialist HR recruiters tuning into the h r l MD podcast will help you to discover strategic growth Concepts leadership development strategies and the values and behaviors that drive organizational change and success together. Let's Empower our workforces diversify our thinking and Achieve significant success. Hello and welcome back to the HR lnd podcast. My name is Nick. A CEO of JGA recruitment a specialist HR recruitment firm and I am also the host of this great podcast, which is where you find me right now. You can of course off find a child Andy podcast on iTunes on Spotify and of course on our very own website JGA recruitment., as well as across all other major Global podcast channels. Yep. If you haven't done so already please do share it with your HR friends your HR colleagues hit that subscribe option. So you never miss a future episode and if you're feeling super generous and you love the show, please please leave us a review be hugely appreciated. So, where are we today? Well today I am joined by Chris Denney who is founder of attention to detail. Com there. He delivers training workshops to help employees and teams improve by reducing mistakes improving task accuracy and improving overall productivity. He's also researcher a trainer and author and a thousand and he joins me today from across the pond in Littleton, Colorado. I think it's early morning over there while it's the afternoon here. I mean Chris is not running his business or spending time with his family. He's touching attention to detail or working with individuals and organizations to become more detail orientated now working with private companies government organizations and even providing one-to-one coaching for how long Value employees. Chris has developed a system which I want to explore in great detail today. He creates over six years ago following six years of research hundreds of surveys and dozens of discussions wage all centered around improving performance with an attention to detail something. I could definitely take something away from for sure. It's great system, right to talk about it more detail song. Chris welcome, how you feeling? Hey, thank you so much for having me. I feel great. Yeah, it's nice morning here. Let's start at the beginning. How did you arrive at specializing in improving such a specific area in Rome into attention to detail sure. It was kind of by accident. Honestly. I have been a business owner since about 2008 and somewhere in the 2010-11 timeframe. I had an employee who was technically wonderful mean just fantastic, but he couldn't produce client ready work and you know, it's what I labeled lack of attention to detail and so I look pale I looked for something to help them improve, you know book something and I couldn't find it and that just that just nagged at me and he really a technically strong guy off. So I wanted to invest in him. So I thought well I'll make something myself and I thought it would take an evening and I would make a worksheet or you know, a checklist or something and it just didn't. Work that way, you know given the topic you really want to get it right or at least I did and I kind of went down the rabbit hole. So to speak to the point that I mean after several months. My wife was she was really asking me what is what is this thing you're doing in the evenings? You know, what what's what's this attention to detail thing. I started researching it and I was kind of posting some things online and and a year or so in love with I actually got some calls and companies would say hey, will you come teach this and and I I rejected it because I was just doing my own thing. I was just researching and studying. It was a kind of a hobby after a while and I got enough of those and I realized wow people people want this and then six years later after I mean I even spoke on it, but just for fun and to get feedback and I did hundreds of surveys and silly amounts of Library time, like actual old school libraries, you know going to the local universities and yeah see after six years. I I just had this system and then someone just home. And to call and they said hey, will you come present this for our company was it was a large tech company security company and I said I'd love to but I need a month because you know, I'm not I didn't divorce isn't it? I just did it for fun. And so that's how that's how I got into it. That's how that's how it started. I they loved it and I loved doing it. And so so here we are amazing amazing, I guess as well. I mean this is me looking at life in a different way, but I guess you can't really launch a business as you know, all around attention for detail to these unless you yourself have given it absolute attention to detail in its own creation, right so I could not totally understand when it comes to this kind of subject. Why? Okay, you went down a rabbit hole will also why it's so important that you do because you know, the one thing you don't want to be short on is being, you know, your attention to detail within your own business, right and then your own knowledge and your own research and it sounds like you you've done that to a really high detailed level which is fantastic. So using this then in a in a trial indeed context Can people really improve their attention to details I worked and I recruit lots of people at the minute and I would say sometimes some people just have it and some people just don't and teaching it's like some squash you can teach but some attitudes you can't so is it a skill is it an attitude thing? Is it something you're born with? What's your what is your experience tell you? Yeah, so it is teachable. Of course. It's like anything but some people are going to be naturally better at it than others for for whatever reason it's sort of a nature versus nurture thing. Right? It's some part of it is how people were raised what job they ended up having what sort of tasks with what their parents made them do when they were young but I think that the way people used to think of leadership, you know, it's a very are you born with it or can you develop that sort of thing? And now we know that God it's like what I just set some people seem to have it naturally other people can develop it and it may take six months for some people and a lifetime for others, but it can be developed wage. You can improve it across the board and everyone. I truly believe that but it's just like the leadership thing and there's a system and and you mentioned attitude and there's a certain attitude component but it's what I call one of the five fundamental elements, but it's not attitude like hey stay positive and and that sort of thing. It's there's a bit more to it. So, why would you start then? I'm not ever going to go into the system itself in more detail, but for the lane for someone like myself who and also sometimes it's difficult to recognize because individually, we probably think we have it in sometimes this is the kind of skill where others will point out that you don't well, you know, I'll forget my keys all the time and consider myself forgetful. My wife would certainly save and the most forgetful person she knows so we often have a different version of ourselves to how other people see us and this is a skill element I guess or training element that I couldn't really come across before discovering your book and discovering your system. So it was quite new to me that this was even being trained as a skill and maybe you're the first but where does someone start with this wage? Do you start to identify where there's an attention to detail? Skill gap for example. Does it come from from a manager? Does it come internally? What what's been your experience with? Yeah, I would say most of my individual clients come to me because the issue has been identified by a manager or some Superior. And typically the root of it is that we need to start with the understand that there are three types of attention to detail and a lot of times the concept is used in such a general and Broadway and that's where the frustration comes from because people just a be more detail oriented pay more attention to detail but people have different perceptions of it and it is applied in different ways. So there are three types there is additive analytical and contraction and I kind of went top to bottom there but some people are naturally contrastive detail-oriented. So this is what we usually think of with engineers and maybe Accountants, you know, that's that's sort of the stereotypical people. They they really need to get every little piece right because by getting the little piece right, you know, that's how you get the bottom line. Correct, but there are some people who are going to be more typically more creative and they're better at at it to the attention to detail and that's where you're creating something new you're being Innovative that might be a project coordinator off or an event planner someone who's creating something new and each of those people are detail oriented in their own way, but they'll kind of have conflict if they're working on a project and one will think the other is not detail-oriented because they just don't one doesn't see maybe the big picture in a certain way or the the different parts fall into place. The other one doesn't care that there's an inaccurate number. It's just okay as long as that gets done. It doesn't matter if it's 7 or 17, you know, it doesn't it doesn't really matter. And so that's where a lot of this comes from and so we watch Start with that basis that foundation and we work from there. We make sure that that that's understood and we can label it and then go from there how much how much does the tents to detail relate to long-term relations? So in we talked about attitude briefly we talked about skills in more detail already, but from my perspective always find that I will give something more attention to detail if it's something I'm passionate about something that I you know, I'm desperately have a an emotional attachment to that. I want to succeed. Whereas if it's a task that I don't really believe in I know I have to do it because I've been you know order to do it by by bossel, you know, what life might be but I think there's more risk can be making an error if I'm not emotionally attached to it. It does that fall under one of those three categories is you know, is that where the skill can sort of bridge the gap with with Adam chewed. What was your what is your your experience tell you? Yeah, that's for the way you're asking it is is really a fantastic way to be asking it. So there are five fundamental elements. There's Focus interest dead. Which is what you just asked about the motivation component, but it's more of an intrinsic interest. So Focus interest knowledge systems and attitude and the funny thing is they all go together are all interconnected. So when we talk about interest like you just said there are some things you are just naturally more interested in doing or there is interest because of some obligation or birth of some type of criticality. So for example, an engineer, let's say an aerospace engineer. They need to get the numbers right because it's going to go to another level of review and if the numbers are incorrect and it's going to come back and of course the entire system of review is set up in in Aerospace because people can die if things aren't done properly right or with building a bridge. So it's very critical to get it done properly. Sometimes it's their obligation, you know, it could be as simple as you said you would do it you're going to do it you're going to do it properly on the other hand. There can be a total lack of interest and we all have components of our jobs. Ask that we just don't like we don't care about but we have to develop the interest somehow now we can offset that interest with Attitude maybe and by attitude I call it's more specifically right or wrong attitude know it's it's you have to develop a a Clarity of what is right and what is wrong so that you can just know what you're there to do. And also of course just understand why you are and that's where interesting attitude going together and then you can you can apply a system and the system can make up for some of that lack of Interest by essentially automating attention to detail in a meeting some accuracy in there. So they're they're all connected in in a big way. So that makes sense. It's give me a good visual picture of how that works depending on the kind of task. I might be considering but so far less then Chris. Can you share something from the system that you've developed or from the processes you use that? They consult take away they can sort of understand. Yeah, absolutely. So again off Always start with that Foundation. There are three types of attention to detail in that needs to be understood because again, we we so often just say be more detail oriented or whatever. So once you can apply for that, you always want to work backwards if you're dealing with an additive or an analytical type of attention to detail you want to break it down into its individual components and that's what contrasting pulled up contrast of attention to detail is about identifying the individual elements of an issue a challenge and equation and making sure those are correct and then you can build upon those for an analytical solution from a political challenges you can develop additive and I know it sounds very general. So an example of analytical would be something with multiple Solutions. So let's say you're trying to figure out the best strategy for sales in 2021 right there. There are 17 different ways. You can log Or five hundred different ways you can you can do that there. There are two hundred best Solutions and you need to figure out the one that works best for you. And so you break everything down into it's contrastive elements you identify with any of those as you can and hopefully you apply some system some amount of knowledge and then you develop that analytical solution if you're trying to create something new then you get into add it and that is absolutely the most complicated. You're you're really trying to create something new which means there's not a system in place. It's it's hard to copy. It's hard to look for something else that you can write down back of now after after you identified which type or types of attention to detail you're working with and you can start applying the five fundamentals and that is where you get into typically people have a challenge they've identified with in their team or within an individual and that's where you say, okay, you know based on the types of mistakes being made the types of errors or where we want to be. These are the things we need to improve. You know, it's focused interest knowledge systems knowledge. For example, one of the most common things I see in in coaching and Consulting is, you know will approach the knowledge component because we just run through the system will wage approach the knowledge component and we realized that there hasn't been proper training put in place, you know, people are expected to do something. They don't really know how to do they were just kind of thrown in they missed training day. They you know, maybe they were hired three years after training or whatever that has to be applied. You can put all the systems in the world in place. But your your error rate is still going to be higher than you want it to be because there's a component missing there's a fundamental element in the office sure that makes sense. How much of it that is is are you mentioned all the different types which is kind of fulfillment for amazing things in my head here that try to make me understand it better. So how much of this is down to interpretation. So for example, I don't know if you remember I think it was a 1999 98th and all that when Tracey Emin did a you know, a controversial piece of artwork, which was an unmade bed when she put in the the tape mod. And you have some people who don't know much about art, you know looking at it and it's going or maybe that me myself going that's just an unmade bed. Right? That's you've got this. You know, you've got a van Gogh to the right which is a beautiful piece of art which has great loads of talent and you've got this unmade bed. I'm talking about trying to work out the creative element is this where some people could look at that from Tracey emin's perspective that's got a huge amount of attention to detail. It's probably got months and months of research and thought but for the untrained eye in that in that particular field that might look like something where there's been no attention to detail. Is that is that way you mean it could be quite complex from a creative side. Is that a good or bad example, I'm trying to get this white in my mind. Yeah. Sure. So to be honest, I don't get into art too much because of what you just said. There's so many ways that can be interpreted and frankly. Also, I'm not a specialist in our I have to say that you know, my lack of knowledge would would keep me from from commenting too much on that one. What I can say is that yeah, you would certainly be in the realm of additive attention to detail. You're creating something new you're trying to make people think in a new way. Typically the example of someone with additive attention to detail is Steve Jobs. I mean, he's he's like the ultimate example and there are so many stories around him. Right? So it's kind of easy to research him. His attitude of attention to detail was so awful Andheri basically that it was almost it was almost contrast of like in his mind there was only one solution whereas typically with additive attention to detail there are endless Solutions. So okay create a new project the world will like well for him, it was pick one, right? It was the iPod, you know first. So it was okay put ten thousand songs in your pocket and it has to be wonderful to hold and it has to be, you know, in his mind it was clear and I'm sure maddening for the people that worked with him because they were trying to get there right and so, you know, they were working on these analytical solution log. Well, what is he doing in his mind? It was it was like it's not right until until it's right. I mean until you give me the thing in my hand and that's what I've been talking about. It's it's not right that's good place to achieve. I mean there are you can Google him you can Google attention to detail and Steve Jobs and there are some very interesting stories about him because even at a contrast of level he was I don't know. I mean you might say on the Spectrum or something something like that, you know, he was something special but that creativity is absolutely the most complicated part. I mean, I rarely get clients or or even out phone calls about it because frankly most people are delving into that, you know, and it is a very different thing. So it's an innovation now that you say that plan so we can all reference TV package, which is a great example, I think and that I put stories they're not familiar with it. Definitely Google that if nothing else because it's an incredible story and and and and very, you know, he had a he had a dream and he made that happen. And as you say must be maddening for those around him If I'm an HR Manager, then I'm listening to this and I'm thinking you know what this is ringing true. I've got a team a brilliant team who I love and they're committed and all these things but in a certain individuals in that team or perhaps even get the whole organization who I feel could all improve a little bit more attention to detail with that in mind. How can you take how can HR manager or business take this off your concept and your system forward to really improve attention to detail across an entire team or an entire organization with with with a I guess improving performance being the the outcome looking to achieve as a result. Yeah sure. So it is a system and you can run down the system again, you know, I always start it is it's such a solid system and I always find myself having to go back to it. I'll get into a challenging client and I have to remind myself. Hey just go back to the system and you know, once you've identified the types of challenges you're dealing with because that's another thing off. I just that people will call and they'll say hey, we've had problems with mistakes with errors, you know with attention to detail and we have to dig into it so that they can label them more accurately because black people use the term attention to detail or detail oriented in such a broadly conceptual way and that's what gets frustrating for both the you know manager and the module or the or the team when they're being told to be more detail oriented. And so you start with that, you know, let's identify the specific things. We're trying to correct then you work on applying. Well also you need to see if different people on your team have different types of attention to detail dealing with for example, I currently have a coaching client a wonderful young lady who was brought on to a team of Engineers and they're on basically the quality control team, but she came from the new product development team where she was considered highly detail-oriented wage. And because they're trying to create new things they're being creative. And so she she had great ideas and brought in, you know, wonderful things to consider for new products. However, when she was suddenly thrown into a group of Engineers well now she's in coaching for attention to detail because they all said, well, you're not detail oriented, but they are so into metrics. It's just where they come from, you know, if you look at how Engineers are trained took pains, they deal with case studies constantly and what went wrong and they're always drilling down to find the smallest the smallest things that created the effect and so for her thoughts are bridging that Gap and sometimes you have to do that with individuals within within a team. So but but going from there once you kind of know what you know where everyone is it's not always that complicated but wage then you know, you work through the through the fundamentals you address things like Focus you can get into things like office layout you can get into well what kind of processes and procedures do we have in place is our Mission clear is the objective of this task clear. Have we made it clear? What right or wrong is at the completion of this task where this project it gets into a lot of things but you just have to be able to you apply the system you essentially work through the system. So can you can you tell us a bit more about what the system stages on a business you've mentioned the five fundamentals a couple of times but if we're assuming it's you say it's quite often. Do you want a bookstore by a little bit late as well which talks about it being quite a straightforward system. So what does that system entail? So let's look at a team level so, you know don't worry about individuals so much. We're trying every one to do it with those fundamentals. You make sure everyone understands the fundamentals and as individuals, they will all they all go through certain exercises. For example, they will identify the issue of mistakes. They make and the effects they see and that of course identifies it for themselves that identifies it within the team and then there are discussions around that and that gets everyone on the same page. On the dialogue in a way that isn't accusatory, right? So when you let's say you have 15 people on a team and five of them identify the same error. Well, then it's clear. This is something we should we should address we should discuss this because if five identified it in their top three, they're probably five others that could put it in their top five, you know, we're brought up in their top five. And so you open the dialogue about the kinds of things because there are so many little mistakes and errors that happen within a team that no one brings up. It's just that you know, someone sees it happening they're kind of annoyed and they don't realize that other people have the same challenge as well could be mistakes. They're making themselves. So we get everyone on the same page, then you work through those five fundamental elements. And this is where it gets a little bit challenging with an ongoing project because different people have different levels of all the five fundamentals you have You know, you can address training at a broad level and everyone can agree. Okay, we need more training on this topic. Okay, let's do that. You can then have the same sort of exercises in discussions around systems that we identify the mistakes we have now what kind of systems can we put in place to automate attention to detail to remove the human error and put it into a system. It could be something as complicated as new Machinery or the way Machinery works retooling. It could be as simple as let's increase the font size and the instructions or the checklist. It could be that you just need a process in place. You know, sometimes people rely on knowledge they say well we have good people in place and they can check the system or they can review the papers or documents or whatever and they will knock out that error, but if you can apply a template or a check list or some system maybe software is needed. You can reduce that to a greater degree and save everyone a lot of time and headache, you know the interest component. There are some tasks that is just starting off. Right, we'll we'll have those tasks and you know, so you can either delegate them. Maybe you can automate them through some sort of system. And then also you can develop interests. So it's not just about getting rid of a great. It's it's about developing interest and some people don't understand the importance of their role and I run across that every now and then where they will be people who don't see their place in the in the greater system. They don't they don't really understand why they're doing what they're doing and they're quite a few tasks like that, you know where you'll talk with someone there. Like, I don't know I have to do this every month and I don't know what the point of it is because they don't see that when they handed off to someone else, you know, the input it goes into another project or into a bigger weekly report that helps. I don't know the exact same get get moving on. So you help everyone understand their role and then there are other smaller ways to help people develop interest. I mean, you can liken it to developing culture, right? So we're all in this together here is our history. We started in you know, nineteen thirty-four with somebody and and so on and so forth and he developed that that sort of brand story and get everyone on the same team. What I do like to be clear about with interest though is that that's not motivation frankly when I first developed a system I use the word motivation and the difference is that interest is an intrinsic thing. It's it's within you you're you're actually interested in doing the task properly motivation is a little more external now, it has its place, you know, if you need the sales team to do better you can give them motivation or whatever. If you need to reduce ipv4 sure on this batch then everybody gets a happy hour if this is perfect, but that's that's temporary. It's not a lasting and built-in sort of thing. You know, I mentioned training earlier you had to make sure the training is there may be some tasks are not assigned to the right person. And then of course the system systems is typically where you will get the biggest dog. Impact the fastest not always but typically applying a system of some kind of or improving a system or making sure people know that the system exists because that happens sometimes you'll get somebody who's been working there for six months and they don't realize that there's a software system in place that can do what they've been struggling with. So that's I mean, that's really it it's just kind of difference for everyone. But but that is that is the system and you might want something more specific but that's why it's straightforward. You just run through, you know, you Identify and discuss those three types and then you run through the five fundamentals in a very thorough way and make sure you've addressed them all and it can be a little that part is where some people get stuck because they think of them as separate entities. They don't understand that you can offset lack of Interest by applying systems. You can improve focus by well developing interest, you know so dead. They all are so interconnected. Have you ever asked yourself? How can any recruiter understand my HR recruitment challenges. Please don't give up on your hiring challenges just yet here at HR recruitment wage appreciate the difficulties associated with attracting recruiting and retaining top Human Resources Talent. We also understand just how costly app or higher can be off HR recruitment would like to partner with you to help you overcome. Your hiring challenges contact us today on 01727 800-3776 recruitment to find out more. I think of now back to the team that whole organizational piece of any particular case studies which you can reference where you said, you know before before they got involved in the system. It was like brakes and then when they got involved in the attention to detail system with yourself, maybe you're doing the coaching directly you ended up with why any any kind of stories you can share you know, what's complicated about this is that almost everything is in a new one measures how the error rate of their people, you know, no one says well before we had ten and a hundred errors on this particular task and after implementing the system may have you know, 100 Erics? No one no one says that it's we're doing better overall. Morale improving is actually one of the bigger things. I am told that's one of the best best pieces of may I get I mean to me in internally, I just I love hearing that, you know, people just didn't enjoy it work a bit more because you don't have that frustration around. Oh, well, if only someone said would be more detail oriented or something else. One of the things I appreciate most is when I hear that people start implementing the system in sort of their daily morning meetings their daily practice page. BASF is is one that comes to mind where after we did trainings and we did we did back-to-back workshops with a lot of people at a one of their facilities and they have facilities around the world. But, so we applied it to one plant and they immediately started applying it throughout. I mean the chemistry using it the lab techs were using it as I understand it. They actually adjusted off a few of the parts that they use for taking samples from tanks after the training. So I just I just love that where they saw so many different ways to improve these little compact and that's that is a lot of what the workshops and training are about is helping people identify opportunities to to improve the system in a small way. It makes sense cuz I sent him a job. And you're giving them the tools to know how to identify to know how to improve but when you've done that workshopping you're not always there to see the the art, you know, the delivery of that data. So that makes total sense. So let me know show me a lot more now about you know, attempts detailed Solutions. We know a little bit more about your system. We know that your company and an individual that is supporting individuals companies government organization. Sometimes you help them stick Evers increased productivity improved quality and all of that, you know in a workshop type environment where they're kind of analyzing and try to understand where the areas are and they're coming up with those Solutions themselves, which is fantastic to me creative in that regard. So now that we've got that what's next for for you and attention to detail because going back to that rabbit hole analogy. He used earlier surely. There's there's no end to how far you can go with this would love to know where you're looking to take attempts to detail next. Yeah. Sure. So of course, I'm always researching. In fact, I've got a few papers in front of me. I was re-reading one of my favorite authors. With digs into error rates and it's probably mind-numbing for a lot of people but I love the topic but so I'm always improving the system in some way and I'm getting more in addition to Consulting. So going Beyond training which is a very come in kind of dropped the knowledge and then take off sort of thing getting into ongoing projects where we start with training. We identify the challenges and then I help carry the solutions through and that's a lot of fun. So, I mean just just so much fun and it's really interesting and I love you know, being able to help organizations and individuals to so and then one on one coaching is also very interesting. So those are the places I'm going fantastic. Well, of course if anyone is interested in finding out more about the coaching, of course, you can go to attention to detail and you cannot see speak to Chris in contact Chris directly regarding the ones one services and workshops that you offer you home. Who was also written a book which you can get on Amazon which is called improve attention to detail a straightforward systems developed attention to detail in yourself employees and across an organization. Which as I say people with us right now on Amazon what I'd like to know while I've got you on the podcast Chris if I make is whether you can tell us what does that book provide someone who's going to go to Amazon and purchase the book but perhaps you're not able to give us, you know in an audio base capacity. What can we take away with the book that you you haven't been able to give us today the book essentially list out the system for you, you know, so I mean unless you're unless you're taking notes, which I doubt you are wage than the the book would provide that that structure. I'm actually working on a second edition because the feedback that I have on the books so far is that people wanted more prescriptive. And so now after more work more experience more application the second edition, which is not out anytime, you know soon enough that I can that I can give a date palm. It will be more prescriptive. It will have more than type of type of scenarios and really drive at home a bit more really help you take the password for for you. But he's Giant Book lays out the system and you know, it can be applied rising. Of course. I should probably add as well. But on your website attendance details on, although you're based over in Colorado. A lot of the courses you deal with virtual you do online courses online one-to-one coaching. Some of those courses are certificates it as well. So people do want to get a qualification in this and really take it to to the next level then Thursday. I'll put a link in the shower notes. If you're interested in finding out more or indeed. If you've got an individual in your team who you feel could really benefit from some of Chris's coaching's then definitely do go to attention to detail page. Com. I think we've that's taken us full circle really quick. It's been a fantastic Whirlwind tour in in in terms of what you're doing and how it's an absolutely critical element. I think within any business you'll be able to identify them. I are the teams or individuals and the probably not maximizing their skills in relation to attention to detail think you're giving us a really good understanding of how we can do more how we can identify whether it's gaps are and how we can start applying systems to to improve processes. So thank you so much for joining me today. Are there any other links or any other sites you'd like me to direct our listeners to while I've got you on line know I think that's it. I keep everything at attention to them. Come and you know, I love hearing from people. So I invite everyone to reach out to me. If you're having some sort of Challenge and want some ideas. I'm I love hearing from people. I love hearing examples and and that's kind of working through Solutions. So I invited one huge number of testimonials on your side as well from Happy customers, but where can people find you where can people reach out to your quest attention to detail. Com is is truly the best place I go there and fill out the contact form. I'm on LinkedIn and I love connecting with people there. So just look for me there Chris Denney search me by that and and I think it'll be pretty clear that that's me fantastic job. Small put that LinkedIn connection right into the show notes as well as well to find out reach out to Christopher you can do so pop into the episode notes click on the links and it'll take you straight through and while you're there why not leave off of you at the same time, but listen, thank you ever so much for joining us stay on the island being podcast. Of course, if you are an h o l m d leader listening to this right now and you have an HR related vacancy, but you would love some Specialists who Resorts is recruitment support with please do get in touch with me. I would love to help you would love to show what a great HR recruitment experience can feel like and you can catch me at Nick at JJ recruitment, our website Jose equipment, or give me a call directly. 1727. 877 just leads me to say a huge. Thank you to Chris steady form at m.com for joining me today. Thanks for listening to you. Wonderful people out there who have enjoyed this broadcast and I look forward to bringing you the next episode real Scenic after yourselves and each other. Thank you so much for tuning into the h i l MD podcast with your host Nick day off. CEO of JJ recruitment Specialists HR recruiters if you need any help with the current HR or l m d vacancy then please get in touch with Nick and his team off all contact details can be found in the episode notes in the meantime to make sure you never miss a future episode. Please subscribe to the show through any of your favorite podcast channels till next time.

JGA Chris Chris Denney Nick day Tracey Emin Adam chewed Nuri headache Littleton Steve Jobs Google Nick Colorado Andy Rome van Gogh Amazon BASF Evers LinkedIn
Alejandro Chaoul | Opening to Deep Stillness | Guided Meditation

Hay House Meditations

24:19 min | 8 months ago

Alejandro Chaoul | Opening to Deep Stillness | Guided Meditation

"Hey there listeners have you heard the latest news from hey house. We've just launched a new mobile APP. It's called Hey House unlimited audio. Implies gives you unlimited access to every meditations podcast episode. We've ever recorded plus thousands of hours of additional guided Meditations audiobooks, confirmations, and so much more all in one user. Friendly APP. With Hay House unlimited audio you'll be able to get inspiration from your favorite authors and experts including Nat con Rebecca Campbell Alberta, the although David G Dr Joe Dispenser, and hundreds more. Get, started today with a free seven-day trial check it out at house dot com slash meditations. That's he house dot com slash meditations. Welcome my name is Alexandra Joel than. Going to guide you into a short meditation. To be connected. With your breath your body. Three mind. Pay attention to that sound of the bell until it dissolves into silence. And let that silence be an invitation to bring a mind in words connect your breath. As you breathe Anna. Trying. Guide. Your breath to breathe in a now through your nose. Sometimes. You want to excel more through the mouth, but for this meditations, see if it's okay. To breathe in and out through your now. And as you're breathing. You slowly letting go. Of that last conversation. Maybe last text or email. In. Ping more present in this moment. Has Your God your brass. No. Notice as it comes to your chest and you can breathe the lower. Towards abdomen. And then back again through now. Keep on breathing into your abdomen if it's comfortable, you can bring more on hand both hands right in front of your belly Baltin. And field that breath. Well. Come into your abdomen that made inflated like a balloon as you breathe in. As you lad co the air. Pre Out. Again breath in through your nose into your abdomen. BASF few now. As you keep on breathing in this way. You might slowly be listening the relaxation risk. If it's constable, close your eyes but not to die. Or if you prefer MMM open them slightly looking to the tip of your nose downwards in a peaceful. Games. As you still breathe from your nose into your abdomen and bathroom knows finding a rhythm. That is comfortable. Comfortable to. Maintain. Focus. Comfortable that if you lose the focus to come back to your Brown. You can visualize your breath green light. This green relates to the element of air in Tibetan tradition. So you're focusing in the pure quality of air. You mind gets his tried to. Gently. Bring it back to your nose on your prior. Without judging what distracts you without criticizing yourself for being this tract? Come back to. And as you, keep on breathing into your abdomen and bats here. No. Notice. How you feel? You're sitting posture. Notice your sits bones on the chair or cushion whatever surface you're sitting. And notice your legs fee touching the ground. As you keep on breathing all the way into your abdomen and bathroom. Keep on breathing into your abdomen and field the support. Of sits bones of your legs of your feet. Notice as touching the floor that you're connecting to the earth. where? Of that unconditional support of the earth. And wherever you are. We. Are All being supported. By mother. Can feel how we're all doing this meditation together. We're. Reading from our nose into are apt to man bat. Support of the Earth. We feel the mind with the breath into her body. Notice your body. Slowly. Connect to the stillness of your body. We can accommodate our posture by noticing are optimum lower back and strengthen it a little bit. Noticing that that can support the allegation of. So. Stretching your back and meet if it's comfortable. and. Stretching your arms accords. Like wanting to grab the sky. Breathe into your abdomen and back through now. That's stretching releasing any tension in your shoulders and your bad lower by. Keeping them permission to go that tension and the effort that you put to support the tension to call. As. You feel more support in the stillness of your body. Notice, your arms opening. into the air into space feeling more breath into your chest and abdomen. Feeling that brass nourishing your whole body. Even, your spine. Bringing, breath into. Every Vertebra. Maybe feeling a little bit like a tree. Up. With the foods. Earth. Your arms. This Opening your chest. Feeling that breath. Nourishing you deeply. That call your arms. And rest. With your arms up your hands on your lap and elbows out. Your chest area has expanded. Supporting your old Bernard. Keep hombre. With the support of stillness of your body, the shoulders relaxed and let go any tension. You notice. Your head and you can feel from the top of your head a little bit like pulling up. So you maintain the straightness of your posture. Lags your face and. As your brain is relaxed. Your is even more relaxed. Feeling the breath in your eyes nourishing. Giving them a break from all the time that you might be spending. Looking at screens. Computers and phones. Letting all that tension cow. And relaxing tensions in your cheek. And your jaw. Particularly Joe as you. Sometimes clinched too much. It's a good opportunity now to relax and. Please your tongue in your upper palate. Lacks. He plays that you put tension effort in your Fay. How it feels when you relax. Focusing on the flow of your breath. Supported by the green light. Supported by the stillness Soviet body. Conditional Support of. Mind gets his tried to just bring it back to your Bra. This report of your body. Still. Noticing and that still as a sense of relax so not stiffness. Still. Opening to the deaths of up. Then, time we get distracted gently bringing minds attention back to your. Body. Slowly connecting more to the. Openness. Of Your Mind Heart. So that instead of Having your attention your brain mind. Can Be more in your heart mind. Or less tendencies of. Of that RIB TIM and brain. Of that sense of grasping or rejecting. Touching criticizing. Rather is. More deeply into the space of your mind heart. Maybe bring one hand a both hands air. Sense of. Support. Must like a self. Hug. Self embrace. Allow whatever needs to be there to be either. Maybe, there's a sense of frustration. Certainty. Whatever it is, allow it to be there don't reject. Breath notice how it feels. Many. Of these feelings sometimes feel a contract our heart. So as we breathed into them. They can loosen up. As. We keep on breathing into space of our heart. Notice there's. Much more space. And just that feeling. Space where there's so many wonderful quantities. Available. Notice what you can tap into now What's available? Maybe. Loving kindness. Maybe compassion. Choi. Not Peace of mind. Patience, what do you need? And as you tap into whatever qualities available at this moment. As you breathe. into, it's like igniting that medicine. Letting nourish all your, heart. Let. It nourish every cell of your body. Let Inertia emotionally mentally and spiritually. As. You. Keep on breathing. It's not about rejecting any feeling. tobacco. How it to be there and embrace and pray. Tap into the quality's thirst more supportive. They can nourish US fully. Must Feeling All Immune system. vitalising just the physical. Also emotional mental and spiritual. Notice? As we feel more nourished. More connected tour. Sense a feeling. Interconnection to others. Maybe. Feeling how? Others also have different feelings and may be suffering for many different things. Moon. Let your heart open. To them and. Be Able to bring this quality that you just cultivate. Wish of sending. them that loving kindness that compassion that Choi that equanimity You be open to receive from them's. Receiving. Nourishing and feeling. And so as we conclude this meditation. Today. Without. Opening your eyes if their clothes. Stretch whatever part of the body needs A massage any part of the body? That you feel needs it. snowed. Open close, your eyes a few times as you. Integrate with the external world without losing touch off your home. So you could do it slowly. A. Wonderful Day.

Dr Joe Dispenser Choi hey house Hay House Alexandra Joel BASF Rebecca Campbell Alberta US Brown Bernard Inertia Fay David G seven-day one hand
Building a Better More Sustainable Battery with Group 14 Technologies Co-Founder and CTO, Rick Constantino

IT Visionaries

43:20 min | 2 d ago

Building a Better More Sustainable Battery with Group 14 Technologies Co-Founder and CTO, Rick Constantino

"Smartphones are incredible pieces of technology. They allow users the ability to track stars tex people around the world purchase items at the ease of click map their next destination and so much more their individual capabilities are truly remarkable. It's crazy all of that is powered by the battery and really what limits it. The engineer's imagination. They know how much they can get out of that in terms of the energy. So imagine now if you could get fifty percent more energetic phone into fifty percent more tasks that we hadn't even thought of yet rick constantino in what he is saying me sound too good to be true. It's not on this episode of it. Visionaries rick dives into how group fourteen is reversing that trend by working to replace the traditional graphite ano- with a silicon casing material plus rick touches on why silicon is the future of the battery industry the impact it will have on devices that use lithium ion batteries in how group fourteen is thriving despite some early stage struggles. It visionaries is created by the team at michigan dot org and brought to you by salesforce platform the number one cloud platform for digital transformation of every experience. Innovate fast empower every employee and skill with confidence from anywhere with a customer at the center of everything you do learn more at salesforce dot com slash platform. Welcome everyone to another episode of. It visionaries and today we had the founder and cto of group. Fourteen technologies rick constantino rick. Welcome to the show thank you. I'm glad to be here all right right out the gate tell us what group fourteen does group. Fourteen is helping to develop better batteries specifically lithium ion batteries so that your batteries can weigh less store more energy so we did a little homework on you and says you were. You'd spent twenty years of your life as a biopharmaceutical expert. And then you later on pivoted you mentioned in some articles interviews that we read with you that some of the things you learned their directly applicable to what you're currently doing group fourteen. I was hoping you could tell us a little bit about you. Know a little bit what you used to do in kind of tell us how much does apply to engineering. Better batteries. copy. Talk about that. As mentioned i started my career in the pharmaceutical industry and i got my phd to mit. And i started working for a company called genentech which is one of the big founding companies in the biotech space on the oldest companies around The earliest actually start. Cloning proteins for therapeutic use and you know i'd like to say had the sort of grand career plan to make this transition from pharmaceuticals into energy storage. But the truth is it was more of sort of a serendipitous path for me. You know with the With the big recession two thousand eight. I ended up consulting for a while. And that's how i ended up going to group. Fourteen actually energy to is the company at the time and rick lewis. Who is the ceo of of energy to found me. Because i had co edited a book on freeze drying from cynical and of course freeze. Drying is a method to remove the solvent roof water. So that you can have a dry formulation of peptide and protein drugs so that they would last longer they'd be more stable and this is a very important technology for example stabilizing vaccines. Obviously vaccines pretty pretty hot topic these days. Yeah so as it turned out in that case. The technology for freeze drying was being used to help make engineer a carbon michelle for energy storage. And that's how. I ended up consulting for energy to in later on was brought on his. Vp and then we spun out of group fourteen As a company working with my battery. So i find those same engineering principles that were useful for me in the pharmaceutical world. We're also very useful in terms of designing this material for for any storage purpose. Not talk to us a little bit. About what group teens attempting to accomplish because on the outside hearing that you want to go after a you know a battery that weighs last or carries more charge. We've had other. Cto's business leaders that are working in fields like this kind. Give their point of view. I was hoping you could share how you're approaching this problem. You know how are you is uniquely approaching the idea of how you even make a battery carry more illiteracy or a way less. Why does it even matter kobe. You could share some of that information. Sure sure be happy to share that you know when you think about lithium ion battery you know. There's a lot of components in there and two of the key components. Of course are your code and your cathode the different pulse of the battery and they're over the decade. There's been lots of work optimizing. All those various parts the battery. You know a lot of work for example has been done on cathode side lots of lots of great advances in materials technology on the catholic side on the inside. We've been using the same basic approach. Which is a metro club. Graphite which is a great material and yo- for decades and so we were thinking about. How could we improve that sort of that. Last frontier of the battery improvement on an side and so that brought us to thinking of course about carbon and of course graphite is carbon. Says this is very specific and very interesting form of carbon called an ala trope and so we were making a different form of carbon. We're making what's called a hard carbonates. It's sort of a different It's still the same chemical structure but it's a it's a different sort of three dimensional structure and we were using that to make ultra capacitor materials when we started out of energy to and we saw our big moment where we said okay. How can we apply this technology to improve. You know today's graphite and try to make something better and that's where silicon hudson and then silicon is Is is It's similar in some ways to carbon in that it has. It's on the same column in cryonic table. If you guys remember from the chemistry classes and happens to be that a fourteen th column over So it's a group group fourteen as the name of of that column on the periodic table so we ended up naming company grew fourteen to reflect that we were trying to combine. Carven with silicon. So the key is to. How do you get silicon to work. Because silicon is a tremendous material in terms of the amount of energy. It can store. it's ten times. The amount of energy that that graphite that graphite or in carbon ca store but the problem is silicon is when you when you put it in the battery and cycle it you know you need to insert lithium inside and outside of the material that silicon expanse about four times and that makes it really difficult for the material to rebound and expand every time and retain its integrity in the same capacity to absorb the same energy every time so silicon is fantastic high energy density but it tends to not last very long when you cycle so that's not useful in the battery. You want your battery. Last hundreds of thousands of cycles just like graphite so our approach was to protect that silicon. Make the best possible form of the silicon and and protected inside a porous carbon matrix. So it's a hybrid material heart carbon parts. Silicon they're both met that group fourteen calm and so our material has the has the high capacity of silicon but has the stability advantages of of carbon material. Now talk to me a little about why this matters Because the benefits great but part of this is battery technology. We're we're increasing depending on batteries. That's no one can dispute that but a lot of people don't realize is how environmentally detrimental it is to actually extract the materials necessary for a battery the mining the strip mining whether it's looking for the metals. I'm not as familiar with what it takes to get graphite out of the ground. But i was hoping you could. Maybe like what does it take to graphite out of the ground. What does it mean if that energy source like you mentioned before has a higher storage. What does that mean for the other. Like example lithium. We know that lithium nickel all the metals used to manufacture batteries. Typically i mean. It's a dirty business. Most people don't want to acknowledge this. But like i've seen some of the footage of what it looks like post these wendy's minds are operating. I mean you're talking. It looks like scorched earth to get these things out I was hoping you'd share about like what do you think the supply chain impacts will be you guys you know successfully figure this out and bring a mass adoption yet. Your absolutely right and that environmental aspect is a critical part of our business in kind of the whole ecosystem of energy storage. And it's it's a really hot topic At our meetings You know at at at meetings at scientific meetings and even internally we talk a lot about that it's kind of part of our culture is. How do we have a battery supply chain from of start the finish. That's as sort of environmentally friendly as from it to this planet as possible. And you're right the the extraction of some of those materials. There's definitely that's a huge impact there and so you know so you have to think about how do you extract those materials and processes materials in as you know sort of friendly environmentally friendly as possible and ethical way as possible. How do you link your supply chain from from the raw materials you know. Being being being unearthed to how they're have to have to be refined if necessary to how they end of in a battery so that whole chain needs to be as connected as possible and as efficient as possible and then another key aspect of this is the battery itself. And how you know how how long it lasts of you have very long lasting batteries. Very heinisch energy density batteries. You don't have to make as many of them. You don't have to make them as frequent and that last up and there's a lot of you know kind of focus on this last step is how do you extract and recycle those materials from the battery as much as possible so that you don't have to go back to the earth to to make the next battery and there's a lot of activity along that entire chain and you know i think no one company can sort of do it all But we're all kind of the wrong kind of in this together. And i think there's a lot of interesting synergy lana entire chain so we wanna source our materials from as sort of a friendly as possible. We want for example our process we want to be ideally to be completely enclosed system. Our business at large scale all the energy that are processed needs. We're going to actually generate it within our own process and recycle it as much as we can and as much as we can. We want our material as possible at least in with the other materials to be able to be recycled as much as possible so again. That's that there's that whole chain. And i think each each company that is trying to do its part and we're all kind of linked together in the effort curious in your testing so far. How are things gone. How close are we until this. Your this material. How's it. how is it performed in. How close are we or how close group. Fourteen the having this material more widely adopted across all the battery manufacturers. I'm assuming that's the business model. Which is if you have this technology. You want ourselves the energizer all the companies that make these make batteries to adopt this and then we'll dive into even like the bigger scale batteries automotive batteries that are now we already know e even more popular i. It's not just tesla. Major auto manufacturers are introducing electric vehicles electric vehicles. So they're going to need huge batteries. Yeah absolutely and you know. This is an industry that's extremely dynamic and there's a lot of interesting Technologies and and companies out. There you know some technologies are going to take a while to be adopted so the particular approach that we've taken is to. How do we adopt as fast as possible. So our our material is a win for graphite in the anat's so we are materials of black powder. It looks just like graphite. It processes the same way as graphite its performance is quite different than graphite but in terms of how armed chills can use it. Amateur can be used for our customers. They can use their same equipment that they use to make their anos today. They can use their same Manufacturing lines that they're using to make the batteries today so all of that means an extremely rapid process from you know we present the shelter customer. They they tested. They like it now. They can actually implemented make batteries. Sahra philosophy has always been to try to be as fleet of foot as possible you know armature aerial is available today in some limited quantities But we are actually at this very moment. We're going through a commercial launch of our material here in washington and were were about to. You know we're sort of going through the kind of the final commissioning phases of that plant. So that de will be available at pretty large quantities. Actually about one hundred ton per year a quantity in in that particular plant and were were. We'll be available pretty soon For that for that material and then of course that sorta quantities will be interesting for for some of these initial markets on. But they won't be able to feed those automotive. Markets is really really large markets. That you're talking about. That's going to take another one or two. Orders of magnitude more production capability and our vision is to with this commercial launch plant. Which will be able to you know. Get into some of the smaller batteries and devices for customers. That'll be the blueprint for then building a larger plant. You know using the same same exact sort of platform technology the manufacturing but how about for like cell phone batteries is is this type of material. Goes into a cell phone batteries. Well yes absolutely. So lithium ion batteries. They're pretty much ubiquitous. These days. Your cell phone your computer. Of course that sort of holy grail market is the automotive. Yeah But there's lot of course wearables You know that the airpods right now. All these various things you know are really other all powered by lithium batteries. Gotcha so the reason why i asked. That is because. I didn't know you mentioned before that. There's like size requirements. You talked about in the chemical level of separating the silicon so that because you said it expands in orders of magnitude greater has a It carries more power but it has shorter cycling times. You were working on different mixing with different graphics to make sure it works better. So i liked it phrase it in terms of cell phone because i think we all or many of our listeners. I'll say all have a smartphone. And we all know that they kind of only last for day. A day of heavy usage the power is gonna be depleted. I mean if you can make through a day i think. Pretty good We've all been conferences. Remember back in the day when we go to conferences. Every conference has a charging bank because they know that power to these devices is mission critical and so when we talk about that we also know that cell phone like to my knowledge not to speak anecdotal experience in about a year or two the ability to hold the charges diminished a lot in her cell phones. So talk to me about what this means for. Like a cell phone Take me through this because you know we use numbers all the time that say it's going to carry four. You know more energy more whatever so give me. I put phrases this in terms of like days if my normal cell phone lasts me a day. What does a cell phone with a battery powered by group fourteen materials. What's that gonna last Let's say let's say a day. And a half gotcha. So it's got about fifty percent potentially more capacity to deliver the same energy on that order magnitude. Yeah getting double would be would be a pretty pretty tall feet. But i think something about a day and a half In that order is is definitely very feasible. And that's the kind of the kind of results our customers you getting as we're talking. I'm noticing my computers. At sixty six. Percents i just reduced Produce my brightness. Just just in case. Yes so if i get a fifty percent more usage how about the times i have to cycle because now i'm cycling it fifty percent less as well you're right i'm only charging it wh- you know instead of every day every day and a half so how. How many times can you charge. Because it does still have like three hundred sixty five days of cycling or three hundred sixty five cycles or how many cycles will have the same the same cycles it. It depends on the particular customer requirements but for example the cellphone kind of requirement. They won't let you get away with less cycles. You have to match the cycle the current product and just store more energy so it means either you know like you say you don't have to charge as often you can still have the phone. The battery last as many as many days or as many charges as possible. But another way to think about it is. Now you're now your phone can do fifty percent more things and nothing. I think humbled me more than a meeting with a consumer electronics customer. That i can't name. Who said you know your your material has so much energy density that we can do more things with our consumer electronics devices. We that we hadn't even imagined yet. So if you think about today in your hand and your phone. You're carrying this remarkable device. It's not just a phone a phone. it's a computer it's a. Gps gyroscope flashlight tiktok machine. It's a video h admission videos and songs film editor right video editor. It's crazy and all of that is powered by the battery and all of that and and really what limits it. The engineer's imagination. They know how much how much they can get out of that in terms of energy. And so imagine now if you could get fifty percent more energetic phone into fifty percent more more tasks that we hadn't even thought of yet that's awesome in like i want to hear about this perspective because you just brought up a great point. I think a lot of our listeners might not have about which is the manufacturer themselves. It depend on the battery. They have requirements and like you mentioned before they had requirements had to have the same cycle life. What are some of the other requirements you hear from different industries that maybe you were surprised by like hell. I didn't even think about that in terms of being able to willing to accept your material as a as a as a replacement for the current weight with you my own has done You know the other kind of requirement aspects again all this depends on what the application is but for example the temperature requirements and. How hot or cold. That device has to work. So you might imagine. An automotive battery would have to have sort of a more sort of more swings than consumer electronics device. That you're gonna keep in your home if it's let's say a kitchen appliance or something so there's temperature requirements and there's also the power requirements. How fast you want to charge or discharge again in sort of think about like a power tool. You wanna have very very fast discharge. Yeah it doesn't even matter how. How sort of how long. You're joined us that when you drill. It has to have a certain energy delivered. So you know certain. Batteries insert technology have certain requirements. And there's really not a one-size-fits-all to that so given that you as you were developing these materials as you were developing his batteries you probably were introduced new requirements that. I don't know if you had thought of yet right. And so talk to me about the development process of bringing this material to market. I'm sure people would introduce new. Just new standards that you just hadn't thought about and you had to go back to the lab and try to figure out like the temperature requirement like figuring like how do we get the temperature not rise not fall too much right now great great question and you know. There's this kind of an interesting kind of analogy. I was just thinking as you ask the question that goes back to my pharmaceutical days. And you know we're we're not trying to make the world's best battery or trying to make the world's best battery material and let those companies that already know how to make the best batteries just feed them or material and say here's a new material you can rethink what's possible with your batteries and we had that same kind of philosophy back in my days. When i was working on drug delivery we had a technology for delivering the drugs. That was a fantastic technology. But we we knew that getting into the business of discovering drugs there was a lot of other companies that you had to do the already so we. They came to us with a new job of making their drug better and delivering it. So we have the technology that can help deliver energy and so we work with all the major battery companies and again give them our material and say here's a material. It has extremely high capacity. It has extremely good cycle stability and those other aspects. We were talking about the power. The temperature requirements. You know some of that is going to be limited by the material but lot. Most of that is limited by the battery design itself and the battery management system. And so you know. There's so much to that. That companies already know how to do really well that you know. We're just trying to make the very best material and then feed into those into those applications. Gotcha i wanna take us back. A little bit because talk about the earlier stages of grew fourteen. I think people are audience. Definitely enjoys hearing about the process of discovery. So i guess where was the company when you got involved. The had you had the materials already been identified. Had what stage where you guys because you admit you'd mentioned that one of the cofounders saw that you had written a thing about you know how to remove the water in inside today. You might be able to help us here. How far along was the company towards its discovery. When you when you join. Yeah so when when i joined energy to the company was was quite small and there weren't very few scientists In one of the scientists was was actually a professor bill scott from university washington and so we were again making carbons for ultra capacitor material. So these were ultra. Capacitors are a very interesting and specific type of energy storage device that can extremely rapidly charging discharge and can do it extremely rapidly but not hold a lot of energy so it's really useful for capturing energy for example when you're breaking your car that regenerative braking technology is actually an ultra capacitor helping recover that energy that very small time but it can't hold a lot of energy so we were developing the carbons for passengers and it was an interesting market for energy to but it wasn't you know hugely lucrative market for us and and so in twenty fifteen Bs purchased energy to and at the time we were starting to dabble on research. End in in this as i said the sort of silicon and carbon fusion for lithium ion and. So we said okay. This technology still incubation stage. We spun it out as group fourteenth. That's how we started group fourteen and we tried so many approaches. Hundreds of approaches in my personal philosophy in life is kind of the thomas edison model. You know it's it's You know have a hundred ideas to have a good one kind of thing so it may drive my family crazy. That all these crazy ideas and okay. That doesn't work. Just keep going. Because i know one of these is going to be so know. We tried a lot of different ways of combining silicon and carbon. And we actually one particular approach that that was That got pretty far along but still wasn't gonna hitting the mark especially for cost and scale ability so we what we decided to do as we decided to kind of put a halt on all of our research and what we decided to do is kind of just have bisque. Meet every day and just talk about what is that. Forget about what we've done so far. What is the ideal material. Look like what are we really wanna do. And then let's think about how to do it and we spent. I think about a month in those meeting rooms every day just discussing and you know talking about papers and other companies what everybody was doing and finally over the course of that time. We had the aha moment. Well okay we know how to make carbon really well so instead of trying to figure out the silicon piece. Let's take the best carbon we could think of to try to make a template so that we can make the best silicon inside the carbon so instead of thinking of silicon focused approach we had a carbon focus approach and this is very different from our competitor companies and that was kind of the moment and then we said you know what okay now. We know how to make carbon now. Let's take that approach. Make that best carbon and then make the silicon inside the carbon and out of that meetings we. We decided to scrap all the old old projects and and kind of restart which which is a very kind of bold thing for company. Do it's very hard to kill a project in companies. So i love hearing that story because it sounds like you know you're looking at a problem which you're looking at it from for whatever reason you're not seeing the other side or the other dimension that you could potentially be solving you your heads down. Everyone trying to solve this one thing. Unfortunately it was unable to be solved. You had this moment we said. Hey let's take a step back. Let's let's put on the table what we know. And let's examine the problem. See what we can come up with in use when you came out of the box and said let's go at it another route. I'm curious so people are notoriously. I would say anti meeting because they feel like it gets them nowhere How many meetings that you have to have before this discovery was made. I wanna say probably had about twenty meetings on the ten or twenty. It was it was about a month and meeting pretty much pretty much daily so it was. It was kind of a painful process to go through the talk about how you were feeling that the really oh man head-scratching i cannot figure this out. Well i think at first people were were like what the heck is this. We want to get back in lebanon. Do stuff so. I think at first there was a little bit of this friction but after i think the first week or so of doing it then it no pun intended gathered a lot of energy because people saw. Wow okay this is. This is time for us to think back and start reading papers and we started assigning people papers and presenting it. And what are the pros and cons of that approach. And and what could we do better than that. And then what else could we do. So you know we we We started getting a lot of interest in energy momentum after awhile. And would i think really helped you know coming from a compl- coming from outside the battery world coming from a pharmaceutical perspective but as a chemical engineer having the principles you know i would come in and i would have a crazy idea and people like. No battery. just doesn't do that. That's not a bad every works. I'm like okay fine. You know for me. Electrical engineering was least favorite. Thing barely passed for my phd. Sure how i got through it. I hit it to be honest. I did not like this aspect. But koso- coming in. But i love the chemistry love now engineering materials and somebody here about okay. What is an have to even if you guys you guys teach me about the whole bathroom just going to focus on. What does the nfl mature. Woody you want it to do what we want to look like. And focusing on just the one aspect of the whole battery and again my not having a preconceived notion of what could or could not be possible was really helpful for me to kind of you know lately that group and lead some of those discussions so during this process. How is all of this financed Was because you mentioned before the other company has been acquired spun out and this was spun out of basf so was it through that the financing there or was did you independently. Go get money. How did you. How did you create enough runway to research this. Yeah good question in those early days are always tough. So when we launched the company We had a small investment from usf in the form of a convertible note and we also had a grant with us department of energy through their vehicle technologies office and really that that those two fundings were were what really launched the company in those those early several years until we got to our our next year. Our i raise a first series. They raised about about a year a little year ago. So talked me melt. The did you were you. What kind of pressure would feel a lot of pressure because that's obviously very limited runway. You're trying to change the way material. Engineering or chemical engineering. You're talking about group. Fourteen year changing the way chemical compounds are known to to function right. So there's part of you. That probably is thinking well. Is this even possible. And then you have a finite runway like if you bring back result in this is going to project will run out either. Run out of money and right. 'cause no one wants back project where you don't have an answer. Yes yes and you know. I ve been around the block a few times here with this kind of a question and you know again back to my pharmaceutical days The last company. I sort of joked that. I've i've moved progressively from large companies to monster small. I started at genentech. Which was you know thousands of employees one of the one of the second. I think it's the second oldest or third oldest bow to company so you want to join quite established then moving to a company that was maybe a hundred employees then moving down two tenths of made my next giggle giggle. Just be me in the garage. Nobody also not sure but that that sort of that funny question. So when i was an energy you know when i when i was at my last pharmaceutical position. Of course we re. We basically ran out of funding With with the recession and twenty two thousand eight and because we had a business model where we were. Reliant on those partners fund their projects were funded by other pharmaceutical companies and and it was within the span of just a few months. I think every single of my scientific counterparts gave me painful call said look. I'm really sorry but we have to cancel program. Nothing personal in fact. I have to laugh my entire division kind of kind of thing so that was just as horrible experience. You know where where we just ran out. We ran out of finding even though we were well. Funded up to that point. It dried up real fast. Yeah you on the energy two days You know we. We eventually did make a relatively successful exit with the bsf acquisition. But it was a tough road. There were there were multiple occasions. Where the runway was getting really short and we had some really creative If he had a really creative. Cfo and some really creative things that we did to kind of just constantly keep things going and of course you never you never wanna hundred of bother your your employees with the with the runway question But you know there were. There were so many cases when we were so close So you know whim east. We spent out You know grew fourteen. We were in those early days. Extremely careful about growth the company in fact we were just five employees for it for quite a long time. So you know you have to be really careful with that run we have to really really judicious about it. And it's it's it's sort of this philosophical question if you if you see a little chasm coming up and you're running. Do you do put the brakes on a mission of fall over or do you kind of run as fast as you can You know to make sure you can leap over and make that make clear the chasm and so and i feel right now that we're a fantastic position where i feel like we should just keep running and running With it but until you really know that you know you're you're you can you can do it. You gotta be careful and so it just takes takes experience and perspective yes like i guess You you know you talked about bringing the team together. Guys had twenty days or more of meetings trying to figure out how solve this problem. You guys go after the carbon side of things you know while curious about is what about that first experiment where you're like. The lights went on like we are on our path. Talk about what that was like. Oh my god it was. It was amazing so again we had a really good material to that point but however when we tried this new approach it was like a huge step change in the performance do was an incremental is like you entered a new space it was like double the cycle life the other material like for the first experiment and we haven't even optimized yet and what was i think even more of the amazement was not just the performance but the simplicity of the approach because our previous approach was extremely complicated in our previous previously approach not to get too technical but it was to take a alloy material of of of aluminum and silicon an etch away the non silicon part which was not a trivial process involved acid yovany certain nasty conditions harvesting that will be called a sort of this feathered. We call them webbed. Approach a look like a spiderweb. Then he took that material and then had to mix it with some precursors and then carbonized a create. A carbon coated silicon. So it was kind of it was. It was a lot of steps thought of sort of harsh conditions. But this new approach again. We knew how to make the kind of carbon wanted and we could do that pretty easily. 'cause we kind of knew that and then it was just making the silicon inside so compared to how hard the other approach was. This new approach was way faster to get the material way easier and we thought we were going to be a lot faster and more efficient to mitch produce as well as had that better performance so it was it was. It was an amazing moment. Getting those early early results. Awesome in then when you finally feel like you talked about this moments doubling the The cycling talk to be win. Did you win do you guys. I guess have a material where you were saying. Hey we we can produce this at scale could because you kind of talked about the first iteration. It was extremely difficult to produce. You mentioned that you use the words nasty nasty conditions. Yes was there like a goal or metric that you guys had internally k we needed to for example like maybe it was a cost number where you guys said. Hey we have to figure out a way to make this at x number of dollars an ounce when you like okay at this price point will buy this talk to me about how. How did it get to the point where you could say battery company and say. Hey we have new material for you. Yes so that no no great question so the so that you know so again because we're producing both the carbon silicon ourselves the so the first piece we already knew how to do it and fact actually one of the things i did energy to. Reinvented how we even made the carbon. We used to make the carbon again in a multi. Step kinda complicated process. I reinvented that as a as a single. You know if it's ironic. Because they came in. They hired me to help fix the freeze. Drying step which was one of eleven steps. And i helped them do that but what i ultimately helped induce throw all that away to do it in one step with a completely different process. That had nothing to do with you. Replace your knowledge. You replace yourself with freeze drying so thank goodness. They were freeze drying at the time and using the wrong method. Otherwise never would be talking to you. who knows. Maybe i'd be you know working on. Who got lord knows what anyway so we knew how to do. The carbon piece had already scaled. Not in in this new technology was even easier to scale and then of course there's that again that second step making the silicon which we also is also pretty pretty. You know simple in the sense that it's a single reaction single step There's obviously some some science to it. But you know the second step. We also had vision. This looks very scalable and we we we were able to do that in elaborate Easily and you know so it was a matter of just you know producing the material for for customer sample. So that's that's one of the hardest things in this business. There's lots of amazing ideas but you have to get them at show with customer to test and for the customer to make a battery takes may be you know at least something like maybe hundred grams even kilogram to released enemy multiple kilograms to make relevant batteries. The kind of batteries that you're gonna you know would be the same size that fit your phone or even you know an automobile much larger so we had to rapidly get to that kilogram scale. And that's we were able to do that by just you know picking processes that we thought were very scalable. Yeah because that's like one of the for anyone out there that's trying to invent technologies that are going to enter an existing business supply chain. Will you just mentioned is something that live. don't think about which is when it comes to a supply chain. They actually don't want introduce things that can't rely on. You know you mentioned that you had to be able to produce with confidence at kilogram scale right like because if i'm a company like let's imagine them duracell and you come and tell me you give me one kilogram. A month of what was the point of me trying this. It has no value to me exactly and that that was the key turning point you know i would say the first key turning point was the turning point where we have these meetings and and kind of sort of redefine. What we're gonna do on how to do it. You know second key moment was when we got our first kind of kilogramme batch and we had. We had again. It can't go too much the technical details but we had a pilot scale reactor at the time that a kilo scale reactor In this was part of our department of energy project and that reactor was designed to. You know sort of opportu. Certain way that i won't go into and it wasn't producing the material as we had expected of course right so you're nothing turns at the way we always want first timer even hundred times so we watch and again so we are trying to get to work. Tried everything and again without going into the detail There is a basically a piece of this reactor that i didn't like that i thought was hampering us. Yeah so. I waited till an occasion. My my ceo is actually out of town. And i i had my engineer literally take the speaks out of the actor. And he's like. I don't know the middle dangerous on this job. I think you'll find him using and my engineer is like well if i take it out. I'm not one hundred percent. Sure i'll be able to put it back in that okay. We both look at each other. Like yeah we're okay with that. So he he pulled this piece out and basically we again long story short. We reconfigured the reactor after that and it was after that like that literally that evening i pulled out of the reactor and i could just tell by looking at it. This looks right and it's funny. You get when you start doing this kind of things you know. I'm kind of old school. I i look at the material. I can feel it through the gloved fingers and i could feel it feels right. It looks right. And i knew right away on my goodness. This looks good actually texted the team picture. Like oh my god i young. We got this. And so that led to us being able to produce kilogram quantities. And let let let lead to a kind of a redesign of the reactor a little bit and let us to be able to sample the kilogram quantities. And that was that was the other key moment was being able to produce those kilogram samples For our customers to make real batteries and then they knew. Wow this were onto something and that led to our first funding round. Yeah and then also like you said. The bills forecast it like forecast. How much would it cost to make a certain size right. Once you have the process down you can actually forecast and give because every company that manufactured skill they're gonna wanna know. How much does it cost. How often can get it to me. Like all these things have to be true for them to introduce it into their own supply chain exactly and you may have a huge demand for the mitchell right now because a lot of customers are getting into their larger format devices and again as i mentioned were kind of on the on the cusp of our of our commercial launch at that hundred and twenty a ton per year scale i it's not quite the plant's not quite open yet so we're still yeah cranking out the smaller samples and man. There's a there's a. There's a big backlog right now at that material. Listen as a person who you know. I'm i don't think any different from anyone else except that one thing. I'm super cheap. So the whole idea of buying batteries constantly just bothers me like bluetooth headphones. Like you know the small the small ones that you have in your ear. Like i have a pair for running but like i actually don't like them because of course if i go fly then i can't really rely on them so i like things to last a really long time swan pretty darn pump that this material is making its way batteries. I love the idea that in the future. It won't it. Sounds like it a not to distant future for -elvar devices to last fifty percents longer. That's pretty significant in or look the other way to look at if you're environmental side is your production can drop by fifty percents. But i don't think it will cause from the band from not shrinking more and more people want electric devices. Exactly we'll rick was awesome. Hearing your story Right now though it is time to do the lightning round the lightning rounds brought to you by the salesforce platform the number one cloud platform for digital transformation of every experience. Rick this is where we ask you questions outside of work so that our audience can get to know you a little bit better you ready. I'm ready to go for all right when you first walked in the doors of. Mit what did you think you were going to be when you as you got older you know i thought i would be heading up. A pharmaceutical company. Starting my own company. So you always had the dream of being in pharmaceuticals as well as the leadership position. These companies. i at that point in my career. That was my plan. Of course. I've had that that plan chain many times but at that particular point that was the plan. That's awesome and when you first got to school. Did you learn anything interesting that we said yourself a this is definitely in the path because you didn't really deviate. Yeah you actually followed through on your plan. I i learned. I had to to co advisers. Who had very different philosophies of life and one was sort of extremely detail oriented and the other was just this sort of amazing insights and more sort of the more of the. We're gonna try a lot of things until it works inside. Tried to sort of blend those two those two approaches for for my career. What about for your conference. Where do you think your confidence comes from. Because you kind of mentioned throughout this show that you are very much experimental guy like you're not afraid to you're willing to go The most famous person i've read about the has failed. A lot is like i read about. How james dyson invented three thousand one hundred. Twenty seven prototypes. That didn't work before he figured it out. Dang i would quit one. I think it would've put it number ten but the secret. I am not confident. I think it's more not so much confidence as just the the ability to have to have humor and be self effacing and not and you know what you know. It's okay to make a mistake. So i think i think it's more about a not so much the confident that i know my ideas right but that it's you know he got sort of laugh at yourself and just gonna kinda move onto the next idea. News that attitude. Translate to anything else that you do outside of work. Oh it's translates to everything i do. It's my approach to cooking. You know we kitchen surprise. Just whatever's distracted post up together and sometimes it's good sometimes not whether we're skiing and other it looks good over there. Let's go for it. You know in life you know. Sometimes you just have to sort of you know just sort of see what happens and and just be ready ready to go a different path if need be right because a common stereotype of people that are highly analytical or versed in stem is that they're more like calculating approach in their approach. It sounds like you've already talked about running towards chasms. You're talking about cooking. Whatever it is you see. You're talking about skiing. What other interests do you have. Well i one. My other interest is japanese ornamental. Carp or ulsan. Is coy in chicago. And i started got into the japanese gardening thing and i have. I have some some coy in my my pond. Actually i purchased from the from the farms in japan and had had shipped over here. Now those those fish get quite large housing or your big koi right now My biggest car right now are about On the order of maybe about three feet by two and a half feet long. That's pretty substantial job raising these fish. They get pretty big. We'll feel like going you're going to visit. You would be pretty fun. You got the zan japanese garden. You've got the beautiful big koi fish swimming. We might go skiing and you might cook up something pretty fierce good or bad. It will be your another hobby. I i was going to mention Is i used to not anymore. But i used to do a lot of a lot of singing in amateur. Choirs sang in the boston. Symphony and i sang in the seattle symphony. And then most recently. The san francisco symphony symphonies. Well okay. so you're legit then like your voice. Must be pretty magical. I don't know about magical but at least you know at least ten hours Tend to be pretty pretty high demand so my voice is pretty high as you can probably Detect there and it makes it easier to get into those those choruses but it's a it's a fantastic hobby to have. I don't do it anymore. I don't have the time anymore for the schedules can be quite grueling but You know at the time. It was just an amazing experience completely different from the rest of my scientific world. Just lose yourself. You know in the midst of an amazing performance with a professional orchestras will rig. I can say with confidence. You're the first guest ever on ninety visionaries. That is a symphony caliber singer. Phd ari what was but it was in some serious orange. Chemical engineering inventing new materials for batteries. Cook and skiing. I'm a renaissance man. You do it. All the arts the arts and sciences. I try i try again hundred. Do just keep going at it. Try a hundred times and one time. It'll it'll one time it'll be right or thanks for joining us the visionaries for our audience. You might not see group fourteen on the name of your future battery. Pack your packaging of a battery. But i think this is something that all of us can relate to. All of us have been somewhere when we ran out of power. I think you know having percent barrier that can be game changing for the world. Rick i appreciate you joining us today on. It visionaries it's been a pleasure. Thank you so much. It visionaries is created by the team at michigan dot org and brought to you by the salesforce customer three sixty platform the number one cloud platform for digital transformation of every experience build connected experience empower every employee and deliver continuous innovation with the customer. At the center of thing you do learn more at salesforce dot com slash platform.

rick constantino rick salesforce rick lewis Carven genentech koso lana washington tesla bill scott Silicon wendy michigan thomas edison basf usf
Brian Crannell SVP of Knowles on Tiny Speakers and MEMs Mics - Voicebot Podcast Ep 202

The Voicebot Podcast

1:04:55 hr | Last week

Brian Crannell SVP of Knowles on Tiny Speakers and MEMs Mics - Voicebot Podcast Ep 202

"This is episode to to the voice. Podcast my guest. Today is brian cranston. Svp at knows a global leader in microphone audio processing and speaker technology consumer electronics that enable those voice assistance to speak hello voiced by nation. Welcome back brechin seller your host. The voice by podcast. We've something a little different for you today. We're talking hardware layer technology. I know many of you live at the software layer of most of the time or you focus on design or business areas so much of what we can do with voice. Technology starts with the constraints at the edge even with a cloud based service. It is the edge that starts the processing and we have more functions that are moving to the edges smart wearable devices even for privacy on smartphones for example so the firmware chips microcontrollers. Turn out to be kind of a big deal. That's why i'm excited to bring you conversation. Say with brian crandall of knows corporation. We get down and dirty with hardware capabilities. And he does a really nice job of explaining the key elements driving or constraining innovation today. In particular we go deep adhere. Those smart wireless earbuds. Everyone is wearing nowadays airpods. Maybe you might have some of those today. In addition to addressing a wide range of other consumer electronics is well before we get started. I have a quick shout for my friends. Voices dot com. They operate the largest marketplace for voiceover talent worldwide there more than five hundred thousand voice actors on the platform covering one hundred languages. Many people listening probably at least considered or maybe used a voice actor for an alexa skill. Or maybe a custom voices system voices dot com is a great place source that talent however. There's another fast growing part of the business. Providing audio training data for voice assistance voice dot com can source variety of speakers multiple languages speaking the phrases that matter boast your application thinking supply all the voice data you need along with everything from hiring payments and reporting storage so you can sign up for free of voices dot com should definitely check them out. You needed for training data or if you just voice over talent for something you're doing in the space voices dot com all right. This week's guest overseas audio solutions voice and knowles corporation bryan. Cranston can speak in detail about the microelectronics power. The speakers microphones in today's consumer electronics. We get into the biggest trends and voice and the technology and where the engineering is headed franchise degrees in mechanical engineering and law. His deep expertise bobo. Mechanical and defense and global supply chains. You spend a lot of time in china so next up all about the mics and speakers at any able voice assistance to communicate with humans. Let's get started frank randall. Welcome to the voice by podcast brett. Great to be here. Okay so you are with knowles corp and i believe knows corp is kind of like basf. When i was growing up there are the components supply chemical and almost everything that was used by consumers back in the day. Actually don't know where they stand. These days of private acquired divested three or four times. But why don't you tell me about knowles. One of the most important ingredient components suppliers out there. Happy to happy to It's fun place to be This is my tenth year with knowles. And really when i joined i didn't appreciate the brand And as you get into it you really learn the heritage and really starts with knowles founder. Back in the forties of the last century Kinda technically inclined trying to stop some problems and ended up Chicago had a number of hearing aid companies that were supplying to people who had hearing problems in the fifties sixties and hugh worked very closely with them to come up with some new concepts. To frankly miniaturize microphones and speakers so in the old days The hearing aid was sort of a belt. Pack and then you'd have something that sat on the table and something went up to your ear a contraption and at the end of the day by a couple of things miniaturising speaker and microphone but also more importantly taking the power way down That was able to really enable it to go to be a worn device up at the air so in hearing aids. Today there is typically two microphones and one or two speakers on each year. And that's kind of knowles inside and what we've been able to do over the years. Is it translate that expertise on high quality audio super small super low power in two different of the same and One of the biggest things we've done That are no. The last fifteen years is invented. New class a microphone. Which is the men's microphone so it's basically a silicon wafer where the structures are built using standard silicon techniques and with a little magic we a- carbos up and put him in a little boxes and test them and salacious is voice enabled. These days has got a high probability of having a new right okay. So let's let's talk about both those product lines and a little bit more detail. So the the mems microphones when we're talking about. Let's say true wireless earbuds that a lot of people are using today. They had an explosion in an buying last year. Yeah so people were surprised actually thought his mobility devices. Everyone was at home and were buying by earbuds but there are good reasons for that. But tell me about those microphones. So like typical true wireless earbuds. How many mics are in our area. And each one of the buds so The leading players. Today use microphones perkier. So a sets can have six microphones inside which you know surprisingly to some people. That's more microphones is actually a mobile smartphone. These days so why. Why do they use three. What are the roles of the three different mikes. So you know fundamentally you're doing a couple of different use cases or features You start with communication. So if you're doing calls or different things The next thing you're doing is you're doing some sort of noise processing and then On a lot of them People are moving towards Music listing of course but then also doing Anc with that until agenda. Doing with you. Got to microphones in the outside. That are trying to do some sort of directional approach to point them near the voice. They need to be picking up. Whether that's for a phone call or it's four. Basically voice wait commands to talk to whatever assistant is is either edgy naval though are ultimately cloud chainsaw. Or what's score the baseball. Game or whatever's going. On you'll use those same microphones than for different modes transparency. Is what a number of people doing now so you get all day wearing seeking sorta leave him in. If you need to talk to somebody. You're hear something you can switch modes so you take those same microphones in nearly pass through the outdoor sounds. And then the other thing you can do with. Those outside. microphones is due seen awareness. Uh soldier as you're doing. Anc you're doing noise. Cancelling you're doing transparency The more and more advanced devices are using digital signal processing on the device to say in this context or environment going to make some setting changes you know. I need to increase the noise. Cancelling because i'm loud or in a airplane that's got a different frequency spectrum than perhaps a bar restaurants or train does and you'll see on a devices of all their sensors in some way so there are audio sensors and using taken something in process something there and then what did you see on the inside. Mike is while you wanna understand. How much is leaking in. Frankly is the easiest way to think about it. So if i'm playing music through there or having a conversation through there. I know i've got external noise. I know i've got outside. Microphones picked up a level of that noise. If i have an internal microphone. I have somewhat of a reference and if i take the two signals i can take those frequencies that might be seeping through. That are part of the song or the communication. And i can you know signal processing to take those out. So it's sort of a closed loop system in some ways and by having the three you do a lot of things with software you need good processing software to take advantage of him but there's a number of people that are taking advantage of what's been developed a couple years right so if you didn't have the internal mike. What would the issue be a lot of devices today doing. Anc don't have internal mike. That's kind of where it started So you're really doing just feed forward so you're sort of guessing what you're cancelling That if you put the third bike you can feed back. So it's really. Yeah you get close on the one side you know. These sounds are hari song. But you really don't get that Purity that you would get from the foreclosed Right because what it's doing with the whatever that sound leak is into the inside of the ear. It's basically somehow processing combining that with the information from the outside so you're just getting one output is opposed to potentially multiple outputs could be a little bit out of sync correct out of state girl or frequency. Or just you know maybe. The years leaking a little bit. You know you move around so they may have a great signal going but it doesn't know you're chewing moving talking whatever and you got more leakage. Coming through there. It doesn't know to adjust because it just got so. Let me. just ask a couple of things because That often i have an expert like you in as a captive audience. So i think i think these are interesting. Me probably listening So when we think about the different types of on ear in ear and then the tight fitting in the ear. I don't know what do you what do you call about something. That's like just sits in lows fit or -cluded fit louis generally get kinda close federal open fed on the earbuds is how we yeah. General terms get people steered one direction. The other right so that the clothes fit where it's that tight. How come with many of those the There's an issue when you're like chewing drinking or something like that. We joke about dinosaurs steps in some ways role boom so which ended up doing is the close fits to a really nice job of passively attenuating outside so you're taking the noise down and it works really well. It's not expensive so silicone or foam is by preference. Do a great job. But the problem. Then is you've got that very small year cavity and you don't have sort of any relief and so you're what you're doing is you're amplifying those low frequencies and they may be low frequency sticking in but it may just be vibration at the end of the day. And so you know as the jaw is making noises and other things you've got this closed cavity end because of those low frequency signals. You're basically amplifying. And that's giving i guess awkward or uncomfortable approach and so that's why a lot of people have chosen your want. Some sort of open fit in what they'll do is We can call it a leak. It's controlled leak. So if you know how much you're leaking. I can tune for those frequencies sort of make up for some of it The flip side. Is you do a full clothes fit. And you put that internal microphone in there and you sort of send through signals to attenuate some of the other things that again as well because if you're listening on the inside you can pick up the vibrations so so that i think of one particular set of earbuds which have anc. And i don't really find much difference in the the experience whether the anc is on or off but i've taken him running for example and after a few minutes you sort of get used to it but it's not it's not like a great experience whereas some older model that i like which are just sort of rest in the ear Totally a natural experience. Yeah it really gets back to That tore open fit class. It's if i ever go away because you transparency hearing sirens horns cars. Safety is no better way You know there's no microphone application. No as there's no his sometimes so battery usage so at certain use cases in price point two different things. It just works really well. So i think with Earbuds in particular. You know it's true for me being in the business. But i think a lot of people i know you have. Multiple pairs meant the end of the day. Not one size fits all. You're going to have a different set that you like for different activities. It's amazing how many people think about like airpods for example and they'll say oh it's it's like these are less expensive now but these are really expensive. But i'm always going to get one and then what you find is that people have like four you know and they might be like airpods one sport thing from gyro somebody and then and like another thing that they've just acquired somewhere something that links over the air for more stability something that's great in just the battery life. I mean that's the other thing is when the batteries are dead. Some of them work on the old classic. The battery went dead. The anc stop in. But you still a pair of your phone. Listen to thing. So i think people make those trade offs will continue to have a few things in the pocket or purse. Okay all right well so we probably went a little bit deeper and that use case. We'll we're gonna come back to some of these things Let's talk about so did earbuds market. I've seen nick gun talk about this in terms of tracking the increase and music streaming services over the years and so a lot of a lot of it has been just the convenience of having that music in the phone and having some easy way to do this true wireless earbuds got us out of that problem. If you're getting out of a of an uber cab wire your but the players go everywhere again. I can't tell you how many times it happened to me So we saw that. But we're also seeing people start to think about this a little bit more about the quality of what they're they're listening to because there's a wide variation so maybe you could just talk a little bit about how that markets evolved as well. Yeah definitely you know. When i started a knows one of the things i focused on was a small business that we had which was selling are hearing aid components for music earphones. And it's a huge vote. What i learned was for those people that are doing this for a living. As in live stage performers They didn't just throw in earbuds to go onstage. They do special devices and the reason they did this special devices. In the reason they use the knowles components is what they're doing is replacing the wedge monitor us front of the stage that unfortunately just blasted music adam and allowed level to offset whatever's going on and just caused a loss and so a number of i say hearing loss people had kind of figured out what i can take this technology that use in these hearing aids which are these very very small speakers and we call balanced speakers just because of their construction and what they do is they say i. We're gonna fit somebody and to get that full fidelity they're looking for may do a two three four way and what they end up doing new think about your old floor speakers You know the very much tall. And yet you know subway from the corner or mid range to tweet or something like that With the balanced armature is because they're small often because of their profile. You can fit a four way together so you can tune one of them to be your offer you can tune one or two to be the mid range then you put the tweeter in there and so that's something that we've always done to get that really flat or customized frequency response across the range that really allows them to pick up Symbols debase the different things and as we saw that emerge over the years. A number of people that took that concept and said hey we can sell these commercials and they tend to be a higher price point very specially specialty kind of audio file We've seen a few mass market companies introduce those products But what it ended up doing is you've got the really high end over the years. A lot of people had gotten usage. You can do some good things if you got a nice sized dynamic in there but you really shrink the dynamic down you gotta choose. I'm doing low and my doing high. What am i going to give up and it kinda got to the point. Where the freer buds giveaway. The plane or other places they were just cheap You know they weren't actually tuned for music and then with the mp three kinda had class of people just like. If i go portable gotta give up. And i think we've seen is as high fidelity streaming services of calm and people gained an appreciation that i want to get back to how it was recorded. They realize all right. I got this great recording. But then i still can't hear it a net gets back to while you've gotta make some different choices and if you want something that's earbud instead of the over. Here's what we found is the balanced armature technology sometimes coupled hybrid yell. the dynamic. Does a really nice job on the roll frequency if you've got an open fed as we talked about to take care of all that leaky but if you're willing to go sealed you can get a really super performance sound at a size batteries. That spare practical. And frankly the price point in candy manageable right. So when when we're talking about this you talk about the balanced armature. What are some of the other technologies that people use out there. And what are the differences between them in terms of it. Sounds like you're talking about the quality and the in the yeah there are would say we talk about the earbud you Over the years earbuds is how we separate them headphones earphones. And people like the preferably earbuds because you can put him in the pocket or they're smaller. Not wires go away and i think there. There's really the two choices it's a moving coil. Voice goal driven standard dynamic driver and You know the balanced armature technology and what we end up seeing is some people make a choice to go very high high-performance in the dynamic can get pretty close but you really significant price point on In trying to go into it. So you're not Sorta bottoming out the voice coil at high volume and different things like that But one of the things is you end up with it's bigger It might be a little bit less efficient with all the signal processing so you end up burning some power and so the trade offs really. What we see is sound quality size power and price at the end of the day. You know. there's a certain price with the balanced armature. It's a premium product. So we're not going to be in the free giveaways on the united flights but You know if you're willing to pay for something with some great quality. The multi driver of the hybrids are really nice approach. So now i think you're involved or certainly was involved with the development of the standards. Around the true wireless earbuds. We've been active Kind of in that ecosystem for a lotta years. Both on microphones in what people are looking to do and then the audio output in the audio off what tends to be. Ross you know what's the frequency range. Or what's the quality you can get as they gotta lean on the standards You know there's a number protocols out there. The different manufacturers from is so when you look at that standard what were some of the key things you think that happened. There did have put us in a position to be successful today where we are with sort of a rapidly growing here segment. It was primarily the synchronization between between the earbuds. Was it memory. Was it all the above something else you know. It's a little bit of lot of factors. I think at the end of the day. The big enabler was the synchronisation. you know. The i hear ables the first true wireless We worked very early on the back. Follow twenty twelve. We engaged with somebody who can add a brand new concept startup in as we got into it and worked closely with them in. We divided up this tasks and we said we'd take on some of the acoustic expertise. They spent a ton of time working on the bluetooth side of it with partners and Greg concept which realized that things have to share and i think as the standards have matured. Chips have matured. You know you get that synchronization. You also now moving to where you're gonna get low lower power that's the other big draw is a long things last and i think some people have kinda gone outside the standards as a starting point but the standards are now sort of saddling maturing. So you'll have sort of that low energy with high quality audio that i think will become the defacto standard for this class with devices. Go on we. We're talking about the the microphone versus the speaker in earbuds. What's the ratio of power. Draw between the two. So the challenges on the microphones depending on what you're doing there on all the time and so what we end up looking at. We've got kind of different classes. We can we have a. We supply microphones. Today for those true wireless devices. That can run a week plus on a button cell so disposal matter right so the microphone itself can get really really really low Speaker it's obviously going to be proportional to allow us so depending on what you're doing that's kinda the use case trade-offs if you really driving it hard loud music And it's kind of the parallels back to the hearing aids somebody with high level of loss is gonna ride them a lot harder and that tends to be you know bigger drawn the batteries So you can get You know really. Low on the microphones in sort of a sleep listening mode to enable long life but on the on the speakers themselves. If they're being used they're going to be a much. bigger draw. create is by the end of the day. The radio itself is a much bigger than that. And so you sort of cascade down in what we end up with Discussions with our customers is okay. This is what i got left. So find me. A suite of products that will fit in the sort of acoustics budget. Because i've already had to allocate x for processing radio and the prosecutor radio tend to dwarf. Anything we do. So we're always squeezing power. People are always asking us for power but our devices are way down on the list of power. draw okay so for power driver. we've got bluetooth connectivity. We've got the the process audio processing debt. And then we've got the running the the speakers allen. Dr speaker and microphone both lasted okay. Yeah that's that's great. That's really good context pres. Yeah all right. So let's think about the use cases. We talked to a moment about or just a moment ago about the rise of of digital audio particularly in the mobile device arena. We see your podcast obviously have come on top of that. But they're very small percentage of overall listening when the grand scheme of things. But i did have a question about that in terms of optimizing the sound profile for talk versus music. How does that go into your engineering discussion as a difference in power draws or difference in the coosa profiles or can use the same models for both. You can use the same models both at the end of the day. We have customers that optimize around voice If it's just a pasture device Committee hearing a legacy trying to recreate voices So we'll do some things to eliminate other noises that you may not wanna pass through and we can tune them but if somebody comes to us and said hey wanna high fidelity on the voice will get picked up. Just fine you know. We're really focused about the full range in picked up and have no trouble at least in you know our zone of Of the voice fans. They're not that difficult to get. So if it's just voice then you have a narrower frequency range you can optimize around therefore it can be tighter you can draw less power as opposed to having a much broader range very much the right way to think about it and you know if you think about that in terms of if i got a dynamic speaker a balance return of just him voice. I don't really need to worry about that. Low frequency sound or i don't need to high frequency symbols and you can. It's just easier to build a device make trade offs. So if you're doing anything that's music and you know we're now stretching out twenty k thirty forty k. up four different Applicastions or different things. People are doing You know there's some technology shirt off. She had to get there but at the end of the day. I think it's it's really more tuning. It's not like you're an incrementally new cost world gotta know what your exotic for so beyond beyond those two those two use cases talk or just. We'll just we'll call one use case audio content consumption. What are you most focused on. In terms of use cases trying to support i would say the output processing and strong music are a piece of it but we spent a lot more time talking about Input so anc. Is that a music case or is it really audio conditioning today. You're doing audio conditioning. And those audio conditioning. Use cases are difficult You know that's why we're in the business You know. I want these sounds. I don't want these sounds but i don't want this to be too loud but i gotta hear this and then You know the selective is becoming more and more different use cases. So using the microphones tuning appropriately that they can behave as your recording device in a rock concert at honored. Twenty five thirty db. That's painful but if you're taking a video and you've got protection or something you wanna go show somebody the video when it's all clicked off yet. You not doing your job. That same microphones got to pick up a whisper call. And so you gotta figure out. All right i gotta have these different characteristics or may be something really quiet Performance kids performance or something. And you want to pick up everything so that full range and then you know. We spend a lot of time. Talking about opera processing input processing robustness dropped it in the pool. I dropped did period. You know these are mechanical devices. Both our speakers or microphones in particular is a membrane that you're moving driving. We make the smallest possible They tend to be very sensitive materials so we spent a lot of time on you. It's got a sound great. But it's also gonna last mcdonald's and save us take for granted but you know many times. Yeah you'd be surprised. How much of our effort goes into at. We got the acoustics figuring out. Now we gotta make sure it lasts because the other day these devices if your not able to talk to it or pass through. It's not work. It's the core use case that's right so let's talk about. Anc for just a moment because strikes me that this is newt. Earbuds not not that is completely new but It's now becoming almost two bic witness. It seems whereas we used to get them on the can headphones The nice tight sale than they added the the anc assume that the big innovation here is power consumption or something else. yeah it's interesting You're going from analog to digital a lot of cases so the analogs were such that you would get a nice tight seal you designed around that tight seal you tune your coefficients and you'd sorta burnham in that. Was that set of your butts. What it is when it left the factory and doesn't have any sex so it didn't really matter what sort environment you're in you may trade-offs gave him something. Louder doesn't work as well worked. Great one quiet and so as that shrunk from the over the years to the in ears you know beginners unit with a little bit of a external pack. You know i own them or you end up with a bigger air because you really gotta get that chip in processing technology in there. And they're sort of that was version one version to is always like we can do this with a digital approach but a digital approach means for us digital microphone which has got a different interface and a whole bunch of other opportunities to get right and with that ultimately You know you can do very low power analog. It's pretty well but by moving to digital you end up actually eating a bit more power so we end up working very hard to work. The power back down for provide somebody features and the configure ability that they can now do sort of seen switching or mode switching or writing things. The answer that you just can't do with a fixed antilock. Yes so the the the an c. n. era. I mean what was what was the first time that those came out so i would say The bose qc's are said qc fifteen. That i had for a long time. you know they're wired and you had the battery pack on the cord. I had to charge a battery pack with the usb But those were great anc in the air. One of the first season. I in those. Those were the ones they they were. They were wired. Were they'd wire. Just to a pack and then wireless or wired right to the device. They're white wire advice. And i think then they they may have stepped. I think they stepped right to putting the radios kind of in parallel. As the true wireless emerged. They moved the radios up. And you went true wireless in those first ones. But what what timeframe are we. Looking at true wireless. Anc which true wireless anc. The devices that we talked to the people about in twelve. I guess those launched in may be fourteen You had a few other people's hide states. Twenty fifteen twenty. Sixteen started I would say you know the airpod pros have done a really good job of able meeting true wireless and the anc annette's what three years ago that got a so so we're within the last six years and it was a small selection. Initially it very much is. Because you've got all right we wanna do. Anc i wanna go digital. I need to have chips. That can power effectively. Run all this. Anc and do the switching and funds in. It's it's fairly complex problem. So i would say we're seeing a lot of customers. Moving from generation to generation to generation here on their roadmaps to improve upon it got and so as you look at the market like what percent of the market today has. Anc we always look at in terms of price points you know just kinda tends to be the way it is so if you look at earphones above one ninety nine versus air phones in that one hundred ninety nine in one hundred We really don't see it at the one hundred There are things out there that say. Anc but you. And i both look at mcgaw. You're doing something but it's not really seat. You're knocking some noise down chart account debt. But i think that above two hundred dollar price point. And i think as we look at new designs coming forward. I don't expect anybody to have you know a mainstream high-performance device that does not have. I think it's going to be given feature just because you can do so many different things with a you know. Once you get the software platform up running And is really important for it was anc for music. But now it's noise processing if you're having a conversation with somebody or it's noise processing if i want to pick up my wake word and so it ends up being kind of moving from just anc multipurpose actions right. It seems to me that we started to see in there under the two hundred range. The active noise reduction not the cancellation and so does that. Active noise reduction. Does that still stick around. Or is that going to the the value segment low hundred or does a. It's just binary. Anc or not. No i think its ships down. I mean with anything it's You know what is the semiconductor processing capabilities in the al complexity in. I've got something that ends up being standard standard feature. Yeah think you'll see continued integration by the radio guys of if i can add some features differentiate my radio. You may be a kind of a standard check. The box kind of like analog breaks it. You can't buy a car without him because the price point came down to where it's sorta just in the system got it all right now. That's that's really good so you actually expect to see that. Even sub hundred dollar price point to start reduction. Yeah anything that's got a power to minutes you know if you want to move away from a passive device where you're driving it off the port. You've got the budget you've got the battery. You're not using that much okay. Yeah that's that's great. Well let's talk about something that the listeners of this podcast will be interested in in particular is the rise of voice assistance. Yes so my sense is that there's a lot of people in my industry that really look at this. And i'm i'm actually one of those who think that this is a really interesting use case but then when i talked to people in the In in your industry. Let's say they're like yeah. It's really interesting but it's very small. You know where do you come down this. So i think it's going to be very big But today if you look at percentage unit shipped across different classes of devices whether it be you call the tv set-top box soundbar. Remote television. Still pretty small appliances whitegoods vacuums robots coffee makers still pretty small. You know there's very small adoption rates There's a lot of people who've got prototypes in test cases. And they're kind of figuring out what's the right fit Enjoy need a voice enabled refrigerator. You'd say well just open the door but then you get into like while it's in the kitchen it's you know maybe a good spot for some of the stuff and maybe the speaker in the corner goes away because other things connect with each other so i think of it on those sort of core plants as we just talked about very small mobile phones today. She ubiquitous it's gonna stay there and sort of built in Earphones we've talked about previously nra anc. If you're plugged in and you got microphones why would you not voice right. So you know change saw turn up you know. I keep filling with a minute. I never get it right. I got two different pairs camera. One is the the push twice the other than maybe just a can't remember which one is backwards or forwards on songs. I do remember. Hey whatever song whore. So there's a. I think a number of use cases that we expect to broad ago. And then it's you know lots of applications that light switches and other things in elevators. Elevator is going to be a great example. Why do you have to ask somebody to push the button for the foyer want. He just asked tell it to go to your floor. There's a great video us. Yeah i i think it just showed it. I'm voice about live really To scottish guys who get on voice enabled elevator. It's like sixty i've enjoyed. That is very very funny. I'm hoping that's not the prototype but it's very very funny. Yeah they've got. They've got the whole play on scottish accent. And it's it's it's good but yeah so i. I see a lot of people starting to look at this very seriously. Particularly with the new view of the contact lists environment future or maybe having both right see remained maintaining the buttons and that. I think you know you're going to transition. I think for a class of people. Technology changes not comfortable. Things always take a lot longer at least from my perspective that you know for people to adopt the concept because there's always some technology bugs and then there's that learning curve and then i'm stuck in my ways so you know the reality for me is one of the reasons why we're not seeing it as broadly is it's somewhat complex to do it. Well there early implementations that okay. i'm voice enabled. I only work when it's quiet. Let's stop really voice enabled it is but that's not the use case that people expect and so when you have these all this error and calling and yelling at it not getting Kinda like your elevator. It's like this isn't quite there and so what that ends up being. Though is you're making the choice of all right. I'm gonna cloud process armitage process and the first class of devices raw caught processed. And they were in either a wildfire environment environmental urine a cellular environment where no big deal but These applications you don't wanna be in a connected environment you don't wanna have that tax in the sense of paying for the wi fi paying for the cellular independent of the cost of implementing that your device the power usage. So what we're seeing is. People are very much appreciating for certain use cases. It just needs to be edge and the edge has to be cost effective in terms of power usage and overall cost but has that performance. That is good enough We're never gonna compete with the cloud on ability to get the signal to noise. We know what the benchmark is and so. It's a little bit working back down helping our customers with you. Know good albo. Good voice wake good words fighting as well as good audio processing and then having a Microphoning put and low power processor. That brings that sweet together. It's just taken some years to get figured out. So i think you'll start to see a lot more devices. Is that package gets bundled out there. Well and when we talk about edge we're talking about two different classes of edge devices. Because we have wired the wireless ones we think are aligned with what you just said ones. They don't have to worry about power. They've got plenty of room to put processing and for the most part. Yes but and this gets back to the epa and the eu. You know agreeing tv or green appliance. If you're sleeping archer wifi is on going to the cloud waiting for me to wake the tb up with the voice. You're no longer compliant. So the reality is there's a class of power devices that you and i would think you got power no problem but they've all said hey we're gonna be good stewards on climate change and everything else and there's a number regulations you have to comply and so if you comply in that way You can't be wifi connected per se So that's why we look at it and say well true edges wander intel. Whatever it is the wake up. But i don't wanna be doing it in a way that it's powered like it's fully on the whole time. I was thinking of an elevator. It's always going to have power elevated. yes and that's a yeah. They'll have power all the time if you use cloud that's probably a good example where the power budget's not a real budget. You know the traction motors can eat up more than you're even there. I mean you. You mentioned cloud You could do a really robust implementation on the edge for an elevator. You never need to go to the cloud. And that's the point is though okay. The building different countries. Different activities my. It guy wants to clamp down. Because i don't want you know maybe you're working in a sense of industry and you know the whole. It system is totally clamped down. Except your elevators. Captured the cloud with microphones. So i expect there will be places where maybe it's better that we don't have connected to cloud if you know what i mean. That's interesting well you know. I see two different schools coming up around edge computing. One is really just talking about performance right and then the other talking about privacy. Yeah i think You know we look at it from the microphone. It's always gonna be sensitive device. Everyone's gonna have concerns about rare microphone. Import going and in a lot of the implementations in the technologies we approach. We've moved from being just the microphone speaker guy to moving upstream for that reason in we've seen the the opportunity in their need for low power and so you know we have a small light of digital signal processing jeb senator. Al goes all the software goes with it and we really pitch part of a low power optimized limited functionality. You know it's not a everything everybody. Mcu it's doing some normal but fundamentally it doesn't have any connections cloud you know you've device itself is isolated. So if you build a board you just don't have any connectivity to a radio chip than there is no radio risk. It's really interesting. So i should go back to voice assistance for just a moment and one of the i wanted to point you to a couple of pieces of data that we have from consumer surveys here at the s One that we found was that the growth in us on smartphones in particular has gone up about ten acts over two years so if you think about the growth of voice assistance just through the the mic that's on the smartphone itself is is about doubled. yep but it's gone tannock's tax through the to the hero beatles and then the other thing that i was thinking about there was that the We had the growth obviously last year about ninety percent growth. I think in sales in the second half of the year anyway of the devices and for us on smartphones. It's one of the questions we asked in. Our survey was what do you. How do you most often access your voice assistant when using your smartphone and that's gone up till like ten percent so one ten in this happens to be actually the people who use it tends it tends to be the dominant form for them and then most other people don't use it but it's it we've seen a really significant change in my assumption is that there's two forces here but is more important than the other one key forces. The people just have curable devices now that they didn't have for years ago and then the other is people who are starting to use voice systems more so maybe maybe that's doubled over the last several years but the availability of of urals that can access voice. Assistance has grown by that factor of ten. What are thoughts on that. yeah. I think That is true. And i think you know on the mobile side you think about when the first voice assistance for launching the phones it was a relatively long time ago right and know the fact that you're still seeing uptick in growth in a variety of things one get performance so people have an expectation that all right. They've figured it out. I'm not getting that annoying response that i used to get To you have demographics. There's a whole class of teams that have never done anything. But like why would you turn it on and touch screen. You know so. They just sorta moving forward. And i think the same is to be said for the true wireless device in the year devices. Y- you've got a couple of devices that have done it now as a standard the performances getting there than sort of people are sort of getting used to use cases or getting used to it You know it's one of those things that i think you're gonna survey again. I'm sure and da. I think that's going to be one of the few things that i'll bet heavily that the rate will be no question higher. You know there's no plateau that seems to be coming because for most of what we're doing on these devices voices good enough or it's the ideal way of doing it. Yeah well we see that across the board interested though. You mentioned The demographics there. And so i assume you spend a lot of time thinking about. This has a company that has a hearing aid business. True wireless business that. We spent a lotta time demographics. Yes so. are you a both ends of the bell curve. There's been some people have said over the years are recreating challenges with our good speakers. That maybe we up later. You know. I've heard story. Although i i would think that they actually the new class of earbuds going significantly realize you ask about that third. Mike has one of the other things you can do. The third bike is you can do dosimetry so you can listen for free four hours. Whatever you're listening to such a. Hey i'd spend a little overdoing it here in know you're gonna opt out but the reality is your ears could use a break so it says be some sort of like intervention they would they would come from from where from your smartphone or yeah mean or the device itself can kinda gets adds up. You know you've been at higher super high Eleven now for two hours. You know i'll let you want to continue. I haven't really haven't really thought about that that much now. I will say that. I guess systems would be smart enough to know whether the noise Pumping directly into your ears is louder than what you have around you. Because some people are using them. Because there's a lot of noise around them as well. The systems are all smart enough today. It's a question of software processing but yet you've got all the centers on the platform already. Well let's talk about the. Let's talk about. Sensors gets two different things just in terms of applications the hearing side. And maybe we'll just talk about other devices at the end but So one of the things were. There's a big move towards is using some of the sound augmentation capabilities in order to help out people with mild hearing loss who would never who almost never wind up in the hearing aid category And i guess it's really the mild to moderate some least low end of the moderate. What are your thoughts there. And how that. Markets developing is an application. That people are g- rocking At this at this point or is it still just too much of a novelty You know i think it is going to slowly keep becoming accepted Because you've got in some ways. The historically the stigma around wearing hearing it. I think stigma's largely faded alot. The median hearing envir- from last. Hi survey is still in their seventies So you know. I think people have gotten to the point. I can't hear. I might as well go do something about it and the despite our so discreet you know depending on what hairstyle you where you can't tell you have been so i think that is expanding it and i think then you get the next classes while not quite ready for hearing aid but if i have a feature on maybe these buds i wear all the time Maybe i'll try it. Maybe it's a way for me to insert applications. Give it a try. I think what you're looking for is restaurants and bars with that loud noise that's generally the hardest application for anybody. It's losing a tends to be more high frequency loss. I and if you can get a device to say well actually this is improving for me or laying my phone down on the table in front of you and i'm wearing earbuds. There's different ways you can go at it. I don't necessarily think that the true wireless are gonna replace. Hearing aids at all. I think ultimately somebody who's got a problem and embraces that there some solutions to solve that the ecosystem the infrastructure that's built to kinda handhold them through that bring him back tournament of an train. 'em it's important you know. There's a certain class of replacement. I'm looking for but i do think there will be people that will be supplementing and maybe gateway a little bit to say all right you know. Maybe there's some things. I can do watching tv or different use cases where i'm ready to commit to the hearing aids but i can You know address few things and We're not that far off from that. As i said the system is their capabilities or there I think the big trade off these days between a hearing aid and a true wireless device is the battery life. You know you're expected on a true wireless device to take about charge of every force hearing aid manufacturers all know that's not life you know they were in the middle of the day. That's right well. How long before we have true wireless earbuds that are all day. Wear so what. I think we're seeing is some of the hearing aid manufacturers are adding features to play music streaming music and those are all all day. Wear so it's gonna be interesting to see him thousand our devices. Let's talk about devices that are sub two fifty right. When are we going to see one of those where you can actually have a man all day using them and you won't have to charge until bedtime. Yeah i think it's a good still ways off because it's sort of add a battery chemistry driven. And i think we all know whether it's ev or two wireless The lithium cells the density. It's it's not moving exponentially it's incrementally and we're looking for a breakthrough there as well as that it's going to be Semiconductor nodes Processing and i think system partitioning say this is where we're spending time in these modes. All you have odd is the microphone. Then i'm going to switch modes than switch votes. And i think you can see more of that so i think it stretches but i still think we're number years from somebody coming out and saying hey. This thing is twelve hours. No charging five years fox. Probably right is probably right. Okay i just think about semiconductor design trends and battery trans. So i think about this too. And i've i've talked to when your colleagues view on that i don't i'm not as close to the To the trajectory of the innovation. There is as you are. So i don't know that i would have a better sense of that i it does strike me that it's not moving fast and your colleague. Andy is talk to me about this fact that even when they do get better power performance. They tend to add a feature before a focused on. Yeah i totally agree is a we could squeeze a little more power out or i could put another feature on the box to differentiate like a go into feature bank four hours season. Yeah exactly it's like i guess. Apple set the standard apples. Like oh we can do four and a half hours that better. You know everyone else is like okay. I can do five hours but no more like not worth So that leads to the other thing about other things in these devices. I don't think i think this little field from where you're going but you talked about sensors and we talk about microphone in sound stuff like that but people are are very anxious to but other types of sensors in the ears I'm not a i. I'll be your your perspective. I'm not a big Oceans a big fan of it. I should say that. I'm not overly optimistic. That that's where it's going to go. Just because i still believe that the earbuds are going to be in an out devices People aren't going to have them in all the time. And for some type of bio sensing feature people are going to want it to be on all the time even though they asked is such. I think it's the same as the prior point when you get to all day. Well you're not gonna probably be a great platform for sensing until you get to wear it I think the watch today. The wrist isn't as good but they've found a way to get all day wearing just that form factor and is and so it's becoming more of a place for it and i think it's the trade off of you have all wearing period devices but the sensors in your really the power budget. So you're again. You're coming back to that Age old problem of power. What can they do. Well let's talk about the other devices because we spent a lot of time talking about here. Because i'm definitely not an it's of interest to my audience but you're not just in in these devices you're in a lot of devices now. So what areas are you most excited about in terms of your business. They're growing. that are using microphones speakers. Your other technology so we've done very well in the smart speaker business You know again. That's a relationship of us being around for a while we worked with a few of those customers on a bunch of different things that you maybe didn't turn into the blockbusters combination of use case in. You know we were there to say we can take care of the microphone processing for you. what we've seen though is we've seen sort of a flattening in the cloud. Sorry in the smart speaker I dunno growth rates It yeah i definitely flat at people like me in the biz and i upgraded one. But i graded not for the voice capabilities. I wanted better music output. Yeah so the music side at the end of the day drives my upgrade. All almost all of the new smart speaker sold in the us last year where two people that already on smart speakers there were almost no new net news. Art speaker owners here. It's like And i think the key there is It's got to migrate to other devices as we talked about. And so that's really what i'm excited about is we've had a nice kind of twenty twenty Growth in product announced with our customers in the conferencing space. Doing a calls like this. Why more people are doing calls. Zoom calls yes teams calls and everything else in their sorta realizing you sound terrible idea. They're like what you sound worse than i do. It's like you need upgrade bruins. Living i get out of college. Somebody like time for different solution. This isn't your bandwidth That's the problem. And so that's been a nice Kinda work from home upgrade for us that we've seen and they tend to be you know go bluetooth Operated we're gonna go voice enabled and we're gonna provide great audio the next big frontier where i think we see it is. I talked about briefly. Tv class of device in we've seen My provider i have a bunch of voice roads which got to push the button to go find it. Grab it. I about a doctor. Okay we like the you i. We like voice works fact. Quite voice enabled device. And so i think everybody said. Hey this is really the answer. But it's a question of okay now. When does that catch up to say. I'm totally voicing able and i think i'm excited about that because i'm not gonna go buy a whatever because the voices better now whereas speakers kind of a dedicated purpose but if i'm upgrading whatever. It is appliance tv component. I'm to expect that well. My last one had boys capability. Why am i buying one without voice capability you know getting that or operable is key for us when it comes to the smart. Tv's or the smart media products. It's mostly the microphone business that you're focused on correct. I would say it's pretty equal for us We are doing a lot of the edge edge processor side because whether it's tws or tv they've got a application processor radio chip in their. Tv's a great example The chip is full. The sense of it's optimized for. I got to the dolby gotta do the video. The eight can't do all this stuff and so it's a little bit of. I want to make room for the voice piece harnett room and then the other thing that's really worked out well for us. People have kind of different price points in future points across their line whether it's appliances. Tv's different things. Yeah you're ak seventy two inch. Tv has got a different processor than the giveaway twenty itch. And you're not gonna put that expensive processor in just voice so what. We're seeing a lot of Success with is microphones of course. But we're also saying well. Hey i can get your your voice experience for your brand to be standard across all your price points. Just kinda edgy naval it. You get your software working and that's really exciting for us as it becomes data platform play. You know it's a feature to have and every time. I upgrade whatever. I gotta go re upgrade the voice. It's kind of a pain. I can get it working and have a reliable platform for it. Today it's theron turnoff. I'm up by down guide. You know that's right so what you're talking about. Then is the system business to the microphone. Where the whole suite makes it easier for these players. And so i want to ask you just in general about market observations as we close a one thing. You just mentioned smart. Tv's we've seen in our data significant growth in the acquisition of those. But also the use of them in particularly with lois yup and i- i- tribute that part to behavior change but a lot of it's just availability distribution. Now of more things that that you can speak to and so. There's there's two two vectors coming together. If you think about people in the voice. I industry who typically are focused on the application stack. How how would you recommend. They interpret that data around smart. Tv's are you thinking that there's going to be new applications. People are going to be expecting to be on there. There's gonna be this fusing of what we're doing on the phone and what we're doing in the smart speaker to the javale different. No i think it is content on the. Tv's obviously the lead base once you move beyond the basic features it's finding me content effectively. But you know don't need a smart speaker in a room where i got a smart tv. Don't they all just give me scores and news and you know particularly if you want media sound system. It's better quality than smart spider. Why would you do. I need in what we've seen is living rooms really popular place for smart speakers but it seems redundant if you've got that all television and the family thing know. I got the new high-quality smart speaker that i was going to put it another room it up in the living room. The families all excited like this is great. We could play music. I'm like we have a music system like. Yeah but you got get the remote to push the button and unlike all right i get it. Sorry soon all that with vicinity. Have you're right. Yeah so in that way. I think of it as its use case expansion. Whether it's the automobile your phone your earbuds your tv. Probably a few others that are not. The sorta interface focused elements people looking for that ubiquitous experience of wherever matt. I'm gonna treat it the same way. Ask it this practice. Let's perfect brian. I thank you for spending so much time with us today. Really appreciate it. Great how how should the listeners learn more about knowles in keep up with what you're doing all the time you know i think the best is knowles dot com. We're doing a more active job Refreshing materials there can get linked to microphones bounce armature as well as Processing in audio pretty active on linked in non you know different releases and things. We've got going and overall hope to cs more in the in the news with new product releases coming out this guy and for those of you are listening and are familiar with. The company knows as k. n. o. w. l. e. asks that's correct. Yes i've come across at once or twice maybe a story or two about you guys. Thank you voiced by listeners. For listening all the way to the end once again i'm brechin consoler. Your host. The voice podcast. You can find me. On the twitter african sela any clubhouse apres can sell us so a lot of you've seen you. They're looking forward to android expansion to clubhouse and we'll probably be on twitter spaces pretty soon too. But i was really happy to be able to bring you the story around hardware. We a lot of us focus on software most of the time. But that's offered doesn't get to work if we don't have the input and output from the from the hardware so brian thanks so much for giving us a few minutes today to talk a lot. More about what you've been doing it innovating in the space except really enjoyed it.

anc knowles Anc brian cranston brian crandall knows corporation frank randall knowles corp aids nick gun united flights ables basf Cranston bose qc hari corp brett hugh
First Friday Q + A on Oil and Gas This Week  OGTW225

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast

31:36 min | 3 months ago

First Friday Q + A on Oil and Gas This Week OGTW225

"You're listening to the oily gas this week. Podcast with marc lacorte and page wilson. Vince is the show for busy oil pros. Who quickly want to keep their finger on the pulse of the industry. You're listening to all this week. Podcast brought to you by. Ibm this is the show for busy. All pros who want to quickly he their finger on the pulse of the industry. Thanks for joining us. For first freddie q. And a. episode to twenty five happy new year mark. How are you do it. Also happy new year to you page in happy new year to all of our listeners. Out there we made it through twenty twenty and i don't know if they could never get worse than that but sides being happy new year. Everybody got a bunch of stuff going on. I wanna take this chance to mention that we have a hybrid event that we're gonna do some time in january for some really exciting announcements one including the show. Don't have a date yet. Don't have a location yet. But we're probably have forty or fifty people in person here in houston then we'll have two or three or four thousand people on the livestream. This attention our social media. Susan get everything bake will get that out there and then the other thing talk about real quick is reviews. We got this i view of the year page. And you actually cut this off so have to go to the website to look at it but it says informative and professional show my favorite five stars. I have been listening to the show for a year now and i love it in fact i like the show so much that i created an apple. Id just leave a review since the android podcast app won't let you review these guys know. The industry are realistic. They always promote diversity and equality in the industry on the environmental side. They always inform their audience about the oil and gas industries optimization actions to run cleaner however sometimes they confuse me about the prosperity and the longest industry offers. I think they always mean economic prosperity and not our environmental one. I get it. We need a good economy prosper. But what about a clean environment for our children and grandchildren. We need a balance. Marcus always acknowledged when he's wrong about something and promised to keep improving the show. A very human team runs the show like their family. I hope i can attend one of their events. one day. That was belt. But it happens as a great review for i one of the i never right for qaeda. You knew the deal you ask the questions. The goal is not to stomp page nine. The goal is to help educate our audience. Let's get into the first one. I don't think i've ever seen this guy. But yeah i think it's pronounced ludvik ludvik. Yeah you'd be cough exactly means on every first friday q. And a. and he asked what thanksgiving's about so basically it's a national holiday for the united states. And if i look at the wikipedia just kind of figured out mark. Canada also celebrates it granada saint lucia and liberia all celebrate. But for different reasons it began as a day of giving thanks and sacrifice for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year. So you know here. In north america we really commemorate the harvest festival celebrated by the pilgrims back in like the sixteen hundreds so ludwick basically the first americans almost starve to death. They partnered with the native americans here. The native americans helped them form in conditions that they were not used to coming from europe. 'cause forming here in the north america's radically different and so the helped him get through the first severe winter without starving to death and they were so thankful they gave. Thanks and that's where thanksgiving came from. Get down good. Yeah all right next question. Can this is from one caicedo. Oil movements analysts oregon refining inc. Hi guys my name is one. And i recently graduated with a master of management and energy from two lane. I have been a regular listener. Blown guests sweet podcast for the past year and absolutely love it. You guys always bring relevant topics and great content. It is an excellent way to stay informed and very useful for me as an oil movements illness. Keep up the great work. I look forward to the big changes. Coming up with edgy and website. Oh and by the way are really want one of those. Ibm t-shirts argue. That so this wasn't really a question. Mark well so he works for oregon. Route find her and they do a very specialized very niche. their nap. pathetic oil were five. What does that even mean. That pathetic is one of the several base oils. There's synthetics there's mineral when the mineral brands and they have different characteristics. This was known as having less wax in it. So think about lubricates. The fluid temperatures right. You have more wax and oil the wax to become a solid disaster. Kate here's a bit of trivia that a bit. Nobody knows other than me. Because his how marks brain works. I believe actually speaking of lubricate and things and low temperatures. You wanna guess what oil we still use today to lubricate. Satellites have to go from extremely cold extremely hot in a few seconds wail oil really is the only oil that can stay in this temperature swing so when you think of a satellite the hubble and you think of the motors turning the transmission to realize that mirror. It's lubricating oil interests saying now. How did you figure the first off what prompted for you. try to figure out what that was. This is something. I researched for the show. This of the stuck in the back of my head and we start talking about less waxy oil basis and it just popped meadow. There's a one that's even better that way oil. So there you go audience you get educated stuff next time you pay trivial pursuit and you win. Give me credit for nomar wind. Don't send why he has enough source. Ibm shirts one. We can't give you one takes her one and help design them so you have to register it but one. If you don't win red every week just read every week eventually. If you live long enough you'll in you. Have this gone by then right all right. So the next one is from phil pearson president and rnd llc mark. Do you still play on debating. The ibm person on climate warming so phil. Thanks for keeping me to my bosa made us as probably maybe even close two years ago. But phil were doing actually something better. We don't have all the details baked but it looks like it could be a panel discussion between some the top client scientists in the world and myself in alex which and awesome. And we're going to talk through this not from an emotional point of view. Nothing political point of you were doctors. As a from a factual point of view you will see both sides. you'll see the heavy hitters. Come out with all the data. And i think page what we're gonna do. Is we charge. Lafayette we're take that money give it to charity cooling. Yeah have you all decided which one yet not yet. It's still trying to get everything lined up but phil we. Do we gonna do at a much better much deeper much higher scale than originally just me and david goal from. Ibm sewed so stay tuned. It's coming it will be in the first quarter this year. A kind of a little nervous to get on stage at lowe's level of client scientists. But you know what a walk. The walk right. They feel it's coming. Oh so this is a i just as bad here hosted oj n. Hey i think another guy. Have we ever had any one of our hosts. Ask a question before. I don't think so. I think luther like spending too much time with us or talk to listen to their own podcast. And they don't wanna listen. Yeah whatever so you. Until the audience with joseph's the host of actually. I don't have my wife offer lousy so poor. Joe has been steadfastly very patiently. Wait i get to show launch no. Yeah it's what's happening this year. So question says when you mentioned the canadian gusher. Well and talked about geothermal. I think he misspoke and you said norway's producer of geothermal. My i thought for geothermal is iceland. Thirty percent of their electricity is geothermal and seventy percent. Hydropower norway investing in geothermal energy research in has some amount of direct use geothermal but no electricity production just wanted to clarify that. Thank y'all so folks. You see why joseph is hosting our podcast. Because he's one hundred percent right. When i was thinking about this i was thinking of iceland and for some reason nor we came out but iceland has unique geographic characteristics where there were the few countries that can run their entire grid on hundred percent. Renewable right if you count hydro as renewable which for some reason greenpeace doesn't think that i don't have no idea why the so joe you're absolutely it's not norway iceland and i think it's really cool. How far they've come and that technology that they spent years developing is now spread out through the rest of the world that have the right geologic characteristics to be able to tap into geothermal. So thank you. Joe for fact check could be here all right so this is a long line. It's from joel. Motta mechanical engineer at petrobras by far my favorite podcasts inside or outside of the oil and gas industry pager mark. You do such an amazing job and so many of my coworkers our listeners. Keep up the great work. My question may start some trouble. I am okay if you choose not to read it on air a read and heard a lot of comments on the unfair and sexist treatment of women and oil and gas. I've been in this industry for nine years. Although i've seen and experienced this type of treatment myself it's rare at least in the companies that i've worked for. I have how ever known women who intentionally dressed and behaved in the ways to encourage male attention to say that how a woman dresses makes. No difference may be okay in. Hr circles but we all know. that's not reality. I've personally talked. Mentored some of the women. So i know one hundred percent that they wanted the men in the office to notice them. I'm not saying that they were wrong or if they were right but it is a real thing that happens every day of austin no man whose personality is naturally friendly outgoing and sometimes get accused of flirting and hitting on their female co workers once again. I have coached some of these guys and they were just being themselves not flirting at all. Any thoughts on our industry should deal with the reality of the different sexes while at the same time not backslide on our diversity progress and how do i get one of those ibm shirt so audience. This question is deep right. It's heavy just a couple of things real quick. I don't know this for sure. But the combination that she works for petrobras lasting moto portuguese is correct. Basically means people that live by the fort or fort people and then she ended the instead of saying. Thank you or goodbye or cordially. She said binging jingles which is little kisses and portuguese makes me think she's portuguese right. So which means probably english is not her native language. Well this was definitely very very well written so the brazilians no english back and forth. They learned from very or early age. But the horita bring that up is if you just rattled off real quick. It sounds a little bit condescending but the culture in brazil is different. Hagan conduct condescending. And she's saying that women dress a certain way to track men attention. So i think i think there's just a slight cultural difference here because i believe she's brazilian which i love brazil. The second thing is it's a matter of the intent. In my opinion. You know men and women worked together to. We've worked together for thousands years together in the future at times you cannot help but be aware of sexual differences right your of your healthy normal or male and at times you may do something that other people may not appreciate whether it's the way you dress or the way you interact with people but as long as you're sincere. I think you're okay with it. So let's say page that other women in the office thought that you dressed provocatively i. I know that's such a good example. Let's say that's just what your personality was. That's just what made patria comfortable within your intent is pure. I think it's fine at the same time. What if your intent by go into office was to find a rich husband. See now you're tint is not pure angry with that i've seen it. Yeah a lot throughout my career from guys point of view lately last couple years. It's sometimes it's hard to what you can't say. I naturally a very friendly person. And i sometimes have to tone down who i really am when i'm around strangers because i don't want the perception to be that i'm flirting right. I'm not. It's just who i am once again. I think it's your intent. If i am trying to make sure everything feels comfortable in my intent is pure think that's okay and then lastly means no. We'll all right. So if i'm in the office environment. I'm flirting with somebody in the office and she politely or implied ever tells me. Hey i'm not interested. It needs to stop right there right where it gets weird is when people start dating and then things don't go straight. I mean you have all this great area throw punches. Yeah so so. I think bottom line is is what is in your head. What is your intent of doing this. And i think long as your intent is pure. You're okay with this. You know you go to brazil. You got anywhere central south america the way. The women dressed in office is slightly different than the way women dress here in europe. But it's just a cultural difference. Same way the men. The men pride themselves on wearing really short tailored fit suits all the time right. We don't do that here that much. You know just a a different culture. So like i said i think as long as your heart's in the right place and you can communicate that with your co workers. I think you're fine and bottom line is when you have many women working together regardless of everything else. You're gonna have issues like this that you got to learn how to deal with luckily for us. We haven't had this happened yet in our company but somewhere down the road. We probably will have to deal with it. I'm sure and at that point. We'll have to get any details well. Hr that can sometimes makes it worse. I know for a fact a young woman that worked in the company and she took pride in the fact that she watch what she ate and she worked out and other women in her division. Got jealous of what she wore reported her. Hr and that's just wrong. When she went to hr the hr person who happened to be a female. Look to her and go. You're dressed the same as everybody else. I'm sorry your legs looked better right. But you're fine for that media. But what a weird awkward thing to as an hr person to deal with having to make that judgment call whether they've crossed the line or not and you know at what point does the fact that you take care of yourself figure into that you know. Just get to be really careful. Yeah now absolutely agree like i said. I'm very much all right. So next question is from abc. Which is funny. Because that's my brother's name which you're assuming that abor it's either april or we're both in south louisiana so everybody knows her the anamar anyway. I know it's my brother because it says he's a chemist works at one of the big chemical manufacturers. What is your opinion of basf wanting to sell part of its us. Chemical manufacturing businesses. Is this the end of the petrochemical. Boom loved the show though this is usf try to string launch operation. Basf has to be over one hundred years old. They're very old chemical manufacturing company all over the world. they're basically dumping stuff that is not core to their business to raise some capital one of the things that they're selling a piece of their business in illinois's that makes fact didn't even it would do not sell fact it is so think about if you have water in your washing dishes and the water on top and drop one drop of dishwashing detergent in oil runs. Anyway that's a small piece abuse s business. They're dumping it to raise the cash. There's not as much one hundred two hundred million dollars something like that. And then they're also selling another piece of their business acumen for what it is in us but all in all it's like ten percent of the us business and they're doing it to raise cash. They confess business. So this is not the in the petrochemical. Boom there will never be the end of the petro chemical boom as long as me and kind wants to live a modern life style. This is being. Sf jazz streamline will get rid of parts of their business that underperforming can invest in other parts of their industry. So question's from chris in. He's the marketing guy at freeman. So we do a lot of stopper quite remember the name freeman. I don't know probably do so. Freeman used to have the contract for otc for all the more. Okay okay. Click click click. Yeah yeah we actually met with them several times there enormous company. And we've met with some much. I know so many people. I mean i keep the names you stay. Keep everything with the company names. I tried to. Yeah they way. Chris know how you know. He's a marketing guy. Because he's got points redes- email address. He knows it. We're not go plug it. He knows so. Chris basically made up an email address so we wouldn't plug him into our email automation so audits actually reason to bring that up is when we ask for your email address for first friday. Cuny you don't have to give it to us. It's not required. And the only reason we ask you for that reply back to you personally instead of reading on the air so you never have to give us an email address but we never plugged those email addresses into any type of email. What's the first. Friday acuity is gone. It's gone anyway. Okay so we do. A lot of work for the largest energy companies in the world and that includes social listening. And we've been following edgy gen even before it became g and so two questions. What's the deal with all. And i mean all of the large content distribution streaming companies interest in you. Okay let me answer that by. I can't give you details. I do the couple of companies that you're talking about chris. The deal is everybody's looking for unique content every company out there that is a content distribution company of netflix's a permanent sample. They're looking for unique content. They're looking for stuff that nobody else has to compete with their competitors and on everybody's list facility last year has been podcast. There's a certain guy. You may have heard of joe rogan spotify one at unique content. What spotify wrote a big check to make sure that joe rogan's content with spotify content. And you could only get it on their platform. Their competitors are doing the same thing and they're looking at option we've been approached by everybody we've in discussions with several of them can't talk about any any of it in detail but hopefully that answers your question chris. That's what they're looking for. Okay so number two. What you see is the future of the enormous multinational energy events and conferences who before covid nineteen the value of the large conferences and all gas was already on the decline in covid nineteen in the twenty twenty the double black swan of had just sped that honestly i think the large very large. Otc's of the world multinational conferences. Their days are numbered. The smaller niche conferences that they can still be super valuable people. Run them right but the old need for oil and gas companies to go to a conference to learn about products and services does exist anymore. I mean the only reason why we use ago is just go meet people network and kinda messes this will but it used to be page back in the nineties you otc and chevron was there an exxon was there in mobile was there and brisk petroleum. Air texaco is there. All the smaller players. All the service companies. They were there because there was no internet. How work it. Exxon and i wanted to talk to. Every choke manufacturing world. The only way. I could really do it. Effectively was good. Otc that makes sense because that brought peos with me. Yeah because i brought p. o.'s. Millions of dollars worth of business were exchange on that showroom floor and because it drove a lot of value now work for exxon. And i wanna talk to every choke manufacturers go online. I don't have to do it myself. I have one people do for me right and so the value. Isn't there anymore. Like i said for the large events. The smaller niche events the take something super niche machine learning oil and gas or refining. Two point oh or whatever. Those things are super niche. Because you can still learn in your round your peers. Now the interesting thing is to social part of the copters. Which is what you alluded to earlier. We all miss that right because we're with our people and because we're with our people there's a lot of benefit you gain even my just being around people because you have shared experiences. That's the part. That's really hard to replicate with an online event. You know we're doing on on events now would have come to realize is that a live event is like a broadway show so live event just like broadway gift to make sure that the people the very last row get entertained. You have to make sure there's time for people go to get popcorn and soft drinks and to actually go to the restroom right so you have to coordinate this huge thing as one big unit as opposed to online events on line events like tv. New show right you do it. Very short snippets. You have two minutes or weather two minutes for local news to international news right and you're not worried about reach the person in the backseat. So the large conferences. I think if are basically their days are numbered. Value has not been there before nineteen. I think that just better in the up. The smaller niche Once i think still have a lot of value. I think there's this new thing coming on. Which is what we've been experiment which is hybrid events where we have small person audience live and you get all those benefits but then you also broadcast to an online on. Its and you have those benefits as well. So that's my answer. That s what. I think and then chris also goes on to say an page you and i briefly met at the otc caterpillar booth. When you wash your industry leaders show. You've come a long way. thank you well. As long time ago way was that. I think that was four years ago. Mark science knows about three hundred four years. Yeah wow. I wish i could remember. I've slept a lot since then all right. So last question is from bridget. Nelson charges senior manager was accenture. Hey we know them and her question is. I know i'm late in saying this but you're the most bad ass addition to the show. When are you getting well first off. We can't get rid of mark because he brings up stuff like i don't know whale oil. We wouldn't be blessed with knowing those types of things without him so he's probably not going any page before you to request a couple of things. What so what's her name bridget. Nelson isn't that the saloons. Old ex wife. I don't remember the really tall nielsen nielsen. Okay name is pronounced brigitte. Okay and then. What's your email address. I'm not telling everybody okay. Anyway i'm can tell you mill dress. But the first part of email addresses rebound bridget. Now is she a basketball player or does she need help with relationships. I'll man i'm just picking order. I think it's funny. I'm not being mean. I'm really not i'm going to report you to. Hr we don't have any german Touche anyway her question is now that the us elections are over more or less. What will be the impact to the. Us energy industry and also the global energy industry and mark. I know how you are. So when i say energy. I specifically mean both oil and gas and renewables. You're one of my few trusted new sources so please keep up your amazing work. thanks bridget. Who so by the time you hear this. Us elections should be over like really over impact. Us energy industry. So if we drive the price of hydrocarbons up through perception through some executive actions. Which is what i think's gonna happen number one. That's actually kind of good for the renewables right now. The renewables are struggling because natural. Gas is so frigging cheap in this country right now. It's hard to cost justify renewables. So i think that will actually help the renewables. Of course you know. The kurdish or the new administration is coming in very pro renewable. So you'll see a bunch of financial incentives to help that part of the industry out the us hydrocarbon industry so us. Oil and gas. I think is going to be impacted a little bit. Not as bad as you're right thinks it is but the consumption of hydrocarbons will happen no matter what so here in the us. You know no matter what we're gonna burn through twenty million barrels a day oil every day. And if we drop the prices up of american hydrocarbons that twenty million barrel need is gonna come from somewhere. Most probably the middle east and russia so we will continue to use. Hydrocarbons will continue by hydrocarbons. Unfortunately i think we will start buying hydrocarbons outside the us which means that those jobs and those tax dollars will go to other countries not to the us citizens and us countries and then internationally. I think the new administration actually help the oil and gas industry. Globally i think as we limit or restrict the way we can find and then produce and distribute hydrants here in the us it just makes it more lucrative other countries to come sell their hydrocarbons here which i think will happen. The renewables internationally is is really interesting. Most countries don't subsidize renewables other than here and in europe and in australia in so the renewable industry has a lot of room for growth outside the us tremendous room for growth. And it's also understand scale you know you hear people talk all the time about how we are. Addicted to oil and gas were not addicted to oil and gas. We've been spoiled by it. So paid you and i are sitting right now in r- about three thousand square feet of air conditioned space. You know most people outside. Us and europe or even outside of the us can't afford that much space can't afford to keep that air condition so renewables are great for a small village community where need to be able to power up a ipad. Recharge your cell phone run. A couple of small refrigerators. Maybe one lightbulb each house. 'cause you don't need the infrastructure you don't need to build power distribution power lines power generation retail. It's literally could put up a couple of windmills. Have a battery bank or some solar battery bank and supply that village so in that arena. I think renewables have started to grow internationally. I think they will continue to grow internationally. And i think our current administration will actually help that because the us has kind of been an experiment. The cost of solar cells. The cost of wind power has come down dramatically in which just benefits the rest of the world so bridge. I'm not sure if that answers your question. I promise you pick pico. Knew about the rebound bridget thing. Thought it was funny. But i think a lot of the world's could benefit financially from us elections in twenty twenty. All right so that's all the questions mart right. What about. Ibm shirt giveaway. Well everybody's ass where. How is it funnier by once when i just sign up people so hey no matter what. You're listening to on this most probably it's mobile so whether it's ios or android either scroll upper left. Go to the show notes. There's a link you can literally click on it from your phone to go register. It takes a minute in the next two weeks. If you don't get email saying you've won that shirt then register again the next week and just keep trying and try to get it. The shirts have been a big hit. Obviously because everybody asking to get one we got some cool stuff to do with the numbers on those. I think you found something else to do. We yeah you brought up a having. Everybody joined the lincoln group. And so we did a random. Pick and lauren swift one a bag or slash box of ibm. Obgyn swagman eye center in in mail on length. So i'm still waiting for her to get back to me on that. But if you hear it on here. Lauren you have one so. Please reach out to me. Page dot wilson ed. O g n dot com. So i can get your address insanity and speaking of sending people stuff. What's the weekly recount. Why because i heard on your show you made fun of my segues. People love my segues people lineup. Well here's the thing. Someone left me a review. Making fun of your segues. Shame on them wasn't bridget. Was it no. It wasn't no. It was not all right so for the. Us counts three fifty. One were up. Three canada's is fifty nine down twenty three internationally at six hundred and sixty nine up thirteen so not too shabby sorry canada. Yeah and then just go to lincoln. Join everything you are you getting tired of so many different things but the other thing is our street teams really come together. We've picked leaders. We now have different committees so we have social media community. We have a student outreach committee. We have a leadership committee on a committee. So if you wanna play a part and all that go joined the street team there's a little form you fill out to let us know what you're doing and you get to be a part of the fabulous work. We're doing here odeon. Yeah and there's plenty of planning to be done. Trust me so and finally want to get our monthly email newsletter and events are starting to pick back up from zero easy to pick back up for zero kidding right. What's again good links. Sign up we promise never to spam you take off asa vents. Put them together. Put them in your inbox once a month. Plus stuff that the public isn't aware of and also things like our january event that we're putting together and if you like new though gene experts to come speak at your event let me know had a event that was postponed any got picked back up against some really looking forward to speak at conaco phillips l. Cool yeah cool and of course. This was first friday. Hyun as if you have a question we have it set up in on the new website. Now where you can just go and click and the warm right in. The old website still up tallied so if listeners. If for like a day you couldn't find us anywhere on the web. We didn't go out of business. We kinda screwed up it. Wasn't we as a million page but our web team. We try to do something that we didn't know what to do how to do it properly. And so we basically deleted ourselves from the interwebs and they fixed it so the day before we were released. They killed everything literally. No-shows could be released and publish shows. It was not calm around here at headquarters of that happened. But it's fixed and so the tech team is out figure out how to do this correctly the next time so it doesn't happen so for an audience right now. It doesn't matter. Just go anyplace you could find gases week. Get to ask a question. I guess i got so mad. I forgot all right. Page ready to get out of your. Yep remember folks do great work. Pay it forward and we will see next time here. Savannah was events on doug. Happy new year. Everybody it's savannah from ge and here are the events on deck for january twenty twenty one this month we only have three events. But if you'd like the full list you can click lincoln the show notes to sign up for a newsletter. We send it out every month and includes more info about the events. I talk about here. We even include events that occur two months ahead of time. So if you're interested in always staying in the loop wrote oil and gas events make sure to check that out first up. We have our to in person events. The oh ci east. Houston chapter luncheon at the monument in the fifth and the houston chapter energy. Api meeting at the petroleum club on the fourteenth the only online event we have this month is the prefab connect from the twenty six to the twenty ninth other than these events. Obgyn may be hosting some more livestreams this month so make sure to check out our facebook lincoln or our website for more information about any of the lions. We have coming up if you have any questions about the events or any of our shows picture to reach out to me through my email. The show notes. That's all for january. I hope you guys have a great month. And thanks for tuning in tune in next week for another informative and entertaining episode of oil and gas. This week podcast. Up production of the oil and gas global network. Learn more at obgyn dot com.

Ibm iceland marc lacorte page wilson Us ludvik ludvik norway granada saint lucia phil oregon refining inc. phil pearson rnd llc brazil bridget north america ibm basf
Ep. 325: Is the Sony a7R IV Underwhelming or Not? - and more

PetaPixel Photography Podcast

50:09 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 325: Is the Sony a7R IV Underwhelming or Not? - and more

"Hey everybody this is Steve. Simon Passionate photographer and you're listening to the pedal pixel photography podcast with the Passionate Sharkey James have fun. This episode is brought to you by our good friends at Fujifilm's ceremony connects X. right further details and discount codes later in the show welcome to the pet pixel photography podcast episode three twenty five is the Sony Eighty seven are marked for underwhelming or not in this episode. The as seven are mark four might be Ma- cannons got ten X for our F- Tam Ron and a good problem the have love the D six is said to have that Sony's thirty five one eight is finally here and young new does it again all that and more in episode three twenty five of the pet pixel photography podcast ass. Thank you so much Steve Roping the show. I greatly appreciated brother. If you've been a listener photography podcast for a long time now you know doubt out no the name envoys of Photo journalist Steve Simon Aka the passionate photographer aside from being a wonderful human being in a great photo journalist New York City Base Steve Simon is the author of a number of books including including the passionate photographers second edition ten steps towards becoming great the remastered edition of the best-selling classic work for all photographers. It came out just this past may and it's getting great reviews as Steve would no doubt tell you photographers looking at take things to the next level need a plan and that's where this excellent book comes in and no this is not an ad read through the sample chapters on Amazon and you'll find some useful nuggets to help you develop a plan so imagine ads you want. The rest of the book holds. A hardcover is just twenty dollars U._S. and if you think about it that's dirt cheap even if you learn one useful thing from it right so to find out more about Steve and learn from his decades of experience head on over into his website. which is the passionate photographer dot com? You'll be happy that you did and I'd like to thank you all for joining us here. In episode three twenty five of the Pixel Photography podcast we appreciate you all so much and thank you all for subscribing are being rating interviewing us in Itunes or wherever else you listen to us and as always we appreciate hitting that subscribe button do it now please so you don't miss a single episode as well as telling all your friends on social media and elsewhere and helping to get the word out about the show and no I didn't disappear. I had the flu I also had jury duty and it took forever to get this episode out but here it is okay with that. I'm your host Sharkey James. Let's hit it Sony's newly unveiled a seven are mark for is a bit underwhelming but that's okay. They're not only a legitimate reasons as to why it's underwhelming but they're equally legitimate reasons as to why this is arguably the bass ask camera out there today and might just be the best of twenty nineteen we'll see I think it's important if I point out something that I've drawn attention to for years now here on the show and that's that no camera maker let's underscore that no no camera maker that include Sony King Crank out body after body after body that blows away their previous one let alone at the breakneck pace that they once did that's right the arrows Sony releasing bodies so quickly glee that owners of a particular body would feel a bit of a sting when the mark to or mark three or whatever came out is definitely over probably for good. They're never going to be able to do that again. After all. There's only so many whizbang features that you can put an camera before you run out of them that and don't forget that when Sony started showing clear signs of relevancy back in like twenty fourteen they were still many years behind achieving parody with cannon and Nikon's best so they had no choice but a floor it and if you were a Sony user you had no choice but the hang on for the ride all right I wanted a little bit too far with that metaphor right there but you get the idea Nia so here we are in the middle of July in the middle of Twenty nineteen and we've got a body that is of course markedly better than the one before it but still a Tad bit underwhelming it just doesn't feel like the upgrade that the mark three was that the a seven are mark too and when I saw this backs of the mark for I said okay really that's it. That's all we get you know. We've reached the point in the seven arline line where it's become the body that you'd get if you were looking to upgrade from a lesser body or maybe it was just upgrade because you're old body is wearing out. We're talking. Let's say maybe have the mark three or it's just that time in your businesses camera camera upgrade cycle. It's that underwhelming I mean you don't have the mark three and go all right. I mean to sell that right away and get the mark for some of you have done that and we'll do that and that's fine. That's your choice but really I don't know I'd maybe hold out to the mark five. I think about when Nikon Release The D. Three back in August of two thousand seven all long time ago now it was truly a massive improvement over they d- to age and the D. to exit really was the new Sony a-7 are marked for though so is not well. That's okay. Let's run down everything that makes it a better camera than the as Dr Mark Three because it really is. It's an improvement. It's just not a massive. One is what I'm saying but before I get to that watch how online online in the various groups on facebook etcetera etcetera people who just a few days ago lusted after the a-7 are mark three are going to proclaim it to be somehow inferior and it's not and at a thousand dollars is cheaper right now than the mark four. It suddenly became in my opinion Dow basf deal out there for a full frame camera today whether it's a d._S._l.. Are Or mere less and ten years from now. It'll still be an incredible camera so don't forget that now as if the forty two mega pixels in the a seven are mark three weren't enough we now have the mark four and okay get ready for it the world's first sixty one megapixel full frame camera of any kind big deal right and with this new body at further widens out the megapixel gap and makes the a seven mark three and the a seven mark three look like better choices for those who just don't feel like upgrading their computer viewed to a much faster much more expensive one and buying a whole bunch of hard drives for those Jain enormous sixty one megapixel files for many people the mark for is going to be complete overkill so you have to wear your options carefully carefully here but if you do get the oven are mark for you've got a megapixel monster that can shoot up to ten frames. A second with an incredible fifteen stops of dynamic range and that's pretty darn awesome that sixty one one megapixel p._S._i.. Backside Illuminated Sima sensor is a brand spanking new design and if that's not enough resolution for you lock it down on a Tripod switching a sensor shift multi-shot mode for a whopping two hundred forty forty mega pixel image that will surely choke your computer. That's not Debbie Downer talk that is reality right there. You get that image by the way from sixteen separate pixel shifted images well that total of nine hundred and sixty three point two million pixels data. That's pretty sweet but most people are never going to use it on a regular basis and I'd be willing to bet that most people probably aren't going to try it. Maybe once a year or so about five percent. The users will do that so it's a bit of a gimmick now. What isn't a gimmick is that by shooting the seven are mark four in a crop mode rather than sixty one megapixel? 's You're capturing twenty-six megapixel stills making making it the highest resolution A._B._C. capture out there today so it's like having a full frame and totally capable A._p._S.. Camera in one and thus a serious reason for shooters to consider the mark doc four after off you could use that extra A._B._C.. Reach and you only need twenty six mega pixels which spoiler alert hair if you're putting it online twenty six mega pencils is still overkill so it's perfectly fine then you could make the case that this would be a great camera for you now. As for auto focus it has five hundred sixty seven phase detection AF points covering seventy four percent of the image horizontally when shooting full frame and the mark for uses three hundred twenty I five of those Af points over nearly the entire crop area for a one hundred percent coverage vertically and nearly that much horizontally and if you're shooting moving objects you'll be happy to hear this body has the very same same AF system as in the nine with real time tracking af real time as well as animal I f making this camera one where you'd have to try really really hard not to nail focus and remember that's all the while being able to shoot sixty one megapixel limoges at ten frames per second for what the company says is up to sixty eight shots before the buffer fills your shooting sixty eight continuous shots. You're probably doing something wrong long by the way rarely. Would you ever do that so you're good now. As for video the A-7 are mark for can capture four K. video over sampled from six K.. Capture with full pixel read out in super thirty five crop or Pixel Ben Signal from the full of the sensor. Now a bit of a downside here and not really ideal at all is that the video is still eight bit even win piping it out via H._d._M._i.. To An external recorder like one from Adamos Demos and the other companies out there it's also just one hundred megabits per second age dot to six four compression sadly and while super thirty five shooting is a decent one point six crop at twenty four frames per second if you're shooting at thirty frames frames per second year at an even less ideal one point eight x crop yeah not good now when the as seven s three is finally released sometime this year hopefully filling going to be the next year now. That's going to be your go-to for video right it. They're not the a seminar mark four so much. Now of very nice set of improvements in this body over the mark three is that both card slots are now you h s to as they should be that top slot is also labeled slot one. That's improvement. I can't believe that's a feature right there but that's nice and the card slot door opens much like you see on D._S.. Lars where it slides out for quick operation rather than having a fine that little slot thing where you get a fingernail in there and flip the door open that takes way too long as for just day to day operation they've made some great improvements including making the buttons bigger including the AF on one they exposure compensation dial now lock so you're not gonNA screw with your exposure accidents. The grip is much larger and more pronounced like a lot and the focus point selectors now grippier with a bunch of little nevins on it nevins. That's technical term right there so once again we're seeing a Sony Body. Creep leap up in size which is something I've been predicting since the early days of Sony Morales. They'll never be as tall as a D._S._l.. Are Though because they don't need to be. There's no Penta prism to house in there but we're gonNA continue see the grips get larger and eventually. Eh they're gonNA make more room for bigger batteries and those are all welcome improvements and speaking of welcome improvements. The a seven are marked for has an ultra high resolution five point six million dot e AF which a lot of people we're GONNA love. You're not going to be able to tell really that you're looking at a screen and not an image bounced off Amir. There's also more robust weather ceiling U._S._B.. Type C for tethering fast WIFI to support wireless tethering five point five stops of five axes in body image stabilization also known as ibis and if all that sounds great to you you can preorder one right meow for three thousand five hundred dollars U._S. and it'll delivered sometime in September twenty nineteen. Listen the the bottom line here is the Sony Seminar Mark for is arguably the bass full frame murless body out there like no doubt about it and what has some very nice upgrades over the mark three much of it is kinda fluff. I think it's really not the great leap that people were hoping for. It's just not as having the same AF system as the nine nice yes yes. It is no doubt about it but as somebody who shot a whole lot of sports back in my photo journalism days the a seven are marked for just just wouldn't be on the shortlist of bodies Jews at sixty one megapixel it is complete overkill. Oh but you can shoot twenty six Megapixel A._p._S.. Seed Crops Right yeah you can so why would you then by a sixty one megapixel full frame body to do that for that thirty five hundred dollars you can get yourself a Sony nine. That's twenty four point two mega pixels. It's full frame not crop it shoots at twenty frames per second blackout free not attained frames per second with blackout in the a-7 are marked for you can also shoot distortion free without electronic shudder in the nine up to a one thirty two thousands of a second and on and on and on you can't do you that with electronic shutter on the mark for though you know photos of athletes distorted because you shot in silent mode is completely useless. You WanNa get an eight nine instead. That's the body you want now granted that body is two and a half years old. Now I do for an upgrade. Hopefully this year that would be nice but if you can hold out when that forty five hundred dollar so eight nine mark to comes out the originally nine will drop further and price and will be an excellent deal. I mean it's a great camera Emma right now. It's going to be a great one next year the year after that and a decade from now so overall the a-7 are mark four is a great camera. It's just not a big leap and that's okay talk to current Sony users though and many of them are saying they're gonNA stick with their mark three and upgrade when the a seminar mark five comes out and that's fine they'll just be waiting awhile because Sony's now settled into that slower update cycle that we've seen what cannon icon D._S._l.. Ours and that's not going to change and speaking of the big to they've got no choice but to do it Sony did to get to this point there in right now and that is update their full fray murless bodies more frequently they simply must do so to catch up to the full frame murless list leader Sony not cannon. It's not Nikon not yet at least and that's do of course thanks in part to bodies like the eighty-seven are mark for the fourth generation in that camera already think about that Cannon Nikon early on their first JEN's so there's that next I am ridiculously far behind but heading out to shoot tomorrow and along with me. I'm bringing a whole lot of fun gear and yes that also includes next to which I've actually had for a few years now. I've got a bunch of ideas for one. I'm going to shoot but you just never know you might change it up. You know your shot list could change at any time and that's good whatever works I'm talking of course Chris about our photo assignments that are sponsored by the awesome peeps over at Fuji Film which I still can't believe myself you know they heard me talk about how much loved my x t to for a few years now and we're happy to have them on board of course and don't forget feel the free to tag any of your photos whether you shot them for these assignments or not no matter what you shot him with two it's all good I wanna see your best photos. Use the Hashtag my Fuji Film Legacy on Instagram twitter or wherever you are that way we can find Fujifilm's GonNa be sharing their favorites across all their social media outlets and don't forget you can also join us over at our share your legacy flicker group as well now assignment seven was was share your wings and boy. Did you guys turn out with some great images. We've got a ton of wildlife photographers in our audience so there's a lot of birds of course and tons of airplanes as well. I mean it was share your wings it kind of went without out saying now my favorite on instagram is by user photo. He shot it out the window of a southwest airlines jet of a gorgeous sunset over Tampa. It is just absolutely beautiful. The colors are amazing there. I wish we had those here in Boise now. Assignment eight is share your nourishment so think food place settings snacks farmers markets. There's a lot of those going on right now. Cornfields maybe et Cetera et cetera anything that you think it's that theme it can be food or not so just remember though to use the Hashtag my Fuji Film Legacy and we look forward to seeing your best shots next what a good problem is to have having a new lens be so popular that you've got to apologize. Knowledge is for its delay. I'm talking about lands. That's going to be one of the hottest sellers of twenty nineteen. We're talking about. Tam Ron Seventeen to twenty eight millimeter aft- two point eight a lands that I had the pleasure of checking out last Friday along with Levi Sam who lives here in Boise as our longtime Frank Tamraz Mark Morris was in town this playing that companies stellar line of Lenses at Idaho camera by the way. If you're not following Mark Morris he's Tam Ron R. M. On all the socials soak up the information that you learn from him. He is all wealth of knowledge and asset to the industry and Tamraz lucky to have him they really are you know. Just four of those lenses are currently circulating west of the Mississippi right right now. Go ahead and dry spell Mississippi really quick. I can do it. I learned in third grade or whenever as Tamraz revs make their way all over the map showing this new lens off along with the rest of the line now I wasn't able to make it out to Levi's is barbecue a day later but just before ten thirty P._M.. Who Do I see on my ring Doorbell Cam Levi with some barbecue? Oh any brought mark along to with every single one of his Tam Ron Lenses we had a fairly earlier thunderstorms roll through Boise that evening so out K. Mark Sony seven mark three and that gorgeous new seventeen to twenty eight he got some gorgeous images that lightning filled storm and man I tell you that lens is a sweet beat. You definitely going to follow him. See those you're also going to see some photos of Boise's Capitol building that he shot with that Lens now according to the announcement from Tamra Japan of the delay of this lens they say quote reservation significantly -nificant exceeded our forecast and it is predicted that production will not catch up with customers requests delivery to some customers who have already made a reservation. Maybe after the release date and quote this land sells for nine nine hundred dollars U._S. and is or was at least at this ship starting July twenty fifth of Twenty nineteen but regardless of when it ships. I have a feeling that based on the images that I've seen shot with it so far this seventeen to twenty eight is going to be well well worth the way and one of the top sellers of Twenty nineteen now also at Idaho camera last Friday I saw Tam Ron's twenty eight to seventy five f two point eight a lens that is the top selling lands in all of the Sony ee system of all the makers of Sony Lenses. That's right the number one selling lens for Sony amount cameras is not a lens. That's actually made by Sony. It's a Tan Ron and remember Tam Ron produces more more lenses than anyone else out there by a mile and that's because in additional lenses bearing the Tamra name that company makes one or more lenses for nearly all the camera bodies out there and that doesn't include elements that they you make for other lenses so if you've ever said yourself self I would never by a third party lens from a company like Tam Ron well you might be shooting Tamra on made Lens and not even know it so there's that thus live said for many years now here on this show it would be wise to have a look at these lenses from Tam Ronin Sigma for instance because you're often getting equal or better quality at a fraction of the price you notice. I didn't mention token other just saying not a big fan yet. We'll see anyhow I was going to say that Tam Ron Seventy two hundred millimeter F two point eight G. to for instance is something like thirteen hundred dollars cheaper than the one Nikon cells and you'd be hard pressed. Tell the difference between the two of them and any minimal difference that you might perceive that others won't is that worth thirteen hundred dollars of your hard earned money. I mean you can put that into another lens right or you can take a workshop and learn some things that are actually make you a better photographer because the answer is not a lens. It never is a lens nor is it a camera. The answer is working on finding a better composition shin improving your techniques and pulling things out of your baggage tricks like I don't know I ten stop n d filter so you can slowly shutter speed way way down and turn that waterfall or that raging river into a silky smooth ooh more interesting subject that easily you can tell have got N._d.. Filters on my mind and if you saw my instagram account you know what I'm GonNa say I just received the new N D one thousand ten stop Andy along with the N D sixty four which is a sixth stop n d from my good friend. Michael Andrew also Michael The maven. You guys all know him. Head is YouTube channel for a test that he did of popular Andy filters because the results are alarming. I tell you not all N._D.. Filters are so neutral after all. I mean that's what the end stands for neutral and yet there's a blue color shift in lease big stopper that he found and that's not exactly neutral now is it no I don't think so anyhow you're gonNA WANNA check that out and also hit my lend shark instagram account where I've got a highlight story up there of my unbalancing that I also did it Idaho camera of that new me photo while new to me at least Brown leather road trip tripod that you guys on instagram voted for me to get over over the black leather version. It's really nice. You're also going to see some other fun stuff from that last Friday so head on over there next as I reported a number of months ago cannon realizes that has a lot of catching catching up to do on the side of things and announced that for all twenty nineteen you will only see it's our F- lineup see new lines is after all it's e F mountain glasses rock solid refreshes to the lineup can wait another year and the company just like Nikon wants you to hop on over to murless as soon as you can. They've seen the writing on the wall and it says the D._S._l.. Are and it's lenses are not long for this world. They've actually said that anyhow those words but they know it and they've said it it bears repeating for those who still aren't on board with this reality that a Canon and Nikon for that matter have said that murless is where everything's going and two. That's that's right to if here in the middle of Twenty nineteen you can't find a merciless body to make you happy versus a d._S._l.. Are I don't think you're looking hard enough. I mean it's twenty nine thousand nine. We're almost twenty twenty. Go ahead and rent wine. Take one I spend. Ben And you're going to be surprised far. They've come I mean if the is the sticking point for you. Get that as seven are marked for go ahead and ranked it and see how beautiful that e Af is everyone says it's absolutely wonderful and as best as I can intel. We're about two years or so way from nearly everybody being an agreement the D._S._R.. Just isn't gonNA stick around very long. I've said before and I'M GONNA keep on saying it. You're just not gonNA care if there's a mirror insider. Not many people are shooting with their l._C._d.. Screens anyhow since face detection is greatly improved. So what do you care and when you do put your either view-finder. I think you're GONNA agree that the E._v. f- has come a long long way since four years ago times have changed already and wait until you see the next generation to we're rapidly getting to the point where you just can't tell you don't know if you're looking at a screen or an image bounced off of mirror and that's great that day is coming days not right now necessarily but it's coming so why would you wanna Mir. You know it's hard to believe that we're closing in on one year. Since both Cannon Nikon Dovan the full frame Morales with our single card slotted bodies. He's something that's GonNa Change Watch and they're gonNA touted as a feature because why not and on the cannon sided things they've now announced their sixth lands in the R F lineup and that is the Arraf twenty four to two hundred forty millimeter f four to six point three I._S.. That's right a ten eggs zoom and what's definitely going to be a ridiculously popular all-round travel ends I mean if you're going on vacation a lens with this range along with its image stabilization Ebola's Asian and the are R._B.'s ability to shoot in rather low lighting conditions at pretty decent higher I._S._O.'s you're good there's just no reason lug around anything else boom done and with this lines cannons banana ultrasonic motor that's what U._S._M.. Stands for in this lens provides for fast and precise for both stills and video ended allows for full-time Haniel focusing via one of the rings even if you're an auto focus so you can take control at any time now in our first for a full frame cannon lines. This zoom has dynamic. I S which allows for smoother results when shooting video you're unlikely to notice it but if it wasn't there you you could definitely see it in a side by side comparison. It would be glaringly obvious at that point. I tell you friends we live in great times great times. If you're wondering what crop lenses have it you'd have to pop on over to the COS e Osam line and check out the eighteen fifty five and eleven at twenty two S._t._M.'s for that dynamic I ass it works beautifully and it's something that you're going to see a ton of in Canon. R F lands is going forward now in addition to that yeah this Lens Bosa full five stops of image stabilization something you're definitely going to be taken advantage of those slower shutter speeds and lowlights situations when you're dragging the shutter to soak up every bit of light that you can to avoid avoid using flash which would be horrible and this lens isn't going to be a pain to hold because it's fairly small for a ten x Zoom in ways in just twenty six point four ounces also known as seven hundred fifty grams cannon points out that this his lands paired with their e._R._p.. For instance even being full frame is still smaller and lighter than at comparable crop size body and lands on the dias. Laura sided things in their camp and that right there when consumers realized that is going to be a huge selling point to them if you're not invested in Canon glass already. Why would you pick a crop D._S._R.? Of theirs when you could go full frame murless instead and still have a smart kit it just makes wchs little sense the do so this lands also has a minimum focusing distance of one point six four feet. That's point five meters on the wide end and two point five six feet or point seven eight meters on the telephoto ended things as a maximum magnification of point two six x also at the telephoto end a customizable ring for adjusting exposure shutter speed aperture I._S._O.. And it has a whopping twenty one elements in fifteen groups now assuming this lenses of the quality that cannons producing these days they should sell a boatload of these when they start shipping this September of Twenty nineteen and at nine hundred dollars U._S.. That's really not too bad especially when when you consider that for most people this will likely be the only lens that they own for a number of years. It's going to cover them pretty darn. Well and the companies also going to be bundling that lens with Shocker Larios R._p._G.. For Two thousand in two hundred dollars but my advice would be to get it with the excellent twenty four to one zero five f four L. so long as you don't need that extra hundred thirty five millimeters I mean if you do you really only have one choice there but otherwise that twenty eighty four one zero five f four is sweet. Get that instead and if you're going on vacation you can always rent that other lands or here's a thought walked closer that next accurate colors important you right. I mean it is to me. When I was a photo journalist? I shot a bunch of sports teams and you better believe we would hear it from family friends and fans of the players if the colors of their jerseys in the paper and on our website wasn't correct so enter color accuracy tools like those from our sponsor X. Right the leader in color management and right now you can get ten percent off with the Code Petty Pixel Ten at X. Right photo dot com. That's ex- Our I._T.. Steve Photo DOT COM. I've got the original colored checker passport from way back but they've also got new ones out Nanno the many and the mega you can guess which one's the biggest between the one that I've got an island in studio for calibrating my monitor printer and devices. I am set all the colors jive. If you're a wedding shooter. It's not hard to make sure the bride's dresses white right. That's easy to do but if you deliver photos rose and her bride's maid's dresses aren't that exact -til gas who's going to be grumbling about that for years to come and maybe not sending you business yep that's right the bride and she's not a Bridezilla. She's actually got a good point. After all the addresses weren't dark green they repeal a specific teal and that better be perfect so get your colors square right meow. No one has more color science experience than ex right and you should benefit from that. Get your colors in order today and save some money to next. Those of you follow me on instagram recently saw an unbalancing I did were they giant box full of goodies from one of our great sponsors ceremony. They're the highly acclaimed audio gear manufacturer. That's known for gear as good or better than the other guys but at a fraction of the price and remember you're going to save even more if you use the Code Pet Pixel twenty at ceremony U._S._A.. Dot Com where you'll get twenty percent off. That's S.. A. R. A. M. O. N._F._C. U._S._A.. By the way WHOA accidental rhyme it happens in that box was some really sweet gear that I'm going to be using mostly for my upcoming reboot of my youtube channel like my instagram and my other social media that's Lens Shark by the way is in the middle there now one of the items they used any on boxing of my brown leather me photo tripod which was picked by you guys on my instagram account by the away ceremonies laugh micro D I for I._O._S.. Devices that have lightning ports. They also have another for android devices as well as other things like computers that have U._S._B.. Port and also in the box was a V.. Mike pro for using a top. My camera when I'm running gunning in addition to that was a mixer for attaching all kinds of Mike's and getting better audio into my camera. A set of wireless lava lear packs a shotgun Mike a boom poll and so much more for really fun stuff you gotta check it out that on boxing you can find in my highlights over my instagram account len shark or you can just go ahead and save twenty percent right meow with the Code Peta Pixel Twenty at ceremony U._S._A.. Dot Com next Sony has just announced the brand spanking new lens for its amount cameras not e- mount which you people care about anymore and the company refuses to say his dad even though it is and that new lines is one that's Sony shooters have been waiting for a long long time now a new EFI 35-millimeter f. one point eight a lens at Sony says quote sets a new standard for portability and quote and at what they're selling it for which we'll get to a second makes it a viable alternative for those who don't WanNa pony up the big box for Sony's desk Don t star Efi 35-millimeter f. one point four Z. a. a wonderful lands <music> but a pricey lands this new thirty five is definitely made to be a smaller lighter alternative to as it weighs in it just two hundred eighty grams also ten ounces and if one can get over having a tad more depth of field that most people won't even notice it might be worth saving hundreds of dollars by getting this thirty five instead now despite being less expensive Sony says it's still a serious beautifully constructed lands with eleven elements in nine groups including one <unk> spherical adenine blades circular aperture for nicer book balls and I'll linear drive af motor for quicker more accurate auto focus on the lens barrel this thirty five is a focus mode switch a customizable focus hold button and Sony claims that the lens is dust and moisture resistant but it's quote not guaranteed to be fully dust and moisture resistant and quote so why are they mentioned it. I don't know I guess the translation here is if a dust or rainstorm blows through this lens might be okay might it should be okay. Maybe protect it just saying anyhow a new Sony Efi 35-millimeter 35-millimeter F. One point eight. We'll start shipping sometime in August of twenty nineteen for seven hundred fifty dollars U._S. and yes while that's still a good chunk of change. It's still more than half the price of that sixteen hundred distal gone nine and honestly remember people aren't going to be able to tell the difference. They're just not if you know how to compose a photo and you take a beautiful one. They're not gonNA care the U._C.. A little bit more of the background they're just not that said the distal gone really as a remarkable lands big beastly lands but it's pretty darn spectacular and expensive so there's that next oh young new oh company known for leading being no way in reverse engineering flashes than lenses so a whole lot more people could enjoy photography without going broke as done something to go docs. That's pretty ironic. Considering what go docs recently did a pro WPRO photo allegedly albeit. Not what the same product yet but that's coming. There's no doubt about it. I'm talking about the goofy round headed flashes that people somehow thing perform magic even though light is light and it's still a small fairly harsh light source that you definitely don't want a top your camera and you definitely want to defuse. But what do I really think about him. Yeah so young new oh seeing the incredible success of a different flash that go doc eighty two hundred also the flash point evolved two hundred is getting in on the action with what they're going to be calling the Y.. N. Two hundred okay I could've put you in an escape room for all of thirty seconds and you would have given me. Or anybody with just one gas the name Wyan two hundred. I mean it's what we all would have come up with. It's Kinda obvious it's what they do these companies when they're developing very similar products. Let's call them not stealing they name. These products products pretty darn close to the one that there again not stealing so people know which of their product Kinda SORTA is the same thing may be a few squint at the other one according to the folks over at Flash Havoc AVAK china-based young has been shown off a prototype of the Wyan two hundred at trade shows but unlike the go Docs and authorized re brands of the A._D.. Two hundred young new oh doesn't appear to have both a standard speed light had and and a bear bulb head so apparently there's just the bear bulb head but maybe it could be swapped out in the future we just don't know yet now judging by the name and the units that they're made to be competing with it has or hopefully as two hundred under watt seconds of power more powerful than your standard hot shoe flash but one six the power of my incredibly powerful blindingly powerful Ellen Chrome L._B.. Twelve hundred twelve hundred in the name that's right signifies defies twelve hundred watt seconds a massive massive amount of light that is enough power for which the sun is no match it really isn't but if you get these two hundred watt second units and you get him in fairly close to your subject act in diffuse them through a modifier of course because you need to do that otherwise they're going to be incredibly harsh and horrible. You can get the job done but you're going to be cloning out your light much time so you're gonNA have to shoot plates essentially right with twelve hundred watt seconds as though you can easily out of frame I'm you could place it way way back. If you needed to but remember the further away a smart is and thus the harsher the light source it is as important stuff to remember physics cannot be cheated. It cannot now while these smaller young new units and similar ones are suitable for lighting one or two people close to each other and I don't mean B._F._F.'s by the way you know what I'm saying physically close to each other. You just wouldn't use them to light a large group you wouldn't that is not good. You will not get good results that way. Trust me on this. That's where you're going to be better served with some five hundred watt second or higher mono- lights and if you're shooting portraits of one person with two or three of these smaller two hundred watt units you could do some serious damage and a good way I mean you're talking to hair lie you could maybe gang two of them together. So you can't overpower the sun or you've got three different light sources. Whatever you choose to do now the same can be done with speed lights of course but they are a lot less powerful? We're talking. I Dunno fifty watt seconds or whatever they are so you're going to have to gang a lot of those together or get those in even closer and that's going to be really hard on a really really really bright day compared to these two hundred watt second unit so I mean you could do a whole lot more with these now. These young new Wyan to hundreds haven't been officially announced yet so we don't know the final specs and they could change but like the other units. They're clearly he based on. We're likely to see a removable Lithium Ion Battery T._T._l.. H._S._S. also known as high-speed saying manual on auto sensing radio receiver modes and compatibility at first with what young Newell always does it seems teams cannon and then Nikon and Sony will follow that now flash AVIC also reported the company is getting ready to launch its Wyan five sixty x pro radio system which is thought to be backwards compatible. Hopefully the Wyan five six thousand TEAC and Wyan six twenty two radio systems a ladder which I have in it mostly works mostly. It gets the job done most of the time. Let's say now the first item and the new systems going to be that Wyan five sixty pro transmitter flash havoc also notes that go Docs is quickly surpass young no thanks to a radio system that was designed from the beginning to be a lot more inclusive on like young no but with this new system on the horizon and Y in two hundred coming young new oh as clearly got in the message that photographers don't WanNa have to keep buying new gear and new radio systems that should all just be working together like go talks managed to make happen. The bigger question in my mind is will young new. Oh follow go doctors lead in falling pro photos lead a decade or so after quantum's lead in making a round headed flash spoiler alert of course they will because why not it next. You may have heard me say this before on this show or on social media that I believe the days of longing for those aspirational flagship bodies like Nikon Defy for instance are long long long gone. I sold my wonderful and it is Nikon for us to the Miami Dolphins along with my d seven fifty so long story at a friend there and as great as those be Star and they still are with the integrated grips and all I'm talking about the deforest not that they're largely unneeded now. Get a Sony a nine eighty seven are marked three or four. What have you even a seven mark three and if you can't get the job done with those? I'm sorry to be frank even even though Mike but the problem is not the camera it is you there. I said it and also save upwards of four thousand dollars. My D for us cost me sixty five hundred bucks. I mean that's beyond a good chunk of change. That was painful painful right there. That's an obscene amount of money if and here's the caveat here if you can't afford it you don't know how to shoot or you. Just don't need that level camera. Those didn't apply to me while okay. I didn't need it at the time because it was post photo journalism career for me but by but like are you would say I wanted it so I bought it. Somebody's get that reference. Ask Your kids shooting sports with it was amazing. I mean for sixty five hundred bucks you would expect to be a pleasure the right and it totally is I was still shooting a lot of sports back then so it made sense to buy it but shooting with Sony six thousand five years ago now when that first came out that was also pretty darn good. I could get the shots with that but one thing I didn't like is every time you press the shuttle release. You might have wanted one two three frames or so but you were gaining ten way more than you want it. There was no controlling that that does not happen with the deforest that sucker is dialed filed in. I tell you but few people need it. You know if you're one of the last three pro sports photographers out there or a big newspaper hands it to you then yes otherwise. I don't know who's buying these things anymore. I mean you can create great images ages with those Sony bodies. I mentioned or Nykanen cannon bodies. We're probably going to see sometime next year. That stuff is coming expensive. Expensive stuff is coming now. According to our friends over right Nikon rumors they're a hearing that is released sometime in the not too distant future. We're hearing twenty twenty or so that companies d._S._l.. Our flagship is going to feature dual C._F.. Express card slots a roughly point seven seven x magnification viewfinder finder with one hundred percent coverage X._p.. Processors a more accurate AF system WIFI connectivity. Hey three point two million dot touch screen l._C._d.. Finally and better silent shooting modes of a big rumor though is that it's GonNa have in body image stabilization and to that I say welcome to twenty fourteen Nikon seriously and it's that last edition that said to have delayed the release of the D six which should have been out right meow how until early twenty twenty and by that time I think many people may have switched on over to the Sony a nine mark too because it's been two and a half years now. I believe since that came out that's crazy. It's also going to be interesting. Zi Hao ibis in the D six plays with Nikon's V._R.. That they have in many other lenses is again at team up his one connects go the other. Are you going to be able to choose one or the other. What are you going to do? We don't know yet. I tell you as time goes by these as flagship Diaz Lars really do seem like a relic you know and D._S._l.. Are Announcements in general these days are starting to seem odd. They're also further between right. It's not quite like talking about a new film camera but like Light Room Rome were crawling in that direction aren't we. I wonder just how long it's going to be until people are ma- about new. D._S._R.'s being announced because not too many years from now I suspect and if he chartered online which wikipedia does that by the way you're gonNA see longer and longer stretches between Diaz Lars and quicker revisions also has ravs of Maryland bodies and that's certainly true for nykanen cannon because they need to catch up badly and they want you in their new systems. I mean think about it. What those longer times that people are waiting for the next five d whatever seventy who knows what coming out there also going to be seeing these new murless bodies from cannon and Nikon come came out and they're gonNA start having some foam? Oh you know some fear of missing out a natural but not so subtle nudge not only into the new murless cameras but the company's lenses as well so ponder that and while you're at it like liked me wonder if we're ever GONNA see murless versions of those massive bodies I mean I suspect we're going to see a bit smaller lighter versions of them but most of the people I know that are still shooting these crazy expensive flagship body's own and Kerry smaller murless bodies as well. They now complain about how darn heavy there d five is which they never used to do. I never used the do that even with the nerve damage that I've got in both of my arms thanks that heavier gear and years of shooting with them. It's only when you see the alternative and can compare them with each other and what they can do that you see the light light by the way that can be captured just fine in bodies half the price or more so think about that before we go. I'd like to thank you guys for being patient with me and also don't forget our Fujifilm sponsored word weekly photo assignments. You can start anywhere you want to. You cannot do them. You can just go search online for my Fuji Film Legacy or just go through your library or photos find your best images Hashtag it my Fuji Film Legacy and maybe Fujifilm's share it out for you. I mean great you might get discovered. You never know also I like that. Thank you all for listening episode three twenty five of the Pedal Pixel photography podcast don't forget to check us out at pedal pixel dot com slash podcast for the show notes and see what else we have you. If you had on over there you can leave us a voicemail question that we can answer here on the show or if you don't feel comfortable leaving a voicemail feel free to email me at len shark at gmail.com and if you like to connect me personally and I hope you do do a lot of fun over there hit me up on twitter instagram or facebook or I'm Lens Shark. That's L. E. N. S. S. H.. A. R. K. Don't forget the to us in the middle there. I don't know who len shark is. I'm not responsible for what that guy says. Now also so critical to the future of this podcast of course don't forget the head on over to my deals page lend shark dot com slash deals for all the current offer codes from our great sponsors and if you haven't done so yet go ahead and take that fresh books trial it's free. I believe it's thirty days and you don't need a credit card. FRESH BOOKS DOT com slash pet- Pixel and put pedal Pixel in the how did you hear about section all right with that. I'll see you all an episode three twenty six well. It's F. Eight and two fifty second outside. It's time to shoot. Please subscribe to the Pixel Photography podcast. My Daddy is the host.

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#170  The Great Uncoupling

Making Sense with Sam Harris

1:34:46 hr | 1 year ago

#170 The Great Uncoupling

"Welcome to the making sense podcast. This is Sam Harris okay once again reminding subscribers to go to my website log in and get our private. RSS Feed as noted a few times in housekeeping here. There's some changes angels coming and I don't want to miss any subscriber only content so just takes a minute sorry for the inconvenience but you're you're on mobile and go to the subscriber content page on my site. If you're using one of the supported pod catchers just one click and you'll have the the right feed and again the right feed comes through with a red making sense icon not a black one and one of the things that will be coming through subscriber feed. Soon are the conversations that I've been having on the waking up APP. Many of you have asked that I release those jointly on the subscriber overfeed and we will be doing that also new as of last podcast. I will be adding an afterward to these conversations stations in many cases talking about the effect that the guest had on me and did that for the first time with Kathleen Balu do in my last podcast on the White Power Movement and some of you objected to what I said there I said at one point that I detected a level title of Whoa Kness in her that I did one engage with because I thought it would be a distraction and a few of you objected that I was landing a blow on my guest asked when she wasn't there to defend herself and others found the other side of the coin there and took me to task for not tackling her obvious Whoa CNAS and abdicating responsibility to tackle crazy social justice ideas wherever they surface. I must say I reject both of those opinions. I I certainly wasn't landing a blow on her. I don't think I was saying anything she would have disagreed with a was quite obvious that she viewed things like the history of Western colonialism and resource extraction and nuclear proliferation as part of this picture of white privilege and white supremacy. She said is much anyway. I really wanted to get her best case for how worried we should be about the white power movement and I really didn't Wanna get wrapped around the axle of talking about racism in general and the sins of Western civilization and just to be clear the afterward is not a place where I will land blows on my guests when they can and not defend themselves. I would consider that bad form as well. It's simply the new place and the show where I will sometimes tell you what I was thinking and perhaps what I didn't say during the conversation either because I forgot or because I thought it better not to and in the case of that interview I really think it was better not to get distracted by a larger conversation on white privilege and I can assure you there'll be more coming on that topic for better or worse in fact a podcast recorded about a year ago with Chelsea handler. They'll soon be releasing to subscribers. Chelsea just released Lisa documentary on White Privilege for Netflix and she interviewed me for it again nearly year ago and I decided to record our whole conversation as a podcast at the time. This was in part due to my instincts for self preservation. I knew that if she used any of the interview would just be about five minutes or so and I couldn't release the podcast until her documentary came out now as it happens. I didn't make the cut in her film film at all which having seen it was totally understandable. I thought we had a great conversation but it wasn't one that could easily fit it with the story. She was wanted to tell their and here's a two minute glimpse of it. There's let me get this straight. You're doing a documentary on white privilege and I'm the White Guy Sat the situation. We're in well. I'm the white girl is really about my privilege starting getting there. You seem very well versed on the matter and I need opinions goodwill. What could go wrong. How how many edibles have you taken now to whether this conversation now I haven't taken any today. I wanted to stay sharp for you okay. I think the disparity is true because it's it's everywhere. There aren't enough Russell. None of women represented in any industry. Let's but that's not true from talking to people who claimed to not be racist. The first thing out of everyone's mouth is I'm married to a black woman or I'm friends friends with a black person or I'm not a racist and right there and then that says to me yeah. Yeah are human sold this mean. I don't know who invented this. I I wanna find the genius who invented this name but the idea that some of my best friends are black defense is not only a bad defense but a sign of racism. That's bullshit. ooh I think the N. Word is just not allowed or not allowed to use it. No white person should be able to use it. It just elicits too much hate. It's like calling a gay person the F. Word. It's elicits too much pain. You know it's what you're used. What people have used to like oppress them for years. What should elicit the pain. Is clearly the intention to elicit the pain right. I hate you and here's how I'm going to say it I think political correctness is something that just makes people stupid where where they just can't see obvious points right. I agree with you on that but I think when the injury is so deep there needs to be reform on the subject of virtue signaling. Do you think me doing a documentary on white privilege virtue signaling while you'll definitely be accused of it yeah anyway anyway. It was a fun conversation. I will release that to subscribers very soon along with conversations. I've been having on the waking up APP okay and now for today's podcast today I'm speaking with Andrew McAfee Andrews a research scientist at the Center for digital business in and the MIT's Sloan School of Management and he was previously professor at Harvard Business School. He's Co authored the books the second machine age and machine platform crowd but today we speak about his new book more from less surprising story of how we learn to prosper using fewer the resources and what happens next and as you'll hear that has a very optimistic conversation unlike many have here we talk about the history of human in progress and the modern uncoupling of our prosperity from resource consumption we talk about the pitfalls of capitalism realism but also it's hidden virtues and technological progress generally environmental policy the future of the developing world and many other topics wchs anyway this is fascinating material and as you'll hear all too consequential and on balance quite encouraging so now without further delay bring you. Andrew McAfee I am here with Andrew McAfee McAfee Andrew. Thanks for joining me Sam. Thanks for having me on so I was trying to remember. I think you and I have met at least once at the conference. Prince in Puerto Rico is at correct yeah. How many times did you go to that. I just went to the first one and then I went to the more one but I didn't go to the second one in Puerto Rico Geico okay so you and I are in exactly the same boat I went to Puerto Rico one and then a cellamare as well okay and then you can I run into the hallways run into each other at the hallways of places like Ted right okay or similar circles so it's it's great to get you on the podcast. You've written a very interesting book. Title is more from less and you're an unusual spot along with Steve pinker whose recent recent books have been very positive yeah and and against the grain of many people's expectations I can imagine you haven't really started your book tour yet but let me predict that when you get in in front of audiences you will with some regularity encounter the sour face of incredulity for many people who who upon reflecting on your thesis. This is just don't want to buy it. I tell people who you are and your potted intellectual history. How have you come to have an opinion on any of these as matters. We're going to talk about and you know that. Opinions are in not in short supply anywhere in academia. My name is Andy McAfee and I am a scientist at MIT used to be at Harvard and I moved down the river in Cambridge Massachusetts about a decade ago and I just try to study and understand where all of this technology all this tech progress is taking it so sam like you know with my co author and my friend Eric Per Nielsen. He and I have written a couple of books together about this main. Topic one was called the second machine age. The second one was called machine platform crowd about you know the the job the wage the labor force impacts and then the business model impacts of all this crazy new technology and then this new book that I've got out called more from less is is a little bit of a pivot but it's still a technology book. It's trying to convey the story of how our relationship with the planet that we all live on has changed changed in some pretty fundamental ways in large part because of technology right and your your background if our calls in somewhere in engineering and then you kind of went through business school and give me the academic version of yourself. I am a mechanical engineer from Mit. I got my MBA from mit about about sixty three years ago and then I did my doctorate at Harvard Business School taught at the business school at Harvard for about a decade road and then came back to my roots came back home to mit about a decade ago right so your your basic thesis as I understand it in this book is that finally our prosperity has become decoupled from our consumption of resources so we you know as you put we've essentially exchanged bits for Adams or adams forbids and this is this is an incredibly hopeful. Thesis is any you you you certainly acknowledge. Many of the bad things we've done and continuing to do but you you cite the what you call the four horsemen of the optimist and these just WanNa run through these because it's a great way to structure her the unfolding of your thesis. Yeah you talk about tech progress capitalism public awareness and responsive government and each each of those two the first two in the latter two are kind of die ads of a sort of tech progress and capitalism go hand in hand public awareness and responsive government seem to also be joined at the hip in some way so let's just start with the progress. We've made where how have we have. We gotten here. Yes Sammy you just did the beautiful job of delivering both the what and the why of this book that I've written the what you just said is that we have finally learned how to decouple decouple growing our prosperity increasing the size of our economies having people lead longer and healthier and more prosperous lives. That's that's a really important didn't think to do another really important thing to do is take better care of the planet earth and there used to be a pretty sharp tradeoff between those two things in the industrial era we massively increased human prosperity but we massively increased our footprint on our planet as well as just this uninsurable story about the industrial era the that got kicked off with the industrial revolution about seventeen seventy six and so before. I started working on this book I kind of had this fundamental assumption on the back of my head that that's how the world world worked we had to take more from the earth in order to have more human prosperity bigger human populations bigger human economies and what light learned and what. I've come to firmly believe. That's just not the case anymore so you use the word decouple which is exactly right. We have decoupled increasing our human prosperity eighty from taking more from the earth year after year. When the data from America shows. We've got a large technically sophisticated economy. That's responsible for about twenty five percent percent of the world economy. We're increasing our prosperity and in just about all the ways that I can think of that matter. We are leaving a lighter footprint on the planet. Earth Earth and I kind of thought that was a big deal transition from taking more from the earth to taking less is kind of an important transition so I thought it merited a book. It's a huge transition because it's so you can tell the story of technological progress prior to this transition and it is it is a story of progress nonetheless but what of a fairly repay shis extraction of resources and a soiling of our own nest to a degree that is scarcely sustainable all but I mean your your book. You know like my friend. Steve Pinker book is filled with these with some very happy graphs where you see the these the lines of extraction extraction and and you know resource use diverge from the line of increase in prosperity but before we get to the happy moment. Let's maybe us just a few minutes on on just what progress we made even in the days when the progress was was wasteful and polluting yeah and you mentioned in. Steve Pinker and I very very proud to join his tribe of evidence driven optimistic about the state of the world and pinker makes the case that the Enlightenment Enlightenment did a great deal of really wonderful things for the the course of human progress. I just want to add to that chorus with this book by saying something that people have said before four. which was the industrial revolution? which was this point in time where we learned how to access the crazy amounts of energy stored in fossil fuels all around the world? That's kind of me. That's the heart of the industrial revolution this put us onto a just a categorically different trajectory and my favorite way to show that I show show this in the book is by looking at a kind of one graph that shows population versus prosperity in England for hundreds of years and you and I probably use the word Malthusian as a as an insult to somebody these days because the mouth is said in the late eighteenth eighteenth century was essentially. We're all GonNa Starve because we can't grow enough food to feed everybody and he was just unbelievably wrong about that. One of the weirdest things I learned when writing this book was that Malthus was right as a historian rand the great way to show that is to chart population versus prosperity in England from about out twelve hundred to about eighteen hundred we have pretty good data we can reconstruct what that looks like and you just see a pendulum swinging back and forth the only times that the English anguish relatively prosperous was when there were relatively few of them and when there are a lot of English people they were all kind of poor and the only decent explanation for that phenomenon is there was kind of a hard ceiling on the amount of stuff you could take from the earth primarily food and when there are too many people not enough to go around. Everybody's kind of poor. You're when population goes down. Everybody can be a bit richer until they bump up against that ceiling. So from twelve hundred to eighteen hundred malthus looks like a genius and now we we use his name as an adjective for dead flat wrong because of the industrial revolution and the industrial era when we got out of that trade off because of the steam engine and a bunch of other inventions and then internal combustion harness the world's energy and you can watch human population and human prosperity increased together there for the very first time ever in human history and increase at rates that we've never ever seen before and it almost doesn't matter what kind of evidence you look at whether it's global population GDP per capita income growth it doesn't matter you see the same story which is almost horizontal line of nothing really interesting happening and then an almost vertical line of. Oh my God we've never seen prosperity increased like this before and that's the story of the industrial era that that's you know in the end. We say say in the book. The industrial era was not fantastic for everybody at every point in time amen to that we can talk about some of the dark side there but it was this unprecedented chapter turn human history that the trade off that we made kind of implicitly without thinking a lot about it is that as you point out we took more from on the planet to generate that prosperity year after year and we beat up the planet in all kinds of fundamental ways year after year and we did it almost in lockstep with with our prosperity growth you can just graph the size of the economy versus how much we took from the earth and it's kind of a one to one relationship and in the years is leading up to call it. The first Earth Day in nineteen seventy. You can graph things like how polluted the skies over. American cities were again versus the economic on the growth and that relationship is way too tight. It's just incredibly clear that we took more from the earth and we fouled it. We befouled it more year. After year to generate this prosperity yes so we just just looking back. It's be have some arresting images and phrases in the book here which you know I I think this kind of thinking is is commonplace among engineers and perhaps physicists but for most of us who are don't spend a lot of time. I'm in in those fields a very simple statement like prior to the industrial revolution the only way for a human being to move anything on earth was with muscle power either human or animal for literally tens of thousands of years generation after regeneration and before wind and water came online. All we had was just digging by hand right to do anything and made me we we domesticated the ox annual horse to drag our plows it again. It is an obvious use point but when you think of what it was like to live year after year life after life generation after generation where nobody had ever met anyone who ever imagined things could be tactically it just this this notion that a better future was ahead of us. I don't think that's really part of the historical record record. No no and you could drop someone into any ten thousand year interval and nothing would be different. They would have recognized all the same tools and you know cultural practices. Everyone's dying from the same diseases that are you know as yet not even dimly understood. It clearly didn't have to be that way because it is now not that way and whatever progress we make from here is likewise also not guaranteed. I mean we're just we're we're functioning within the horizon of the known and struggling to push that back with all of our scientific pursuits but we can't take anything for granted and end to look back on the history of the species is to be amazed at just how long it took to make progress of any kind it exactly right and to look back and be incredibly grateful that you don't live in that period or at least. I am Sam. I'm sure you come across people who kind of long for the good old days before industrialization and urbanization technology and they want to go back to a simpler time. Why do I not want to go back to that simpler simpler time. One of the striking statistics that I put in the book is as far as we can tell prior to eighteen hundred global life expectancy was was about twenty eight and a half years and no region on the planet had a global life life expectancy greater than I think thirty five years so I put to quote from Hobbs from Leviathan in the book. Our lives really were nasty. Solitary Brutish is short the number of kids that died in infancy see them on the percentage of mothers that died in childbirth. The disease burden skeletons why on Earth from that time we're just a lot shorter and more stunted. I literally can't understand people who want to go back to that time. Yeah just to correct the usual association with those stats. I it's not not that more or less. Everyone died at thirty. Obviously the people lived longer than that although they didn't live to the Biblical ages that are advertised but that really is a the story of just how many children died before the age of five I mean that was just right absolutely commonplace even with one hundred and fifty years ago. It was really as you detail in your book. The advent of indoor plumbing is probably the biggest gain their images in the number of lives saved by getting access to clean water and once we also got some notion that we should be washing our hands whether it before we eat or perform surgery or deliver babies. I was also helpful. Yeah and it's one of the neat things that I learned researching. The book is my list of the important technologies of the industrial revolution certainly would have included esteem power and electrification in the internal combustion engine and Bob Gordon really really good economist at northwestern would add indoor plumbing to that list and I'm Ah I it was like Bob. Come on that's an entirely different level of importance here and Sam. You're absolutely right. It's probably at the top of that list of important things to do because being able to get clean water and take your waste away was so unbelievably important for human health for longevity for maternal and child mortality Haliti. You know thank heaven. We have indoor plumbing that found this amazing quote from a Tennessee farmer in the nineteen thirties who said the the best thing in the world is to have the love God in your heart. The second best thing in the world is to have electricity in your home. There's also the question of what you're eating in that home and and as you discuss discuss the the advent of nitrogen based fertilizers in the Haber Bosch process that delivered those I mean that's you know that accounts silence for the sustainable growth of human population to an amazing degree. I think the statistic was something like forty. Five percent of people alive owe their existence to to the ability to manufacture fertilizer and also just the the growth in human population is is a very surprising curve. It took something like two hundred thousand years to get us to our first billion people in Nineteen Twenty eight and then it was like thirty one years to the next billion and then fifteen fifteen and then they just twelve and eleven after that I had forgotten that the the company. BASF was involved in this in the fertilizer chemistry or is derived from from the Haber Bosch guys and I remember those ads from probably the eighties or nineties where the the SF would come on television or you know it'd be a trailer to movie and they would say you know. We don't make a lot of the products you buy. We make a lot of the products you buy better but they could would've wealth said there are three billion of you bastards who wouldn't exist without us off okay so this has been tech progress up to the point of the decoupling. What what explain the decoupling. How has that or should we talk about capitalism before you get into that. Let me try to bring in capitalism here because you know. BASF was out to make a buck and maybe it's nice marking to say that they were interested in improving our lives. This was a prophet seeking company as was the company that James Watt founded to commercialize the ST mentioned as was daimler-benz founded by one of the main people behind the internal combustion question engine and one other thing that the industrial revolution gave us the came along very closely in time to the invention of the steam engine. We're things like robust patents and joint stock companies and limited liability corporations and all of these elements of what you and I would now call the capitalist system right and so the point point I make in the book was that capitalism in tech progress are a very very natural hair they they're just a one two punch and they feed off each other and what we saw for the first one hundred and seventy plus years of the industrial era was they fed off each other. They increased our prosperity and our population. This is why I I think marks was just so dead flat wrong however this one two punch absolutely enabled us and caused us to tread more heavily on the planet to increase the human footprint on the planet as we went around trying to make a buck and trying to grow our markets. We used very powerful technologies technologies to make more fertilizer that means planting more acres of cropland that means taking more water for agriculture. We dug more minds. We chop down more forests. We took more resources out of the earth. We definitely went looking for fossil fuel all over the planet so anyway that you'd want to measure the human footprint or the human. I'm an impact on the planet. It was going up because of this one two punch of industrial capitalism and tech progress and then a couple of the really unpleasant side effects were also going up over time and pollution is exhibit a for me and then exhibit a prime probably at least as important was we exploited. We did our fellow creatures to a huge extent. We made the passenger pigeon extinct in America. This was a bird that existed in such huge numbers that James Audubon saw flock that blotted out the sun. He said it took days to pass overhead. That was early in the nineteenth century by nineteen in fourteen. The very last passenger pigeon died in zoo in Cincinnati. So this notion that we took good care of the animals we share the planet with this is just wrong for the the industrial era we damn near made many species of whale extinct and then something else. I learned that I didn't know we came in North America. We came really close to wiping out out the beaver the Canada goose the white tailed deer the black bear. These iconic species are very much part of our landscape. Today thank Heaven Man man we we came quite close to wiping these things out because our appetites were voracious kind of indiscriminate and growing year after year ear and again I just think of this one two punch of you know Indus- industrial turbocharged capitalism and more and more powerful technology all the time and you use the adjective adjective voracious to describe economic growth then I keep on thinking of cookie monster economy where it just went. I'm NAM NAM NAM and ate up everything that that all these inputs that it could think of US rapacious or pay. That's even better yes. It's true like cat. Let's be super honest. Capitalism is a greedy process. There's just there's no other way to say it and it caused us to kind of you know take more from the Earth dump whatever we didn't want off to the side and you can point to these environmental dark sides of the industrial era and you'd be exactly accurate about it and for me that that helps me understand the dawn of the environmental movement and the in amazing amount of energy behind the first Earth Day in April of nineteen seventy yeah yeah so let's let's linger on the a convergence of tech progress and capitalism and the synergy there and I think we should say more about the problems because it certainly capitalism. has a very bad rap in many circles these days and it's despite the happy trend you've discussed in your book which is the decoupling and it takes takes as its object when the criticism of capitalism takes us object wealth inequality which seems to be growing even though correct me if I'm wrong. I I think it's not growing globally but within countries is growing. That's exactly right. That's the right way to think about it. I let let's talk about how we we have these lines diverge resource extraction and waste and pollution from increasing gene prosperity but then why it wise is not yet a perfectly happy picture of Sane Environmental Policy Aligned Incentives and you know a a rising tide that lifts all boats yeah so you've asked a couple different times already what changed how is it that we're now getting getting more from less. If the title of my book it's at all accurate and my super short but I think not too short explanation of what changed changed how we move from this voracious rapacious cookie monster industrial era economy to what I'm going to call it the second machine age because that's what Eric and I called old are earlier book where I am asserting we continue to grow our economy and our population and our prosperity but we're now trading more lightly on the planet okay so you're your sixty four thousand dollar question is what changed my very short answer to that is we invented the computer and we finally invented this technology that lets us find all of these different ways all of these overlapping complementary ways to get more from less to get more prosperity disparity from less metal less fertilizer less water less cropland less of all of these material inputs to to the economy and let me give you a couple of different point examples of that when we first introduced aluminum cans they were a big deal because they were probably healthier your and lighter and cheaper than the tin lined steel cans that they replaced and all of us now take aluminum cans for granted all the beer all the the soda that we drink a lot of it comes in aluminum can that can now is about one fifth the weight of the first generation of aluminum cans and I would have thought you'd make a couple of tweaks to the first generation aluminum can and that's about as light as you could get. It turns out that's dead. Flat wrong can get down to about a fifth of the initial weight and the the only way that I can understand that you do that. Is You have engineers in front of their cad terminals in front of their computer aided design terminals just doing simulation after simulation. If we make it this way can bear all the weight will it satisfy all the requirements and can we save a couple tenths of a penny per one hundred hundred cans on the aluminum that we've got to spend money on to deliver our beer to some consumer out there. The thing to keep in mind is twofold that consumer doesn't it doesn't get any value from the aluminum. All that guy wants is to drink a beer and the beverage company would really prefer to spend absolutely no money on that aluminum. They want to get that down as close to zero as possible so capitalism like we've already discussed. Is this voracious thing. It's a relentless quest for profits. The flip side of that and where the new you start to turn good is that it's also voracious quest to save a buck. A penny saved is a penny earned so companies are really eager to hire a couple engineers to sit in front cab terminals and figure out how to make an an aluminum can lighter so that's that's a pretty direct way to see how digital attack progress will help us save on resources. I have a friend who's had a really long career and a couple of years ago. I was discussing the early stages of this book with him and he said Oh. I've got a great example sample for you he said when I started my career I I worked for a conglomerate owned a railroad and he said I started my career nineteen sixty eight and my very first I task as a bright young guy working in this company was to figure out where more of our boxcars were across the country and I said what are you talking about out. He said look in nineteen sixty eight Chicago North West Railway C. N. W. Had No way to know where it's rolling stark stock. It's it's locomotives in its boxcars. Wchs cars were around the country. There was no such thing as an rfid tag or a sensor network or any of that stuff. This was the pre digital era by enlarge and he said the lower inside the company at that point was that five percent of our boxcars moved on every on any given day and it's not that the other ninety five percent needed to arrest. We didn't know where they were. We couldn't move them around the country deliberately and he said look it was abundantly clear to all of us that if we could increase that five percent just to ten percent we would only need half as many boxcars to do all of our business that is a massive massive savings on these these thirty ton steel behemoths sitting out there so he said it was well worth our time to invest in getting that percentage up and the way you got that percentage up in nineteen eighteen sixty eight was you hired people to stand at railroad crossings and watch trains go by and see if they could spot and C and w cars then they telephone owner telegraph back to headquarters what they saw and you'd hire people to do audits of freight yards and things like that and then he said my team started to hear about this thing called the computer cuter. We started to think that might be useful. We can fast forward to today. I'm pretty sure that every single boxcar in America has at least one rfid censor on it. They're they're all these trackside sensors everywhere that count that keep track of which cars I'd be amazed if every row railroad in the country today didn't know where it stock was this with great precision at every point in time because of that you just don't need as many boxcars you start you start to see these examples triangulating coming together. I I think the single most vivid one was a story that I read about a retired newspaper men in buffalo whose idea of a good time was to go around to garage sales and buy stuff that might tell him something about Buffalo's history so he bought a stack of Buffalo News newspapers from Nineteen ninety-one for I don't know what less than five bucks and he was flipping through them and he came across a radio shack ad from one thousand nine hundred ninety one and this guy made a really interesting observation observation a his name was Steve Sean. He said there were fifteen gizmos on this radio shack ad from Nineteen ninety-one he said thirteen of them have vanished vanished into the phone that I carry in my pocket all the time and he was talking about a camcorder and a camera and a cordless phone and an answering machine and a walkman and all these different things and he's absolutely right they've just kind of vanished down into various small very light thing that we carry around with us all the time and so mentally if I weigh those thirteen different devices and I think about how many resources of different kinds went into those thirteen and swap it out for the one smartphone mart phone I start to understand the graphs that appear in the book and why America is now year by year using less and I don't mean less per capita gotta less per American. I mean less aggregate. of really important materials like gold nickel steel fertilizer Eiser water for Agriculture Timber Paper Crop land in kind of the material who's who of how you make an economy the trend line has changed and they're now going in general down year after year and lurking in the back of all these materials savings. I see tech progress coupled with capitalism which is a desire not only is it desire to increase profits and a great very straightforward one away one to one way to increase the profit is to cut cost ripe and materials costs money okay so let me see if I can channel some of the concerns of people who will hear what you just said as yet more techno happy talk and they don't want to get on the ride toward toward utopia that you you seem to be beckoning him towards so so even what you just said there are echoes of problems that people are are now worried about so we. I doubt anyone is especially sentimental about the job of walking the nation's train tracks looking for boxcars but you did just cite one job that has been irrevocably seeded into the power of automation and computation right so this is a trend that many people. I think are rightly worried about that that there's no guarantee that the jobs as we automate away will be replaced by new ones that people will will prefer or they can be or they can be readily trained for or retrain for so There's still a dynamic that is something like a at least in certain sectors is disconcertingly certainly like a a winner take all phenomenon whereas you're seeing fantastic accretions of wealth and wages either are not growing or declining for the better part of humanity or at least the better part of the middle class and lower middle class in the US and Ed who knows what's happening in in other countries so there is that concern that the this invisible hand that is is working to our benefit and in in many ways with capitalism people are not becoming saints. They're not operating by. They haven't had new ethical modules installed. They're just trying to make a buck can save a buck yup and yet the breakthroughs in technology allowing them to do this. In a way that is actually better for everyone but they're still this in fact that there's the haves and have nots in this system and then there are the the negative externalities that the market just can't can't correct for like you know and this these are things you discuss in your book like pollution it had we acknowledged the the problems yet to be solved and and how do we solve them. Yeah yeah and I do try to spend a decent chunk of the book not just cheerleading capitalism in tech progress. I think it's important to do that because they're getting a bad rap in some ways but but there's a difference between being an optimist and being a utopian or a Pollyanna and I'm trying very hard not to be a utopian or a Pollyanna and you just rattled off off a number of really important cautions and really important challenges that we are confronting today that I think are going to get more pointed as we go forward. One of the one of the most good news bad news crafts that I put in the book is a a reproduction of famous elephant graph that Christopher lasker and Bronco Milanovic wrote about in a World Bank report that came out in twenty twelve and it kind of went unnoticed at first and then people started looking like wait a minute. This is a big deal and all kinds of controversy has has emerged about how you calculate how you draw it correctly and so there have been revisions to it but let me try to visually describe arrive the elephant graph and the version that I rely on the most looks like the head of an elephant with an upraised trunk and what I mean by that. Is You know this thing's got a back. It's kind of a hump that looks like the forehead of an elephant and then it drops down super sharply and then it rises super. I sharply toward the end and that's for me. That's you know the the where the head drops off in the upraised trunk starts and what that is a graph of is essentially essentially if you took all the people in the world in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight and you line them up from lowest income to highest income and then you looked look at how much their real incomes changed over the next twenty years over the next generation and then you plotted that increase or decrease on a graph the elephant is what you would wind up with the elephant graph is what you would get and what that shows is that for almost all of humanity almost all of humanity is either other that flat back in the elephant which is right about at fifty ish percent real growth and income then there's the elephants head where you're doing even better the increases even bigger the big divot and then the upraised trunk the end of the trunk are the wealthiest people in the world in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight who to the surprise of nobody we're doing much better in two thousand and eight and the really the the key part of the graph is obviously that divot the divet between the head of the elephant and the upraised trunk hunk of the elephants and that divet represents the middle essentially the lower middle class to middle class in the rich world and that is a really important group to focus on for two main reasons number one. They're the low point on that graph and in every version of the graph that I've seen that that group is is right there at the bottom and we can debate exactly how good or bad they're increase in income was but they are the globally least I big gainers in income over that generation and by some measures. They didn't gain very much at all when we hear about wage stagnation. That's really elite group that we're talking about is that Il class in the wealthy world who when they look anywhere else on that graph they can look down and they see everyone from you know peasant farmers in India to urbanize Chinese assembly line workers. They're all doing a lot better a lot better than they were twenty years ago. If they look up at the upraised trunk of the elephant those are Wall Street People Silicon Valley Venture Capitalists. You know the the global elite. They're doing much better as well and then that person in the middle class and the rich world says wait a minute. I'm lagging way behind the subas global tie. It's lifting other boats here and they're saying that accurately the other important thing about the the middle class in the rich world they are very very important demographic group not just because they're so they're so many of them and Sam not just because you happen to come from that demographic group but they are really important for electing leaders of the rich world and the leaders of the rich world have a huge huge influence on the course of things all across the globe and so that graph really helps me understand the rise in populism demagoguery. Magog authoritarianism around lots of rich world countries okay. You've got that demographic group that is making an accurate assessment about how they've been doing vis-a-vis a lot of other people around the world and there's some real discontent they're going on and as much as I'm sitting here cheerleading for global markets and protect progress those things are part of the reason why that middle class has not seen incomes go up much it turns out that the middle class and the rich world has been doing routine work work. That's that's the backbone of the middle class. That's an assembly line worker or payroll clerk or somebody like that. Those jobs are vanishing quickly to both globalization and automation and the those old fashioned jobs are not coming back so one of the challenges that like you know Eric I have written extensively civilly about it was the subject big subject in our book the Second Machine Age and I bring it up again here is that there are people in their communities getting left behind as has tech progress in capitalism race ahead and figuring out what to do about that is really urgent homework and some of the toughest challenge is one of the toughest challenges ahead of us because of the tool kit for dealing with communities and people who are getting left behind. It's not a very full tool kit and the track record of trying to help communities communities that have fallen on hard times. The track record is not super impressive so we've got some real homework ahead of us there right and there's just the psychological fact that a person or group's sense of whether they're doing well or badly is going to be as you say comparative even if all boats were rising would the the same tide of some arising much much faster. You'd still have many unhappy. People yet in whatever classes is lagging and to add onto onto that if people start to believe that the bargain that they signed up for is not the bargain that they're getting again. The perceptions can turn negative really really quickly and I put in the book this wonderful research from different sociologist that came out way before the twenty sixteen election way before the trump phenomenon happened happened where they spent time with these some of these communities that were on the bubble and they kept reporting back that the perceptions the resentment the anger anger at how they feel like they're bargains are not getting honored him at everybody. Else's kind of skipping ahead of them in line. People were reporting on this in two thousand thousand seven two thousand and eight. I think we didn't listen carefully enough. So I wanNA talk about the the other two horsemen of the optimist public awareness and response wants of government but before we get there I think we should we should say something about climate change. which is the big negative externalities that many of us can't that seemed to admit even exists so we have a problem there that's intellectual and political and and seems especially intractable but before we jump to that what about the concern that even if we are in the process of putting our house in order what we're facing now is a developing world old that is just perhaps despite everyone's best intentions destined to recapitulate the the wasteful industrial revolution fed course of progress that we have traversed and so you have China and India bourgeoning in all the dirty ways that we did but with many more people involved? What's the fix for getting the developing world on a cleaner happier path of the sort that we are now on? It's a great question because our planet cannot take any anymore industrial revolutions the way that we had them play out and they are planning especially can't take more industrial revolutions if they involve a billion people one point point four billion people India China levels of population so you bring up this excellent question we can't see how are we going to avoid watching this movie movie again and one of the main ways that I think we're going to avoid watching. This movie. Again is by making sure that the currently low income world has access to very very different technologies than we had when we were at similar income levels and I think that's going to happen. There is just no way that India or Nigeria Geria- is going to lay copper all over the country to do telecommunications they. There'd be economically ridiculous. They're just not going to do it. I keep keep on seeing encouraging things about how low income countries as they tried to bring energy to their people are going to build fewer coal plants the per capita than America and Europe did at similar income levels. They just have better technologies open to them. There's no way there's just no way that Bangladeshi Nigerians and Chinese are going to be taking a lot of film photographs. It's just not a thing that they're going to do and as railroads and airlines and whatnot dispersed across those countries. They're not going to have the phenomenon where they only know where five percent of their inventory is every day. They're just going to start from a much much higher airbase line of performance in being able to track and optimize things so the reason. I don't think we're going to see an industrial revolution in the currently low income world that plays out the same way ours did is because we've got you know two hundred plus years of better technology and we're not going to give it to low income countries because because we're altruistic. They're going to demand it because it's the cheapest solution. It's the most effective solution out there. They have no more desire to waste money than we did at at that point in time where so I I what I'm not saying to your earlier point is that things are all going to be fine or that. We're going to address really really deep challenges like global warming quickly enough. I I'm not a POLLYANNA. I'm not an optimist about that. We are not doing enough on that particular challenge but on the more more specific challenge of are we going to eat up the world as today's low income countries become wealthier. I'll take bets. I'm very confident that we're not in addition to which I kind of think that they are going to start demanding less pollution early in their development than we did. It really took Earth Earth Day in the Environmental Movement for us to even start thinking about you know limiting pollution or take you're putting animals off outside the market system system and letting them rebuild their populations. The environmental movement was kind of late coming. We were a rich country already. I don't think that's going to be the case in a lot of low. Income Countries and China tells me so many interesting things China has strict bands in place now on buying selling or owning rhino in tiger products products these are you know traditionally very important products for some kinds of of medicine. Their people want them. The government has abandoned place yao-ming is is it going around making films about how we need to take better care of elephants and not trade in ivory a he said he had a bond with Africa because animals. There are about the same size he that's great. I think that we see pretty clearly that China is do we some really environmentally smart things way earlier in its economic trajectory than we did. The Chinese government took really effective kind of draconian but very effective entire pollution measures and in four years they brought their particular pollution Lucien levels down by thirty percent across the country. It took the United States twelve years after the passage of the Clean Air Act to get that same level of reduction and we were a much richer richer country at the time so again I want to draw distinction between being a Pollyanna and being an optimist reason. I'm an optimist is I see today's as low income countries behaving very differently and better than today's rich countries did when they were low income countries and so my conclusion from that is man. Let's help them get rich quicker. Let's accelerate that development. They're going to go through the material resource transition and start getting more from less and when people get rich they start carrying they have the luxury or the bandwidth to care about their environment to care about their fellow creatures better. Indira Gandhi said in the seventies I believe poverty is the greatest polluter fantastic take that seriously. Let's try to try out the poverty. WE'RE NOT GONNA use up the world will do the opposite if we can make other countries rich. Do you think technological progress and capitalism are sufficient there or is or will altruism be the part of the solution. Do we need to share technology with the developing world in ways that are not strictly in anyone's financial interest. Let me give you a qualified. Maybe for that the biggest way that I can think of is I think the single most effective thing the two most effective things we could do to combat global warming are to have an actual carbon tax that that matters in the biggest carbon polluting countries around the world and on the technology front I am I become very strongly. Pro Nuclear as a result of working on this book when I would love to do is have some jointly financed multi-country effort to invent and then deploy a new class of nuclear reactor and Sam. You know they're out there. These gates talks about a lot that are modular. They're smaller. They're much much safer their waste doesn't they don't really put out the same kind of waste that you can use as a weapon that our current generation of reactors does so these are massively superior technologies. I think there might be a case or a point for a Global Patent Bank or Global Intellectual Property Bank around this new category of reactor to go say to everybody. Hey you know you don't have to. I'm not going to charge you a royalty for these fundamental technologies. Just go do this and on your energy path. Get too low carbon zero carbon as quickly as you can. There's a little maybe you could call that altruism. I would call that we all. I WanNa live on a planet. That's that's not overheating aside from a couple of examples like that again. I think capitalism I think market mechanisms will be sufficient and to give really powerful technologies to low income countries now. I'm not saying there's no point in international aid or an NGOs or anything. That's that's a separate category of argument but market mechanisms will bring really good technology to currently low income people and countries but can I talk a little bit about the other pair of horsemen because Ah cheerleading for capitalism in tech progress as I mean to. That's a main point of the book but I keep on using this image of an econ one. Oh One textbook doc because every ECON one one student learns in chapter one that markets are the best way to allocate goods and services what they learn in chapter two of their decent recent ECON one. Oh One class is that markets are imperfect. You can't rely on them to do everything that you want to have done and the first exhibit is always pollution solution and the idea there is that if it's free to pollute we just can't rely on corporate goodwill not to pollute and so pollution is always the classic ask you use this phrase a couple times the negative externalities which is a fancy way of saying something that happens because of an economic transaction that we're the the benefits of the cost do not directly go to the people involved in that transaction so to try to make that concrete in the book. I say look if I walked down the street street to my corner store in my neighborhood and buy some milk is there's not a lot of extra analogy there the store owner benefits. I get the milk that's awesome however or if the dairy that produces that milk doesn't clean up after it's cows the neighbors who live down wind are going to suffer and they're not doing any business with the dairy. Let's say so. They can't choose to take their business elsewhere but they're still suffering because of the nasty smell yeah. That's a that's extra analogy. These things crop up all over the place. They actually point one point. I'd like to add this that you know. I often find among libertarians who you know take almost as a religious precepts that the market is the best asked way of correcting for every glitch in human experience. They are incredibly care free around this point of negative externalities. Turn -ality so like if you know just just to make this clear if your if your neighbor is burning trash in his yard and this you know toxic smoke of you know plastic plastic bags and everything else he's burning is wafting through your bedroom window in a libertarian world where you believe that the market should correct trek for everything you have to price that in so the the the neighbor should be forced to compensate you for the imposition on your health and your experience but that's not the way most libertarians view our economy and and and the our reliance on fossil fuels and climate Emma change and and the epidemiological effects of of air pollution right of interested the they don't seem eager to have those effects priced in to the system and if they would be priced in the economic wisdom of relying on fossil fuels would go completely out the window in in many cases right so it's it's you know if you're gonNA compare something like solar to coal or natural gas unfavourably as a libertarian the only honest way to do that is to actually price in the the health and climate consequences of relying on on the dirty fuels and I find their surprisingly few takers. Here's where that yeah and you bring up this this fundamental point. I love talking to Libertarians because they have a world view and they pushed my thinking a lot in some really helpful ways. I I have the same experience you when you talk to kind of an ideolog libertarian who believes that government never has any role to play this idea of an extra trips them up like almost nothing else does because then they start to stammering stuttering give you these wildly implausible things why we won't have pollution in the Libertarian Economic Paradise and I just don't buy it and so you bring up the the ECON one. Oh one solution to these things which is hey if you love market. It's so much and you shut. There's a Lotta great reasons to love. Markets great put pollution the inside the market but but the government is the thing that does that that hatches a price to a ton of carbon because that ton of carbon pollution dozen have a price so companies feel free to put out as many times as they want the idea behind a carbon tax is is to make the bring us closer to that Libertarian Paradise where markets work extremely well but put pollution inside that market and let companies deal with that and the imagery that I always use is that companies run from increased costs like antelope run when they smell a lion. It's just remarkable how quickly they'll change their activities so like you know build. Nord House won the Nobel shared the Nobel Prize in economics last year in large apart because of his work on global warming and on his solution and north houses brilliant wrinkle and again this gets it closer to kind of a libertarian paradise was was to have a revenue neutral carbon tax and what that means is. Let's say that you don't trust the government to spend your tax money very very effectively or efficiently great. A revenue neutral carbon tax says the government is just a pass through entity it collects all the money from everybody who's emitting carbon and then it turns around and distributes that money directly to the citizens of the people in the country in the form of what's called. Carbon dividend like here's your check because of all the carbon that happened and you probably want to configure figure that carbon dividend so that the dividend is bigger for lower income people who were hit harder by these increased costs out there and then the naive thing too. Is We have if it doesn't solve the problem at all. You're putting more money in people's pockets. They're just GONNA go buy more stuff that pollutes and I think chapter four or five of Your Econ one one textbook book talks about the difference between income effects and substitution effects in other words that when you get richer you spend. Maybe you spend money in exactly the same way you did when you you were more poor and less the relative costs of things have changed so if you're gallon of gas suddenly costs a lot more even if you're you become richer because of your carbon been dividend. You're going to spend money away from that gallon of gas. We're going to spend money on other things and it's just really clear from from ECON one. Oh One and a lot more that led to Nobel prizes that a revenue neutral carbon tax that raised the increases gradually over time because you want businesses to have more and more incentive not to put carbon in the atmosphere atmosphere man that that's weapon number one that is the best tool for fighting global warming and like the amount of enthusiasm for it. It's way too low which brings brings to the second pair forces the other. Two horsemen of the optimist from me are public awareness. Global warming is bad we today we have school kids leaving school in marching all over the world to demand action on this that's great example of public awareness coupled with responsive governments and by that that I mean governments who respond to the will of their people and they respond with good ideas and their and their activities they can do things in the same way that a car is responsive in other words. It does what you want it to do so when I have that one two punch when both those are working then I start to get calm about the things that markets don't take care of which for me are primarily pollution and primarily putting animals outside of the market system. We decided we didn't WANNA kill. All the whales public awareness was hugely increased number that old Judy Collins Song where she did a duet with a hump back that a lot of people's minds. I think I missed it but I I think I actually think I'm pretty sure it was judy. Collins and there's a humpback in the background so we had the Marine Mammal Protection Act in Nineteen seventy-two which said essentially look. I don't care how expensive if you make a whale. You cannot hunt them anymore or buy and sell their products in this country you bravo. Let's do more of that. It is it it does seem team so anachronistic as to make a difficult to imagine that there was any period of life where it seemed normal to be hunting Wales to get their oil to what lubricate gears and what were we doing with whale oil. You're using it as fuel. I mean it's just it's it's so crazy right that in the first half of the twentieth century and before I started working on this book I thought of whale hunting is this nineteenth century Herman Melville L. Phil Kinda thing which was and then we turbocharged it in the twentieth century when we had ships that were not powered by steam when we had explosive of grenade-launching cannons on ships and we built ships that could take whales that normally sink when they're dead the reason the right whale is called called the right whale is because it was the right whale to hunt in the nineteenth century. It stayed afloat. Even after it was debt so you can carve it up and the blue whale the humpback whale a bunch of other species. He's sink when they're dead so nineteenth century whalers couldn't do a lot with them. Oh we solve that problem. In the twentieth century we built these ships where you could drag a whale carcass right on board and carpet up and so we almost wiped out several species of whale during the twentieth century like you say to make margarine lubricants and explosives because there's glycerin in rail blubber that you can make nitroglycerine out of we had other ways to make margarine lubricants and explosives closest. We didn't absolutely need those Wales but it because it made I guess economic sense we hunted them almost literally to the ends of the earth and almost off the the face of the earth and then in the rich world or actually throughout most of the world we decided not to and there's one really really fascinating and terribly depressing housing. CODA to this story which for me shows what happens when you don't have public awareness or responsible government and it's the story of the Soviet whale hunt because as the Soviet Union signed the same treaty that almost every other country did say okay. We're only I think. They signed this in nineteen forty eight. We're only going to hunt a very very small number of whales every year so its population can rebuild itself the Soviet sign that treaty they went out and hunted at least a couple hundred thousand whitmore whales than their quota allowed over just a couple three decades. They went around there. No spotter there are no international observers on their whaling ships so they just ignored the treaty like crazy. That was bad enough the tragic the farcical tragic part of the story is that we didn't use them for or anything. We didn't use Wales for anything. Really important didn't use them at all. They took about the cut the blubber off the whale. It's about thirty percent of the whale they through the rest to the animal back into the ocean and they didn't even really need the blubber because the Soviet Union was already pretty self sufficient and oil had huge oil reserves so ask the the question. Why on Earth were they doing this and the answer is a Stalin Five Year Plan and the Five Year Plan for the fisheries specified that you have to increase fisheries tonnage every year a really effective way to do that is to hunt the heaviest selfies part of the Fisheries Industry which is Wales so the people in charge of the whale hunt became heroes of the Soviet Union literally had medals pinned on them because of their ability to meet the Stalinist stalinesque ask five year plans that were completely unrelated to what the people of the Soviet Union actually need it or want it and the one of the saddest things I put him. The book was a an interaction between one of the Soviet scientists who was on the boats to kind of study what was happening to the whales. He walked into his Soviet bureaucrats office office and said we need to slow down or stop. The whale hunts because our descendants won't be able to see any Wales and the guy responded are descendants are not going to be the ones to fire for me from my job so in the book come down fairly hard on centrally planned economies and totalitarian societies. I really don't think I came down too hard on them because because they they in a time when the whale populations were already so threatened they went out and wantonly killed hundreds of thousands of more for absolutely no good reason listen unfortunately democratic and capitalistic societies or showing a potential for regress and we're having this conversation on a day where I believe the California has just declared a lawsuit against the trump administration for trying to undermine pollution in standards in in the manufacturer of cars so we have as hopeful as many of these trends. Are we have a very stable genius in the White House. How's he claims that climate change is a Chinese engineered hoax and he is showing some passion. Ashen for a time when our air was far more polluted by automobile exhaust for reasons that are somewhat somewhat difficult to fathom. What are the arguments on the other side of this. What are the what are the actual arguments against putting a price on carbon. Is there anything thing that isn't just mere greed or really just the version of the Soviet functionaries observation that listen to the future generations are are not going to be the one to fire me. I think that's a big part of it and one of the huge problems with global warming is that it is not a obvious today problem we clearly see signs that the earth is warming but the biggest negative impacts are going to be decades down the road so it's a problem where you could imagine an elected official who doesn't WANNA face powerful fuel fossil-fuel industry lobbyists or doesn't WanNa face people who are unhappy about an in any flavor for of price increase and that person could say I'm GonNa kick the can down the road. That's the next administration's problem. I think that's part of what's going on the good arguments against carbon-tax. I I have a really hard time coming up with any the only ones I've heard come from kind of the fringe of the left wing of the environmental into movement who are so reflexively hostile to markets into market mechanisms that they reject any attempt to US markets more heavily. I I don't know what they what they think will happen in the future to take us to a better place but they're just reflexively hostile to exactly this combination that I love talking about out capitalism in tech progress. I think they want to go back to the. I don't know the late eighteenth century so they're hostile to these market centric ideas but you bring up the fact that the trump administration is trying to roll back pollution protection in lots of different ways we clearly see it with auto emissions and we see it with methane inadvertent methane emissions from the natural gas from the fracking industry. We see wetlands protections being rolled back and you could say are these things sensible to do because we've we've overshot with our pollution regulation. You know the air today so so much cleaner need ninety five plus percent cleaner than it was in the early seventies is have we gone far enough as the cost benefit calculation different enough now that we've overshot. We need to kind of let a little more pollution happen. That's a sensible question to ask but we know the answer to that question. There's all this research search that shows how bad even our current levels of pollution are and I've seen these amazing studies where they looked at what happened to disease levels asthma levels and things like that in neighborhoods I think on the New Jersey turnpike where they got rid of the toll booth and replaced it with a sensor sir so that cars don't have to sit in line idle and wait to pay seventy five cents or whatever when you do that you see the surrounding neighborhoods get healthier if you look at even modern electricity generation plants that shut down the kids living downwind from those plants get healthier their test scores. Go Co op in school. I look at stuff like that. I think we are not anywhere near overshooting on our pollution controls in our pollution regulation so so all those moves by the current administration are really disheartening to me. We have not won the battle against pollution yet we just need to be we need to be strict. We need to fill in. We we have shown since the passage of the clear the clean water act. It's perfectly possible to grow an economy to have it. Grow a healthy rate to have just really attractive corporate profits. It's while clamping down on pollution. You know let's not walk away from that yet. I've often thought that the the battle for hearts and minds for climate change should be waged on a different front around air pollution and we just forget about climate change less just argue that the current level of air pollution and is unacceptable and drive that down. Let's drive it down with renewable energy and electric cars and you know making all the decisions we should make to mitigate the climate crisis but it never would occur to me that you could find any takers for increasing air pollution consciously right and yet that seems to be what's happening. Anyone who isn't just aghast at trump's moves here with respect to California l. a. -fornia seems to just not care about their lungs maters just kids yeah and it'd be very easy to to get the real time health consequences of all of this is in any city like Los Angeles there have to be tens of thousands of you've cardiovascular deaths and deaths from emphysema and your chronic pulmonary disease that are attributable to particularly pollution and is just of course we WANNA drive that down to close to zero as possible and their their whole new industries opening up that are making that possible astle that's right. It's just the idea that this zero sum contest between economic growth and our health is purely fiction. This was the fact that was much discussed. You know early on in the presidential campaign in two thousand sixteen when when trump was championing himself offers the as the defender of of coal miners everywhere you know of whom there about seventy five thousand seventy five thousand people miners and everyone else included associated with the coal industry all in in the industry this is you know people working desk jobs in the coal industry as well and there's something like five hundred thousand. I was in clean tech jobs alone in California. Right is just madness yeah and to say again. It's reasonable to ask the question and have we gone too far with some of our environmental protection so that's a fair question to ask. We've answered it. We know the answer to this one. I'm KI categorically with you. We we the bang for the buck of continuing to clean up the air in America is just jumps off the page at you. It's just overwhelming in in the debate around the Clean Air Act in nineteen seventy on the floor of Congress. Somebody said a man in one of my constituents cities. Said said if you want this town to grow it has to stink. We used to believe that this awareness of the serious health risks the health harms of pollution is is a recent awareness but we have it and we know that we're still not at any kind of cost benefit tradeoff point on that curve we you have to keep being vigilant about this particular extra analogy and we have to keep holding our politicians to account. We have to keep not believing the press releases from companies and high pollution high carbon industries. This is incumbent on us to citizens but I do have to add here. The very unpopular point that burning earning would in your fireplace recreationally is part of this problem. It's exactly Yup. It's the worst particulate pollution you can impinge upon your neighbor over and the fact that the the press release from your childhood uniform of nostalgia sentimentality around how Nice Wood Fire era smells and how cozy it is to be by all of that is dangerous bullshit that you have to figure out how to reach out of your head because as is the Russian that the planet will be better off if we all kind of go back to the land if we turn our backs on these industrial economies that we've built in on capitalism capitalism in tech progress that we're going to tread lightly on the planet. This is lunacy right. We're GONNA we will if we stop you know getting our electricity from big centralized plants Lance. What are we. WE'RE GONNA burn wood pellets. We're going to chop down trees. We're going to denude the planet seven point seven billion of us. We're going to do the planet I probably in a matter of months and that's a real ecological collapse. What's your take on you. Be I as a solution to part of these problems. I guess the wealth inequality problem above all the planetary the concern that is how is number one for me is clearly global warming when it comes comes to the human condition the number one concern for me is exactly what you're talking about what we talked about earlier. which is the fact that there are these people bowl in communities that are getting left behind as these tectonic forces of globalization and technology put our economy into a different place? One thing I learned writing the book is that since the early nineteen eighties for example we have given an amount of farmland back to nature. We don't farm on it anymore. Equal inside of the state of Washington. That's a lot and that's fantastic. Forest can regrow there. We just heard today. The press release about how bird populations have decline so quickly in America great farm less land. Let forests come back with the birds. Come back there. That's fantastic. The challenges there were people all farming that land making their living off it and because that land is no longer economically viable. We're giving it back to nature. Those people need something to do and I really think that they're in in that low point of the elephant graph and so a really important set of questions around what's the right thing to do for those kinds of communities because the wrong thing to do is it's just to say to them. Hey you can just move to you know the superstar cities out there you can move to. SF`er Boston or New York a lot of them say Yeah No. That's not what I'm I'm going to do and again our tool kit for dealing with those communities for revitalizing them economically man the track record is not great so you bring up this interesting idea of a of a U. B. I. Universal Basic Income. If the problem is that they don't have enough money just give them money. Just have a check show up every month from the government. I'm a much bigger fan of thing called a negative income tax whereas if you're out there working you're earning some level of income but it's not enough to give you the life that we think you should have because you're out there trying to play by the rules we for most people we take away income with tax system just run that in reverse top up up people's income using something like the tax system and increase their income with What's called an earned income tax credit. That's what we have right now in America or which is more broadly. It's a negative income tax. I like that approach better because I've come to believe really deeply in the value of work not for some kind of Esoteric Terek calvinism reason but because work gives you structure dignity community meaning it embeds you in a network of people at build social capital all these are these are tremendously important things to do so I'm a big fan of a negative income tax and the thought experiment I run for myself is to think about these these communities that are seeing these terrifying rises in depths of despair drug overdoses chronic liver disease and suicide died and I asked myself which of those problems will be solved by a check from the government showing up every month and my answer is very very few you if any and then I say what how much will those problems be helped if jobs and work come back to these communities and my hopeful answer is a lot more you're I so I want to double down on solutions and kind of bring bringing back jobs work economic activity to these kinds of communities. I think they'll be a more productive thing to do. I guess the the rejoinder from the proponents of you be I would be that you could give it a level that wouldn't be canceling of of the the impetus to work and also people you know people work for many other reasons beyond just having having to based on economic necessity so it would open the door to be more creative work or work that people would be able to take risks creatively to find jobs that they would find more satisfying and also so it would put a value on types of work that are currently valued at zero in our economy by just taking care of children. Taking care of you know elder stuff that's done in people's private lives that obviously real social capital which is uncompensated yeah and that that second point to me is by far the more powerful one. Let's be clear there. Are People doing tremendously important work taking care of like you say of an old relative or looking after kids inside the home. This is massively important work to do for a society. They get compensated zero dollars per hour on that so a UB. I kind of a no questions asked. Check check would absolutely compensate that kind of person if we wanted to increase the amount of people or the amount of creativity innovation entrepreneurship out there. I'd be much more in favor of doing something like what every other rich country does with healthcare which is to make it universally available at some level fault. I saw a great tweet from from an entrepreneur that I know today. She said to to start a company today. In America you have to be some combination of privileged privileged and crazy and I think that's a great way to look at it and so when you look at our entrepreneurial class they are some combination of privileged in crazy. I think emphasis on the privileged if we we wanted to unleash a lot more of that give people the freedom to take more risks with their work in their lives like take their health and their healthcare often name. Let let's do that right okay. Sandra have a few rapid fire bonus questions game to answer some of these lightning round yeah. Let's get okay so you can. NBA as Rolex as you want but you can also be briefed good so if you had one piece of advice for a person who wants to succeed in your field and you could conceive of your field however however you like. You're a man of many talents here. What would that advice be find a good mentor early and work your tail offer them. Demonstrate your value you. What if anything do you wish you done differently in your twenties thirties or forties. I had a bit of an unconventional education and I wish I had played it right more a lot more down the metal so for example I am not a classically trained economist and if and if I had gone to a very good graduate economics program and gone through that meet grinder. I think my toolkit would be better than it is right now and so if I could rewind. That's clearly clearly one of the things that I would do. I'm not saying I got a bad education at all but I I was. I think I was too unorthodox so you can be an unorthodox on Orthodox person or thinker or have kind of jazzy career wild doing the foundational educational things in a conventional way ten ten years from now. What do you think you'll regret doing too much of or too little of at this point in your life. I'm going to give a completely self contradicting answer. I think I'll look back in ten in years and said you should have you should have done more and better work and you should have enjoyed your life more and the ongoing resolution of that question. You know plagues plagues me. Put that in a pill and I will take it every day. You take that pill to yeah you know. I've learned that for example. I'm learning to kite board and it's just the most joyous it's the most amazing feeling to do that and I love it for all kinds of geeky reasons because it is this product of huge which amounts of individual effort and innovation because a couple of lunatics twenty a generation ago said you know what we should do wish strap strap this new thing called a snowboard to our feet and have some kind of sale kite drag us across the surface of the ocean and Holy Holy Toledo lives were lost in many shoulders were dislocated to make it the tractable safe sport that it is today so you know should I go be a a kite board bum for a couple years yet yeah and at the same time I there were a couple of books that I know I want to write their questions. I want to dig in on and so I I have no no real idea how to resolve that paradox so I kind of muddle through both in a poor way an addition to that you're now being told every hour that sleep is the most important Jordan for your wellbeing and you should be getting nine hours of tonight so you can't sleep less to solve this problem. That's all right. You can't put it's a really bad solution. I'm convinced by that Great Book Doc why we sleep. I'm convinced that you can't shortcut on that and have a happy fulfilled productive long life so yeah. This is a tough one. What is something that you're right about that very controversial feel like maybe the thesis of Your Current Book Fits in there but you have something that you believe that you are right about yet. Most people upon hearing it will will disagree with you on idiosyncratically. I think that the thesis of this book is correct right but I I do believe that we really have learned how to simultaneously improve the human condition and the state of nature and most people. I think don't believe that a little more generally. I think that the current distaste for nuclear power is not grounded in evidence and is serving us really really poorly early especially in a in an overheating world. We have one power source that is clean green safe scalable and Dan somewhere near a cost efficient and where we're running away from it around the world. This is lunacy to me. I generally agree but did you happen to see the the recent and series Chernobyl I in the middle of watching it right now ripping TV. A lot of it's a lot of specifics are wrong. They're just it's dramatic licensed going on me and I think it's driving US farther away from rationality about nuclear power even though it's incredibly good entertainment and I'm literally watching it right now. It's probably the worst piece of PR for the Renaissance. We need a nuclear. That's right. What books should everybody read. Everyone one should read Edward Tuffey's wonderful books about presenting quantitative information and I think the first one is just called the visual display of quantitative information and and it will turn you into a complete chart snob and you will never look at a chart rethink about presenting your evidence the same way you'll do a better job at it and that was that's one of those books that that really changed how I see things and how I tried to do my work right nice. What negative experience one that you would not want wish to repeat has most profoundly changed you for the better? When I was a faculty member at Harvard. I did not get tenure and at at the time. Why was that a bummer that was that was a professional blow because I'd spent about fifteen years of my life shooting for that. I was part of a community where that's the thing that you value when when you're GonNa go do that and and to have my school in my colleagues come back and say it's not going to happen here without that was pretty dark time. Luckily I I I had offered to go do something similar but different at Mit and I took them up on that and you know the the the weird and a great way journey that I've been on for the past ten years has been great professional blessing of my life and would not have happened except for this deeply plea on pleasant event that happened to me yeah yeah you're. You're the second person to have that. Be Your answer. There is that right who was the other one the physicist Sean Carroll who's now Caltech who I think was at the University of Chicago where he didn't get tenure but yeah it was like you know one of the worst experiences of his life that had a silver lining and SAM. You probably know academia's this very weird insular world and when you're part of living inside that bubble you know the thing that you that you're early career oriented around this thing called getting tenure and it's just this brass ring that's held out there and to not get it is is many flavors of bummer all wrapped together and the if I'd been at that point and like said what's the next ten years of your life going to look like this would not have Bennett yeah if you could solve just one mystery as a scientist or economist or intellectual journalist wherever you want to point yourself what would it be. I'm going to give you way too broad an answer and giving this one to you. This is me like leading with my Chin. I think if if we could solve consciousness or understand how consciousness works that that would be one of the great human triumphs yeah that's mine too. Is it really yeah yeah yeah. I I think I think we're just poking at it. We're so far away from it and the person or the team that has the the Eureka Eureka's to get us there. That's a huge huge human achievement near if you could resurrect one person from history and put them in our world today and you could give them the benefit of a modern education if needed. Who would you bring back to the team? I love this question Abraham Lincoln and had not thought about that question before you ask it somebody who was just just such a such an amazing human being such a mench and who knew how to get himself elected and fight and win political battles coli cow to win you to Lincoln now okay last question the Jurassic Park Western if we're ever in a position to recreate the T. Rex. Should we do it. Yes yeah and shorter term. I'm that I really hope. I am cautiously optimistic that I'm GonNa live to see a a mastodon or a willy mammoth again and while that will that be a good day in my life or the the obverse of that though when we're in a position to annihilate the mosquito should we do it. I WanNa say yes just because that that creature is responsible nonstop for so much human misery and so many human deaths every year. I understand that that is opening up a new category of tool kit. I have some faith in our ability to do do that correctly but I understand that it's opening up opening up a whole new box and we had better be careful and vigilant about it yeah. I'm all in on that one. I'm willing to push the button myself so you're in. You'll be driving. You'll get rid of me is such a scourge for humanity. I'm willing to roll the dice for all humanity that whatever the downstream effects affects our of killing the mosquito the bats and whatever else eat them. You'll take that I'll take it to skew the crisper button. Do it well listener. It's been great to get you on the podcast. I wish you the best of luck with this book for once in a Blue Moon. I mean that really the last time it happened. It was with Steve Pinker. It's a joy to help amplify a message that is at bottom really hopeful and energizing so just get out there and spread the word because it really is a breath of fresh air. I really appreciate that and I when I think of the tribe that I want to align myself with your name pinkers name or right there at the top of it so so thank you for having me on and keep doing the stuff that you're doing. It's it's fantastic and really need it. Okay well as I said that was very encouraging and it was interesting to be recording this just as the Swedish teenager teenager Greta Thunberg was achieving so much prominence in the news her highly emotional castigation of have world leaders of the UN was an interesting counterpoint to what we spoke about here needless to say I'm convinced that climate change is a major problem as a problem that will likely exacerbate many other problems why political instability and refugee crises so it really should be one of our principal concerns now but I'm also convinced that we are not going to conserve our way out of it. I think we will innovate our way out of it and and therefore sustainable future is one in which we rely on clean sources of power and drive electric cars is not one where we stop having babies VI's or began making everything of hemp and it's certainly not a future in which we declare that capitalism can't be made to work. I definitely share Andrews view that the way forward is to correct for market failures with Sane Policies May for instance a revenue neutral carbon urban tax which yields a carbon dividend that goes first and foremost to the people who can most use it that sounds like a fantastic idea so we need innovation innovation in that space whether Greta Thunberg is helping or hurting. I really don't know I see two reasons. Thanks to worry about her. I I I'm certainly worried for her own. Personal well-being she seems to be under a tremendous amount of stress but she also seems perfectly crafted to bring out the crazies on both sides of the debate about climate change where people on the right denied that it's even happening and then attack act this young woman personally as a historic or worse and also alleged that she's being cynically used by socialist nutcases to advance hands what is at bottom an economic ornament and a false one and then the far left obliges by amplifying the voices of its socialist nutcases who demand that we put the brakes on capitalism and who described climate change as a problem of white patriarchy as you heard on today's podcast the real problem of climate change is that we now have to figure out how to get everyone on earth to start using the best technology we already have in hand hand right and this is especially true of countries like India and China where most of the people are. I obviously wish Greta Thunberg the best but I doubt we're GONNA find the path forward being led by the Joan of arc character. She has become that was Caitlyn Flanigan's observation nation but we need a sober description of the problem and a clear path to incentivize in the solutions and no no doubt this is the topic I will touch again in greater depth as we all heat up until next time If you find this valuable there many ways you can support it. You can review it on itunes or stitcher or wherever he happened to listen to it. You can share it on social social media with your friends you can blog about it or discuss it on your own podcast or you can support it directly and you can do this by subscribing through my website at Sam Harris Dot Org and there you'll find subscriber only content like my ass anything episodes as well as the bonus questions for many of these interviews. He'll also get advanced tickets to my live events. You'll find all of these things and more at Sam Harris Dot Org and thank you for supporting the show listeners like you make it possible.

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Government acting quickly with CFAP payments

The Big Show

23:15 min | 10 months ago

Government acting quickly with CFAP payments

"Second half of the big show is on your way. Twelve, twelve, the big show clock, Amy Peterson and the big show today about playing on special assignment Nathan Fisher's. Eva saw in line and organized and headed in the right direction which some days as. Tall task as you might imagine mark store here, Buddy with BASF will go out and field and. See what he's seeing here and take his recommendations. What a gorgeous day across much of the Upper Midwest mark what's going on? Hey you're right. Who Needs San Diego weather? Man, this is. Yeah, you know I'll have to. I'll have to send a note to one of my good friends here there and see lives in San Diego there too many days where I get to brag on the weather, and he can't, but today might be one of them It's absolutely gorgeous for us, and things are going nicely, so life is good, right? Absolutely What do you see in In terms of being spraying some residual herbicide I would imagine left to go down, but mostly a wrapping up. Yeah. There's still a lot of Poster besides to go out and obviously the the genius window today Campbell Window is closed for a lot of people based on the stage of growth. You know are not hear it, I have we shut off that? Are One or forty five days after planning so now widow is closed for a lot of, but they're still out of postal liberty to go out and We're seeing a lot of that. And then people are asking about adding a group fifteen residual, and that's always a recommendation you know as long as it's on label to a lot of those fifteen outlook and. we basically allow for V, five or six the product, so it's about the right time to do it because you still have soil. That's between the rows. Residual oversight, the Group of Teens like outlook. You WanNa hit the soil because That's GONNA. Give you your post, residual activity and so takeout. These extended flashes. If you're having Deniro rose. Rose obviously, you're not getting much of that herbicide down to the soil, so you can see have limited benefit to that residual. So if you're if you're windowed out of the ingenious mark than some other options. Well again, if Liberty Lake we see a lot of folks using. That as part of their system, you know there's a lot of other about post opportunities you know. People generally look to the the the PPO's The Flag Stars Cobras. Those types of things about the only options that we have. That's where the court ruling you know, and then, of course there's still a lot of water under the bridge. I think to where you know what's going to happen to the whole day Kampala at soybean business, but guys limit our choices for post verge activity. You were telling me a little bit ago. You're starting to see some eighth activity or hear about it in in many parts of Minnesota with some Japanese beetles. Japanese beetles here in Iowa. They've really showed up in force. I notice in my in my yard. I mean I kinda keep trying things Linden tree that they love. Of course you know, they do a lot of ornamented, also They weren't even in the ASPARAGUS patch. So that tells me they're out and about and they're probably eating someone so he? Generally Japanese beetle, we tolerate their feeding it. Really you know you have to monitor their numbers closely, but at this stage of the beans growing rapidly generally outgrow. The defoliation were more concerned and corn during pollination, and particularly and seed corn where they do a lot of silk pruning. CANESSA pollination and. Really cost yields in that regard so so to young lookout for him scout tour, my counterparts in Minnesota, telling me they found some significant April numbers and the university folks in southern, Minnesota so. My advice would be people to be on the lookout for those because it's a little early for soybean. And we'll just have to monitor numbers, and when they get the threshold or close to. We're going to need to. Flip the sugar and look at a insecticide and I would just routes Athena new relatively new product from BSF. It's friendly Advan so like a lot of the organo-phosphates or primary throws. People are used to This one doesn't bother the the bees and it doesn't bother to lady beetle so those beneficial. Insects are not affected, but it's lights out on soybean aphids. That's one of the strengths of the product and something that I think folks should consider if the Japanese beetles are going to have to look elsewhere. They're probably GONNA be looking at the cold pirates Missouri phosphates. Now. Can you combine that application mark with a fungicide or probably the literally I suppose for that Yeah we on the early side generally on soybeans, we. Are, big magic window is between our two and our three. There are some people that make applications that are one and were. There are approaching that we saw a lot of being starting to bloom here they're certainly not. Won't be for a couple of weeks, but Yeah Fun decides. It's a friendly take mix to go out with a insecticide general. You're looking at the same type of nozzles and coverage and events and the whole nine yards, so it's a very complimentary next, and we see people do that all the time, and and we may see a lot of that if that numbers pickup. well, you talk about growing beans. Corn is to in fact It's reaching some thresholds where it's probably too big for a certain herbicides. Yeah, it's really is and particularly those folks that are unfortunately they get that they grains I don't know when they're going to get back into spray. Some of those fields as you move up to that Butler county area from what I gather pretty wack, but there's a lot of people you know. We need the rain. Obviously, and there's parts of south side with still need it, so you know, see all goldilocks whether deal some some too little some too to about right and too much and You know you just one other cloud. Depending on, what's you under really depends, but I get a lot of questions about late posts, applications and corn and we need to. We need to look at labels and and follow them that they you know they aren't could ever federal law, so we're not supposed to be violating those labels so I know people get into a pinch, but they need to understand is the corners that big you know. It's above the weeds, and generally you know. Know it's going to out, compete and shade out a lot of the weeds, and you have to look at the fact that if you did make a late herbicide application off label, you might injure that corn and believe me it's a it's a lot better to have. Weeds take some bushels away then to take a two hundred fifty dollars for corn crop, and turn it into a hundred and fifty Bushel corn crop because you did something. And caused a great amount of injury to your crop. Thanks mark as always. We appreciate your knowledge and insight Mark Store. B. A.. S. F. in. If you have questions, contact your local Va. SF representatives for more information about an. Archaeologist talked about NATO got markets ahead on the big show. Got A note here on this show today twelve, thirty, five, three, the big show clock, eating Peterson in the big show on special assignment Nathan Fisher with our cropping conditions in the market numbers today from our friends at the Fayette County Fair in West Union. That, says the Randy Houser Corey Farley. Band concert is going on as scheduled with of course appropriate to. Measure 's that will be I. Believe July Twenty Fifth Saturday July twenty fifth, so we've of course been documenting for quite a while these county fairs that changed plans made virtual accommodations to make Holden and hosts. Livestock shows for each and FFA livestock shows to do the best. They could to help out. These kids have so much time invested during the Covid, nineteen pandemic and now. Got some who are resuming plans including Fayette County Fair in West Union Iowa. On July twenty fifth, all right always good to talk to bill, nor the USDA's undersecretary for foreign production, rural conservation, big show, pioneering agriculture award winner as well on a gorgeous day across the Upper Midwest Bill. What's going on? We. Just continue to plug along and we've got a few of her offices that are starting to be available for appointments in person appointments, but a lot of folks are are still operating by my dropping, taper off or emailing stuff in working with their offices over the phone lines, and in the meantime we're getting some of our program activities out including. We've gotten about four billion dollars now of c-pap payments out the door. That's about a quarter of what we are likely to be able to get out the cogut food assistance programs, and that's what I was GonNa Compliment you on Bilas. You've been able to turn this around pretty quickly. You know at pray. I think it doesn't seem quickly to to. Folks in the countryside is probably pretty quick for government time. We had to try and figure out what the losses. Were and going to be back in April is we're putting it together? Who Got Authority from? Congress! to be able to access dollars. Put some rules together? figure out how it works not only for. Farmers which are traditional purchase been their programs, but the livestock producers dairy folks, and then for specially grounds you know, and it really look at those that are being impacted because some commodities being impacted more than others, and developed the rules. Get them through and be right software. Get that training and then be able to get enough out there so producers it figure out how to apply in many cases. Try to get it online, and now have it available for those producers that have in like traffic authentication. and He they can actually apply online and fill out the form and it online and get it to us that way. That's a new edition. that were just able to find. Get on this week, but or go to farmers dot gov slash C-PAP and you'll get a lot of information about it, and and some forms that you can. Fill out and sign a Malian like you don't have that authorization or once while you'll be able to actually email it in without Ed until the office at all. you were any mention of working on this back in April and we talked then and. You were very confident I. Think at that point that there would be enough money in the program with that. I think eighty percents upfront payment. Is that still the case still? It is and we know we have a lot of producers who come in yet. part of this process was. It's called a notice. The funds availability at Norfolk process. So commodities that were not covered in Iowa. We've got certainly some commodities there some. From liquid egg producers in others, they're interested in being part of that no full process and Provided US some information about why they believe they should be covered and. And I believe as a Monday when the process closed We had well over fifteen hundred. Comments in suggestions of. Different, commodities, certainly some for the same commodity multiple for the same commodity, but lots of things to be able to go through to be able to see if we can add some other commodities. Because they were off those tough ring from this and and fit in with the kind of the general framework but that we can add them for payments as well so working on that process to as Heroes. Act of course. is making its way through Congress. Is! There's some funding available in in in there at all. What's what's Your Status Update of that? Yeah there's certainly would be They were looking adding some. It's talking about probably. adjusting it to some degree, but but I think there's a lot of agricultural provisions there that a Lotta community, certainly some very friendly comments from some of the eggs senators as well. So I think there's a you know definitely some thought that that there would be another support package at one time. We thought it might be. Done by Memorial Day, or for early June or Fourth of July, and now I think Senator Grassi's to guess maybe. By the August recess. I think they want time to be able to look at what's working and where the holes are. That are out there so. I think it's it's quite likely that there will be another support package. They don't know what will be in that package in the end, but I think certainly Aga's high and a lot of people's Birdie, and and a need in recognition that the impact on agriculture is beyond. The dollars we've been able to alyce. Be In the first round of C-PAP. we need some more dollars to help to make critters. Yeah, I don't think there's any question about that and Time will tell us if you ever lived through anything like this. They'll. I really haven't Every every situation is different and. I I do remember just had a conversation some folks here and. We're talking about You know in the midst of trying to understand what's going on in a brand new situation. Like many folks nobody liked the poultry producers and I will remember. Gabe Influenza. We're dealing with the situation we had not been through. Just like that, and and that you are constantly trying to figure out okay with today's news. What does change with our? We're GONNA approach things. How do we? In your learning through that process, but again. A single segment in many ways actually more resources because. People have envisioned animals diseases before we had more access to resources to be able to do it. It was terrible for those Ofri. Producer But it's and it was hard to figure out what to do next, but we had some form of a plan. in this case the impact is very broad, completely disrupted kind of the. Delivery System of Food and agriculture. our our folks are resilient and I tell you. Everybody across the country appreciates agriculture today probably than they date going into this. we'll take that silver lining but this is at an impact on a lot of folks across the country, certainly a lot of folks in agriculture. No doubt about that and I know it's been a long long hours for you to try to decide what's fair and and how to do all of this and help as many folks is necessary so. Just tell you build a sunshine in an Iowa today. If you were back, you'd be enjoying the weather. Berry good I hear the corns growing, and it'll be a little bit of rain and some crop, and all the crap got in the ground, and that's all a good thing, so absolutely is is growing so fast bill. You can almost throw on the the big show Corn Cam. Wonderful, we'll take another look at it again. Visit Against Sissonville. We appreciate it. Sounds great, thank you. Yep Bill Northern Iowa Iowa's former secretary now, USDA Under Secretary for Farm, production and rural conservation here with us today on the big show, twelve forty four reads the big show clock time now for the three big things you need to know courtesy of your. I was sleeping farmer. Bogus News Agriculture, says Don Paris American Farm Bureau Federation Regulatory Affairs Senior, director in the navigable waters, protection role, replacing the waters of the US rule was allowed to go into effect this week after a judge in places. California denied a request to block it. This is the first time ever where we have struggled with what is required in the clean water. Everything we have litigated thus far is about an overreach. This is going to be interesting makeup, but the good news, the navigable waters protection rule is going into effect in. He says there's still quite a bit of work to do. On the implementation side of things, behalf of farmers and ranchers, but he says the new rule will provide clarity under the clean water act. The playing Field Governor Kim Reynolds Signing House file twenty three and. which was passed by the legislature on June seventeenth? Removing the requirement to obtain a permit for vehicles and combinations vehicles of excessive size. Transporting divisible loads of Hay Straw Dover or bagged livestock that meet certain weight height than the link requirements. Go into effect come July first, but it will put Iowa on level playing field with neighboring states when it comes to transporting hey! Quieting the. For some of the rhetoric, I guess surrounding the phase one deal with China Iowa Senator Charles, Grassley. Says he wasn't amused with white. House Trade Adviser Peter Navarro's comment to Fox. News later walked back that the phase one Chinese deal key for US agriculture was unquote over the president ought Put a bunch of cotton and Navarro's mouth I mean he makes those statements and Stock Markers. Four hundred percent, and the president's got to respond, so just put a sock innings, mouth, and and ever in. Don't speak publicly now. He says he's confident. The trade one deal will not fall through since president. Trump knows it's critical to farmers. forty-six rates the big show clock, and those are three things you need to know connecting the ninety eight percent of Iowans who don't farm with two percent. Who Do that's the Iowa Food and family project when trust in modern agriculture grows Iowa grows to find out more at. Food and family DOT COM. Well. Don Rose gets the last word today talking markets on the big show straight ahead. Today's top stories in agriculture and the analysis you trust. This is the big show. And thinking guys don wrote down roads to provide it for the so excited to get to you done I even stumbled over your last name I guess here. What are we see? for opportunity here in the marketplace headed into next report. Yeah good afternoon in, but you know, I think when you look at this market, you know just remind people that we are in our risk management opportunity here. Of course you know. The prices are low so he don't like that, but regardless you still have to deal with that start to prepare for your harvest storage. You know that's probably a big important one in basis levels. Are Not that bad for the sleigh supply crop that we have out here so that report is a market maker coming out in June thirtieth Tuesday, and then followed by that and you've got the weather, which so far is conducive to a large crop adequate supplies, so we're anchored on rallies here yet and We think the funds on corner short about one and a half billion bushels of corn, but we think the farmer is long about three and a half billion. Has To move here, so we'll see what happens in this market, but we're marching to a crop daily Yeah Yeah we certainly are. So then what do you do you start to look at maybe twenty twenty one also in in some of this, because that carry out number is going to take a while to chew through. That becomes reality. Well, that's what it is I mean you know and this corn mark at once it gets loose. You know it. It seems like corn once it gets a direction, a wants to go. It just goes there, but you're right. You do have carries in the market which the producer advantage that's also out into July. Twenty one same crappier this year. It's running three fifty seven now versus this. As running three, thirty four, but twenty one is three sixty five down three and a half today on December in twenty two even is three seventy six down two and a half, so it's just this time of year is like a card game. If the cards come up negative for for the weather, you go up, if not, you usually go down, so we're sucking the weather premium out of the market here and you know dancing along here. waiting for these different positive developments which are allusive so far Andy Yeah. I mean I'm looking at and I've only got about thirty seconds. Here's some this may not even be fair, but I'm looking at these. Conditions Ratings where eighty five and eighty four percent in Ireland nationalist a little lower than that but. There's no way we can keep this up while growing season, is there. Well wouldn't think so, but today the good to excellent nationally gives us a yield rather than one seventy eight point four gives us closer to one eighty, one to one eighty, one and a half now We watched that onto good to excellent. Now that can change as we know if it goes down, but we expect it good to excellent to go up next week. How did we get touch directly done? You bet can reach his hair US commodities, a one, eight, hundred, two, four, seven, four, zero, seven, one. There is Don rose. He's are closing number on the big show today. Thanks don US commodities in West Mowing. Thanks to Nathan Thrall of his hard work today. Returns from special assignment tomorrow and you ought to be tuned in for special. Big Show starts at eleven o'clock. We'll see then.

Iowa Producer US Don Rose special assignment Nathan Fisher Amy Peterson San Diego USDA BASF Congress Group of Teens Campbell Window Eva Andy Yeah Minnesota Deniro Missouri Nathan Thrall Liberty Lake
A true breakthrough in the battle against ASF

The Big Show

24:19 min | 9 months ago

A true breakthrough in the battle against ASF

"Forty who? Live from the hy-vee Studios. This is news radio ten forty W. H. O.. Well, twelve all the big show, Black Bob, Quinn the show. Hey, a friendship time time in the big show. We can talk about true breakthroughs in agriculture. We are doing that today. We are talking about a breakthrough in the possible control of one of the spread factors of African swine fever. Yeah, we've been talking about this disease for a long time. It has been found in countries around the world. It has led to a lot of devastation in the pork industry. It led to the cancellation the world pork expo last year right here in Des Moines Iowa well and Iowa. Company now has just acquired a patent for a method to control African swine fever in feed and feed ingredients, one of the known ways that African swine fever has been spread between animals and the folks at Kevin. Industries hats off to them. We've talked about him many times here and we were just so proud to have chemical industries here in central Iowa on the telephone line with us right now. Good friend of the big show, Christie Craft Christie's Vice President Regulatory Affairs and Quality Assurance with Ken Coleman Animal Nutrition and health. And Christie welcome back to the big show. We have some exciting things. Talk about at least in my mind. This could be a worldwide breakthrough in possible control of African swine fever. So tell me what the folks that are talking about. Absolutely well. Thanks so much for having Kaminawa today ball and it's great to hear you guys. Is Voices absolutely Kevin House, really dedicated tapageuse control team, and and we've been monitoring the situation with Africans. White fever, virus, and really engaging ourselves in in key conversations with scientists and industry and government officials. Just trying to look at you know what Kevin can do. you know with regard to the African swine fever. Should it you know? Come into the United States and certainly it's affected us in our other areas of of the world, so we're. We're pretty excited to bring those research forward this week. And that's what I want to point out is that you work not only in the US, but all over the world, so you have been in contact with this so without all the chemistry lesson because Christie. It's wasted on me here, but I kind of tell me what what what? What is it that you're doing? That kind of stops the spread through feed. Yvette well You're right. We do business in over one hundred twenty countries around the world, and that's one of the great parts of candidates that we can draw information from. Of Our business and use it. You know where he's fit and and really bring. That goes perspective to to what we do, but essentially what? What we've. Come forth with this week as you mentioned as we've licensed Patton and really one of our products sal curb, which is a liquid antimicrobial, was used in this patent, and in this research at Kansas State and it was shown to inactivate the African swine fever virus. So that's really the news. It was published in a scientific journal calls the transplant. Diseases by a group from Kansas State. Dr d from pipe stone. and. you know we're bringing that forward as a something for the industry to consider with regard to the African people virus. Yeah Kristie Sandy. That's what I was. GonNa ask you about is Obviously, the search is on for vaccine also, but it sounds like this to be able to prevent the spread. This may be just as effective. Well this certainly isn't a vaccine, but you know what we are excited about India's it really this study on you know that was published, and and the related patent really provides the first evidence of feed additives, being effective at reducing the infectivity of the African swine fever virus in feed and feed ingredients, and it really brings some knowledge for about mitigation, and you know lots of people are having conversations about how to approach it whether it is a vaccine or a chemical additive, but Kevin's expertise is in that whole chemical additives Part of the? Equation I guess, and we have almost six years experience in in these types of solutions and this particular product that was tested sal curb. We do sell all over the world and have a fair amount of research off, but this particular study at a Kansas. State is something. We are extremely excited about announcing. Hey Kristy. We're out of time, but thanks so much for joining us today on the big show. You Bet thanks! Guys keep up the good work. Thank you Kristie craft with us from Kevin Industries and this is a big deal. I I gotTa Tell You and these folks from Kevin. A. They're right on top of this stuff, but they're so humble as well I mean. If I made this discovery I'd be stopping traffic and tell them people. I mean this. This could be a game changer in control of African swine fever. Something that we can't control right now. You know so it. It is this this could be one of the biggest game changers I'm thinking of in the the hog industry and a long long time so You know hats off to the folks at Cannon Industries. And absolutely the update update there. Yeah, and that's exactly what I was just. That's exactly what she says. Right where it's the first sort of a product that that you know is able to kind of slow, the infect the infectivity rate right, and so that's a that's a big breakthrough. As you know you talk about this thing that that starts spreading and we've got no idea how to treat it. Let alone control it and I don't know how moves and the amount of research that's been done in resources have been spent just to get those points, says he say hats off to the folks that can from leading the way here and making some progress against African swine fever can't forget about it. It's still out meredith spreading. Beard damaging the Hawk into the time of the least fourteen. Bob's got market numbers here. Positive. Dig rain-wise, coming up in. Just a moment markets always barking by champion seed, and whether this time around brought to you by hurts. Real Estate Services Hurts real estate services. Farmland auction broke reach and evaluations so nate. Let's take a look at what's going on our neighbors way to the south talk about south. America here corn and beans coming out in fact harvest about wrapped up. But what are we looking at for the final few days of harvest? It's a perfect end to get out and finish the harvest in. In in South America. Clear Skies Today some temperatures in the mid eighties low mid eighties to upper seventies in central Brazil, southern areas, seeing upper fifties into the sixties today, same goes for areas of Argentina those Argentina areas have They've seen some below freezing temperatures overnight for the last couple of weeks. That should should back off just a little here in the next few days with temperatures warming up across. Argentina, also could see some rain over the southern southern parts of. Of Argentina, that have been desperately needing some rain, having been missed over the last few weeks or so, could see some later this week. back Brazil. seeing e clear skies today, but could see some scattered showers tomorrow early in the day, and then during the day on Fridays well before a dry weekend in Brazil twenty eight here on the big show clock Yeah, we had some rainfall across a lot of I was still rav some rainfall south. Central Iowa southeast. Southeast Iowa also into East Central Iowa is latest system moves out of the state, enjoying some cooler temperatures today as well we're building a little bit of heat premium back into the market, though as the weather prognosticators are talking about again mid-nineties fact, I think Saturday Sunday could see some of the hottest temperatures. We've had so far this season across state of Iowa. We'll talk more about that. Also talk about Some boots on the ground eyeballs out in the field about five minutes away here. On the big show. Well thirty five on the big show clock. It's Wednesday, which means it is be a SF Wednesday here on the big show. We are talking with our. The A S representative of the day to day is marked store and mark in central Iowa Veer Mark Welcome back the big show. It's been a couple of weeks, but I WANNA ask you right upfront about this rainfall. We are breathed in a little bit easier now that we've gotten some much needed rain across a lot of the state. You Bet Bob. We've got about one point to where I live here in the Beta and You know it was a blessing, so it really is going to help. Pass whether the storm down there and I know there's some people that are still hurting west of me and you can when you get over into that Boone County and Greene County area, talking to my guys over there, they're still hurting and in Carroll County area. There's still that pocket there that maybe maybe Sunday Sunday now. We'll see if we could get him some rain. Yeah. We've been talking here. On the last couple of days about the need for fungicides out there, what do you see it popping up in corn bean fields? All over I mean we got what I'd say. As any high disease level throughout the Midwest for the most part what I'm seeing is I've got people sending me pictures. Northern Corn Leaf by lesions and I've seen grey leaf spot. you know saw tar spot, being discovered in central Iowa Eyre Polk County, the other day at least make an Anderson says so I trust that she knows what she's looking for. and rust is is here. It's always here common rust There's a little southern Ross coming. Coming out of northeast Nebraska, so that's one we wanna be keeping a close eye on. That could be pretty devastating disease, and it can pop up very quickly, so that kind of covers the spectrum and corn in soybeans. The probably frog Eilly spot is the one that's most concerned again to our west in eastern. Nebraska, there is some frog developing and of course we worry a little bit about white mold, but we haven't had the year for it. certainly the beezer short this year, a lot of errands. Minimize probably the scorer teeny I activity so. A Dodge Ball, and in that regard, because that's severe disease to but. Definitely we need to be keeping an eye on things and I guess the big thing with with tar spot. A big uncertainty, we're still learning a lot about that disease in the biology, but all you have to say if you're a product other than BSF product, Tarsha, by you're losing out because all the data that we have, and this is union, Third Party, university data, neither purdue or state or Illinois. our. GonNa Bill Thima and REV attacker top the charts, and you know even last year. By what are they had what I'd say has a not a major disease year for tar spot at the one of the purdue trials. We're forty four BUSHEL above the check, so you know we're talking significant yield increase because of that disease with the fun decide and the nearest competitor Speedo more maybe a thirty bushel yield increase, so you're a lot of money on the table. If you're using the product like bell, Thima and headlamp is actually performing a lot of the other products, which is kind of an older go to product at BSF offer so. We like our our product mix. We have excellent active ingredient, said great activity these diseases. We have. A lot of agronomist call some free water out there right now. We're going to add some heat back into. It with with this rainfall so I'm I'm guessing that. We got to keep our eyes on this crop here over the next week or so. Well the way with corn. You know what we see is wants to tassels. It kind of gives up a lot of defensive characteristics, so the corn is in the process of filling that Ear, devoting a lot of its resources to building those colonels, and giving us our Ed crop, and so you know by doing so it's giving up some of those resources that are used. As plant is growing vegetative way defend itself, so naturally becomes less ability or has less of ability to fan off diseases late sees it, and that's why we start to see at Tassell is typically the timeframe of corn when it starts to go backwards and start to become infected with diseases, soybeans very similar when soybeans are to their rough half roughly half grown vegetative way. They're going to double in height, so we know when we're at our. Our two stage as we have a lot of beans in central Iowa right now that are are two and our three, which is the perfect time into and fund your side, because you want to protect that part of the canopy from disease. Now anything that comes up after that unfortunately sides are not they won't translocated after provide long late-season protection, but the way the being works as a lot of upper part of the plant is generally. Freer of disease and we have a lot less yield from smaller pods with fewer beans at the top of the canopy. So you make a second application then sometimes that really page really depends on the year but the only way we'll know is to be out there, scouting and playing with some of these things. Yeah no mark your right. This is a vital time crucial time period. Hey, we WANNA make sure we keep in touch with our BASF. Fox here How can we do that? Well talk to your local retailer They're going to have the best the quickest way to get a hold of the local BS. Effort representative, and of course there's a three tech reps, and that cover the state of Iowa here so I have the pleasure of serving central Iowa and people could call me. At any point in time my cellphone I'M GONNA give it out. I think here. Five four, zero, nine, two six, though. That could be dangerous partner, but hopefully it will ring you. Thanks mark. Again, thanks bye-bye. Great weekend. You Bet. Mark Store with US BASF Wins Day here talking and he is. He's a great guy. to Get a hold up. And he gave out his phone number there and You can certainly ring him up or any of the folks serving Iowa, we're talking Kurt Martins and shorts as well from BASF folks. This is the time of the year. Don't let it slip by This is the time of the year to be out there doing some scouting. We've been brought to you in part. this segment by the folks that hurts real estate services. Farmland auctions brokerage Andy Evaluations from the folks at hurts real estate services now. The three big things that you need to know with your Iowa soybean farmer. Running the numbers and adjusting the budgets for the post Kovas nineteen world having no, that's the right way to put it. The corona `existence world I guess. As opposed to pre Cova Nineteen University of Illinois AG economist Gary, Schnittke says he's adjusted the numbers to reflect the three twenty average cash price you eight sixty cash price for soybeans, and that drops the average income on a sixteen hundred Acre grain farm into negative territory for the year just to give me a feel that minus twenty five thousand dollar net income over the last couple of. Of Years, we had one hundred forty seven thousand dollars income in twenty eight assembly, four thousand dollar in twenty nineteen, so were were below those two incomes for twenty twenty, and we would have been below those likely without covid with Cove Ed. We have some pretty large losses, and he says it's just going to highlight the need for further assistance during the twenty twenty cropping year. So release increasing sales numbers at least for the month of June. According to the Association of Equipment Manufacturers First Time this year that detractors, sales and self propelled combine sales. Numbers have risen in fact, total record sales are up thirty two percent to year over year. Only four wheel drive tractor sales declined during the month of June and Kurt Blades. Senior Associate Senior Vice President to bag services at eight am says that they believe some of the pent-up demand from the shutdown. Maybe expressing itself however yet they're currently keeping the optimism cautious as the current state with cove, nineteen could see a negative impact. Talking through some of the factors of the. The, fungicide decision rather. Both corn and soybeans been hauling senator good big show, but he missed with key cooperative says there are many different aspects. Considerable interesting thing was we had a stretch of some wind and hail that came through on just on the north side of the Beta ear a couple nights ago and You know what we're seeing is a little bit of injured. Plan Anson anytime. It's just like a person. You know if you have an injury, there's chance for infection, so you need to protect that land is much as possible in order to save the yield that's currently being developed in the field. We'll talk more about that tomorrow here. On the big ship we were talking with Mark Store there from the the folks that ASL talk make an Anderson earlier as well with were state talking about some of the disease pressure that we're starting to see in these corn and bean fields one of the reasons, though as they pointed out to is. We're getting some rainfall. We have some. Water out there finding now the. Site that we use with the folks at demand on the big show, the big show corn. Cam plod which by the way you can take a look on our homepage now you can take a look at the Corn Cam. And there are some dandy looking corn. There I'll have to say that corner standing strong there at the D. MC- far north of dealt, but they didn't get any rainfall to speak of last night. Coming into central Iowa Yeah ZIP ZIP ZIP zero. Coming into Central Iowa. Johnston which is just north of Metro where the national weather. Service sits picked up almost three inches in some places. You come around to the west side, and we're at six tenths just west of town, and then you get down to the farm. In South Central Iowa and We're at one and three tenths now and another pretty big amounts We heard from Oh the folks their from key over. Where was he at Nevada? Yeah, some heavy rainfall night. is the haves and have nots out in the countryside, which is kind of how this goes, and I was going to get you update here. From Ankara, The rain gnome checking in on the pioneer seeds text line. Near the deere plant always good to check in with those folks like an age rain falling there. You mentioned my preloaded Rain Gauges with water I'm just trying to see how good your your waterproof shipping options. Are In mailing those out. Champion feeder engage. We'll get him out there. What? We may have some dehydrated water. Water. Who? How's that sound? There is a product for you on the big show. How to comment maybe a picture, share them to us on the pioneer seeds text line, five, one, five, nine, nine, nine, fifty, four, ninety, one. That's nine, nine, nine, five, four, nine hundred. Twelve fifty five here on the big show clock by Quinton, the big show wrap it up the other day today. We're talking markets with Alan. Burglar Burglar Marketing and management and Alan two parts of marketing program of course, price and timing, so let's talk about both of those. Let's take a look at corn and soybeans. And what are you looking at over the next week or so? Do you think? Well. We're thinking that markets got a little oversold here we're. We're down at the retracement support seventy eight point six percent. We're looking for the for these corny. Go back and try and close that gap that the left that's it three, four three and three quarters. That's the short term of active, and then we can start talking about going back to three sixty three, but again. You need just a little bit of fundamental help here whether it's a drier forecast for the tail end of the month or couple more big Chinese purchases to finally convince people. They're really doing it but those are term objectives. Yeah Hey Alan Indian you referenced it a little bit earlier, but that Chinese purchase that was the largest single day in history. You know it's like you know beating your head against the wall here. You'd think that provides some positive momentum in the marketplace, but apparently not well. It's a little bit by the rumor. Sal The fact that we we'd heard some rumblings that they were making inquiries a couple of days before that it kind of smelled like it was it was. Was designed to offset some of the some of the damage from the SSD report. Of course, there's no real scheme and device there, but just acts that way, but yeah, it's again. It's it's just. Is that trade off of the the export demand, and then you know she does have a big increase in exports for Korn full dialed in for next year. Okay, they're looking for two point one billion versus one point seven to one point eight billion this year, so. They. It's easy to rationalize that big purchases just part of the expansion. That's already in the SSD table. and then we've got to look at livestock here to pretty quiet cash cattle-trader to this point in the week. It's almost like the pre code routine seems. Yeah, we're we're settling down there. We're getting the carcass weights down. We're getting the so we're the becoming a little more manageable there that the the the weak spot in the beef is beef right now. We are down to the January February lows We're not even hanging around where we were in March, it's. You're like okay. Where's the consumer? The I think the consumers there, but the the service isn't there. We still got restaurants that are running fifty percent of capacity. We got some of these states shutting them back down again temporarily to slow the COVID. So you've got a little bit of demand issue, beef export sales of not being great either. I do like the features action though. How do we get in touch with you to continue the conversation Directly Allen? Four, zero, two, six, nine, seven, three, six to three. That's our number in Omaha a website. WWW dot burglar 'em kt, G., DOT, com, or you can send me an email Allenby at burglar MPG dot com. and. It's the final word on today's big show.

Iowa Kevin Christie Craft Christie Des Moines Iowa BASF fever Kevin House Mark Store representative Kansas State Argentina hy-vee Studios United States Vice President Regulatory Affa Ken Coleman Quinn Kaminawa Nebraska Anderson
Steam-Blasting Beetles and other Animals with Chemical Superpowers

Earth Rangers

15:24 min | 5 months ago

Steam-Blasting Beetles and other Animals with Chemical Superpowers

"At gen z media. We like to spend all of our time making great shows for you and your family like six minutes becoming mother nature the unexplainable disappearance of mars patel and so many more. And we're making new shows all the time. Such as cuban in the reaper the hollow and the last dog and while office great content is free. It's not cheap to create and produce so if you or your family enjoys listening to our shows. Won't you please help us. Keep making more by supporting us. Go to our website at gnc shows dot com and click on the link for patriae on as a supporting member through patriot. You'll have access to lots of fun stuff to share with the family. Like notes from your favorite characters bonus content unique stickers and t shirts. But more importantly you'll be helping us bring you great family shows that you can't find anywhere else thank you. Hello and welcome to the earth's rangers podcast and today today we'll take things the its fall and things start to slow down. Slow doesn't mean will be fun here. We go ranger strict so sorry regions. I applied to take you out on a little fulltime nature expedition. But i don't think that's going to happen today. This mike is waterproof headquarters where riches skis and worse there. We go sorry about that. We're going to do that. And i would have been completely soaked. I am so glad. I'm inside now where it's warm and cozy hard to believe that just last episode. I was complaining about how hot it was and wanted to go outside weird still. I love the fall. It's one of my favorite seasons is true. Well i love summer to you and when you're gonna be really fun and don't even get me started about spring but okay okay. Basically every season has its own things oppose definitely in the top four. It's special especially right now when the trees change colors and leaves are starting to fall. It's so beautiful. And here's something really neat. All the animals start to prepare for the winter. Some flight of the warm south like the proud canadian geese. You won't see them when it gets to cool summer getting fat literally skunks in many other mammals. Eat more during the fall to build a layer of fat that will help them survive the winter but others just stock up on food so they can have snacks during the winter. When food is scarce like three squirrels for example now what they do is called scatter hoarding meaning. They bury small stashes of. That's below the ground so later in the winter they can eat it. They have very sophisticated methods of how they arrange hide. There's dashes big sort out and airy nuts. According to their type so they'll know exactly where to find the nut. They want for a snack. They can also be pretty sneaky about it. If they think some other schools see them the in their mouth daego whole leave it empty and cover it so the other squirrels. I think it's there then. They'll go somewhere else to bury it. Pretty smart And even cooler some of the stashes they never dig up and that's actually really good. It helps plants to grow. Because the caesar already buried in the ground to go a little squirrel speaking about food. I have some food related animal questions for you. let's a quick round of animal trivia. Ready here we go question number one. Kansas are omnivores. That can eat all kinds of things but what counts for ninety nine percent of their diet question to what is the first thing a caterpillar usually eats after its board and finally question number three. What body part does a butterfly us to taste food. Any ideas stay tuned until the end of the episode. When i'll reveal the correct answers. Okay rangers it's time for another episode of our brand new segment where i explore the secrets of chemistry. It's time what back to emma's chemistry corner brought to you with help from our friends at basf okay. Last time we talked about chemistry and learn the chemistry is the science of matter. Now because you listen to this podcast you probably heard the word biology quite a lot. Iology is the signs of everything that's alive from bacteria so tiny can't even see him to the trees in the park. The giant blue whale the ocean. But did you know that life couldn't happen without chemistry. It's no creature would exist if it wasn't for chemistry is that because all of the processes that happen inside all living creatures are actually local reactions. And what's the chemical reaction you might ask well. Reaction is when a material changes usually because it encounters other materials remember the atoms we talked about last time teeny tiny particles that all matters made up of a chemical reaction is when atoms combine to each other to create molecules or the opposite when the bonds between atoms break. Even think of it kind of like lego pieces each piece is an atom and when you put them together you create a molecule and the action and putting them together or breaking. The molecule apart is called a chemical reaction so coming back to white. Chemistry is so important to life. Sorry my stomach's making noise that's a great idea. You can just think about the food. We eat adjusting. Your requires many chemical reactions. That happened inside your body but even chewing it requires chemical reactions that happen inside your muscles and the oxygen you breathe that makes those muscles function. Guess what unique chemical reactions for the oxygen to get to those muscles. And what's really amazing. The coolest thing of all is that many of these reactions are very similar in all living creatures doesn't matter if it's a mosquito or ben elephant so in a way when we look at living creatures we can imagine that inside them. Millions billions of tiny chemical reactions are happening all the time without ever stopping. That said there are some living creatures that have taken chemical reactions to the extreme like next level and they can make unique chemical reactions. That other creatures can't creatures like chameleons octopus and squid in quickly change their skin colors helping them to hide from predators. Hunt in communicate. Chameleons have these special crystals in their skin and if the changed the way these crystals are arranged. Their color changes heels in. Some fish have special organs. They used to create strong electric fields like batteries or generators a ucla electricity. They make two hundred defend themselves and just last year. Researchers found the strongest electricity generator of all animals. It's type of on the amazon and it can generate an electric shock of eight hundred and sixty votes and about one ampere. Which is it's a lot. It's very sappy it wouldn't cause harm to humans but it can definitely stun its prey. Ooh and then there's this beetle called the bombard abo that will want it feels threatened. It creates a chemical reaction in its belly. Causes a splash of boiling smelly liquid. To come out of its rear as a defense. If you are an insect you sure wouldn't want to attack this beetle. Did you know that some creatures can create light and can actually glow in the dark. The real this is called bio luminescence. I o for biology. And luminescence means light so light. I mean you've probably heard a firefly's bears so magical but i have a really cool story about glowing. Bacteria you heard me right. Bacteria some of the live inside of squid or fish. Why would they do. Well gives them protection. From the outside world squid's body becomes their own private habitat. But don't worry they don't cause any disease squid is actually really happy to have them. Why won't because these going bacteria make the squid glow at night. And why does the scrutiny glow you ask good question you see these squids for small sea creatures at night but when the moon shines they make a shadow on the seafloor so the pregnancy their shadow and escapes if they have going bacteria inside of them their own show appears because of the glow so they're actually much less visible and then they can catch their prey. How cool is that. I could go at night. It's anyone working on okay. Those were some really neat examples of cool chemical reactions that give some animals their special powers and it just goes to show you to really understand biology. We have to know our chemistry next time. We'll talk about one. Really cool chemical reaction. That happens in many creatures but doesn't happen in any animal. When i guess what it is stay tuned. Oh almost forgot next time. We'll do a real chemistry experiment together. Chick the show notes for a list of items. you'll need. Don't worry it's all stuff. You probably already have home Hold on one still. Sounds like fallout their best. We snuggle up and listen to a special fall. Time animal story from one of our listeners. Yep i'm talking about a new animal encounter story. Let's roll the jingle. Come this our story. Comes from earth ranger. Mary kate about their encounter with an awkward bird. Higher frayne juries minds. Mary kay and i am from hell. Fax nova scotia in mayenne. Mowing counselor is one day me and my mom were going to a rehabilitation sunday for animals and when we were going back to our cards we saw this big bird crashing onto the crown and we did is no phillies injured or not because it was walking across the road onto feet so then we went to staff and said we think we saw injured am on the staff came up but it was actually a baby. Bald eagle just learning. We've know that they can get their whitehead's onto they were probably wrong. Free by that was such a great story. Yeah it's hard to know an animal's neater health. Many times. they just need to be left alone to do their own thing. Because it's part of their life cycle and yes bald. Eagle fledglings can look quite clumsy when they start to learn how to fly. Thank you so much for your story or three. And you're mary. Kate and by submitting your story. You have been entered into the draw for our earth ranger prize. Pack good luck just before. I go remember the three animal food questions. I asked you before. Well good 'cause now it's time to reveal the answers. Let's start with number. One are omnivores. That can eat all kinds of things but what counts for ninety. Nine percent of their diet is pretty easy so some of you may have guessed. The answer is bambi. They actually eat a lot of bamboo each day and they have to because bamboo is nothing nutritious. They can actually end up munching on fifteen kilograms. Him day roof. Okay number two. What is the first thing. A caterpillar usually. It's after it's born sa- tough one. I knew that caterpillars eat leaves. Just after they're born. Actually have something very nutritious very close to them that they can munch on the you know what it is. It's their own. Angel is sounds kind of weird but it has many nutrients and it helps them mature and finally number three which body part is a butterfly us to taste food. Well this one's gonna surprise you okay. So what if i have this appendage of the mouth called a promiscuous that they used to sip nectar similar to a straw but they use a completely different body part to taste the nectar before they drink it. Do you know which part that is. It's their legs that's right. They have special taste buds on their feet. That help them decide. If this plant juices are good or not more important for female butterflies. They can taste the played this way and decide. If that's really wanna lay their eggs. Some fancy footwork. Well that's all for today. Thanks for listening everyone. I hope you have a lovely autumn. Stay warm stay safe ranging under. Hey it's chris terry sneaking in at the end of your show to let you know that we have a new website for gen z media. Em shows dot com is our new home on the web where you can listen to all of our podcasts by scripts t shirts mugs and more. You can even hear trailers from our releases months before they come out. Check out the new site ajws. Ems shows dot com. The letter g. the letter z. Said if you're canadian like me and the letter m. shows dot com. Thanks again for listening g. e. x.

Iology six minutes ninety nine percent one ampere caterpillar basf mike emma Mary kate Kansas mayenne ucla amazon Mary kay fifteen kilograms nova scotia phillies whitehead Nine percent one day
Celebrating our dairy farmers during June Dairy Month

The Big Show

24:51 min | 10 months ago

Celebrating our dairy farmers during June Dairy Month

"Brought! Twelve on the big show clock by Quin and the big show with today central I was starting to clear out friends western Iowa clearing out as well wind building in behind the rain. We are talking to eastern Iowa right now on the telephone line by the way Andy's with us. We're going to catch up on three big things in the weather ahead, but we are. Celebrating. June as dairy, month and Mitch, Sheltie is on the telephone line with US Mitch Executive Director with the Iowa State Dairy Association also producer and. What would you say this morning? Mitch Round Van Horn and tell me about your weather the last twelve hours. How much rainy to get? Where we gotta be sitting somewhere around three and a half four inches of rain now so it's been coming down pretty heavy. Has It stopped yet. It is, it's still raining here. It's not raining. It's hard I think it's finally starting to let up I hope so because. there's water sitting in every. Every everywhere there can sit water every pothole and every hole so. Yeah well, we're. We're certainly sympathize with you there when you get too much. Mitch reason we WANNA. Talk to you today. A little bit is to celebrate what we do here with the dairy in the state of Iowa now as far as cow numbers. How are we doing? We sold about two hundred thousand dairy cows here. Yeah we stick right around anywhere between two hundred and fifteen and two hundred twenty thousand milking cows here in state, so we're staying right around those numbers and we've been staying pretty steady here in Iowa. How about the cheese market we've heard. We've seen some improvement the cheese market. Well! June being national dairy month it's important to mention cheese all things dairy and we have seen some improvements in the chain. Spark it as as businesses start open back up and consumer start to purchase more in different ways we've seen markets are rebounding, and that's exciting We've got a long ways to go for our industry, but it is promising seen some good numbers on the future. Yeah Hey mentioned sandy. We were certainly inspired here month and a half or so ago and we were talking to our buddy. Tom Up at homestead dairy in walk on, and they were able to Find some some neat ways to to help. Continue to feed hungry islands with the locally produced high quality dairy products through some direct ship. Business so you know dairy farmers doing what they do. I guess being innovative and creative during a pandemic That dairy farmers job is not changed. He's still taking care of those cows three hundred sixty five days a year, making sure those cows are comfortable, but now they're looking at other opportunities. How can we help? those who are in need who are hungry and need food and dairy farmers have seen that challenge came forward, making sure that different organizations or making food purchases in refrigeration unit sent doing everything they can to make sure Gary is available out there for our consumers whether they're buying it at a store, or if they have to stop at a food pantry. We WanNa make sure they have that option. And another thing that hasn't changed matches as the weather gets warmer, there's nothing quite like a couple of cold scoops of ice cream to to get a little refreshment on a hot summer day. Well, I'm the type of guy whether it's warm or cold I can enjoy ice. But. H- especially here lately. The hotter it gets, that ice, cream, cone cone, or that Cup of ice cream sounds a lot better, doesn't it? I need to see the video of you eating ice cream when it's forty below in the middle of January and that. You'd be surprised. They grew up on a farm. That, we find ourselves. There's there's always ice, cream, rain, snow, sleet, or Shimon. You can still enjoy it. You Bet we'd do celebrate our dairy industry. Hey Mitch. You're also a showman as well and I'm talking about showing dairy cattle. Things have changed quite a lot with with shows going on in the Upper Midwest I. See World Dairy Expo has been postponed. That was one of the premier shows. How has that impacted the dairy show side of things? Well obviously with these county fairs and state fairs, and even national shows either postponing or cancelling. It, it's taking a lot of dairy. Shows that are normally in the circuit for farmers out on, but we are seeing some shows us creative ways to to still host those events via virtual or sending and recording the animal, and it's good, but it's not the same thing. Obviously, we go to fair not only to show animal and show off our animals, but we also go there for the people and that's an important part of that experience. That unfortunately can't happen, so we're hopeful that some of these fares can happen, and and those that don't We look forward to having him again next year. You. Bet Well Michigan thanks for talking to a little bit today on the big show. Well thank you for having me and once again national dairy month. Make sure you're out there consuming your milk, cheese, ice cream and all their dairy products. You Bet thanks Mitch. Mitch, Sheltie with US Mitch Executive. Director with the Iowa State Dairy Association all around good guy. Well, and yeah, what? What did he say? Cheese milk ice cream. That's about one meal for me. I mean I get all those dairy products at one time? You're they're? Bob. Well I'll tell you. There is nothing better than an icy cold glass of chocolate milk. I love chocolate milk, especially when it's thick gift that that full full fat milk or or full-fat ice cream. and. It's one of those ones where you eat the ice cream and you can still kinda tasted for about half an hour afterwards My Goodness Gracious, we, we are celebrating. Yeah Oh love cheese Kurds love. She's curves whether there the the squeaky new ones right out of the bag you know, and if y'all get fresh cheese curd, you know what I'm talking about or deep fat fried ones to I love deep fat fried cheese Kurds. You you get him there. You kind of squeeze him apart or maybe hit him with a fork, and the cheese just uses out of the middle of WHO's that good eat? Big Thank you to Mitch Sheltie for raising my appetite now here and I'll tell you what. Coming up we're, GONNA talk a little more boots on the ground, eyeballs out in the field, and get some agronomy into us here. just a little bit folks from BASF will be with US shortly after the twelve thirty news break also coming up. We're GONNA. Take a look at what's going on in the marketplace gets the market numbers, and in the reasons behind those numbers. `oughts all ahead here. On today's addition to the big show. Nate Let's take a look at what's going on weather. Wise. We've covered the delta. Let's go back South America where that crop is coming in out of the field, and we know that still US soybeans very attractive South American crops coming out of the field somewhere around a bucket. Bushel north of what you can buy us, soybeans four the open market, so some good news competition wise, but what about weather wise? Out of the field in Brazil and Argentina, seeing some rain today, across southern Brazil northern Argentina tracking through their today. should be about the same way all the way through the rest of the week into the weekend. scattered moderate showers, especially southern parts of Brazil northern. Argentina as well those southern provinces of rerouted, so potter will have temperatures above to well to above normal until Saturday, and then above normal on Sunday Mata Grosso and Goias, and my Mata Grosso. Low further north there in Brazil should be dry all the way through the weekend with temperatures above normal all the way until Sunday. In Argentina just as I said a minute ago, going to see some scattered moderate showers over the northern parts of the country through the weekend, but the southern areas are going to be missed with little to no showers. Soil moisture is lacking in central southern. Tina outside of Windsor causing stress to their emerging wheat crop Bob Nate. Thanks for the update on whether there. As Allen Brewer pointed out We've had some strengthening in the currency, and that also is playing back into some good news and the export markets strengthening the currency The all we're talking about, and that makes those beans a little bit more expensive on the foreign market, so we are seeing a little bit of an advantage in the export market for US soybeans with. That for the last couple of days here, Andy I believe tomorrow. What eleven o'clock in the morning? We get our next. report. Or Cultural Supply and demand report will be out traditionally. There is not an adjustment in the twenty nineteen twenty twenty crop is. Allan pointed out to in this report. They wait until the end of the month and quarterly stocks report is to will come to an end then but a lot of negative news is dialed in cuts in a final demand are expected acreage, maybe a couple of million less planet acres for Korn. But that is expected to increasing. Carry Out. Both corn and soybeans is kind of what the trade thinking. as to what that report will say tomorrow, and of course we'll have all the numbers for you when the big show starting. Thirty five on the big show clock, twelve, thirty five, the big show rolls on here on W. H., O., W.! MTA. Radio Your Voice of agriculture across the entire upper, Midwest from central Nebraska all the way to. Kentucky, my name is Bob. Quinn Andy Peterson on with news here pretty quick. Nathan Fisher brings us up to date on weather, but we do reach out to folks that are out in the field boots on the ground, eyeballs out in the field, and our boots in the ground guy to day is Eric Schultz Eric is here from the folks with B.. A. S.. F. and we visit with ASF. Technical service representatives every Wednesday here on the big show. Eric is our guy today Erica. You're in a western I we were talking earlier this morning getting ready for the program today, and I asked about rainfall and you said Yeah. We had rain, but boy. We needed some water, but we got a lot of wind so kinda. Describe your weather over the last twelve hours. Yeah we We had some baggage with the rain I. Think it's safe to say that. It was a pounding rain. We had maybe. Up to three inches in some spots, and that all came within a one or a two hour period, so these were quite the storms that rolled through some wind gusts of sixty mile an hour upwards of seventy miles an hour, so here in Western. Iowa we were Kinda. Kinda hoping for the raindrops and we're really just putting up with the baggage that came with it and I think a lot of the reports I've had this morning. Are that the worst that we've seen out of? This is maybe some slightly leaning corn but everything else kinda looks like gets. It survived for the most part so. Yeah, now ahead of that. You're saying that you might have been little on the dry side. Right we we were. Looking at the drought monitor the US drought monitor in western Iowa kind of south western Iowa. There were some hot spots to say that were classified as a normally dry and I think all across the western side. We have been not necessarily screaming for a rain, but certainly getting to the shouting level, so we we'll take this rainfall that we got, and we will run with it. I think the majority of the area. We got one to two inches, which was nice. We got things what again. We activated some residual herbicide so it really kind sucks up to hopefully not have to look for another rain for maybe an upwards of a week. Well! We move our attention now to post application out in the fields. Talk a little bit about that. What are you telling your folks to be thinking about? Well, there's a there's a lot of questions. coming around on timing of applications and the first question really is in relation to if we. Get full activation being dry of our premature besides. Coming back a little earlier than than we thought with the Post, pass and including residual with it and to those questions. I stay that certainly something that we need to be doing where we didn't get activation or where we have emerged needs coming, and they got some pretty good sized to him over the heat last week with the heat that we did have so that's That's probably the most prominent question some of the other questions for the further along corn. Corn for instance some of the gross stage cutoffs on those post herbicides and let me talk about Af after besides status herbicide, going post and corn, the gross stage cutoff is the eight or thirty six inch tall corn much. Our corn is probably around the four to be six. Maybe seven, so some of these grill stage cutoff liked for status. They're gonNA creep up on us, but We gotta keep in mind what though say and wanted to get those applications out? Boy I'll tell you what this stuff does. Grow quick We're driving through one of the valleys. They're on the way back. the farm here day before yesterday, and it's almost like it was a whole different crop. I mean this corn crop takes office. Throw a little water on it and throw some heat into it, and it just goes crazy. What are we talking about with soybeans right now? What are you thinking about? Well soybeans It's it's kind of. It's not necessarily playing second fiddle still posting corn. They're kind of moving into hand-in-hand stage. Some guys are wrapping up posting corn following all the wind we had. We're going to be looking to wrap it up as quick as possible, but on the soybean side of it I mean thinking about the same thing and our cutoffs for growth stages with ingenious. For Cama tolerance soybeans, and then also for liberty for the enlist three acres, and also for any other liberty link like L., twenty-seven soybeans both gene liberty have our one grill sage cutoffs. We've got a nice window here to get those coasts, applications out, and we also have plenty of time to include outlook or zigic herbicides with them as those cutoffs for girls, stages aren't until be five and be sick, so we Yeah. That crop has shot up really fast. The field look look pretty darn good on the western side even though we were a little bit dry. I think we're set up ray to get these posts of both and corn, and then also on the soybeans size. Eric we're you go. Thanks talk a little bit. How can we find out more about what you folks are doing kind of look over your shoulder, maybe throughout the growing season. definitely contacting your your local op retailer they should be in contact with the stuff rap. If you have any questions on our products, otherwise you can find our products and information and portfolio online searching for economic solutions and BE A. Eric again, thank you so much. You are boots on the ground eyeballs out in the field today. That is Eric. Schultz technical, service representative folks. B. A. S. F. and we needed to find out three big things. We need to know right now. Being brought to you by your Iowa soybean farmer. The latest report quality wise of the corn crop is out from the US grains council. It's the corn export-quality report, the second of two which provides a snapshot of Corn Quality. It's loaded into shipping containers. Reese Kennedy is manager of global trade with US Grains Council and says they're focused on trade servicing and explains why the export quality report is so valuable to his overseas buyers. Imploring conditions last year, and it's no secret so when they're looking at that. They have a lot of questions immediately. What's going on? It's been very wet. What's going to go on with the crop and we're able to provide very information. Other countries can't provide that, and that's a huge piece of value that I think the grains council brings to our international buyers. Buyers is giving them to heads up on the quality that they can expect out of the US. Yeah, and especially, when it's C growing season like last year now he says the numbers overall given the circumstances look pretty good, and says the report is issued in English Spanish and even Mandarin to make it available to as many people around the country as possible. Expanding the program that would be the Department of Agriculture. Disaster. Disposal, program for animals. Making it retroactively available to producers who may have had to make that decision back in May Secretary Mike Nag says euthanasia is a quote very difficult decision for producers, and it's always used as a last resort and up until this point the program had been made available, and still is to producers who may have to make that decision in the future, but now producers who did make it in May, can sign up through June twenty second to have access to the program. Of course they're calling it round zero and sign up simultaneously as occurring now for around three before June, twenty second where applicants will be notified if approval in both cases by June twenty-fourth. Wondering about further assistance given Chinese buying in the marketplace, although they've got a lot of buying to do to live up to the trade phase, one trade deal, and of course the. Hurt economic activity, due to Covid nineteen I was Senator Charles. Grassley says the price of corn and soybeans are still lay down, and that may actually offset some of the renewed economic people start driving, and we get the ethanol plants up running things my help the price of corn, but we're also faced. With. What looks like a fairly good crop year with large acreage in so that's GonNa be a depressant has got nothing to do with the Hispanic. Yeah, no doubt about that. He says any future aid package probably will be determined by what takes place in the economy over the next two six to eight weeks well wind blowing across Hawkeye. State Pretty stout here. Particularly Western Iowa Andy we do have one more county. Fair added today to the list of those changing plans. Madison County Fair backyard of the Quin. Farm there in Madison, County Iowa and I will say that I will dearly miss the Madison County Fair this year. especially the wrestling matches. That is a big deal. They have wrestling matches and I'll tell you what I. Remember member watching last year Harvey the Hammerlock in his throwing people around there and the kids were just squally. There were having such a good time there. It's an outdoor ring. They set up boys a lot of fun and all the pageantry that that goes along with that I believe now are counting is forty nine. Counter. World to have. Yeah Yeah, and of course you know here in Iowa. We do have some counties that have couple different fares, so we end up actually with more county fairs, and we do counties, but that's because there's a couple of that have a couple of county fairs and most the early ones of the June county fairs. had to make their decisions here. quite a while back, so That's that's what those are thinking about now. We're kind of waiting a big announcement to the state. State, fair and again you and I have no background as far as any inside information on it, but we know that meetings coming up at three o'clock. So if I saw all you folks out there and make sure I had my radio on a little after three o'clock because I'm sure the folks in the newsroom is going to be. Tell us what's going on with the Great Iowa State Fair. We'll talk markets. Sir Allen Brookner's going to wrap us up on the big show. Today's top stories in agriculture and the analysis you trust. This is the big Joe. Twelve fifty five here on the big show blog by when Andy Peterson and Alan Burglar wrapping up the big show with us today Alan. We have a USDA report out tomorrow. Kind of preview it. What do you think we're going to see? And what do you think the impact on the market might be? Well. Again the market's not really expecting a whole lot to happen on this one. Maybe some world number changes maybe a few on the demand side modest adjustments at all being the big question mark. The savings are a little bit overbought coming into this thing, so there is a risk we might pull back towards a fifth year eight fifty five on the nose if if we don't like the report. Upside is probably nine zero, four nine five the next couple of weeks. If if we just continue with the uptrend, we've had since individual. Over in a porn side. Probably three, fifty, five or three fifty six says is about all. We can do in the short run here if we get a little help from. yeah, that's what I was gonNA. Ask You Allen. Is Do you still think we're in the bottom part of the ranges here or some of that depend on economic rebound in that type of thing? Yeah well. We do depend on economic rebound. We don't have to have positive GDP. GDP growth to get a boost in the commodity markets The. Big Question is whether the stock market keeps going up and if if that money starts to come out of the stock market actually helps commodities, generally speaking, one thing is helping us in the background is the dollar has been weakening here versus the euro, the An and the British Brazilian row so. that's generally supportive. Commodity Prices I. We're in a shallow conservative kind of an uptrend here in we are still as you look in the bottom ten to fifteen percent of the price range for the year. So you think. Maybe a little bit more upside. Potential than than a lot of people think we're. Obviously optimstic. Yeah Livestock Wise. Cattle put in a high here. You think Alan. No I think the the board is discount to the cash We've kind of consolidated here. We've pulled back a little bit. Be as the options expired in June contract, but the the board still pretty good discount to cash. Keisha Trade one seven one eight here today, so. we, we should see the board well-supported here few Keisha course would have some risks just because lower than one of the cash is. How do we continue the conversation with you directly on? Well may call poor. Oh, two, six, nine, seven, three, sixty, three's our main office number, or send me an email. Allenby at burglar. M. Kt G. DOT com or visit our website. WWW DOT MARC DOT com. A Marketing Allen Burglar. Omaha Nebraska our market expert here today on the big, show. Well we'll be listening intently to three o'clock this definitely hear what's going on with the state fair, and of course they have much more conversation about whatever their decision tomorrow and take show. It starts at eleven o'clock. Thanks to date for keeping US on time. Rush limbaugh his five minutes away.

Iowa US Andy Peterson Iowa State Dairy Association Eric Schultz Eric Mitch Bob Nate dairy farmers producer Mitch Round Van Horn Nebraska Brazil Allen Brewer Alan Burglar Argentina Mitch Executive Director Quin South America BASF
Why "biofabrication" is the next industrial revolution   | Suzanne Lee

TED Talks Daily

12:48 min | 1 year ago

Why "biofabrication" is the next industrial revolution | Suzanne Lee

"This ted talk features designer and bio fabrication. Pioneer Suzanne Lee recorded live at Ted Summit. Twenty nineteen you can get enhanced security for your home wifi network with xfinity if it's connected. It's protected now. That's simple easy. The awesome go to xfinity DOT COM. Call one eight hundred xfinity or visit a store. Today to learn more restrictions apply the I started life as a fashion designer working closely with textile designers and fabrics close. But today I can no longer see or talk to my new collaborators because therein the soil beneath our feet on the shelves of our supermarkets supermarkets and in the beer. I'm going to drink when I finished this talk. I'm talking about microbes and designing in with life. Fifteen years ago I completely changed both what I worked with an how I worked after revelatory collaboration. Shen with a biologist. Our project gave me a different perspective on life. Introducing a whole new world of possibility. Not around how we can design and make things I discovered a radical manufacturing proposition bio fabrication. uh-huh literally fabricating with Biology. What does that mean well. Instead of processing plants plants animals or oil to make consumer materials we might grow materials directly with living organisms ends. In what many terming the fourth industrial revolution. We thinking about the new factories as being living cells. BACTERIA ALGAE FUNGI YEAST. Our latest design tools include those of biotechnology my Lyon journey and buying fabrication started with a project called by Ohka. Chew the provocation. was that instead of growing a plant like Cotton Alton in a field over several months we could use microbes to grow a similar cellulose material in a lab in a few days. He's using a certain species of bacteria in a nutrient rich liquid. We fermented threads of cellulose that self organized. Nice into a sheet of fabric. I dried the fabricate grown and cutting sewed it into a range of garments shoes. Choose them bags. In other words in one lab we grew materials and turn them into a range of products in a matter of days and this is in contrast to current methods of fabric production where a plant is grown. Just the cotton part is harvested processed. I into a yawn woven into fabric and then potentially shipped across oceans before being cut and sewn into a garment all of that it can take months so these prototypes indicated field offering significant resource efficiencies from reducing being the water energy and chemistry needed in the production of material through to generating zero waste. We grew fabrics six to finished form if you like biological Additive manufacturer through bio fabrication. And I heard replaced many intensive manmade steps with one biological step and as I engaged with this living system It transformed my design. Thinking here was biology with no intervention from me other than designing initial conditions for growth efficiently producing a useful sustainable material. So now I can't help. But so all materials through the lens of Bio Fabrication. In fact there's a growing global community of innovators rethinking rethinking materials with biology. Multiple companies are now growing mushroom materials. But not literally mushrooms. uh-huh using my Celia them which is the root system of fungi to bind together agricultural byproducts. And it's a process that's being described as nature's glue a common way to do this is to take a three D. Mold. Fill it with a waste crop plight corn stalks or hemp add water wait a few days for the mice helium to grow throughout. Remove the mould old. And you're left with a grown three D form incredibly. We can grow all kinds of structures using living living organisms from foams that can replace plastics in footwear leather. Light materials without animals. Furniture flooring all currently being prototype D- Fungi are able to grow materials. That are naturally fire retardant without any chemicals then. Naturally hydrophobic meaning. They won't absorb water. They have higher melt temperatures than plastics. Polystyrene it can take thousands of years to degrade mushroom packaging. Materials can be naturally combusted in your back garden In as little as thirty days living organisms a transforming waste into cost competitive performance is matching materials that can start to replace plastics and other co two emitting materials a month we start growing materials with living organisms. It starts to make previous methods of manufacture. Seem illogical take the humble housebreak. The cement industry generates around eight percent of global. Co Two emissions. That's more than all the planes and ships each year. The cement process requires materials to be fired in a kiln at over two thousand degrees Fahrenheit. Compare this to bio Mason. They use a soil microbe to transform loose aggregates like sand or crushed stone stone into a bio fabricated or bio cement brick. Their process happens at room temperature in just a a couple of days. Think hydroponics for bricks. An irrigation system feeds nutrient rich water to trace as of breaks that have been inoculated with bacteria. The bacteria produce crystals that form around each grain of sand locking together all the loose particles to form a solid brick. We can now grow. Construction materials in the elegant way nature does just like a coral reef and these bio fabricated bricks a nearly three times stronger stronger than a concrete block and in stark contrast to traditional cement production. They store more carbon. Make so if we could replace the one point. Two trillion fired breaks that are made each year with bio fabricated. Bricks aches we could reduce co two emissions by eight hundred million tonnes every year the beyond growing materials with living organisms. We're even starting to design products that encourage growth and this comes from the realization. That the very thing. We've been trying to marginalize. Not realize life might actually be our greatest collaborator to that end. We've been exploring all the ways that we can grow healthy microbes in our own ecosystems. A great example of this is architects. Who are imagining the skin of a building to function like bark of a tree but not as a cosmetic green layer the designing architectural barks as hosts for evolving ideologies. These surface structures structures are designed to invite life in and if we applied the same energy. We currently do suppressing forms of life towards cultivating life. We turn the negative image of the urban jungle into one that literally embodies a thriving leaving living ecosystem by actively encouraging. Surface interactions with healthy microbes. We could improve approve. Passive Climate Control Storm Water Management and even reduce co two emissions by lowering. The energy used to heat or cool our buildings. We're just beginning to realize the potential of nature based technologies. I'm excited that. We're starting to design by fabricate a new material world. It's is one that moves away from the exploitation of non-renewable resources to working with the original renewable life instead of designing out life. We're designing with it and for it. Packaging fashion footwear furniture. Rancher construction bio fabricated products can be grown close to centers of demand with local resources. Less Land Energy Eh. And even harnessing industrial waste streams it used to be the tools of biotechnology with the preserve preserve of powerful multinational chemical and biotech companies. In the last century we expected Mitchell innovation nation to come from the likes of Dupont Dow. BASF but this twenty-first-century material revolution is being led ed by startups with small teams and limited capital and by the way not all their founders have science degrees they include clued artists architects and designers over a billion dollars has already been invested in startups by via fabricating consumer products. I don't think we have a choice. But to bio fabricate of future from the Jacket Jack. You're wearing to the chair you're sitting in to the home you live in your designed material. World shouldn't compromise your health all that of our planet if materials can't be recycled or naturally can posted at home. We should protect them. I'm committed to to making this future. A reality by shining a light on all the amazing work being done today and by facilitating more more interactions between designers scientists investors and brands. Because we need a material revolution and we need. You didn't now thank you for more than a Ted Dot Com uh.

Bio Fabrication Suzanne Lee Ted Summit BASF Cotton Alton Shen biological Additive Mitchell Dupont Dow Mason two thousand degrees Fahrenhei eight hundred million tonnes billion dollars Fifteen years eight percent thirty days
CrowdStrike Co-Founder Dmitri Alperovitch on the SolarWinds Hack

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

18:28 min | 3 months ago

CrowdStrike Co-Founder Dmitri Alperovitch on the SolarWinds Hack

"They detect ovation a weekly conversation with people. Who are shaping the technology landscape. I'm peter hi. President of meta strategy advisor technology executives sports columnist author and your host. Each episode of technician features insights from top executives thought leaders at the intersection of business technology and innovation. If you like what you hear we be grateful that you give us a rating on itunes or through. Whatever other sources you use for podcasts. Please subscribe so you. Don't miss a thing. Thank you i guess. Today is dmitriev rich. Dmitri is a cybersecurity expert and was a co founder and former chief technology officer of crowd. Strike dmitri is currently co founder and executive chairman of the silverado policy accelerated nonprofit organization focused on advancing american hospitality in global leadership in the twenty first century and beyond in this interview. We discussed dmitri's perspective on the recent. Us government hacked believed by many to originated in russia including why the heck was not an act of war but instead of traditional espionage y this hack has potential to be a hundred times more significant than the opium hack as well as some of the silver linings of the heck. We discuss how organizations can protect themselves from adversaries including why everyone's ization needs to start with the assumption that an attackers already inside. Why trying to build walls. Around the perimeter of your network is futile and the importance of planning regularly to defend cyberattack. We also discussed the importance of using password. Managers why individuals should be suspicious of emails and not click attachments from hundred people why our government is at its weakest point to be able to respond to this threat currently in a variety of other topics. Dmitri why don't we just jump right into it and would love your kind of analysis of what has happened Know there's been a lot of A lot of controversy there seems to be consensus that The the hack is the work of the russians a country. At least that you're quite familiar with in terms of its tactics relative to this. Maybe just sort of set the lay the land if you would. Yeah absolutely so. I think it's important to understand that while this is a great situation and certainly Will likely be highly detrimental to our national security in the short and medium-term The not an act of war. This is not a digital harbor as as some politicians have been talking about this In the last few weeks the important thing to understand is from what it looks like right now and we have now your information on what this operation has been at least over. Last year is traditional espionage The targets have primarily been government agencies with some Technology companies is wild wrapped into it but primarily focused on saft of secrets that are as you can imagine of high priority on to russian intelligence If it proves to be the As is most likely the case right now so This was an dacia operation in incredibly well executed very very patient but at the end of the day the goal is staff that goes not destruction. The goal was not the leaking of that public information. There's small chance we may still see that at n than we have to reevaluate our assessment. But for now at least it looks like the exact that the us government the us intelligence community would be proud to have executed against our around adversaries. I'm now from a supply chain perspective. You know we do now understand that You know we have a major threat factor that most organizations have not been focused on which as their it providers like solar wins like resellers that sell their microsoft cloud offerings which you can be compromised Without really having any way to control for for that risk at least on the front end of the of the intrusion cycle. Are you at this point. Confident that it that it is the russians indeed so the interesting thing about this Particular intrusion is that the private sector really does not have attribution here unlike virtually every other operation. We have seen or last ten years. Where many in the private sector including Former company grabs strike was very good at attributed jackson in many of them very quickly this one because the tradecraft was so new and unique never before seen. There's really nothing to tie back to any previous operations. We have seen To really give us good understanding who the adversary may be. So all the attribution so far From government officials obviously intelligence agencies are very good at Attributing attacks based on your variety of different sources and methods that go well beyond just technical measures so for now at least You know we have to wait to see what the evidence is going to come out with regards to this. We may very well seen in the future. Will this operations justice department has been establishing Very good. I think precedent for indicting Foreign intelligence operatives on a regular basis for various various acts that they've done against this country in You for private sector companies. What what would you advise chief. Information officers chief information security officers others were involved in In at least trying to grapple with the consequences to their organizations and ensuring that the damage is limited the extent to which they can. I think this really underscores the topic that you talked On a number of occasions about which is that every organization out there needs to start with an assumption that already inside. this particular gates underscores. Just how futile. It is to try to build walls around the perimeter of you network because someone somewhere is going to get through through through new mechanism that you haven't even thought of or or can't control four so it could be supply chain attack next time. It could be zero table an ability. It could be a known vulnerability that you've got patched against that or could be an insider The number of methods that they can get in are numerous. And if you're trying to chase your tail china For closed down each one. You're always gonna fail because there's always gonna be one more thing that you adding accounted for this out there that you may not have even thought of And the reality. Is that if you start with assumption that capable adversary will get inside in. The east are for their activities within the network. That's when you can get an advantage. Where if you detect them quickly into jackson before joining damage you can prevent for from any damage any damage from being done. And if you look at how They executed this particular attack. Yesterday came in through the solar winds vulnerability where they came in through the reseller On the was selling office re sixty five and azure licenses to their customers but at the end of the day once they move past that initial doctor they started doing traditional things started maintain persistence trying to kill security products. Move laterally trump. and that's what you had the opportunity to detect them in fact some organizations have to talk to them and Jacqueline before any any bhakta Before they had any impact to the company. Yup it's interesting also this. This comes at a time where there is. There have been a number of vulnerabilities that the fire. I issues that have resulted for instance some of the organizations who have been best equipped to help organizations guard against these very issues It underscores the possibility. I mean just as you say. You need to operate under the assumption that they're already in that's even true of the security organizations themselves fair enough now absolutely right and frankly fire is somewhat a success story here because they picked it up you know. They were hunting for for leads within the organization in this particular case the attacker made a mistake when they were trying to bypass you factor. It triggered alerts. Someone was smart enough to look into that and and uncovered intrusion You know you could argue. Maybe they could have picked it up sooner but at the end of the day If they hadn't noticed it to this day rally not know about the extent of the operation that has been done and the number of victims and sort of wins Was one of the factors. And so i think they've done a huge job service to the entire industry security industry as well as the broader public in this delight in revealing. What had happened to them. Yeah so i mean as you as you say a key key message to technology executives. Who are responsible for. The security of their organizations is to assume that you will be penetrated which means having as we've talked about in the past treaty You know not only having great technology ecosystem of partners at your disposal who can help you but also having great in his part and parcel the same but it but also involve process points in people points associated with this as well in terms of training of your people having a culture that is tuned to this having a sound disaster recovery business continuity plans in place in tested and so forth. so it's kind of marshalling. All of that together is that does that a fair synopsis that the most important thing is how land test up land regularly make sure that every person within the organization both in security team outside legal calms excetera are aware of what their roles are. And how this man bold so that's really really critical at the end of the day. There's no sort of magic pixie dust that you can just sprinkle all of your network and make yourself means to do any attack It will include technologies will include Processes all this together is what ultimately will make an organization resilient and be able to withstand even a sophisticated atmosphere. Such as this one. It what are you. You mentioned that this is you know primarily espionage has said it was not a a attack to destroy information What do you foresee again with the information we have now some of it's still validated of course the sort of medium to long-term consequences of this. Perhaps the most interesting element of this was how targeted this was. It was really like a sniper shot from mile away Going after very specific victims. So if you look at the toll. Potential victim. Population is massive. You've got the eighteen thousand Solar winds customers alone. That have downloaded the back door. That could have been compromised by the adversary You have other supply chain mechanisms which were still just about them. Learning now microsoft resellers is just one of the latest ones. So you you'll probably will will find out there. Tens of tens and tens of thousands not hundreds of thousands of potential victims That the attackers have access to but What we're finding is that the number of organizations actually went in and use that access us that master if you will to open up the door and get in is much much smaller. Probably my guesses on the order of a couple of hundred. Maybe three hundred at most Most of them government agencies. So i think the impact will primarily be limited to do national security when you look at the agencies have been targeted at the pentagon the state department treasury nuclear security administration agency this responsible for protection of our nuclear weapons. Those are the types of things that a nation state like russia would have know incredible interest in gaining access to the silver lining. Is that while. There are two silver linings. One is that most of the potential victims out. There looks like got the kill switch from adversary. Where the the attackers basically said. We're not interested. You And basically shut down our And the second. Silver lining is that it looks like they have not been able to infiltrate classified networks at least based on what we know today and of course classified networks as where we restore most of the super sensitive information in the us government although even on classified networks we still have a lot of highly valuable data that can be damaging for years to come in when you compare some the reaches we've had opium prior to this incident was probably one of the most impactful In terms of the security of this nation when you know twenty plus million Background checks and people clearances have been stolen from the government agency. This can be opium times You know hundred Going forward as learn about the impact of what was taken and the fact that they were able to run this for at least nine months in probably longer is also testament to What impact will probably see from this end in. What sorts of additional vulnerabilities are there with the changing of administrations. While that. that's an interesting point because of course right now you have things in a flock swear. There's no political leadership for example anymore. An nc sock cyber security agency. That's managing part of this response Prescribes of course was fired by the president About a month ago and along with his deputies so now you have an acting civil servant in charge of seaside who is a tremendous individual but as a civil servant as someone enacting capacity. You just don't have the authority to do what's needed in order to marshal on your other cabinet officials in in the rest of the federal government to respond to this crisis on top of that you have situation where many people are polishing the resumes resumes in. Have one foot out the door if not both feed out the door at this point Looking for jobs in the private sector. So you have a government that i think is the weakest point in terms of being able to respond to this and of course you have. A new administration is gonna command on january twentieth. That's not gonna have any confidence that the networks of these agencies that they're going to run on Are secure and have not been infiltrated by. The adversary in the atmosphere is not reading every email That they're sending in fact today. We know that. A number of these agencies have already transitioned to operating unclassified networks because at this team that the unclassified networks are not secure and that that has real operational impacts because lots of people don't have access to classified networks when you're on the road Outside of a scam. You can't easily get access to your classified emails. So it really impacts communications with the government Very points raise their curious. Is there anything. i mean. Dmitri you're somebody who's been cognizant of these these issues and have been operating with the philosophy you talked about at the outset of this what you recommend other executives in terms of you know zero trust in anything that you recommend suit to to individuals in terms of safeguarding. Their personal data. And in light of this recognizing it wasn't necessarily Individuals who were the primary targets in this case. But it underscores the fact that you know there. There's always this possibility that the data is most important to us. Most private to us may may be accessed by by people against our wishes while from an individual perspective. There are a couple of things that everyone should be doing at one One of the most effective security mechanisms is actually also one of the cheapest which is a password manager Everyone out there should be using password. Manager there free versions of them. They're they're very cheap ones. As well and important thing is to make sure that every password that you create for literally anything any software any website out there in the equipment that you may have is random and unique and you save in a password manager than the only pass where you need to remember is a password to password manager That is one of the most common ways that people get compromised reuse passwords. These weak basf awards and password manager really can stop those types of attacks that the tracks and beyond that Really be very suspicious Be very suspicious. Emails you get Don't try clicking on attachments from unknown people or or anything that you may think is suspicious. So if you use any A webmail service like a g mail or office three sixty five. They have preview mechanisms. Where if someone sends you a spreadsheet or a pdf you can preview within the browser in a very safe method because they render it on the server side And it doesn't execute on your machine so those attacks things you wanna do To try to keep yourself safe again. One underscore the point. You just made peter that this particular intrusion is not gonna be that impactful to individual aside from from people working in the government or having clearances but you know there's certainly plenty of other attacks out there beyond this one that we should also be focused on. It's actually what we covered most of the points. I was hoping to cover with you. Anything else that That i haven't asked you that you think. My readers ought to be aware of as a result of this. I think front from a policy perspective. One of the things that i would encourage the biden administration. Do not do is overreact here And you know some of the initial Statements that i think have come out have not been particularly helpful. The president-elect Issued another statement. Last night that i think was much better. Where it He talked about the need to build resilience in your networks. And i think that's the main lesson we learn from us You know i've you this as a good on them for for for doing this Shame on us for letting them and we need to do better on defense and this is not a sort of a kansas belly for for an aggressive attack. If it is the russians there's plenty of issues we have with them and there's plenty of Highly destructive attacks that they have launched the years included not patio that have that has discuss billions of dollars in damage olympic destroyer attack on the olympics in south korea and so forth But this is not one of them this traditional espionage of the type that we all do and We we wanna Doing so i don't think it's it's a good way for us to use this attack to Norms against espionage. Let's quite excellent. Dmitri thank you so much for taking the time. Thanks for tuning in. Please join me on monday. When my guess. George lotto the chief information officer of alexia on.

Dmitri dmitri peter hi silverado policy accelerated n federal government jackson russia department treasury nuclear se microsoft justice department Us Jacqueline gates china pentagon cabinet basf biden administration peter
Why We Have To Face Death To Be Fully Alive with Lauren Zander

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

54:43 min | 10 months ago

Why We Have To Face Death To Be Fully Alive with Lauren Zander

"Coming up on this episode of the Doctors Pharmacy if you are committed to making a difference in the world, it's a good time because the list is real. High rewind Dr Hyman here before we jump into today's episode I WanNa chat about water. Your body is sixty percent. Water water is essential for all the hundred trillion cells in your body. It helps regulate your body temperature. It helps you digest and metabolize food and transport vital nutrients. It helps you flush out toxins. It's also vital for proper immune function. In fact, you can live about three weeks without food, but only about three days without water. However, clean water is really important. I always say you can put crap in your body. Body and you feel like crap so keeping crap out of your drinking. Water is really key now while it's true that our bodies are equipped with very sophisticated detoxification cleaning systems, the toxic burden in the twenty first century. Overwhelm us with insults from every direction. Our bodies just can't keep up and this could leave our immune system susceptible to illness. It's crucial to keep yourself clean and protected, and this starts with what you put in your body and clean water is arguably the most important thing you put in your body every day. So with everybody I have a question for you. Do you know what's in your drinking water? Well, my favorite water filter and one that I use entrust is the true filter. If features a four stage filtration system that removes twenty times more contaminants in the best selling water filter. It removes all the crap like lead. pfos's hexavalent chromium remember Erin Brockovich. That's what she was known for and lots more with the current emphasis on boosting and supporting your immune system. There's no better time to invest in clean water for you and your loved ones and right now my podcast listeners can access the aquifer. Aquifer water filter for only two hundred nine dollars. That's one hundred and fifty dollars off the normal price. All you have to do is go to Dr Hyman dot com forward slash filter. That's Dr. Hyman! Dot Com forward slash filter, and you can get the special and exclusive price on my favorite water filter, so stay safe out there. Hi, everyone just wanted to let you know that. This episode contains some colorful language, so if you're listening with kids, you might want to save this episode for later. I'm Dr Mark Hyman welcome to the Doctors Pharmacy, and that's pharmacy with an F. F. A. R.. Mac Y. Place for conversations that matter, and if you care about the subject of death, that's there's a lot of going on right now. It's going to be worth listening today because it's with my good friend, my best friend and life coach probably in that order a. Lauren Zander, who's the Co, founder and chairwoman of the Handout Group? You might have seen her on some of my previous podcasts and instagram lives. She's extra woman. She's the. Founder of with her sister, then down group, which is a Corporate Consulting Life Coaching Company and this methodology called the handle method. Is Revolutionary. It's revolutionized my life without. I don't think I'd be happy or healthy or sane. At least I'd be still struggling more than I am now which I'm still struggling, but it's not as much struggling. So it's good, and she is with her group spotted over thirty five universities and institutes around the world including Mit Stanford, Graduate School of business why you and the New York City Public School System. She's author of an incredible book which you must get called. Maybe it's you cut the crap. Face your fears and love your life. It's a no nonsense, practical manual and helps readers figure out not just what they want out of life, but how to actually get there, which is important. He spent the last twenty. Years Coaching thousands of private and corporate clients, including me I am executives at bogue. BASF. AOL and she's also an expert in many many publications. Who Your Times BBC Forbes? Women's Health Dr Oz and many more so welcome Lauren. Yeah. Tie, so listen This is a really intense time right now. a lot of people are scared. A lot of people are facing things that they don't usually have to face like death. both the fear of death death in their own families and their communities On top of all that we have. The racial violence. Wondering our country. That is also a lot of death going on in there. And as One of the things you've really worked on is is looking at. How do we? How do we get straight with all the areas of our life that we need to get straight with in order to be happy and. You've talked about twelve areas, but you. The new area called the thirteenth area which is about we always have. It's it's. It's it's It's maybe in my mind taking a little backseat yourself you do and I, think he really not focused on how how this area needs to be addressed by US in order to be engaged with life so. What are the first twelve areas? And then? Why are we adding death as the thirteenth area? The twelve areas are all the areas you currently with a like. You might not imagine them. and I I can't listening all twelve, but I. WanNa, hear wanted you WANNA walk, but if either the areas money career love search reality community. That's in love. could literally. I used to actually have eighteen areas, but when I went to write the book, everyone was like no one will know unbelievable by it if they understand there's many areas. Good I just a bunch of areas but one of the we always had the thirteenth area was death, and it was funny, 'cause it was number thirteen right, and so we just one of the areas where someone even has to focus first and foremost be happy in their life, but he's one of the areas that becomes critical as you get older. Or has you face someone getting older or as you face the truth about life? or You have kids like the minute you start to really be a provider, you understand how much death really mad or everyone in your life Is Right now you know where it were seemingly folks death more than ever rain every year over seventy million people die from this or that mostly chronic disease, but now we're seeing hundreds of thousands around the world dying from covid nineteen, and it's sort of catalyze our focus on death in a new way, and it's made it more immediate and more real more scary, and I think people are suffering from this pandemic of fear, and what are they fearing the fearing death really and the reason people aren't going out the reason people are saying home reason where social distancing yes as to protect each other, but even in countries where they're opening up. Aren't going out which is striking talking to a friend of mine and Germany's. You know were open, but people are terrified to go out because. The still has pandemic of fear which is probably linked to the. Fear of death so. Yeah, we're talking about it, but is that enough? Not Well, you know. If you know me at all, you would go. No, that's just the header. The area right like so I will think that first of all I think life is a privilege to be alive, and that happens because view deeply face all the areas of life. And what I have found. Is in order to help people really? Fix The relationships resolve things. They've never resolved get. Get right with your parents. Get Right, get when desk forces you to face. You're never gonNA. Get to have that conversation to. You're never gonNA get a not tell that story like you. There's something that needs to happen. Death really forces you to go I better. Get it done before I'm not able to. And better and then also makes a person have to deal with. What do I WANNA say? What's resolve? Right, so one of my favorite and I talked this class. At places that are into it like the JC, see like there's places. Center. Right like they're like cool right so and I. It was packed, but we and it was all ages, but what it was like really if this was if you knew you were going to die, what's not results today? And then make a list of people list of actions things you've never done in your life. Like death makes you face. Life. Better right, but that's a little heavy. And then. Also. No one knows what they think happens really really after death. Right and so when someone died. The exploration of our they still with you, are they still there? Or what? What? What is that light right like what happened? You know most people. Have you know bread? No books on that haven't like some people are obsessed in love it. And then most of us just go into deer in headlights and got real things to do west so. We go into denial. No one's walking around. Maybe now you might be. Mostly. We don't walk around like where African that. Essentially. It's built big. Know many weird, because when I was in college I was fascinated with death. And you read about the to and book of the dead and then. I actually read this book called death and dying by Elizabeth Ross, who taught about stages of dying and I volunteered to hospice worker in college. And my first job was to be with his family was. Cornell physics professor. Who was dying of brain tumor. And he was so much intact when I started with into, so watch him go downhill to not be able to walk and talk. and to see what's going on family. It's like I was literally front row seats I was the caregiver that would be there to relieve the wife for the kids, so they can go do something on house. And it sort of put me face to face with death and a very young age in way that most people haven't seen and then as a doctor I've seen more death than most people and now facing and has been sort. It's sort of not so mysterious to me and I've been with many people who died in her dying. The most. Horrendous experience out of death, which was really hard to cope with Haiti where there were three hundred thousand people died in. You know the sixty minutes episode were I brought the the reporters back to this more that was at the hospital, where there was no room for the people, and there were hot, and it's like Haiti in January eighteen ninety degrees and humid in the body. Just hundreds of bodies piled up them basically a parking lot. And dying and rotting, and so you couldn't like. Avoid death, right, and so most of us. Don't have that up close and personal view of death. And sort try to bury. Enter pretended us. Just we do it in hospitals. We do to nursing homes. In our homes and I think. You know his take us away from the whole new wife and you know people died at home before. NEVER MIND! No. One makes it special Right it's not like. Birth birth gets like birth plan as right everything around birth is like everyone wants to manage every minute, and who's risk like I? Get so much attention which we understand right, but are you also sure we should be given the same kind of love and attention the other. Transition. So we all those we've pushed aside those thoughts, but why? Why is important not to push them the site? 'cause it's coming to a theater near. You. Don't know when our numbers are up, but we all know numbers are up. And the more you face. Everything I mean we so. I teach this for real and I've helped even have coached a aging mother who knew she was dying I was coaching her son. For years and she knew she was GonNa die and was going into hospice, wrote the like we got the so resolve. In everything they needed to say to the point. where she designed my session with him. After she died. Of what she wanted me to read them what she wanted me like. And I still get. Children can get moved at their relationship and I. Swear my children. How moved get? I, can fill feel her. and to me I would want that for my children right I would want that with my parents that they felt that present secure and allowed to go at like the the amount we could be in on accepting death and designing that. Or even and then the amount, so I sat madge ACC class where I taught all about facing death. And what would you do and you know? People were very happy to make the list of everything you've ever done. that. You want to do before you die and how serious that list is because if you go on sixty four. Oh! Shit I better get moving right I need money for like so so most people and I'm such a planner like like design and plan and fulfill. That they're getting people to dive into it, versus the in denial is going to happen with a miracle for all of that right and an act of love. And what they found is nothing wasn't order. Relationships for Messi money was a damn. And then conversations never had over time. Or also a damn map. And, so if they died today, they'd be devastated. That they're not set up to dot right and I don't need you to be at up to die I. Need you to be able to die because you're prepared for that that. Come on comes with the packaging people. mazing well, let's talk about how you coach clients around this, and and how maybe you in a specific example about somebody. Who you coached around the death of a parent or somebody who loves older and the difference between being resolved, and how to say goodbye and went all it's about. Wow. God are the question. And, then they're so good. I could spend my life working on it. Gave well. We have given our. Say. It's just it's a so the most important thing for me. To teach people is to say everything. Forgive everything except everything resolve everything. That's why resolution it's like people are step fruits. You've told all your life. You've been forgiven. Everybody knows everything you're. You're not dying. One could say you're not dying with your said you're not dying. Still angry about anything you're. You're forgiven your loved and thank you. Write for everything you did and didn't get to do and everything. You wish you got to do that. They get to do and everything. You like everything that you wished for comes with you. Leave with you and thank you. Right, and that's you know when if you read you know what people most care about. When. They leave is all the things they've never sad. And how much love they've never expressed or apologies, they've never gotten to say or who they wish. They would be forgiven by so the emotional body of us like the amount we above and acceptance of forgiveness. It takes that obnoxious. Knock at the door like no. You don't have to the you know. There is no tomorrow for you. To. Make you realize the list? Of people you wish you. Could get resolved with and so I make someone sit down and actually do the list. And then I make someone plan doing the list, so you don't need to die in order to be able to die. Powerful eight, and then I I do parent letters. Yeah you help me? When my mom died a few years ago, because a lot of stuff that I had still unresolved and I didn't finish it, but I definitely worked on love. Still there, but I was going to do, and it's hard to finish. Some talking about one is apparent letter in in important in in. How does it change him? I never had a more like so. There isn't a coach. My company that becomes a master coach that hasn't done their parents letter, and what happens when I do apparent better. Is someone like I design. Everything you regret at everything resented everything. You need to forgive everything. You want to apologize for everything. That was unsaid. Everything that was never done that. You wish was done right like. Like anything and everything, but not in the name of screw you, you owe me. You shut up. But really this is what was happening for me throughout my life. This is what I wish this. What I never said. This is like it's really an apology that I. Get all this shit done or said. Before you were dying. or before or right now so that we can have a grownup relationship that is carrying our entire path with us. And so the. It is sacred to set your parent free and yourself free. By stopping. The narrative long enough to go I can reboot. If I can change it, I can deal with it. I can forgive it and. It is my opinion that it's the next generations job. Like his kids job. To help to to forgive that parent to tell like like it's OK. Your parents suck. Right okay, they didn't right. What's your excuse? Right so it it it it goes to the next. Generation should be better than the last generation. Like. Of course you expect the apple to be better than the rotary. And, so people don't even know what rotary phones. So. It's are I like to put the burden on the kids to resolve everything from their family line, and how I recommend you do that. If you get free with your parents, and you clean up all your life, you quit you. Ask All your questions and you don't do it. As an act of judgement, you do it as an act of. Luck. So one thing is facing. Some believe loves death and the other facing your own death. and you talk about. The bucket list and you talk about also something called getting resolve Lewis. Who can you talk about? How do this process? Because it's something people want to into usually. But? That's because it's so. Like, you've learned to Barry You'd learn to think you're okay with it. You learn to accept you think. You know. is well defined with hating them. Like I've accepted I will never forgive you right the second people right because it shouldn't right acceptance really let that that doesn't mean you have to be best friends with them, but you really can get their perception their perspective everything. They experienced everything. You did no more fighting and set each other free. Right so there, it's actually. Pretty tricky right because humans instinctively only think the way they tell the story is the only way the story salt. And if you don't hear it the way I, say it if you don't agree with me, you're lying or you don't understand me or you don't feel my feeling. Right rather than Oh, we will never were parallel. Right my experience your experience. If you really WANNA forgive each other, you'll accept mine. I'll accept earth and they don't need to agree with each other. Now that might sound simple like. Ha Ha, Ha, have you ever gone a human to listen equally to another? and Go what you say. You said it was blue. I thought it was Brown. Wow I bet it was blue and I bet it was brown. That's amazing. Most people go. OCCAS. Right. I and the right, so that's the main thing I change in human dynamics, if the ability to love and listen without judging and needing them to a great. The most profound experience, my dad. died. On a year and a half ago and Now he you know cancer divorce when those young and he wasn't around much and. Didn't really show up in the way with love Tim to show up. And try not a new story in the stories, told thousands of dimes, millions and billions of time guy on the planet. And I think I really never understood what his experience was and when he was like seventy, nine invited him to come to this men's group. This men's weekend where it was sort of A. Men's group and we sat in the circle inside the circle of what maybe forty or fifty men witnessing this on a weekend and. You know they invited each of us to share our experiences of. Know Each Other and what we needed in what was going on, you know and I. It was the first time I really to say what I need to say to him to feel complete, and it was the first time I heard him explain why he had the operating system that he had from his grandfather and his father. And it was like for him as a little boy in what he was missing and would. Let him having the beliefs he had and. He didn't change them. But I understood the. was able to go. Okay I. Get I get. This is what happened and dislodged. Relax about it. And even though he really couldn't say, I'm sorry. He, couldn't really I was like it was okay because I understood that like now I get why he was behaving that way, and it wasn't because his nestle or meet me trying to be mean or trying to not care for me. It was just it was oh powerful, and he died in on I. Remember being with him. He's spent much days with him before he died. In his house and you know he was his embraced death in any way. he thought it. He didn't like it was coming. Coming but didn't like to talk about it. And you know because to be with him in that peaceful state and be there was a beautiful experience and I didn't have to make him different. From death to be different even at the end. You know. who he was and he didn't you know he didn't change, but I it was. With a really. Different experience me. Of having feeling of lacquer, having him be mad at him for not doing any danner, continuing bad behavior is able to really just go. This is this is his experience like this his story and understanding, and it's Ok like in and and it would lead me. Let me flying cree complete with him. Mostly. If hating resenting. Judging. Being offended. thinking you're superior to any of those things actually worked. We would be such an amazing human rights. Then we all like. Love Acceptance Listen allow. Right, and make your own choices and don't right like we. You know what it's like the Elvis Costello. What's so funny about peace, love and understanding, right? It's like. Humans just don't. They think they are that? But they really don't give it. They want it. So the. With your work, you, you help people get through that help. People change that. Way of dealing with your life from the offended victim, resenting blaming not owning like it, just a very different framework, so you actually become free I mean sense I think that's part of the work of and now group is helping people become free from the stories that keep him emotionally spiritually and quickly imprisoned. Again it. Doing on, it's an it's an it's an act of love, and it's an act of love. It's an act of knowing your soul. It's an active fulfilling on your soul and all human. Right and it's it deep. If. I do not think the ticket onto. The planet is Lucky for astor. Ticket onto the planet is our everyone. If you don't like my cursing is power you fucked. And what did you do to get out of it right? It's it's A. It's a boring trap. That we keep defying the dark side if we do and then the only trick. Is that. We don't get how dark dark right we don't get not getting out of bed. We don't get another cock down. We don't get specially for your people right that haven't fulfilled like totally embraced Broccoli over a dorito right, nobody wonders. Would you rather have a door reto? Yummy right I know very. But. I get it me neither. Let's. Chocolate chip cookie. Or steamed Broccoli with a little while and. Didn't even assault right which one's fulfilled on your life. This one fulfills on right now. WHO CARES I? Love it and this one holds court the rest of your life. And does the work. Right and then aren't we interesting animals? There isn't one of us that doesn't. Like and then feel sad that we don't get the cookie. Right, and then that's the dilemma in about forgiveness. Facing things we don't WanNa face getting like doing the work to get happy is. The Broccoli. Sorry everybody if I. if it was a chocolate chip cookie, we'd all be rocking it. Hey everyone. It's Dr Mark. Now that it's June, I couldn't be more excited for summer and all my favorite outdoor activities, and that means father's Day's coming up soon, so it's the perfect time to reflect on the health of men in our lives. Who We know and love now whether it's a dad, brother and uncle, husband or friend, we've all seen a man we care about show up for us in amazing ways, but maybe not take great care themselves because they're trying to take care of their family. Since lack of sleep can lead to lower testosterone and chronically missing out on chronic sleep may make it hard to maintain a healthy weight and make it easier to gain weight. This could increase the chronic diseases that we see so much of in our society things like type, two diabetes and cardiovascular disease, lack of sleep may also lead to multiple kinds of cancer including prostate cancer. It's clear. 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It's like the nineteen eighteen pandemic of the Spanish flu. It's the Great Depression in its nineteen sixty eight race riots all happening the same week. And it creates a sense of powerlessness helplessness. I mean. I'm experiencing it. I'm experiencing God. What's happening to America I mean I had dinner last night with. You know a former senator secretary of state and. Talking about are standing in the world and how? Know when he was secretary, stay would go to. Different countries in. To tell them how they have to have integrity about this or that. Look at us like really who you kidding like you don't have. You're trapped together like when you get your. You know what together you know. Maybe we can have a conversation, but. You know, how do we? How do we deal with our own sense of helplessness, hopelessness and overwhelm Because I was doing okay until like this George Floyd. and. You know it's sort of exposed a lot of the underlying cracks. In our society that were just about to blow been, but got exploded with what's happening and it's not just here. It's around the world. You know the divisiveness, the hatred the racism. The conflict and all of a sudden around the world are protesting for understanding through love for justice for peace for like it's like Whoa and yeah, there's disruptive forces in at all, but there's in Cro. Outpouring of enough is enough like enough is enough and. And yet is individuals I. Think a lot of us are feeling. On. How do we navigate this? How do we? How do we emerge? Designer life is when they talk about. Let's you know. Create your dreams and desire life me Mama world falling apart and when He. How do you how people navigate this moment? I have the. I. The world the world everyone's paying attention right now, but the world was actually horrendous. Last November right like there wasn't a lack of. That were now aware of it and upset about it. Is a lot healthier than denial. Right and you know. I was so messed up. That like trump came after Obama. I thought we won the war right? All Wars I was like Oh. You know like like I don't do politics, but I would like a woman. We could get a woman president. It would knockout to. It was right like I. Am Equality Junkie Right? On Mike, how can we get this done as fast as possible right, and then what we found is that's not. Actually, true for. All like that's like really rocking New York. NEW YORK AIN'T Everywhere and so the allusion. Blew up and then everyone the half to actually face that we didn't fix what we wanted to. which should get everybody up in arms and I really do think if you meet my three kids and their relationship to caring about politics than what's happening versus me when I was. In a messed up world, the nineteen seventies like. RIGHT NOTHING! Right so I? I. I really do pull out. The Dalai Lama, like human evolution is going to take thousands of year people. Like, we all long time to deal with. What's wrong with US right? And and so here we are in our privilege. Call it a hundred years. We each get. which is a blink? In time. But our chance to make a difference or right and so. All I WANNA. Do the more the world is in distress is succeeded the lane I pick. Right. I still just want people to write their parents letters I still just want you to face your death I still want you like as an individual to deal with being present in your life and design your life so i. don't think anything. Changed! I think people are more. Conscious. To things that are. Messed up on earth. And could mess you up personally and I. Even think this entire. See Them Kovin. Season has dropped people out of their heads do. To, hearts of everyone got slowed and everyone has to deal with. Are you okay at home? Do we the? Might your home you? You're with at home. House home right? Are you eating and drinking more, or are you doing more? Are you out of work right now? And what are you GonNa? Do about it right so I just still only care about individual being true to themselves and realizing how great they are. And I just WANNA kick your butt to get what you want right now. You need right now. And if you are committed to making a difference in the world, it's a good time. 'cause. The list is real. Yeah. That's true. That's true. And did yeah, I think I think people are trying to figure out how to we. Take this moment in in. is in the way that actually creates. something could adamant horrible moment in history, and I think you know each of us have their tune out of that crisis to create something good. I mean in Chinese the character for crisis is not. She comprised two characters, Mar to ideograms one is danger knows opportunity so danger. No comes also opportunity I think. We can succumb to the fear. Activity or we can go, okay. What? How do I so show up? How do I serving as soon as the George Floyd? Attache in murderer is that people are showing up that people are expressing themselves. People are wanting to white. People are one we will. How am I a racist? I don't even understand how how does work and how do I learn about it? And there's there's people actually trying to make a difference and that that's really helpful to me. Even though there's a lot of dark forces at work I think there's a lot of people who are really the waking up, which really is great and I think that's great. Yeah I I, also say that the bad guys have no problem winning power and control. It's the good guys that are. Totally not. According power money and control like we need to. You know except I'm a teach people to tell the truth. Face your lives and deal with loving your loved. The work. Yes, so let's talk about that you know you, how do you? How do you begin to sort of? Build your life in a way that makes you feel fully alive and fulfilled to get your dreams. If you don't love yourself, and how do you? How do you sort of? Come out of what's happening now or people lost their jobs when. They're alive, reflected all sorts of ways when things have changed dating finding love I mean like you know like virtual tinder now. so. You know people often were on a track like had a vision, and now they feel like things are upside down. To where they want so what you've you seen those. Pivot. Pivot and pivot means is that you're totally capable of rebooting plan and chasing a new plan at any time. Right so you get divorced. It doesn't mean you're never gonNA love again. Really you might not go looking for it. Make sure you get yourself in a place where what you're gonNA. Look for and deal with this, but it isn't. Anything is possible. If you're willing to go forward and do the work, so if you so, that's number one. And I believe that I don't care who you are I. don't care how many I don't care. What happened to your job? I will help you find another job because it anything I really do believe everything is possible for an individual. They're willing to chase it and have enough conversations about it. Honestly okay so. What really matters. Is You know what you want? And you have the integrity to get it and when I talk about integrity I'm always talking about your action. Now. The other thing that really drives people crazy. Which I talk about way too much. Is your inner dialogue. The way you talk to yourself, so if someone says Oh love myself, right? And I'm like no the voice in your head. Right like no. No your higher self, his mother, where is she? Where is he? What happened? Let's get it like nothing is true human? Nothing's fact over there. No one stuck forever. Nothing's drew. Truth is something you believe, and that's very fishy, right? Because we woke right, and so what we start what I started to unravel. Is that your thoughts create your feelings? Create your actions all. At instantly and it's. Like and you don't see them happening, but if you slow it all down and get conscious to what the voice in your head is saying, you can take on one area of your life. And enough. I love people taking on food. because. Especially when your Diet Right, you're not hungry people. This is not a diet, right? This is not calorie in right. No Calorie management right so this is just eat damn busy, and you won't be hungry. Right. Right, and so that's ideal to hear your inner dialogue chasing drink tasting cookie chasing why you deserve it. Chase it like you have to to know yourself. And what the voices saying in any area? You're suffering or loathing or disappointed or feel depressed. During your dial on you, think actually you. That's the problem it's like there's no separation between the story. You're telling yourself and actually think is true. So you don't people can't even tell. They got fed something to themselves like right, so we've been working on something for me recently around my sleep because you know, my sleep gets disrupted. I travel fifty percent of the time different beds here and there and story about it and tell myself all this nonsense and I finally came begging to you after trying this many times. I just need help and then you. Know it was even cooler because your your fantasy had a solution that if you ever stayed in one place, so it had a theory, you had a whole theory that it's all because of this. It's all because of this. It's all because of this. It's all that like it's all because of the things I ever got whole long enough and slept in my bed. Long enough in my like you. Wife was over there long enough. It'd be good. Enough no, how about that? So the boys is in a constant. Only if only, if yeah, but yeah, but like it's crazy. You're like last night. I was like Oh, well I went out. to a friends place for dinner. And handsome wine. we stay up really late and I usually don't stay up that late. Something Oh, the winds, going to make not sleep. Oh, if I stay up late, I have to get up early to get somewhere, so like might not going to sleep, and then I'm not could possibly doing if I wake up, am I gonNa Fall Asleep, and so had this whole thing going on. It was just be asked that another anything even before I went to sleep. And as an example of that entered alike Mike. That's up like that's I it's like so you have the ability to kind of recognize it, and then notice it and then understand it's not true. It's just his voice that you need a different voice saying something else so then I. Then I ask you to go. So what happens is i. get you to trail. You're negative, inner dialogue, so at least you now who? Sorry Everyone Kirk Mana fucking with your life. Right, it's. The future and you don't you. Don't move in it right and seeing the future. You don't make money next month. You're seeing the future. You don't right and it's negative. Over eighty percent of our thoughts are negative. So that's the work we have to, and so once you start to hear the voice. Then I tell you that your lower south. Right and your your higher self gets to respond. So your lower. And I and I call it a talkback. Talk back to that voice like H, f Ir Cell. Talk back to L. S. lower. Right and we and I get, and then all the sudden you start to get. That the negative inner dialogue is genius because it tells you what you actually want to think like your issue about sleep is likely not disappearing for your life Mark Right, so if people overeat. If people don't like to exercise if people over drink, right? You will be signing up for that issue for the rest of your life off. I'm sorry you've been signed up. You weren't at the gate. I'd Atari. Over eight get used to it, let's win right so then. Your lower self said something, and you're like shut up. Here's what I really think. I'LL BE SO tired I'll sleep like a baby. Right like right so then you can have another. Belief. Counter the lower belief. It's so powerful. I feel like I've really broken down when I I didn't know this work and I but I really didn't see how I was doing to myself because I had really very. Very convincing! And and I think right now. People are struggling and I think. It's important narrative story. We tell ourselves and. I think it's powerful and I think right now. We're we're. We're shifting Howard doing things are shifting learning I. Think I just want to share with people that this is something that it will change your life if you if you focus on. Working with? Your mind in the way that Lauren is talking about it, it's transformational, and it brings so much peace and happiness, even in the midst of chaos, which Lauren, the now and we all need that and you know we're doing all these things online now we're doing number podcast online, which was never my intention and you. This incredible coaching course called in you whether you like university, so it's like enter universities kind of cool idea and. And and the tagline is inner. You helps you learn to human better, which is great. We all WanNa be better humans, and it's gives people all kinds of tools to help them do the things. We're talking about right here in this podcast to get on stock to get while, be happy to get thriving where it matters the most your relationship to yourself to your career to love your body money time on that so. Buddy's we give you. Two people can get like the month and. Tell us how it works houses, course work, and in what kind of. How. Can. This works so well online. So it's. Like twenty five minute talk like podcast, talk my best work like in modules that comes with homework example, but it's all digitally there you just click and you start to listen right, and it takes you on a deep fried, and it has you know Elena. Brower is reading her parent leather it. Ha- like best in class stories, real people like I needed a good as I can make the content, and as short as I can make it, so you get of. Right away and laughing and get it, and we're very self deprecating. We tell all our own real stories right, and then there's whore. That you can do online and in a private interview world that if you ever end up wanting a coach, or you have a buddy, or you wanna post something, or you want to just track your own private journal and journey. It's all right there. And then the work is all about you getting to know yourself now. What we do is we have masterclasses? Do they cost you anything? You already paid once once you get in the door, you're. Right if you ever want to hire a coach, that's an upsell. You don't need one because we have masterclass. Right and we also give away like what we do is. WE HAVE ACCOUNTABILITY BUDDIES? And, so you can start to meet people from around the world you people are putting together their own groups. People all have doom connection because we do all our masterclasses, very. Right and we've been doing this for years. People Right, and so it is. Work on yourself, connect with people. Talk about like and we have we do. Everything's free once you're in the door, right and. It's right for you. I don't know if it's something they should do. If you don't want to take a lot of new actions and deal with yourself run. I actually did when I first met you Iran. Gives me like six or seven months to come back and let you in the door. I don't WANNA deal no way. Nor you right? So if you're not ready to. Face! Things like you know you leave your husband. You really started to tell the truth. Right and you'd actually have to stop it. If you stop drinking, you would have to. Really leave your right like so right so if you're in a terrible bind, and you're not ready to like. Tell the truth about it. We're the last thing you should do, but we should be the thing in your back pocket that when you ready, we'll get you out of will shift your life within a month. When we start rocking from the minute, you say okay. I'm ready to tell the truth. I'm ready to change my life. Right this shit work. Like you have to go, I'm ready and if you're not ready. You don't have to be ready. I'm not I. Don't make people ready. That's not my I am not going to convince you because this is real and deep. Because I did run. It was because I didn't want to leave my wife and I needed to. I finally got out that. So this is actually rental. Is You know I've worked closely with Lorne for years? And it's a privilege, but they can do it. It's expensive and. It's worth it for sure but and I do refer people, but this is scalable on this. The humanity needs this and I would say heading up. This is the right program for you. I would say just ask yourself this one question. Are you human and if the answer's Yes i? Think it's the right course. Yeah and just so you know people if you don't like it, we we are the people who give you your money back yet. Like respond to a complaint like what your about. Were those people we really are those people, not maybe. Not Maybe. Baffled proof. It's just my no right. If you don't love, don't have a I. Don't want your money i. only want money that people. WanNa pay because they're happy to do it. So. That's that's one thing and the other thing. Is that We have found. That inner you just listening to it. And like hippy audit, but like I'm promising to do homework and just whitewash. Mess up like do the Wash Oba. Even, the word sounds bad now. Like whitewashing. Right No, Anyway. Just listening to it is profound and makes changes immediately, versus how much like twice as much success if you actually do the work, but people if you just WanNa listen an audit. It, you keep it for life. You can come to our classes. You can see like it's even if you just want people telling the truth and you wanna hear what everybody's doing to faith all their fears where that game. That's amazing well. Anybody who's interested can go to. Website him down group dot forward slash Mark Hyman. That's me HAENEL GROUP DOT com for slash Mark Hyman. They can get. Fifty percent off, which is twenty five dollars using Hyman seventy-five special coupon for podcast listeners hyman seventy-five. You have a correct mark. Please and eight. It's an incredible offer I. Mean You get Lifetime Access? You Get twelve audio coaching sessions from Barnes Zander. F- One Free Private coaching session with a coach. That's right access to enter university. And the Six Week Coaching boot camp with the Hindu group coach fourteen homework assignments, the interactive promised tracker to make sure you're accountable and track your promises and consequences. It's an incredible program, and honestly without Lauren in my life. I think I would be successful, but very unhappy and also probably not so healthy so I'm so grateful to her in the work of Group and encouraged to get started with your hyman seventy five coupon at hand, L. Group Dot com for slash mark. Hyman and I'm just so excited for you to learn more and get the benefits that I have because I've never been happier in my life. Regardless of what's happening on the outside and that's the point, right? I wish that for everyone right because it really makes everything else that you'd want to deal with in the world more possible because you're connected to. You're doing it for the world, and that is an act of love. Give form, thank you for all the love you give to me to all the people in the world to humanity. This is functional. Medicine is for the body. This is for the soul, and the might so I would. I would kindly agreed to checking out at you. Love this podcast. Share with your friends and family on social media. Leave a comment. We'd love to hear from you. Do with the cars. And wherever, you day your podcast and we'll see next time on the doctors. Hey everybody's Dr Hi thanks for tuning into the doctor's pharmacy. I hope you're loving this podcast. It's one of my favorite things to do introducing you all the experts that I know and I love and that I've learned so much from and I'm GonNa, tell you about something else. Doing which is called marks picks my weekly newsletter and in it I share my favorite stuff from foods. Supplements to gadgets tools to enhance your health is all the cool stuff that I use, and then my team uses to optimize enhance our health and I'd love you to sign up for the weekly newsletter. Only Senate you once a week on Fridays. Nothing else a promise. And all of us go to Dr Hyman DOT COM forward slash picks to sign up. That's Dr Hyman Dot Com. Four size picks P. I C K S and sign up for the newsletter I'll share with you my favorite stuff that I use to enhance my health and get healthier and better and live younger longer now back to this week's episode. Hi, everyone. I hope you enjoyed this week's episode. Just a reminder that this podcast is for educational purposes. Only this podcast is not a substitute for. For professional care by a doctor or other qualified medical professional, this podcast is provided on the understanding that it does not constitute medical or other professional advice or services. If you're looking for helping your journey, seek out qualified medical practitioner. If you're looking for a functional medicine practitioner, you visit IFM. Dot Org and search. They're fine a practitioner database. It's important that you have someone in your corner. WHO's trained? WHO's a licensed healthcare practitioner and can help you make changes especially when it comes to your health.

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