35 Burst results for "Bart"

"bart" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:53 min | Last month

"bart" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"The most was really incredibly easy to say that's a hot take. Is that The Simpsons taking a bit of a political position there? I mean, yes, but it's not their first, I don't think. I don't think it's so much, of course. It's impossible to separate economics and politics. So I asked him if he was worried that this episode might alienate some viewers. Comedy is by its very nature kind of alienating. I mean, at some point, we have poked fun of everyone. And certainly we have done plenty to poke fun at the left and certainly there's plenty to poke fun of there. And so, you know, it just eventually we managed to target everybody. So I'm not that worried about it. You know who comes out of this episode looking pretty good though, patty, or firefighters. In the last act of the show, after barts, fragile hopes for his future have been torched by Lisa and Hugh Jackman and Robert Reich. Bard gets himself into the cerebral situation, and he is rescued, saved by firefighters. And they're not there just to save Bart, but actually to revive all of our hopes for the American Dream to deliver the message that a comfortable middle class is possible. You'll be okay. Thanks. By the way, how good your pay. Pays court and pensions great when we retire. Nice. Sweet health plan plus cool and boots. We're always hiring new recruits. Gotta love the hat and boots, you know? Plus the pension. The perks are everything. But yeah, I mean, if you look at what they're talking about here, this is stuff that used to come with lots and lots of jobs, not that long ago, but now is very rare, a job with healthcare, a pension, really good pay, union protections. The point that we're trying to make is that the middle class is sort of a vanishing species. And so, you know, we were slightly tongue in cheek when we said that firemen is the job that he should get, but he could do worse. Yeah, and of course, then there's the fact that we really need firefighters. I mean, do we really, really need firefighters? Given the strong likelihood that some part of the U.S. or they could burst into flames at any time, I guess that's job security. But you still hold me in high regard. Eat my shorts, you tell them more. Don't. Don't. This episode of the indicator was produced by Jess Kung with engineering from James willets. It was fact checked by Corey bridges. Our senior producer is Viet and Kate and cannon edits the show. The indicator is a production of NPR. Did Robert rice look over the script? Yeah, he did. He did. And he didn't have a single change. So this means that we could say that this show was in some way inspired by the indicator and fact checked by Robert Reich. Yeah, that's one way to put it. Sometimes politics can feel like just a lot of noise. But the decisions made by leaders in this country affect you. Stay on top of how changing policies breaking news and new rulings affect your life. Every weekday on the NPR politics podcast, listen now..

Robert Reich Hugh Jackman patty Bard Bart Lisa Jess Kung James willets Corey bridges Robert rice Viet U.S. NPR cannon Kate
"bart" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:24 min | Last month

"bart" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"This is our spoiler filled Simpson story coming up after the break. Just like you, dad. I can't wait to live the American Dream. Well, actually, what? Oh, nothing. Support for NPR and the following message come from data IQ. The AI platform that connects data and doers through everyday AI, helping leading organizations turn complex data into business impact at da IKU dot com. Tim long has been writing for The Simpsons for 24 years. He grew up in Ontario, where his father was a John Deere tractor dealer. It was the 80s, so he got an early taste of how hard the economy can be on people. You know, I was coming from an agricultural area. It was very boom and bust. And so you saw a lot of people who were doing well one year and doing very cool the next year. So I feel like this is the sort of thing that's always sort of fascinated me. And in late 2020, the Atlantic published its great piece on The Simpsons and in March of last year, we aired our episode. So I started kicking that around in my mind. And then I thought, well, what's the funniest way that we could respond? And then it felt like, what if it were a musical? And in the show, Homer's son Bart embraces the American Dream. That ideal that we can follow in our parents footsteps and do just a little better or even a lot better than the last generation did. And he decides that he, like Homer, will work at the nuclear power plant and replicate his father's middle class life. I never thought about it, but Homer makes enough to pay for this awesome crib, two cars with enough left over to fill the freezer with three kinds of French fries. Waffle, curly and steak cut. And then it takes this crazy turn where Bart is informed via a musical number. That that may not be possible anymore. Woohoo. Your dad and his buddies had it swell, who gradually it all went to hell. The primary voice in the song is none other than Hugh Jackman. And he plays a sort of magical singing janitor who takes Bart on a musical journey through the American economy from the end of the Second World War until now. 1945, we won the war. I've always came back to the factory floor. The good Homer gets his nuclear plant job during that post war boom. Bart's prospects today, however, don't seem so good. For one thing, if he wants his dad's job, he's going to need to go to college. A fact his little sister Lisa takes great delight in telling him. All I need is a foot in the door and I'll take dad's job when it does at 44. And job you see now needs a PhD while paying student loans leaves you in poverty. Oh, Lisa Simpson. Such a downer. Truly though she has a point. In fact, when we crunch the numbers on The Simpsons household last year, we worked out that Homer would earn about the equivalent of $50,000 a year in today's dollars. Tough to send a kid to college on that kind of money, let alone get them an advanced degree. It's a good thing kids these days have options. Because there's a lot of new ways that I can make a dollar I'll ride the money train and make a rain ha ha I'll buy and sell Bitcoin build a new app do pranks on YouTube. I'm great at that trap film TikTok tricks on my sick motorbike. Your chances are slim. Go to hell, brother. I Robert rice. Economists, they're everywhere. They called isn't this the greatest indicator moment ever? That's the greatest indicator moment ever. So the former labor secretary from the Clinton administration came on the show to as Tim puts it, through dine some facts. I mean, the whole thing is rhymed, which is not that easy, but I just wanted someone to just start spitting facts for about 30 seconds. And I thought, well, who else to get than Robert rice? Who I know is very funny. The decline of unions rampant corporate greed, Wall Street malfeasance, and the rise of shortsighted politics, oil contributed to increased economic inequality, widespread real unemployment. That doesn't sign all that funny to me. Yes, in fact, you know, there is a very dark streak running through this entire show. There's this one scene reminiscent of the musical Les Misérables, which of course is set in the bloodiest days of the French Revolution. The old people in Springfield come out and start talking about why they vote for certain candidates. And it's sort of like the part in Les mis where everyone comes up to the ramparts. And sings this rousing song. But in this case, the song is about how.

Homer Bart Tim long John Deere Robert rice NPR Simpson Ontario Hugh Jackman Atlantic Lisa Simpson Bitcoin Lisa Clinton administration YouTube Tim Springfield
"bart" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:12 min | Last month

"bart" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"NPR. This is the indicator from planet money. I'm paddy hirsch. And today, Stacey vank Smith is with me and I asked her to join me for this very special episode. Thank you for joining me, Stacey. Well, I couldn't not join patty. I was very, very excited about this episode. Just over a year ago, we did what we rarely do and we dedicated an episode of the indicator to a single person, a patriarch of one of America's favorite families. The Simpsons Homer J Simpson. The iconic American economic everyman with his middle class job at the nuclear power plant, his suburban home, his two car garage, complete, of course, with two cars. And his beloved family, his wife Marge, his son Bart, and his daughters Lisa and Maggie. And Homer's kind of regarded, as you say, Stacy is America's everyman. However, as we find out on our show last year, that image is deeply flawed. And that message appears to have resonated around the American economy because a lot of people listen to that show. Yes. And one person in particular listened to it. I am Tim long. And I am a longtime writer producer for The Simpsons. The Simpsons writers listen to the indicator. I feel like we just need to take a moment. Thank you, Tim, keep listening. And Tim heard our show, which was props to the Atlantic inspired by an article in the Atlantic magazine, and he decided to dig into this question of Homer's lifestyle himself. You know, it's obviously crazy that Homer has managed to maintain this middle class lifestyle. Like, how are they living so well? But just the issue, the hard economic facts of the show just struck me as kind of like an interesting topic. So Tim and the rest of The Simpsons writing team get the goofed rhyme for a year. You know, the way writing teams do, making jokes about crushing poverty and social alienation. The classics. And a year later, this Sunday, in fact, the show will be airing its 33rd season finale. And we are just over the moon excited about this. The entire episode is dedicated to the very greatest subject of all time. The American economy. And of course, you know, this is The Simpsons..

paddy hirsch Stacey vank Smith Homer J Simpson Homer Tim long NPR Stacey patty America Atlantic magazine Tim Marge Bart Stacy Maggie Lisa Atlantic
It's Election Day in Pennsylvania; Who Holds the Edge?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:34 min | Last month

It's Election Day in Pennsylvania; Who Holds the Edge?

"Morning, glory, America, don't go high candidate who you at live inside the beltway on this election day in Pennsylvania, Tuesday, may 17th, polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. today in Pennsylvania. I've heard all over the state from Scranton and all the way up in the northern northeastern corner down to Philadelphia. All the way over to Pittsburgh and up to Erie, and I encourage everyone to go and vote for David McCormick for the United States Senate. I also think Lou Bart, let barletta is a much easier to elect candidate. I don't think mister mastriano can win. I know David McCormick can win. I don't think any of the other people can win if you're going to vote for Kathy. Barnett, or Doctor Oz, I think you were throwing your vote away because they can't beat John fetterman. And this election matters so much because if McCormick doesn't get the nomination, we're going to have a very hard time getting the Senate back. In Republican hands and then confirmation of Supreme Court Justices will remain in Chuck Schumer's hands. The opportunity to break the filibuster will remain in Chuck Schumer's hand. It's vitally important to elect David McCormick. The bronze star recipient graduate of West Point grew up outside of Pittsburgh. He built business in Pittsburgh, built jobs in Pittsburgh. He's a Pittsburgh. And so this goes against migraine to say nice things about a Pittsburgh Steelers fan. I mean, steelers forever with McCormick, but Dave McCormick's a great American and when you're a West Point graduate and you receive the bronze star for valor in the 82nd airborne in the first Gulf War, you can trust the character.

David Mccormick Lou Bart Mister Mastriano Pittsburgh Pennsylvania John Fetterman United States Barletta Scranton Chuck Schumer Senate Erie Mccormick Philadelphia Barnett Kathy West Point Supreme Court Pittsburgh Steelers Dave Mccormick
The Problem With Putting God on Trial...

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:21 min | 2 months ago

The Problem With Putting God on Trial...

"But I mentioned in the last episode that the idea of putting God on trial and saying to God in a sense, can you account for the evil and suffering in the world? This isn't just something that atheists do. They do it to score points. But there are believers who fall into a situation where they also have a beef with God. And very often it's for personal reasons. You lose a family member, you lose a sibling or a child, and you go, oh my gosh, so suddenly all the deep faith that you thought you had all along starts to crumble away. Now, one guy that I've debated on this topic, and I would call this guy an ex Christian. This is Bart ehrman, a Professor of religious studies at the university of North Carolina and Chapel Hill, he was raised as a fundamentalist. He was raised as a kind of conservative evangelical. And he says that he lost his faith over this issue over the problem of evil and what he calls quote unspeakable suffering. He goes, that's the reason I lost my faith. And when we were having one of our conversations and this, I think if I remember was on a campus, he began to say, I discovered that there's, you know, hunger and starvation and famines and poverty, and I'm like, fart, you're 50s. Did you discover that like now? Haven't you known your entire life if not your entire adult life? That the world is full of suffering and that suffering is pervasive in all societies. It seems to me a little unbelievable that this is some kind of a mid life discovery on your part. But nevertheless, orman continued to insist that his so called deconversion that's his phrase was because of this. And he said, you said it's not that I don't believe in God dinesh. I'm not actually quoting him. He goes, what I don't believe is the God of the Bible because he says I read in the Bible that you've got this God who cares about us. And you've got this God who had his own chosen people. And he looks after them, and he works miracles for them. And he shares their suffering and then I read about Jesus who healed the sick and gave sight to the blind and made the lame hungry, but he goes, what is that God? Why isn't he like in full operation today?

Bart Ehrman University Of North Carolina Chapel Hill Famines Orman Dinesh Jesus
"bart" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

The Thinking Atheist

02:00 min | 3 months ago

"bart" Discussed on The Thinking Atheist

"Going to have to think about that analogy here. I'm just going to have to stew on this. And they mow people down with them. It's a bad use of cars. Yeah, but I mean, if you look at the Bible is built as a vehicle and the vehicle has some seriously faulty elements within it. And the Bible does, right? And I'm not telling you anything, your doctor Bart ehrman. But if many of the components are themselves faulty problematic, even dangerous, then we have to examine that before we examine whether or not driving a car is dangerous. So that's, I think, that where I shape a little bit at that metaphor. I get it. I get it, but the manufacturer of the car didn't design it for those purposes. And the manufacturer of genesis did not design it as an inherent scripture to tell us that, in fact, evolution is wrong. That's not what that's not what the book of genesis is about. It's a misuse of genesis. What do you think genesis in your opinion? What was it written for? I mean, what do you think? We're trying to do. I think they're trying to explain why it is that the world is the way it is. And you know, of course, we don't agree that Adam and Eve were the first two human beings and that their son cable Kane, the third person on the human on earth, built a city. So we take it as folklore and I like ancient folklore. And this particular folklore is informed the western consciousness for thousands of years. And so why wouldn't I want to study it? Well, it is something I'm hugely interested in. And again, I'll put the link to that course in the description box. I want people to go and take that journey because I really do want to hear what you have to say on the subject. More with doctor Bart ehrman, we got to talk about white Jesus. Oh, in the United States, the Christian church loves them some white Jesus, so we're going to get into that.

Bart ehrman genesis Kane Adam Christian church United States
Bart Herbison: Songwriters Are a Dying Breed

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:09 min | 6 months ago

Bart Herbison: Songwriters Are a Dying Breed

"You just made a comment just a minute ago that I think a lot of people, if they're listening to this, let's define a little bit of terms here, because I think you said something that was pretty interesting, but I think it's still true today, although you and I can sort of laugh and joke at the inside or part about how many artists actually write songs. But, you know, I've always used this example. George strike being the king of country music, you know, the undisputed everybody loves George Strait. But George Strait has 60 number one songs of which he wrote none. Neither did Elvis neither barber's dry sand. I mean, some of the greatest artists ever that just was not their gift. And in the modern streaming era, songwriters get paid so little that we've lost at one point over 90% of the songwriters who weren't also the artist. Look artists make most of their money from merch sales and ticket sales. Some writers don't get any of that. So it's a tough and dying breed. It's a very difficult prospect. What you did is already starting to show a difference and over time it will be the Salvation of the non artis songwriter. And that was the music modernization act.

George Strait Barber Elvis George
Bart Herbison Tells Us About the Nashville Songwriters Association

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:15 min | 6 months ago

Bart Herbison Tells Us About the Nashville Songwriters Association

"When I talk about the Nashville songwriter association, they asked, well, what is that? So let's start off here, but just won't tell a little bit about how you got into this and also about the national songwriters as well. Well, me first a little hoity toity. My father was a painter in Paris. A house painter in Paris Tennessee. And look, we grew up in a rural area, somewhat poor, and music was the thing. Music, my grandma played piano in our little Methodist Church, and everybody was musical in my family. Three brothers played Trump at I blew mine, the other two played theirs. And I guess it's 16 years old. I got a job as a dish jockey at the local radio station, which was an NBC affiliate, and ended up doing some work on a national show they had. But a guy that grew up with me became a very famous songwriter named Jimmy Stewart, he wrote brotherly love, the last number one for Keith. Whitley, a little less talk for Toby, and I just was always drawn to that. I always drawn to they just make this up out of thin air and I said as a child some day somehow I'll work with American songwriters, and I did. For us, the origin story, I don't sing, but remember please release me let me go. The waste our lives would be a sin, release me and let me love again. That was written by Eddie Miller. Yeah, singing was not part of that too at bar. It takes a while to pass the bill. And he was a real southern gentleman, and he thought we can orgas the songwriters. There were only 80 songwriters total 80 in the entire town of Nashville in 1967. And he reached out to all of them and a lot didn't want to risk their career because even our friends within the music industry didn't necessarily want to see the songwriters quote unquote organize. But Eddie got married John wilkin Chris Christopherson fully and boulevard Bryant Liz and Casey Anderson, a bunch of really important songwriters and 42 risk their careers to become an advocate advocacy group for American

Nashville Songwriter Associati Paris Local Radio Station Methodist Church Jimmy Stewart Eddie Miller Donald Trump Tennessee Whitley NBC Toby Keith John Wilkin Chris Christopherson Nashville Bryant Liz Casey Anderson Eddie
"bart" Discussed on NFL Live

NFL Live

01:40 min | 7 months ago

"bart" Discussed on NFL Live

"And then awful. All in the same game and they've done it every single game this year. They look like a great team than they look like crap. What the heck do you make of the Minnesota Vikings? Yeah, really hard to evaluate kind of like what you're saying, Rex, they went out, they try to really revamp their defense, sign Patrick Peterson. Really try to off season make a lot of changes to sort of balance that team out and I think when you look at them defensively, they're just been really inconsistent. Including Patrick Peterson, by the way, Harrison Smith to be is still like their best defensive player, Anthony bar when he's healthy, but they lost ever seen Griffin danelle hunter's been out for the year. So they've struggled rushing the pastor. Now, Kirk Cousins to his credit, he was able to stay in toe to toe with Green Bay a couple weeks ago and beat Aaron Rodgers, but I agree just because they're so inconsistent on that side of the ball. Let's Dalvin cook's a 100%. I just don't see Minnesota going very far this year. I got you, I agree. Well, Mike, I can't thank you enough for joining us today. And, you know, it's been great catching up on some old times. Hopefully we can do this again sometime, but thank you so much. All right, Mike, I appreciate guys. I'm Rex Ryan. He's my Tana bomb. And this is organized chaos podcasts. Bart and I will be dropping a new podcast each NFL weekend from now until Super Bowl Sunday. You can always catch Bart weekdays 12 to 3 p.m. eastern on the Barton Han show on ESPN radio.

Patrick Peterson Harrison Smith Anthony bar Griffin danelle hunter Minnesota Vikings Rex Dalvin cook Kirk Cousins Aaron Rodgers Green Bay Mike Minnesota Rex Ryan Bart Bart weekdays NFL Super Bowl ESPN radio
Apple vs Epic Games Lawsuit: Apple Must Allow Other Forms of in-App Purchase

Mac OS Ken

01:44 min | 10 months ago

Apple vs Epic Games Lawsuit: Apple Must Allow Other Forms of in-App Purchase

"Us judge yvonne gonzalez rogers came back with her ruling in the epic games versus apple fight on friday her decision to seen by most as a win for apple. Not an outright win. More of a. It could have been a lot worse win. Basically apple has to lead developers put buttons and links and their apps to take customers to third party. Payment options effectively says a piece from tech crunch. The judge has ruled that apple cannot prohibit developers from adding links for alternative payments beyond apple's app store based monetization remember the deal apple made with lawmakers in japan for outside payments for reader apps. Yeah this is basically that but for every app that wants to take advantage. According to the ruling apple can no longer stop developers from one including in their apps and their meta data buttons external links or other calls to action that direct customers to purchasing mechanisms in addition to end up purchasing and to communicating with customers through points of contact obtained voluntarily from customers through account registration within the app. Not what apple would have wanted but again could have been worse. The app store might have been deemed a monopoly. It was not according judge gonzales rogers while the court finds that apple enjoys considerable market share of over fifty five percent and extraordinarily high profit margins. These factors alone. Do not show antitrust conduct. Success is not illegal with that bart apple was

Apple Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers App Store Japan United States Gonzales Rogers Bart Apple
"bart" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

01:55 min | 10 months ago

"bart" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"Bart and hot defender. What the hell am I supposed to do? Okay, Derrick Henry. I'm going to stand up right Because guess what? I don't want to hit you helmet to helmet. Meanwhile, he's laying in his face forward, perhaps is when he went offensive players that have the football. Their hands lean forward. Their helmet is in front of everything. Nothing to hit. But that helmet I'm taught as a defender. For me to make something. Go backwards, Advocate underneath it for me to get underneath something. What I have to do have the gold lone at the same time. Okay, one. You're bigger than me to your fashion to me. Three. You're stronger to me. Okay, I'll hit you hot and see what happens. You gonna take me for a damn ride? There's a law of physics. So why do you think he's getting low? Because he's trying to get underneath me, so I'm trying to get lowered to get underneath him. But it's my fault, right? No, it is your fault, too. And so now I'm on his highlight train. I'm watching ESPN encounter the running back to get off the train track, like really. Bart and hot weekdays at noon Eastern on ESPN Radio and on ESPN. Plus, Man, there's been an event everywhere. They're gone and FX original series. Why? Last night we heard rumors that some men survive, cetera. I know what I saw Keys, the key to putting the world back together again. Why him? His survival classified. Nobody can know about him. Woman long. That's why the last man premieres September 13th streaming exclusively ethics on Hula. The one thing the game always does is. It shows you very clearly where you are down. Alabama Major upset Ohio State Just like the Irish enough listeners monumental Georgia, you're either elite or you're not. That's what we've been saying. This is why you came to Ohio State to play in big games like this. The whole nation will be watching. Never go exactly like to think the rivalry that you want to be a part of why you come to college with playing dudes like this college.

Derrick Henry ESPN September 13th Last night Ohio State Bart Alabama Three FX ESPN Radio one noon Eastern Keys Irish Hula Georgia
Bears' Andy Dalton: Looking Over Shoulder at Justin Fields Worst Thing to Do

Get Up!

01:01 min | 10 months ago

Bears' Andy Dalton: Looking Over Shoulder at Justin Fields Worst Thing to Do

"It's all anyone has been talking about. Andy dalton the biz. Qb one starting. Sunday night against aaron donald and the ranch yesterday dalton addressed his mindset heading into this season with the rookie justin fields waiting in the wings. That's the worst thing you can do is look over your shoulder and so i think that's understanding that is is key about tuning out the stuff that you don't need to focus on and knowing where you need to put your time and effort and all that kind of stuff. I think that's just where i'm at and you don't worry about all the the all the stuff i wish you all could have heard that as he was talking. Bart scott was laughing aloud. What was so funny about that image. Mike land steve is blowing in the back of an ear. Yeah yeah. I just feel like you're gonna turn around and go fill me right. We all know elephant in the room. And he just he just holding the ball handed baton pretty

Aaron Donald Justin Fields Andy Dalton Dalton Mike Land Steve Bart Scott
Is It PMS or Is It That the World’s Ending?

The Guilty Feminist

00:45 sec | 11 months ago

Is It PMS or Is It That the World’s Ending?

"I'm a feminist bart. This week i have been feeling down. And i honestly can't decide if it's because i've got my period or because the united nations has sort of announced that it's very close to the end of the world because of climate change. It could be that i'm premenstrual. It could be climate change. I don't know maybe it's make believe i don't know. It's a strong potent cocktail. Sarah when the week before it might be those field at the end the world so i think it is. I think it's a combo. I think it's a combo not to make light of the un report about climate change in any way shape. But i have been unaccountably like feeling low. And i'm like premenstrual but also there. Is this very real

United Nations Sarah UN
Gettr CEO Jason Miller on Birthing A New Social App For Conservatives

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:32 min | 11 months ago

Gettr CEO Jason Miller on Birthing A New Social App For Conservatives

"Actually spoke on the salem radio network about a month ago. Right after the launch of getter you're a month and now the news has been incredible yard over two million users. You got to a million in about a week. Which is absolutely record-breaking. How's it going give the listeners. And update on getter. it's going create whereas you said we're right about two million users who've already joined the platform where the fastest ever social media platform to a million users did that in three days took facebook about ten months comparison. And what we're seeing. It's it's really exciting. The growth that about fifty percent of the user bases here in the us fifty percent is international. But we're seeing all sorts of conservatives and mega warriors and some of the favorite folks quite like the phone social media in addition to yourself. Dennis desouza mike pompeo ben carson marjorie taylor green and of course one of the things. I still have twitter on my phone now to have it. I'll go and look at it. Every now and then i kind of dread when it opened up twitter. Whatever the left wing soros bart's going on the attack today and Yes orangemen bad. And they hate president trump and it's it's all negative on nasty and then opened up getter and direction. Real conversations is kind of exciting speakeasy of conversations. There's been some news in the last twenty four forty hours that the much vaunted much requested notifications feature is here forget on desktop and coming soon to the apps is that right. Yes absolutely and Trust me we. We've heard folks day we've got to have notifications that's what's gonna make the engagement Exploded in the way even more so before and by the way. We're seeing ton of engagement but you know we wanted. We made the decision that we wanted to launch. Until i four to get out there and because people were clamoring they wanna do social media platform something not controlled by the silicon valley tech oligarchs with people being d platform and shutdown. We wanna have some setup you know. We could have waited another month month and a half nature. everything was perfect or we had whole additional features. Wanna get launch In right now it's been sitting with Our good friends at apple for about two weeks now Just waiting is they control everything that goes onto the platform so as soon as they approve the next upgrade which can literally be any second which we've been waiting for about two weeks Then you will have notifications on On your iphone which will be great. It's on the desktop. Now people are already raving about it

Salem Radio Network Dennis Desouza Mike Pompeo Marjorie Taylor President Trump Ben Carson Twitter Bart Facebook United States Apple
WSOP Field Sizes Are Dropping

The Fives

02:41 min | 11 months ago

WSOP Field Sizes Are Dropping

"I know i said the wsb gets a pass on field sizes in a year over year comparison because things have changed dramatically since twenty twenty however last year's fields was two thousand one hundred twenty six centuries from fourteen hundred hundred fifty. Five weeks seems awful. Yeah it feels like a really steep drop off right there. And i know that we talked about it and i was thinking something like maybe like a thirty percent. Drop off. I think would been good and acceptable. Just based upon the fact of everything that's going on in poker right now that having that kind of field size would still be good but this does feel quite thin for championship. Event as a sixty two percent drop year over year in total entries. That's that's ugly no matter what. The circumstances are surprised that low. I did have it being over a thousand. Maybe getting closer to fifteen hundred total entries but Just seem to be a sort of a. Instead of being the exclamation point at the end of the series. It was kind of a hard thud. Couple of other events wrapped up in the closing days mitchell harrison. Brad's osman and dancing. Lar- winning the finale though event to run after the championship event all in all. I think he's probably pretty happy with with word. Got out of it. It seems like there was maybe far less appetite than even they'd predicted given all the different changes so We're gonna see what happens with the gp stuff which is now underway. They started just as w dot com is wrapping up. Gee-gee was sort of hitting the gas pedal on there's the fifty dollar buying kickoff event called the return man i'm going to butcher. This dudes bart lumpia bata. Oh man. that's really good. I think that's really good. I think you didn't really got okay. There's a hockey player with a similar name on relied on my my childhood memory hockey players. I was waiting with baited breath to see what would come out of your mouth. Very give call him. I'm going to call them bar because that's only fair to him cops. A thirty thousand eight hundred ten entry field takes him one hundred sixty thousand dollars not bad for fifty bucks. Yeah not bad at all. You know Last year the the field size was good too. I know last year the opener for the events it was double the buyin one hundred dollar opener and they got twenty nine thousand three hundred six runners. And so this this. I know it's a difference in half of the buy-in but still for field size. I think that's a pretty good

WSB Mitchell Harrison Osman Brad Hockey
Why Michael Brown Understands Atheists

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:08 min | 1 year ago

Why Michael Brown Understands Atheists

"When i met at the age of nineteen i have been following jesus than for two and a half years. She was a hardcore atheist. Jewish atheist are mom been married four times. By the time she was eight she concluded there was no god she thought it would be wonderful. If god exists existed this eight years old but concluded that there was no god. So when when i met her she was a really a god. Macher and really thought that that faith like this was just for weak people and to the core of for being. She's a realist. I mean to this day. She is the most realistic person. I know in terms of just call This being honest with re- with reality say and yet god intervened in her life and brought it to himself. He revealed himself In fact the first thing that happened was she realized that personified evil was real and therefore is personified evil. The light went on there is personified. Good and god began to work in her life. But going through this book eric. She helped me a lot because she understands how an atheist thinks and a lot of times. Because there's no such thing as ats That always bothers her because she knows and the court for being what she believed in didn't believe and then many many atheists actually had a very lofty view of god and that god didn't seem to exist that they wanted him to others are intellectual atheists and others are just angry and things like that but there are many that atheists at a disappointment and pain. And i remember when i debated bart ehrman. It'll high state university years back on the problem of suffering. Does the bobble provide an adequate answer to the suffering and i. I was preparing for the debate. And i tell nancy okay. I'm gonna use this argument. Things great gets no is really good because down on. Let me let me tell you what that sounds like. Oh i got it. I see it so she really helps. Sensitize me in writing this. And she has so many times cried herself to sleep at night just with pain and burden for hurting world. That that it's helped me to really wrestle with issues

Macher Eric Bart Ehrman Nancy Okay
"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Judaism in the hebrew bible in roman religion. A massive thing. I've been doing this every week. Five five posts. There's a member membership fee to join the blog And the reason there's a membership fee is because i use the blog to raise money for charity The membership fees low. It's about it's about fifty cents a week. I mean it's like the right now we're going to be. We're instituting a new blog soon. We're launching a new blog but but right now a year membership is twenty four dollars ninety five cents and for that you all of these. You'll hundreds and hundreds of plus archives going back eight years so i don't keep any the money myself and not a penny goes to operating expenses and so all of the money goes directly to charities We have raised about nine hundred fifty thousand dollars over the years and that amount is going up. It looks like this year. We're hoping we're going to hit two hundred thousand dollars just for this year people joining the blow and so we also there's an option of like if you just want a one month membership for less try for three months you can do that but just go to the barnum or blog and check it out and and you'll see all the money the jerry's all go to actually they all go to deal right now with the crisis of mainly charities dealing with hunger and homelessness both locally and internationally so i support five five charities and all the money goes out to them bart thank you so much. It's been real pleasure gasping. Great thank you so much all right so that does it But thanks again to bart for for sharing his expertise with us. I really had fun talking to him. and at the end they're just want to remind you yet again. Bart mentioned his blog. If you're interested in the sort of subject matter. His blog is a great place to go. Deep plus as bart mentioned every penny of the subscription money goes to great causes. So you can check that out at erman blog dot org and his spelled e. h. r. m. a. n. so that's e. h. r. m. a. n. blog dot org and again. The book is heaven. And hell history of the afterlife by bart ehrman in the meantime. If you'd like to check out other episodes of stuff to blow your mind you can find us wherever you get your podcast and wherever that happens to be just make sure that you rate review in subscribe. That really helps the show out huge. Thanks as always to our excellent audio producer. Seth nicholas johnson. If you'd like to get in touch with us with feedback on this episode or any other suggested topic for the future or just to say hello you can email us at contact at stuff to blow your mind dot com stuff to blow. Your mind is production of iheartradio for more podcast. Iheartradio iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows power in the twenty first century who has it. How were the using it and how is it. Impacting our lives. This is the recount. Daily pod were will explore the intersection of power business technology culture and yes politics two. I'm nine and i'm host of the recount daily pod. I've spent decades covering politics and foreign affairs as a white house. Reporter and middle east correspondent traveling everywhere from baton rouge to benghazi each morning on the recount daily pod. I'll bring you a quick rundown of the top headlines and then an in depth interview with decision makers the reporters covering them and experts who break it all down who's actually controlling the narrative. And how is it shifting. We'll connect the dots helping you reframe and rethink the issues that matter. Listen to the recount. Daily pod on the iheartradio app on apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts from iheartradio the done the definitive twenty four episode podcast series on the producer of flashdance beverly hills cop and top gun the maverick don simpson back in the nineteen eighties. Don's behavior wasn't just tolerated. It was encouraged. The film industry gave gone a long leash for his high class. Call girls his alliance. The vatican connected italian mom the private eye that cleaned up his car. Crashes and illicit firearms schemes. The doctor feel goods on retainer the expense accounts for exotic cars and private jets and ski party. Or jason aspen. Don's black ties. Were an open secret inside. Hollywood and it was don's black market connections that led to his tragic death season. One takes you into the circumstances surrounding don's tragic death and sheds light on the unsavory characters. That may have been complicit. Listen to the dawn on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

bart Seth nicholas johnson bart ehrman Bart jerry apple benghazi don simpson baton rouge white house middle east Don jason aspen don Hollywood
"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:19 min | 1 year ago

"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Anything especially bad theology. I wonder if that's just a an availability. Heuristic issue like if this is somebody who's writing christian literature in the name of paul. They're probably thinking a lot about their enemies with theological minor. Theological disputes is. Just what's on their mind. It's what's on their mind and it's who are the who are the big enemies of christianity. And they're the ones who get it the worst so in the second century Road the worst enemies were the persecutors Those who committed idolatry were speidel. And those who committed sins violations of god's law those are enemies by the time you all the enemies or in the church because the churches are split the bad theologians. You got people leading crazy things you got. You got immorality in the church and so those are the ones being punished okay board. I've got one more question so in the divine comedy People who dante runs into in purgatory. I i noticed are constantly begging dante to go back and tell their relatives especially female relatives that they should be praying for them more. Where does this idea come from that. The prayers of the living especially the prayers of women were useful and important to those in the afterlife and could affect their fate there it does precede the official catholic doctrine of purgatory right. Now comes after. Oh okay so the so yeah. Let me get a little background because the deal with this in my book i have a section on purgatory In my book as well as a section by the way on the idea that everybody gets say which is also interesting. But but purgatory. This is an important for a lot of catholics. because cats the catholic church continues to teach Purgatory and i'm surprised. I've talked with a number of catholics. After i wrote my book didn't realize really what is it didn't realize they'd have to suffer in their holding ben and now i'm sorry i should read the purgatorio not fun fun so so purgatory for for those who are not catholic arose catholic who thing attention purgatory is. The is the doctrine that eventually developed. It says that there's not just having an hell. The reason four purgatory developing is against kind of the same. As of justice. I mean it's not really fair that everybody dies and gets the same thing and so rewards and punishments seem only fair But on the other hand you know not everybody is deserving is a saying you know going to go to heaven but not fair for the tortured forever and so there's so they come up with this middle place Which is is it specifically for people who are going to end up in heaven but they have to pay for their sins i. They're there there since they are not holy enough to go directly. They need to be purged of their sins. And that's why purgatory because they're being purged of their sins and purging as painful and so they have to go through certain number punishments but They can Get out faster if a living people intercede for them So what's that all about. Whereas come from. So what i do in my book because i i don't talk at length about the later dr purgatory except to say or dont or dante's purgatorio except to say that the official catholic doctrine was not implemented until the thirteenth century and so So christianity around for since the first century. So it's a twelve twelve centuries before pretoria becomes a standard dockland the catholic church the term purgatory was invented in the twelfth century. And so there are people who claim that purgatory wasn't invented until the twelfth or thirteenth century. And so in one kind of technical sense. I guess that's right but wanna try to do in. My book is show that there were earlier forerunners of this very idea that some people who die are punished temporarily before allow being allowed to enter the they're heavenly a reward. And what i do. Is i look at the earliest examples of that which are text the people. The general run of the mill person wouldn't know if they don't know dante they don't know the probably the the martyrdom perpetual or or the acts of fackler but there are these. Are these books That that talk about A saint and she's she is usually a woman a living woman who has a special relationship with god she's very holy who Who prays for either a relative or somebody that they're requested to pray for who's be who's having a bad afterlife and god. Here's the prayers. Here's the person's prayers and the person that has released from their punishment and is is is rewarded and so there several stores like this. They're fascinating stories on their own terms. We will get into the really interesting stories to start out in the second century I go up into the third century and onward and so this idea that it's possible to kind of get out early get out of punishment. Early is an idea That's floating around and so some people did have this idea that there's other place somehow we're and so people have the various ideas and You find in saint augustine for example of plays with this idea a little bit He's not quite sure about it but he affirms it didn't seem to affirmative in some places and so so it becomes a standard idea but then only later in the thirteenth century does become a doctrine and there are very interesting books if you got people among you your leader readers who are really interested in kind of scholar views of things. There's a guy named jacques. Logoff who wrote this book called. The birth of purgatory explains why in the twelfth or thirteenth century. This became all became something and it became and it wasn't just me for religious. Reasons is because the sociopolitical context within which developed. It's called the birth appurtenant where they can look that up and find it all right barbara. I think we're running toward the end of our our time here but i just want to thank you so much for joining us today again. I genuinely really loved the book. As i've enjoyed all your books before heaven and hell i think If you enjoyed our conversation today listeners you should definitely check out the book. But you should also look up. Bart's blog bart. Do you wanna talk about that. For a moment. I do nothing. I like talking about more. So i have a blog. I've had it for over. Eight years started in two thousand twelve on this blog. I post oppose five times a week. Most of my posts between twelve hundred and fourteen hundred words had the post deal with everything having to do with all the stuff. We're talking about now and about anything about the new testament. The historical jesus. The writings paul revelation. It's harder than persecute talked of women in early. Christianity talks about jews in relationship to christians but also about early.

speidel dante catholic church fackler paul pretoria ben Logoff jacques barbara Bart bart paul revelation
"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:49 min | 1 year ago

"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Word for it. Somebody says that you know at my inauguration. There are this number of people there. You've got to check to see if that's true or not and so there. There are certain things that you check for and historians have web checking ancient stuff just as we have ways of checking modern stuff. If you check this historic last richmond. They're very reasons for thinking. Jesus didn't tell the story for one thing. of course. it has a different view of apple iphone. One jesus had that you can't zach. That's the question your argument of circle but there are other things about it. It's all found only luke so there's no one else who tells the story that we know of. And so how do you know. Like inlets verified survey. You just got into the. I'll just cut to the chase because this is going onto one reason for early night. It wasn't wasn't a story. Jesus told is because the story presupposes that a man has already been raised from the dead. The end of the story is if they don't believe moses in the province they won't believe even if a man is raised from the dead that means that the reader the christian reader these are christian agreements are gonna say. Yeah that's right boy. They didn't believe what america got raised on the devil. You got that one right. Yeah well that's because. The storyteller knows that jesus from the dead and is jewish listeners. Most of them are not accepting and so it has marks of being later composition. It also by the way does go inside with luke's understanding of the afterlife. The author of luke his understand the live is different from the understanding. Put that jesus himself apparently had and so they're all of these reasons for the doesn't go back to the historical jesus. This brings up an interesting. Another tangential thought i was wondering about. So when you consider what purpose the gospels were supposed to serve as written documents. Did they serve an originally were. They intended by their authors to have an apologetic purpose like pre as preaching documents to outsiders or do you think of them primarily as things that were ridden four christians who were already convinced to be read and to i don't know further edified them in their faith this is something that's been debated over the years although it's debated too much anymore just about everybody who is an expert on the stuff things. These books were not used for evangelistic purposes. You know this is not the sort of thing like he you enhance hand the gospel of matthew. To somebody say here read this so you can become a christian. Then take a look at you kidding me. No read this get outta here and so So there are all sorts of hints within the books themselves that they're written by christians and four christians to promote christian face having said that One of the secondary uses of these books would surely have been to tell christians what to tell others when they were trying to convert them and so the books themselves would not be tools of conversion or evangelists tools but they would be informing christians of information that they could give to others and one of the reasons that christians needed have some damnation is because they were being opposed in the roman world Most people thought they were nice and christians as no. We're not it's actually we. We have the truth. And i'm i'm going to explain why we have the truth. Will you need you need to have some kind of things to tell people. To show you got the truth of all the four gospels luke. The one we're talking about gives most evidence of having this function of trying to convince outsiders that christianity is a good thing and that it's harmless thing. It's interesting you know. One of the problems of christians had in the early roman empire was that the guy they worship was crucified for crimes against the state he was. He was a state criminal who was executed for it. And so like if that's the guy you're following Now that doesn't look too good in the is that the law and so they had to explain. Well actually. yeah but you know. Pilot didn't wanna do it and the romans were actually jesus. I is damned jews. It made us do it. And so so. They're putting the fault on jews and exonerated romans to show that we're not a threat to roman society and luke does that more than any of the others. That doesn't luke. Also repeatedly mentioned the fact that jesus was innocent. Lick it uses the word innocent. yeah so when. He's on trial before pontius pilot. Luke luke stresses three three times pilot actually declares. Jesus he's innocent. He doesn't deserve this as the jewish leaders force him to cruise vibe and then when he's being crucified in luke scott only loose now. So you have the centurion. His crucified him and in mark's gospel the century and looks up at him and he realizes that. Oh my god. What would we truly. This man was the son of god. But in luke's gospel the same guy's looks at him and then he said he says this man was innocent and so is the son of god. He's in yeah. Yeah but the point is luke is emphasizing. He was innocent and and so. It's not you know everybody. All the romans is is the jewish people didn't recognize so you're mentioning several different strains of thought that are developing after the life of jesus you think the the consensus of biblical scholars today would be jesus. The real historical. Jesus was some type of apocalyptic. Prophet he was preaching the imminent return of god. Who would destroy the enemies of israel. And bring about this kingdom on earth but obviously that changed you talk in the book. About a process of de apocalyptic sizing the christian faith over the following centuries. Can you in brief terms. What does that process. Look like. what what motivates. And how does it happen. Let me live prefaces. By saying you're the first person who's interviewed new could say the apocalypse is students nuts. Talking about the d- apocalyptic cessation of the tradition. So so d- apocalypse is. So if jesus has this apocalyptic view that the clips is coming. And the god's going to wipe out things and it's going to make everything right. The reason one one of the functions of that kind of religious discourse that kind of apocalyptic language was to encourage people who were in the midst of suffering. Because you're telling him look yes. You are suffering. God is on. Your side is these powers of evil. That are lied up against us. But god's on your side and the point of this is that god is soon going to intervene and take out these forces of evil so if you just hold on for a little while it'll be okay. That's why the book of revelation says no he's coming soon and why the apostle paul says need to be alert. Because it's coming soon. It's going to be like a thief in the night and you know if you're not awake you're gonna be rob and so you need to be alert. And why jesus himself said. Truly i tell you. This generation will not pass away before all these things take place. Jesus predicted that his own disciples would see it. And that's the nature of this kind of apocalyptic language and still is by the way people today who believe in the left behind series or who think jesus is coming back then in invariably. Thank you know it's going to be in my lifetime. You know maybe next time sometime next thursday. I don't it's going to be pretty and so that's that's all part of the part of it in early. Christianity there is a very firm belief is going to come back right. It's going to happen right.

luke jesus zach Luke luke richmond apple roman society luke scott matthew pontius america mark israel rob paul
"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Angry was enjoying good sleep. We say anything about being with anyone else. He just he. This is not something you're supposed to do. You're the king and you know this you pass this. You can't do this. And so god's really ticked off because god told you not to do this. And so and so it is not his. It is not a soul separated from the body that goes back. Samuel actually comes back in bodily form fully clothed as an old man and and there's nothing to indicate that he's been either in a place of torment or in a place of reward and so hebrew bible scholars. Don't look on this as an instance of which somebody you know showing that when you die your soul goes one place or another. It's the only place by the way. We're in the hebrew bible where that kind of neck romance is performed but we do know that Some a lot of israelites thought it could be performed. Because they're all these laws against the by a budget laws doing something and so they at least think are seances going on. Something's happening but you know what it was. They were thinking is to know. This is kind of attention but that does make me wonder about this. So it's it's example of this belief in the persecution of witchcraft or or necker. Nancy why do you think it is that monotheistic religions like judaism christianity would have been so opposed to people independently practicing magic or consulting the dead. In fact i believe Correct me if i'm wrong but this is also sort of one of the horrors of the book of i knock right where these evil heavenly creatures. Come down and they teach human women how to do. Magic spells is that right. Yeah they don't mention netco massey there but they do. They do teach humans all sorts of practical things that god does a like. and so. that's that's kind of what's going on with his neck romance thing when you raising somebody. Up in a seance or or however you doing it through magical rites the ancient thought. Was that this person. It's it's not that the person's soul is living on the person's temporarily come back to life again there. Solis come back into the body and because they have died and they'd come back from the dead. They have these kind of powers ad in monotheistic religion. There's only supposed to be one superhuman power. And as god and so these other powers are threatening and people usually turned to Necker massey and other forms of magic precisely because the established religion wasn't working too well for them and so they were. They weren't learning what they need to learn. They weren't getting what they needed to get. They weren't you know. And they try and alternative. Means and in these monotheistic religions. God is a jealous god and he doesn't like it when you go to some other divine force and so that's why it's like a form of cheating almost was a form of cheating. It's like you know you go to your you. Go to your priest for advice and then you go home and get your ouija board. I mean look right. Just said don't bother. Where'd you do. People usually boards anyway. What i was a kid we used. We always great. Okay okay. so that's the view of of the ancient jews. They would of mostly believe. And of course we should acknowledge that whenever we're talking about Views describing them to groups of people. There was probably some diversity but we're talking about like the dominant views that are represented in the record right. Well it's it's a very important point because in my book i tried to show. There are in fact. Different views and hebrew bible itself. I mean you mentioned ecclesiastes and the book of daniel has a very different kind of you and so there are varieties the one variety you don't find in the hebrew bible is you die in your soul those having her house right so then what about the to turn away from ancient judaism. What about the influence of greek philosophy in like the ideas of socrates and plato and how those came through in the pagan beliefs of the roman empire. Yeah it's very important Far more important than most people realize in the earliest greek records we have they come our earliest records come from homer from the iliad and the odyssey and the earliest four hundred dante in the western tradition so gilda mashes in the ancient but in the western tradition the earliest four dante is a homer odyssey the odyssey book eleven is this going into the underworld and visiting people there including his mother and his former colleagues in the in the trojan war and and he needs all these people and the point of this description to show what is like down there and it's not good. It's not good for everybody because everybody is just down there the same. They've got their their shadows. They're called shadows. They're not even people anymore but they kind of shadows people and they've got no strength and no power no mind you can't think they can't remember. It's they can't talk it's like they. Just it's awful forever by the time you get to plato about four hundred years later so plato's riding the early fourth century bc. So you know four hundred years before. Jesus ministry plato. By the time of plato greeks. It started thinking that this idea that like everybody goes to hades and it's the same and it's boring for eternity and there's no that's not right. I mean how can you mean that somebody who is a valiant warrior who is upright and you always does the good thing and helps other people he dies and like that's it. He doesn't get anywhere award. And there's some schmuck over here like this tyrant who oppresses people just cares about his own self getting massively rich and powerful and doesn't care who he hurts the process. He dies in the punish. No that can't be how it is as greeks came up with this idea that in fact after death there rewards and punishments. We don't know of other people at the same time came up with this idea. But we find that. Most firmly in the greeks especially plato who devoted a lot of time in his dialogue in his surviving dialogues to show that the soul and the body are two different things and that the mistake people make in life is catering to their body when the important thing is their soul and so plato was pushing for philosophy. The love of nod as what philosophy Means the love of wisdom because he thought we needed attend to the needs of our inner selves especially our minds and our our mental states and our values and our views of what's right and wrong and our ethics and how live and those are the things we should be concerned about not like getting drunk all the time and having parties and having sex randomly like players. They know that is catering to your body. And the problem is if you if you giving your body's pleasures then you're gonna not pay any attention to your soul and when you die your soul is going to live on your body's going to die and so you need to make sure your souls doing well when it dies or it's going to be bad news. And so plato. Plato tells these myths of the after. He calls the myths he. I don't think he means i'm literally. But he he tells these kind of stories of people who die and they check out what it's like afterwards and those who tend to their soul have very good after lives and those who are just licentious torrential bastards. They're tortured forever. And so you get rewards and punishments. And so plato. Plato popularizes idea. It's not clear he invented it but it's found in a number of places in his dialogues especially Say in in The fado and in the republic and ended up becoming a hugely significant understanding things for the history of the.

netco massey Necker massey gilda mashes Plato Solis Samuel Nancy dante daniel
"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Joe mccormick and today we're going into the volt to bring you an episode from last year. This one originally published on july fourteenth twenty twenty and this one was called heaven and hell with bart ehrman. This was an interview that i did with a With a secular biblical historian named bart erman. Who's a really interesting and passionate scholar. Who who knows a lot and is really fun to listen to. And it's all about the origins of the christian concepts of heaven and hell. I thought this was a a really really interesting discussion. I love talking to bart and so we hope you enjoy this classic episode. Welcome to blow your mind. Production of iheartradio. Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is robert lamb. And i'm joe mccormack and this week. We are going to be featuring a couple of interviews that i recorded last week because last week robert. You're out of the office. You were at least off work for a bit and so so i recorded conversations with authors of some books one book. That's already out this year in one book. That's coming up so on thursday of this week. We're going to be airing a conversation that i had with the author of a fascinating upcoming book about the evolutionary biology of cancer. But today we're going to be exploring a topic in the realm of ancient history and religion. And if you followed us for a while. I think you probably know this about us. That one of our kind of trails to go down is tracing the evolution of religious ideas through ancient history. I mean i. I think. I've outed myself on this podcast. Before as a the kind of nonreligious religious person who loves the bible. Like you know. I i love to read ancient religious texts and learn about them and see how the ideas from the ancient world of super filtered through to us today in shape to the society's we live in and so that's exactly the kind of thing we're gonna be diving into in this episode I'm talking with a secular biblical historian named bart erman about his most recent book which is called heaven. And hell history of the afterlife. This book was released in march of this year by simon and schuster. And it's all about the christian ideas of life after death where they come from an ancient history. What influence their development and how they changed over time So there is a part. That cited in the intro of bart's book where he talks about a pew research poll that was conducted a few years ago. I think maybe it was in two thousand fifteen where It found that. Seventy two percent of americans believe in a literal heaven and fifty eight percent believe in literal hell and yet i think most americans would be deeply surprised. Even shock to learn what historians can show about the origins of these beliefs. In the strange thing. Is that like the historical conclusions. That bart's gonna talk about in. This episode are not fringe or unusual among secular scholars of the bible and historians of the ancient near east This is utterly mainstream critical scholarship. And yet i think regular people are especially in the united states are going to find it very surprising. Yeah absolutely and i. I want to stress something here for everybody so i. I just got back to work this morning. And i plugged into a pre-production Cut of this interview and it's really. It's really excellent. So if you're even slightly scared away by the idea of an interview with a secular biblical scholar don't because because bart is tremendous. He's he's funny very high energy. I think you're really going to enjoy this chat. Joe had with bart here. Yeah parts full of knowledge. Good humor passion for his subject. I think you're really going to enjoy the episode. But before we going to do it. I'll just give a little bit of background on bart's. Here's his biography. Bart ehrman is a leading authority on the new testament and the history of early christianity and the author editor of more than thirty books including the new york times bestsellers misquoting. Jesus how jesus became god and the triumph of christianity and that last one's really interesting. It's about how. Christianity took over the roman empire and went from a really small religion to the dominant religion of the empire in just a matter of a few centuries Anyway so he is a distinguished professor of religious studies at the university of north carolina chapel hill. And he has created eight popular audio and video courses for the great courses. He has been featured in time the new yorker the washington post and has appeared on. Nbc cnn and the daily show. With jon stewart as well as the history channel national geographic channel bbc. Npr all the hits. His most recent book again is heaven and hell Just one more thing before we get into it. I wanna mention. Obviously we are dealing with the the audio constraints of of remote recording in the age of covert nineteen so for example around the twelve minute mark in the episode. There is briefly. Some background noise. That sounds like a fan was turned on or the some rain. It only lasts for about a minute or so and so please just put up with a little bit of background noise and it's very brief. I promise it's not the sounds of hell right now. Audio recordings of the underworld leaking up through Some sort of mining microphone right the well to hell was unleashed office So yeah i would say Without any further ado let's jump right in barnum and welcome to the podcast. Thanks so much for joining us today. Yes thanks for having me so your book. Heaven and hell Just finished reading yesterday. And i i really really enjoyed it and i want to say that i started reading this book at a very opportune time. Because i didn't plan it this way. I'm also currently in the middle of rereading the divine comedy. Actually my wife. And i are reading it together and of course the divine comedy. Dante is wonderful poetry. But it's also psychologically fascinating because when you go through the theology of dante you get the sense of somebody who is simultaneously ingenious and thoughtful and in some ways very intellectually bold and open-minded for his historical context but in other ways dante's also very limited and provincial in a word medieval like the way you see him taking so much pleasure in designing horrific tortures for his enemies from these petty thirteenth century political struggles in italy working with ancient religious texts. Do you find yourself. Encountering this kind of irony embodied within the same author or traditional part of my book. On having the hell is dealing with some of the earliest forerunners of dante. Many people think that he was creative. In coming up with this idea of guided tour of the infernal and the parodies. Oh and the and the very on. But in fact he was borrowing from The the motif of a guided tour of the realms of the dead from earlier authors and Including in the christian tradition. I think one thing that very seriously contrast between Dante and his early forerunners..

bart erman bart Joe mccormick bart ehrman robert lamb joe mccormack schuster history channel national geogr robert simon cancer university of north carolina jon stewart the new york times the washington post Joe united states Npr
Sticking All of Your Systems and Data Together With SaaSGlue

Data Engineering Podcast

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Sticking All of Your Systems and Data Together With SaaSGlue

"Your host is tobias. Macy today interviewing rich and bart would about saz glue assess based integration orchestration automation platform. That lets you fill the gaps in your existing automation infrastructure. So rich can you start. Introducing yourself share. Yeah my name is rich. Would i've been developing software for too long twenty plus years in the financial services industry in big data mostly dulling distributed systems and now currently helping to found saskatoon and bart. How about yourself. Basically the same thing except oil and gas financial in healthcare and going back to your hd member. I good involved in the area of data management. So i started my career in the hedge fund industry building real time distributed trading systems dealing with really high volume low latency stock market data and two thousand eight. When the hedge fund industry wasn't done solo. I switched to the data industry. So for about ten years i've been building distributed felt tolerant scalable datum pipelines and bert. He'll get involved in. Data management rich turned me onto it a lot more experience with graphics in front end in or distributed real time systems but not as much data pipelines. So so you've both been working on the glue platform and you've co created it along with year two other brothers and so before we get too much into sas glue. I'm just curious if you can give some flavor of what inspired you to actually found a business with family and how well that's been going for you particularly as four brothers. Yes oh that's kind of an interesting story. So the brothers are jack j. Rich in myself. Bart in about three years ago. Jay and a friend had an idea for just as simple script owner. That could be done remotely and rich got on it in and once rich got on it i got on it and then jack kim a little bit later

Tobias Macy Bart Saskatoon Rich Bert Jack J JAY Jack Kim
We Did It, We Survived

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:16 min | 1 year ago

We Did It, We Survived

"Is so great to be with all of you. This is incredible. This is absolutely amazing because it means we did it we lived. I'm alive thing. I didn't think i'd make it. I didn't even get cold. But i'm just not to survivor. That's the how anybody i know would describe me. I'll even tell you what a year before the pandemic right fully. Before the pay. I was walking in. New york is looking at the sky. Love my life looking up being happy. And i stepped off her. That's all that's happened so far. I stepped off the curb. And i stepped off. A bird is not a dead bird. Okay this bart was also walk around. Pay attention loved his life. We just collided with nature humanity at once and so i stepped all the bird. The bird and i freaked out and the bird. And i made the same noise that is not so by that survives global pandemic if you can match the pitch of a pigeon out of fear the no no one is checking for you in the max movie. You died in the first five seconds in that montage about what went wrong with the world as you at a bird like how it ends. This is insane. Global pandemic last year was crazy because it was the first thing that ever happened. That happened to everybody. That's while that even happened in the world wars and they're named after the world you know there were some coaches like this. Y'all seem to be working out over there slowly become a little. We don't need to be dusted up to mass. Some people thought it was the end of the world. Which is why. I'm pretty sure that in all that. Chaos all that uncertainty in all that fear somebody somewhere definitely eight a person

New York
The Science of Learning a Second Language

Short Wave

01:57 min | 1 year ago

The Science of Learning a Second Language

"All right emily kwong today. We are talking about the science of learning second language because you are learning mandarin chinese which like as far as a pandemic hobby goes more power to more bart. Right for real. Though it is a hard language to learn. Language itself actually is an incredible ability. If you think about it that we humans have it involves many parts of the brain and the study of language spans across many different disciplines. So bilingual's studied in at least three different fields linguistics psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Sarah phillips is a phd student in the linguistics department at new york university. And exactly the person. I wanted to call up to talk about language learning who. Yeah i remember sarah from our episode on six hundred like how the brain responds to sentences with confusing grammar or syntax. Yeah brains and language are hurt. Jam met in korea while her father was serving in the marine corps and they raised her bilingual here in the us. Learning korean was very important to be able to communicate with my mom's side. They family and the same way that growing up speaking african american english was very important in being able to communicate and be a part of my dad's family. She's got a really interesting backstory. And i told her about my project about taking mandarin class for two hours every monday flash cards on the other nights watching movies. I can't understand and listen to us. Someone who is engaging in learning a second language thereby uses another language on a pretty regular basis that means you're a developing bilingual so in essence you are via lingual by by you know we probably exactly if maybe maybe maybe as an alternative to be bilingual. Maybe we should think of. This is developing bilingual.

Emily Kwong Sarah Phillips Bart New York University Marine Corps Sarah Korea United States
Why Your ABM Strategy Isn't Working With Kristina Jaramillo

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Why Your ABM Strategy Isn't Working With Kristina Jaramillo

"Christina. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me billy. I'm looking forward is conversation. It's my favorite topics. That will have fun with. It will be fun. We'll be fun so for those that don't know you or much about personally b. m. tell us a little bit about yourself and personally b. m. short sure personally. The end has been around for over ten years. And we've kind of evolved with account based marketing. We've taken we take very niche approach. Hence the personal bart's typically people will say we're running an abm account based program. Were running with like maybe three hundred five hundred accounts. We usually only have about two to three dozen accounts and we're focused on accounts that are fitting the ict to a t. And have the greatest revenue growth opportunity and we work with tech Sas firms people with complex sales longer sales cycles six and seven figure deals and even companies in the logistics three pl space to either we focus on a couple of things win protect or expand key accounts and again. They're going to be the ones that have. The graven is greatest revenue growth potential and greatest expansion opportunities while awesome awesome. So how'd you get into you. Know how did you guys get into to doing this with personal. Abm yeah well. We started just Lincoln marketing originally with small businesses and consultants and we. We saw that account based marketing was coming about it. Hadn't really been given that buzzword that official title And we noticed that it was working on lincoln but it needed a spur. Special tweak to it needed an extra layer of relevance that personal layer not just relevant to the rank individual but to the actual person. So what matters most to them as a person as opposed to a buying committee organization or even their department

Christina Billy Bart SAS Lincoln
Michael Isikoff Has An Issue With Barry Meier and The Collusion Hoax

The Dan Bongino Show

01:53 min | 1 year ago

Michael Isikoff Has An Issue With Barry Meier and The Collusion Hoax

"I saw this this weekend had tipped Glenn Greenwald to put it out in the social media can actually does real journalism. Greenwall picked out this gym these air. This is a former New York Times reporter Barry Meyer. And a liberal reporter, Michalis two coffees on me not have trouble Connemara reporter, but whatever you get the hint This is a fascinating exchange. Let me give you some background. You want to see how we get to group think and how people believe things that aren't true. Listen to this sucker here, a little background on it. So Barry Meyer was a former New York Times journalist. And he wrote this book recently. And the book is about how the whole Russian collusion thing happened. And how fusion GPS these air basically paid spies who were paid to feed information to media outlets that we now know. Was it true, Donald Trump colluded with the Russians? You've heard it all before. We don't need to re litigate the collusion hoax here. It's all fake. Okay, it's made up, you get it. But Meyer didn't expose in his bookkeeper minds Got you sorry for The New York Times isn't right for bright Bart. Conservative Review Bongino calm. He was right for the New York Times, and he's highlighting and sounding the alarm over this. Paid intelligence operation Fusion, GPS and others who are paid to produce political information and then feed it to media. People who run with it. Well, what's the problem with them? Information often turns out to be false. Sounds like a big problem. So it's a cop who's a big lefties interviewing Barry Meyer and instead of celebrating the fact that conservative media My show, Fox news. Other shows out there. Molly Hemingway Home and Jenkins John Solomon, who got the collusion hoax story right that it was a hoax instead of celebrating it liberal Michaelis a cough is more concerned about the fact that right wing media chose to have Barry Meyer despite him having written for The New York Times on their shows. And he's not concerned at all the fact that we got it right and they got it

Barry Meyer The New York Times Greenwall Michalis Glenn Greenwald Donald Trump Meyer Bart Molly Hemingway Jenkins John Solomon Fox News Michaelis Cough
Dan Austin, MD Lake District Farmers

Humans of Hospitality

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Dan Austin, MD Lake District Farmers

"Donald stein managing director of district farmers. Thank you so much for joining me on the podcast day. Hugely appreciate you sparing the time to chat. I just asked dan. Because unfortunately despite the fact that i love the late district not face to face but where in the world are you. This morning i am on the only island this morning by the each on fairly ironic because other agents Rarely get song. We do have some nice job today. So it's beautiful. So why is that is that is that is on the coast. Is it or yes. I live in borrowing furnace case. Shipbuilding town a systems etc. Our animals assaults trout lake district so bart alec cetera. I am but i am a barrel boy on bread and only is alive in just a filing furnace. Mazen are well. I'm by the beach as well as that. I was going to be deeply envious imagined you identify sat on the top of the stonewall fouls or you know smoking a pipe looking out over the lakes but you know we're we're coastal brothers. So that's That's better on monday. So william i wanna be up there right. You represent some incredible foams in an genuinely you know. I think i think the lake district must be one of the most beautiful places on the planet let alone in england. I adore it but for those who have not heard of late district farmers. Can you just explain to people about. Yeah do as a business. I i mean basically. We represented founding cooperative. And i don't say the found his shop window for really found producing a brilliant Just create excellent products.

Donald Stein Bart Alec Cetera Mazen DAN William England
Relational Mindfulness With Bart Van Melik

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Relational Mindfulness With Bart Van Melik

"Here we go now with bart van. Milk bart great to see you. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you down likewise god. Every time i see you. I think about the first time i saw you. Which was my first. Meditation retreat in two thousand ten. I wrote about it. It was like the key seen the key chapter from the first book. I wrote where. I go in my first meditation retreat. And i'm having all these interactions with joseph goldstein in the moments when. I'm allowed to talk to the teacher and in all of those moments. I don't think. I mentioned it but you were in the room because you were practising with him and he was giving me all this advice and you're sitting there nodding sagely so it's always a pleasure to see and you know. The pleasure is very mutual. Dan and funny story is. I had no idea what you do right for your livelihood. Because i had just come to america from the netherlands so i remember i think joseph said something to affect you notice person will know no and then he didn't say anything else but later on i found out. Oh it's yeah it's you. Well you were there for one of the most important moments in my life that retreat really change the trajectory of my life. So i always associate you with that home so many areas. I want to touch on with you. But let's start with relational mindfulness. Can you just give me a very basic description of what that is. Yeah i can. It's let me start just a little bit about that. We as human beings are relational by nature and a lot of meditation practices are done in a way where we bring attention to something. That's going on in early. And yet if you look at how life unfolds it. Unfolds very relational and so in relational meditation practices informa- ways. You learn not only to be aware of what's going on with a new but you'll also get instructions to be very mindful of. Let's say another person who's sitting in front of you

Bart Van Joseph Goldstein Netherlands DAN Joseph America
Eastern Australia Is Facing Worst Floods In Decades

Environment: NPR

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Eastern Australia Is Facing Worst Floods In Decades

"Less than two years. After bushfires blazed across australia the countries east coast is seeing its worst flooding in decades. Some areas accumulated over yard of rainfall since downpours started last thursday. Tens of thousands have been ordered to evacuate on sunday alone. Five hundred giga leaders of water. The same volume of water and sydney harbour spilled out of sydney's largest dam even as rain subsides. The floodwater will still post trouble for weeks to come joined now by laura chung who has been reporting on all of this for the sydney morning herald. Welcome thank you for having me. Thank you for being with us. So what are you hearing from people on the ground there. Can you talk about the scope of the damage that they've seen so far of course say unlike the bush fires. We don't actually have a clear image of how much has just been damaged or destroyed. We know it's significant part of the state but what we do know is there has been water. Everywhere we've heard and seen houses just picked up floating down rivers that used to be farms and paddocks we've heard of livestock just being completely washed away their videos and of cows and horses just trying to make it through these really heavy floodwaters and what used to be straits and headaches just now yet completely flooded with water right up to where the pow lines off so if you can imagine that it is very striking image. What about people who didn't weren't able to evacuate and are now stranded. I mean how are rescue operations going right now for a lot of people who live in these low lying plains. Floods aunt anything new to them. They've lived with them before they know how to prepare for them. But there are a lot of people who would just not quite ready for how quickly the water would come up So we've got thousands of volunteers from the state. Emergency service who out there along with police on an interstate help as well. Who are rescuing people in. Bart's people saint helicopters being deployed to try and aol if people out of certain areas. And you're not only are off volunteers having to deal with the really intense flooding conditions. They're also having to deal with the wildlife. That's coming their way as

Laura Chung Sydney Morning Herald Sydney Harbour East Coast Sydney Australia Bush Headaches Bart AOL
"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

05:44 min | 2 years ago

"bart" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb and I'm Joe McCormick and this week. We are going to be featuring a couple of interviews. That I recorded last week because last week Robert, you were out of quote, the office you or at least you off work for a bit and <hes> so so I recorded conversations with authors of some books <hes> one book. That's already out this year in one book. That's coming up so on Thursday of this week. We're going to be airing a conversation that I had with the author of A. A fascinating upcoming book about the evolutionary biology of cancer, but today we're going to be exploring topic in the realm of ancient history and religion. If you've followed us for a while, I think you probably know this about us that one of our favorite kind of trails to go down his tracing the evolution of religious ideas through ancient history I mean I think I've outed myself on this podcast before. As a the kind of nonreligious person who loves the Bible. Can I love to read ancient religious texts and learn about them and see how the ideas from. From the ancient world of super filtered through to us today and shape to the societies we live in, and that's exactly the kind of thing. We're GONNA be diving into in this episode <hes> I'm talking with a secular Biblical historian named Bart Erman about his most recent book, which is called Heaven and hell a history of the afterlife. This book was released in March of this year by Simon. And Schuster, and it's all about the Christian ideas of life after death where they come from ancient history, what influence their development and how they changed over time <hes> so? So there was a part that cited in the intro of Bart's book where he talks about a pew research poll that was conducted a few years ago. I think. Maybe it was in two thousand fifteen. Where <hes> it found that seventy two percent of Americans believe in a literal heaven and fifty eight percent believe in literal hell, and yet I think most Americans would be deeply surprised, even shock to learn what historians can show about the origins of these beliefs in the strange thing. Is that like the historical conclusions that Bart's GonNa talk about in this episode? Are Not fringe or unusual among secular scholars of the Bible, in historians of the ancient Near East <hes>. This is utterly mainstream, critical scholarship, and yet I think regular people are especially in the united. States, are going to find it very surprising. Yeah, absolutely, and I want to stress something here for everybody, so I just got back. To work this morning and I plugged into a pre production <hes> cut of this interview and it's really it's really excellent, so if you're even slightly scared away by the idea of an interview with a secular biblical scholar <hes> don't be because Barda is tremendous. He's he's funny. Very High Energy. I think you're really going to enjoy this chat. Joe Had with Bart here. Yeah, parts full of knowledge, good humor passion for his subject. I think you're really going to enjoy the episode, but before we can do it I'll just give a little bit of background on Bart's here's his biography Bart. D Ehrman is a leading authority on the New Testament and the history of early Christianity, and the author or editor of. Of more than thirty books, including the New York Times bestsellers misquoting Jesus, how Jesus became God, and the triumph of Christianity, and that last one's really interesting. It's about how Christianity took over the Roman Empire and went from a really small religion, too dominant religion of the empire, and just a matter of a few centuries <hes> anyway, so he is a distinguished professor of religious studies, the University of North Carolina Chapel, Hill and he. He has created eight popular audio and video courses for the great courses. He has been featured in time. The New Yorker The Washington Post and has appeared on NBC CNN and the daily show with Jon Stewart as well as the history channel National Geographic Channel BBC NPR, all the hits <hes> his most recent book is Heaven and Hell <hes> just one more thing before we get into it I. WanNa mention obviously we are dealing with. With the audio constraints of <hes> of remote recording in the age of Covid, nineteen, so for example around the twelve minute mark in the episode there is briefly some background noise that sounds like a fan was turned on or some rain. It only lasts for about a minute or so, and so please just put up with a little bit of background noise, and it's very brief I promise. It's not the sounds of hell right. Now audio recordings of the underworld leaking up through <hes>, some sort of mining microphone right? The well to hell was not unleashed office. So yeah, I would say <hes> without any further ado. Let's jump right in. Bardem and welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks so much for joining us today. Yes, thanks for having me so your Book Heaven and Hell <hes> I just finished reading yesterday, and I I really really enjoyed it. <hes> and I want to say that I started reading this book. It very opportune time because though I didn't plan it this way. I'm also currently in the middle of rereading. Rereading the divine comedy, actually my wife and I are reading it together and <hes>, of course, the divine comedy Dante his wonderful poetry, but it's also psychologically fascinating <hes> because when you go through the theology of Dante, you get the sense of somebody who is simultaneously ingenious and thoughtful, and in some ways very intellectually bold and open minded for his historical context, but in other ways. Dante's also very limited and provincial in a word medieval like the way you see him taking so much pleasure in designing horrific tortures for his enemies from these. Petty Thirteenth Century political struggles in Italy. Working with ancient religious texts do you find yourself encountering? This kind of irony embodied within the same author or traditional lot

Bart Erman Robert Lamb Joe McCormick Barda New York Times Ehrman Schuster A. A Simon Joe Had editor
"bart" Discussed on Science Salon

Science Salon

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"bart" Discussed on Science Salon

"Going to wrap it up here because I know you go. I'm going to read the the final paragraph of your beautiful book even though it is debated in my mind it is relatively clear which of these two choices socrates rather his ventriloquist plato actually thought he believed death was the end of the story but this was not a source of anxiety for him and it didn't need to be for us either. It doesn't need to be for us either. It is instead a motivation to love this life as much as we can presume long as we can to enjoy it to. Its most as far as possible and to help others do the same if all if all of us do that we will live on after death not in a personal consciousness once our brains of die but in the lives of those. We have touched perfect beautiful ending. Congratulations on the book. Thank you for your important work. And I can't read the next book this going to be. Great Yeah your next book should be a movie you know. Because filmmakers love the apocalypse Olga thing before the pandemic I've always watched all these apocalyptic movies. And all these reading all of these apocalyptic novels. And then your right in the middle of one of these is when the pandemic is watching contagious. Something Yeah exactly you know. I just had a phone meeting with a couple of screenwriters working on a TV project. And I just flippantly asked. Is Anybody thinking about the corona virus? Oh scripts already written. We don't even know what's going to happen but it's it's scary enough we can write a good TV movie script for all right. Bart will thank you again for coming on the show and thanks for your work..

Bart
"bart" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"bart" Discussed on WTVN

"Bart will get you that key word coming up tonight at six thirty we have another one of the stories of former teacher and administrator in central Ohio has been indicted after allegedly having sex with a teenage students thirty nine year old Brooke right indicted on two counts of sexual battery and two counts of unlawful sexual conduct with a minor right worked it ventures academy in Delaware at the time of the alleged offenses she was suspended and placed on paid leave after the school officials were notified of a police investigation the the alleged inappropriate sexual acts took place in multiple locations in Franklin County and if convicted on those charges right faces numerous years of incarceration as well as registration as a sex offender why do you think that we're seeing this happen so much more often now where it's a case of an adult female having sex with an underaged male and as I was talking with blazer there before we parted ways he's a believer that that's always been going on it's just more widely reported on probably obviously with the internet social media all that stuff twenty four hour news networks that are constantly looking for for content that stuff like this song just gets amplified more even even you know the case of child predators and and missing children that that's that's been going on for a very long time do we have more of it nowadays or is it just the fact that we know more of it happening nowadays do you think it's as heinous when it's an adult female having sex with an underage male verse is an adult male having sex with an underage female because I think in a lot of cases both men and women assume that that the female victim has been raped or manipulated in some fashion and I don't know that that necessarily applies if you're into the under age male victims that this happens to Hey I got a couple more touch points that I want to get to would love to hear your side of the story how you feel on this AT one WTVN eight hundred six ten W. T. first though let's take your business traffic and weather every ten minutes on the tense from ten star heating and cooling products and Johnny the trip out to downtown getting a little bit easier we're still slowing down as seventy east into seventy north merge over on the east side now back up to seventy two about a thirty three seventy one north still having to about seventeen Davin new but minor delays off the fairgrounds the lay still for two seventy west the Westerville three fifteen that an accident southbound south of king here before six seven is off to the right hand side of three cars involved there the.

Bart Ohio Delaware Franklin County W. T. Johnny Westerville administrator Brooke Davin eight hundred six ten W thirty nine year twenty four hour ten minutes
"bart" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"bart" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"You have a favorite bart Starr story encounter. I don't have a single one because they basically all what's good same here you need for your go up you think there's no way he remembers he doesn't remember yeah he knows almost everything about yeah and he leaves you feeling better than you felt when you arrived in his presence and that's the way he treated every single person you could watch from afar where you can watch a close and you'll see that he treated every single person the exact same way with the utmost respect a true character I mean I I don't have nothing nice to say about. you know it's amazing John so you've got to know the Starz a little bit and yesterday a division game against a bitter rival the two teams a likely be battling it out at the end of the season for who wins the division and yet the moments that most people are talking about today involved what happened at halftime with the commissioner with mark Murphy with cherry star what was coursing through you as you saw that unfold there at halftime that beautiful ceremony. well just a whole lot of. the Packers have been blessed with such and and quite frankly one of the most important history in the in the NFL with the you know be and I'll I'll get in nineteen nineteen they're they're one of the only adult no Chicago Chicago until nineteen points of the Packers are the only team that first nineteen nineteen. and. throughout the course of the Packers who they they have some wild foods and some really incredible moments but that three P. from the last World Championship to the first two Superbowl whose book to people kind to the NFL because of the joining of the AFL NFL imports store really is is is a man that that took that time that possible war that helped popularize the sport nationally and. to make a point but he was the star himself because he was the first two super bowls and that popularity only grew as time went by and after he was finished playing it as he coached her which wasn't the the greatest years for the Green Bay Packers but still very much respected for the way he was at the man and and you just call the whole history and tradition of the Green Bay Packers in the stores kind of wine there and have time to go to all the people that he had an impact on even guys that he didn't play with but he left a lasting tradition with Brett Marvin and Aaron Rodgers so it was a truly special John Kuhn with this and W. T. M. J. H. alley got less than a minute left I want to ask you quickly those first plays are scripted what happens if down and distance don't measure up to the plate that's been scripted like the third one is that deep slant in its third in one how does that work out. well I mean you have your scripted in place and and those are basically your first and second dump if you plan on using you know for your first fifteen perfect template now your script will change you have your favorite yardage play you have your favorite third down play they're not necessarily written into the script local under those games situation well the thing with when you enter the ends and that screen is something that they were looking to set up early the the touchdown to Jamal Williams and maybe it's just that the second play of the game was it did you have to kind of set up that screen and set the misdirection so there there are scripted there's a reason they're scripting you kind of fault there early on he is Packer great John Kuhn love have any on the show John will talk to you next week thank you bye Packers insider sponsored by.

bart Starr
"bart" Discussed on The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

02:49 min | 3 years ago

"bart" Discussed on The Business of Sports With Andrew Brandt

"But when he went into an started talking to. Employees. That's when I saw what was going on? With Bart Starr, usually with his wife, who always had a smile on her face always hundred percent of the time is wife cherry. They would just wanna walk through the offices and they really didn't want anyone to make a fuss over the didn't want to be led around. They just wanna walk, and they'd stop at the desk, and they'd see pictures and they talk about. Oh, that's your daughter. How old is she? What is she into? She liked dance. She liked gymnastics. What's her favorite pet? What's your favorite color, and these were sincere questions and they would follow up with handwritten notes everyone? I know in the office got a handwritten note from Bart star, including me. I got to any ended every Renault with the exact same line, which was thank you for all you do for the Green Bay Packers. It was cherished because what the Bart Starr. They're not they're not minimum around or not many of them left the truly truly cared about everyone, but themselves. Obviously, this was something that, you know, you see a person like that. And you think how are they like that? I used to watch him and I would watch the way people interacted with him. And more importantly, after seeing this few times, I would watch the person who interacted with Bart after Bart walked away and inevitably inevitably that person man or woman would have a smile on their face. They would kind of look around. They look down they'd smile. They go back to work, little more pep in their step. It was. I mean just thinking about it gets me a little choked up because he left a trail of appanage wherever he went Bart. Starr was that special where he took such a sincere interest? In people that had nothing to give him had no way to pay him back. There was no quid pro quo. He just had an interest in even in his darkest days as chronicle by Peter King in that moving tribute he did with Aaron Rodgers last year. Was you saw the bar, you know, trying to get the words out not about him not about anything else. But about Aaron he wanted to do it for Aaron. He wanted to everything for everyone else. It just it just impressed me so much. And, you know, close friend of mine shared something with me after this, and it was a letter that his father, my close friends father had sent had sent a letter to bar in nineteen seventy. Six basic criticizing BART's coaching, and discussed it with the play on the field, as you know, they weren't a good team under bar when he was a coach. So Bart writes back my friend, I put this on Twitter. I'll just read it, dear Mr. clump ner..

Bart Starr Bart Green Bay Packers Aaron Rodgers Twitter Peter King hundred percent
"bart" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

13:19 min | 3 years ago

"bart" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"WFAN. WFAN FM. It's utter chaos in here. Bart scott. I love the death match that we were all waiting to hear it. See? Mano Mano L, John minko. Not a big fan of. Oh, what Jacob degrom is pulling John. Just one question. Have you ever told the coach you don't wanna play any second downs? No. But they always pay me my money. Underpaid players in Saint players. We just saw one this year later on bail say you know, what? I think I'm worth more a term deal. So I rather just sit out this year. And I'd rather give my services in my Carey's to a team that's going to invest in me long-term because you're not gonna do me like DeMarco Murray who had those four hundred carries the year before in Dallas and couldn't get signed because he was all done. They took it out of here. But the difference is there he's not getting paid. Yeah. Yeah. Getting paid. But he's on he's on recoup that money because we saw happened to Earl Thomas Earl Thomas decided to play got hurt and he'll never get that money. Because now he's a thirty year old come surgery. Well, that's the risk. You take. So you have to do something smart for you a business. Why so Drake at Bagram San? Hey, I'm not gonna you know, put myself on the pitch. Limit is saying, okay, I'm gonna create some long Jody for myself. And I'm going to try to risk. Yep. No. But if you compare him the bell doesn't that that means the ground forfeiture seventeen million dozen pitch. All that'd be. That'd be the very drastic case. Yeah. But that would be the correlation. But but it, but if it was like being on the franchise tag. Just a year they lead the ground go, and I'm sure he'll get picked up. You think somebody pay the ground seventeen million dollars? Weekday grams decision to. To to leave. So the Mets would still have the right store? Well, Brazilian the right? They can say, okay. Well, if you're the Mets widely can relieve the rich it I can get my seventeen million dollars and go pitch pits to say my arms tight, and what can you say? Well, then you go on the injured list. Thank you. I still get my chain. Man. You guys just blow for blow. Round of a prizefight. Sweater bar shirt. Pitch. It's almost like. Well. They'd be a stretch on not gonna I'm not gonna go. All I'm saying is the wilpon is making money off me and my wars over ten so paying you wanna work. All right. Unfortunately, I have to leave it there being all right? All right. I'm going to call it a draw. You know, you guys fought admirably. Can't wait until the rematch in the Philippines and ten years. Macau? We can go to Macau. Get a thrill in Manila part two. All right. We. Let's head down to port St. Lucie or so pleased to be joined by the third baseman for the New York. Mets. Todd frazier. Hate dot it's Maggie and Bart. How you doing today you got? Fantastic. Well, let's just gonna start here. If I hear one more time, how nice you are. How funny you are. You know, what a great personality you light up every clubhouse. Okay. There's been plenty of stories written on that tell me the last time and that Todd Frazier like turned heel. What's the last time that you really just got frustrated flew off the handle because you're a human being you can't be sunny. In a good mood all the time. How do angered probably was driving these people? They're not the best driver saw probably I went off a little bit on the driver's here. But other than that, you're not trying to look at everything with a clear, conscience and. I'm a big believer. My dad taught me that that, you know, think down the road like you really going to be that upset with things down the road. And it's like, yeah. You know, you know, small potatoes is mostly everything. But I'm gonna aggressive driver. That's probably about it. Yeah. Well, speaking of driving. I find it hard to believe that the drivers in port St. Lucie. Could be a lot worse than the ones in New Jersey. You know, we're we saw on your Twitter feed. Todd's traffic alerts you try to give the heads up, and you try to do a nice thing. Here you try to give a heads up to the people in south jersey. Hey, route eighteen heavy build-up got a one car accident things. Open up at mile marker twenty one the first response to that. Todd was why don't you start using the whole field instead of going for home runs and hitting in the low to us. People are crazy. I try now people out trying to be nice talking about people in in a good manner. And all they talk about their nasty. Get nasty Roger don't get. So just block them. And then you know, I might have to block like ten people a day. But hey, it is what it is. Okay. So you and my co host Bart Scott have something very big in common. One former teammate. Got it. I mean that would be the only one right? Here's something funny. Right. This is what Tim tebow? Has said, right. He's like I have a lot of Todd Frazier stories, but none that I'm going to share with you today. I've got a lot of them. And you know, it's I'm gonna call Bs on this. I don't think there's one story that Tim tebow could tell that's rated more than PG. Listen to my wife says it all talk. She's like, you're not the person at home. I come to a different person in the clubhouse. And I'm a different person at home. I tried to get everybody laugh. About afraid to you know, get under some people get a little bit. And but. I messed with ten because he thinks he thinks he's is a winter and. He's such a good football player come in here and be a big leaguer like right away. So I have to break him down a little bit. And you're not the first time. I met him. I basically told him as a lesson. I need I need a Chinese. I need my lunch at eleven o'clock. And I need a Gatorade. I want you to Mexico to Gatorade up and that he didn't do it. So I this job that's about all I can tell you about that one. Did he calls the system because he's like what? He's like widely in a beaver, man. I people think it's a steak like like, that's really who. He is. He's like, Aw, shucks type of guy, man. I'm trying to get them to listen his collar a little bit. Now. He doesn't curse it all. He's. There's a lot of guys like I said like my God damn it. I don't know. I don't recall dang it. I don't know what that word today. But he is the nicest. I gotta break down every once in a while. So he was actually Bart was his date to the met gala. Now. Now you had the thumbs down. You had the sought. Shakur was going to be the rally cry this year. What are you thinking about? Or do you kind spit ball a little bit with the team exited? You just come up with a organically yourself. Is it comes up? It's one of those things where it just happened in spring training and took off it. But did you did you did you burn the Sar grant? Thanks gone. I actually my wife, you know, use it for dinner. Grinds everything. I dunno. It just comes to send out like when I was at the Yankees that just came out of nowhere. So you can't really push it. You gotta let it come from what happened in halfway during the season that happened at all. So just let come. Todd frazier. Joining us here on CNBC. Okay. From Dom Smith said Todd Frazier, quite the rapper Todd's feeling it. He'll start wrapping. And he can wrap he wraps freecell from the top of his head Harrap about whatever he'll kick out a flow. And it'll be a good one. It will be funny. It will be good allies right there. That's the other top prejudice. About. J T DJ Tf. I'm telling you, I need to get on the on the show where I can just be me. Like the guy who didn't get on a masked, man. Yeah. If I could do that that'd be all. Every part. People like, all Catholic. Yeah. Blended with everybody, there's all different cultures and different things people. You know, you know, you never know who's you gotta try that's round with people. I really don't think I'm that good at Robin. But he might have thought that every once in a while it's been something out. Good enough back. Oh, man. I wish I wrote that down. But I never remember. I was going to say, we we are radio station will drop a beef for you. If you want to leave it up to you know back. I'm good. And you don't even remember what a what a great line. You got off at any point in your life. A good performance. Burnett up. My favorite line is out. Doc like, I always on something. I hit the ball good all day. But everything is like, hey. And then my my next time. It'll be like I'm so good. I'm Larry Bird stayed away. I don't know why say that. But always dropped that at the end. We like it. Tom frazier. Joining us. Okay. Here's the ultimate them. You can eliminate the shift in baseball. You can eliminate it. But it means we have to cut off your pinkie toe. Eliminate the ship please, I need I need a take away my pinkie toe the peanut butter. It's underneath milder toast. So read it out there. And Todd Frazier. Join us is there ever a time. We try to make someone laugh on the base paths. They're trying to get them out of their game. And it actually backfired on you. Yeah. Is there are some times where you forget who you're talking usually guys the talk back. But then you say something funny and the guidance saying that back I'll just stand there like, man. This is awkward and then finally the. Combat and lab alone that but I can't give you like a certain instance of what I said, but there's been times where it's just like you'll bring something up about another player or somebody like that. What about like? Yeah. And like. Okay. This guy can leave but other matters and major league baseball players, and they get awkward just like the rest of us. Happy to hear that. How would you characterize Saad? The feeling of a player over thirty who would be heading into free agency right now, that's mate. How do you feel? I feel good. I feel great. I think we talked about this a lot. The game has changed. Try to bring the younger is up a little more. One of the things where you got to work even harder. You got to work even harder to gotta work. Everybody. Show them that you know, you got three or four or five more years then hopefully that happened. So for me. Got to put up a good year play the team game and all the eventual individuals take care of itself. But. Yeah. It's a different game now. So and that if it's gone in that direction, I I gotta work even harder. So you come out in support for for the Gromit saying that you know, he deserves to get paid. He had a Cy Young season best pitchers in a game. But how do you prove to the ownership that you guys can be productive post era era? Over thirty being nutrition. Be whatever the new technologies of the day. How do you guys convinced the owners, or do you believe that you know, you guys are gonna have to attack? This new CBA when it comes up. Yeah. And that's a great question because the new CBA without further the new CBA coming up. There's there's some big issues that we got going on besides what would you talk about about players over thirty a lot of free agents. Still unsigned out there. It's just crazy to thank, you know, people say, oh, you're making this amount of money. You should keep your mouth shut. But hey, isn't that what we strive to do drive to work at the a job, we love try and make as much money as possible and. You know, it's something that we definitely got a, you know, when the union comes here, we've got to figure out what we're doing. I think we've had some good talk to ready, but for God's over thirty like myself. Production production, and if you produce and they come back and say, they don't want you and data. You look yourself in America. You know, what somebody's gonna want me? Because at the end of the day. I put myself that I can do it. And I'm confident everything I do, you know Todd. We're talking about Todd Frazier. One thing that we try to get across the fans. Listen, it take away the dollars and sense that you're paying the players. It doesn't get passed on to you the fan. You know, you pay a player less. It doesn't mean. You're ticket prices are going to cost less. It doesn't mean the beer and concessions are gonna cost less than merchandise isn't gonna cost any less. You don't get that savings. But the idea that players might put restrictions on themselves to try to save themselves. Maybe for free agency and try to maintain their trade value. Do you think enough players would be willing to step out and do something like that? Yeah. I think we got a bunch of guys right now that understand that. The path where you know, things things aren't going to be good and baseball things are going happen. We need any more talked. I think I don't think guys will ever step out and not want to compete..

Todd frazier Bart scott baseball Mets Tim tebow Earl Thomas Earl Thomas DeMarco Murray Mano Mano L Jody Saint port St. Lucie Bagram San John minko Drake Manila Macau Carey Jacob degrom New Jersey Twitter