19 Burst results for "Barry Schwartz"

Interview With Steve Ells

How I Built This

03:49 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Steve Ells

"So there's a famous ted talk by a guy named barry schwartz. It's called the paradox of choice and in it very explains that virtually all kern research on human behavior supports this idea that we humans we don't really like to have too many choices. Anything beyond four to six actually makes us anxious and unhappy which could help explain the success of kepala. Because if you've ever been in one you can probably tell me the menu by heart burrito bowl salad tacos four options. That is it. There isn't a whole lot to agonize over. And it's one of the reasons why you put late just exploded in the two thousands on the eve of the millennium the company had just been more than twenty stores and today cipolla has nearly twenty three hundred locations across the us and in four other countries and its value is around fourteen billion dollars now aaa as you will hear was never meant to become what it became. It was supposed to be a one off burrito joint in denver a joint that would generate enough cash to finance a high end restaurant that was developed as plan. He's actually a classically trained chef and he wanted to make michelin starred food. Not foil wrapped burritos into the earliest recollection. I have of in being in the kitchen and cooking was in the third grave and we lived in germany. And i remember cooking scrambled eggs. Had you make them. Did you scramble the digital crack the eggs into the panel scramble him or did you scrambling before no ice. Scrambled them for With a fork in a bowl. Thank and then. My mom had a a very well. Seasoned cast iron skillet. Nice i mean it was very very smooth and almost nonstick and i used to push the kurds into the center in a square shape. A perfect square. Maybe three by three or three and a half by three and a half something like that and then and then when it was just set enough i would flip it over and I mean it was very controlling. My can says a lot about me. Because i'm a i'm a little bit of a control freak and of course i had no idea then but I was just. It's an interesting. It's an interesting memory. Like what point did you start to a. I've read like stories about you in college where you'd dinner parties and and people like. What is this that you butter you. You'd make like duck con feet and stuff like how did you even know about this. How did you get into foods at such a young age in it well. My mom was a very adventurous cook and a really good one And she had a garden. She got all the cooking magazines and had a lot of cookbooks. And i used to. I used to spend time in the kitchen and And follow along. And at some point. I started watching cooking shows a julia child and graham on the galloping. Gourmet and the pbs series. The master chef series. I really love those and and would duplicate the recipes and and liked to cook for my family and then When i was older in high school i started having people over so you go to college in in boulder yes and you study art history and of course it made zero sense to my father. What you do with artistic. He'd be like so. What are you gonna do that. Our history degree. Of course i would say you know. I don't know we'll see. We'll see how this unfolds. And probably i was thinking that i would continuing and go to graduate school but my roommate suggested to me that i go to cooking school. She said this just weeks before

Kepala Cipolla Barry Schwartz Kern TED Denver Germany United States PBS Julia Graham Boulder
"barry schwartz" Discussed on SEO 101

SEO 101

05:23 min | 6 months ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on SEO 101

"Wouldn't say that google is gonna lose much market share. I i just. I be shocked if they they're always so far ahead of everybody so it'll be interesting to see what what is google's market share these days. I don't think i've looked at them for a year or two. It's depends on who you ask. I mean if you look at it in your clients. It's usually what how much what we're getting search. Google ninety something percent right Microsoft says they have like thirty percent share in some markets. So i'm not sure it depends on who you ask him how you actually qualified. I would love to see from the google side a breakdown. Excuse me of their their market share based on where they get the traffic like how much for example that would be relevant to. The conversation is how much of apples The money that they're paying apple to be the primary search on apple devices for how much percentage is that of their overall percentage. Right does that sense. It would be interesting to see that. I know like i mean there's different websites that track this stuff so hard to say how how large it is. But i mean safari. Mobile has a really has like almost like a fifty percent. Sixty percent browser market share fifty five percent. I think the last metric chrome mobile is only thirty five percent or so. So i know for i know for our sites and we we literally get millions and millions of visitors a day combined across dollar sites were over sixty percent on mobile right. Yeah surprised the anthem stopped going away. We paid experience update. We'll see what happens. Boston has lots of different changes. Coming up in two thousand twenty one should make seo and the whole industry still exciting. Even though it's been you know. People have leaving the industry dani sullivan onto google and matt cots so weird still get weirded out by that you you typically are now considered the new dani sullivan. So when are you moving to being question. Dwayne four stricken issues with that to twenty foresters at yelp now her years ago else. You're right correct next. Yeah so. I don't know i'm not sure i don't. I have no plans on going down with the seo industry seo's dan. I'm going down with it. Aren't we all well do you want. Is there anything you'd like to promote. Are there any upcoming anything. You'd like to tell us before the end of the show. I'm trying to become a youtuber. So go to my youtube channel at youtube dot com slash rusty Slash rusty brick. Subscribe to your friends. This subscribe smashed out like button comment. took her say outside of that. Yeah no Pretty active on twitter rusty brick Check out the surgeon roundtables Land checks conferences doing a virtual conference in december. And if you're interested in being your new york area near tristate area and you want to be on my blog or interview in a socially distant way were standing about ten feet apart and gold outside now so that might start slowing soon. So he can. Now be fun. I can interview. There's no cost. I just want to help people get their name out there and talk to some interesting people in search and pbc and so forth. that's awesome. Well thank you again for all your hard work and keep up the keep. Keep the machine running on your machine. There's no doubt about it. Thank you so much for having me. House awesome. Yeah so we have myself ross done. Ceo of step forth web marketing. John carr cut the director of seo advance local and our special guest. Barry schwartz founder and editor of search engine roundtable. Thanks for joining us today. Do you have any questions you'd like to share with us. Please feel free to post them on. Our facebook group easily found by searching. Seo podcast on. Facebook have.

google apple Facebook dani sullivan John carr Barry schwartz Boston twitter Microsoft new york Dwayne yelp Ceo director founder editor
"barry schwartz" Discussed on SEO 101

SEO 101

08:03 min | 6 months ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on SEO 101

"Radio dot fm. Welcome back to seo went to one on webmaster radio dot fm hosted by giancarlo director seo for advanced local and myself ross done ceo of stepped forth web marketing inc. Joined by barry schwartz founder and editor of search engine roundtable so johnny cookie lewis world's yellow suit so a lot of stuff's been going on this year twenty twenty. It's been crazy but a lot of us tend to forget that in january of this year google talked about how that chrome browsers gonna go. Cookie lists within two years. So like twenty twenty. Two cookies are gonna be pretty much a thing. There's a lot of talk in the programmatic space of other subtypes of search marketing. The rely more cookies and seo does a the phrase the cook Cookie lewis world is very very common. I don't hear many. Seo's talking about the impact. And i'm not sure what the impact would be for us but you have any thoughts on how. Seo or organic search general might change when cookies go away a preemptive with just one thing which is what to our listeners. verdy probably just turn them off anyway. A lot of top hat. But what do we mean by cookie like calculus. So what's going to happen. Is the browsers. Themselves are going to stop working with cookies. So chrome browser would be support for third party. Cookies will specify its third party. Cookies in a chrome browser would be phased out within a couple years. Which would put it in gone by twenty twenty two but cookies do it primarily. Let's advertisers of track things that happen on websites in its website owners. Track things that happens on their sites there they they don't have specifically identified identifiable information. So they can't say. Hey john carcasses. Read my webpage. But they can't tell you that a guy from ohio who's done this this and this and has visited these sites just visited your web page and if for advertisers. That's great great information. They can target people better lots of things that are tied to advertising. But i always kinda of wonder that's going to change the way. The web works a lot because advertising is much harder to do. Because you don't have cookies. How much more important does it make us. Yo will we have to change anything around. The the fact that browsers are now to not look at cookies. What's what cut of a general thoughts on this. Yeah i mean essentially so. We've been seeing coming for a long time even before. Gdp our concern about tracking users and tracking them around the web. The funny part is the you said. It's only third party so big about it google's everywhere facebook's everywhere those first party cookies so if you go to google dot com you do a surge we go google properties used to seeing any ads ends ads. Kind of those kind of google's handling it is our first party cookies so we track it. We know where. I party and we're able to still fox. It's not really impacting like google or facebook. They actually i think loving it because they're able to still get this data across the whole entire internet because they're all over the internet so the ad mean. Seo's have always been in a space off. You know search engine. The us do cookies. Seo's are just not talking about it because if they're only doing organic search or whole life was around google s Making a webpage not supported. Not reliant on cookies or session ideas or any of these types of things because those were not something that google bought would actually initiate session. Ideas are bad for your l.'s. Back in the early two thousand people use those cookies were way around that and then again. Google does not accept a cookie so seo's Care about that. New p seaworld or you're gonna search edward or if you're in any of the display edward specially that's more of a top concern around there and i don't think google has to worry about their face because it's really first party cookies. I believe if your absence publisher and stuff like that you have to give consent or something at first party cookies to enable that i believe i'm not so deep into the space but i believe it is like a setting where you have to check off and say you give google the right to do. I party accused or something like that. But i think. Seo's are really you know built around not having to worry about cookies. Because that's their like blood. I guess so. I kind of fun. Tricky question here but google's future as a whole so with all this doj stuff coming down. There's a lot of discussion around whether the potential is for google to be split up Do you think that will be good for innovation and likely brig another search engine into the space to think. You know google's obviously google's worked hard to get where it is. It is the best of paint at this point. I think it'd be great to have another search engine out there but do you think that this might help if they do get broken up or are you saying i mean yeah. So it's early in the say they actually did file a lawsuit. Like you said what's going to happen is very very much so in the air. I think the will be significant changes. I just don't know what those changes will be will be more on the android. Cy will be more on the search side. I don't i don't really know. I know that when google first launched were on a what fifteen different search engines all competing the big one was vista for a good day are no longer around. So could somebody come up even without the department of justice. Actually doing something. Yeah was interesting is that now. I mean since two thousand fourteen. I believe apple was trying to like crawl the web and now i can get yesterday. The financial times had reported that. It's coming soon apple. Search it's gonna come out and apple. Obviously as you know has a huge share of mobile browser margaret thatcher. The question is will apple search with be regulations and timing around regulations if they're implemented around the same time goes live with their search engine if they live in a search while that Go ahead and help apple. Maybe microsoft being captured some market share. It will be interesting. I would be very interesting to see what apple comes out with and search. I just don't know. Microsoft launched in two thousand and four embassy search feature wasn't really good but they had dominant share of the desktop markets market share with internet explorer. There wasn't a mobile browser back. Then it was just stop in guy was the thing there was fire fox was really dominant back on. I believe and i thought oh well. Msn search is gonna launch. They're gonna make it the fault on all the browsers and google is going to die and they didn't as you know goodwill then said oh. We have a problem here. We need to fix it. We need to build our own browser. They go chrome and mobile's coming. We've got a builder own device. They bought android so they've been smart about it and they paying apple billions of dollars every year to be the fault search engine on safari a mobile safari and so forth. So we'll be interesting to see what happens if apple decides. Hey you know what instead of paying billions of dollars every year google as invested in ourselves. They have Because they took over they took the head of Search From from google three years ago and they've been investing in things so it'll be interesting to see if between department. Justice and apple starts launching and microsoft being pretty good these days in terms of relevance relevancy in search quality will be interesting to see what changes would happen between all always turn avenues for five years will be the dominant player. I wouldn't go. I wouldn't put my money on saying they would it be. I would say. I.

google Seo apple twenty twenty Cookie lewis Microsoft barry schwartz ceo margaret thatcher ross director johnny ohio facebook founder department of justice
"barry schwartz" Discussed on SEO 101

SEO 101

07:04 min | 6 months ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on SEO 101

"Passages so it's hasn't launched so nobody really knows that we can just make assumptions and google has told us like you said before you can't optimize for those who can't optimize bat specifically around core updates. And then later they said all right maybe can optimize for it but here are some tips after us harassing them on. What could we do if we get hit by a core update and they finally do that. It'd sink japan on so forth but usually they know nothing to do. But then there's something to do but question is what can you do with rank. Brain rang her brain and stuff like that. So there's lots of things that technically you really can't directly optimize for your optimizing for burs optimizing for gonna be really for passage indexing. Mike go ahead and say all right. This is the content that passes indexing likes misses. How have the kind of structure that content and maybe that will help my content better because of this new. Change that google bait. So it's not only optimizing four. I guess but his optimizing with it. I guess maybe structure in your pages. In more structured fashion the header is maybe matter more. How much content you have within those header sections and how you structure those paragraphs. These are all assumptions to test. This stuff when it goes live and see what matters so. I assume wants this goes live will quickly see that seven percent change. What pages went up. What pages went down what. What are the differences in terms of. What when higher or lower right. And i'm doing this. we're not even knowing if patches passages will even apply to the news space right. You're you're absolutely correct. We don't know. But i do think that there are things we can start thinking about now. It could potentially help us what it does launch by the end of the year. Okay so i mean does make sense. I mean there must be a way to like restructure content. Kinda take advantage of this much. Not news content per se but i very specific theory about news content that i love to talk you about but i'm not going to do it in public but if you have a conversation i have a pretty strong case for how it could impact news content. Okay second question before you start yours. Ross is Don anderson wrote a great article. About how bert might be connected to passages that you just talked about. I'm burping part of that whole conversation. Can you talk about with. John was going after their. So she. I i yes. I was very very close with her in terms of actually publishing that article over the she was running for the course of two weeks or so. And it's a it it's like don't you printed s pdf. It's like fifty five pages. It's an articles. It's a great jobs. Everybody goes downloaded at search engine. Land and print didn't read it over the weekend. It's great it's great. I highly recommend it so it really kind of goes through an academic approach about what she could find from the research papers and the academic papers around passage index singer passes ranking and any relations to that with burton so forth. It's hard to pull out and say this is what ghouls doing with it. Exactly 'cause a lot of research papers versus what's actually implemented doesn't actually you know that's not always the case. Sometimes the wording. I dunno google. It's hard to say for example but it's super interesting to see these research papers and say all right so maybe this is how it's working this is what the engineers and the phd's behind all these algorithms you're thinking of so it's definitely worth a read. Tackle the hardest. Summarize because it's really academic but it's definitely basic concept is is bert helping google figure out and rank the staff this this passing ranking is. This is bird helping with that. Initial evidence in the research paper saying yes. It is actually Don's can be reading. A number of articles. Around bert in telling us where surged are used And so forth so that we could get a better understanding of how burt at michigan. Those types of machine in a algorithms and they are actually used in search that we get a better understanding of you know maybe how how we should think about writing content how we think about Getting links and so forth It's kinda like giving you a deeper understanding of how research papers work and the academics behind creating search engines. The article is amazing. Very detailed one of the things that i pulled out of. It's kind of a weird thing. Because i'm weird is bert was not a term developed by google bird is actually a term used in the natural language processing industry as a whole as a specific type of would you call it outward the the term that was used in the information information retrieval community i think microsoft implemented berkeley four. Google even For being search so now there's different variations avert if you ever hear dog speak enemy conference. She goes through an off or burnt. Burnt mini bit large. There's all these variations of analysis things. Well about birt's abilities. That microsoft's using google's amusing soon as well the terms of in terms of china understand content. And what those meetings contents are. I just noticed that her business she works at his called birdie so that is interests asked her about that. I i did log series where i interview different personalities in search community god willing. Hopefully i'll be able to interview guys on it and basically i asked her about that and she's like my dog named burt. I need my company. Berkeley for my dog or something like that and it was well before the bert. Bert even came out So it just worked out like the next expert so good for her and and she picked a good niche jump into we always i i always. It's been awhile since. I've done a lot of writing but i'm still always trying to find a spot that it can be my niche. She's picked a really good one. That's awesome and you gotta really be got some brains for that stuff. I picked a niche many years ago my niece was going to be the What what was the did the. Oh shit sorry. Can't say that word. But i did anyway with man. I'm having a brain brain dump authors. Authorship officers youtube cruelest thing the biggest complaint about authorship was seo specifically is that any time needed a search seo stuff they would see my photo come up in the search results search around table searches. Land the chances of seeing a story about you know anything related would be pretty nice. I thought john i blame john. Mueller removing because he just stick a seeing my face.

google bert John japan Brain Don anderson Berkeley Mike microsoft Mueller burton Ross michigan
"barry schwartz" Discussed on SEO 101

SEO 101

08:05 min | 6 months ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on SEO 101

"Off with some fun questions. Frankly i've always wanted to ask these questions. And i was thinking about it and i'm like why did i ever get never get to because whenever i saw you any conference. We usually walking past each other. We cannot say hi and then when there was actually kind of that time to chat. I guess you weren't often a lot of the parties of stuff. So i didn't get a chance to really find more right. True preparing for social distancing. There you go you prescient. Of course so i. How did you get into this business. So the writing. Honesty openness yeah. I'd stobbe I just come cleaner to like grass back in the ultimate day in so far like how does this work. How have these different sites rank. How do i get my sites ranks. I started searching for things about some online. You know forums back in the old days like the old webmaster rural. I guess still around the gyms world and these old forums and like wow. This is fascinating. I just want like you know what we are watching. The industry grow and so forth. So i basically started a blog just to keep notes back then it was the place for me to keep my notes. Anything anybody else would read it on. What's changing in the space. What's new communities talking about. And it kinda just gone and people started reading it. That's awesome and in that time. Well i guess what what was the name of the website then was that search engine roundtable. Yes searching around tell you that up named that name up from the beginning in two thousand three call around table. Actually on a movable type install that was like the cms. that was before wordpress. Eventually i just converted into a built My company don't myself bought yeah. It was always culture and change around him. So what what what. What made you come up with that name. So the concepts was basically getting a round table view of. What's going on the community by looking at what people writing about in the community through the forms i have a lot of people discussing different topics and seo former back in the day. Google updates changes you. I changes and so forth. Statistically quote a lot of people saying this is what this person thinks about this chain. That person about this change. We're kind of getting this roundtable view of the different perspectives around. Search changes now obviously social media discussion. So that's incorporated because there was no twitter back then but it's basically trying to give a roundtable of view on what's changing it and research community. Kenyan imagine how did we survive without twitter. I know those down. I'm not sure what to do So what did you do before you got into seo like what were you doing. Got you doing this. Research company called rusty brick. We build a gas in the early days. We've built a lot of different websites but more focused on building software for companies. So right now. We're just build anything that's custom software. Development traded company. So it could be you know. Workflow management systems counting software. Whatever it might be We a lot of custom web and mobile applications for third party companies but nearly as it was also was really really software around. That was more building out building up high in websites for these companies. Though some you know. How do i get traffic from search. So that kinda spurred it. We don't offer seo services we were. So i just write about it. I don't really offer that as a as a killing payments that yourself and you a programmer yourself no. I'm not a team. Twenty developers in house company. The only non alone that doesn't actually produce anything that makes so usually you see when he's person starts a company. They're the ones that are doing all the work there. The person who does site so my brother. And i and twin brenner ronnie. Who he does. He's all technical More on the business side so we split the business that way since he makes those technical stuff on these technical teams do business stuff. Identical twin. No very prominently search conferences. It's kind of interesting. Because i when i the last time i was at a conference was a while ago but what. I'm going to a session. The same something interests me if i see berry in the front row sitting down ready to cover it. I know i picked a good session. Why haven't covered the sessions in a long time tweeted. Now it's kind of pointless and everything with kobe's online now so it's exactly like you said conference in years either so we're all talking to the past to us that's yesterday you better come to the next exit excellent when it's in person which probably won't be until two thousand twenty two if i want to. Those are great. They're fun brilliant. Brilliant speakers always learn a lot So how do you. I just i honestly an off never been the kind of person can do grind. I've got my grind going to work and all that stuff but you're every day writing content. It seems a how do you keep it up. Do you take off time. no. I do take off time. When i li- religion makes me so we have our jewish observance jewish person. So i take off on saturdays and any jewish holidays. That require me to be flying flying. And i'm completely off fine meeting. I can't turn on a computer. I can't check my phone. Can't even turn on a lighter. Turnoff light that's a stay where they are so although you can't schedules doesn't on their whole topic so i do take off. But when i'm able to online outside of religious purposes i am online so sunday As much as possible. So yeah. I mean i just i. I enjoy working. I enjoy the seo coverage type of side of things. So i enjoy that type stuff. And i have a routine. So i resigned. Master's a lot these days like. Why do i write so much. And there's a process where basically you know. I have my routine. Where do the research that i do. The right thing and an average blog post takes me probably less than ten minutes to write and publish. Wow that's a good lead into your next question. Ross yeah well yeah. What is your average weekday. Look like i noticed you were doing your show before the your your show the other day. Your podcast. our view bill. I don't know how he got video. Cast search cast of delight came up. So what time you starting play usually start around five thirty now that i don't drive to work them working from home while i start a little bit later usually like five fifty and then the morning routine emails. You know that type of stuff. I do i go to the rss feeds. I go through all this different social media and forums stuff that tracking seo side. And then i start policy publishing around seven. Am and i'm usually done publishing by eight. Am and then. The rest of the day is usually mostly rusty break and then a mix of some seo stock in between so. I usually start around. You know five thirty five fifty or so then. I'm on my computer. My computer from around six. Am till not ninety nine pm russo. An apple gives you these weekly Snapshots with how much on daily basis on your computer and generally well over ten hours specially with being offline for.

twitter Google wordpress programmer apple kobe berry Ross
"barry schwartz" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

Optimal Living Daily

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

"The number of products in the average supermarket swelled from an average of eight thousand nine hundred. Forty eight to almost forty seven thousand. There are fourteen different kinds of cheerios. When walking down the cereal at the grocery stores overwhelming while people go hungry in our cities and countries. Something is broken. I'm not saying that fewer cereal choices is the solution to hunger but we weren't so weighed down with a meaningless decisions. We make every day. Perhaps we'd have the clarity for choices that make a difference in the world instead of mastering productivity with the goal of making even more decisions every day. What if we eliminated some of the unnecessary choices we make every day? We are fortunate to have the freedom to choose. But according to Barry Schwartz author of the paradox of choice. Why more is less? We aren't happier because of it. Schwartz says quote when people have no choice. Life is almost unbearable. As a number of available choices increases as it has in our consumer culture the Autonomy Control and liberation this variety brings are powerful and positive but as a number of choices keeps growing native aspects of having a multitude of options begin to appear as a number of choices grows further the negatives escalate until we become overloaded at this point choice. No longer liberates but debilitates and quote if we were making fewer decisions. Can we make better decisions? I've experimented with living and dressing less and the answer I've discovered as have many others is a resounding yes when we create boundaries around things that are distracting us from what really matters our level of engagement in the things we actually care.

Barry Schwartz
"barry schwartz" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"She no one idea you explore has to do with the perception that we all have about ourselves that we are unique. What is this perception have to do without desire for choice and how we make choices so we all have an innate desire to be somewhat? We don't want to just be a member of some massive crowd unrecognizable from everybody else? So we want to somehow stand out from everybody else. We don't WANNA become this lonely minority but we do want to somehow be distinguishable from the person next to us. And how do we do that? We do that through the expression of identity and more and more in the modern world that expression of identity is coming through the choices that we make the more choices we have the more. We believe that we can identify and pick a choice. That is the perfect expression of who I am and what I want. And so. That's really the link between my desire to do Nikolay be known as a type of person and how choices are used to establish uniqueness. What does the psychological research say about our perception of uniqueness? Is it actually true? Well it's interesting that you ask that question So let's say I give you a bunch of things like names to call your children or sunglasses or shoes or ties in the case of men and I ask you to just rate these on how unusual they are how common they are and I also ask you not only to raid on. How unusual in common there but I also ask you. How much do you like them? How much do you think other people would like them? And we did a series. We did this the series of different kinds of decision making scenarios and what we found was that most people really believe that they like more unique things than everybody else. They also believed that they are more unique than everybody else. But when you actually look at their preferences for what they like as compared to what other people said they like. Essentially we like the same thing. We want that which is considered to be slightly unique. Nothing too bland. Nothing too bizarre so like if you look at ties right. We don't want to take the tie with the you know the orange disco balls on it. That's a little too weird. We also don't WanNa pick fist the solid color but little too boring. We want something with just a little bit of a kick to it so we believe that we are unique and we need choices to express that uniqueness but then sometimes as you say find ourselves on the awkward situation of making choices that are not very different from others which then challenges. Our notions of being unique. Utada funny story about waiting in line for hours at an apple store to buy an iphone for your partner and he gave you very specific instructions. What he wanted Tell me what happened next year. So this is my ex husband. Yes for his birthday. It was just at the time when the apple iphone had just come out for his birthday he wanted the original iphone. So what happens was on that day? I don't know if you remember. But when the apple iphone first came out they were these long lines. That would go down. Many many. Lots six o'clock spent the last hours reading. I get up at the middle of the night and go down to the apple store and stand in line to get this phone that he really wanted for his birthday and he had given me some very specific instructions that he needed the black iphone. Agape meal. Do Specifications Bobby wanted the block one? Because he had said that you know it's less likely to get dirty and it looks sleek etcetera. Well by the time I got to the front of the line. He caught up with me. Got Out of bed. Came to the apple store and this is a win on Fifth Avenue. Gut at a bed. He got to me and he's like just putting new order for the blocks phone. He's like no no no switch that to the white and like what do you mean you went the white. You told me one of the black and the reasons why he wanted to block. I didn't really care about black or white. Would I care? And he's like you looked around everybody else's got the black one. I want the Whitewater. Now Mind you. We're only talking about black versus white. So as far as I was concerned I really couldn't see the big deal here now and he was in the lone lots of people who regularly make that decision as to which ones can somehow make them. Stand out now today. My understanding is he doesn't even carry any apple phone in part because it would make him look to conform so visit even apple products. So so yes. We often do that. There are experiments along these lines of people sitting in a restaurant deciding to order a sometimes they get to be the first to make the order. Sometimes they have to wait for everyone around the table to order. Tell me what these experiments find and how satisfied people are with what the order depending on whether they go first or they go last night. Favorite study is a study that was done in her brewery where people are at a table and these are just normal customers at a table and They would ask people to order and so the first person would order the second person Third Person Fourth Person Fifth Person. The orders of the first person were much more homogenous meaning. There were more likely to order similar things when you looked across the first orders but when you looked at the people who ordered at each table subsequent to the first person now you saw greater heterogeneity right so the second third fourth fifth person. They're all ordering something slightly different from the person who just ordered right before them. Interestingly enough the person who's most satisfied with the beer that they ordered is the first person who ordered because they weren't paying any attention to what everybody else already ordered another issue with having choices. Is that it. Forces us to grapple with options that we have to forego. I'm wondering how this worry might affect the world of dating when we have so many people we can potentially choose from but making a choice involves forgoing other choices. Oh it's a huge problem right. It's what we call the foam. Oh Barry Schwartz and I. I identified it in the domain the job. Search right that when people get more job opportunities even though they actually do better in many objective senses right. They get higher salaries. They get better package. Is there less happy than people that had fewer job offers and the reason is not so much that they're convinced that they didn't pick the best of the bunch that they had most often? They are convinced that they picked the best. But they're convinced that there might actually still be something better out there because they compare what they chose against some imaginary option and the same thing is happening at a much larger level when it comes to dating right because you have so many options and you many ways these are incompatible.

apple Nikolay Barry Schwartz Whitewater Bobby partner
Theory Founder Andrew Rosen on Fashion's Past and Future

The Business of Fashion Podcast

34:44 min | 1 year ago

Theory Founder Andrew Rosen on Fashion's Past and Future

"In Sherman sits down with Andrew Rosen a legendary executive from the New York garment sorry and now he's reached a new stage in his career he's investing in companies Andrew to take stock. Here's Andrew Rosen inside fashion when you were growing up where did you grow up how much outside of Boston Massachusetts in in a real sort of country town no and I I suppose that I didn't really know I was going to my exposure to clothing always when he came home and and you know I would get exposed to it in that way or sometimes he'd bring back I remember exposed to it sort of on the periphery from time to time my dad had a factory in I was doing sorta kids stuff and I was really into golf and I was a so at some point your dad moved his factory to New York or to work after World War Two from my grandfather he like co Tuesday Wednesday comeback Thursday so my dad was when I was growing up did that have to do with factories and being able can you know six early sixties fifties sixties seventies it's just the way it was we my dad's company was addressed company it wasn't until the mid to late seventies that company started to with my dad maybe in the in the late sixties way the business was in those days but you know like everything else new at some point your dad's started manufacturing genes for Calvin Klein Right Calvin Klein jeans business and he within three years he was doing Toriola and and was was really sort of the consummate and he also at that time had done a deal with Diane von Furstenberg to die in Verse Berg Dresses so back in the you know I was very young and Diane was you say that the business that he was doing before there was no future to that and you know it was just the risk reward wasn't to to do that in a big way and he did that with Calvin Klein with it's worth business with Calvin Klein jeans and he made more money with and the opportunity was was so much bigger and you know he quickly I I started working what what made you decide to go did you go to college I really that's sort of what I was into and what happened is and he said I'd be more than happy to speak to can I was nineteen years old and I went in my dad started it was very unusual and spent take about two years this from from the beginning and really under getting a perspective showroom and started selling Calvin Klein jeans in the in the showroom in New York and I sort of had a I guess maybe I had an affinity for it and a year after that my dad got the license to do the men's Calvin Klein jeans and in in one thousand nine hundred seventy seventy eight and was an amazing innovator and we ah pop culture moment because that's really one fashion in the in America especially became a whole new generation of American fashion and designers becoming I think the really the beginning of what was ultimately to come here sadder and I was able to experiment with a lot of things in my mind eight learning experience for me and and and understand asked to weigh in nineteen eighty three and that I was nowhere near ready but in the moment I was just something that that was what I had to do so I had to be ready for it you well I think that there were some things I did really well and some things I didn't do so well and and have a vision and lead people and and Do all the kinds dad but in another way I had to do things the way I was comfortable with not the way my it did it or I felt like I could make my Ogle with that I was lucky with my dad that he and I never had that kind of sort of learning a lot on my own but you know I I as I your dad passed away in and it sounds like he was kind of Ah the first person that would come to mind would be Berry Schwartz but I don't know what kind of relationship I spent some nice time together and have a lot of fun remers about my Dad Barry although he and I had a nice relationship it wasn't the kind of to have that relationship but actually my dad had a his his me and a and a and a great friend and a lot of ways replaced Like I didn't have that kind of I was lucky that I had myles there to be that kind of so theory is is still we're talking like no what nineteen eighty through any right well Barry Schwartz and Calvin Klein it was it was a public company in Barry I ended up staying and working for them and actually was in the same building and I just moved to was down but Alvin things I learned from barrier I think both of them are are great over the years I think that my philosophies were shaped by a number of people I learned so much from from different people over the years what made I stayed was I felt like I wanted to want to walk away from that and when I when the four years later I had proved my worth and What I needed to accomplish and was ready to move on but I I and I think I made the right decision and staying and I think it was it was it was very good post on a Karen Frank Morey and Tommy Line and it was again a great experience for me to a- An- and he and I worked very closely together I think that you we've parted ways that was in one thousand nine hundred ninety six so I was there for your idea for theory what what did you want to do with it you essentially forty years old I was forty years old when I started my company and I companies all my life I had I wanted to be able to do things it was about the quality and integrity of of the clothing we make made in how we did business on and the idea of clothing having more versatility it was wherever they were and so I I wanted to create a company where at that time I was I was doing some work with Ellie Tahari and Elie Tahari voted on Ellie was very excited about the fabric showed it to me I said you know I never expect it would turn into the kind of company it did but it was a bull wearing stretchy fabric like that I remember growing up that order was the comfort and the wearability immediately adopted you know the whole idea the city and so a basic shirt or a basic pair of pants it became very different when you use fabric with Lycra and we were doing was really really sort of changed the way you know national and you could take just a simple pair of sharing and and sourcing fabrics like with that was the thing we were going to own as a company hearted making clothes and and and people started putting them on thank from beginning that it would be a work where thing that it would be you know suiting office was going to become a place that was wherever you were it wasn't so I want I really sort of zeroed into that I can feel that was as I say more sophisticated and and but this idea of contemporary and that price point a very you know my experience in the early days was in the gene business at Calvin Klein and a and melded the two together and came up with a very fresh new as I didn't want to sell the bridge department because if we sold the bridge department or were part and it was a very small department at that time and it was made up of a lot of random companies I guess in a way I was fortunate that it worked out but I and so I think that you know we we didn't want to become ears right I sold the company in in seven it was best for me it was best for Ellie to be able to aw I wanted to be free to do other things I didn't want to just to to to to to be able to diversify and by divers way basically I just wanted to diversify finances assessment that I was only going to be there for one year it lasted a lot stuck and and doing one thing for the rest of my life why why did you stick around people fast retailing was was a incredible the I enjoyed the people I was working for and there was no reason to make and were mentors to these designers and work is what you make it and I maybe I had a with the people inside our company and with the people that I invested in that and where we were going and were very passionate about accomplishing being proud of the work that you did in the way you did it on was was yes in a way it gave me a perspective on what was new and what was up and coming any companies I invested in did I try to impress ah views were and what their the culture they want to create and as many of the other companies are I I enjoyed a and still enjoy today did you ask him for money how did you choose who to invest in what it what is the thing in this industry not as a as a as a passive player as uh-huh sale to you know every aspect of the business I have an understanding I have an understanding of where it can fit in the market they have the integrity and the ability to be able to make that work I'm just a sort of a mentor or I had my own job I never was looking for to the inspired and creative the work that I was doing there and to mind back in the day so well in the twenty years that you have had a major of about what has changed in the industry but what what are the fundamental things that you think I started in the mid nineteen seventies so things have and just technology in general I mean technology is totally changed the way we live our lives it has so changed the world that you know one has to think to change but it's you know it's it's something that Oh you know when you think about the ability to it's pretty incredible and that's a fundamentally different thing

Andrew Rosen New York Sherman Executive Massachusetts Boston Forty Years Nineteen Years Twenty Years Three Years Four Years Two Years One Year
"barry schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And I've got a I've got to make it comfortable we've got a slow it down we've got to make sure that you were seen each step if this step isn't working I'm not going to necessarily let you work through it as long as someone else I'm going to take over and give you information right away so you don't get frustrated and start full into that that rabbit hole that you had where I'm feeling again no you're not you're right here it's working everything's good and he was right it was good I finished the knocked it was empowering maybe that's the real key to this kind of training it helps clear out some of the clutter in our minds the negative chatter that's psychologist Barry Schwartz says people experience all the time we self sabotage because of the way in which we talk to ourselves as we're going through our day you know I'm not any good at this I'll never be successful I should sit quietly I shouldn't volunteer to take on new challenges because I'm not any good and eventually they're going to discover that I'm already getting more responsibility than I deserve you keep talking yourself in that way it's very self defeating to be sure there are limits to this kind of teaching and learning Barry Schwartz points out that there are times when great things come from the emotional interactions between teachers and students what good teachers do aside from communicating information is they do establish relations with students that inspired the students to go beyond the specific lesson that's being taught that day or in that class I I became a psychologist because I was inspired by the the teachers I had especially the the pretty true taught me my first psychology course when I was a an eighteen year old who had no idea what psychology was my entire life course was largely influenced by the inspiration provided by that teacher.

"barry schwartz" Discussed on Experts On The Wire

Experts On The Wire

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on Experts On The Wire

"Manage your client expectations around that at this. Obviously, I've seen a lot of talk about the topic is probably read it about it but it terms of rusty brick it's rarely more. Straightforward, like here's a SPEC. Here's what we're going to build. Here's what we're going to deliver. Of course, suspect might change over time, which is fine experience and how bad that managing expectations but the bottom line is you have to treat your your client gold. They are incredibly important if they treat, you should treat them respect. They should treat your respect I. Think you'll have a great relationship i. think that works across. I need this line respect your clients if they should respect you, and if they don't respect you and that you should be working with them. Do. You have to deal with clients that want quick deadline. You know I know in in Spec work that can even be an issue sometimes of. You. They want things right away and how do.

"barry schwartz" Discussed on Experts On The Wire

Experts On The Wire

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on Experts On The Wire

"So yeah, I think I. It seems like there's been some more transparency around the ghoul updates mean announcing some of the core updates ahead of time the one area that I felt a little disappointed in was. When he so he asked twitter for some people to give feedback on Google that he could pass onto the team. I mean the overwhelming feedback was people were concerned about all of their surp- patriots in Google that are taking away from clicks, cluttering up the syrups. I've seen a like a new feature. Every day practically feels like So do you think that information is getting through to Google that he's asking for? I mean it certainly on the surface is sounds like a great. Thing that they're trying to do but I you go look at Google. Cluttered with all kinds of things that don't get clicks and knowledge panels and it seems like it's there's a disconnect there. Yeah I mean I. I wrote a post about this of specific thing. He did collect the feedback. He actually made to this call the Google Science Fair project or raking fair. Yeah and decreases board and basically highlighting complaints Seo Industry specifically around those types of topics. So voices, senses, Feature Snippets, publisher, traffic, senator, Senator, zero clicks. So I think he's definitely getting the word out multiple ways to the Google engineers and whoever makes the decisions I google but. I think he makes those calls I. Think. It's goes up the ladder and somebody else makes those calls although I believe he has a very, very strong. Voice in the company especially around the search. Where do you think? I get some does he get nervous about the direction that Google's headed with all the surf features in the and the Zero Clicks Even, just as a user. So it's not even a moral thing, but I mean that could be a separate issue but sometimes user I go to mobile I searched something. And I don't know if you feel this way, but it's very overwhelming. There are a lot of things to click on. There's related stuff at the bottom with images. There's people also ask there's Thumbnail images for each result. What's your take on the current state of Google's surp- mobile or desktop? Do you like the direction that they're headed. To question I, think. I'll start on universal results came out back in I. Don't know two thousand or something like that seven. Our was exactly. What Google without your soul links with those show vertical niche areas of image search videos and maps, and so forth..

Google twitter cluttering senator publisher
"barry schwartz" Discussed on Experts On The Wire

Experts On The Wire

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on Experts On The Wire

"Rusty bricks, a company that my brother twin brother and I actually started. Back. In High School in the Nineties Nineteen ninety-four actually. Where software all the company we build software that's inter- mobile mobile based or web based software That runs off the Internet. Now cloud based software rebuild soft like emergency room hospital software to taxicab cab software stuff that helps businesses and organizations become more efficient. Through, just building software for them. So that's what is that's my day to day job. We have office year, we have about twenty five people in it. fulltime. Mostly developers mostly on a lamp stack PHP. By sequel type stuff. Obviously some of that has to do with building some front end web sites, but the core of it is really ninety nine, percent ninety, five percent back in developments. With interfaces. Experiences to build the software for. You have a technical background. I'm not a programmer. But mostly everybody in my office are programmers. Yeah What is your? How is your brother involved? I never even knew you had a brother let alone a twin he active online or is he more behind the I? Didn't I didn't know that you had a brother? Yeah? No. Yeah I mean it's auto website. His name is Rodney he pretty much runs all the technology stuff. He the show I guess of our small company on the. Business oriented stuff he's not really. He doesn't go out there in the limelight. He might have a twitter account he doesn't tweet so. SEO is really not a rusty brick thing. Obviously, it's known for people. It's funny. People are clients have that we that I write about Seo at our. At, our SEO industry has no idea that I do rusty brick software development. Amongst other things. So yeah, really your clients don't know who you are in the Seo World I find that Kinda. Funny like who are some types of clients that you have I mean you have to say names but? Types of businesses or the people that you might work with or. Work with all a lot of startups that are trying to build out some cool idea. Some established companies, we have companies like Pitney Bowes Harpercollins Harvard Yale. So the whole mix of stuff and that. Involves either building enterprise software for them or building. Cool..

Rodney programmer Pitney Bowes Harpercollins Har High School twitter
"barry schwartz" Discussed on Experts On The Wire

Experts On The Wire

04:45 min | 1 year ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on Experts On The Wire

"One welcome to episode one, ten of experts on the wire. I just had an incredible discussion with none other than Barry Schwartz. He is an absolute legend and really frankly hero in the Seo World I. Think a lot of us depend upon what he does more than. We often realise reporting on SEO news and chatter and things happening in the industry in Google updates and going to conferences and it was a great discussion. We talked about everything from how he got started doing what he's doing why he continued to do it to this day how he gets so much stuff done. Following all the ESPN news and he he runs an entire other company Seo's not what he does full-time. We talked a lot about a recent Gulu updates and people like Dani Sullivan going into Google after being a reporter on the SEO space for so long. So it's a great discussion I. Hope You enjoy it. So sit back and relax and enjoy episode one.

Barry Schwartz Google Seo Dani Sullivan ESPN reporter
"barry schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And start fall into that that rabbit hole that you had where oh I'm failing again. No, you're not. You're right here. It's working. It's everything's good. And he was right. It was good. I finished the not it was empowering. Maybe that's the real key to this kind of training. It happens clear out some of the clutter in our minds, the negative chatter that psychologist Barry Schwartz says people experience all the time we self sabotage because of the way in which we talk to ourselves as we're going through our day. You know, I'm not any good at this. I'll never be successful. I should sit quietly shouldn't volunteer to take on new challenges because I'm not any good. And eventually they're going to discover that I'm already getting more responsibility than I deserve. You. Keep talking to yourself in that way. It's very self defeating to be sure there are limits to this kind of teaching and learning Barry Schwartz points out that there are times when great things come from the emotional interactions between teachers and students what good teachers do aside from communicating information is they do establish relations with students that inspired the students to go beyond the specific lesson. That's being taught that day or in that class. I became a psychologist because I was inspired by the teachers I had especially the the teacher who taught me my first psychology course, when I was an eighteen year old who had no idea what psychology was my entire life course was largely influenced by the inspiration provided by. Teacher. It's true that a clicker cannot inspire a play the role of a mentor. It's a good tool for certain kind of learning. But that doesn't mean it's the right tool for all kinds of learning. And yet the clicker when it is the right tool can fix one of the most detrimental parts of the teacher student relationship when students start to care more about getting craze and avoiding criticism then learning if the student wants the feedback more than the actual skill. Well, then you start to see these things go wrong. You know, you have students who do whatever they think it takes to get the approval of their teacher whether or not it contributes to their mastery of the material. They're not there to get good at math. They're there to get smiles from the teacher. And the teachers less than perfectly calibrated. It's gonna turn out that the things that gets miles from the teacher in the things that actually produce understanding of math are not the same things. One of the reasons clippers might work.

Barry Schwartz clippers eighteen year
"barry schwartz" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Differs for sure you've made that point in your papers that two people in the same exact job you know differ widely in you know the orientation even within a job and i think that's a great point i wonder what can shell to say his here because he's of made the argument like the ideal happiness is doing growthoriented things for the right reasons it's both having the growth goals and having autonomous motivation for is versus a controlled motivation for it that both lobban and then you get different relations of all these things so he's like you know in the middle might be like he might make the case my gosh it's funny i'm trying to reconstruct with might say this at all okay let me phrase it like this because i don't want to get him in trouble if i'm wrong but his research think suggests that like impurity choosing jobs that have a focus on money even if your motivation is growthoriented yes is not as conducive to wellbeing having a job that is dane in day out the focus is on helping others and you had atanas motivation i think he would make that argument i and i would agree with him entirely and this is you know i've been doing some work with barry schwartz recently and if playing threesome ideas i i'm i've been blessed with wonderful coauthors colleagues he's you know primary sort of among that number but you know we've been working through some ideas having to nature of motivation and so on and thinking about this sort of builds off of ideas in a paper that we wrote a few years ago looking at the nature of the motivations of west point cadets of why it is they went to west point in the first place and those motivations more internal to the activity of what it is that you're doing it west point which is becoming an army officer versus were they more instrumental motivations and what we find is essentially sort of longterm field.

barry schwartz officer
"barry schwartz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Operating in in any call center your operating in i think you can find nobility in what you do psychologist barry schwartz has a new book out it's called why we work you can see more of his talks at ted dot com so what do you think i mean why do people work people work for a ton of friesians this is dan ariella he teaches psychology and economics at duke we work for identity in fulfillment in a sense of connection with other people they're just many many things many factors that get us to work money is one of them and maybe not even the most important dan studies motivation and like very schwartz he's interested in what it is besides money that gets people to care about the work they do and to work hard even when the incentives aren't obvious here's dan explained it on the ted stage if you think about this all kinds of strange behaviors in the world around us think about something like mountaineering and mountain climbing if you read books of people who climb mountains difficult mountains do you think that those books of full of moments of joy and happiness no the full of misery in fact it's all about frostbite and difficulty to walk and difficulty of breathing cold challenging circumstances and if people were just trying to be happy the.

duke barry schwartz
"barry schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The meaning of work and whether work is something we do because we love it or because we have no choice there's a kind of attitude you sometimes see kind of us in them attitude this is psychology very schwartz there is the elite who want all this fulfillment from work and then there's everybody else it just wants a paycheck and we should organize work on the assumption that most people don't care what they do as long as they're paid for it and i think this is completely false picture it matters to people doing these jobs too and it matters very short says because humans have this innate need to feel valued feel like what they do mean something even when those jobs might not be the ones people necessarily want here's barry schwartz on the ted stage why do we work now i know of course we have to make a living but nobody in this room thinks that that's the answer to the question why do we work so we wouldn't work and we didn't get paid but that's not why we do what we do and in general i think we think that material rewards are pretty bad reason for doing the work that we do when we say of somebody that he's in it for the money we are not just being descriptive now i think this is totally obvious but the very obviousness of it raises what is for me an incredibly profound question if this is so obvious why is it that for the overwhelming majority of people on the planet the work they do has none of the characteristics that get us up and out of bed and off toward the office every morning how is it that we allow the majority of people on the planet to do work that is monotonous meaningless and sold now the thing about work says berry is that it wasn't always like this people didn't think integrity about whether work was fulfilling people were craftsman or farmers the work they did was simply a part of their life and not divorced from it psychologically not divorced from it physically no one was wondering if their work was meaningful they were just busy living their lives functioning in the role that they played in the community it was varied from one day to the next it presented challenges that you couldn't anticipate you needed to use your ingenuity you needed to be flexible you needed to learn from your experience that was sort of intrinsic to.

barry schwartz berry one day
"barry schwartz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The meaning of work and whether work is something we do because we love it or because we have no choice there's a kind of attitude you sometimes see a kind of us and them attitude this is very schwartz there is the elite who want all this fulfilment from work and then there's everybody else it just wants a paycheck and we should organize work on the assumption that most people don't care what they do as long as they're paying for it and i think this is completely false picture it matters to people doing these jobs too and it matters very short says because humans have this innate need to feel valued feel like what they do mean something even when those jobs might not be the ones people necessarily what here's barry schwartz on the ted stage why do we work now i know of course we have to make a living but nobody in this room thinks that that's the answer to the question why did we work so we wouldn't work and we didn't get paid but that's not why we do what we do and in general i think we think that material rewards are pretty bad reason for doing the work that we do when we say of somebody that he's in it for the money we are not just being descriptive now i think this is totally obvious but the very obviousness of it raises what is an incredibly profound question if this is so obvious why is it that for the overwhelming majority of people on the planet the work they do has none of the characteristics that get us up out of bed and off toward the office every morning how is it that we allow the majority of people on the planet to do work that is monotonous meaningless and sold that now the thing about works very is that it wasn't always like this people didn't think in antiquity about whether work was fulfilling people were craftsman or farmers the work they did was simply a part of their life and not divorced from it psychologically not divorced from it physically no one was wondering if their work was meaningful they were just busy living their lives functioning in the role that they played in the community it was varied from one day to the next it presented challenges that you couldn't anticipate you needed to use your ingenuity you needed to be flexible you needed to learn from your experience that was sort of intrinsic to.

barry schwartz one day
"barry schwartz" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"barry schwartz" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Hey sean i'm speaking with barry schwartz sees author of the book the paradox of choice it does seem as if every one today has to have a website sometimes more than one if you have a business or organization it's mandatory but i know people who have a website about their dog of course the problem is creating a great website seems daunting and if you think that you half the checkout square space they have simplified the process and created the technology that makes creating a beautiful website fast and simple you start with their templates created by world class web designers and then you just follow the process if you have things to sell their ecommerce functionality is built right in an easy to set up whether you're a consultant or a jewelry designer of furnituremaker blogger or you own a restaurant or you just want to create a website about your dog square space can help you create a stunning website that projects just the right image and you'll have it up and running in no time i know because we use square space go to square space dot com for a free trial and when you're ready to launch and this is important use the offer code something to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that square space dot com and the offer code is something so buried don't you think it's human nature to wanna look at all the choices and feel like you've made this evaluation and come up with the best choice for you because you you don't wanna look across the table at the restaurant and see what somebody else ordered and said she wall you know i wish i wish i had ordered that no i that can certainly happen but but you know the notion that doing an exhaustive search and shooting.

sean barry schwartz consultant ten percent