22 Burst results for "Baruch"

Interview With John Paul Baric of Aurum Capital Ventures

Bitcoin Radio

01:28 min | Last month

Interview With John Paul Baric of Aurum Capital Ventures

"Welcome back to reimagine twenty twenty. I'm unocal's joined by. Gp baruch founder and ceo at armed capital ventures. Jp thanks for joining us excited. All right well jp. I'm excited. It's the first time i got to speak to you. So maybe let me and the audience know who you are and how you got into blockchain sure so my name is jimmy very time run or capo. Ventures with his cryptocurrency mining company focus on optimizing stranded energy across the us globe and billy out large-scale mining facilities and then selling hash rate to consumers and building out financial products for institutions to access As an asset class i myself got into cryptocurrency and bitcoin. Back in twenty thirteen. I was a freshman in high school and saw bitcoin was going to change the world so got in started learning a lot about it. Talk to my teachers. Talk to my everyone in my family about it and just happened. You know preaching. Hey bitcoin seventy dollars this things going to change the world. only scarce money and then really just met a bunch of very interesting people on the journey and it's just been working the community building since then That's a little bit about my background and my story and since then i've just been kind of playing around with cryptocurrency mining trading software products in the space never really did any of the ico's but just kind of watch from the sideline and i've seen about the three bubbles now and going into my fourth year

Armed Capital Ventures Unocal Baruch Jimmy United States
Zion Williamson, Lonzo Ball, Pelicans Hold off Donovan Mitchell, Jazz for Win

Get Up!

01:20 min | 2 months ago

Zion Williamson, Lonzo Ball, Pelicans Hold off Donovan Mitchell, Jazz for Win

"We are back on. Get up and jay. Williams made his way to take a look at the game of the night last night. A good one between the jazz. And the pelicans and this one was all about ziad. Look at him. Going right equity go back just constantly challenging rudy gobert. He gets his shot blocked more than any other player in the league. But it doesn't matter because it's going to finish at the rim. He had fifteen points in the third quarter. Zion did look at them continuing here and just taking a straw once again. He loves eternal right shoulder. That's his patented move. Twenty-six ten last night for zion who was really emerging clear in his second season. Well let's take you to where this game is decided thirty seconds ago jazz are down by one. And here's the big sequence. J. will often miss from donovan mitchell. Donovan mitchell mrs baruch. I don't know if i call that over to bat call rudy gobert. That just much taller. But since i did it take another look at it here. That's go bear. He does get called for over the bag. Zion would make too so the pelicans of a three point lead in. Here's the final shot. Not a great look that the utah jazz get off. Zion gets the rebound josh. Hart gets uncontested dunk. And that is all she wrote. The pelicans get the win. One twenty nine one twenty four and again as i on finishing with twenty six points. Ten boards five assists. Joining anthony davis as the only players in new orleans history with game with those numbers before turning twenty one years old. They will play again tomorrow night

Rudy Gobert Zion Ziad Donovan Mitchell Donovan Mitchell Mrs Baruch JAY Williams RIM Utah Jazz Pelicans Hart Josh Anthony Davis New Orleans
Coronavirus Update: WHO investigators discount theory that virus leaked from lab

Mike Gallagher

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Coronavirus Update: WHO investigators discount theory that virus leaked from lab

"Of World Health Organization experts, wrapping up a visit to China to investigate the origins of the coronavirus dismisses speculation that the virus escaped from a government lab and move on you wait shows food safety, an animal diseases expert Peter Ben Am Baruch discounts the theory, Kate was very unlikely that anything could escape from such a place. And we also know that when lab accident happened there, of course extremely rare. China has rejected that possibility On has promoted other theories for the viruses. Origins. Wh O is exploring a scenario that it's more likely to have jumped to humans from an animal.

Peter Ben Am Baruch World Health Organization China Kate
"baruch" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"baruch" Discussed on What It Takes

"In accidental finding with Earth shaking implications Dr Bloomberg and his colleagues quickly developed an antibody test for blood banks so they could screen for hepatitis but when he wrote a paper on it in nineteen sixty seven showing that this hepatitis virus was responsible for liver disease and liver cancer. It was rejected at first by the annals of internal medicine in his memoir he explained quote their reaction was quite understandable. None of us was a virologist we had not been formally trained as epidemiologists nor did we have any special expertise as hepatitis clinicians beyond our ordinary experience as physicians. He goes on. We found the hepatitis virus while we were looking at quite different things. We were outsiders not known to the main body of hepatitis. Investigators some of whom had been pursuing their field of interest for decades and of quote but their work was replicated by other scientists and eventually was accepted more important within a few months Barukh Bloomberg and his colleagues realized they could make a vaccine. The virus formed a lot of Sir. Plus surface molecules called antigens and knows the less dangerous part of the virus could be given to people who had never been exposed to hepatitis so they would develop the antibodies needed to block the more dangerous part of the virus while La. It's a longer story than that. Naturally because the way they made the vaccine was expensive and pharmaceutical companies. Didn't want to get on board but ultimately another way was found to make the vaccine and as I said at the outset it is one of the most important and widely used vaccines in the world. The accidental discovery earned Baruch Blumberg. The one thousand nine hundred seventy six Nobel prize in medicine a look has grown. Everybody's career is no question. I mean you can find a dozen times when he could have gone either way. We're back. With Gertrude Elliott for some final thoughts. She reminded us about that Saturday. She went into burroughs. Wellcome looking for a job when she met. George hitchings who would become her scientific partner for over forty years. That Saturday interview could've been the other Saturday and someone else would have interviewed me But all along the way there I go back and think about it often. And how a particular person who wrote to me and ask for a compound and and I sent it to them made a discovery with it which changed the whole line of what we were doing so You can't you can't do it without luck. I'm sure but I think you have to recognize the luck when you see it and you have to be prepared to pivot if luck comes your way as Baroque Bloomberg did and as Gertrude Elliott. Did and we did. We changed many times. We got into feels that I never expected to be in originally thought cancer was what I was going to do and and it is what I did for the first ten years but then it changed other things. When trudy Elian was working on leukemia example she stumbled on a bit of serendipity the compound she developed to treat acute leukemia in children was something called six mcadoo. Puran and it was super successful at stopping the cancer cells from replicating but then we realized that children weren't cured so we were on the right track but we weren't there yet obviously seemed obvious at the time that we will close because children went into remission for six months year then relapse so then we began to say well what happens to the drug in the body is. There's something we can do to make it better and we'd studied the metabolism of the drought. We found out that a lot of it was destroyed in the body. So we said okay. Let's try and design a compound that will release this in the Leukemia. Cell and not harm the other cells. And maybe it won't be destroyed as readily so I spent several years making derivatives one of these derivatives was as good but not better in Kimia but just at that time somebody who'd written to us for six recapped appearing look at it in the immune response and a rabbit and let us know that it inhibited the immune response so he came and sources said you know you have some compounds. It could be very interesting in the Immune Immune Response. We listened and said okay. We'll set up a screen. That will try to determine whether some of these Andy Leukemia. Compounds have activity on the immune response and low and behold this one compound that I had made which was equivalent in in. Leukemia was better on the immune response. Then out of the blue along comes a young surgeon she told journalists. Gal I can thaw a young surgeon who read the paper about the antibody response in rabbits and says you know. I tried six recapped appearing on kidney transplants and dogs and it really prevented rejection for quite a long time. Do you have anything that might be better? Well we don't know but here take this compound. It looks better in mice so he goes off on a fellowship to the Peter Bent. Brigham Hospital in Boston. Tries it and finds it definitely is better and the next thing you know it's preventing rejection of kidney transplants man. Now I didn't start to make a compound that would do that. But if you listen and you keep your mind open and you say I have a related compound that looks better on the immune response and somebody asks you for it. This is what can happen And this was sort of the story of our lives in a way. Because then we were often the field of kidney transplantation or to immune disease and so on it sounds like Scientists has to be able to get along well with colleagues and have a spirit of team playing absolute otherwise. You're stuck in your own laboratory not getting input absolutely. I think there is no question in my mind that it's a team effort. It's a team effort at the beginning. And it's a team effort all the way through because they're so many aspects of drug development of finding out what the side effects are finding out the best way to give it a finding out any number of things that you can't you can't one person can't do that you could. I suppose if you spend a lifetime on every drug but if you want to work at it I'm in I've always compared it in a way to To walk strep that everybody plays zone instrument very well but it isn't until you put them all together that you have anything but sounds like music..

Leukemia Gertrude Elliott annals of internal medicine Dr Bloomberg Barukh Bloomberg Baroque Bloomberg Andy Leukemia liver disease Baruch Blumberg Nobel prize George hitchings cancer liver cancer La trudy Elian Puran partner Brigham Hospital Kimia
"baruch" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

10:51 min | 1 year ago

"baruch" Discussed on What It Takes

"We're all hanging onto hope for a covert nineteen vaccine or treatment and scientists around the globe are working furiously and collaboratively to bring us one. While in this episode we want to honor to Nobel Prize recipients whose work on viruses lead to vaccines and treatments that have been saving lives millions of lives for decades Gertrude. Elian and Baruch Blumberg. You may not know their names but their discoveries are among the greatest medical achievements of the twentieth century. The vaccine hunters of today are standing on their shoulders. This is what it takes from the Academy of Achievement. I'm Alice Winkler added made. This child is gifted and I heard that enough that I started to believe. If you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity and you don't take it you may never have another it always so clear. It was just like the picture started to form itself was new wing which ally could prevail over the truth darkness over light over life every day. I wake up and decide today. I'm going to love my life decide if they're going to break your leg it's going at play stay out of there. And then in. Long companies differentiate experienced. That you don't look for you. Don't plan for but boy you better not miss them. The answer is there and you've got to hunt for and so the faith is really that there is an answer somewhere and that you can't Just give up. You've got to find it now. There's so many things still to be found and I still have faith they will be found. That's Gertrude or Trudy Elian talking about her work on viruses will meet our other guests Barukh Bloomberg in just a bit Trudy Elian was interviewed by Kademi of achievement in nineteen ninety one and she died in nineteen ninety nine but while I listened to this interview there were moments when I had to remind myself she was not talking about the current pandemic. Here's just one instance. When our interview or Gal I can. Tho asked whether there was any hope of curing viruses. That's difficult there. Are Some viruses? Probably One can cure but mostly if you think about viral diseases. The big successes been back. Saination it was true polio. Smallpox is true of measles when you get a good vaccine and preventing disease. That's the best thing but the next best is if you can prevent the virus from becoming late now the reason it's so hard to cure virus diseases is that the virus may stop multiplying and you can stop it from diplock but it doesn't necessarily go away. It stays dormant in some cell types depending on the virus and comes back. The patient gets elderly. The patient gets sick from some other disease. Patient gets into an emotional state and suddenly this virus reappears and it's true the AIDS virus. It goes and actually integrates into the normal DNA of the cell and until it comes out and tries to reproduce itself. It just sits there. There's not much you can do about it. So you could prevent it from getting there if you could prevent it from integrating if you could kill off every sal in which it was integrated. Maybe you could cure it possum. Nothing is impossible. Sadly we don't have trudy l. e. and join the fight against Cova nineteen. She was born in nineteen eighteen the year of the great flu pandemic and she achieved the near impossible many times in her life. Let's just start with that Nobel prize for medicine in nineteen eighty-eight which she shared with her colleague. George hitchings and British researcher named James Black Elian was only the fifth woman to receive the Nobel and medicine and she had no PhD or medical degree. Also she made her scientific contributions while working for a pharmaceutical company. So highly unusual. It never occurred to her. She could win a Nobel. The Nobel Committee said any one of the life saving medications. She created could've earned her the prize but instead they lauded her more for the approach she took with George hitchings in developing new drugs in approach now referred to as rational drug design in kind if possible lay person's terms. How did that approach differ from the traditional approach of developing drugs while the traditional approach was to take something that worked and to make some changes on it or to take things off the shelf and try them Things that had never been looked at before either natural products or just chemicals. What they were doing in pharmaceutical companies was saying. I want to develop a diabetic. I'm going to test every one of these compounds as a diuretic even though you don't know what the mechanism is well. We didn't do that. I mean we made specific kinds of chemicals with very specific ideas in mind for over four decades trudy Elian and George hitchings examined and compared the biochemistry of viruses parasites bacteria and normal human cells versus cancerous cells. Ms Ellen focused her work on pure enes a of chemicals that are building blocks of DNA and RNA in those early years they didn't even know the structure of DNA. That would come later from Watson and Crick but their hypothesis was that you could manipulate. Puran's in such a way as to stop. Dna production in other words. Stop certain cells from growing it worked treaty. Elian was able to stop leukemia in its tracks but it was too toxic to patients so ms. Elian did experiments exploring the metabolism of the compound. She created to come up with a better one she tweaked she subbed a sulfur in for an oxygen and finally she arrived at a drug that still commonly used today in the cure for childhood leukemia. And we learned a lot about biochemistry. With these compounds we learn some of the pathways that existed but which we hadn't really identified before so the the compounds themselves ended up being tools for discovery as well as ends in themselves and then. I think is one of the most important things about discovering new drugs is to let the drug league you to the the answer of that nature is trying to hide from you and we were able to deduce that certain enzymes existed. Even we didn't have a name for them and then these enzymes were discovered and it was this wonderful feeling of there it is it was there. We knew it was there now. It has a name. Here are some of the diseases. That met their match in Trudy Elian Leukemia as we've heard but also malaria lupus hepatitis. Arthritis gout herpes. She also developed the first immune. Suppressing drug used to prevent tissue rejection in transplant. Recipients that one transformed the world of kidney transplantation and late in life the colleagues who trained under her identified the first successful HIV AIDS drug act. But here's a near impossible. Feat that Trudy elion achieved much earlier in life. She became a biochemist period. Not An easy task for a woman in her era but starting when she was fifteen she had only one goal to cure disease. I liked everything in school. I I enjoyed learning things but I had no specific bent toward science until a grandfather who died that summer of stomach cancer and I was very close to him because he came over from Europe when I was about three years old and slid live drake close to us and used to take me to the park and tell me stories and when my brother was born about two years later he spent more time with me while my mother was busy with the baby and so we got to be very close and And also I watched him die essentially in the hospital and it made a terrific impression on me. I decided that nobody should suffer that much. Of course a lot of people watch a loved one die of cancer but most do not go on to dedicate their lives to science. It was a critical time in my life when this happened because I was just leaving high school. Having to make some sort of decision what my future would be and it. Was you know it was so dramatic? Then made such an impression at that critical moment if it had happened earlier. Perhaps it wouldn't have trudy Elian says. She knew she needed to study either. Biology or chemistry when she thought about dissecting animals though she chose the chemistry PAF Madame Curie was a great inspiration to her but when Gail I can Tho Astor who inspired her the most. The answer was simple her mother because she was a housewife. She had no higher education but had the most common sense of anyone I knew and wanted for me to have a career and so she was always very supportive at a time when many other I think women of her generation would not have been She also was a self taught person..

Trudy Elian George hitchings James Black Elian Nobel prize Elian Gertrude ms. Elian virus diseases Academy of Achievement trudy l. Trudy elion Alice Winkler Baruch Blumberg Smallpox Nobel Committee polio leukemia Madame Curie Europe HIV
"baruch" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

12:24 min | 1 year ago

"baruch" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"Hello and welcome to speaking of psychology. A biweekly podcast. From the American can psychological association that explores the connections between psychological science and everyday life. I'm your host Caitlyn Luna fear about the corona virus has gripped gripped the world as I speak more than six hundred people have died from the virus and more than thirty one. Thousand people have become sick. That's according to the World Health Organization. Nearly we all cases have been in China but that hasn't stopped people in other countries from worrying here in the US. A dozen or so people have become ill so far while this new illness certainly is frightening and needs attention. It's important to note that far more people die from illness. That's all too familiar. The seasonal flu an estimated ten thousand people have died from it this year in in the US according to the Centers for Disease Control and nineteen million have become thickened. Why are we so afraid of this novel Corona Virus when we are much more likely to catch the flu our guest for this episode? We'll explain why we worry about new risks more than familiar ones how to commerce. And what are the psychological effects of being quarantine which is what is happening to some some people who've been exposed to this new bug. Dr Brooke Fish off as a professor at Carnegie Mellon University and an expert on public perception of risk and human judgment and decision and making. Welcome Dr Fish Off. Thank you for having me. Thank you and APA for taking on this issue absolutely. We're happy to have you here today. Dr Fish Office I just shared shared. We know that the seasonal flu has sickened and killed way more people in the US than this novel Corona Virus. But can you explain why Americans are fearful of this new virus. That's out there. Well we don't really know how fearful Americans are. There is no systematic research as far as I know so I can only answer based on my own observations and experience with other Health health pro pandemic some of which I had an opportunity to to work on the difference or a major difference difference between seasonal flu and Corona virus or other pandemics is that we understand seasonal flu very well In fact I were part of a project objects onto by. CDC trying to get our predictions of seasonal flu even more accurate whereas with corona virus. We don't know where it's it's going doing. So the fact that we have had no decimate the United States as yet Is a weakened is only a week indicator of what the problem is going to be and and what that projection will depend on two things that public health officials are still investigating one is how transmissible missile the viruses among people who are ace of the Matic and second how effective our our Public Health measures will be. How can people manage their anxiety about about this? I mean you see all these new stories information social media. It's hard not to get wrapped up in being worried about it so if you're here in the US run a country country. That's not severely impacted like China. How can you manager anxiety around around this novel? Virus the most useful thing that people can do at at this stage is to find some trusted sources of information like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the World Health Organization or some of our major media And just stick to them for information and that will They're professionals they do the best job they can of gathering and communicating the The information that will also Protect you from From the irresponsible the rumor mongers the people for using this as an opportunity to to sell things or to inflame racial hatred or ethnic hatred. So I think find a few good sources of information if they tell you that the that the virus is still is still remote and they give you confident that our public health officials have the resources and the freedom to deal with this under professional professional way than you can afford to monitor until they tell you a something else you want to touch a little more about how the rule of racism xenophobia. And all this I mean I recall some similar panic about SARS Avian. Flu outbreaks aches and just a few years ago. We were in panic mode about Ebola which originated in Africa. So why do you think that plays into all how people reacting and these like you said the rumors you might fall all pray to that sort of thing when a health problem like Ebola or corona virus comes from abroad we have poorer information about it than we do. Do about health problems in this in this country Often foreign places have poorer surveillance capabilities. So they just gather other Were information sometimes. They have authoritarian regimes. Who suppressed the information? So we have greater uncertainty about things that come from places with poor core it. Poor Info information We also are vulnerable to people who have other axes to grind seizing On this situation as a way to as an opportunity to inflame xenophobia fear of of other ethnic groups and you know we as individuals need to be above that and we need expect our leaders to to calm them to calm any of those fears at the stand up for people people who are being unjustly justly criticized. I was my university Carnegie Mellon I give our leadership a lot of credit. They've been on top of this issue from from from the very very beginning today provided a psychological support and practical support for for people who've come back from China during the in China during the winter winter break and might have a slightly higher probability of being being affected so ethnically did that kind of leadership throughout the country in. Why do you think we are more afraid of something? We don't know them. We are of something we know I mean I think if as I say that I'm sort of like okay. See why people are worried about something they don't know but can you get into the psychological reasons why this is the case. Well putting on my risk analyst hat I would say we have a poor understanding of do viruses than we have old viruses. The course of seasonal seasonal flu is pretty well predicted. We're part of a project sponsored by. CDC that getting those predictions even better whereas with corona virus We don't know where it's capable of going if you follow the public health literature. There's a vigorous debate about the effectiveness. The kind of quarantines that our country of the United States has vigorous debate about whether the virus is transmissible when People Ra symptomatic. If that's the case then it's going to be harder to a harder to to control it And there's a lot of concern circle legitimate concern about the public health officials about how how much has in how widely the disease was spread during the a period in which the Chinese public health officials did not respond to a effectively part because of their political L. A. Regime. Do you think some of the reactions we've seen. I'm talking about. Americans being evacuated from China canceling flights to and from China. The State Department has issued a travel warning against people going to China as well. Do you think those are warranted in this in this time. We're in right now where there's a lot we don't understand about out corona virus. I would hope that those decisions are made on public health grounds rather than Rather than political grounds sometimes is leaders will do dramatic things in order to present themselves as As views leaders in ways that are are are are ineffective so the research on quarantines is that they're often ineffective unless they're accompanied by I strong support for the people whose lives have been interrupted by the quarantine that is they need material support if they're not able to work and and living paycheck to paycheck or Gig to gig somebody needs. They need help in doing that. They needed to be treated respectfully if individuals of fear that they're being Not treated well or countries feel as though they're not treated well people will You you know will get around the vaccines or set a higher threshold for saying you know. I'm not feeling so. Well maybe I'm going to go into quarantine ourselves there's also risk if we rely on on quarantines that it will we will have opportunity costs of not doing other things that That that are more effective than we feel that this takes care of the care of the the problem you know as you may know There in the last two or three years. There's ever been a substantial cutbacks and in the US ability Capability for surveillance for for pandemics A global health was A demoted in its importance on the national security Council so if we are providing those those were relying on quarantines and not providing our public health officials with the resources and autonomy that that they need We the You know we may be creating problems down the road. And what about the shutting down of the Chinese city of Wuhan which is the Ground Zero four zero for the krona the virus what kind of psychological effects that have on the citizens when often. Here's a claim that people are panicking. The people who study panic more psycho sociologist allergists than than psychologist find that actual panics rare. You will see them more in movies and you actually see them in real life than under crisis situations Jewish people typically rally around one another. They support one another. They Act to the act at bravely You can disrupt that if you Deprive people of the opportunity to act in a coordinated way like if there are no trusted sources of information formation than you get more less coordinated information I think the tragic situation of the people in Wuhan are are are experiencing is is a result of of A. I guess a political regime that didn't allow public health people to do their work. And then the problem got out of got out of control and then the in these draconian measures. There's were Either way we're implemented Ed you'd have to ask a an epidemiologist is just how fictive this is likely to be in. And what is the problem of the. I've seen an estimate of five million people who left Wuhan during the time in which the the The response was was paralyzed. Even they laughed and then to talking about getting out of the city limits. That's right they left. They left the city and some of them are out there and some of them are ill. Hope the very few of them are are sick and that they're able to get better health care than they are in the people in Wuhan have who who from what I understand that their local health officials just don't have the surge capacity the handle a pandemic so people who are are sick go from hospital to hospital and being unable to be treated people who are sick with things other than Than Than Kuroda a virus but are uncertain maybe going to places where they're exposing themselves either to that or or or or to or to other things so that's a reflection shen of public health system. That's been under under resourced. If you things that you would wonder about you know I would wonder about in this country is is you know..

United States China CDC Flu World Health Organization Wuhan psychological science Caitlyn Luna Carnegie Mellon University Africa Dr Fish Office Dr Brooke Fish APA State Department Ed analyst professor hospital to hospital
Groups sue U.S. to stop deportation hearings by videoconference in New York

The Takeaway

04:02 min | 2 years ago

Groups sue U.S. to stop deportation hearings by videoconference in New York

"In June of last year, immigration and customs enforcement New York field office made an announcement. It would no longer take detained migrants to court hearings in person. Instead it would hold hearings exclusively through video-teleconferences on Tuesday. The Brooklyn defender services and other legal organizations filed a class action lawsuit against ice challenging this move. Joining me in our studios is Andrea science an attorney with the New York immigrant family unity project at Brooklyn defender services. They provide free lawyers to detained low income immigrants. Thanks for being with us. Andrea thank you for having me. So can you tell us why you filed this lawsuit? What's wrong with hearings by teleconference? So what's happening? Now is that instead of in years prior where our clients were sitting next to us at these hearings that determine whether or not they're going to be free going to be back with their families are going to be. Deported to a country where they possibly face persecution or harm. They are being beamed in by television show, and it's simply not a fair hearing is the bottom line. They are not giving given the opportunity to fully participate in their hearings to communicate with our council to see the evidence against them. And we think it's fundamentally wrong and unfair for the most important person in the hearing to be the only one who's not in the room for people who don't know how it works. Can you explain how it's used and how much now what's happening right now at Baruch is that every single hearing is being done by video. So it's not just for a routine scheduling conference, you know, come back next month. All the here's a smiling deadline people are appearing by video further. Bond hearings were they're being asked to testify for their own freedom for hearings were were determining whether they're mentally competent enough to even understand what the hearing is about. And most importantly for hearings that are about their entire defense to remove all including whether they can stay permanently with their families or whether they have a case for asylum. So every single. Kind of hearing is being done on video, and what's the justification for why the are using video teleconferencing? Well, the agency has told us a couple of different things they've told us that they had to do. So for security purposes, there's been protested Eric in the past and that has not stopped the production of people safely to court. And they've also basically told us that it's efficient, and we think that due process is more important than efficiency. And that in fact, as we explain the lawsuit we've had enormous inefficiencies from this policy because the technology has been so problematic that we've had to adjourn hearing after hearing, can you give us an examples to tell us how you've seen this practice play out with with your clients. Sure. I think there's a couple of different categories of how this has hurt our clients. The first is that they are in detention for a really long time where we can't hold their hearing properly. The government has maintained that this is a fish. I'm actually the opposite has happened where we've had days where the hearing couldn't even start because we couldn't connect by video. We couldn't get the interpreter online or. Something happened during the hearing where we needed to ask our client. What do you think you look at this evidence? What we need to take a decision in this moment, but we can't confidentially speak to our client in that moment. So we have to adjourn the entire hearing. And then drive out to jail the next day and talk to them and come back and do it. So we've had clients who had to sit in detention for another two or three months because of what happened in the hearing that's one category. And then when we go and see them we've had dozens of clients tell us, I don't know what happened. Can you? Explain it to me. I couldn't hear I didn't understand what the judge said. And the other category is just that we think that the judges aren't able to assess our clients credibility, or what's really going on with them over a screen and the complaint talks about some of those clients in the lawsuit, including a client who had to talk about his sexual orientation over a video in a situation where he didn't feel like it was confidential, and you can imagine how that affects your -bility to tell your story in another client who had serious, cognitive, limitations and sobbed. Uncontrollably during his hearing, and we couldn't finish the hearing in time and it got adjourned. And in the end, the judge denied both of those cases, and we feel like

Brooklyn New York Andrea Attorney Government Baruch Eric Three Months
"baruch" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I worked at a trading company wants, and you know, if you built trading software, you really don't want to make a big mistake. Like if you make a big mistake in building the trading software. Maybe the traders think that they're trading in a certain way and the software is actually not doing what they think and you end up losing a bunch of money in the company goes bankrupt, and that's really problematic. So you would think okay. That's great. So we'll write tons of unit tests for you know, if I if I want to execute this kind of trade will just right tons of unit tests and make sure that all the corner cases and whatnot work. That's actually really hard to do. Because a trade is can have can have so many different parameters. You've got these different kinds of securities. And then maybe you want to set up a trade to work in a way where it only executes if this other trade, actually execute and there's. So many different corner cases. And we you know, we did right unit tests, but it made me suspicious of the whole unit testing process. And so there what I mean there was manual testing as well. So you had this combination of unit testing a manual testing. But even the premise that you could move to a world where you only have automated testing where you're not testing in the wild. Or you're not testing with a manual review process. I was very suspicious of that idea. And I remain very suspicious of it. Because our software deals with such a variety of inputs that it's just not possible to test a in an automated fashion. So I I like I like the idea of let's actually it because we're acknowledging that we can't test everything let's really improve the rollback process up -solutely. And specially when we are talking about trading where every Nana second counts because you can lose millions in those nanoseconds releasing a pitch with our it's a new fee. Leaks or it is something that we think that was deployed yesterday is not fast enough. And this is where local or Oba consume portent. But going back to the fact that we cannot trust our unit tests in in particular and automatic tests in general these brings back the people that judge dismissed twenty minutes ago, when we spoke about okay, let's go to mate everything, and there will be no manual QA. Actually. Now, we come back to the very very rare, very important skills that those manual tests have and these sees unique understanding of the business domain, and how this business domain can be tested doesn't mean that we want them to go and click through our user interfaces. I'd say we can put their unique knowledge into better use it. And that's in design of automatic tests in that way. That we can build a trust that we spoke with. So those people not only they are not going away. They actually getting promoted to actually much more important much more sophisticated and much more pleasant jobs of a thinking about the design of testing instead of going through and clicking buttons. Okay. So we have painted a kind of bleak picture for people who are listening. Who are you know, we we set them up with this idealized world of liquid software that maybe they can get to some day. But then we've sort of dashed their fears by telling them all the ways in which this is, you know, it's not possible to it. First of all, it's it's it's you know, you shouldn't be doing manual QA. But then we've just given a reason why you should be doing manual QA. But Emmanuel QA is a perfect example of something that completely slows down your released process. So you're at Jay frog, which is a company that's focused on. Alleviating these kinds of problems I've talked to countless continuous. Delivery software providers, countless monitoring companies cloud providers, and there is all of this software that people are building that are alleviating different parts of this problem. Talking to somebody later today about service functions and I've done a bunch of shows about that. So that kind of gets at the smaller compose ability. There are lots of different ways to tackle the small components of this refractory this movement towards liquid software. What are the things that Jay frog is focused on? So was our products..

Jay frog Nana twenty minutes
"baruch" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:46 min | 2 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Solution as your as it may sound is actually releasing more and releasing foster. Because if eats Spain ful, do it more would it in Jim we should do the work because well when we automate when repeat when we continuously improve we will get better, and it's not just you know, kind of. Ideal sheepish mantra, we actually have proof and the most profound proof is latest accelerates that state of DevOps report from Dora institute, and that's a report by Dr Nicole forest, green, just humble and Gyaincain all of them are obviously people that we know entrust and the issue lists reported state of DevOps report every year and in the latest edition, which was released. I think couple of months ago, there is very profound finding and this finding is not only there is no reverse correlation between the frequency over over leases and quality the resumes direct correlation between the frequency of release the quality the more you release the higher your quality gets that is very well said, and if you think about it some examples of. Of frequent releases where the software just improves over time. And there's no manual updates. So e c two for example, as far as I know, you don't have to manually update it I like it just gets patched for you. Or you know, if not I haven't spun up an EC two instance in a while, I've never managed a big as easy to set of instances, but like ECS or Amazon's AWS Lambda API or if I'm using my Google home. I have no idea. What version my Google home is on? But it always gets better and win. It gets worse. It gets better in a couple of days like they figure it out because they have good observability around, you know, user sessions, and they can detect anomalies in if a if a user stops using it, they know. Okay. We did we rolled out something that was our us. And so they just push it out to you because they know it's an improvement. It's not like the IRS operating system where oh it's kind of an improvement. But BA, but actually it drains your battery life twice as fast. And because they want to put the onus on the user in that case to install this software that bricks your phone, so all those all those are exactly the examples of liquid soft or or please oldies getting that, and I was very puzzled with this anomaly, how calms that when you remove mental QA, you actually get better quality, and in the support in the door state of the reports there is a great diagram that now goes directly into all of my my content, which is called the j curve of transformation and on this j curve, there are number of states. First of all, Tim begin turns formation in identify queens, and they move towards liquid soft certain foster development cycles, and then ultimately helps to actually go foster, but then quality Plumbly because suddenly we do less mental checks, and we realize that. We start automating gate, and we can actually get better quality by performing better ultimate checks, which will run foster. So that means that we can do more of them. And this is how we provide better quality. And this is J curve transformation is very powerful makes a lot of sense..

Google Spain Dora institute Dr Nicole forest Jim Amazon IRS Tim Plumbly
"baruch" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"There are a couple engineers. I've talked to at major internet companies who have said recently that there is maybe an overaggressive move towards breaking down the monolith. So some of the most the most highly regarded engineer organizations like Facebook and Google I know to some degree manage their software as a mono repo. It's not exactly Mike. It's not. It's not a monolith. But it's a mono repo. And I've heard that there is some simplicity that can be gained through having some centralization of infrastructure. Have you talked to anybody who is advocating for more monolithic, more centralization? Is there a counter argument that you hold in esteem? Yes. So Mona report is as you mentioned, not exactly. And and of course, Microsoft Office is bringing enormous. Complexity into the system specially when we're talking about interoperability between the micro services when there are on different versions and specially when data is involved which might be on on different versions as well. And and Munnelly doesn't have that problem. It has a bunch of other problems that not this one and heaven Dimona ripple is one thing and delivering software in smaller pieces. It's another it is harder to do the right thing when you need to send smaller chunks of software constantly. And of course, there are issues with a how to update properly how to rollback properly how to build those op dates to be transparent to the users and end, of course, you know, just declaring UK continuous update. And that just happened. This is not realistic. Our Buca among other things go. Oh into good level of Italy's ation and good mound of helpful tips about how to manage this complexity. The comms always constantly updating different parts of your software. Right. So in speaking about those different parts of software infrastructure at a legacy enterprise. Big legacy enterprise is generally not looking at things the same way that Google or Facebook could because Google or Facebook has effectively unlimited engineering resources, not not truly unlimited engineering resources. But a legacy enterprise is more. Like, they've got some engineers the engineers are specialized in certain things, maybe some of them are highly specialized and how to operate some older systems. And so you're you're you're not dealing with the same kind of engineering workforce. And so you don't exactly have the same capability of just moving your architecture in whatever direction you want to you are kind of restraint. Reigned by the legacy of what applicastions you have around. You have prince proprietary CMS you've got, you know, maybe your operating out of a non data center. And that's you know, that's just the way things are you're not going to be able to throw away that and move to the cloud instantly. You've got all these different things you've gotten mobile apps, you've got internal web apps. You've got legacy dashboards. So for somebody who's in an enterprise like this or who has just entered enterprise. Maybe somebody listening is a new grad and they've just entered into an insurance company and they're doing technology insurance company. That's eighty years old, and they have no idea how to handle this modernization process. It can be really intimidating. What are some general principles for how to approach this wide array of software that is not getting released as easily the rollout process is not as smooth? There's a lot of pain. What are some general things to keep in mind to make steady progress in making that software more? Liquid? So I think we need to keep in mind. What is the goal of going liquid? And what we try to do is actually released foster more and more reliable and was higher quality. And it is a tradeoff like everything in life when you have some coffee supplication that leads us the once a month and generally does its job pretty well. And gets updated wanting three years, I'm not sure if that's your next MiG ration- to the liquid soft should be right because it's all a matter of as you mentioned, the res Phoenix amount often Janine force that that really need to do the right thing. And I'm not sure this is the first thing that they should invest in. So what's the prioritization process? I'm the CTO. I'm looking out at a vast quantity of things that I could ref- actor and. And then I've got a feature backlog of ten thousand different things that the product management team wants me to implement. How do I direct my engineering resources? So I truly believe that everything starts with the business volume. This is why we are in the industry..

Facebook Google Mike engineer Microsoft Munnelly UK Mona CTO Italy Janine eighty years three years
Donald Trump, Trump and Obama discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

04:14 min | 2 years ago

Donald Trump, Trump and Obama discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"But one of the moments are really still to me was Connie tried explaining what he finds so appealing about Trump my dad and my boss separated. So I didn't have a lot of male energy in my home and also. American family. No Jeep doing youthful though, but there's a time. You know something about. Love love everyone, right? But the campaign I would just didn't make me feel good guy that didn't get to see my dad all the time, like a guy that played catch with his son. It was something about when I put his hat off and make you feel like superman you made a superman that was, that's my favorite superhero. And you make a superman Cape for me also as the guy that looks up to you lose up to wrap around lives up to Baruch, industry guys, critical, no bullsh- with the beep on it. Have you wanna do it five, six delay and just goes eight hits done. Try make some sense of what are we saw today, dry Britney. Cooper, author of elephant rage, a black feminist discovers her superpower, Jilani Cobb, staff writer for the New Yorker, and I'll certainly pretty, I actually thought that one minute summation of feeling emasculated and feeling under threat about one's masculinity and finding an projecting Hillary Clinton because of a choosing. Donald Trump was like assessing to articulate. For the motives of millions of voters as you will find. Absolutely. So you know, there's so many things going on here, but you know, he's playing from the patriarchal playbook of Trump and basically he sat in the Oval Office today and said, who's my daddy trumps my daddy and look. He's actually not the first politician in recent years to make this argument that black men since father loss our fatherland drives policy rock. Obama also did this a lot. But what what I think is doing or thinks he's doing is actually setting himself up for presidential run. Using Trump's playbook, he's making a media spectacle of himself. He's trying to play on black moon's emotions and thirteen percent of black men supported Trump. So he's trying to say that we're putting black families back intact by putting fathers back in the center of the story. It's all trash. We should reject all of it, but I felt really triggered in this cavenaugh Cosby moment about our. Inability to think about the function of patriarchy, right? It's it's a clunky word and so we keep on leaving it out of the discussion. But this is about male domination. This is about the ways that they were explicitly bought over. Literally black men have there are many black men who who cannot get onboard with a full black liberation plan or liberation for all people because they want the kind of power that white men have. And so- communist model that first today he said, look, this is what I, what I aspire to is to be Donald Trump and any black person who is being honest, will tell you that it's not just white communities are Republicans haven't Trump problem. We have a Trump problem in black communities too. One of the things that's instructive is that less Atta conversation with historian Timothy Snyder and philosopher Jason Stanley. We're talking about fascism and one of the things that most salient things do found authoritarian regimes across the board was this leader as paternity figure and the fun father father figure of the state? Exactly. And so listening to Conde articulate that was really kind of shocking and frightening in this particular way. And of course, it's not unusual. We know that this is the dynamic that's happening, but it is still nonetheless striking when you hear it so succinctly articulated and Brittany's point of saying that Kanye west wants to run for president. I remember a time when we would laugh at something like that and say was awful, but now we're in such a bizarre twilight zone kind of reality. The cool knows what actually could happen in this country. And also to your point about the sort of fascism or authoritarianism like those are just strikes me to county likes the aesthetics of it, like he's very explicit that like I liked

Donald Trump Barack Obama Jilani Cobb Connie Hillary Clinton Baruch Brittany Cavenaugh Cosby Conde Britney Oval Office Cooper Kanye President Trump Staff Writer Atta Jason Stanley Timothy Snyder
"baruch" Discussed on Big Brown Breakdown

Big Brown Breakdown

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on Big Brown Breakdown

"It came with bacon inside. That sounds good. That shit. You don't make this place different kind of all that the place was packed a throwback in a shirt, but then the line, there's like tons of people waiting this cops. There's everyone you don't wanna be like, oh, you know, you're next on the shuffled do it sounds like you know, fuck it, I wanted to share, but fuck it. I don't wanna hold the lineup. Everyone was star. Having my mouth watering WikiLeaks got impact now, but this is what makes my replaces different mean all around on this comedy journey. I've had barbecue everywhere because I'm fat. And the thing that makes all these place different. The brisket you good. This place might be a little better. A little more tender ribs is usually the kind of the game changer. Can you tell on ribs of falls off the bones? Nice and moist. Pork. Fuck you port. Same everywhere. You go chicken, get the fuck out of my face sausage, get the fuck in my face. So some just cancel each other out. But the one thing that separates all these places the sauce, the sauce baby. It's the sauce. Like you went to place called off off the bone, highly recommended it. People had great ratings reviews. It was good. My mouth is wanting the only had one type of sauce, and it's too vinegary. It's one. There's like like kind of almost a sour. Nigger barbecue. You liked that idea drives me nuts like a smoky sweet sauce, bro. And the con- loud had that. And it was delicious. It was fuck into is worth the wait. I didn't think it would be. It was worth the wait. Now take says, great Baruch, college, top three I've ever had giving it some hate for this, but you know the best Mark you have ever had..

Baruch WikiLeaks
"baruch" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Know we we didn't specifically ask why a couple of things in our our survey did that bike suggests y you you would see that age difference one of the differences that we saw was that that um uh people who had health insurance experienced less stress or people who didn't have insurance or were uninsured experience more stress and we know that younger people tend not to be insured uh real in relation to older individuals um so that may be explaining part of the the difference um and so um uh you know that finding was was quite interesting i also you know saw the chart on the income regardless of the income below fifty thousand over 50000 they were within were then viewpoints of each other that they were stressed out about the cost of insurance uncertainty about the future changes to healthcare policy cost of medications that's a huge when cost medications and then the medical bills europe about would surprising to us as well that uh americans who are below the median income of fifty thousand and above the median income of fifty thousand experience stress around health care in incomparable way mm m e also touched on obd races and and how their stressed by healthcare and you say that hispanics are most likely to be stressed by healthcare there at the top of the list baruch europe a profitable looked at again that may be because we have higher rate of people who are uninsured and unity so generally speaking our survey looked at stress broadly find fed african americans will latinos have the highest levels of stress on this particular issue though we saw a much higher levels of stress for the i'll latino community them for the african american community you know something else to in and you you you pair this together uh whether you're concerned about yourself or your loved ones in i think a lot of us are concerned about our loved ones whether they are of the younger kids like i have a 30yearold whose uninsured and he doesn't want to get insurance i cannot talk him into it a you know right right right and i think that speaks to the issue that we we were just talking about a higher proportion of younger people in fact are uninsured.

baruch europe
"baruch" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"You'll find out why let's go to sarah she's in new mexico sara you're on free talk live with ian and will bharti dr baruch right we are what we might get the death penalty back here in new mexico soon to get one thing what was the death penalty that's bad you sound excited about that i i don't think zeroes in favor of the death penalty i'm going to go out and make that prediction sara go ahead whether the reason is because the the democratic uh governor that's more than likely to win a breach him she wants the death penalty back to hughes the democratic candidate running for governor logistical the people who support the death penalty are authoritarians across the board whether they be democrat or republicans but what do you think about it sarah what do you think about the death penalty i mean right i work back because uh st kilda we murder seventy people appear an abacus stop murdering people i am not killing killed people that sounds like you win and killed somebody you you in a group of people were killed seventy people and that's not there's not a good pass that ever killed one person but i'm just saying art beatty the murder way but worth twenty years ago so our border wall while you were but you're right i'm so i'm shocked zero i thought you were compassionate person i thought.

mexico hughes beatty ian bharti dr baruch sarah murder twenty years
"baruch" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Build his legacy she's in legacy building mode she doesn't have to worry about the implications of her remarks for months to come right said this is the time she's most free to say what she feels what she believes and what she wants the message to be for the public i think what surprises and upsets people most often is that first lady's give more public remarks and vice president and that's been true over the last three administrations she wrote reid appeared on breathed bartsch radio with host alexandra marlow i love how michelle obama says baruch was successful in inspiring hope in the nation then why do you think we just voted trump pen michelle obama you have world fame protection for life and five houses and no hope see a doctor unita antidepressants so michelle is out there claiming that we are all racist and with trump taking the white house the nation is emma state of hopelessness this coming from someone who said she was never proud of america and tell her muslim racists pathetic husband was elected hey lady i hate to break it to you but your husband has destroyed america and has left the entire planet in a complete state of chaos the only reason he was elected is because he is black let us know what you think about this in the comments below and be sure to share this to all your family and friends god bless together we will make america great again.

vice president reid alexandra marlow baruch michelle obama america michelle emma state
"baruch" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Build his legacy she's in legacy building mode she doesn't have to worry about the implications of her remarks for months to come right said this is the time she's most free to say what she feels what she believes and what she wants the message to be for the public i think what surprises and upsets people most often is that first lady's give more public remarks and vice president and that's been true over the last three administrations she wrote reid appeared on breathed bartsch radio with host alexandra marlow i love how michelle obama says baruch was successful in inspiring hope in the nation then why do you think we just voted trump pen michelle obama you have world fame protection for life and five houses and no hope see a doctor unita antidepressants so michelle is out there claiming that we are all racist and with trump taking the white house the nation is emma state of hopelessness this coming from someone who said she was never proud of america and tell her muslim racists pathetic husband was elected hey lady i hate to break it to you but your husband has destroyed america and has left the entire planet in a complete state of chaos the only reason he was elected is because he is black let us know what you think about this in the comments below and be sure to share this to all your family and friends god bless together we will make america great again.

vice president reid alexandra marlow baruch michelle obama america michelle emma state
"baruch" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Wsb this is atlanta's morning news and here's marcy williams judd hickinbotham happening now cobb police search for two suspects who shot at a police officer during a traffic stop a mabel tim the officer was not hit he pulled over vehicle to gas station on veterans memorial highway route one thirty this morning as the officer approached the car one of the men inside fired several shots of vehicle took off it was found abandoned on venetian way a police dog picked up a scent of the suspects but lost at the new from overnight wsb's richard sangster reports live two men credits seat belts for saving their lives and a hit and run wreck on roswell road richard gardner could have been riddled baruch for the guy who bar fenway and the man driving uber survived it ron recommend aggression arague wall road at went group awkward because they were wearing info openly kogo were up next month no uh the june going phobia friendly is convinced without seatbelts both men would have gone through the windshield or worse a friend of send lead driving in some of them chased the woman who blew through the web whiten hit the man and woman eventually returned to the scene of iraq she was arrested reporting live from sandy springs richard sangster wsb the reward grows to thirty three thousand dollars to find the robber who murdered a manager at barcelona wine bar most of that money was raised her private donation which holds one of the three suspects robbed the rest one a rut restaurant on how low road shot twenty nine year old chelsea bellere after she opened the safe for them anymore with a tips contact crime stoppers the trump administration points to.

atlanta marcy williams police search officer richard gardner baruch fenway iraq richard sangster chelsea bellere cobb ron barcelona wine thirty three thousand dollars twenty nine year
"baruch" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"His business dealings inch in president trump's past linked business dealings before coming to the white house that he be also help shed some light at that his concerns about people peeking into our poking his financial dealings slow i think one of the concerning things about president trump's business histories that he has consorted at times over the years with career criminals most famously with felix eight of the baruch rock group they built the soho the trump soho together cedar had organized crime ties he served time in prison for fraud our for assault and i think there's always been this question of why the present entered into these relationships so readily in easy explanations people put cash and the table and he was always willing to be stirred by the opportunity of easy money we've also talked about a lot of traditional big banks who would refuse to lend money remember he when he went almost went personally bankrupt in the early 1990s and he left several of the biggest moneyspinner under banks in the united states on the hook for about three point four to three point six billion dollars most of which he didn't repay and he became a pariah among the big banks after that actually the only major bank the dealt with him from the mid nineties on was deutsche bank bite other than that he and he wasn't able to get money from big banks and when your real estate developer that's something of the death sentence because as you know big banks reliant commercial lending was speaking of that jared kushner has a big and kushner family has a building here in new york and we've seen his inability and problems is trying to get financing for that right it's sort of interesting when you're have that kind of plays into swell it says i think it's another leg of what moller's from we know that mothers looking at a jared kushner's solicitations to unban other chinese 'financiers others a question of of.

trump fraud assault united states real estate developer new york moller jared kushner president felix baruch rock deutsche bank six billion dollars
"baruch" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And for being with us this morning you've cooled full competence and coherence in government always saying that now over this whole brexit the drama playing out the tweet theresa may on boris johnson good morning market and i think what we need in from all of our color of government or those of the opposition gave that coherent than that competent nothing but a lot of business the telling article v k is not fit in great evident than rate greek to are very strong requests you know the government but mercury all of the party at a time of great convict in a time of great king for the baruch we'll be working collected rick and ring data so important to other coming away yeah as an if businesses across the uk a getting a tool in patient wave the division at the heart of that british politics how is that showing up concretely in the decisions that making own investment on spending on hiring is it showing up yet well i mean still early day therapy the new evidence tomorrow off the briton talking to all in the smaller businesses are going to go ahead because they are less dependent on political correctness and on brexit' a bear number roger that mrs puts are all going back now i'm looking for clarity we knew everything we can to ensure that they get that cleric he'd be over the breakfast or over domestic economic environment which is also hugely important we get the bat brexit you in the world and they will not heeded or less we've got the better the next environment in the uk herbert nurkic to grow grit and make the investment that you mentioned adam is the party of business in the united kingdom at the moment we all seen this breaks at standoff within the tory party which is really clouding the outlook at the same time you were also critical of the labour policy and what happened to the.

theresa baruch uk herbert nurkic adam the outlook boris johnson coherent rick
"baruch" Discussed on Bon Appetit Foodcast

Bon Appetit Foodcast

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on Bon Appetit Foodcast

"Yeah or vinegary sauce the meat is rich in saudi a maid's bows on the other night with a friend uh any of this big glaze christie pork soldier in you want some kimchi or that ginger skauen thing you need something to cut through that fat artery with with acid is a tip is acid more that's something more that's usually added after the fact actors from his cook did give it a little zip and a little zingg yeah i i sort of break it down and recouping in kind of cute kind of ashford furthers baruch the basic sort of cooking our foods that we add in pill long hooked foods or earlier on and cooking things like wine um or maybe a vinegar that you might put into i don't know like a are you know when you're making karni tests and they squeezes uh seville orange in cut breeze earlier at the at the beginning and then when you sit down ear cremedas taco you also put all the condiments on top and so you're getting sort of these cooking acids that are layered in early whenever you're making a i don't know boania they saw you put wine in there and tomatoes at the beginning and then a lot of times you'll put parmesan on right at the end so you're getting sort of these two hits you're getting the the longterm acid that has time to sort of metabolize into your dish and soften and become part of the foundation of the flavor and then you use the garnishing acids which is to me like the most exciting ingredients in my life are those garnishing acids things like i st yogurt i grew up putting yogurt on everything so like yogurt or cheese or that little bit of parmesan the put on top of something the hot sauce hot sauce is almost always being based in vinegar or something fermented you know uh pickles sour cream all of those things um they provide a little acid and that's what makes a big difference you know like this.

baruch
"baruch" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

02:18 min | 4 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"And eight hundred seven seven wobbled you five we'll keep you updated on the oj hearing i got a tweet that said 'cause we were talked about chester benefit from lincoln park committing suicide i got a tweet and he said the the guy said that chester benhington was best friends with chris cornell and that today was chris cornell birthday i don't know if they were bffs i know that they were probably close and yeah today's cornell birthday and i i you know the air those to really can act they detained i don't i don't know i'm sure they maybe i don't know did he leaving no to this area is probably too early here i may possibly take pictures the seen it in relief collected with chris cornell and we'll we'll go by the end of the show he left a note or not in oj parole hearing they took a thirty minute recess they're going to return in thirty minutes with a decision holy crap crowd emmys yes they're trying to get the police the baruch people will be celebrating a kabas shops going to run out of kabul to rather live whose as short what's up sean a wachtel also offers by ort industry over it out of work what does talk about so c diff is at c d i f all right uh and what it what is at exactly series that like an ecoli uh situation especially where the area there's an area that you're you're only we started with what uh what else bars are up what what what pressure shot up uh martini restarted failure of it the rebel urgent probably about black day or with all the way all right thank you great very uh very rosy picture point what i've learned over the past five days that every single person who calls in tweets is a medical professional i've learned not as well everybody just wants to help the were the ones complaining so they just want to try and there's one calls as you guys are gonna die one calls as you guys are gonna live one call said everything's differing no one ever really die and we know that let's come back with more drew out alive your j verdict it will ojeh get out of jail i think we're going to find out in the next segment that's awesome ooh we are building great radio.

chester benhington kabul wachtel martini lincoln park chris cornell baruch thirty minutes thirty minute five days
"baruch" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"baruch" Discussed on KOMO

"Of that money brian calvert komo news someone lose time ted ted an to the as we go as of errors try to salvage a game for their threegame series with the royals after losing seven three last night that was not a good news not good news for the barriers for the very beginning first pitch of the day from felix hernandez hold up the case it retired gets one at baruch failed belts what i did here's what he did last night he leads off well with an extrabase hit only this it's a four bagger off felix hernandez one if one up it was the physio and rex hudler other the television network the matters would back to score two of their own in the bottom of the first but kansas city took the lead for good in the fourth and to go to the 73 win taking the first two games of the series and tonight are real aranda ali over seattle against former mariner jason vargas who leads the american league with a two point two two uri and twelve victories these others were in action in colorado clint dempsey had a pair of goals will bruin with the gold added a says they be colorado three two one i rode wooden for this are only the second round of the year for the saudis and their first win of any kind since june fourth and the sattar's will be back home toast german club eintracht frankfurt in a friendly come ming up on saturday which exports attended forty path each hour of the home of the huskies traffic and weather just two minutes away north korea leader kim jongil has vowed he will never put his nation's weapons programs up for negotiation a day after it successfully tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile the hard live suggest the north will conduct more weapons tested ciller perfects new oh clear ard missiles capable of striking anywhere.

royals felix hernandez baruch seattle jason vargas american league clint dempsey sattar frankfurt kim jongil brian calvert ted ted television network kansas colorado north korea two minutes