20 Episode results for "Barry Jenkins"

If Beale Street Could Talk

Pop Culture Happy Hour

24:51 min | 2 years ago

If Beale Street Could Talk

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from scifis new series deadly class from executive producers. The Russo brothers and based on the graphic novel by Rick remainder and west Craik premiers. January sixteenth watch the first episode now at deadly class dot scifi dot com. After winning an Oscar in two thousand seventeen for moonlight director. Barry Jenkins is backed with the field streak could talk this time. He adapt a James Baldwin novel for the screen lane stars as Tisch and Stefan, James place. Fani their two young lovers who find their lives disrupted when Fani is imprisoned for a crime. It's a crime Tisch that's out to prove. He didn't commit. I'm Stephen Thompson. And I'm Linda Holmes and on this episode of pop culture, happy hour, we talk Beale street here with me. And Stephen in the studio is Glen Weldon NPR's arts desk blind. And joining us from the New York Times is our pow Aisha Harris high Asia. Hi, everyone when we talk about Bill street as we said, it's James Baldwin novel this casts defined James KiKi lane. Also, Regina king who just want a Golden Globe for her role as Kiki's mother. It is a sprawling cast. We might say full of super awesome people. Brian Terry Henry is in it. And Glenn, what are your feelings about Beale street in general? What's your bottom line? Remind me Linda when you wrote the review for this NPR. Did you use the word luminous? Because everybody else did some do you? Remember, he wrote if you said, I don't remember. I think that I think what makes people say that is the way Barry Jenkins treats faces and I think that is true going back to moonlight. There are certain words that critics keeping their back pocket and rarely use words like luminous and transporting and soaring lyrical, and they all fit and all of it is done in service to depicting this burning passion between Titian funny at the heart of the movie. It's also in service. However, and this is getting less attention. I think to this and of outrage the sense of injustice, this anger. It's also in service to a sense of family coming together of community depicted, very accurately. Really like, there's a there's a scene where funny and the landlord are trying to determine whether or not a refrigerator will fit into this loft space that they want to get. And so they mime fitting the refrigerator, and then that's just felt like it's this tiny specific moment in the middle of all its. Flourish. It's a bit of business. You do feel the debt to Douglas Sirk melodrama in the use of color and the music, and I we can argue about this, but in the depiction of the racist cop and as a follow up to moonlight. I did feel him going back to certain techniques that were effectively there. So like the sense of having a character stared down the barrel of the lens, which brings you up short. Because it only happens a few times happens a lot more here. And it's I think it's less effective. But yet tremendously moving, and you know, luminous. Yeah. Nation when you come down on bell street. It's funny because the word the first word that comes to my mind is lush just the colors the red of Fanis jacket the yellow of tissues, I think it's her sweater that she's wearing like everything about it. I see the Douglas circuit. But I also see in the mood for love Wong, Kar wise movie from two thousand I was really struck especially by the characters around Titian Fani. I think that their love is great. And I'm glad to see this depiction of black romance in this way. I don't think we've ever seen it quite like this before. But really like all the supporting cast was what really stuck out to me. So Bryant Henry who we've already mentioned who has amazing centerpiece moment in the film where he's only in one actual one sequence actually. And he plays an old friend of Fanis, and he comes back, and he talks about how he did a stint in jail and how it was. He was there. Unjustly its moment. Where berry Jenkins is kind of zooming in on Brian Terry Henry's face, and he's telling the story, and there's like the slight undertone, this underscore of music that just kind of very ominous, and man he's not getting as much attention when it comes to the acting circuit on the award circuit. But like that scene is a you're at the Oscars he's nominated, and that's the scene. Like that moment is what you show like that's the club you show. I'd be happy for him to Judi Dench. And. Yeah. I mean, he has been in so many good things recently. So good in widows. He's so good in Atlanta. He's so good in this. He's amazing and an episode of the HBO anthology series room one. Oh, four if you if you like him track that down, Stephen what are your Beale street thoughts? Well, I do have I do have luminous in my notes. I also have the words sumptuous which is one that I come back to again. And again, this is such a feast for the senses, it's so beautifully shot. The music by nNcholas Patel who also did the music for moonlight works on Adam mckay's movies as well. This score is absolutely gorgeous. And I think really captures the mood of not only this kind of swooning romance that music that's in the trailer that you you're just like, oh, my God this movie looked so romantic, but it also captures the darker undertones. I mean, this is a very bittersweet romance. This is a movie about compromise and sacrifice. And you know when we talk about how race. Is covered in movies. We often see race through the prism of how to people get along. How movie like green book where own white man in a black, man? Learn to become friends, and this is a movie about race that is about the systems that create injustice and the vehicle for telling that story is this romance. But you do leave this movie with a sense of quiet outrage that that is very palpable and very different from how I have felt walking out of other movies that are telling stories about race in ways that that make you angry. There's something muted about it in a way that made me think about it for a lot longer. Yeah. For me what it is. If you think about a found like the hate you give which also came out in two thousand eighteen which I also think was terrific movie. But the angle on the injustice that happens in that film is more about when the person left behind is dealing with their grief and. It's all about the pain of that injury. And although Beale street does deal a lot with the pain of the injury. They're also very careful to build this world that shows you the joy that is lost that he should be able to have that. There's this beautiful love story that cannot you know that he can't have in. She can't have when I should talks about how important it is to portray black romance. I think there's a coming together of the romantic aspect, and the kind of the the injustice aspect that shows you that one of the things that happens when these unjust things come to pass is that, you know, happy lives are not able to happen. It's not just the suffering while you're in prison. It's the blank space that has left by the happiness that you can't have him. I making sense I share now. No, I completely agree with that. And I think that the other aspect of this is just it shows really plainly the ripple effect that this injustice has because we see all the. Family members, we see tissues mother, we and her father and Fanis father trying to do whatever they can possible to help get him out. And anticipate sister who is played by two on a Paris Ernestine. She has a connection to this white lawyer who's played by Finn wit rock. And it is interesting to me the see sort of in. This is very similar to the book where we had this very obvious racist white cop who is the reason funny is in jail. But then he also have these I don't want to call them, quote, unquote, good white people. But that's kind of what they are. There's a really striking scene with FINRA wit rock. Tisch says in voiceover about. How he's tried to like penetrate the upper echelon of the the legal system, but he's kind of a low low on the totem pole, and he just enters this room. And it's he Barry Jenkins films it in this very like kind of darkened sexy. But also, darkened sexy and threatening way. We're just a bunch of rich. Old white guys who like are the ones who are impeding Justice. And so like seeing that balanced out with the racist white cop. I think was just a very interesting way to take it. And I appreciate it. I liked that aspect of it, you I think all three of you answered a something that I've seen various critics grappling with not critiques. Not a full throated critique, but an open question, which is that. Okay. This film is so elaborately wrought it's so elegantly composed. It's a richly constructed aesthetic jewel, and what it's dealing with is the great open wound on the American soul. You know, the legacy of slavery and in an an institutionalized racism, and the what they're asking is if dressing up such ugliness in such a gorgeous gift box risk leaching, some of the urgency some of the the anger that any depiction of such a systemic injustice should inspire. I have my own answer to it. But you've all been saying it's not an either ordeal here. Right. And I think Linda rebutted that. Argument perfectly when she talked about this movie showing the lives that are disrupted, and I think that is an incredibly important part of obviously much much larger picture of of these systems. I mean, I talked before about compromise and sacrifice in Iowa. You mentioned the the ripple effects on the family. I mean, there are members of this family who are basically forced into a life of crime to try to raise the money to combat this injustice where you have wrongs be getting wrongs beginning wrongs, which can reverberate well beyond the this initial injustice, and I think it does a good job of to the point Glenn was making the other reason why I don't I'm not troubled by that it makes sense to give roundedness to people's lives and understand that a black characters life in a movie about injustice that characters entire life is not about that moment of injustice. It's not the person is not defined by being a victim of racism. They they may be and that's why I love the fact that the rest of. It is so tender and could come out of, you know, a a regular romantic film. The there is a sex scene in this film that reminded me more than anything of the sex scene in love and basketball, which is an incredibly kind of gentle realistic to me very realistic picture of what it is actually like when people have sex for the first time much more than in most films. There's a wonderful scene where when tissues explaining to her family that she's pregnant you're primed to believe that that is going to be a a scene where the family gets all upset and the parents are angry, and what you get is this family, that's very supportive of her and very kind of celebrate, Tori. This is going to be a baby. It's a good thing. And it's not it. It builds so much warmth in the family, and there's a really funny scene that involves Fanis sisters and tissues sister that I that I love and I could wash a hundred times in a row. Oh, and my my answer to that question about the the quote unquote conflict between aesthetics and urgency is that just as a feat of adept tation. What Jenkins is doing is capturing the experience of reading James Baldwin's, gorgeous, luminous rose, but urgent but urgency Baldwin isn't Hemingway has no interest in being Hemingway's, no interest in that clarity above all. Just the facts BS. He is an interlocutor. He's between you and the events his writing is beautiful and angry at the same time. You can have gorgeous urgency, and you know, I mean, you know, who says you can only make ugly films about racial injustice. Right. Why why why why why we and people aren't I want to make this clear? They're just sort of questioning is this is this. What does this do to the message? What does this do to driving you out of the theater as Stephen was saying feeling something that you grapple with as opposed to, you know, it's not Spike Lee Aisha? How do you feel like it works as an adaptation of the book? Well, I actually encounter. The buck for the first time in preparation for the movie I wanted to read it and before seeing it, and so it was very fresh in my mind, while I watched the movie for the first time and Jenkins actually Hughes pretty closely to the book, especially a lot of lines in the film are directly taken from the book. And I think he does do a really good job of capturing that especially the intimacy that is in the book the book is actually very graphic in. It's the way Tisch narrates. The the first time that they've had sex in a way that it was like, oh, wow. Like fifty shades has got nothing on what Baldwin has written about how how like what her experiences like with for the first time. And I really think that he was especially that scene of the first time they come together. It just says a really great job of capturing that it just hangs there, and you can feel it, and it's it is just beautifully shot and tender. And loving. And I mean, I I wish I had but like. Yeah. I just I just thought it was beautiful. Yeah. And my big obsession this year when I was at Toronto was looking at the use of color, and film, and it it kind of makes sense what we talk about lush, and sensuous and luminous and all that stuff. But when you see this film, look for the use of color look for the way in the very opening scene. They are walking under a kind of a canopy of bold. Fall leaves it. Matches the color of her sweater, it matches the color of his collar, and it puts them very much at home in the world that they're in. It creates a lot of harmony where their lives are happy. And throughout the film, you c- moments where you know, she is dressed in different ways, depending on where she is. And it's really worth paying attention to that stuff. It's interesting between this and the TV show homecoming I feel like I spent a lot of time in two thousand eighteen on entertainment in which the face of Stefan James is very lovingly photograph. That Hannah has a beautiful beautiful face enemies. And so and he is so terrific in this. And I'm so happy to see I was so happy to see Regina king win, the Golden Globe. But there are people in this movie. You mentioned Brian teary. Henry I felt the same way awards wise about Stefan James between this and homecoming but also about Colman Domingo who plays tissues dad who has. He's a veteran actor he looked at his IMDB page. It is a loan and he's done a lot of stage work, and he he is such an interesting character because it is this mix of this intense fatherly love mixed with with a willingness to do. Absolutely, whatever it takes for, you know, for his kids. And that is that is a really rich portrait that I that. I that. I really just adored. Yeah. I think it's terrific. And we are not the first to say, so but. Beautiful foul, and if you have a chance to seek it out it's kind of been broadening out. I feel like the rollout was a little bit quiet. But it is in more theaters now. So if you look for it, you may be able to find if Beale street could talk it's a beautiful movie, and we do recommend it. And when you see it do tell us what you think about find us on Facebook at Facebook dot com slash P, C J or tweet us at PCH after a quick break. It's going to be time to talk about what's making us. Happy this week. So come right back. This message comes from NPR sponsor sci-fi from executive producers. The Russo brothers. Survival is extra credit in scifis new series deadly class set in the unsanitised counterculture of the nineteen eighties. A disillusioned teen is recruited into kings, dominion, a secret academy for the deadly arts based on the graphic novel by Rick remainder and west Craig deadly class premiers. January sixteenth on scifi watched. The first episode now at deadly class that scifi dot com. Support also comes from NPR sponsor, National Geographic and the new series valley of the boom from executive producer, Arianna Huffington. And starring l'amour and Morris, Bradley Whitford and Steve Zahn valley of the boom tells the story of the birth of the browser of the first social network hashed in a dorm room. And of the epic fails of early streaming valley of the boom premiere Sunday January thirteenth at nine eight central on National Geographic watch the first two episodes now on demand and on the NAT geo TV app luck back to pop culture. Happy hour. It's time for our favorite segment of this week. And every week what's making us happy this week, Steve. And Thompson, what is making you happy this week. I've never gotten to write or speak about one of my very favorite albums of twenty eighteen called now only by a guy who performs under the name mount eerie. Now, one of the reasons that I have never talked or spoken about this particular record is it as one of the most depressing pieces of music, I have ever heard in my life, and I can brand. I thought I'm sorry. I had the devil. You say Glen Weldon pool responses to that statement, imagine the movie Amore, but but sadder and set to music. The story isn't behind. This record is incredibly sad. The singer Phil Elvis them who's been making a kind of self releasing this really beautiful rich sad already music for more than twenty years. His wife jump. You have Castro who was also a musician died in two thousand sixteen and he made a pair of albums about. Her one is called a crow looked at me. And this one is called now only, and I would I would play a little piece of this music. But it is impossible. I think to excerpt it in a way that captures the cumulative experience of it, which is you're hearing these incredibly, vivid and detailed discussions of this woman. He loves and her life and death and the aftermath, and it is crushingly sad and beautiful music, and the coda to this story is that Phil Elvis was recently on the cover of us weekly magazine, which is almost impossible to imagine. If you are familiar with the catalog of. Phil from the musician because he recently and quietly married, the actress, Michelle Williams, and that they and who is obviously experienced her own own loss with he Fletcher, the two of them kind of quietly slipped away and got married, and I got to pick up a recent issue of us weekly and see one of my favorite, sad, sad musicians. And just starring it's an it's a nice, very, bitter sweet and beautiful story. And it is that story is so much richer. If you spend the time with these two records, they put love and romance in this completely different context of that. I have really valued. I love these records so much. The most recent one is now only there on all your favorite streaming services. Thank you very much. Stephen Thompson, Glen Weldon. What's making you happy this week musical pillow smothering basically, well known, okay? So last year did a piece for ATC asking why haven't Hollywood movies really grappled with online dating in any kind of way. You have people on TV swiping, right and left all the time. They show the text on the screen, but films are lagging way behind so asked a couple directors and producers, and what they basically said was a it's a numbers game. There just aren't that many romantic dramas comedies being made right now be it's not that cinematic. We haven't cracked how to depicted in interesting refresh way, there's a little film called dating. My mother written and directed by Mike Rama that has cracked it. It streaming on Amazon and other places it's about a young gay Hollywood screenwriter. Wait hear me. I know what you're thinking who goes back home to suburbia to live with a single mom and lick his wounds, the jokes they land the characters are allowed to be real. And rounded the mom's not a cartoon. And that was important to me. But when it comes to depicting online dating in a fresh funny, visually inventive clever way, the movie nails it. So that is dating my mother on Amazon and elsewhere. Thank you very much Glen. Well, then I should Harris. What is making you happy this week? The regina's are making me happy this. Also known as Regina king who leave already talked about in if Beale street could talk and also Regina hall who was wonderful in support the girls, which is another day think everyone should definitely check out. I actually had the pleasure. I was a guest at the New York Film Critics Circle awards and both regina's received awards for their roles in those movies. And it was lovely to see them both there when Regina king went up on stage. She said I love that the regina's are here in everyone in the audience, just like oh. Sweet moment and then Regina hall one. When she went up, she also acknowledged the other Regina, and then also went into a weird, but lovely spiel about how she had a crush on. Steve Martin Martin was also there so it was a delightful night. Anyway, the regina's are making me happy, especially just because these are both actresses who have been their careers are very long their resumes are very impressive. But it's great to see them sort of evolving from where they started in the respective careers. I think, you know, for a while Regina hall was probably best known by a lot of people at least people who rent black for scary movie. And it's great. She is great in that movie. But she could do so much more. And it's great to see her do that. And support the girls and digital Regina king who, you know, she started in two two seven had bit parts in like boys in the hood, and has now really blossomed into like, your go-to, actor filmmaker she directs a lot of stuff on TV. So. I'm just so happy that they're finally getting the recognition, and I want to continue seeing everything that they do. So the genus are making me happy. Yeah. And I believe that support the girl says now made it to Hulu. So if you have Hulu, you can check it out even more easily. Thank you. I should Harris. I am happy this week. It's funny because I'm in the middle of a bunch of things I particularly in the middle of reading a bunch of books. Some to do a thing. I wouldn't normally do until you about a book. I'm in the middle of reading. Because I finished a section of it that I do want to recommend an it's Susan Orleans the library book, and there is a section near the beginning of this book where she very specifically tells the story of the massive fire at the LA central library in the nineteen in the mid nineteen eighties. And she tells the story of this fire with with such specificity. She this is what she does. She does narrative nonfiction. So it's like reading a novel, except it's you know, a true story that she is heavily and carefully researched. And when you talk about a library and the loss of materials and the way they try to save them in the devastation of the fire. I can feel the book now shifting into more of kind of the question of who did it and who was responsible for the fire which people felt from the beginning was was arson, but the description of the fire itself is one of the most it sounds sort of terrible to say I wanted to hear her talk about this fire for. For twenty hours. But it's it is a great great piece of descriptive work. So what is making me happy? This week is making my way through the library book by Susan Orly. And that is what is making me happy this week. And that brings us to the end of our show, you can find all of us on Twitter. You can find me at Linda, Holmes. You can find Stephen I dislike Stephen you can find Glenn at g h Weldon. You can find you shed crafting my style, you can find our producer Jessica reedy at Jessica underscore radio. Producer Vincent academic via casino, and our producer. America's and use director might cats at Mike and Katherine of K A T Z I F Mike's band. Hello, come in provides the music. You are bobbing your head to right now. So thanks to all of you for being here. Thank you. And thanks to all of you for listening. If you have a second, and you want to hear more from us, including what is making us happy this weekend every week please sign up for our newsletter. You can do that at NPR dot org slash pop culture newsletter. And we will see you. All right back here next. This week on fresh air, Terry gross, sits down with comedian Kevin Hart to talk about his work and recent Oscars controversy find that interview and other long-form discussions with the biggest names in entertainment journalism in books in the fresh air feet.

Barry Jenkins Stephen James Baldwin Linda Holmes NPR Stephen Thompson Brian Terry Henry Tisch Regina king Aisha Harris Glenn regina executive producer Stefan James Oscar Fanis Rick remainder Golden Globe director
Filmmaker Barry Jenkins On 'The Underground Railroad'

Fresh Air

47:20 min | 2 months ago

Filmmaker Barry Jenkins On 'The Underground Railroad'

"This is fresh air. I'm terry gross. My guest barry jenkins directed the film moonlight which won the two thousand seventeen oscar for best film. He also directed the twenty. Eighteen adaptation of james. Baldwin's novel if beale street could talk now. He's co adapted and directed the new ten part series the underground railroad which will be streaming on amazon starting friday. The series is based on the twenty sixteen novel by colson. Whitehead which won a pulitzer prize was an oprah book club selection and was excerpted in a special standalone section of the new york times. It's a reimagining of slave times. And the underground railroad characters in the story are cora and enslaved teenage girl who escapes a brutal georgia plantation and ridgeway the slave catcher. Who pursues her. Cora escapes through the underground railroad. Which in the novel and the tv series is literally an underground train that secretly transports people who have escaped enslavement and make stops in different states. White people in each state have devised a system for dealing with former enslaved people. North carolina has simply band black people but in even in south carolina where white people appear to be helping black people succeed. The motives are sinister. Barry jenkins spent four years making the underground railroad and says it's the most difficult undertaking of his career. He says there were times. He wept onset while depicting slavery devoured by the barbarity of that truth. Barry jenkins welcome back to fresh air. It's a pleasure to have you back on the show. Congratulations on on this enormous undertaking. I interviewed colson. Whitehead when the book the underground railroad came out and he told me that he had been reluctant to immerse himself in the history of slavery. Just so painful. And i was wondering if you felt that way too when you decided to undertake the project if there was a bit of a reluctance knowing what you'd have to put yourself through. Thank you for having me terry. It's a pleasure to be back. I felt the same reluctance. But i think for different reasons. I didn't feel reluctant because of the need to immerse myself and the subject matter when you go out and to make a film making a film with a group of people so you're not alone. I can't imagine what it was like for colson to have to go deep into this world by himself So it wasn't a reluctance of immersing myself in the world it was about the responsibility The moral and ethical responsibility of taking those images from the page and translated them to the screen for other people to witness. That was where the hesitancy a reluctance lied. Yep can we address that head on for a second. Sure so in the first episode a a really Brutal seen on the plantation and a a man who has escaped the plantation is hunted down by a slave catcher and return to the plantation to set an example of. What happens if you dare run away. The very sadistic plantation owner throws a lunch for guests and as they eat and drink out on the lawn. The manas whipped. He's hung by his arms and then set on fire and burned alive. While all the enslaved people have to watch and so this is something that you had to put the actress through and that you had to direct them in and witness what was it like to shoot that scene for you and for the people in the scene had to enact it it was incredibly difficult Partly because we were standing in places where it was. There was a feeling that things like this. These atrocities had occurred we filmed the show entirely in the state of georgia and the soil. The history of georgia is soaked in blood And that's just a fact and so on the set for for one you know. There's no blood. There's no fire the actor. I ever get a great job. You know he's very well taken care of. He's on a harness. He's not actually suspended buys arms so there's a certain remove That comes into play that allows you to approach the workshop. I shot almost like Constructing a house in a certain way But of course over the course of a day we filmed it On one day. Because i didn't want to put anyone through the mental space of creating this image anymore than necessary. Over the course of the day it just became very clear that we were standing in these spaces that our ancestors stood when they were forced to witness these things that we were not witnessing even in the remove of creating a piece of art. I think the witnesses you mentioned the people who are forced to watch these things to me. That was the reverberations of the trauma. And it was how one violent act can reverberate them. The many and so just approaching. It like that I felt like there was a way to get the work but of course i'm a human being and as you alluded to in your comment. This was the one time where. I walked off my own set. I walked off for about ten minutes. Did say heaping to anybody just walked off and then i got it myself and came back to be strong for the actress and particularly. Eli ever played that part. I want to read you. Something that colson whitehead told me and get your reaction to this and he was talking about how he couldn't watch all of the film twelve years a slave. It was just too much. And so here's what he said he said well. I was able in other words while he was writing the underground railroad. He said well. I was able to put all the stuff on the page seeing the movie. Twelve years of slave made me really upset. And i could only get through half of it. It was one thing to put my characters through the reality of slavery and something different to see actual humans actors. Go through some of the things. I was writing about and it was too much. It became too close. Seeing children ripped from their parents and sold off and seeing the auctions and the things. I'd put on the page enacted by actors. I had to stop the movie. Twelve years a slave. And i still haven't finished it because seeing a real human face was too much and that's very related to what we're talking about so i'm just really interested in hearing your reaction to that. Yeah i completely understand. we're calls coming from. I would understand where anyone who made the statement will come from especially Black people However for me in front you mentioned twelve years a slave at the very proximal relationship with that film. I presided over. The the world premiere The first screening of that film. And i can tell you right. Film plus one conducted the first. Qna for so. I'm very familiar with that work. I think for me what it amounts to is this idea. There's a power and images there's power in images. There's also a power in language and my medium is visual language and for the last four years with four years that i made the show the slogan and i filmed this show in the state of georgia. Mini red hats on there in the slogan. You would always. Here is make america great again and to me. There was a blind spot in this idea of the america. That once was great or this place. Deepen the historical pass where america was great. And i think we only feed into the erasure of the actual history of america and the actual history of my ancestors by deciding that we would rather not see their images active on social media and when the first trailer for the show released and people saw the images. Colson is referring to there. There was a comment. Because i feel like this important. Listen is important as an artist to be interrogated by the people you creating work for. It was a comment said. Oh i don't wanna see any images of slaves positive imagery. But i think inherent in that is the direct association that any images of my ancestors are inherently negative And i think we have to these. I have to can't speak in we. I felt i fill in responsibility to reconsider. Actualize the power of those images by speaking forthrightly to them but then pushing pass them And i'll say i'm the sequence with began any typically in a sequence like this character was just responding to the acute trauma but we felt it was very important to give voice and so he says three very important things i sequence he says to the other slay people forced to witness no more masters new more slaves and then to as brutalize he says god damn you god damn shoe and i think that's where even we create an image and some way warren ardine another aspect of it. Or at least. I hope so You know you mentioned. Make america great again and how the you frequently heard that slogan in georgia while you were filming the underground railroad and you know this was also a period because he shot this over four years. This was also the period one in some places. Confederate statues were coming down confederate flags. We're coming down. But as we saw in january six during that insurrection. There were large confederate flags. There we all have images in our minds of those confederate flags and so like that has not that has not gone away. No the official confederate flags in some states and cities have been taken down. So i guess that's what you're talking about two in terms of you know how some of that is still present. It is an to a certain degree and and again. I don't want to put make america great again just on the state of georgia. I mean it was a worldwide undoubtedly. But i think you're right. The stuff hasn't gone away. But we also can't allow it to go unchecked. You mentioned the confederate flag. I just find it especially working on this show for the last four years of being obsessed with it. There are more monuments in streets named after the insurrectionist threaten this country. The my ancestors. We had a huge fight about placing one of the greatest american. Harriet tubman on the twenty dollar bill. And yet i would go to set every day and see images of confederate generals estimate side of a mountain These things are just completely incongruous. They make sense but i'm talking about images. This thing is carbon into the side of a mountain. And i think my was language and i have to carve images in my own image or the image of my ancestors. You're taking about stone mountain. Yes i am. Which have you seen the whole. Show terry it's not a spoiler. But the north carolina episode was filmed on stone mountain. And i dunno. I think a bit petty. But i'm very proud of the got to blow a little piece of it up episode. Do you know anything about your own ancestors and their experiences of enslavement. Are there any stories that were passed on to the family or any documents or artifacts that remain a do what i don't i don't know anything any actualized information. I know to be honest like i can. I can barely tell you Who my grandfather. Who my great great grandfather were So that's the literal answer. But i think figuratively through working on this project I feel like. I know them very well. And i mean very well Both through the research process of making the show and then being there in georgia are background actors which was filled with advisers. We hear all about the civil war and actors. These men primarily white men who preserve these muskets and they go to these sports. They reenact these battles scenes but there are black people. And the american south do the same thing honoring the legacy of masters. But oh my god terry making the show productions mark friedberg and on i said to him. I don't want cgi trains. I don't wanna cgi tunnels and also the only thing that we've left standing because we won't acknowledge this history on the plantation houses but the spaces where my ancestors lived those things of all wasted away. So we rebuilt the entire slave quarters on a plantation. Built it from scratch planet. A cotton plant sugarcane build build shacks the whole the whole deal and these advisors came down and they trained our background actors and how to perform as my ancestors and you know before making the show if you ask me who else the senate of i would've said i'm the descendant of enslaved africans and i have no problem with that. That's a fact of my existence. I think now that answer has evolved. And i am the descendant of blacksmiths and midwives and herbalists and spiritualist no matter what happens with it. i don't know who's gonna watch it or or for how long they'll stick with it But the thing that brought me this proximity the closeness this reverence of my sister. So and that way i would say yes. I know them very well. And how has that if at all help. You see your own life differently. It's interesting in pre production for the show. I was standing in a cotton field. I mean a massive cotton field and really sad and really angry and i debated the efficacy of even making the show of instead taking a little savings ahead buying the field and just burning it to the ground And then i realized that there were people who look like me. That student is very field. Could never have imagined that. I would one day stand in the same field in create images To honor them. And then i realized they. They must've i realized they must've. Because there's no way they could have endured. There's no way they could have chosen to live without the possibility that they would be get children who got children who got children who went oscars and make shows and their honor and so for me. It's made me very proud. Not that i wasn't before. But i mentioned the the twitter user before who said i don't want to see any images of slaves. I won't positive imagery. I now associate nothing with any images of my ancestors after going through this process. I mean the strength of these people was absolutely amazing. Terry and i think it was one thing. That's a goal of mine and making the show is to re contextualize how we view my ancestors the show for me is about this character colorado. It's not about her trying to vanquish slavery. It's about her trying to reconcile this hole in her heart. She feels by this abandonment from her mother. I thought the same thing with my mother because the first twenty five years of my life. I didn't understand why she didn't take care of me. I didn't understand why i was estranged from her. Cora goes on this journey. And we've done certain things to the show. We've created this journey. Were corre understand. The sacrifice of mother has to make it. Can i just stop for a second and say that cores mother had abandoned her in the sense that that she fled enslavement and left corner on the plantation and core doesn't understand how my mother have tried to flee to freedom but leave me behind like that exactly and i felt the exact same way as a child. You only know what you know so looking at this book. It's all about parenting. Am doing all this research and then and i hate to say this but kanye west goes in. The tmz says slave was a choice. And i'm trying to unpack them so angry pre production on this show when this happens. I'm trying to unpack this. I remember as a kid you would say. Oh if i was asleep. I would iran or houses slave out of done. This oughta done that. Was that where he's coming from. With this idea of this choice and then i realized it was a very militaristic operation. And we don't even get into it as well as we could because we only spend an episode and a half on this plantation but communication and weaponry To one of the choices was everyone could have taken arms and rebelled and everyone would have been slaughtered and yet all those children terry would have been left behind and it's interesting because talking about sacrifice in the media a lot lately Often heinous as it related to. George floyd so many use the word sacrifice here but i hope i can distinguish it from that but i think the choice that my ancestors made in filled us through the process making the show was the choice to live because had they taken any of those other options. All those children would have been left behind and their children everywhere. Terry it's worth one of the proudest of and recreating these images. That has maybe a little bit different from the images that have come before we make sure to put children everywhere and if there was a choice it was to live and protect those children because by eighteen eighty five there are men in congress who were born into slavery because my ancestors protected those children and so for me this was about we contextualising because i believe now making the show. My ancestors are responsible for the greatest collective parenting the world has ever seen. The world has ever seen how. How's mlk possible without this. Act of collective parenting. How i possible without this act of collective parenting in terms of the collective parenting as your series makes clear like the children were property they were valuable. And if you were a plantation owner with enslaved people you wanted them to have children because just added to the property that you had it added to the workers that you had enslaved or you could sell them so there was a dollar sign on those children. I mean there was. I mean but we were talking earlier about how this show relates to present day. I think the private prison industrial complex as the same way you know. We need prisoners to fuel that system. And i think that's why so many. So many means of both incarceration codes and and entrapment practices is a direct mirror of that. Even more to that point. The families were fractured. A child will be born in. The child will be set somewhere else This was systematic and yet the child would always arrive somewhere and somehow a new family unit would be born and this is crazy because we think a black families and i must saying we somehow through media imagery we present it. We think of black fathers as being absent we think of black mothers is being caring and nothing. Nothing could be further from the truth because the fact of existence as proof positive that this parenting had to have taken place. Why one of the images on the show. And it's a completely Innocuous image is of an enslaved black man sitting on a porch sewing adul- for two children who he did not conceive but whom he will raise as his own because black men. Did that like women did that. My ancestors did that. And i wanna contextualized so that when we see them when we view them. This is what we see first and foremost and the the condition of their enslavement. You know right now. We're referring to them as enslaved. Which i think is very honorable worthy but it takes the onus off of who they were places in what was done to them and i want to get to what they did and what they did was protect. All those children. Terry i wanted to talk more about your series and your life but first we have to take a short break. So let me introduce you hear. My guest is buried jenkins and he directed the new series the underground railroad which starts streaming friday. He also directed the films. Moonlight and if beale street could talk so we'll talk more after we take a short break. I'm terry gross and this is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr sponsor trade. Whether you're looking to put your money to work in the short term long term or somewhere in between each raids got you covered. E-trade can help you with your finances from saving for a first home to investing for retirement. And they're backed by a team of financial professionals to give you support to get started today. Visit eatright dot com slash. Npr for more information e-trade securities llc member setback. Let's get back to my interview with jerry jenkins. He directed the films moonlight which won an oscar. For best picture. And if beale street could talk which was adapted from james baldwin novel jenkins directed the new ten part series the underground railroad which is adapted from the pulitzer prize. Winning novel by colson whitehead. It tells the stories of a teenage girl. Cora who escapes enslavement on a brutal georgia plantation and the slave catcher who is pursuing her in the story the underground railroad is literally a train that operates in secret underground and transports people escaping slavery to other states. Each of those states has devised its own obstacles to prevent black people from truly achieving freedom. We last spoke after you directed the film moonlight which when the oscar for best picture and the mother in that story is dealing with addiction which leaves her son basically without a parent and so a drug dealer and his girlfriend become the boys parental surrogates and they both seem like wise and generous people but we later learn that the drug dealers the same dealer. Who's selling to shira's mother to the boy's mother and keeping her addicted Your mother was addicted. And that's why there were years of your life when she she really wasn't available to you as as a parent. Can i ask how your mother is now. She's she's good. She's vaccinated she's good. I mean as good as anybody can be in this time right now. I'll say this. I think making that film. It opened up A line of communication between us that not that it had not existed but it had become frayed And that's what i'll say about that. But yeah she's good good. Who who raised you during the years line. I know your father died when you were twelve. Yeah i was raised by a woman named minerva hall my grandmother who I'm pretty sure there's no blood relation to me But was a was a caretaker from my mom during her very very rough years. There's actually a character in the underground railroad named after her. Migos wife is named minerva. After my grandma. Minerva overhaul she was awesome. She was the kind of woman who there would be twelve people in a two bedroom apartment at different periods. Because if you need shelter she will provide it You know it's interesting i didn't. I don't make these connections as making work. I'm just about the The characters. But i mean there's a direct line the way Charming in the way these kids. These children was put off from their families. Were taking care of my ancestors. We treated like a son. I was i was i was i was i was. It was different. But i was. I was. I think just like with kora in this show so many people are trying to show her love. You know whether it's Caesar play by pierre. Royal played by Way of harper. You know or john. Valentine of these characters but when you have this whole your heart. It's kind of hard to receive love. And i think that was very much a function of how i operate as a child. How many children were. They're living at home with you are depend there were there. Were times where there were like. I don't know six seven of us you know. Sometimes my brother was there Brothers nine years older than me every now and then my sister would be there. She's ten years older than me but yeah it was. It was a revolving door depending on how hard the times weren't and we talk about. You know crack cocaine a lot of the nineteen eighties but also the the disappearance of industrialized work in these communities was also happening at the same time so there were a lot of folks needed space. On these floors husband nathaniel daniel hough. He was a longshoreman. It's kind of cool. I actually haven't thought of this terry but episode of the underground railroad that we didn't to make call genesis. It's about these black men who were working in a mine and the mine cage then during an explosion and their insurance policies. Taken out on the enslaved especially these men who work in these minds rather than dig them in out the owner mind decides he will lead them berry and casualty insurance. So these men start digging and digging and digging and they come up above the mason dixon line and rather than walked freedom they go back down and they keep digging. This is one hundred grand railroad begins. We wrote the script. It was really short but very expensive to shoot a film like that. But i say that because daniel who paid the my my granddad longshoremen who always had a roof for these ten to twelve people. When i saw him what his hard hat and people said the underground railroad for the first time. That's what i saw not even imagined. That's what i saw. The number got to go to work with him and realize he was unloading ships containers ship. I thought you got a hard head in the toolbox. He's going to build something. It was minerva anything. You have a player in high school right. I was not a very good with a played with some very very very talented people. People who made it to the nfl. But yes. I was the fact that you're on a team and that you know sports are like really structured. There's a game you have to. You know you have to learn the plays and everything was that helpful to you. Growing up having the strapped. You're having the team. Having having a discipline. It was helpful. It was it was even beyond helpful. I think it may be saved my life to a certain degree. I grew up without a father. Figure and these coaches. you know. it's funny thinking back on them now. Because i think thought of them as these these old dudes who were like three generations above me i realize now many of them were younger than i am right now and yet they were the men in my life and and they they were tough but they were fair And i do believe they taught. They taught me valuable lessons. And they gave me self esteem. And there's no doubt and it's funny. I make these films now but when my basically a football coach emulating these black men. That i grew up with coach smith. Kotaro wakeman hardwick. See my life. This guy coach. He's the first person to call me a man and he did it in a way that it wasn't about masculinity or hyper masculinity it was just he was talking to me. We're having a conversation. He wanted me to understand that he respected what. I was saying And i think those are very valuable lessons. If you're someone who's growing up without a father what else did you emulate about the coaches. I mean you'd have to come to one of my set stereo and check it out. Basically you know. I'm i'm very diligent. I think the best coaches understand that their ego must be checked because they are not the ones before me. Are they gonna film set. A director can be a tyrant they can be this person. That fills all powerful. When i'm going to set. I sometimes feel powerless. But i give that power to the crew. I'll give that power to the cast and in my goal and my job with my hope is just like mycosis which is to inspire everyone. I'm working with to be as good sound so soft ended but to be the best them that they can be an promise. You terry as people watch my work. Things that affected the most the moments that affected the most in the ones that have the least to do with. Its where these people are out on the center in the scene. And they're becoming this thing that end them to become And that's what. I love the most about what i do. Let me reintroduce you here. If you're just joining us my guest is buried jenkins. He directed the ten episode series the underground railroad which is adapted from the pulitzer prize. Winning novel by colson whitehead the series starts streaming on amazon friday. We'll be right back after a short break. This is fresh air explore the many ways artificial intelligence affects your everyday life and your future for better and for worse. Listen to ai nation from whyy in princeton university available. Now wherever you get your podcasts. Let's get back to my interview. With barry jenkins who directed the ten part series the underground railroad which starts streaming on amazon friday. It's adapted from the pulitzer prize winning novel. by colson. whitehead jenkins also directed the films. Moonlight and if beale street could talk. There's a scene in the indiana chapter of the underground railroad. And this is the chapter in which cora is a community black people own and run a farm and they make wine and their free and prosperous in that episode. There's a scene where everybody from that community is standing alongside each other in in a row facing forward and looking up but sideways as the camera. Pans across all of their faces and bodies. And i'd like you to talk about the effect of that moment and also what you told the actors to do like how you choreographed that scene including there is. Yeah yeah they were just talking about feel before. I could just feel that something was happening on the set one. We're in the state of georgia. So we're standing on the soil. Our ancestors stood on it. I could just feel something. In us of something in them was fusing in those moments. I would stop the show. Those moments plan the not rehearsed. And i would say very simply to the cast. Show me yourselves. I'm going to drift the camera. Pass you want you to look directly in it and just show me yourself. And that's it really really simple terry. We have like five hours of those moments there interspersed throughout the show but but very few of them in that one was one of the few. Where because of the state that we're Transposing indiana where everyone's free there was just something very self possessed about that moment and i don't know if it's to say look at this. Look at how beautiful this could be if these people were just left to themselves and allowed to be fully possessed of themselves. But i think even more than that you know. I've always had this imposed to view my ancestors. I want to see them. And there's something about this direct gays and again this show man made me so damn soft But i think maybe in some degree if you believe in the spirit connection of beings that also they can see us because they're looking directly into the audience and the audience is looking directly into them until. Yeah that's what those those moments though shots or about. Do you feel that over the years. Just through through time through getting older and through reading and adapting james baldwin and making this new series the underground railroad and just learning more about the history of your ancestors. Do you feel like you understand your mother. More i do. I do feel like creating these. Three works has made me understand my mother more know. Actually i kind of regret some of the way up spoken about my mother in the press. Because you know. I talk about her as regards to moolah in a talk about her in regards to the underground railroad. I've never talked about her in regards. The character regina king plays in bill streak at talk. But i think the were moments in my life where my mom did go to baffling and there were these moments where she did she did find a way to correct the ills that were painting her and and she was there and she was president. You know. I had my mom pretty much for my high school years. I have my mom from high school years. We didn't live together but we had a very good relationship. If i need it because again. The greatest octopus elective parenting. The world has ever seen. There is nothing black. Parents won't do for their children. This is something that we found a way to conceptualize as being bad or being negative. I'm going to definitely have that experience with my mom Through high school so more about her. The bill street press. But maybe i should talk terry gross. Who build street. And that would correct it. That but i do think it has brought me a greater understanding of her. Can you talk more about how your understanding of your mother has changed over the years one. I just i'll tell the short version the man of named after my father berry. I'm pretty sure is not my actual father. And yet i learned after about twenty five years of life That barry raised my brother and my sister as his own children. Four the ten years before i was conceived And i believe it was an act of infidelity. That calls this break between my father and my mother and this thing is what. Let my mother down the very dark path that she had to deal with the demons. She had to wrestle with For the fracturing of this family knowing that knowing that was it was not that. I should have needed that information To reconcile the sense of obamacare fell but but knowing it learning it it just completely shifted so many things so many things and even though we're not kind of people who communicate as forthrightly as you and communicating right now Think emotionally and spiritually Ah did shift the access about a relationship. Was i right in saying before that your father died when you were twelve. You were yes. Yes you were However it's just it's just a tricky thing. That's a tricky a. Because i'm not sure who who my father is so so it's a tricky as a tricky thing so tricky thing was buried. This is barry who died when you were twelve. This was this was berry. Yes ma'am were you living together at the time. no i have. I have never Have been in the same room with berry multiple times over those twelve years and we never said a word to one another or he never said a word to me And even that. I didn't understand but But then when. I got that information around the twenty five. I understood man i understood. That's a lot to take in. It can't be maybe a working it out through through creating these images You know. I do think that the journey the core goes through and the show through her ordeal With north carolina with where she ends up at the end you kind of learn to doing and you kind of prepare yourself living life and i think that's what i'm doing The living my life and creating this art. Let me reintroduce you here. If you're just joining us my guest is buried jenkins. He directed the ten episode series the underground railroad which is adapted from the pulitzer prize. Winning novel by colson whitehead this series starts streaming on amazon friday. We'll be right back after a short break. This is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from best fiends. If you find yourself choosing the longest checkout line that can only mean one thing. You've downloaded best fiends. The five star rated mobile puzzle game which means where other a hassle all you see is a chance to play one more level a few more times turn dull moments into pockets of fun download. Best means free today on the app store or google play. That's friends without the our best means. This message comes from. Npr sponsor via the comfort company. Sada was the first company to sell luxury. Mattresses online without the hassle or expense of traditional mattress stores so sought for customers have always paid fifty percent less than retail visit as double a. t. v. a. dot com slash. Npr today where npr listener. Save an additional. Two hundred dollars sought via the comfort company. Hi it's terry gross inviting you to check out our new online archive collecting forty years of fresh air interviews reviews. You can hear my interviews with people like david bowie of franklin johnny cash john. Tony morrison searched for names. You're interested in make a playlist for yourself or friends at fresh air. Archive dot org. That's fresh air. Archive dot org. Let's get back to my interview. With barry jenkins who directed the ten part series the underground railroad which starts streaming on amazon friday. It's adapted from the pulitzer prize winning novel. by colson. whitehead jenkins also directed the films. Moonlight and if beale street could talk. Did you get to see a lot of movies when you were growing up. I didn't i. Didn't you know we would go to the movies. A saw really big budget American films at the army plaza You know i remember seeing things like Coming to america the color purple you know kid. Play was big. You know. I remember seeing house party in class act and things like that. What did you want to become a filmmaker. It was interesting. We were just talking about my mom so much that first semester film school was really brutal at florida state university. I entered the film school and in the first semester realized. I was a bit in over my head. I didn't know you needed light to expose film and some a technically i was Far behind my peers. You know. I had to question a lot of things you know. The question was not good at this. Because you know. I'm black and poor. And i grew up in the projects with a moment to crack cocaine or do i just not have access to the tools. These kids have had How about just not been privileged. These kids have been and i took a year often. This was around nine. Eleven and came back and i made a short film. People were saying being apple being muslim and america's the new block. I knew what it felt. Like to be black in america and through my research reading and and watching these films knew that films and empathy machine. I thought. Oh if i can figure out a way to empathize with these people and make a film. Maybe there's a way that i can hold us my voice and so i made a film about this arab american couple washing american flags for free. You know as a sign of a patriotism called it my josephine and i made that thing And it worked. I'm really proud of that short and In right away. I realize the first time in my life where these perceived handicaps that i thought i had I just i just blasted through them. I disprove those thoughts. That i have in the back of my mind about myself and i thought oh i can do this for a living. Hell yeah i just been chasing it ever since. I like the expression that that film isn't empathy machine. What led you to start thinking of movies that way I think it was the feeling that the film's gave me people talk about. Why and how indebted to walker. Wise work My films are talk. That chilean aesthetics. But i think also to again. I'm a kid who grew up. You know i know five square blocks and those are some hard as blocks and now. I'm watching this movie about these men. You know in asia who are in love and this is so far removed. From any experience i've ever had and get feel things Just as an example right away. I thought this is one of the most powerful things i've ever experienced in my life so it really unlocked something to realize that you could use your experiences and put them to work. Even if wasn't about people who you knew. Not even that. Terry i mean yes that but also i can do this and it was very clear to me. There's no reason why i can't do this. The democratization of the form at the curriculum i went through f- floor state university. Everybody had the same cameras the same emotions everything on film and just clicked in my head. I start with an empty frame like anyone else in. There's nothing limiting me from painting within that frame. Something a box of and maybe even beautiful but definitely empathetic and there was just something. I mean you have to understand. I don't know where how you grew up. Terry but you know this is line in bushwick a talk. Where baldwin writes. The kids have been told that they weren't worth and everything they saw around them proved it. This book was written in the seventies. I grew up in the eighties and the nineties and it still was applicable and so to get into a place where space where. I could take my experience and harness it in a form. That was sharable. That was rich. That could actually incite people to feeling a movement wishes nothing. It was one of the most affirming things that's ever happened in my life. And i make more work. Nothing not winning an oscar. Not even the magic. I was talking about but nothing compares to that feeling. What are some of the things that made you feel when you're growing up that your life wasn't worth anything because you weren't worth anything You know it's interesting working in media now or the creation of images you know. I would watch things like the cosby show. You know why. Why can't my life be like that or even just in the neighborhood that i grew up in you know there were people who had these very strong family units and i did not. You know. I wasn't told you know i was loved or i love you as often as maybe a child should be told but it's interesting as children. We do a great job of contextualising. Our condition. Until i don't know that i felt the lack in the moment that i felt it. I think it was only as i got further away from that experience and abused my childhood in the context of others childhood Then i realized there was a deficiency terry man. You started off light but but you you finally a new. You're gonna do this man. We started off. We were real chill and then we got it. Somebody being burned alive after by a are that is true. Starting off light you know just got warmed up. I speaking with the intellectual side of my brain and now it's become so so kudos to you lady. Okay thank you very much. So you've done some pretty heavy films. You know moonlight and bill streak guitar another from the underground railroad and one of the next rooms. You're going to do as a prequel to the lion king. So how how do you see that fitting into your body of work. Why do you want to do that. And willoughby live action or animator. I some live action. It's a it's a blend of the live action animation as they call it I guess the reason i want to do it was the characters and it was the characters thing snuck up on me when i read it. I did not assume. Or when i began reading it. You know. I did not think i was going to be into it and i sat down to read. You know depending on how it comes to me. I'll always read thirty pages of it. And i looked up and i was on page seventy and i realized i was. I was hooked. You know the original film. The animated film came out while i was helping my sister Raise my two nephews at the time and so we will watch this movie hundreds of times. I mean hundreds of times. Terry very i had a very deep love and appreciation of the characters in the writer. Jeff nathanson who wrote the script. He just posted in a way But i thought was refreshing. And shocker terry shocker. Shocker but i saw quite a few things about the way. I grew up The story of the way. Mr moo fossa grew up until i thought you know what maybe i should undertake this one similarity I grew up in this way. Where i kind of like collected This family you know. I don't know who my father is. And and i grew up in this place where i always felt on board and then i started making these films and i've kind of built this family around me. I've built these people who i deeply love who i've been working with a nonstop for the last twenty years and i think there's something about the way this character will foucault learned to be who he is That is very deeply embedded in the script. Jeff is written as well. That's all i'll say about that. And hopefully disney will strike me down for ego saying that much. Barry jenkins talk with you again. Congratulations on this series. And thanks so much for coming back to our show. Thank you terry. It's been a pleasure. Always as barry jenkins directed the ten part series the underground railroad it starts streaming on amazon friday. Tomorrow on fresh air our guest will be writer. Francisco goldman his book. The art of political murder about the assassination of a guatemalan human rights. Activist was adapted into an hbo documentary. His novel saying her name is a fictionalized account of the tragic death of his wife in a bodysurfing accident he has a new autobiographical novel called monkey boy. I hope you'll join us Fresh air's executive producer is danny miller. Our technical director and engineer is audrey. Bentham our interviews and reviews produced in edited by any salad. Phyllis myers san brigger. Lauren crendall heidi. Simone theresa madden and rebelled. Not they challenor. Set kelly kayla lattimore andro. Wolfram our associate producer of digital media. Is molly seavy nesper. Roberta shorrock directs the show. I'm terry gross. This message comes from. Npr sponsor ford the all electric mustang mach e and a twelve foot rocket. Take off the rocket launches up into the atmosphere while the all electric pony takes off toward the horizon at full speed visit for dot com for a new perspective on range.

Barry jenkins colson georgia colson whitehead terry america pulitzer prize terry gross Cora oscar for best film Whitehead Terry warren ardine jenkins amazon mark friedberg cora corre George floyd
The best of The Big Interview: Barry Jenkins

Monocle 24: The Globalist

30:30 min | 2 years ago

The best of The Big Interview: Barry Jenkins

"You're listening to a special edition of the globalist in association with UBS. Hello and welcome to a special edition of the globalist. I'm Ben Ryland over the festive season we've been looking back at some of the very best interviews we did hear on monocle twenty four throughout twenty eighteen. The big interview brought you the fascinating live stories of some of the most influential people from the world of arts, and culture business politics and design today the last one in our series. We listen back to my conversation with the Oscar winning film director Barry Jenkins that was a person who didn't participate as much as maybe I could have often felt quite alone, quite isolated. But I still wanted to be engaged. And so I was in observer. And I think when you watch people, and you see the way they affect one another those things starts imprint themselves on your being and for me what I loved about cinema as when I finally stumbled onto filmmaking. Here was a place where I could express what I thought was very odd. Weird way. I learned to navigate the world which was by watching people in really. Investigating small gestures because in my life. It was always the smallest gestures that rang the loudest for me, the very gentle kind things that people differently unexpectedly, but often bring on these wells of catharsis if you've seen the film moonlight which won the Academy Award for best picture rain 2017 you'll recall the rough Miami neighborhood where much of the action took place some years ago that area was the home for the film's young director. Barry Jenkins now after that sensational victory at the Oscars that sold LA La Land accidentally announced as the winner varies. Life has taken some surprising turns he's latest film. If Beale street could talk see him fulfilling a long held dream of adapting the great James Baldwin, and although the events of the film take place in Harlem in the early nineteen seventies. It's themes of racial prejudice at the hands of law enforcement, deeply resonant today. I'm Ben Ryland. And I'm pleased to say that Barry Jenkins joined me here at Meduri house in London full the beginning of you. Barry, it's been quite a ride from promoting moonlight to an Oscar winner. You must be still pinching yourself is pinching myself. Not quite, but yeah, pretty cool really really wild ride at the end for sure. Well, the journey. I think has been all the more extraordinary few. Because of course, when you were younger, you never wanted to be a filmmaker diedhiou. This is a complete u-turn, I suppose from where you were hitting when you will not younger. Yeah. It was kind of by happenstance. I was already at undergrad for about three years before I realized that there was a film school. And it wasn't something that I decided, oh, I want to become a filmmaker. I just thought oh, I like movies. There happens to be a film school here. Let me try this out. And now here we are. I guess fifteen years later going back to when you not younger. I mean, you were quite poll growing up and the area where you grow is actually the same area seen in moon line. What was your exposure to movies like back, then it was mostly like really big budget commercial films? Like black people in the neighborhood. I grew up in we always went to the movies. So it was like the color purple coming to America things like that the family would all get together. And catch the bus and go see those things, and even then it just didn't occur to me. Even though those were like black films that home. Then there must be black people involved in the making of them. It was just something that I enjoyed but not something I wanted to possess. Did you ever ever consider back then the doing something creative making movies or even even writing something that occurred? You is something that could actually be a career not a career. I always enjoyed writing. I had a teacher in third and fourth grade who encouraged me to write my grandma will take fishing on the weekends. And she said, oh, you're the only kid in this neighborhood in the projects who goes out to nature on the weekend. So you should share that with your classmates? She'd had me write down these weekend trips. I took my grandmother and then read them out loud to the class. This my earliest memory of writing. But even then it was like, oh, this is just something that my teacher forces me to do. And even though I enjoy it. Didn't we I can actually do this for a living some day? And so again, it would in one ear and out the other, and then somehow ten years later, I just kind of slipped back into it. And of course, as we mentioned the area that you grew up with quite Rothen. You'll family background was quite a difficult one. As William mother was dealing with addiction looking back at your childhood back. Then what would the would and Bishen have meant to young Barry Jenkins? What did you see in that mode? I thought going to college at all was something to aspire to and even then I didn't even take that very seriously. I only went to university because there were these public funds of the Florida Lottery that pay for the tuition of high achieving students, and I was a good student n really have much ambition beyond maybe thinking, it might be okay to go to college. Because you know, if you saw moonlight the character Naomie Harris plays is essentially, my mom in the main character in that film was essentially me you don't look at what that kids going to go. Oh, yeah. That kids going to go to Harvard or Yale. You realize now that of course. That's possible. But back then when I was living that life, it just didn't seem attainable. But even if you said that two people now who have hats steel in that neighborhood, it would be difficult to convince anyone living in that live in that reality that just because you did it. It's possible for anyone is that part of the problem that the people no matter how much you tell them and how much it's proven that something else is possible. It's difficult to make people really believe it's difficult. But you know, I think of we've been starting this conversation decide idea of ambition the things that I did or did not want to become when I was a child and one of my best memories on my phone has memories from the process of making moonlight was being in the neighborhood onset as the director and inviting all the neighborhood children who would be out watching us a make the film, and they would be outside at night is a rarity for them because all the drug dealers shootout all the streetlights, but he big lights to make a movie until these kids at the age of eight nine ten twelve or watching me a young black, man. Direct all these white crew persons to tell the story about these black actors in front of the camera, and I could see in their eyes right away. Oh, this is possible. Because here's this dude. He's doing it. And he's from here. He looks like me. So I think when you have those very real world lived examples, which I guess I am now. One of now, it's sort of reduces the distance between what you feel as possible in. What I like to say is what you allow yourself to dream to the point of taking off the table because Beijing has Israel. You know, he's not some fictive personality. Here's a guy who's like literally made his movie in the projects that won best picture. So yeah, I guess it's all the shit's attainable. Now, it's about representation, then it's about representation, but also to representation does all these words representations. Diversity change, all the stuff a think when you can really look at someone and touch them literally kids was sitting in my director's chair it goes beyond representation, then it's just like us. I think it's just a childhood like the one you had could have broken you. It could have prevented you from really getting out. Out of that sort of weld. It could have broken anyone wanted to know break, you, you know, I've been thinking about that trying to unpack it. I mean, maybe it did break me. I happen to be here doesn't mean it was I wasn't broken at some point on the path towards getting here, and to be brutally honest actually was after making my first feature medicine for melancholy, which screen at the London Film Festival in two thousand eight I pretty much gave up on the idea of making another film five years past and like nothing happened with my career, and my friend, Dale romance key, who's a producer on moonlight and his new film of ill. She could talk. She more or less picked me up off the canvas and said, this is unacceptable. You have to make another film. We have to figure out what we're going to do. And I will hold your hand and help you do it and that talk turned into moonlight in abuse Rica, talk, but to answer your question. I don't really know. I just always had people who cared about me in who at the right moments. You know, people like my sister teachers, and my friends that I made in film school, especially they just refused to allow me to. To revel in my broken. And I think that's what a lot of us need as we're trying to navigate this crazy thing we call life. When I want you films. I see someone who's clearly very capable of communicating these very tend to roll emotions that are often hard to get across onscreen without actually saying it, and yet you'll films can communicate a lot just from a look there's a certain language going on here. But what I don't understand is that when I look at your life story, there's not a clear recipe here for how you've learned that thing whatever that thing happens to be wet does that come from. Where did you get that filmmaking language from? I think part of it goes back to, you know, a really nice way trains conversation with way, I grew up that was a person who didn't participate as much as maybe I could have often often felt quite alone, quite isolated. But I still want it to be engaged. And so I was in observer, I was in sometimes in observer in my own life. And I think when you watch people, and you see the way they affect one another those things starts imprint themselves on your being and for me what I loved about cinema. As when I find. Stumbled onto filmmaking. Here was a place where I could express what I thought was very odd. Weird way. I learned to navigate the world which was by watching people in really investigating small gestures because in my life was always the smallest gestures that ring the loudest for me, the very gentle kind things that people differently unexpectedly would often bring on these wells of catharsis think now in the films that I make whatever however that came about I'm trying to translate that feeling now that I've had throughout my life. I'm to these characters and would a love about what I've gone to these last two films is the act was really understand it in. I think they come to work with us. And I say us myself must Motagua for James Laxton because they know. Oh, if I do this really small thing that often goes unnoticed. Barry Gibb, James lax. And I'm going to blow it the hell up, you know, and make sure it's felt so you know, it's funny. We're talking about all these things that may be could have been or should have been handicaps for me as a storyteller as a person as a filmmaker cetera. But I see the strengths of in a certain way. And I think that had grown up with a silver spoon or had I gone to Harvard or Yale or anything like that. I wouldn't be the filmmaker that I am today. And I maybe wouldn't be able to make the operations that I do in my work miracles. You would have had to deal with those sorts of people those people that I suppose in some ways did grow up with a silver spoon in the amounts. What was it? Like you to come from the background you did. And you wanna be a filmmaker you're encountering these people who perhaps haven't struggled as much as you've had to struggle. You must have approached that situation and thought I'm handicapped by will these weaknesses. How come that feeling? I never had like a a rough macho in karate kid moment where I was in love this girl. And I was wrong side of the tracks that I went to the party, and they thought I was the helps to have through spaghetti all over the rich. I'd never happen with me. But I do remember getting into film school and understanding that the tools that we're using to make these films. These other kids have grown up with if they had cameras they had parents who were writers artists and things like that. It was never anything that they use an. Aggressive way to demean me to subjugate me on my work. Instead, I decided okay. This is a proving ground. I'm going to do whatever I can to really investigate understand. Why this difference exists between us this handicapped and being able to apply the craft because nothing deficient about my intelligence person. So I'm going to go out to year off from university in train myself and the tools a filmmaking. Let me still photography and watching all these weird foreign films and reading about light and things like that. And then I went back in and the handicap was raced in one year, the handicap was completely erased and again back about representation, and and things like that was like I didn't need to see someone like me who knew how to do these things to be inspired to do. Then. I just thought oh, I think it's within me to catch up because this thing shouldn't be the barrier to ability between me in these people. And when I came back into the program. It was true. I was like, okay. Yeah. I can make films just as good as these kids from the other side of the track. But they don't have the voice that I have. So I'm gonna take it one step further. We should backtrack just slightly because you, of course, didn't just go into film school quite early on a used out of that Ravi light because you at first pivoted to football and winch confuses me somewhat because I come from a sport loving nation. And as far as I can tell creativity and football make fa fairly strange bedfellows. How did that work out? I think it worked out really, well, I think all my film sets. I'm kinda like a football coach. Then what I like about. That is football. Coach knows I'll speak in your country sport is your countries for the football. Coach can't go out and be the striker. He cannot, but you can figure out the shape, and he knows that the wing, you know, maybe these two pension a little bit, you know, as the game goes on. But he can't go out there and actually do the pinch. And so for me one, I realize my ability as a football player was quite limited. And so by the time, I got to college that was done. But again, I think these things that maybe were handicaps initially kinda prove themselves to be strengths because when I first went to university, I studied English literature, and then I switched. To create a writing and it wasn't until three years after being at university in three years. Very solid. We knowing could not be a professional football player that I discovered there was a film school at Florida state. And so while I took that year off to catch up to the other kids, I was still working towards barn degree in creative writing. What happened was when I started writing screenplays must screenplays had this element of interior already which is very difficult to translate into cinema. But as a literature student as trying to write literature, it's all about the interior mind translating that into story for him. And so when I brought that into by filmmaking again, there was something distinct between the work I was doing in the work. My peers we're doing it actually ended up being like the best way to get into filmmaking. Instead of being some fifteen year old kid with a camcorder who wants to be Steven Spielberg. I was this guy who started off I felt like an a disadvantage in. I did all this work to catch up in looking back on it. Even the way I write screenplays now is really heavily affected by this delete process getting into filmmaking. Let's talk about James Baldwin then. Because obviously, he has had a massive impact on your life on your creativity. When did you first discover James Baldwin, why discovered James Baldwin in the same window undergrad? I was dating a young woman. I think that was like a she's gonna kill me. I was like a sophomore. And she was like a senior between she was smarter than me. She was more attractive. She was more worldly. I don't know why she was dating me. He didn't take me very long. And when she broke up with me as a way of showing me my world needed to expand. She said you need to read James Baldwin, and she recommended I read the fire next time Giovanni is room. And I thought highly of her so I did read those two things, and I was hooked like my mind's just blown. I remember not long after moonlight. We spoke, and you said that you reasons for wanting to adapt if Beale street could talk with simply because it's bold when it's Baldwin Baldwin explained the gravity of Baldwin's words fear, you know, for me to read someone again, I get this whole comprehension back to representations to read an author who was from. A place like me, I'm grew up in a different time. But I think in the same way that I did. And then to read Giovanni is room in the fire next time and see just how expansive his view was just how expansive his experience was. It was I opening again, it was where I realize. Okay. There are things that I don't know. But then I read Baldwin I go, but the feeling comes from his home from the place that he's from. And I thought oh, maybe I can do that as well. And I just always felt like he in a very particular way speaks to what it feels like to be a black human being what it feels like to be human being an American citizen of the world. Anything that exists? I think Baldwin could write about atoms, and it will be like lush and sensual and romantic, but it would also be angry bitter and just like fervent as hell, and I've always responded to his writing in a way, even he's writing about intellectual things it gives me visual impressions. And he had never been adopted before. I thought I have to do this. There was a wonderful documentary ab-. Baldwin by robe heck that came out in two thousand sixteen it was called. I am not unique grow and it included a clip of Baldwin visiting San Francisco in nineteen sixty three way he stumbles upon a couple of young men on the street and begins discussing the possibility of a black president. I I just want you to listen to a pot of their compensation. Negro Pesident into this. In this country. What do you say that jobs? Are we going to be a president gotten? But I want you to think about this. They will be new president of this country. It will not be the country be that'd be sitting in now. But if you say to yourself, then never will be a negro president Louis country. Then what you're doing is agreeing with white people who say you on fear. It's not important really know whether or not his negro president. I mean, it that way what's involvement that you should realize that you can become a you can't become the presidential. There's nothing anybody. Anybody can do that. You can't do. Wow. It's such a wonderful. Wonderful busy. This is what I mean. The man is like a prophet. It's insane. The competition could have happened nine years ago. Ten years ago Hella conversation can happen tomorrow. Because now, I'm sure people feeling like they will never be another negro president or people feeling like there will never be a female president. Because the last two years have been so hard on everybody. I mean Baldwin is just like eternal eternal. So I've seen that by the way because I made a short film with the same cinematographer in twenty ten called re-migration. And it's about the fictional version of San Francisco in the future where there are no working class people in the city, and so the city government program to bring working class people back to the city, and we actually use a clip from the documentary one of the children in the film is like watching it on television, in her mind, like my mind is being blown. But we didn't use that part. And we should have been it. His now had to go back and re edit it. One thing that strikes me about Baldwin. And of course, he was speaking in nineteen sixty three. But even as you say speaking now, it must be difficult to make these sorts of points. Like the point he's making they like the point you'll making a new film, if Bill straight could talk you making very serious points here about the way that race relations work in America in the world, more broadly. I'm sure as well. And yet it's being done without anger and frustration even though the anger and frustration must be there in the back of your mind in the back of Baldwin's mind, as we know how do you get those points across with the tend to roll emotion and the subtlety that the comes across India films. In bowlen's words, I think I've experienced anger in my life. And I think I've had people try to make salient points through anger in my life, and I refer them a salient points because the points would have gotten through whether or not been filtered through anger, and we talk about being broken up being broken of you times. I have allowed myself to feel broken to rebel and the broken. This have the one I've let anger get the best of me. So. Yeah, I'm pissed off. And I think you watch the last two films. I think even if you watch a medicine Malakal, you watch all three films, there's some element of being really pissed off or being disillusioned. But if I allow my storytelling, my voice, mice that it to be filtered through that prison. I think it might break the thing that I'm attempting to say in a certain way, so the tinnitus you're speaking of illegals part and parcel with this idea that in my personal life and my life as a human being I just don't see anger bitterness as a solid place to work from. And I think also to what I love about the compensation Mr. volume as having with those men is they are pissed off. They are bitter, and they are broken. And I think he understands that to give them back the energy. They're all they're already. Rebelling in is not going to prove his point. It's not going to help the point get across. So I think I approach the films that we build in the same way. Even though they're talking about things the films are that really should pissed us all off will. Of course, you started work on it feels streak with took before you had the Oscar before you had the rights. What difference did getting the also make to approaching this project for you know, and actually one of the really lovely things about this project moonlight. I wrote them at the same time in the summer of twenty thirteen I wrote moonlight in Brussels. And then I went to Berlin via train and wrote a book SRI could talk. So they kind of went hand in hand. And I always knew that I wanted to make this one immediately after the last one the process of unlocking, the rights beginning to thirteen in so moonlight didn't exist when we began this process, and the Balkan state is really adamant about mentioning not moonlight but medicine from Ellen Cali when they explain why they allowed us to make this film. So no, the Oscars in have any effect on really at to be buoy, honest. It was like the opposite way around and think going right into those. We could talk really helped me process, and sort of move away from all the madness of the Academy Awards and everything it's interesting to locate the loan gist, Asian periods of this project had view, and of course, it's based on a book, which is quite old in itself. And yet the film comes. Across is quite topical quite timely. It feels like something that specifically is saying something about now. Now, I can have my own theories on that. But I'd like to know why do you feel like it's talking to now I think it's just Baldwin. I mean, look if you had played that clip, you know, ten years ago before Brock Obama was elected you'd be like holy shit. This is insane. I think it's just this quality in Baldwin that he speaking to the human condition, and he's also speaking to the idea of America quite often in people like to think, oh, we have a president. Who is doing? God knows what in the world is on fire the country's on fire, and I think of Baldwin hair. He would very clearly say, but it's always been on fire haven't you been paying attention. And I think for that reason the work is still very relevant. It's old. But at age is like fine. I want to ask you about a project that you worked on the us later, the scrapped you had written a film treatment about your mother. But I understand that you decided not to proceed with that. Because she thought it was too personal. Did you find that idea of being personal and maybe not to personal new filmmaking is that a balancing act because when I look at filmmaking. Sometimes I feel like there aren't enough personal deeply personal films at the cinema of golden you'll film moonlight. And if Beale street talk, of course, they are personal films, but they feel like the exception to the rule at the moment. Do we need more personal filming? I think we do I think I learned that lesson the hard way I scrap that film. And like I said, I went through this five year gap in my career, right? I made that film the gap probably would have been much shorter. I mean, the process of making that film kind of made me turn them into the process of making moonlight, which is soon was about Terrell and his mom, but I'm very quickly realized is also about me, and my mom, I think that was a mistake. And I think the process of realizing that is what gave me the confidence to go out and make moonlight. I think we sitting in the cinema. And you see something that comes from the source that comes from the heart that comes from the gut that is personal you can feel the difference. And I think in that way, when I meet young filmmakers, and they. Asked me, ho what do we have to do to get a career in film to things that can really tell them with truthfulness and honesty is to work with your friends. I make it personal. So yeah, I do think we need a more personal aesthetic more personal cinema in the cinemas. My first impression after seeing moonlight. Which was the first film of yours that I did say was that it made it very easy to see the beauty in something that you might not otherwise see as beautiful you'll film moonlight. And you'll film if Bill straight talk, they're taking place in welds that a quite rough and not pleasant in many ways, and yet they come across his very very beautiful as making films made it easy. If you to see the beauty and things that may not immediately be quite pleasant. Yeah. I think it's made me more attuned to the beauty. That's always been present in my life. I think the the life of black folks in America has always been unfortunately surrounded in stomach despair. Just so many dark heavy things and suffering and pain. Through no other little fault other people doing the suffering. And yet we love. We celebrate the so much joy in just by tally in black folks in America, I think making these films made me realize that it's always been the case, you know, even the much out. It was heavy. There are moments of just extreme abject beauty in my memories. And it's why moonlight looks the way it does. And it's why Bill street looks the way it does feels the way those films do, and I think if there's anything about Baldwin's work that I've been able to really really ingest in take with me and apply to my work. It's this idea that despite the bitterness in the the anger of the things Baldwin is talking about how those things make him feel if you ever hurt James Baldwin laugh, then you would know that he also understood that there was such such extreme beauty. Enjoy in living a life this way through the prism of so much suffering. And yet here, we are, you know, you cannot break us and be us when speaking of of black folks myself, and Mr. Bauman and the subjects of our work. So it's been really. Really lovely run with these last two films things I was maybe trying to get away from and now understand that. We're always a part of me when you hear James Baldwin talk. It comes across as though because you referenced the fact that he obviously was quite angry and frustrated in the back of his mind often. And yet when we heard him speak to those young people in San Francisco early, you get this idea that he's he's speaking in a sort of fatherly turn like he sees himself as a mental he understands that because he's in the public eye. He has voiced that a lot of people don't have and he can speak in a way that particular point that a lot of people can't do your in the public eye. Now, how do you deal with that idea that you to have a voice that not everyone has? And maybe there's a responsibility that comes with that too is not something that that you feel that that weighs on you. Sometimes. Yes, something I've had become more aware of and take more notice of especially in the wake of everything that happened with moonlight. It is something that I don't enjoy like to say, you know, voices and well. Work the films, but I also realized too because of the very privileged position. I find myself in that that's not enough, and it's not acceptable. So it is something that I'm very aware of and I'm trying to be more responsible west sitting down in being very open and honest with folks like yourself, you're an Oscar winner, obviously. And you've just adapted James Baldwin, which my understanding is almost laughed. He said, obviously, it has not so obviously, but in the end, obviously you've fulfilled one of your big dreams now. Right. I mean, obviously standing up on stage would be at the Oscars would be a dream for little people. But I think perhaps the bigger dream few adapting James Baldwin into into the film that you releasing now what inspires you now. What comes next full? Barry Jenkins way to you see you'll craft taking you I just like telling stories, you know, I love being said I love collaborating with I'll say my friends, you know, but the friend group is expanding. Now, I've always worked lucidly with my friends case in point. I was up till two AM last night. I. College is if I'm not as fresh with it as I should be in this interview, I'm working on other projects, I just had to get the pages done. And so I think I'll always be someone who just wants to tell stories and wants to tell them in a think a very visceral and for me cinematic challenging way I often want to keep challenging myself. There's a sense of wonder and all that I get from watching movies in. I'm always trying to reflect that feeling that movies. Give me to the people who are watching the work that I create and when the time comes when I don't have that sense of. Aw, I don't have that sense of wonder when I don't derive it either from the work on creating from the work. I'm watching the go sit down, you know, in L teach folks how to create the same sense of wonder an that cinema is given me in you'll films as a feeling of acceptance of forgiveness in coming to grips with wear one is in their life. And they've become looking at you now and looking at you a journey and how you got here. How do you feel about the very Jenkins Yuan today? That's a tricky woman. I've been working so much over the last year and a half that I haven't really had a moment to think back on it in really look at where I started in where I am. I do realize it's kind of extraordinary journey, and it's very difficult for me to take any responsibility for it. And I'll just feels like happenstance in a certain way, but I think there's any responsibility and that too. I think I have to own up to the fact that I think maybe I'm good at what I do. I've never felt that I was good at anything. I did I'm gonna have to also own them to the fact that maybe have earned this because I never felt like I've earned anything as well. Again, always use the word happenstance. So I'm gonna go home and maybe do some therapy. And then I'll think when all come back to Monaco and give you a better answer. Barry jenkins. Thank you very much. Thank you. Oh shit. My thanks to bury Jenkins, you've been listening to a specialty dish in of the globalist. It was produced by your lean go fan and edited by Cassie Galvin, the globalist is back in its usual full not at the very same time on Monday. I'm Ben Ryland. Thank you for tuning in. UBS global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of our people. We bring fresh thinking in perspective to our work, and we know that it takes a marriage of intelligence and haunt to create lasting value for Clinton's. It's about having the right ideas, of course. 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Barry Jenkins The Underground Railroad Is a Stunning Adaptation and a Brilliant Critique of Black Suffering as Entertainment

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13:46 min | 2 months ago

Barry Jenkins The Underground Railroad Is a Stunning Adaptation and a Brilliant Critique of Black Suffering as Entertainment

"Barry jenkins the ground. Railroad is a stunning adaptation and a brilliant critique of black suffering as entertainment by judy berman. There is a horrible and brilliant scene in the first episode of the underground railroad. Barry jenkins breathtaking mini series adaptation of the pulitzer prize. Winning novel by colson whitehead a runaway has been captured and returned to a cotton plantation. An antebellum georgia stripped to the waist and covered in bleeding lashes. The man played by ally. Everett hangs by his wrists from tall wooden structure behind him. Stand the dozens of enslaved field. Workers who are being forced to witness his execution opposite them fancily dressed white men and women feast at a table. Set out in front of the masters grand house waited on by enslaved domestics a pair of black musicians strike up a jaunty tune as the man is burned alive. This could be yet another graphic reenactment of black suffering under slavery crafted by well-meaning hollywood type says a reminder to an implied audience of similarly well meaning white people with on feasibly poor memories of historical racism look deeper though and the harrowing scene reveals itself and incisive response to pop culture. That fetishizes black people's pain without acknowledging the psychological impact of such depictions the same murder that white revelers voluntarily consume as a twisted form of entertainment constitutes trauma for black witnesses. Who have no choice. But to look by sticking close to them and filming through the victims own smoke fogged is jenkins makes their perspective paramount in a work that not only does justice to whitehead's masterpiece but expands it in ways. That only television could he implies that. There's no separating america's racist origin story from that story's ongoing exploitation by the american entertainment industry the public execution leaves the underground railroads. Hero a young and slaved woman named cora south african actor too. So embiid do all desperate intensity paralyzed in the field. It isn't her. I grieve psychic wound. She has already survived abandonment by her mother. Mabel sheila atom who escaped when cora was a little girl rape and other forms of assault our daily realities on the plantation. But it's the execution that compels her to run away with caesar. Aaron pierre a new arrival who was treated relatively well during his youth in virginia and refuses to endure the horrors of georgia. A big strong intelligent man who dreams of working with his mind rather than his body. He sees maples daughter as a good luck. Charm cora who in invaders mesmerizing performance can resemble a scared kid or a frail elder as well as the young adult. She is is too furious at her mother. Most of all to believe she could be anything but cursed that anger turns out to be a talisman in its most dramatic departure from reality. Whitehead's alternate history. Imagine the underground railroad as a literal subterranean rail system. This conceit underlines in poetic terms both the superhuman stealth demanded of real life fugitives and their abolitionist. Allies and the layton capabilities of people who had been violently prevented from working for their own benefit. Who built all this. Cora asks the station agent. Who built anything in this country. He replies the stations range from functional to luxurious to piles of rubble and the states. They carry cora through one. In each episode or two are as fictionalized by whitehead and jenkins with a nod to caesar's beloved gulliver's travels just as distinct south carolina fancies itself and says of enlightenment where black workers are housed closed and fed properly taught literacy and life skills treated to social functions paid in devalued scrip but still legally. Enslaved north carolina outlawed negroes. Cora is told chillingly upon her arrival there though. Her journey isn't entirely bleak as long as she's off the plantation. There's always hope. Each of these states is a different flavor of hell in pursuit of the fugitives is the fearsome slave catcher ridgway. Joel edgerton failed to apprehend able now presumed to be outside his jurisdiction in canada and ceases obsessive quest to bring her daughter back to georgia as a chance to settle the score. The character reflects an astute reading of white supremacy in america less than ideological bigot than a ruthless entitled. Opportunist ridgway is in cut out to earn a living through honest labor instead. He makes a fortune off his aptitude for calmly inflicting pain on enslaved people whose pursuit of freedom he takes as a personal affront by his side throughout the journey is the show's most inscrutable presence. Homer chase w dylan in a haunting precocious performance a quiet black boy in a dignified suit who maintains an inexplicably fierce loyalty to ridgeway. It is a credit to both the book and the show that even the most minor characters here possess enough complexity and enough resonance within the context of american history to fuel a novel or mini series of their own earlier. This week jenkins released the gays. A fifty two minute video made during the show's production featuring moving portraits of background actors whose presence he wrote gave him the feeling of looking at ancestors whose images have been largely lost to the historical record beyond the runaways and their pursuers. We meet a naive white station agent. Who is blind to the racism roiling beneath the polite surface of seemingly progressive state and idealistic couple trying to foster a peaceful black community. A little runaway girl who lives in a crawlspace and could be cora in miniature. Some of these stories are interspersed in both works with the chapters that follow cora and it makes sense. That jenkins departs slightly from the selection of people and events whitehead emphasizes this underground railroad premiering may fourteenth on amazon certainly qualifies as a faithful adaptation. But it's neither a reverend nor a timid one whitehead and jenkins are very different kinds of artists. The former a minimalist whose sparse prose conceals allegories of remarkable depth and the latter an expressionist infusing trenchant ideas into sounds and images laden with emotion through its stylistic restraint. The novel touches on just about every major theme of american history from eugenics and the double edged sword of christian faith to utopian communities and the conflict that so often arises within liberation movements between respectability politics and radical idealism. At the center of this web is slavery. The original sin masterly as it is on the page. The story might have flattened on the screen into something redundant a rehash of wgn's underground or twelve years a slave but jenkins uses the medium of serialized television to open up. Its layers transcending the specifics of place and period with roughly two minutes of screen. Time for every page of text he's able to reproduce the books most resonant monologues but also insert long wordless lyrical passages that communicate characters inner lives more elegantly and completely than the voice over narration. So many literary adaptations lean on. Images of fire. Pervade the mini series. We observe how it's power can be used for good to shed light to cook food to forge tools but also how easy it is to exploit as a tool of devastating violence and destruction. Although the show takes place before the civil war one environment cora traverses is a scorched gray wasteland that simultaneously recalls sherman's march to the sea and activates anxieties about future climate crisis. Could there be a more apt. Metaphor for american exceptionalism thanks to the directors roster of longtime collaborators and what was reportedly an enormous budget each setting has a unique visual and sonic palette that deepens it symbolism james laxton the cinematographer responsible for the singular use of light in jenkins's films captures the almost physical weight of midday sun beating down on a cotton field. Mark friedberg a production designer. Who worked on some of wes. Anderson's and todd haley his most visually stunning projects. Deploys color with purpose. A light green motif in the episode south carolina at first suggests vitality and newness but slowly comes to represent sickness and clinical sterility north carolina. If vokes zealous austerity of america's founding puritans with a town square straight out of a seventeenth century colonial settlement complemented by scenes lit like dutch master paintings. Dark as a starless night save for the menacing glow of a candle or two composer. Nicholas retell of the infinitely memorable succession theme weaves elements native to each landscape from hissing insects. In georgia to the locomotives metal on metal clank into a score held together by muted piano passages superimposed over all these elements is jenkins's greatest contribution to whitehead's narrative a constant awareness that this country has always treated slavery and other anti black violence as well as violence against other oppressed groups. I don't think it's a coincidence. That the execution scene also calls to mind the salem witch trials as entertainment there is quite a bit of carnage in this series. But it's never gratuitous often jenkins turns away from the gory details of a murder or a rape choosing. Instead to make viewers watch as an indelible secondhand injury is inflicted on the people forced to witness it. The filmmaker has confronted the terrible power of such images. He has said in interviews that he briefly walked off his own set during the execution. Seen the detail reminded me of an episode in which cora takes a job portraying and enslaved field worker in a diorama at a museum were white children. Gawk at her through a pane of glass. She is essentially reliving her trauma on a loop for the education of an audience. That doesn't acknowledge her humanity. Let alone her ordeal sometime later. Her past life intrudes. on the pantomime. It is a frightening moment for corre. She has to leave her post and run a white and her flight into a story. He's improvising about the daily lives of slaves in places like georgia. The white patrons clap. One tv show is not going to end this shameful centuries tradition of black pain as white entertainment instead the underground railroad takes it up as a central theme. So much is happening all at once in this series yet. This aspect of the series carries a particular significance for hollywood and its customers in an era of racial reckoning. Everyone even spectators plays a role in systemic racism. 's theatre of cruelty if you're lucky enough to avoid corporal punishment for the crime of mere existence. You're either on one side of the gallos getting traumatized or the other being entertained.

cora Barry jenkins jenkins whitehead judy berman colson whitehead georgia Mabel sheila Aaron pierre Cora ridgway caesar Homer chase w dylan pulitzer prize america Everett Joel edgerton maples gulliver Whitehead
#825: The Underground Railroad / White Heat ('40s Noir #6)

Filmspotting

1:21:51 hr | 2 months ago

#825: The Underground Railroad / White Heat ('40s Noir #6)

"Every day can bring changes challenges and opportunities that can also change your personal or business financial goals and priorities as a true partner. Sandy spring bank can make it a little bit easier. Someone who really listens understands and then create solutions in hard times and good times. We will always drive to be your advocate today. And every day that's real banking for real life and real business visit sandy spring bank dot com slash real member. Fdic what kind of show you guys put not here today. We're not interested in going to do this thing conversation from chicago. This is film spotty. I'm josh larsen. And i met him. dr air. I saw a dappled wonder said across the fields hovering on angel wings. Brandishing a blazing shield. That's from the trailer for the underground railroad director. Barry jenkins adaptation of the pulitzer prize winning novel by colson. Whitehead the ten part series debuts this weekend on amazon prime yes. We're straying a bit from the film. Spotting part of our mission this week. But we're the director of moonlight. And if beale street could talk goes we follow. We absolutely do also this week. Nineteen forty-nine white heat the final film and our forties marathon all that and more where margot's white heats cody jarrett films spotting support for this. Podcast comes from invent together. Let's talk about innovation in america. Did you know that patents are a major driver of job. Creation and economic growth. Problem is not every. American has the same opportunities when it comes to inventing and patenting. That's especially true for women and people of color. Even the women make up more than half the population less than thirteen percent of all inventors with a us patent or women black and hispanic college graduates patent at half the rate of their white counterparts. Invent together is a coalition of organizations companies universities and concerned citizens committed to ensuring that everyone can invent and patent because research shows that more women people of color patented their ideas. It could boost us gdp by almost one trillion dollars a year. What can you do to help. Divers inventors patent and unleash economic opportunity. Find out at invent together or bookham to film. Spotting we wrap up the forties noir marathon. This week josh. With james cagney in white heat. This is long. Been a blind spot. I have wanted to remedy needed to know needed to understand where that memorable final quote came from. And now i can finally say i do. Will jimmy cagney win. Are savage award recalling them for best actor of the marathon. We will have to wait to find out next week on the show when we share those awards but he's got a fighting chance if he doesn't i don't wanna be the one to tell him that he lost it. That's for sharing good point before we get to white heat. It's the underground railroad with his last two films. Barry jenkins established a unique intimate unmistakable. Filmmaking style how does that translate in a ten part amazon series was run away never return nothing suffering and it is tom good. Samaritan is wonderful man lost mom then annoy he ever given up on finding me you. Yes must wisconsin fueled washco salvadorian. Man is capable when he believes his cast. Because i was certainly excited. To see the underground railroad josh least be couple episodes. I was able to fit in this week for this discussion. Because as you know. We're both big barry jenkins fans on the show. Moonlight was in my top five year. It came out of beale street. Could talk was my number one film of its year twenty eighteen but i have to confess i was also reading it a bit just based on the title just based on what i suspected the subject matter would be. There's that element of brutality. That i imagine would be part of this show but i was less worried about that and really more focused on the toil of watching people emotionally suffer and suffering along with them. And that's certainly something we've come to expect from berry jenkins work and then you said something last week on the show josh. I think you'd already caught up with an episode or two. The gave me hope. You said it's not really what you think. It will be or something to that effect and i thought okay. Maybe i'm in for a big surprise here and maybe it will be a relatively pleasurable watch. And then when. I admitted to you today in our slack that i was going to have to binge these two episodes just prior to recording. You said binging may be harmful to mental health. And i knew that. I was in for an experience. It didn't take long into the first episode to understand exactly why you said it. I'm curious were you able to have a non bingeing experience with the underground railroad and if so would you recommended to others. And how exactly were you surprised. By the underground railroad a work that at once could surely be described as historical fiction but also maybe even science fiction or alternative history with a fair amount of horror as well. So what did surprise you the most about it. Yeah it was that element. And i do think we should tread lightly in how we describe Explicitly it this series. Has those qualities in terms of the plot and what happens but that was. I got a hint of that somewhere. I think it was on twitter. What i was referring to on last week's show that It is absolutely historically sat but does have this. I don't know what you'd call it fantasy as well magical realism elements baby. I've been thinking of a of a term like history. Askance this this fantastical side i to the realities of life under american slavery that that the series has and also just the seemingly infinitely evil ways that white people have subjugated people of color over the country's history it it touches on as the series proceeds it touches on You know different elements of history than just the one plantation where it starts in that first episode. That first episode is so much to handle. And it's what an hour eight minutes and the degradation. It is as intense as anything. I believe we've seen in something like twelve years a slave There are other works that this series so far seems to be in conversation with. I want to get to maybe later in our discussion here but that first episode is so intense. I think you do have to get to the second one where that history askance element is revealed. And that gives you. I think it gave me a little more breathing room And saw that. This is interested in things. Even though it's definitely in that slavery drama tradition. It's also interested in some different things as well I would say to your to your other question as people get into this. And i do believe all ten episodes are going to be available at once. If you can give the space to breathe so our experience was we did watch the first episode alone one night and as i said a lot to process there even as it sets up the story effectively And then we did watch episodes two in three back to back and that was just too much. I mean really. Both of us had the next morning. You know like not. A good night's sleep doing that. We also did it just before bad but still decided like the next night we were just gonna watch one and and now and then i even said like okay. I've seen four now talk about on the show. Let's pull back and absolutely wanna finish this but maybe get into like one a week rhythm or something moving forward because It's not just you know because there's so much to take. But i think that is the right way to give the work the attention it deserves as well. I've never been a big binge. Her debbie is more like that. I mean she'll she'll kind of plow through you know half a season of arrested development in a night or more And even with sitcoms. I find like after a while. I need to take a break but in particular i would say with With the underground railroad give these upsets time debris getting give yourself time to process what they're going after in each distinct setting that so far has been given to us with these individual episodes even though they do focus on this main character cora played by two so embiid who Who in the first episode escapes the plantation and kind of follows her and her companion. Caesar played by aaron pierre. Who escapes alongside her. You know it follows them and gets into their stories but you get very different settings each time and so there's a lot to wrap your mind around in each of these so that would be my advice. Yeah another way that your wife and i are more alike than your wife than you. A little bit more obsessive a little bit more compulsive. If i'm into something. I really want to dive in and i am susceptible to binging and this case i definitely feel that your approach is the right one and it's not because it's so heroine that it's unbearable or that it's unwatchable at all but i think it does require that time to breathe and to sit with it and to process it and that also speaks to the other reason why i'm absolutely going to continue and finish the series and recommend to everyone listening and that's that it is surprising you in some way not just episode episode in which there are sort of broader more startling revelations but really just moment to moment i mean seen. There's enough here that takes you by surprise. That doesn't spell itself out to you in really require scrutiny that it has me really wondering what could possibly be next in the next episode and we will dance around the other genre elements here may be at play. I will just say that. Of course. I expected a show about slavery to form our modern perspective on race relations in our country. This goes into a realm where it's so relevant and again i'm only talking about through two episodes so far it's so relevant that it almost makes you feel like these characters have entered a timewarp without actually taking that full on plunge into that science fiction realm and i'll get back to the the suffering in the physical suffering here for a moment there is a scene maybe even just a quarter of the way through halfway through the first episode where we watch. A slave who has been caught trying to escape be returned to his sadistic master and to use him as an example to the other slaves he not only has him whipped brutally and yes. I'm not sure that there are really that. Many degrees of being whipped. That aren't brutal but this is on another level even to prior beatings prior with things we've seen in the episode and jenkins does focus on the flesh even being torn away from the body in this moment. and then that's not. That's not enough josh. We watched this character be set on fire and in that moment. That's where i was really thinking. Okay what have i gotten myself into. Do i have the fortitude to really withstand this and there's a moment where he goes up in flames and you think okay like a lot of movies or shows the show this type of horror we then can kind of maybe pan away from it or some kind of crane shot pulls away whatever it is and we get to move on and we think well it's over not only do we not have to watch it anymore but even that person that character must be done suffering by now. Maybe they're maybe they're dead and just when you're thinking that berry jenkins cuts to a shot and it's brief. But he wants to a shot from that man's point of view looking out through the smoke as he's being engulfed and it doesn't necessarily intensify the agony. It's not as if it feels like jerry jenkins is trying to exploit that moment to make us even suffer along with the character more it. Actually my experience was. It wasn't just about trying to put me in his place so to speak and it's interesting. I came across a quote today. Where jenkins said he deliberately approached this material as a tv series versus a feature in large part because he was supremely aware of the intensity of the suffering he was going to have to depict and he wanted people watching he wanted viewers to be able to kind of be in control of their experience with it versus maybe going into the theater. You're sort of a captive audience if you're watching this at home streaming on amazon prime and that moment is too much. You can do what i did. In that moment. I came across this quote after. I saw it. I did that in the moment. I paused it. I just had to pause it for a second purist experience. I should be having with it. But it's the experience jenkins certainly as a filmmaker anyway has said he's okay with and expects of viewers if it was two hours of that trauma if all of it was compressed that we're going to get over the course of this ten episode series if it was compressed down into two hours or even two and a half hours not only with that not be good for any viewers mental health. You then have the abilities. I said to maybe step away from it. Even if it's just for a moment and then kind of balance yourself and go back to it. I still don't know what to do with that shot. That point of view shot I think the character's name is big. Anthony played by elijah everett. Because you know you've laid out nicely. Some good possibilities there in terms of strengthening our identification with big anthony and forcing us to look not pan away. Those i think those could be it. It's so quick it it. It's like you blink. You could miss it. And i think it might return a second time in that scene very briefly again and it's very curious to me because it was almost so quick i don't i didn't have an immediate reaction to it where where i knew what to do with it and as i said i'm still trying to figure that out but i do know that it stands significantly apart from the way. The camera is handled so far throughout the series which is much more familiar. To what we get in beale street and what we get moonlight which is that gently flloding almost as if the cameras just floating on burris among the characters even in conversations it. It doesn't pan from person to the other. It certainly doesn't cut but it just kind of drifts from one face as they're talking and then drifts back to the other one And those are as. I said of a piece with his previous work but to me. I wonder if they don't always seem to fit here. There's a romanticism. Today lilting camera. And it completely fit. In if beale street could talk which was you know in some ways a romance between stephan james and kiki lane but but it doesn't always seem as fitting here you know and then we get something like that out of the blue that bolt of pov which is so startling and it's contrast in. I don't know that there are a lot of examples of that in the other episodes that that i've seen interestingly the fourth one i believe now the third episode which is set among this really religious cult there is there is an instance of someone being burnt. It's not quite as graphic but fires involved and we don't get a similar point of view. We're very much removed from it. And there's there's a different element of horror to that sequence. I'll just say. But yeah i'm still trying to work out. How jenkins aesthetic. Which which as i said at the very top is very distinct. The lighting here that we have which is like this honey son right that sometimes shining right into the camera I like how it echoes in the in the warm spotlight of a train when we see a train. And it's just you know it puts us in. I don't know. I guess the warmth is it's kind of jarring to me that there's that element of warmth with which i associate with jenkins that is sometimes given moments of intimacy scenes of into intimacy between some slave characters but also is just the way it's capturing daily life and Another touch of his the focus on faces. You know where people's faces are often directly looking into the camera again. It's used to to give us the sense of adoration in bill street. But it's used here in episode. Two adam how about the moment where it's used for this deceitful white woman who is teaching cora Something in and we learn at this point that she's deceitful. But she kinda gets that intimate camera shot. So i'm still working through and maybe with here's where we can say. This is still processing conversation and we have the right to change anything. We say when we do finish the series and maybe do a little bit of rap but jenkins own aesthetic. I i'm. I'm still trying to to reckon with how he's applying to this subject matter. Yeah that shot is another one. I had in my notes. I think it's one of the more memorable single shots. In these first episodes in terms of that woman talking directly to our main character. Cora and she so close to the camera that she becomes despite her sort of overly pleasant nature. She becomes almost grotesque. There's something monstrous about her. All of a sudden in that moment when previously we have viewed her completely differently. So i actually really liked that use of the close up there and that use of point of view which is another thing that we do get a fair amount of not necessarily in the close ups but a fair amount of characters looking right at us there. Is this sense of maybe indictment. But at least sort of implication maybe another word used earlier just identification and jenkins in. This case is a little bit more. Here's another i-word insistent on it. But we think about jerry jenkins and his appreciation for and the influence of one car y on his work. He's talked about it here on the show when he came on to talk about moonlight and because of the use of point of view. I was thinking of jonathan demme a lot actually in this shirt especially in those kind of moments with those close ups but we had a similar discussion about if beale street could talk which you also liked. But i like a lot more than you. And i went back and looked at my notes from that review so many of them to apply to these first two episodes of the underground railroad. You know it's him. He's working with james laxton again as a cinematographer. The use of color is so vivid that you do really feel like it's jenkins right from the opening and there is the opening that sort of a little prelude where we see characters. I'm imagining we're seeing characters in the future. Perhaps the the show is jumping ahead and giving us some foreshadowing even though it's all out of context and we don't really know what it is. He is using time and slow motion in an interesting way that we've seen him do before characters even kind of suspended or falling in space moving backwards in space. But then we get to that conversation that happens between cora and caesar and yes. Warmth is the word we know their slaves. We know that there's nothing positive about their life and there's even a lot of friction between each other. This isn't like stephan. James and key lane. In if beale street could talk were right away when we meet them. We know they're madly in love with each other and we want them to stay together forever. We don't know how we feel about these two characters because they don't even really know in this moment how they feel about each other and there is a lot of tension and yet despite that tension and despite their circumstances in it being the sweltering southern landscape that were maybe used to seeing in a lot of other depictions of slavery. Onscreen it's similar to have deal street could talk in that. It's a tunnel. There's a lot of greens and oranges in yellows and browns. And it's so it's so soothing. In a way i don't know if it's so much about barry jenkins trying to give these characters dignity as just allowing for that dichotomy to exist simultaneously the beauty of the world the beauty of life and the horror of it and i had a line back. When we talked about of beale street that i think applies here. It's as if jenkins's saying only when you see just how beautiful the world can truly be. Can you really understand how ugly it is truly feel that ache. It doesn't it doesn't distract for me. It only amplifies. I think in the right way. Yeah bill street for me was all about what's lost when racism has its way it's the the beauty that's lost Absolutely another jenkins touch that. I think we see here is just his talent for finding talent. I mean in these two Embed who has cora. What i love is that she's shivering but sat you know she's a victim certainly but also survivor. Yes and there's a personal fire. Also what i've latched onto an almost more intrigued about that. Anything else is the relationship with her mother who we barely see. But we know that. Her mother. When cora was much younger a young girl fled herself escaped herself but left corner behind. I think the opening line to the series is the first and last thing. My mamma gave me was apologies in so that becomes a through line. We're just there's there's little returns to that relationship and embed captures how cora has grief there but also real anger at her mother just trying to understand how she could have left her behind And and that is you know that's just kind of an interpersonal intimate element of being enslaved. That i don't know a lot of other dramas have given attention to and is so good at capturing that and then aaron pierre caesar he knows what he knows how to do is returned that barry jenkins gays as that the camera i think i think stuff and james did this really well. Also but when the camera settles on his face he looks back on guard right open and he's at once in doing that he's at once a completely unique person that we feel like we're getting to know intimately and also something rohrschack for your own conflicted feelings about what he's experiencing. So pierre has that that sort of face as well and And jenkins goes back to it again and again. Well it helps when you have not just the face. Aaron pierre has but the is air gas which when you google it it seems that those are his naturalized and not context though. That wouldn't surprise me either because there is something happening. I'm hoping it's not just the way. This is streaming for me josh. There is something happening with is in this series where they take on a little bit of a twinkle almost in some shots as if he is playing with that idea of magical realism in some instances. I'm looking at them online. Maybe he is wearing contacts in this series. Because i think of them as a little bit more of a brown or a gold ish color but in the pictures. I'm looking at their almost like sea blue but either way they're they're just magnifying. Something that is that is natural to him and is really pretty stunning on screen. Now embedded as cora. There is from the moment. You meet her a defiance. That feels not just something. She's projecting outward because of that rage and that trauma that she has lived through and is living through. It's as if it's it's ingrained into every fiber of her of her body and her being. There's a weight that she is carrying that you feel in the first moment you even just see her on screen and then when she does start to have that conversation we hear in voice over and then that conversation with caesar before traumas even fully revealed. You get the sense of it. You really feel like you understand the other thing. That's pretty amazing about the performance is. She is so defiant and she is so set to use your word josh that even though she must be when they're standing next to each other anyway they look like they're about eight inches apart in terms of size. Yeah she's she's diminished. All use resented that way she's presented a small and he is very tall and yet he feels tiny those next and it's not because of anything he is doing or isn't doing he's giving a really good performance but there is something so forceful and there's so much power in that diminutive body that you really can't take your eyes offer know what as you're describing her. She almost makes me think we talked about. How viola davis in marigny was formidable. This formidable presence. It's almost like embed you has that. And she has but she's a quarter of the size as davis was in that range but it's that same presence that she brings to the screen here and yet as far as pierre and commented on his is. It's even mentioned in that second episode right joel. Edgerton has a supporting part here as a bounty hunter who is on their trail and at one point he encounters counter caesar and even remarks on his is yes. So here's something. I wanted to bring up and again early on Have the right to take. Take this back but i do. I have gotten a sense. So far that the series can sometimes feel at the same time. It feels too fast and too slow. And i guess what i mean by that. I think you were talking atom about how. There's these scenes lake. They deserve your attention. And they're very languid and you can be. You can just kinda sit in them. And that's a. That's a good thing i think. That's what jenkins jenkins has a talent for so these the episodes somehow because of that do feel slow. It can feel like a scene is going on for a couple of minutes yet. In terms of plot they packed so much jin and sometimes with characters who we meet for the first time and likely aren't gonna meet ever again There's one character like that in the second episode. Certainly that third episode. I mentioned in this religious colt We spend a lot of time with a married couple who. I'm almost certain we're not going to meet again. And that's where it feels like. It's almost moving too fast for me. It just doesn't episode. Three particular doesn't really have the delicacy of something like moonlight or beale street it gets a little strident the new characters are maybe thinly sketched and jenkins characters are almost always fully formed. You can count on that from him. So i feel like this is maybe a challenge of the format clearly. And it's maybe some. We'll just have to watch you know. But i did occur to me why did moonlight which is sort of like three episodes in two hours right because we're getting three phases in the main characters life and that is something that so far seemed to work a little bit better in terms of this pace seemed to me or the shifting from one segment to the next and maybe that'll level out and even out as again i'm only four in ten so i'm not even halfway there but it's something i am curious about want to watch. I don't know if you detected any of that in what you've seen. I did actually in episode one because it felt like the plot sped up pretty quickly to get our characters in motion. And maybe maybe. I was okay with josh because i wanted them to get in motion so so ready for them to leave this place that i was okay with it but i was aware while watching it. That from the moment. She says i'm not leaving here. I'm not going anywhere is bang. Bang bang three really terrible things happen in a row that you know. Seal the deal that of course she's gonna leave there. Isn't that kind of space. That i felt that we got more of in episode two and actually even later in episode one but again maybe i was i was okay with it because i wanted them to start their journey and i wanted to get out of that space as well. I suppose we do have to at least touch on. If we're going to throw some superlatives the score here as well. Another collaboration with nicolas retell and there are elements to the score. Here that feel like the material itself grounded in this historical reality. The feels traditional and feels familiar and yet he manages to make it still have that element of magic to make it feel just a little bit other-worldly but it's just a little bit. It's it's so subtle that had just insinuates a little bit and it puts you in the right head space to accept these kind of challenges to the historical record that that do come with the material. But again i do think it's very subtle. It's not as if he's using a bunch of effects or bizarre instrumentation. Least that. I'm aware of to make you feel that kind of eeriness. It's not trying to force itself on you in that way. But just like in moonlight. And if beale street could talk extremely effective yeah and it's working in concert with you know the the sound design which so many the insects so much of this is taking place outside and those insects are constant It's yeah it's beautiful work. Another nice musical touch is the use when the end credits come up after each episode of anachronistic contemporary songs. Which kind of just give you a little bit of a jolt and right and that's also episode. Yeah that's also. I wanted to mention a few things that i said i feel like this is in conversation with. That's something that lovecraft country did Hbo series from last year. Not entirely successful. i. I don't think but it did. It was also kind of like a history askance at used horror scifi to tell this story of a black man living in segregation nineteen fifties. Us and so doing some similar things the other thing from last year that This made me think of was antebellum. Which that's the film. That i think i'm the only person who actually liked last year. But that you know that. Got a lot of flack for being this sadistically. Generic slavery drama But similar to how underground railroad is working so far you could say that for episode one in some ways and you could say that for the first act of antebellum and they both antebellum takes a wilder turn. But it's kinda takes this. Turn that re frames. What we think we're seen so so just wanted to put one more plug in their antebellum. Then lastly of course. Toni morrison's beloved the the book of course and then the jonathan demme to bring up demi again the adaptation. That's where i see chorus relationship with her mother. You know this idea that of the brutal choices that in an slaved mother is forced to make in regard to her children. Just brings reading that book just it. It brought historical straight down to the deeply personal and intimate and i think element of the underground railroad with in her. Mother is working in a similar way. The other piece. I was thinking about a little bit. While watching the underground railroad was harriet. And not just because. It's the last kind of slave drama that i saw but because it did something i wasn't a fan of that i think the underground railroad is doing better or at least isn't making the same mistake in that. Is it used this kind of sense of magical realism or the supernatural mystical with her character. In these spelled she had that. I actually think worked against the material and the character and that it seemed to make her actions really not her own it. It took away her agency somehow as a character. We talked about that a little bit. I think when we gave the movie some time on the show or at least i remember giving it a brief review but watching that film it was as if everything she was doing or a lot of her significant actions were being dictated by some other force and i. I was a little nervous. That maybe that's where this would go as well because it does start out in such a fantastical way and has these elements to it but it doesn't or at least it hasn't so far. Yeah i think. I worked a little bit better for me in harriet. I i liked how that kind of made her a profit figure. But i would agree that so far. Underground railroad is is a more successful take at the other sort of material one last part i wanted to bring up and it's tough without really getting into the details of it here. But there's an element in episode. Two that i thought was really provocative where we see white characters framing the slave experience and this is another moment where it feels like the series is in dialogue with us right now in real time where. I don't think you can help. But watch it and think about when these types of stories are told by white filmmakers or by white artists but it isn't provocative just for the sake of being provocative it doesn't feel like jenkins is using it here and i'm sure of course that it was part of the whitehead material but it doesn't feel like jenkins using it just to make a point or get a jab in or feel topical at all it really does feel like just another violation of these characters and their experience. Yeah we would have to really get into spoilers to to dig into. What's going on there. I will say if okay if the underground railroad is not going to work for someone. I could see them using that element and saying listen. This entire series is essentially doing the same thing. And that's been the accusation. And i know there is. There's exhaustion from from some people in terms of slavery dramas and. Interestingly you'll you'll read black critics who have this critique and i think that was part of critique of antebellum as well now i would argue antebellum has a twist. It's twist works similarly to that sequence in episode two. I think it's saying similar things to how we treat history today. How we present history today. Let's just say that sequence is getting at. It's really complicated. Very provocative and i cannot wait to see how it's received once this comes out and yeah that is going to be this. Friday may fourteen on amazon. Prime from the underground to the top of the world will conclude our forties noir marathon next with nineteen forty forty-nine white heat plus the results of our movie crime. Boss poll stay with us My pennies piggybanks is day. This is going to be an emotional roller coaster. The odds are against you. But there's a chance right. There's a chance josh that we will finally get to see movies like that one a movie. We've been waiting to see for a year or more now in the heights. Starring anthony ramos. Of course the breakout play from lin. Manuel miranda translated to the big screen. It might be the first movie. I actually see in a theater for the first time. I know you had that experience but if it is in the heights l. Feel pretty good about that you know. They're they're already screening it. I was so tempted to go to one of those screenings. But i figured we wouldn't be talking about it for a month. I wanted to be fresh. Hold off and though. I try my best to avoid getting sense of reactions. What i have seen a little bit. I'm letterbox twitter. So-far sounds good. I mean people. I trust have come out of this pretty positive so cannot wait next week on film spotting. We'll have our summer movie preview. And as our previews usually do it will take the form of our top five questions about the summer movie season. If you've got a question about a summer movie or a tidal you wanna make sure. We don't overlook email us feedback at film spotting dot net. You can also lease voicemail. Three one two two six four zero seven four four. If in the heights is on your mind you do have to sing your voice mail. You can also make your voice heard by taking part in the new film spotting poll which asks you if you can only see one film this summer. Which one will it be and we gave you these options. The will admit that we forgot to include one of them until after it had already gone live to film spotting newsletter subscribers. But we're not going to say which one josh the options are a quiet place. Part to that opens may twenty eight. That might be the first movie you see in the theater. Adam because i think points to review we're going to review it a quiet place part to then in the heights. June eleven f. Nine i understand. That's a fast and furious film. Adam i have that correct okay June twenty five is the release for f. Nine black widow comes out july nine space jam. A new legacy. I know you can't wait for that one at you. Were a big space jam. Fan back in the ninety s. I skipped the old legacy. Skip the new legacy to that. When opens july sixteen the green knight. Which people are salivating over on twitter directed by david. Lowery starring dev patel. So yeah i guess. I can understand that opens july thirty and then last option here on the paul candyman directed by trivia spotting that nia dacosta. She did join us for one of our trivia spotting events and her film opens august. Twenty seven do you have an obvious pick their atom. I the f and f nine stands for family. Don't forget that judge. I've heard that. I've heard that the series is really not. It's what it's really about for me. It's the aforementioned in the heights. i think that's it. I think if i could only see one it's that one. I can eliminate a few of those already eliminated space jam black widow. I'm curious about the director. There key shortland making that film coming from her art house background to the mcu which seems to be all the rage these days. Of course. I am very curious about candyman as well but right now i'm in the head space for as good a time as possible and i'm not saying that the fast and furious movies aren't a good time but maybe i'm just more in the mood. Josh i singing and dancing than ridiculously absurd car tricks and stunts fair enough fair enough i would probably lean towards in the heights while i am very much looking forward to that except for the fact that we do have a cost candyman. I mean that is. I watched the original for the first time last year in preparation. And it's such a fascinating texts that is ripe for reinterpretation even before the showed up to play trivia spotting with us. I was looking forward to this one. So i'm gonna go with candyman. Well maybe that pick will help. Get her back on trivia spotting. We would love to have you. If somehow you are listening to this you can vote in the poll and leave a comment at film. Spotting dot net also next week show massacre theater the part of the show where we perform a scene from movie and you get a chance at winning film spotting t shirt in case you missed it and if you did boy a very well reviewed so far performance from one atom are. Here's a bit of our last massacre. I wish i had a mother like me instead of nice. Nice get you fuss. I didn't like my mother either. So what i gave you a gift. You cursed me. Your monster spilled milk baby that last line. That was fun to say spilt milk. Baby spilled milk. Baby i make co op that use it in everyday life. I have enough kids certainly running around the house to say too. If you know what film we massacred e mail the movies title along with your name and location to feedback film spotting dot net. Your deadline is monday may seventeenth. We will select the winner randomly from all the correct entries and announce it on next week's show this week on our sister. Podcast the next picture. Show adam i. it's a film. We weren't brave enough to tackle. We flirted went out and embarrassed ourselves down and pulled away. Part one of their fighting spirits. Pairing is this week the pairing the new mortal kombat which we could have seen. We reviewed adam and they're pairing that with john carpenter's big trouble in little china. I live with this. Is i mean. I've been kind of looking for an excuse to revisit. Big trouble in little china for years and finally here. It is given to me by the next picture show. Yeah i guess. I'm still a little bit surprised that the sophisticates over the next picture show actually talked about mortal kombat of us aka. Right you and nice guy. I mean that's who we are. We yes we are. And that's when we check into fancy hotels on our film spotting tours. Those are the names we gave at the front desk. You're right you might sky. I have heard now. I'm really gonna embarrass myself further because maybe this was always the case in the mortal kombat universe. I've heard ice guy is the bad guy in this in this adaptation. The the the guy. I always played is now the villain again. Maybe always played the villain. Just never knew it. Sure it's very possible. This is very revealing. because you're also a big fan of iceman undoubtedly villain of top gun back in the eighties and yet you defend him too. I don't think so. I don't think you want to bring that up atom that that law by it's a big l. in your ended by the next picture show is hosted by tasha robinson keith. V scott tobias genevieve kofsky new episodes of the next picture. Show post every tuesday. Wherever you get your podcast it's a great show. Listen to it. Download it subscribe and you can get more info at next picture. Show dot net one way you can support. Our show is to join the film spotting family over on patriotic. You get special benefits for your five dollars. A month. subscription like early show downloads and monthly bonus. Episodes talked about hal ashby's shampoo from eighteen. Seventy five a few weeks ago. We're going to do some more. Seventies blind spotting give our listeners. Vote between three robert altman films that we haven't seen one of 'em i've seen mash but the other two. I really need to catch up with you. Need to see all three. Three women is one of the other contenders and california. Split is also in the mix we will put that vote up here shortly for our family members to vote on. And then as we're taping this were a few days away from trivia spotting ten to yuma saturday may fifteenth no theme this time not going with a certain decade just in general movie trivia got some new captains in the mix got some great returning captains. It'll be fun for all josh. Can you tease us with captain i. It sounds like nia casa's not returning this time. We hope to get her in the future. But can you give us a name or two. It won't be near kosta. But i will give you two hints. One is going to be a member of the slash film cast. Ooh okay and another is going to be a contributor and a very fine contributor to roger uber dot com both first time players first time players. Very excited okay. You can also get an annual membership. Sign up now. Get a ten percent discount. Basically get over one month free with those special benefits patriotic dot com slash film spotting challenge. Why the ancient voice of comeback met this chosen ground to settle for good no who holds sway over the five points us us. Born right wise to find land foreign hordes. Defiling was so tempted. Just now to really scrunch up my face and try to do this whole part as bill. The butcher but i'm not a good enough actor. I'm an active role. You're you know you buy this going speaking of butchering before we get to our forties noir. Marathon review of white heat which features jimmy cagney as gang boss. Arthur cody jarrett. We're going to get to the results of films spotting poll a couple of weeks back. We asked you looking ahead to this white heat conversation. What is your favorite movie crime boss performance just from this century. We're not going all the way back. Jimmy cagney not eligible your choices. Daniel day-lewis as bill the butcher from two thousand gangs of new york. Or you could go. Denzel washington as frank lucas american gangster. Jack nicholson is frank. Costello in the departed jacki. Weaver as smurfs cody in two thousand. Ten's animal kingdom or would go back to source. Says the irishman joe pesci as russell. Buffa lino or. What about ray. Fines harry waters in two thousand eight in bruges. If none of those options work for you you could write in a candidate you could go with other and we may get into this a little bit who constitutes truly a crime boss versus just a very big kind of larger than life. Criminal doesn't fines just appear like in one scene of in bruges makes me. But i feel like he just shows up at the end for the finale and yet it seems based on the voting josh. He made an impression on our listeners. Indeed now if you had someone in mind other than these options you voted. Other three percent of the vote went that way. But here we get to the options we gave you in. Last place was denzel. Washington's frank lucas got five percent of the vote. Jacki weaver got nine percent of the vote. Jack nicholson's frank castillo little jump up here in the poll. Fifteen percent of the vote. Just behind joe cheese russell buff alina who received sixteen percent of the vote up at the top here though. Yup refines did come in second place. Twenty two percent of the vote as harry waters but it went to daniel day. Lewis as bill the butcher with thirty one percent of the vote. All those options gained day-lewis took almost a third of the vote. evan wilcox. Hey evan says of these is gotta be danger they lewis as bill the butcher so great but how could you put a denzel performance on here. That's not alonzo harris in training day. Crime boss of the century so far for sure. Josh g. think that alonzo harris from training days eligible for this list or is he out on a technicality right. I think this is what you're hinting at. Right he's a bad cop essentially probably He's a criminal probably like overseas. Maybe i dunno as he in cahoots. He's in cahoots with others. But i don't know that he's in a crime boss. Yeah i don't know if he is either now. It's been a while since i have seen training day. And maybe near the end. There's an implication that he's kind of running a syndicate of some kind. But i don't think so. I just think he's just kind of on his own like a lone wolf king kong. Got nothing on him. Josh i i do remember that. I think he might be running like a whole network of these police officers. Who are on the take or something like that. So i guess he would be the boss of them. If i'm remembering correctly but still a little bit of a different category in my mind. Yeah but evan we get it. And i think that is a significantly better performance actually think draining days a better movie than american gangster as well all right here come a couple nominations for someone we didn't offer as an option david c. says for the spine tingling performance jacki weaver and animal kingdom gets my vote with ben kingsley's performance in sexy beast a close second roxanne baker had the same thought. Ben kingsley deserves a spot for sexy beast. I had nightmares after his chilling performance. And another mention of kingsley here but allen barry ultimately goes in another direction kingsley grade in sexy beast but i think ian mcshane is the boss in that film and he's equally great so that's my pick also a shout for neil's airstrip in a prophet who is terrifying great additional mentioned there from a prophet and yeah. I think alan's correct another technicality. In terms of just criminals onscreen. Bad guys onscreen i mean all-time movie villains ben kingsley. In sexy beast. I think has to be part of the conversation. We also heard from tim stevens. Who says coming at you from newington connecticut. Home of the world's smallest natural waterfall. We'll thanks for that jim. I voted fines. He feels both the most cartoonish and the most real to me at once. We often give crime bosses too much credit for being wildly geniuses when really most are horrible brutal impulsive man finds his all that with some truly cracking dialogue. The others on the list might be smarter or scarier. But harry water is the only one that feels like an accurate portrait of a crime. Boss can i just put in a request that anyone who writes in or makes a comment leaves just a random fact about where they live. The more i scare the better. I like it. I like it to that just talking about a waterfall. Even if it's the world's smallest natural one it immediately just relaxed me. We're talking about refines and that big brutish performance and just having that note about the waterfall. Just call me josh. I'm sure it's a lovely waterfall. One more comment here from jeremy webb ni berman. This is a fine list of performances but there are some absolutely ridiculous emissions. William hurt gives ten minutes of the greatest acting of the century in history of violence. He comes out of nowhere and absolutely dominates. The movie however by vote must go. To leandro firming as lizzie in city of god he is ferocious terrifying both incredibly human and larger than life at the same time and ultimately a figure of tragedy on par with any shakespearian king prince or general. All right so adam. You said that you preferred what to training day. You prefer training day to the other american gangs all right. Well let me. Let me say something outrageous. I actually prefer city of god to gangs of new york. They're both doing similar things. I'm going to say you've got us the better film. I think there's probably a lot of people that feel that way. You've got a pretty revered film. at least i've always thought it was. I haven't seen it since it came out in two thousand to two movie salmon. I saw together at the chicago film festival before film spotting was a thing and i do not remember it really at all so i can't speak to lil zeh. I will say. Sam especially should feel great. Shame leaving out william hurt. That is some capital a acting. It may have been the biggest onscreen performance we had talked about at all up to that point in film spotting history and i think history of violence came out in two thousand five. It was our number one film of that year shared number one. So it's not like we talked about a lot of big performances but that turned by william hurt is truly something and i think it's pretty great. It's pretty fun to watch anyway. And he absolutely should have been part of this. Are you saying this. Poll was flawed. Adam i'm saying. It is a classic deeply. Flawed trademark films spotting poll. Okay we've done our job. Then yep thanks to everyone who voted in that deeply flawed poll and left a comment again. You can vote in our current evil if you can only see one summer movie which one is it. Fm spotting dot net spoiled. You wanna push in a place like fort knox and grab yourself a couple of tons of gold. What the toughest thing about a job like that getting inside the join our by da a gentleman and a balcony right out of button getting which brings me to a story to tell me when i was a kid story about a horse Way back there was a whole army trying to knock over a place called troy and get nowhere. Fats couldn't even put a dent in walls and one morning one morning people wake up look over the walls and the attack. Nami disappeared man. Boats the work's taken a powder but the one thing after a great big wouldn't hawks. That is james cagney in nineteen forty nine wight heat. It is and i say this with sadness. Adam the final film in our forties noir marathon. I kind of wish this could just keep going. It's a very different kind of picture that i think the other. Titles we have in the marathon. More of a straight up crime thriller compared to the other films. We've seen definitely a gangster picture. I think you could say though. It is a film that distinguishes itself with some pretty brutal violence. And that memorable lead. Performance by cagney as arthur cody jarrett psychotic criminal with a mother complex along with an actual mother jarrett also notably suffers from frequent debilitating headaches. That can only be relieved by the massaging of said mother. Now ma is played by margaret wind shirley jarrett's crew also includes. His wife played by virginia. Mayo steve cochran is part of the crew. To as the conniving big ed summers and then this is you know this is an undercover cop picture as well on top of everything else that it is so we have vic pardo played by edmond. O'brien going undercover. In cody's gang. We last saw edmond. O'brien in ida lupino is the hitchhiker. One of the two men who are taken hostage in that film which was part of last year's overlooked tours marathon white heat. It was directed by rao walsh whose career dates back to the very early silent era and he continued making films through the early sixties. Now atom i understand that the professor nathaniel myers back from sabbatical. He was took a few marathons off. from setting up our discussions but he is back. And so we wanted to start with voicemail from nathaniel. Hello adamant josh. First of all many congrats on another great marathon as is so often the case. I feel like the film. Spotting family came out the other side having discovered some really unexpected gems things like detour. And this gun for hire as for what he well first of all. I will say that. I had kind of twisted pleasure watching it. On mother's day. I felt like cody. Jarrett would have approved and definitely had its cold blooded moments those opening minutes especially had some pretty brutal killing to say nothing of the grizzly scalding by steam. That we see on a narrative level. I really loved the way. It's seated certain information that you just knew was going to come back to haunt its characters. I think the most stressful of which was probably all the business around the photograph of hank's fake wife in prison. But the clear point of interest for me has to be jared and more importantly cagney performance. You know throughout the film. I thought the nature of his particular psychosis was pretty unclear to the point that i wondered whether he was insane. Or if he just had the occasional bad migraine and an uncomfortably deep abiding love for his mother. I even thought the film might want us to question whether he's actually matter if he's just playing at it. His incredible fit of anguish and the prison mess hall is surely a thing to behold. But the next time we see him. He's backed applauding in a way. That makes you wonder how deep the calculations go or at least they did for me but you know in the end. It didn't matter because whatever is happening in that final scene the thin line between madness and playing madness has certainly fizzled and cagney goes full on maniacal supervillain frankly i thought it was great still. There's no doubt that it is a big performance. And so i'm curious to hear where you both landed on it to hear a bit about what you thought about the film more. Generally i hope all is well guys. Thanks so much. It is always great to hear from the professor. Thank you. so much for that nathaniel. And i'm in lockstep with him here on almost everything first of all. I did not watch on mother's day. Though i agree there is something perfect about that or at least perfectly twisted about that. This is yet another film in this marathon. That is cold blooded especially cagney s- character. There's some brutal moments. In it as nathaniel said and yet i thought and i wonder if you agree with me josh. It was actually the most polished of all the films in the marathon. There's been a lot of ragged edges to these movies so far. That's kind of why we picked them. We've seen all the big super well known or really important. Capital is important no ours or at least most of them and these have all slid under the radar for the both of us. And maybe the crudeness if you will contributed to us overlooking them the crudeness also contributes to what makes them so fun to watch and this one feels a little more slick than all the other ones in the marathon. Maybe to its detriment. But i definitely agree with nathaniel as well on the way walsh and the screenplay give us some of those early fake outs that have us on the edge of our seat and he mentioned the one where cagney and some other guys in the jail cell. Try to kind of test or prank vic. Pardo the edmond o'brien character by taking out a portrait of his wife from package to see if he'll recognize that they've got it on their desk and he doesn't notice while the problem with this is if he doesn't notice it's his wife then that would be a fairly big reveal that maybe he's not who he says he is and cagney doesn't trust him so that is a very tense scene. But the other one is the bit with bo creel. Who is someone he says early on. No you gotta get him out of there before i go into prison. He'll know i'm a cop. I arrested him. he'll definitely recognize me. It pretty early on it pays off you know. Of course it's going to. He gets in there and creole somehow. Still there. and he's gotta figure out a way to maneuver himself out of that so he doesn't have his identity discovered is really nicely intense. But then you think that's it and they they give you another twist involved audio ice right. Yeah it pays off twice. So i thought that was really great and then of course at the heart of it all and really. I don't know that. I would have enjoyed the movie that much overall if it wasn't for him. There's jimmy cagney as cody jarrett. And maybe my favorite line we can talk about. Those moments that nathaniel touched on the freak out the emotional freak out in the mess hall when he finds out about mother or the end of the film the famous ending to this film. But my favorite line reading is maybe just when he discovers pardo and he says a copper copper with that with that devious devilish smile on his face where he actually is so angry and you know so filled with rage in this moment but also maybe a little bit impressed that i think he's really got that this violence. I guess what that's a great point. See you figured out a way to make it much. Smarter than what i was gonna say but i was watching this movie thinking about psycho. Because of the mother son relationship i was thinking a lot about. I know. sam said this on letterbox. And i'm right there with him i was thinking about. Nicholson as the joker From tim burton's batman watching this performance. Seems like it had to be an inspiration. I was even thinking a little bit about heat watching this film. Not that cody. Jarrett and deniro's character are really similar at all but something about this underlying idea of you know what let's just pull off the last big score you know and then we can actually get away sort of enjoy life and there is something to his willingness to be violent and that lack of hesitation. That does make me think. A little bit of neil mccauley deniro's character again not a psychopath but someone who says you know. I will not hesitate. I'll do whatever i have to do in any moment. You definitely get that with cagney character as well but that performance here one where he is big such a small package right five five when you google jimmy cagney and yet. He fills every inch of the screen and seems like he's bigger than every other performer unscreened. They all actually seem like they're doing something way more stylized than him. He's the most natural performer. Probably in the whole thing. Well how about another performers. That had to be inspired by it. In miller's crossing. I saw a lot of you know miller's crossing elements here coen brothers film. I know we both love marcia. Gay harden's character in miller's crossing named verna virginia mayo plane verna here. Yeah before. I get into cagney just real quickly because i think you're right about how professionally made this film. Is i think what that means is we might glide over what walsh brings as director but he makes a really good heist movie. He makes a really good police investigation thriller. He makes a really good prison drama. And as we said an undercover cop store he does all of this in one film in each one of those genres honored and executed really confidently. So i think that's what we have with wall shear but cagney. Oh my goodness i mean. It's hard to imagine you know. I think the word big comes to mind because it is. It is big but also because it's easy to describe with dissed with deck decides of distance. This is fun. Right he's fine. He's chewing up the screen. But i wonder if apple the time he wasn't just more scary when when audiences saw him. And here's another performance. Probably influenced joe pesci in goodfellas member. When you first saw joe pesci in goodfellas it was due. He was funny but he was scary right. He was ultimately. What do you mean exactly what you mean. Like he was like he was a clown like he was there to amuse. You've josh and think about how that scene turns right is where you are amused by it. And you're you're laughing at it and then it takes that turn. The turn is what cagney has in in this performance. And how about the moment so virginia mayo as wife. There's a guy when he's making a move on her big ad and cagney shows up. Kills them right a half second later. What does he do. He offers verna a warm smile and his arm. A gentlemanly arm. And that's cagney is like just turning that on a dime and to your point making it natural not doing like psycho stick and then like it's just like you believe that this guy turns like that and then you do have the big moments. That are just more fun. I mean the way this guy drives. It's like he's looking for a squirrel to squish. he's not even talking in a getaway seeing. I think it's the where he's pulling up to the hotel and no one's after him but he's still driving like a maniac or or the language he uses when he wants. The radio turned off. What does he tell one of his henchmen kill it. You know and everything is violent with him. He's just you referenced. His size the word pugnacious is had to either either. Kenny was born because that word existed. Or somehow that word was developed after cagney came on screen because it just fits him so perfectly. And i think that for me someone who can be suspicious of big performance sometimes is is why this is so effective of a portrayal of a crime of a really scary crime boss. Yeah well he also makes the vulnerability feel real like it doesn't just feel part of that psycho stick that he gets these headaches and it's another opportunity related kind of act out or or act big and draw attention to himself. It really does feel as if he is in need of someone. He needs that kind of physical. That's a moment right. There's a moment that you you know again. Speaking of seating elements you know. It's probably coming. We've seen what is mom does to soothe him. We've heard edmond o'brien's character joke about how he'll put on his best motherly routine that he basically. That's why he's there. He's taking the mother spot becoming a confidante to him. This is in prison in prison. And it goes beyond just being a confident in the scene where he finally does break down and he. He rubs the back of his neck in that moment. I don't know if you would. I think many people probably would call it that. There's perhaps a romantic element being hinted at at minimum. It's it's affecting. It's moving right which you don't expect from these two men in this setting and certainly not from jimmy cagney. It's romantic and if you notice at a that moment max steiner's score which has been pretty cut kind of big and brassy like it takes this plaintive turn i mean it's more romantic than anything we get between cody verna. I know he i know. He carries her upstairs. Very pointedly in scholley at one point. But i think this is a more romantic interaction between two people what we see here. And you're dead right. It's because he's seeking that affection and it goes to the little aside. We learn at one point. I think one of the investigating police officer says something about how he pretended to have the headaches as a kid to get his mother's attention. There's a chance. There is no physiological beila by logical element to these headaches it is purely to get someone to come and and touch him and be vulnerable with him and his only way of expressing vulnerability himself. And so as you said. That's a totally different layer. He brings to the character. Yeah now here's where. Maybe the polish comes into play to the movies detriment at least for me a little bit and this ties to something you said in terms of it being effective as kind of three different types of movies including the police procedural kind of a cop drama is i felt like it went above and beyond even what you would expect from the late forties in terms of sort of hays code moralizing. I was wondering josh almost if like j. Edgar hoover financed this movie. It feels like a government production. Almost and i know that it's not g. Men is not fbi agents but the treasury men. Yeah who are the good guys here right. But how many times do we see them. Do something really impressive to zero in on jarrett. Like let's show how scientific and sophisticated scurrying catching criminals like no matter how psychopathic or diabolical. Or clever they are. We will catch them. Will use math with pro. Tractor will use mask technology and spectograph dirt analysis and advanced tailing stuff. We'll even use radar. Like i don't know that i didn't like it so much as i just felt like it was kind of a commercial for like government agency service or something like encouraging people to wanna become a cop. I mean i did. I did laugh at some of it. And i also felt like maybe i'd actually prefer to spend more time with cody and his mom writer dealing with that whole drama than dealing with all the all the math and such. It's a little. it's a little dry. Yeah yeah it's a little drive. But then also kind of the part that i felt like was truly the insult was the ending because the ending is spectacular. It's this amazing. Over the top. Kind of showcase for cody. Jarrett him saying goodbye and delivering that great line. Top of the world ma. Except that isn't somehow josh. The ending of the film. I think this is probably one of those things that people always kinda get wrong. They say. Oh it's the last line of the movie. No it just should have been the last line of the movie instead. The actual last line is the two cops the to amazing t men standing next to each other and one of them. Says cody jarrett. And then edmond. O'brien says he finally got to the top of the world. It blew right up in his face. It's like okay guys. Nice clunker reminder thanks for the reminder. That crime doesn't pay. How do you have a line in a moment. Like top of the world. Ma delivered by jimmy cagney there and you don't just flash the end. Yeah they're dialogue is way too much. I'm in complete agreement. But let me just give you two reasons. Maybe i don't agree with that but two reasons. This is part of the cagney brand right you when you go back to nineteen thirty one the public enemy where he established this persona really right and that was even more moralizing. I mean that is like if i'm remembering correctly there's either a voice over a title card at the beginning believed basically saying we do not endorse what we're about to let you get frothy over for the next hour. Whatever you know so. It's kind of like the cagney brand. But also here's where you know. White heat is smart is that it's going to give every audience member whatever they could possibly want. So if you're in it for cagney and you just want to root for the psycho. You got plenty of scenes that do that but it's it's also good to give you a good guy. It's going to give you admin o'brien as this undercover cop. And so i think that's why that is tacked on there is kinda like yes to be moralizing a way to bring it back for those audience. Who would audience members who go out and be shaking their heads. Even if cagney went down explosion that he got the last line so it just kind of trying to have it a lot of different ways. Not the choice. I would've made. But i can see why what direction i do want to touch briefly though on virginia mayo as his wife kinda shocked. That 'cause i he's interacting with moss. So you think like okay. He's he's mas the woman in his life and we see no in the bedroom at their hideout is mayo. They introduce her snoring right. I didn't make up. Isn't that the memorable. I love it. I love that because for me it. It's oddly endearing and communicates right away that she's not just a trophy. This is an actual woman. You know this is. This is a real living breathing. Human being and not. Just some sort of pinup. We've talked about how some wires can depict their female characters that way and i also like how we very early on that verna is playing both cody and big ad against each other. And she's just you know it's a chess match for her. She just needs a place to land when the dust settles and so she's constantly keeping them in balance and how about the great line. My favorite line of hers. I forget exactly when it comes. But he's he's complaining because the cops are on his tail now. They're they're getting close and he's complaining that someone must have betrayed them and she says it's always somebody tipped them. It's never that the cops are smart so right to that is maybe feeds into what you were saying about. You know this having be glorifying. The police. So much. But i i just love how. She's going to call him out. You know no matter. She an sheet like it may cost her. There's there's another thing about. Cagney is the violence towards women that so many of his characters express. But mayo you know is not just a punching bag in this film for sure no no. I think that it would be very easy to watch her in her first few scenes and think. Oh she's going to play the emotional dame or whatever and she's just completely under his thumb and ever pushes back but you're right. There is real suspense around her character. Think of how much more lively screenplay is just because you know that she's capable of undermining him right that she that she is capable probably of of conniving him and getting what she wants even though he kinda seems like. He's onto her at the end of the film. You never totally. No you feel like you to what he he needs that he needs that support especially with dog gone. You know that exactly. Even if he doesn't fully trust her if he's getting the type of approval from her that he needs then maybe he'll keep her around but that's only even a possibility because of kind of the power she has as a character and as a woman in this movie. So i agree with you on mayo. White heat is currently available to rent on most digital platforms. You can also check your local library and inter library loan. We will officially close out the marathon next week. We're going to call the awards. The savages in honor of actress and savage. Who gave a very memorable performance possibly the most memorable performance in the marathon as vera not verna in nineteen forty fives detour. And i mean come on. The savage is just too perfect in terms of describing the overall tone of marathon and these characters. now i have not done any prep. I know you did your homework. You have your picks already prepared. We'll see if you can tell a good lie here. Josh and keeps me in suspense when you think about best lead performance from the marathon cagney have competition. It depends on how you define lead. Okay okay and the way i've defined it. Let's just say no. It says it's his okay. Well spoiler alert. You're going jimmy cagney. I'm probably going jimmy cagney as well but the other ones. We'll just have to wait and see we will share our savages next week and of course you can find all the information you need about. All our pass marathons and this current marathon. Fm spotting dot net slash marathons josh. That's our show if you want to connect with us on facebook and twitter. Adam is at film spotting. I met larson on film in the show archives at film spotting dot net. You can find reviews interviews top five's going back to two thousand five and that's where you can vote in the film spotting poll. What is your most anticipated movie of the summer to order. Show t shirts or other merged visit film spotting dot net slash shop and you can subscribe to our weekly newsletter at film spotty dot net slash newsletter out this week on digital joe right he of my beloved and also and prejudice and the darkest hour has a new movie out. It's based on a twenty eighteen bestselling book. This is the cast. Josh amy adams gary oldman julianne moore. Anthony mackie brian tyree henry. Jennifer jason leigh and tracy letts. Why aren't we all just beating a path right now to our couch so we can get prepared to watch the woman in the window. I mean it seems like it should be a big deal. Right is this is this. Just another ovid casualty of ninety. Sure how to distribute something. When it's actually out i mean that's the only thing i can think of. I feel like it was supposed to come out last year and yes got pushed and so now. Everyone's kind of forgotten about it and it hasn't really gotten much promotional attention or at least not enough that it's been on our radar now. I do remember reading the article about the writer of the book. Long piece like new york magazine or something about that writer and the bizarre back story on that person and i don't know of that actually hurt This in terms of the adaptation and maybe the scandal. If you will about our that writer scandal might be too strong of a word but it's a really interesting mysterious story and if the woman in the window is half his mysterious and interesting. It'll be a pretty good movie. Maybe we'll catch up with it out in wide release. Spiral from the book of saw is out chris. Rock samuel jackson in this movie from the director of saw. Now he didn't make saw too but he did make saw three and he made sophomore out. That josh i it doesn't matter to me not i think i've endured three of the saw picture man. That's three more than me. Who boy others will have to let me know how this those who wish me. Dead also out with angelina jolie as a survival expert protecting a teen on the run from assassins and from a deadly forest fire taylor. Sheridan wrote directed it. He also directed wind river road. Sicario and helen highwater. That's coming to hbo. Max but right now. We're not gonna talk about any of those next week. We're going to devote the bulk of the show to our summer. Movie preview will share our questions about the summer movie season. My number one might be. What's a movie theater. Do they still. Yeah is that a thing. Can i get popcorn at the movie theater. That's my number one summer. Movie question spoiler you. Can't you got films. Spotting is produced by golden. Joe so and samphan haugen without salmon golden joe. This show wouldn't go our production assistant his cat sullivan. Thanks also to candidates griffiths in the listeners of the film spotting advisory board an special thanks to everyone at wbz chicago. More information is available at w. be easy dot org four film spotting. I'm josh larsen. And i met him. Dr thanks for listening. This conversation. conserve no purpose anymore the bond.

barry jenkins jenkins josh cora berry jenkins jimmy cagney amazon jerry jenkins Sandy spring bank josh larsen dr air cody jarrett tom good aaron pierre caesar elijah everett stephan james kiki lane
The Underground Railroad

Pop Culture Happy Hour

19:32 min | 2 months ago

The Underground Railroad

"The new amazon series. The underground railroad is the latest project. From barry jenkins who directed mood lights. And if beale street could talk. It's the story of cora a runaway slave in the antebellum south who escapes a vicious georgia plantation and sets off on a journey towards freedom aboard the mysterious and entirely literal underground railroad at various stops along the way will encounter many different facets of racism pursued all the while by a relentless slave catcher. It's many contradictory things at once lyrical yet. Brutal luminous yet horrifying. I'm going weldon and today. We're talking about the underground railroad on pop culture. Heavy from npr. So don't go away. This message comes from npr sponsor virgo. The family reunion will be extra special this summer. So check out virgo to find a private whole vacation home with something for everyone. A private pool outdoor space a grill. Whatever the family is looking for you'll find it on virgo and if plans change you can cancel for free on select properties download the virgo app. The time for getting back together is now. Welcome back with me is npr. Tv critic. eric. Duggan's hey eric. Hey man how you doing very well. Also with us. But not reach audrey. Welcome back but thank you so much for having me glen unless at least is iheartradio producer. Joel monique hello joe. Well well. this is the underground. Railroad is a ten episode amazon's series with an impressive pedigree. It's directed by barry jenkins and based on the pulitzer winning novel by colson whitehead to so beatty stars as cora. Joel edgerton is her obsessed. Pursuer ridgway cora i escapes alongside her fellow slave. Caesar played by aaron. Pierre lily rob turns up as a devout woman. Who reluctantly agreed to hide. Cora and william jackson harper is royal a conductor of the underground railroad who seeks to help her heal the wounds of her past and speaking of wounds this shows depictions of the horrors of slavery are stark and unflinching. There's an ongoing cultural conversation about entertainment that four grounds black trauma and the underground railroad will certainly become a part of that. So joel start with you. What did you make of the underground railroad cinematic exploration of race as it pertains not just to our ancestors to ourselves. Currently we've entered a time where we have to contemplate what it means to taken slave narratives and it's really hard for a lot of people if you're one of those people i encourage you to dig through and get through. There's a payoff. It's worth watching this series as challenging as it is and many breaks as i needed. I'm glad i watched it. I'm glad barry jenkins into himself and enter. Mr whitehead's work to tell this story. It's hard but it's really something to watch same question would you make of it. I mean i agree with joy like you know it is hard to watch but it is something that we need to watch especially in the country. We live in today. In fact by jenkins an in an interview says that throughout his schooling in the us the topic of slavery was broached and i caught so pithily shoddy and heen asli that he had to make this and i think that is fair. This this show is so radical burgers it forces you to look and you can't look away from that history because you have to not make peace but you have to at least acknowledge that we have a violent history and the only way of moving forward is acknowledging it and then processing it and then bettering it. We can't ignore it anymore. Absolutely now you've been doing some thinking about this. 'cause there certainly has been a spate of recent media that Deal with this topic and deal with it in a very explicit way. What did you think of the railroad. You know i used to be one of those folks who would get a little annoyed at people who say you know as a blanket statement. I'm not watching it anymore. Slave narratives because i can't stand to watch like pain and i gotta say man. When i started watching this. I had the exact same reaction. It is so hard for me to watch it. Even though i trust barry jenkins and he's an amazing filmmaker and there is a lot to like about what he's done here. There's a part of me that gets really pissed off. That black people have to constantly open our wounds and show how. We been brutalized by america to get america to understand trauma and the heritage of trauma. And what that's done us as a people. So the critic part of me says this is an amazing piece of work. And i'm so glad that barry jenkins made it and i'm so glad we're at a time. We're filmmakers i. Cam can get the kind of budget that he got to make this moving and cinematic work and then there's another part of me. That's like what we have to keep doing this. I'm tired of having to convince the world to pay attention to our pain and learn from it without us having to reopen those wounds and show them again and so i just wanted to say that because i have a feeling will be a lot of people who might feel the same way and is cool to feel that way consumer of media. I want to be able to honor our ancestors and watch their stories right but in order to do that impactfully. I think you have to be as creative as beary was in in creating new ways to horrify the viewer. I've never seen anything like the pilot. Actually in a lot of lynchings in films and television as horrified this is a lot of emotional and intellectual labor. That jenkins is doing. That's what eric also talks about. Hunting says why do but vital black people need to keep the opening wounds to do this. And of course there's like psychological backlash to that emotional labor and i think the viewers should be aware that there is a lot that in this show. Well let's talk about that narrative tension here because the thing about fiction that deals with the atrocities of slavery this giant festering wound on the american soul. The mere fact of it is so huge. It's almost impossible to get your head around and what this is doing is trying to help us. Get our head around it. He's talking about so if this were any other novel or film or tv show and you were workshop or or getting studio notes you get feedback saying okay these antagonists too either. Cartoonish lee evil. I don't buy them. But that critique goes out the window because this evil was not nuanced. it was absolute. And if you're going to write about it you have to respect that you have to depict it that way. You might get somebody saying well cora as character. She's too passive. She has no agency. She needs to act not always get acted upon. But that's not a flaw in this storytelling that's the point of this storytelling on fresh air Last week jenkins told terry gross that he sees fiction as an empathy machine. Which of course is exactly what it is. And he's putting us in chorus point of view. So yes we experience these atrocities along with her but if he was only doing that it would be misery porn. But he's being very careful to make sure that we're there so we can look around like she does and see the people around her as they distinguish themselves from each other individualized themselves they build networks and they persevered in the face of this unimaginable evil. So the thing. That i kept coming back to you though is joel edgerton as ridgway the slave catcher. I don't think i've ever seen that actor. Be better than he is here but to be fair. I haven't seen him that much and he got a lot of screen time here. This is six hundred minutes long this thing and he's onscreen a lot. I did feel in his early scenes the same way i did reading the book. Which is that i hope. Please god tell me. You're not saying daddy didn't love me. Is the justification for him becoming this monster. Because it's not doing that but it's true. I think what is trying to do is add a facet to this giant blank wall of pure evil. I did feel sometimes that we were getting more of his backstory than we needed at the expense of chorus. Inner life. Joel you agree. I agree just in that like at one point that i just don't care about this story anymore. I don't want to hear from him anymore. But i also think there's moments in here that are shockingly modern right moments where you're like. I defy with the situation in a way. That's frightening because. I hoped we would be so much further from this era. And if you think a lot about cunanan about the way people have prayed and hoped rayson would die out as if it's something inherently within just old people. I think this is making a very bold statement about the way. Racism doesn't fade right away that it's not necessarily taught directly in the home in the way that even the best of parents who have the best of intentions are not only unable to educate society's racism from their children but aren't going to do a whole hell of a lot to make sure their children aren't inflicting pain on people right. If you are going to explore you can't do it without exploring the people that enforce it and so much as i was over it i also understood the necessity to use it as a backbone in exploring chorus story because somebody is physically haunting her. And we need to understand. Why if we're going to ever come to terms with what happened. I mean. I really like the board modern because you know be all. We've all met people who've said or i'm not racist. I have a black friend. And when you see gordon character. He's literally that person. Because he has homer the daniel kid walking with him everywhere and being his pre-match right-hand like he does all the work in the modern sense. It's also like how a lot of people talk nice black people to kind of say that i'm not racist. What i want is actually justice are let me decide how much joy black people are allowed. So i you know. i'm. I'm so glad that you use the word modern here. You know what's interesting to me about. This is so much of the choices. At barry jenkins makes our double edged swords. Appear one reason why it's so distinctive is because the storytelling moves so slowly but that also means that when he showing atrocities. We're spending a lot of time with them. Were sitting in them in a way that is really damaging and the other thing is that when he goes off and gives us the back story of this the slave catcher. We spend a lot of time with this guy. And he's the only character that i can think of in the narrative who jenkins shows us his motivation and then the guy tells us his motivation again. You're getting his story twice because because berries showing us that he's jealous of by people and he's particularly jealous of this one black person that his father Really respects the thing. That's interesting to me though. Is that okay. Cora a holdback because that makes sense but it also means that we don't know her as well as we know the slave catcher which i think is kind of bizarre and see like a book can take you into her head but this visual narrative. It's harder to do that so we don't know her as well and the other character that type of care to that we don't get to know well. The white abolitionists who are also risking their lives and their families lives to protect and save black people and the one abolition family that we kinda meet seemed to have a lot of contempt for black people. And i don't even really understand why they're doing it so like i said it's a double edged sword you get a a character really compelling but then you wind up spending a little too much time with that character because of how the narrative is constructed to eric's point like jenkins is trying to eliminate the white savior right that narrative and then the white person came and it was better and i think that's what makes it feel modern to me. I get your point in that. Obviously there had to have been other people on the side who were not doing this. But i also think that being able to showcase the ways in which whiteness kin at first seem like protection or and then sort of come crashing down around you and then to play into the ideas of you know so much of what makes the story is that your main character has no idea where she's going ever like. There's never any clues like okay. You're gonna be here. You'll meet this person and so there's no ever Net of safety and without that net. Everything all of the tricks and turns and distrust you know e think in the pilot that you've seen the worst of it you know because it's physically upsetting like it's it's awful to look at but then the mind games are not our only played against cora but that she has to play in order to survive ray the way. She has to look beyond just blatant cruelty into manipulation. I think there are vital lessons in that. And i'm intrigued in a series. That isn't interested in a white savior. A definitely here. That i guess my one of my bugaboos in watching some films is when i feel like characters. Reactions are changed to fit the narrative that the storyteller wants to tell and they make the character act in ways. That don't make sense the abolitionist couple. Who takes ankara. Those characters. just didn't feel like they made any sense to me. And i think it would have been possible to create them and describe an abolitionist point of view without making them white sabers because ultimately they don't save her but feeling like i'm watching character who is making choices because they are they are not supposed to be the white savior makes me feel like i'm an you know just like the beat man. How much of that is is an effect of the fact that this is ten hours. I mean the barry jenkins of this is a major selling point here you know. He has characters stared down the barrel of the camera. They're implicating us in that way. He's he's amazing. Compositions and his matafi just captures color and light and shadow and and in some cases. The the real vibrancy of these costumes. Also the sound design. He doesn't get you know people. Don't talk about the sound design that much but i mean like there's a moment when a conductor opens that manifest which is where everybody who rides the train kinda writes down their story and whenever that book is opened we hear this. Low murmuring of many many voices and soon as the book is closed at that cuts out completely. It's really cool. But there is not telling tales out of school here. There is a language to his pacing. That just hits different in a two hour movie than a dozen a ten hour. Tv show these scenes stretch out without dialogue for long minutes and eric. I think this is what you're talking to your. That's time we could be used to get inside chorus head and we just we're outside of her head watching as the camera paces back and forth slowly. It's gonna test your patience. But i think it's trying to amazon dropped ten episodes at once which is very unusual for them. They usually do that. Weird thing it's three episodes here and the next week to and then here's one. It's a fascinating choice. Because as much as i admire the show and i admired everything about it. This is. nobody's weekend bench. This is unbridgeable. You guys agree. Yeah i mean not to take away from the artist take slash cinematic value of Of the series. I mean like you said you know. I think berry jenkins's the master of lighting. I remember this was eighteen at the new york from festival. In a conversation with the author darrow. Pinkney thinking says to jenkins that you mind us over and over again. How beautiful black bodies are in color. And i have never forgotten that that comes with it. I mean eighteen. Thousand twenty one. I keep thinking of that one-sentence every time i want. Something by jenkins is just how beautiful the use of colors and use of light can be especially unlikely which we haven't seen because we we know that there is a problem that photography where nine black people are either washed out are like just blobs. So i think you know there is. There is extreme artistic value in this series of botched from the trauma. Bartram the pain and also the celebration. There's there's a celebration off community. There's a celebration of beauty. So yeah i mean don't binge watch it watch it slowly let it happen to you and please allow yourself time to process this. There's this i think hunger for black portraiture specifically as it pertains either two groups of beings or time periods where the available portraiture is limited to the mass public. And i think that it resonates i is language. If you're like me don't mind a very long slough shot. They something really beautiful and contemplative yvonne moments. If you're really hungry for action for the push of the story you know. I binged it. I'll be honest. I watched eight episodes back to back. It was harrowing and exhausting. I took fifteen twenty minute breaks. I played with my dog in between for sure don't feel rushed in eating to Complete this it's a study and you can take your time. We want to know what you're thinking about. The underground railroad find us at facebook dot com slash p. c. h. and on twitter at p. c. h. That brings us to the end of our show. Thanks for being here. And and of course thank you for listening to pop culture. Happy hour from npr. If you've got a second and you're so inclined please subscribe to our newsletter at npr dot org slash pop culture newsletter. And we will see you all tomorrow. I'm yohe's shaw. I'm kierra tastes with the npr podcast invisibility. Ah you can think of invisibly. Ah kind of like a sonic black light. When you switch us on you'll hear surprising and intimate stories stories that help you notice things in your world that maybe you didn't see before listened to the podcast from npr. This message comes from npr sponsor rocket mortgage home loans that fit your life rocket can visit rocket mortgage dot com slash wait call for costs and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states in mls consumeraccess dot org number thirty thirty.

barry jenkins cora jenkins npr eric joel edgerton Joel monique colson whitehead ridgway cora Pierre lily rob william jackson harper Mr whitehead amazon Cora cunanan rayson weldon Duggan america beatty
# 91 - If Beale Street Could Talk / Boy Erased / Black Orpheus

Truth and Movies: A Little White Lies Podcast

45:31 min | 2 years ago

# 91 - If Beale Street Could Talk / Boy Erased / Black Orpheus

"Today on truth and movies direct. Barry Jenkins returns with James Baldwin and uptaken if field three talk don't you thinking, I think you some batgirls only other foolishness like that. Because had just Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe star in the gay conversion therapy drama. Boy erased play the. Wants your home. You gotta figure out what next clip off the nineteen fifties. Brazil the myself commuters unique twist on Greek tragedy office. Well, coming up on truth and movies. Podcast. So this we have something quite rare. David Jenkins little lies guesting two weeks running. Welcome back. David. Hey and joining us Kelly Weston, welcome back Kelly, always a pleasure now. Kelly have you seen burning? I have seen a burning have a screen link for burning. We'll have not finished it yet. David. We had some response after chat last week about this mysterious cats that you said you could see if you freeze framing zoom in burning. We have Ross Logan on Twitter here saying responsibility chats if the cat were imaginary who was pulling in the box blow the bed Jenkins. But that's that's another question that you need to ask. If you can't see the cat. Then he it's it's the shredding is surely this catch if you can't see he's doing the Poos is dead or alive. Gosh. And also, David we have an Email here from Steve Burke ary about last week's chat specifically about Jason, Raymond. This was a wild Wim out say I mean, I think I was maybe a little bit ill. Had some cold and flu tablets stills of washing around my systems. Maybe that was where this this of Jeremy it came from. Let's see what Steve says, hey, I was amused. The David having confessed to basing his original review of the goes Pacific on reasons other than the merits or otherwise of the film immediately proceeded to launch into a fatwa against the films of Jason Reitman at expect reaction visceral towards vantera Greenaway film. But Jason Reitman really the guy. I think is more that he is a kind of his been somehow position as the acceptable face of indie cinema. He's kind of bringing of slightly indie flavor to very kind of mainstream projects. And I don't know what it is something about his films thought always find either agrees or offensive at the desperately trying to give this very enlightened liberal viewpoint of things. And just fails every time I can't think of a film of his I've seen that. I haven't thought that's kind of I feel offended. So that's that's the reason. I mean, I think Vondry green away they're in the element of self consciousness that there she like they are kind of teasing, and and jabbing e but I just watched Reitman's films and get a sense that he doesn't really know what films making thing, that's maybe even more brutal an assessment than I delivered last week. But I stand by Steve does conclude hair. His love of anticipation for new Reimann Ghostbusters is now the join threat and agree. Really? Even though it seemed that we were going to blows at the end of this episode. This is first big constitute Blombos, you know, seeing what Jason Reitman makes of CG effects. You know, let's let's see what this Kelly you have right fan. I am not a right fan. I think he is the wrong man for most of I agree with David that. I he's been positioned as this like sort of indie God. And I do think it's interesting that or maybe not maybe it's just my own little bubble. But I think people do give nepotism in nothing credit for us. But I don't find him offensive is just find it annoying. The I am expected to like his films, and yeah, I could just ignore him. Most times it's been easier. I think this year than others due to some flops his, but yeah, I I'm not particularly like passionate about him in one way or the other just like would rather not think about it. Actually way back in the day. I think it was like two thousand and seventy thousand eight I was basically anti Juno. And this is when this is this is when he was like super wells seven nominated Oscar winning June. So I loved, you know, actually, I take I've like Beth said last we twelve year old, however old I was when I came out I loved, you know, I've not watched it since I saw it instead of as a kid. I remember just having lots of long discussions with people telling me how wrong I was. And you know, strike me as a moldy peaches phone astronaut lungs. Moldy pages way when time in a place. Well, it's definitely time and place for discussing Jason Reitman thing that time places going past now, thank you very much Steve. And thank you as well. If the correspondence if you'd like to let us know anything, he think about the film's we discuss or the discussions in general, let us know the usual channels that truth and movies on Twitter truth at te'o, linen dot com by Email or the elderly dot com slash podcast comment section. So let's come with this week's new releases. We're gonna go where the street has no gnomes, tortured pun really because Bill street has to nominate wanted to YouTube. That's fine. That's good. Keep all that. In the explanation of the unworkable pun in. I always liked to try try to hard maybe. But let's talk about Newbury Jenkins movie if Beale street could talk. Barry, Jenkins, director of moonlights hair doubts in oval by James Baldwin is the story of Tisch and funny. A couple of nineteen seventies Harlem separated by a wrongful conviction and to make matters worst TISCO she's pregnant his clip for million the film when you tell finally the big news. To show you what this baby. And finally once it to our baby. In not his fault that he's in jail. It's not like he ran away. And we've always been best friends since we little daddy. You know that and we'd be marry now if it wasn't for knows he knows it your daddy knows it. He's just he's just worried about you. Quip from if Beale street could talk that so Kelly listeners may know James Baldwin there was that documentary couple years ago, I'm know your negro, let's know about him this novel and is a good fit for Jenkins after noon white. Yeah. So James Baldwin is having actually a bit of resurgence. He was an extremely popular and well known writer in the when I say from late nineteen forties onward, and this book is like one of his later words, but he was phenomenal essayist Tana hoc- coats has e-e-e-e-no clotted him and credited his you know, entire career to James Baldwin. He's very very well. Well, loved among black creatives and intellectuals for good reason. I do think he is most famous for Giovanni room. But a lot of people also cite the fire next time, which is a book of as sort of like written to his a fifteen year old nephew at the time. And. He was writing in in the heat of the civil rights movements, admittedly from abroad from Paris. And he was so incisive about the sort of emotional decay that racism ro on America and Americans. And what I heard it was announced here was doing this. But I wanna say it was like right on the precipice of me too. And I just thought like this is not a story that I want to hear right now because you know, the synopsis it's about women trying to prove the innocence of her boyfriend who may have raped this woman, and I was actually having a conversation with some friends among them Taylor Montague who wrote the piece for a little white lies. And we mentioned we liked that. It was actually quite this is not a spoiler like it's very clear in the film that he has not rape this woman. But this woman has been raved, and I do think one of the really commendable things about this film is that is so generous with its compassion and. How gracious is to like all of its characters even those characters that are not immediately lovable or endearing, and I think berry is actually, you know, he's such a great fit for this. Because I think he's somebody who's a truly compassionate director without sort of veering over into sentimentality, which is I think quite easy to do with the film like this day, you were confirmed found to moonlight. Does this continue what we may expect from the film if I'm being truthful, I really liked moonlight without loving. I had a few kind of structural problems. And for people who haven't seen it. It's this kind of triptych film that follows through three periods in his life. And there was I love the first section. I love the third section. But those was this middle high school section, which just econo- spol-. The film's me a bit really. And I really watched again prior to g intervene barring and it's still stuck in. My Crowell on ado, find the this film. I mean, I just love this film. I mean, it was I've read the book, and then when I found out that he was doing the film. I'd is of go out again and read again, and it's very cinematic book, the very easy book to read and that she visualize real people saying these lines and making decisions it doesn't take a great leap of faith through magin. How this would look on the screen, and I think that what Barry Jenkins done is made something which feels so close to the book. I mean, I mean, it's it's not exactly page for page. He's just made it feels so honest and truthful and economics like he's almost creating memories of what it was like to read the book in the first time in particular. I remember being very very moved by the character of the mother who in in the films play by Regina king. And I think it was just so supremely satisfying to see that transpose to the film to make over to the film for that character to be so rich and powerful matriarch who is kind of. Going all out to essentially safe a son safe a grandchild safer door in law. Just like take a moment to really stone for this film because it has gotten lost. I think in the discourse and maybe necessarily because I think the films that have risen to the top. However, you feel about them green book rap and to lesser extent. Vice you know, hopefully that conversation is productive and dual see how that turns out. But I would argue just like objectively speaking, however, you feel about this film. And and like you David I really really loved this foam. I've seen it twice. And the first time I was I I walked out of the screening crying. The second time was also it's just like really cemented my love for. But one thing I think that is just like unquestionable that this is such a technically well made film like it is flawless everything from the editing to the pacing cinematography. I think you're right. This book is really cinema. Matic sort of lends itself to the screen, arguably, I think more than than any of his other books, but it's so I think easy given the structure of it. Because it is a film that's told through flashbacks, and they're so many tension field themes that it's very easy to fumble this, and they're such like craft that has gone into this obviously like so meticulously well made and the score is perfect. I wrote would like walking out of the screening thinking this is like, and I didn't even know this is this is exactly the way that I would want James Baldwin adaptation to sound could we be specific here because this isn't a heavy film where we took the setup the book is in addition. So I picked up in the bookshop today's one hundred seventy pages, it's not an epic very specific story, and you talk about this tentacle craft. What is he doing here? And what is the fact that is creating I was just taking off the puck is for. And one of the things that he mentioned was that the scenes in which you go back in time, and you see Titian Fanis love their relationship is just sort of like bay are floating everything the entire film is like really, vibrant. And just sort of just like just brilliantly shot berry Jenkins has now become known for this thing that he does where he has his actors looking at the screen, and there's kind of like sustains looking, but he mentioned that all of this that we're experiencing this film entirely through tissues is even though there's certain scenes where she's like not where of what's happening. And the thing that's popping into my head is a scene where Regina kings character lands at Puerto Rico, which is an incredible breathtaking shot of her just like coming off the plane, but because we're like looking at her memories, it's all sort of like glossy, and they like the very first seen them sort of like floating down. The stairs is like, you know, imbued with. This real like, you know romance. It's it does feel epoch like I read the book after I seen the film, but it does sort of make their romance this lake really like huge graduates thing, and I think that's sort of accomplished through James Laxton, the cinematographer that genius worked with route for all of his films, and how much more vibrant, the colors look. And then in the present day, you see Tisch sort of like having a difficult time she's pregnant the quick editing, and it's really liked this push pool. Like just watching it is like you're so immersed in like what she's going through? And I think it's incredible. How the quality you talk about everything you to love this film going through watching a movie like this just slutty? Oh struck again. I mean, it's on so kind of cheapened obvious to so of site, the Oscars and the film's kind of two nominations, Regina king. Also, Niklas Patel. Original school. Barry himself screenplay. Green, miss counseling. So I just find that we that this film for me is the very definition of like the whole package. I mean, every kind of Fulmer element every creative aspect the performances. The writing the wet show this of mood the school. It's film that like is kind of moss to full example of bringing disparate components and making them work as a new unique thing, and I can't understand why it would not get best picture nomination. Because I mean, I don't wanna toke ill other films there sat in films up for best picture, which I think the only thing going for them is kind of big lead performance. And it's kind of generally agreed every other element is refuse almost off. As usual because there's so many of the nominations. It has got it. And I agree like, we probably should we shouldn't dwell on this. Because just because it hasn't got us cours does it mean anything, and we don't want to give unto credit to wards. But there are so many like easily award -able. That's not a word. Like this targeted like, the editing and the performances are really understated. I mean, Regina king is great. And she deserves everything like she deserves all the glory. She's been great for a really really long time. But I think Colman Domingo's also really great in this film KiKi lane is I want to say this her debut. This her first big, John? And she's great. And and Stefan James who plays Fani also gives like a really incredible. It's not even just like, you know, a performance as sort of designed to make us feel sympathy for him because you know, we're spending so much time with Tisch that we don't get to see him. But that transformation his transformation feels really seamless. Like, they're things that happened to him in jail that we don't know about that. You can see on his face every time we see him. It's great at. I mean, like again, Brian Tari Henry I say again, but really I've just been talking about him a lot my personal. Yeah. He has one scene, and it is one of the most powerfully active scenes that I have seen in years like he does so much with like I wanna say ten minutes of screen time. He tells the story what happened to him is so much more explicit in the novel. But Barry Jenkins, sort of I think really wisely entirely relies on his performance, and doesn't like, you know, have him say like all of the things like went on while he was in prison. But it's just like, I'm extremely baffled. The way the SPO the many ways, it's been overlooked. Well, praise another way if you're sick of the conversation this movie, it sounds very strongly recommended here so much to recommend for any final comments dated. I think one of the things I I loved about it. And I feel quite unique is it has this kind of ethereal quality to it. It's very delicate film from films that you add maybe associate that take place in Harlem in New York, there is this kind of bustle. And and that big loud and brash is very unique. Like look the city as well. I think it's kind of Brown impassively, and it feels that you're in the time as while. I feel it feels like it's at least seventies with absolute like minimal effort his taken back in time. Let's just create a mood than the film is a mood. I think you know to use that old thing, but I can't wait again. I think that whatever misgivings had about moonlight beginning buyer. As is in Moscow. And the way he's kind of constructed this film, the camera movements the way he kind of moves the cameras expressive way. I mean, he often talks about how he's a big fan of of the Hong Kong direct to one cow wine. And I think you can absolutely sit in this film. I mean, this this feels like his kind of in the mood for love. It's got that kind of tender yearning which is going to like drown out the the din and focus on these two souls, and everyone else just do that thing. And we just going to just have a look at these two people. And it's yeah, it's amazing. Piggy back off of that really quickly and just very concise lose. Going on about this. I do think that there is something really special about the this is a film about black people. And I think it's it's a very familiar sort of story. We've definitely seen stories of 'bout young black men who have been imprisoned unjustly. And I think it would be very easy to to make this film like really gritty and relate depressing, and it is sometimes like really difficult to get this from James Baldwin as well. But there's definitely like an underlying hope in optimism to his work. And I think that Beijing is managed to like translate that to scream because it is a really really sad story and it's heroin. But I do think at the end of it. There is something really uplifting about it ultimately. And it's really special, and I really like want to give like, you know, kudos to him for that. Because I yeah, this is very close. Heart. No. Unfortunately, this whole issue of the twilight about his film. So he can go deeper into the film's. Please do. Yes. Pick up currently on the shelves when we spoke to Barry and Colman Domingo about James Bolden and have a big thing on Jane's Bolden in his comb, Chris and specifically talamante review is such an intense, personal pieces. Fantastic plenty to read up on that. But let's put skulls on this Kelly L comes. He I this is in anticipation enjoyments in retrospect s-, I'm getting. I'm getting. So that's. Else? I say full five five that tiny little twinge of Dow just because as I I had a feud trenches of down about about moonlight. Buck always so excited about the book and Barry's doing some TV next. He's doing like a serialized slave narrative. Underground mood the wing novel Conrail road yet. Sorry that say I don't about the boat. But you know, I really loved moonlight to five and spatial me. This didn't transport me in the way, clearly you so probably three enjoyment. But I'm so willing to go back that craft is ready is nothing else out that like this maybe outside of the ska window poop the pie, Michael, hey, but it's this Oscar season seeing all of these films. We come week. This is not failed Oscar stole some of these are. And maybe we talk about one next in five we haunting one next. It's play raced. Based on the memoir by Jared. Conley boy erased bounce his teenage our played by Lucas hatches who sent to a gay conversion therapy become pies. Parents Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe that he's under the supervision of science played by director Joel Edgerton who uses host methods to kill the kids at that same sex attraction his clip of John receiving Smith vice versa. Five in the program. From fellow attendee. Played by us while since pop singer songwriter choice of on it. Okay. I'm fine. Fine. I'm gonna give you some advice. Play the part. John what's working getting better? Fake it until you make it right? You don't wanna end up one of those houses for anything. I've heard the stories and you're not good. That's where you're likely gonna end up. Sarah's aren't either? Some play department. Want your own you gotta figure out what to do next. This sounds remarkably similar to film that came out in the few months ago. In fact, twice co film, the miseducation of Cameron post is sufficiently different risk to care about this. You've jumped ahead of me that you've you. I was totally going to bring that up. But you've you've beat me to it. I mean, obviously people's experiences will vary, but it was very difficult for me to watch this without thinking phone Louis of desert vans miseducation of post, which I think in pretty much every way is superior piecework. The stories are like virtually identical. I mean, I mean the difference is Cameron posts about female and the tone of Cameron post is just it feels so more affecting for just being a little bit less kind of hyperbolic and has it's gonna wind Komag edge to it. And this kind of deep sense of exasperation melancholy was this film is kind of trauma suffering bad things. Hatred self hatred. You know, it's kind of big emotions thrown at the screen, and I didn't necessarily find it like to be a disaster. I I must say wasn't film. I was like particularly excited to see. But yeah, it was fine. His an example of a scene in the film, which which I think sums it up, and these guys are laughing 'cause I think they might know what you see them talk about like, Lucas hedges. Jared is in the gay conversion camp, he's having a really bad time. And he's being forced to kind of admit that his impulses are incorrect, and that he is kind of devil in the is lower than what what not and he's kind of walking down a street at night and on a bus shelter. There's kind of advertisement for some like a fashion advertisement. And it's like a kind of hunky guy who's dripping with sweat so water or something and he stops in his tracks. And looks at it and start psych hating the the advertisement. As if the this hunky guy is the reason why life is is kind of turning bad, and it's very very poorly. I mean, obviously based on a on a memoir, I dunno. If this is actually a thing that really happened that the the real gyrate actually took is anger on advertising Bill, but but as a kind of cinematic moment it rings, so untrue. And so contrived for kind of something to put in in a trailer, which is like big emotions, the I don't wanna use melodramatic in a negative way. But this is kind of the by specs of melodrama, I guess fascinating. Because I I've really liked Charlotte since fest movie the gift. Plum house sort of Thrilla which pretty schlocky tons that goes on, but it's quite straight laced and full of tension. And then in this one it feels like he's been inspired by the film loving. He did a couple years ago, which was a sort of issues would drama that didn't gals Canova nations was Klay going full and strange you say smell dramatic. But it's also not really it doesn't pop off in the way, you expect melodrama to to have that moment where you're solving entails or some sort of rising action is similarly understated and melodramatic and neither Susswein night impulse. Because there's no real villain in this. I haven't seen the gift, but reading up on this feels like know. You know, he's really really interesting about that them. I think the miseducation of Cameron post, and this film are both just like good films. I know a lot of people loved the miscegenation of Cameron post. But I think that one of the things that makes this film more interesting is that it frames those scenes in the gay conversion camp as har- scenes. And I think that's good. It's like I would argue that one of my problems with MS education of Cameron post is that it did sort of imbue those scenes with the kind of just like, oh, we're here, and it kinda sucks. But it is like, you know, this moment for us to just like bond, and like, you know, we find ourselves find, you know, sort of group of misfits he like with each other. And ultimately, I think that does work on some level. But I the same time. I also think it sort of undercuts how awful these places are I liked Joel Edgerton sort of drove that point home. The opening sequences like the gift in a fence where it's just like this ominous sense of our forboding is very pointed saying see what he's basically tricks you into thinking that Lucas hedges has been sent to prison of some some old crime. And that awful crime is being yes without giving spoilers or anything. But actually, the other thing that I think is is quite interesting about this film, and I'm still sort of grappling with how. Well, it does. This is that look hedges is gay, but he's also sort of experienced a trauma before he goes to this camp. And it's interesting how that trauma then frames his experience of gay conversion therapy. And how different that is. Then the other thing is we don't really like to know any of these other characters there. You're just sort of like shadows around him, basically. But it becomes this thing that really likes separates him from the group and really like isolates him, and I think. That was something that I really like I found like quite engaging and also quite often sick, and like honest so much like what's happening there. These children are like being traumatized, basically. And there's certain things that I think that he's able to recognize just because he already is sort of like opting out because all of these things sort of just like make it impossible for him to eve Merce himself. I guess in the belief that he's wrong. He's been raised as a Christian. But also there's something that he he knows fundamentally that was happened to him as wrong. I don't know that I've put that very like articulate terms. But I I do think how that is depicted is quite interesting. I think there's some very interesting complexities to this story that owns income post. So as you say, yes mixture of how trying to figure out your identity sexually come being affected by troll linked linked. Bundled together by outside forces. Likewise in the latter half, the film, it becomes just as much parental drama as a gay conversion therapy drama where Nicole Kidman's character comes in. It's more relationship between Lucas hedges and his character and his Baptist minister slash used car dealership. Father played by Russell Crowe with tremendous guns. And that's probably where it becomes less sensationalist and more about the nitty gritty of relationships and coming to terms with things with with generation bringing together the paradox. Is it, you know, it's like drilling down the idea of like, how can you believe in the wood of the bible and still, you know, love your son whose lifestyle doesn't abide by those strictures. One of the things that I found quite interesting. It was so sexy in the middle of the film which involves flea from red hot chili peppers and his best performance is top his back to the future. Maybe maybe he's playing this kind of aid to Joe alleged since carry two, and he's he's teaching these people the idea of what it is to be like a man's, man. And this Sean that people's though saying to each other is like fake it till you make it which is essentially just pretend that you'll convert it, and there's no way they'll ever know that idea itself is kind of fascinating the idea of like, well, this whole enterprise is based on kind of on a nothing you you can't tell a person's gay by looking at them. I guess so, you know, maybe people might dispute that but let you know is there a way of actually like pretending that you'll you'll find, and you know, it's interesting, but but it doesn't really go too deeply into the ongoing direction by sensation stole deepened set chink him because he's quite nice idea about like, you know, the idea acting as well like is it just a concept changing yourself and making other people believe something. Thing was supposed to finish with Lucas hatches. How does he have coasts much by the see incredible fullness there? And if this is the those beautiful boys have lost is both because hedges Tim shell may have just almost disappointed with difficult followed films Kelly. How does Lucas faffing? I think I'm just like just right out of the generation of shallow mayors or whatever they call themselves. But I think that they're both like really interesting performance and Lucas hedges is great like he's the saving grace this. They my rant before about like him sort of experiencing this trauma, and how it like sort of wrecks him all of that is made real to us through his performance. I don't necessarily think it's in the script. I think it's just like his, you know, sort of Torness that really, you know, sort of made me by this character. And I think that he is great. I mean, it's interesting that this is the film that. People have sort of like, I think it's just because of the boy in this is the people like sent tinted like juxtaposed beautiful boy where even though the Lucas headstones out that would be like more comparable is been as back, which I haven't seen. But have heard that he's good as well. But I think that they he's really interesting. I I would argue the see the new Matt Damon. What you mean by that? Yeah. Simi had you're going to buff up and start doing. Be like karate and Lizzie type scifi movie. For what he could do because I do think that he's like really engaging. I've something really quite interesting about him. And the choices he makes both Lucas hedges and Tim shell may and Little Women. The next of just Timothy or Tim Tang to Matang, Tim O. One for the oldest. David. Let's put some schools on erased. Yeah. I probably would say two three two. Even mentioned by the wasn't liquors had just wasn't the thing that I liked about that film to be on Sint sorry to be go like Jason Reitman on. We're not to get two jobs. They thought about Lucas hedges Phillies. He doesn't feel like a film star to me seeing him in a move is like I'm just seeing a guy in front of a camera. He likes in kind of aura that can translate into kind of exciting screen presence. But so. Actor character actor potential, maybe I will say the jury's out on. No, I'm not writing off now. But he's you know, investing in the hedge fund. Kelly Yose goes, please. Two three three like if I wouldn't walk away if somebody put this on while we were like hanging out at the house, and I've not seen boy raised I would still stay. I wouldn't just immediately walk up and. How how does because I like Joel a lot actually, but there's effort has been made here. And I appreciate I'm really grateful for that effort. Because as you say, God, do you think there's some complexities in this film? It doesn't always like deliver on them, unfortunately. But I want to give a beef or effort. Yes. Threes across the poet from the thing this is penalty fine if not exceptional except me about you. That's erased up next. We have film club with black office. Our site is a gift won that series. I disease could compromise. But yearly exams from an eye. Doctor can detect them before it's too late. Find an eye doctor today at think about your eyes dot com. Sponsored by the American up to metric association. A retelling of the Greek myth of office. And you say you black hoffy reset the proceedings in Rio de Janeiro at the height of carnival. It was the only major film director the motel, but what a hits have film on the palm door account in nineteen Fifty-nine beating both fronts while four hundred blows and Alan Rennie's, Hiroshima more, and it when the best foreign language also the following year, David this is one of those films that seems to be everyone's pie to wash west is this one that should go to the top of that list. Yeah. I mean, I've definitely had it in my to watch list for long long longtime. Maybe the idea of like, oh, it's it's Greek tragedy. You know, you feel like, oh, it's condemning is work. Call me fun. And then one of those like horrible moments where you put the film on them within two minutes. You just like, oh one idiot on have been. Because it kind of isn't that film? Really isn't a stuffy literary epic. The maybe you thought it was saying Rio de Janeiro in Favila kind of overlooking SugarLoaf mountain, and it's a happy place. It's it's maybe you could argue it's too happy for a slum living, but the direct to Mossel come when to Brazil and was kind of enraptured by the kind of carnival scene there and decided he wanted to make a film working all of these elements together. So you do have kind of there's a lot of so documentary footage of of the carnival in the film prey much wool wool bossa Nova in the background, which is nobody thing in my book. This of rough story is kind of in the lead up to the carnival and people preparing that big song don's number that gonna perform on on the streets. And you have all fierce who's a tram driver and your day SU is the cousin of a friend. And they're. As of star-crossed when she gets onto his tram and minutes later, he's offices widdly decided to go and get married to his other goal. And and and yeah, I mean, he he's definitely play. But like, maybe one of the strangers elements of the film is how quickly he from greens get married to the point where he's basically head of heels in love with erase is like two minutes in in real time. So like, you kind of feel bad for other on on on his girlfriend. All lake into marrying her from the beginning. And I think he also briefly forgets her name. But I mean, the fact that he agreed to you kind of thing that there is some history there, and she's where you're it is this very kind of mysterious type, she's more demure than yes, she's modem. You. And his other girlfriend is like wild and crazy Danzig, and and she has to buy her own engagement ring looking stomachache engagement, I'll pay about late. So while I go and buy my back from the poll show now. Paid player. Brennan mellow literally football player right before we street casting. This is such a good energy in this phone energies around without. Without lovely body. Well, you know, it's really interesting that you like Ben should all like dancing scenes because one of the really like worked for me in the film is extended sequences of like certain ceremonies and like religious traditions. And that is just I think credit so beautiful because I think there's a way that has traditionally been done when you're like sort of gazing upon people of color that quite others them. And I think this is just like, so vivid so humid, just sort of like sits the camera there, and you're just like allowed to like watch them and almost like participate in this moment, and it's just really really beautiful filmmaking. And there is a scene which comes like when I say, maybe the cl- we'll know south the climactic scene, but it's is a scene where they're like at carnival, and they're all dancing, and they're these different things that have happened or like different strands have been set up. And so you know that it's not going to end. Well, basically in the. Hey, the camera like goes back and forth between several different characters and just like really build up that action and also suspense. I think is just like so great. I love this. I think one of the interesting things about as well as the although you have these kind of almost social realist documentary elements of like, capturing the reality of carnival in this mail stream of colors and sounds and whatnot. The film is really heavily Starlight as well. But he really interesting ways. I mean like there's almost kind of like, Derek Jomon levels. Like, for instance, I really love the way he's red lights on light black skin to almost kind of produce this glowing shadow there were often moments where like the characters will walk into a light or the walk from one white lie into a red light. And it's so peaceful corridor often that way and set up and these kind of scenes which may be happened between the big crowd scenes, just amazingly realized and. Thought-through with light this immaculate precision. And they just look beautiful too. I mean, the red light in this film is just topnotch red lights. Weights incorporates elements of the myth is really low key and interesting as well to figure who is pursuing you to see who is dressed up pets Tobin skeleton outfit because it's kind of all is death. She'll whether he's actually real figure note supernatural, also my favorite scenes, the film are all around office in his guitar playing which he kind of brags when I played the song time a day, always the sun will rise and not just takes on. This poetic errors is the film goes on. I prefer him playing guitar solo than the Boston over with that might be my my sort of musical ignorance could just sounds like the demo track on a Casio. Keyboard. View back Obama's writing illness film. Yes. Because I think this really fascinating one of his memoirs talked about this being his mother's favourite film. And he she took him to see young age, and he was bought by its and negative opinion. Since I'll read a quote, I suddenly realized that the depiction of the child like blacks now seeing on the screen. They're image of Conrad's, doc Savage's was what my mother had carried with her to Hawaii all those years before reflection of a simple fantasies that had been forbidden to a white middle-class kale from Kansas, the promise of into the life, warm sensual exotic difference. I so fascinating. This film was internationally huge house hits. You know, it's all these festivals at the Oscars the baptism Soham. But as a very exhausted sized view from French filmmaker going and progressing stories. What we think about that? Can we excuse to pots the power of the film? I think you always kind of enter into that mindset whose view is this who who's is that we seeing these stories through and it is kinda strange French director would make this. Film if I hadn't known I've maybe wouldn't have predicted it because it does set any fail. There's a kind of organic element to I think, it's it's strange. I mean like the same time. It's like, I guess the reverse argument. It's like should be resent the story being told because it is not focusing on poverty and shame and degradation. And maybe the the realities that when not seeing in the film, but yeah, I mean, I don't know. I don't have a definitive answer on that. I wonder if anyone does Kelly would you be recommending this? I would recommend it. I mean, I like this is definitely been on my to watch list for some time. And I was I was pleasantly surprised because I didn't know who directed it. And I just had a feeling that, you know, I wouldn't I wouldn't be unfortunate. I think I actually started out feeling like, oh, I'm quite uncomfortable with this because historically how black communities poor communities have been portrayed in does not always give them the humanity. Our dignity that they deserve. But. I I don't know. I also don't have a definitive answer on this. I just know that I had like it was such sort of immersive experience. I really felt like sort of swept up in it. And I don't think it is all joy, I do think so much of their happiness, and and exuberance is a way of sort of hiding from the daily realities of their lives, and I appreciate how they're framed so often like there's so like beautifully lit. I never felt like I was washing them be like sort of stifled or or or made to be exploited in any sort of way. So I recommend it. I think it's like I would say it's a joyous thm. Maybe read up on the myth of or your before you watch the spell, but it's so interesting. So maybe we don't have a definitive answer to that question. But. Very one just dimension one element of the end. Which is kind of interesting is like. Kind of jarring. This is death scene. Which is. Yeah. Tragedy. Facing you to see. But yet just saying this one place where you can find a Finnish Vance's, and that's on social media. So let's go wash this film, and you wanna solve this question for us. He can let us know at truth and movies on Twitter at truth movies ads dot come via Email or the common section. It's allies dot com slash podcast Kelly. David thank you so much for joining me. Stay next week. We'll be talking about the kid who would be king the fancy adventure by joke. Ownersh move talking about private war starring pike and fulfil club. It's going to be nineteen forty one comedy Preston services, the lady eve starring his time. Wake and Henry Fonda. Let's not think of felony Phil. Hey, come talk about it's getting a release. That's why we're talking about it until then I've been Mike alita. And as always this has been a seven digital productions. Our site is a gift won that series. I disease could compromise. But yearly exams from an eye. Doctor can detect them before it's too late. Find an eye doctor today, a think about your eyes dot com. Sponsored by the American up to metric association.

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Firestarter, The Lion King, Disneyland, A Fistful of Dollars, Borat 2 and Jurassic World

/Film Daily

31:58 min | 10 months ago

Firestarter, The Lion King, Disneyland, A Fistful of Dollars, Borat 2 and Jurassic World

"Hello everyone and welcome slash on daily for Wednesday September thirtieth. Twenty twenty. On today's episode were discussed latest film and TV news the slash. Home. Editor in chief Peter Surata joining artists such on senior writer than Pearson. What's going on and writer Chris Evangelista Hello. Well happy. Birthday Ben Thank you yeah. It was. Yeah What do anything exciting undergrowth. Birthday. Not really a this past weekend. I had my parents come over and my sister and her husband drove up from Orlando to spend some time with me. So that was nice to see them just a you know trying to keep it contained and not do anything to nuts. I opted out of watching the debates or or paying any attention at all to that last night as a way to celebrate my birthday and just being like you know what? I, don't need this today. So that's what I didn't do on my birthday and I'm very pleased with my I also did not watch the debates, but I had a running commentary on my like group chats from other people being like you know outraged that trump did not Go against white supremacy. I'm like does is surprise you? This is the reason why I didn't watch by the by the way it's like. Nothing that could be said would surprise me and nothing that could be said would change my mind in this debate right like. So what's the point of watching it and getting angry? Yeah. Hopefully everyone's come down on on the the correct choice at this point because I mean for God's sake, there is only one. Correct. Cheeses Christ. Okay. Let's dive into the news. Let's start first with a Stephen King Remake Christoph Spider. Yes. So Blunt House is making a new fire starter with. was previously adapted into a film in Nineteen eighty-four starring Drew Barrymore and we earn new the movie was works but now we know who is going to star in it at least. Play one role in it. He's he's clearly not going to be the lead character who is a little girl but Zach Ephron has joined the cast so There you have it. It's going to be very. fire-starter movie I. I've never seen fire starter the book. So, what is fire starter about fire starter is about a little girl who has a Pyro Canisius power she can start fires with her mind and the reason she has this is because her parents were. Experimented on by secret government agency called the shop and like all secret government agencies, they're evil and they want to use these powers for nefarious purposes and. Basically. This is one of the many things that stranger things borrowed. Yes. It's one of the. Many many things stranger things. Borrowed. Who Do you think will play because he not young enough to play the Child? No, he's not. I'm guessing he's playing. May, her name is Charlie. I'm guessing he's playing Charlie's father because. A lot of the book and the movie is about Charleena father on the run. On the other hand he could play one of the film's villains. There are two distinct villains in the story who work at the shop and are trying to manipulate Charlie for various reasons I kinda think it'd be more interesting if you were playing one of the villains but I'm almost positive he's going to end up playing the dad character. Like Ephron when he's playing a more complicated you know not the the the lead role kind of guy. You know because I haven't seen fire starter I is this worth remaking Yes absolutely the. One thousand nine hundred four fire starter is is not good. I would even go as far as say it is bad. So there's there's lots there's lots of room for improvement here. and. There's good enough stuff in the the source material. So that's worth. Yeah it's not my favorite Stephen King Bug but it's definitely It's got a lot of stuff at you know his fans enjoy for a certain reason and I it's pretty good there. There's there's enough in the books that could make a pretty good movie. Okay. Let's talk about a story. They hit yesterday that kind of surprise I think everybody. If, I told you that they were gonNA, make a follow up to the lion king a movie that I. Think Everybody on this podcast did not enjoy the re the recent I want to call it a live action remake, but that's not even true the. What are we even refer to that as the recent digitally. If someone's GonNa, make fall up to that movie and it would actually be a director that you cared about enough that you are interested in this movie I feel like nobody would believe that but apparently that is happening ben tells about Yeah Barry Jenkins who directed moonlight and if Beale street could talk has been tapped to direct a follow up to the twenty nineteen version of the lion king that was directed by Jon Favreau so. What the Hell I don't know I mean a very like totally out of left field choice here we had no idea that I mean you know we don't. We're not privy to a lot of the behind the scenes stuff but just from like a narrative outside looking in perspective, the seems. Like a really, really weird thing to happen because Barry Jenkins says not so far shown much interest in being in in joining. The blockbuster sphere as it were, and this movie is going to be a follow up to the twenty nineteen version which made. A billion dollars at the box office. So it's got this is definitely him stepping into the biggest project of his entire career so far? We don't really know much about the movie itself. Disney's referring to it as a follow up not a sequel and actually, very Jenkins like after the story came out tweeted that it is not a sequel does not a remake and when the original news broke about this project. It said that this version of the lion king will further explore the mythology of the characters including mosses origin story. So that leaves Prequel on the table. But yet at the the actual details, are you know sort of remain to be seen and we don't know anything about like which characters from the original movie are going to be coming back aside from Mu. Fossa. But we don't even know look how far back in vases storyline they're going to be going or anything like that. So. Yeah just We're all sort of reeling from this this news because it's so unexpected will he's just such an unexpected pick because you know his film so far what moonlight and if Beale street could talk are those to fill or does he films before that? He has some films before that I to say he directed one called medicine for melancholy, right? Yeah. But none of those films show. I think any interesting like computer generated like? Visual effects rank. In this movie, it's going to require basic way I guess performance capture technology. I'm assuming like it's going to be shot in the same way that Fabrio shot the original or not the original but the twenty Nineteen Lion King, and that didn't necessarily have performance capture. It was more like a shot in a virtual reality space. And they had the actors come in and you know act out some of the scenes on in like an empty volume and empty sound stage essentially, and they just used their the footage that captured then four basically for reference for the animators. So it wasn't necessarily you know Andy Circus and Lord of the Rings Performance Capture Level, kind of thing but it's just so strange to think about Barry Jenkins jumping into that technologically advanced style of filmmaking, which is so You know it's so different from like the classical kind of storytelling that we're used to seeing from him. Head either of you seen the wine king to Simba's pride which was like this direct to. Guessing it was vhs at the time animated film, it was a sequel. No I know our own HD is a big fan of it. She's a little bit younger than us. So maybe it's A. Younger millennial touch points but I've seen it Chris if you've seen it no, I don't think I ever watched any of those directive VHS Disney sequels I think even as a kid I was like. I don't trust. This can only one that I saw was the return of Jaffar, the Aladdin. VHS But yeah. Well, they were making a lot of money off these for a while but I think it kind of like tarnished the Disney animation brand name because they were such. You know far drop from the tree of what the theatrical releases were and I remember when John Lasseter came aboard he put a stop to that but then they had Disney tunes and then that fell and whatever you know history pizza itself over and over again. But it you know it doesn't seem like this is going to repeat. Is Not going to be inspired by Simba's pride because you know that was a sequel. So you know that was falling Simba's daughter. So if this fall is STARTS TO I can't talk I what is. What what could this be about? I? Guess this could be show like how the? The feud between him and scar like how what do you? What do you make of this like? We'll get attacks, Jerry Jenkins Robert. I was trying to think about that too from a narrative level. That's that's where my mind went like Oh the you know we start to see the fracture relationship between Mu Fossa and scar and that kind of thing, which doesn't really sound interesting to me. But Barry Jenkins also released a statement where he said having the opportunity to work with Disney on expanding this magnificent magnificent tale of friendship, love and legacy while furthering my work, chronicling the lives and souls of folk within the African. Diaspora is a dream come true. So the way that he ties. The concept of the Lion King in with. His filming legacy of of directing essentially movies about black characters. That makes it a little bit more interesting to me than because it's sort of. This potential this movie with. More meaning than just a crass Ip kind of thing you know like, yes it is going to be about Mussa's origin story but maybe that's just though the little bit of information that we're getting about it now and Berry Jenkins is actually going to be able to. Subvert expectations an insert. Under like a Trojan horse in a bunch of ideas that he is actually interested in into this big Ip thing that has built in audience. That's the only way that I can justify in my mind him taking on a project like this is if he's going to actually be able to. Insert some of his own stuff in here. I should mention that he's not writing the script for this Jeff Nathanson who wrote the twenty nineteen version is writing the script. So maybe that'll change maybe Jenkins will pass on the script or something like that but Yeah, to answer your question, I'm not sure but that seems like the only way I can justify him being like you know what? This is what I want to do with the next you know x number of years of my life. So now that he's involved are are you guys excited for this? Is. The right word for it. Are you interested intrigued I wouldn't use excited I'll probably more intrigued ones I see footage. That said I saw a lot of people on film twitter yesterday just freaking the fuck out about this and I was glowing and because I was looking at twitter basically really angry like, oh no, the Disney machine is gonNA. Swallow up Barry Jenkins. Look, Disney I I don't have. I don't have an affinity for Disney I do think you know their company and most companies are inherently evil that said. Even. If this turns out to be you know a crappy movie Barry Jenkins is GonNa get paid. He's GonNa. Get a lot of money to do this more than he's he got to make his his last two movies and I'm all for Barry Getting as much money as possible because you can then. Use that money to make. Movies more like the things he's already made, and at the same time I also feel like. There's a lot of this. knee-jerk reaction where people think they have to like stand up for. Artists like Berry is an adult like no one Disney didn't like put a gun to his head and be like you have to make the lion king to like you know I'm sure he went to meetings and all this is something he wants to do. So it's just it's very weird to me when people act this way where it's like, oh no, the Berry Jenkins working for. Disney. Like he he obviously wants to do it like it's you know he's not I I've heard nothing about him having like massive tax debt straight like that. So He has no reason to you know be forced into this so That's how I look at it like even if this movie. TURNS OUT TO BE BAD. It's something he wants to do and it's something. He's probably GonNa make a huge chunk of change for doing and I really can't see a downside to that. Yeah. I'm really curious if Disney pitched the him or if you went in to Disney news like I have an idea like I dunno I. Feel like this kind of thing doesn't happen with Disney pitching this idea him right like. I don't know maybe I'm totally naive there, but I feel like. Every time I hear about stuff like this it's usually like The studio has a huge list of fans like here is what we want to make and they bring in filmmaker they like and they say, which of these insurance you. So I'm guessing it was something like that having a of titles he was like, Oh, I can do some with this and he he went for it or completely wrong and dizzy really did show up at bury Jacobs's house with a gun. Listen. You are making this lion king movie and he was like I have I have no choice I must do this. Okay you. You were talking about the evil Disney machine in that. That's the subject for our next story Disney yesterday announced that they are laying off around twenty eight thousand cast members in the United States, and this is the the parks resorts business Ben. What do we know? Yes. So Josh, Morrow who is the Disney. Parks Chairman announced in a tweet yesterday that in light of covid impacts that that has had on the Disney businesses and and the fact that California has not. Allowed them as not lifted the restrictions that would allow Disneyland to reopen that they have to essentially fire twenty, eight, thousand domestic employees, cast members, and stuff who work in the park's experience in products department. So. They're going to be essentially like negotiating with unions to figure out exactly who is going to be affected by this because some of the it's not just you know okay. If you work in the theme parks, you're done anything there's there's different levels. Some executives are probably going to be affected by this as well But yeah, that's that's the bottom line. A lot of people were about to lose their jobs and you know we can blame that on the state of California as tomorrow seems to be doing in this. In this tweet or we could blame this on the corona virus and the lack of leadership from the top down it's a bad situation. All you know all around and certainly anytime. There are massive layoffs at any company I. You know my heart goes out to anybody who's affected by that. So I know there are probably a lot of like Disney cast members who are listening to this podcast right now I feel for for them in this in this time. Edgy no I. Go to Disneyland A lot. I'm friends with a lot of cast members and both Disneyland and Disneyworld you know one of the cast members in Disneyland has ridden for our site with my friend Nate's He's enough terrified that he's GonNa lose his job. This is. Sad. It's really sad but. It's like it's like obviously. Disney was going to have to lay some people off right like cove is going to completely cripple the parks resorts in this is also a cruise ships as well. The cruise ship business and you know I'm sure no one's going on a cruise ship for the next couple of years I. Think what did we read in a previous episode like Disney parks isn't going to recover for three years or something to Something might have even been till like twenty, twenty five or something like that. Yeah. So like you can't expect them to pay the same amount of cast members to do their job if they're gonNA be getting a lot more business like you know it is a publicly traded company. Not Defending Disney. But like you know some people were supposed to, we're going to lose their job Cova you know. It's responsible here I I. Guess The question is like is Josh. Is Is it wrong of him to blame California because? I'm of two minds here. one is California was supposed to reopen alongside Disneyworld in July and that didn't happen governor newsome decided not to. Do that I, I know a lot of people on this podcast are for that decision Disneyworld from what I can tell is doing really great job at keeping safe keeping you know the the safety protocols and the enforcement That said You know I I do understand the idea that we we wanNA crush this thing, and we don't want to have theme Parks Open. But in California, there's in called knotts Berry farm in they're having these food for an hour, the theme, parks, code, but, the the whole. Whole theme park is as a food festival and I went to this last week They have a taste following and they're doing this all of October and it's also that it's completely sold out to sold out for the entire month of October that they had to add more dates to this thing in this is like a full theme park. That's you know miles down the street from Disneyland that is like open and at the same time like the governor here in. California. won't release guidelines I don't know I'm kind of like. I want to be like this is the governor because definitely isn't it's Kovic fault. But at the same time like released guidelines and be like, you know you can have the parks open but no rides open. Really something. The fact that like he's like sitting on these guidelines and I, it's like so many people. are going to lose their job out of this. I know this includes Walt Disneyworld too. So I think like ten thousand or something like that are disneyworld world. So it's not all Disneyland it's not all because they can't reopen and don't have these guidelines but. This is a crappy situation I guess is what I'm trying to say I just hope I hope something can be done in some these people can be saved because I'm seeing on like my instagram feeds people that have worked for the company like So when I know worked for the company twenty years over twenty years lost their job yesterday. So. That's crazy Okay. Let's let's move on with talk about. A fistful of dollars they're doing TV series based on this Western crest tallest better. Yes. Fistful dollars was released night sixty four hours directed by Sergio Leoni, and it was Clint Eastwood's first real starring role, and it's also the film that really made him star. He was just struggling until he went and saw doing Spaghetti Westerns and turns them into like a you know a bankable actor and it's it's based unofficially it's an unofficial remake of a curse hours you Jimbo. And when I say unofficial I mean really unofficial they. Completely forgot to credit him and. Toho Studios took this film to court and sued and they settle out of court because it's pretty much the same exact story where it's about. A loner. Wanders into a town that's in the midst of a war and he starts playing the two feuding A. Families everywhere to call them against each other, and now that's being turned into a TV show. We don't really know a whole lot about this. We know that Brian Cognitive, man who wrote for game of thrones is is rumored to be handling. The adaptation not confirmed as just a rumor We also know it's going to be in a contemporary setting so it's not gonna be. A Western nor will be A. Story like Jimbo but that's all we know it doesn't even have network yet. So but that's in the works. Well if you're going to do a contemporary retelling of this store, then what's the point of even calling it a fistful of dollars brand recognitions, beater. That's all that matters. Now, people want that that hot branding like ratchet they had like all the kids were like man I hope someday, someone cashes in on that one flew over the CUCKOO's nest Ip and Netflix came along and they're like we got you and they released ratchet and that's where we are as a society. Then why not just basis on the occur of movie that this was you know and maybe the rights to this? That maybe. It sounds like for a season of Fargo or something doesn't actually sounds a lot like the currencies to forego, which is kind of interesting. I just don't understand why don't you make this a Western at this point I don't know there. Are there any Western TV shows on the air right now I mean obviously the I can't think of Westworld I mean kind of visiting. Council western anymore like the city maybe that show that a Taylor Sheridan does on the paramount network is it called yellowstone? Yeah. I definitely like temporary, we have several modern Western but I I would look to see like an old school classic Western on modern television that'd be awesome. It seems like it would be a good way to get away get away with all those Kovic rules that you have to have masks over, but it could be like wearing bandannas over their faces. Anyway. Okay. let's let's talk about Borat to It didn't even talk about the title of this movie on this podcast. The existence of the movie but the title came out after we talked about it on the podcast. So okay why don't you start there Ben? Okay all right. The official title is four at in of pornographic monkey to vice premier Michael Pence to make benefit recently diminished nation of Kazakhstan. US So. Quite the mouthful of title. They're very much in line with the original super long title of the two thousand, six movie. But Yeah we we've learned some new news about Borat too which is that is going to be debut in on Amazon prime video next month. So actually in late. October. In time for the twenty twenty presidential election. So as you can probably tell from the inclusion of Mike Pence's name in the title of the movie, He is going to factor into this this comedy in some way. I don't know I. Haven't heard anything specific about how exactly he's going to be. You know in what capacity he fully appears in here I don't know it's like Sasha Baron. Cohen actually got close enough to him to like literally offer him up some sort of weird monkey or if. If, he's actually going to be. You know a major character in this movie but. You can read the story at slash dot com that has like basically of rundown of everything we know about the film so far. Deadline actually calls this the first movie that was officially made during the Kobe nineteen shutdown and that Sasha Baron Cohen The star of the film actually wore a bulletproof vest on two different shooting days because the dangerous situations that he got himself in while they were shooting so. Yeah. That's they're still a little bit about this move. We don't know. We're not sure if Larry Charles who directed the original Borat is is back behind the camera here but we do know that it's going to be coming to Amazon sometime in late, October? There's some rumors that it might be octobber twenty third deadline initially reported, but they deleted that information after. So sure if that was like they spilled the beans too early or if they were just misinformed so. Maybe keep a special eye on October twenty third if you're really looking forward to Borat too. But in you know if it doesn't hit that day, it's going to be coming sometime very close to them. I've talked to some people that know something about this movie and they keep on telling me that people are going to get fired when this gets released. So that excites me the release date of this movie right before the. Election makes me wonder like, do you think like is this movie like I know Michael More often releases a movie and he gets being he's accused of being opportunistic and he's exploiting the election for money and him you know, I, you know ticket sales for his movies or do you think this is actually something that is going to be you know that Sasha Baron combing is is releasing to actually make an impact on that election. Well kind of like what we're talking about the very beginning of this episode where like. A basically, everyone has everyone has chosen their side at this point I. Don't think that anything that comes out between now and. Maybe, not anything but barring something it would have to be a hell of a lot more than somebody being embarrassed onscreen Bhai Sasha Baron Cohen to actually change the minds of anyone at this point I think people have dug in so hard and like you know whatever comes up is just either going to be fuel for their side or defensible in some way and and you know casting the other side in negative light. So I. I don't think that he's making this in order to change minds I. do think he's making it to. Sort of like, rub these people's face in. If. He can. If he can do anything to make these people look stupid and it just so happens to be right before an election where it might change a person's mind I'm guessing that's why. They fought for this to come out and also like this movie in the year twenty twenty, it was just never gonNA come out in theaters so. Because of the pandemic, there's no way that that was going to happen. The first movie made a ton of money and like theoretically in an alternate universe, this could do the same thing if it came out in theaters but I think it was sort of a a. Conflagration of a lot of different events unlike. Since theaters are essentially off the table. It's Sorta seems like well, yeah. We might as well put this out and if it's done already, which the whole thing was shot secretly an edited earlier, this year movies done than might as well. You know put it out before the the a election is over. Yeah. Okay. Our Final Story to talk about today is about the third dressing world movie, which apparently is the film. Then Colin trevorrow wanted to make from the very beginning christel sweater. Yes Colin trevorrow. Gave little. Quotes about the film and I will read it in full gear. He said quote. This is the movie I've been waiting to make from the beginning. It's the one we have spent the past two movies building to it was really part of a larger story part of that design I think people may have underestimated the size and importance of Laura, dern and Sam Neill and Jeff Goldblum characters. In this movie, it is very much an in Samba and that element and the ability to take these beloved characters from almost thirty years. Now, at understand how they interact with each other in the context of world that we've really never seen before not been able to witness until now is very exciting. I'm having the time of my life that was in that me. You're having the time of your life not just yet. Okay So I guess I'm I'm very curious about this movie and what it actually is like if the first one was like. I think you call the allowed big dumb monster movie in this piece crafts I it. The sequel was kind of like a half disaster film half like contained like horror movie in a punted house kind of thing or do you think Dominion is going to be I mean if it's you know really building off the ending of fallen kingdom, it's going to be setting his world where humans and dinosaurs are literally existing in. The same space. The desserts are just on an island somewhere and As low as I am every time someone says about a sequel, this is the film I wanted to make I dial inside because it's just them trying to link cover up for shitty stuff that happened already but I have to admit as much as I have not enjoyed the Jurassic world franchise. I am very curious to see what this is I really do like the idea that Laura dern and Samuel Jacobo back and based on everything. We've read including these quotes they have like a major role in the film it's not just going to be like fallen Kingdom Jeff Goldblum literally never leaves courtroom in and says like five lines so. That alone has interested. Yeah. I just I just wonder like is this really the movie he wanted to make from the beginning did he go into that meeting with Stephen Spielberg like pitch like the idea of the first movie becoming about dinosaurs loose on earth and then st was like no I really wanted to be at the park again. Our No. I'm curious. How much of this is you know him saying that versus you know I I guess in a way he's trying to say that like this one is going to be good. Right. Yeah. Those other two sucked this one will be good though wink, wink. That's pretty much issues what he say. I'm I'm curious. I'm very curious about this one but when does Jurassic World Dominion? At this point, we have a release date I know it's shooting during overhead. Peter. While we're looking this up, I said conflagration earlier apparently, that means a disastrous fire I misspoke convergence. Oh. I didn't know what the word men. Smarter than, me like okay. I said it and I was like wait a second I don't think. Those right. So anyway, sorry Chris Go Judge Judy Eleven's twenty, twenty, one years the current release date, but that could obviously change. I'm guessing it probably will. But okay that does it for today's slash on daily you can find more of overwork it's the. Find links to the stories we talked about on today's podcast in the show notes, you can find this podcast, I, dunes, Google, overcast spotify, all the popular podcast APPs please feel free to send your feedback questions Com insurance to US Peter as from my com and please had an overture tune spades give us a rating give us a review. Tell your friends spread the word and we'll see you on. Friday.

Disney Barry Jenkins Disney Chris Evangelista United States Stephen King Berry Jenkins Zach Ephron Twenty twenty Bhai Sasha Baron Cohen Simba Peter Surata Michael Pence Drew Barrymore California Jeff Goldblum Sasha Baron trump Orlando
EP304: Doin the Most (The Underground Railroad, Gay Samurais, George Floyd 1 Yr Later, Anna Paquin/Biphobia, Sexism in Yearbook Photos, Tessa Thompson/Taika Waititi/Rita Ora, Sandman Casting, Central Park Karen)

Minority Korner

1:21:58 hr | 2 months ago

EP304: Doin the Most (The Underground Railroad, Gay Samurais, George Floyd 1 Yr Later, Anna Paquin/Biphobia, Sexism in Yearbook Photos, Tessa Thompson/Taika Waititi/Rita Ora, Sandman Casting, Central Park Karen)

"Welcome to minority corner where we take an introspective. Look at the world doing intersectional lens. I'm james he him. I'm a queer political activists actor comedian self-proclaimed sexy blurred that say black nerd and each week. I'm joined in the corner by other fabulous minorities and some allies tackling the news pop culture politics media entertainment and history with little self care. South loves sprinkled throughout all of our own personal and collective empowerment. Well maury men has these here to save the day. Y'all whoa oh my gosh. This is getting this out to yet. But our original livestream updates with a if it's clark it's loss of the ethers y'all it's just laws. It's gone if you saw you saw if you didn't it's gone never to be seen again so we had to re record thursday night before we launched On friday or whenever this is coming to us. Maury graciously agreed to jump into the co host seat. So here we go a second attempt episode three zero four oxygen second version of opposite three or four. So i we talk about barry jenkins underground railroad series on amazon. It is must see tv and a pack wind calls out by phobia and then the main corner capping off our celebration of api heritage month. We dive deeper into casey mariah's homosexuality and feudal japan. Then it's off to a quiz corner. Ding ding ding summer. School is in session. Find out which celebs are making comebacks. Nobody is ready for what series in shows are making great strides in queer inclusivity. And and the what the fuck category what. The fuck is actually happening. This week like seriously. What the fight here as it is. Take to a episode three or four. Here we go in a sense of learn. Laugh amply your maury to the rescue. Thank you so much but at the bat signal and where he was like i got you. It came out of the cave. Yes okay. I'm getting too old for this shit so really young. But i'll do it. I just thank you so much because how the sausage is made we had We did another live episode. Wastes was like come on back to black by popular demand. And that guy. And i were doing a live show. We did it. So she caught that livestream. You caught that. Magic is gone for the. It's just gone live theater like you never to be seen again. The jokes the information All gone so. I'd audio fucked up. We couldn't use it and so you know it's the last episode is literally the loss episode. You had to be there. It's mysterious i. Just yeah this is one of the things that we love our community so much and asthma therapist was pointed out. And i don't mean this humble brag. But now i understand why. I'm so stressful. The time anything will relate to you as well. I'm a high achiever in. So i couldn't just like not let up is like my listeners. We've got to get the community content and episode. And also you know. We're talking about gays samurais later. It's the last week of api heritage month. And i just. I couldn't wanted to get this information out of here out here. So a naked couldn't be here. We got the other great bessis. Maury longtime listed are longtime fan and guest co host here to help save the day. Happy to be care very happy to be here. So i tell you i love moments that i'll be like this is like deja vu because there are some stories. We're gonna talk about that. We didn't talk about but there's some stuff that's gotta be fresh and new. So what onto your buds. I just wanna say my Something happened to me today. See this is fresh fresh for you. Listeners was not of the last word. I just taught my first microaggressions workshop out of different companies. So i just got my dream. Job may dream adult job. If i have to have a job in the corporate world. I have a job in people ops which is rebranded. Hr and diversity equity inclusion like the perfect place for your boy right like i mean this is the perfect place and so now coming out for five years during diversity equity inclusion and then got the tap tap tap on my shoulder company was like can you do a microaggressions workshop at right at our company. I've never taught a workshop on microaggressions. Before and i almost like i don't know like and that is the thing about us minorities and folks we feel like we have to be experts in something like overly we have to have written all these books before return and i was like no have the data you a mediocre white man and just be like oh my god one hundred percent and i just wanna make sure. I could do that because i've been doing this. Podcast is literally like my phd understanding. What microaggressions are being able to teach a workshop on it. So i did some research. I put a deck together and led a workshop and just got email. Because i'm always looking for feedback. You know what. How can it make a ten percent better. You know what worked. What can you know. The feedback is so great and a foul just like just like the ripple effects that we can do like. I'm doing the work at work. You know like. I am the martin luther king junior these companies being you. Stop being racist and okay. We got people over there right i. It fills me rewarding to just know that like i. Today how give people tools in the workplace empower them specifically working with their black employees for their affinity group. Empowering them and helping to deconstruct what is the micro aggression so if you all need the james's available i ever. Da person diversity equity inclusion. So i just wanted to share that you. Don't you know if you have that s mediocre white man and do what speaks to your heart. It's funny because i recently got a new therapist. And she's finally. I have someone that i like really relate to. She understands and we talked about that. Like us minorities just doing the most and being extra about like what we don't even the like. We know we know what we're doing what we're talking about. But a part of us is always like no but i have to be at the top of my field even young so that i can talk about this. When you're probably better than like seventy percent of the people out there for talking about the topic one hundred percent. I love what you said doing the most like minorities out here we do the most. It's literally the tax like i. Now understand where my therapist said. Well you know you're a high achiever just threw. It was like hold on. Go back to that. I didn't realize that for result. And i was like. Oh that checks out. That explains why. I'm so stressed all the time. Because i'm out here doing the most. Y'all hubble brag it just made me realize like oh now i'm at peace with like wow. I'm so stressed in doing feel like. I don't have time stretched so thin because i about here. Just you know you care and of course you do the most because you want whatever you need to producing to be a great thing right for like even like the sobbed casio want could out something. That's like a great even. Yeah even just like coming out. Like i wasn't just like whoops. Sorry y'all know episode this week or is the record it and no problem with that. Y'all would've been understood by. I'm a high achiever about here. Doing the most is like okay. Let's redo this episode leads. Go not the first time. I had to re record entire show so so but i do want you don flipping the script completely and why we are here. Even doing this work you know. We're year later after the murder. George floyd and billing as the anniversary. And i don't like that word for this. It just didn't that don't seem right like an anniversary. Something like like you and your husband celebrate and i've been married happy occasion like i'm sure his his friends and family would have rather had him a year later. Obviously you know. Just so absolutely. And so i found that. Let's see lawrence. Ross of the root of kim about the new like introduced a new term for us to use. And i might be saying this wrong. But i said it wrong in the live. Show him saying it. Ryan junge j. a. n. g. a. Not to be confused with binga. It's a swahili word. Which means tragedy disaster so their billing as the george floyd jong and i'm like oh that makes sense that makes yes. Yeah it's not. It's been celebrate but to to remember. Remember acknowledged right. And leave it to blackie pool to league. Turn you just find the magic to like. Okay flip the script and finally the realness in it And same with memorial day which is coming up. And i realize i. I've got a really take a moment this memorial day because in my background. If y'all can see that there's a flag or if you're watching this on the videos on the youtube so the instagram's on my great great uncle's flag who he died in world war two right so like i ve. There's you know again. But morial days thought like an anniversary a day of remembrance and taking that on the heels if you remember a year ago not only did george floyd hop him but also Central park karen came onto the scene. Literally yeah and you to know what she up to. She is doing the most in the worst way. Let me tell you okay. So amy central park. Karen cooper is suing her former employer for distributing discriminating her as a white woman who got out while yes absolutely. They are saying that her company. They're claiming that her her company that she worked at franklin templeton international investigation ahead of her firing that it wasn't comprehensive. They didn't or just judging her on her status as a white woman and they they they wrote. They said. Franklin templeton perpetuated and legitimized. The story of karen verse innocent african american to it's perceived advantage with reckless disregard for the destruction of the plaintiffs life in the process and they also wrote that the suit further attempts to the suit also further attempts to project blame onto christian cooper no relation but he was the man who is victim assaulted by her white woman this out and they characterize him as an overzealous bird watcher. Engaged in central park ongoing feud between birdwatchers in dog owners basis in shock as hit with a pie rolling my eyes this is so light and hearing up the waiter later we can really amy. Stop wasting everyone's time and resources. There could be other things. These people could be doing instead of doing this for you. Well i mean like in some ways like there's a lot breaking this down again here a year later and like she's still getting an understanding it and just she's being the victim and i think in some ways like maybe she's hasn't been able to get a job this sort of ruin her life. But that man christian. Cooper my cutie. Hey still single over here christian cooper. Because he's like a bird watching blurred. I love it And he like he could have died back. And that's why mirroring. That's what happened with. George floyd it could've gone very similarly not the thing in the issue and in some ways like i mean she. She was in some ways. I wouldn't say discriminated against. She was fired for abusing her white woman. Privilege right like she over time has been told that she can do those things right and call the police and say that she's being attack. She she was doing the most doing the calorie ward performance about how she was being attacked. And all this stuff because she was conditioned know that white woman endanger black man. She'll be able to have her way. Yo yo sure. Yeah your abuse of your white lady Privilege gotcha ask fired right. Yeah it's not because he was. It's not because of like a bird watcher versus donald owner. You know this is. This has nothing to do with fateh. L- let's we'd bird watcher In doc yeah yeah. that's not. That's not the case and and like they're trying to paint it as the media took the side of the black man. fuck off because wayne. Is that the truth ever. Where does that the truth. 'cause this whole entire thing has remnants of emmett till there's so many examples of of what happens with with with two black mint anything they look crazy out a purrs they the history of it right. Thank god it's twenty twenty one twenty twenty that like we're actually capturing these things on videos and audios apply but like if this was even the ninety. Forget it or early two thousand. We're dumb you know like he could have been gravely armed or dead and like yes. She did this to herself. And the consequences and on the heels of tallying stories and i have been blowing up your our tax chain this the underground railroad choo chew gonna switch gears here. It is a ten part. I have to wanna plug this. Ten part series on amazon in it is directed by barry jenkins and. If you don't know burying jacobson's exhausted. Beijing directed it bill streak talk and moonlight and if you have not seen moonlight. You're listening to this podcast. I need you to press pause right now and go watch moonlight and then come back. You can't listen to my door de quarter and not have wads moonlight. It just can't and if you've seen like burke route or coined by might call me. What does that like. Call me by my name or trying to get confused. Dos crazy video by you've seen that you haven't seen moonlight you gotta as questions like newly. It was the first time. I saw myself like a black gay character on the big screen. You know pursue my anti seen so you know and even if you're not black and gay you're still probably going to find some things not story to connect because there are certain things that are universal. We've been doing all our lives connecting to like you know white straight runaround fall in love jump off buildings and were able to be like. Oh yeah agree and connect to that. I guess i see myself in. Karen we've had. We've had to do the mental gymnastics for you. Simone biles style. A y'all can flip it up and now that you bring it like now that he actually put it into words and mentioned it. It's crazy that like that. People have such reaction to certain fictional characters being cast You know to like a black actor and they lose their mind over right and it's like we've been doing this. We've been doing this like what. Why can't you do this. Yeah y'all have had enough archie board. Aren't you border to solve or to looking at your stories like we're there's so many more stories explore there's there's room for for more people at the table. Tables large enough adds some. What do you add some leafs and you put the lifson and it makes it longer so that was at the table. We addssome leave so that table. There's space right so under ten part series. It's centered around and escape sleeve. I corps played by newcomer through so but douro probably butchering her name. But she's been south africa a nominal actress. She is so fucking talented. It's insane like sometimes like she doesn't even say much but her eyes out. She wears the way of this story like so so well. It's an anthology series like this is very much like our generations routes and it's it's everyone it's a must must must watch in. I will say this. there's some. There's some some fantastical realism to it. Because there's a literal underground railroad train in this series it was like an actual undergrad right. I remember i remember you sitting like i hope. People don't think part israel. And i just want to put a disclaimer. That is fantasy. Y'all this is like an allegory. Very gulliver's travels is the idea of this. It's like an allegory. And there's gotta to be somebody who's got a thing. Oh wow how did they. How do they not get caught with these underground trains. Like you know people are. We can't even get sixteen. Nineteen project taught in school. So i just wanna put the labor so in. There's like to because like every state in the first few episodes has like a different thing going on. Like i think it's when they get to north carolina eighths. They've done a rave not just with slavery with black people. So it's illegal to be black in north carolina in this in this They've they kill black people if you're black. It's dangerous to be there. There's some states where black people can be free. But they're kinda not like they have some freedom so long conversation is like what is freedom for black people in and it's it's it's not like there's also i wanna stay like there's a black there's joy in this there's love and it's so beautifully shot. Barry jenkins is so brilliant and the importance of having black directors behind the camera. Because they know how to shoot black skin and just let it all of its beautiful richness to shine through just so creative in the way that he's telling you know telling the story and also snaps so brad pitt. Because he is one of the producers on this and he used in that white privilege and he's he'd you will see a many a black produced movie or project and you'll see brad pitt. He also is one of the producers. Eight twenty four for minority as well so like he you know he's he's he's doing. The work is done newark soon. The although someone did call him out one of the customers minority one one of the awards. They're like in. He tweeted something that would have been nice to see you on sat for one of those days. So he doesn't. Yeah but you know why. I'm fine with we'll take your white man. Money and make are amazing. Projects would be nice. You know the next step show up you know anything. Don't be like okay. we should do. it is league. don't give notes anyway but the show is very fubu. Think you can't tell these stories about blackness without having black humanity at the center and that's what this series really really does really well. There are two whipping scenes. I leak but they're done. I don't wanna see the whipping scene. But brilliant with the he directs it because the focus is actually on the 'cause they make the slaves watch and the focus is on their experience watching it and how that's trauma that trauma gets passed down. And it's what they used you used to do. And i think it's important for everyone to watch this because it's it is our history and it's it's so important in for white folks also see like you know these were your ancestors participating in the varying ways that they were like some were you know slave catchers some were just complacence. I'm just hated like people. Some were in different but that indifference was not helpful to anybody. And so. I think it's important for us to go back and really hear these stories and i know some people are like another slave story. Well jenkins's behind the wheel. Because at first. I was like oh another saves do okay. But barry jenkins like there's certain directors. The i will trust the top stories and barry jenkins is definitely one to do it like only black people should be the ones directing and tying these stories right. Yeah yeah so highly. recommend any. We'll say this to the. I like this quote from barry jenkins as he was saying that you know i mean. This is america's original sent so it's nothing it's nothing for places for black folks that we might feel like shame around okay my ancestors slaves. But it's like you know. Fuck that like. They're the survivors. What they endured. What they rush. Through and barry jenkins set in this quote. I'm very proud. To be the descendant of blacksmiths and midwives and healers and herbalists. I'm berry damn proud of it. I'd rather be the descendants of those people than the descendants of kings and queens kings and queens have subjects subjects. this means subjugation. I am so damn proud of my ancestors. I don't think they're images are inherently negative. And i think that's showing the things that they transcended. There's nothing more positive than that. Yeah i mean it's powerful. It's definitely more powerful than kings and queens. I agree with one hundred percent into even in the black community. Sometimes like we empower ourselves. There's this thing we'll okay. We'll our answers the become kings and queens. Like not all of us. Let's be honest and there again. Let's go back to the subjugation and the highlight is actually the folks that survived and injured and did all this amazing soft to build community from nothing like learn the language from nothing right like and do all this other stuff. That's the real magic plus like the kings and queens little assessments. They didn't take shower. That often the shower because they had bad bones. Watch ask i dunno gross. Yeah absolutely so highly recommend and then last thing you want to take us through is in a pack. Wayne why we wait. I'll wait. i was thinking about someone else. i was thinking. I was thinking way to get emma. So i was no no hands i was thinking about. I was thinking about the the lady from star. Wars show. Gina carano fi-. It's only because at the show notes earlier old from earlier. Yeah geeta we'll say it's really annoying because the did like the importer on like all the consideration posters because like award season already gearing up for it and so they're advertising like for your consideration because they want everyone to nominate him and for the mandalorian they have gina. Carano is like face on it. And it's like wait. We don't she's done an fact like but then they also canceled her show. She's gonna have like a spin off. Show the rangers of the new republic. And so it's just really. It's a weird message to send just taker face off. She was in like three episodes. It's fine. I think i think the marketing team some interred wrong wrong. File like oops supposed to put in like did they put ming ma make it onto the hope so she better anyways. Venus the baby yoda even. He's on the poster. I mean like Nobody nfl queen. She called bi phobia. She posted on international day against homophobia transphobia and bi phobia. She said oh no. She didn't see this. Somebody pretty much went on this tirade. About how like. I'm getting tired of by celebrities. Advocating for only to end up conveniently married to men with multiple children living out the so-called white picket fence lie. They said for once it would be nice to see. Generally by celebrity ended up with a female. But i'm yet to see it so far and unfortunately that does little for the cause and makes it look like a publicity stunt more than anything. And then she replied anna. Anna paquin was like yes. The you work queer enough. Be us so you know. Where do you stand here. I think let people be people lake i like. I don't like a by tasks like it's none of my business. What you need to see what she's doing in her bedroom. That's like none of your fucking business and comments and by phobia exists on all spectrums of the sexuality scale. We see it in the queer community. We see it in the straight community. An audience size has pushed by folks further into the closet. Because like i mean if you're only gonna have one partner well one's gotta miss out and so if if she advanta pack was with a woman they'd say oh she's not really by she's just a lesbian right or right. There's just no winning right and and so it's just like it's not a it's none of your business like calm down in was there's just inherent erasure either way So it's none of anyone's business. Yeah let people just be. You know is really frustrating. You know who you know who doesn't have issues with this generation z. Like take notes. Because they don't have any labels like everyone's kind of just everything and they just don't have these issues so like it says you know and the other thing it's like it's pretty much assumed unless someone comes out and has a parade that their default is like sis hetero and less their actively performing that identity and that's very problematic so like be taken off from gen z. And you know other gen z. Like leave millennials alone. They come after us. And i'm like wait. We weren't going after generation x although they weren't really doing very different that was their thing we are right don't really new generation x. Oh cool drinking pepsi on mtv. You weren't like you know with their team jacket and looking up to y'all do an nine lot of anything it's just hanging out. I am not gonna get rid of my sight part at just to my hair how it is for an. Did you see so tessa thompson. This is a great. Psa to get vaccinated doesn't thomson is walking. Psa of why to get vaccinated because she is having hot girl sexy summer. 'cause you see. She was caught so she's done australia shooting thor love and thunder and she was in a three way. Kissy kiss who shares heiko watts and then rita ora. Which like reno. Or i'm so confused. What is her career league. No she's she's dating. Td why t so. They're dating and she's apparently like i know. I've seen her name in like songs. I don't i can't tell you what song was hers. Like whoever her publicity team is need to get it together. Because like i don't know what you re or accept making people. Oh here's the here's the interesting thing about this is plus thompson later was seen making out with somebody else. A completely different dude and it was the same day because she was wearing the same clothes. So vaccinate sees. She's having the time of the day but also again right. It's none of your business whether she's who kissing you know what her orientation is and Yeah i she's she's been. Yeah we just. We love her like her be whoever she needs to be in. It's none of our. It's it's none of your business. I was like a solemn peppers long like wanted to a guy and his thought. It's none of your business unless like it's that guy. Those are the right words by. It's definitely his business. T touch consistent. We we like to. We like to gossip about it but in a fun way not like you know trying to figure out what she's up to one hundred percent i just like i'm like get it like yes to get your three way kisses on and then go kiss somebody else. So get your vaccination so she go take a quick break and then we're going to dive in continuing our celebration of a history e. We're talking about diving you story. Blacks is dedicated to being the world's best royalty free stock media subscription service with an advert growing library of stock assets including music. Images sound effects. Buoying and more. It's just me doing. It's actually just a lot of images of me and sound effects of me. No no no but maybe there will be you see story lacks is dedicated to being the world. Bass royalty free stock media subscription service with an ever-growing library that has over one million high-quality stock assets including four k. hd footage. Ooh that's fans after facts and premiere pro templates. Okay they do an up. They got music. Images sound effects. Buoying remember those and more with so blacks affordable suspicion plans for everybody so whatever. You're into different media stuff that you're needing they got you straight blocks unlimited all access plan. You can get unlimited downloads. Everything in their library. And this is what i really do love about them. Is that if your subscription ends everything you downloaded you get to keep which is really nice. So you're really just saving some money having a subscription painful which need then when you're all done it's also yours and as part of the ongoing restock initiative story blocks has released a new round of collections queer spaces and faces. Ooh created by some really incredible. Lgbtq i plus creators that will feature the layered experiences of the lgbtq. I plus community. I mean this is just perfect jackson. Time for pride. Yes yes yes. Oh and you can explore their library subscribed today at story blocks dot com slash minority. Wins again that story black dot com slash minority somewhere between science and superstition. Thou is a podcast. Your doesn't say she's a demon. She says she's the devil himself. That thing is not my daughter. And i want you to tell me. There's a show where the hosts on just report on fringe science at spirituality but take part themselves will there is and it's ono ross and carry on maximum fun this year. We actually became certified exorcists. So yes karen i can help your daughter or we can just talk about it on the show. Oh no rawson carry on maximum fun sabah arrive. We are okay. Sem of ryan gave said barack we are gay sabah. That was a was a really sucked up version of the we are we are v are we are be are troopers did you not get. Vr troopers okay. You probably got the original version of vr troopers. It was really like him. You down like off of power rangers trying to like cats lately. They do a lot where they'll take like. The actual japanese footage and then bastardized american actors doing the non costume stop and just making up their own bizarre storyline so anyways you were probably over in either like japan at the time and got. Yeah the power rangers say warrant so here. I realize all of them across to. Yeah but over there. it's different. They have different names for each of yes each one. This finally started doing that here because it's still going on. They finally started being like power rangers. Space or powering. The circus barriers like space about two or power interest. Dinosaurs and so. They finally started doing that because they were like. Oh okay we'll just but yeah it's really a passing was watching this anyways. There's a video will put an show notes but the history of like the power rangers and it's very fascinating about anyways which also brings a su- it is. Api heritage month. Were closing it out. And the original supercenter warriors are part of that. This is all your month a heritage month. Right ja you. you're a yes south asian. Do we do we. You're you're this month. I hope you had a good wine. I had a. I had a good one. Yeah because i just said a video. What am i my colleagues he a southeast asia and so that counts so yes is your also your month. Cool well this. Also great because you spend a lot of time in japan and so this is also conducting to i would say your you know part of your connection and your your culture and heritage so may so we never explained why a month is in may and it started back in the seventies around nine seventy was like the bison tiny all everyone was like it was a bf fd. I have no intention of being here for the tricentennial. Or whatever else to be like. I will not be here. They'll try to send me to the moon or something. I won't be here but they are trying to get it passed and eventually like by nineteen ninety-two is officially doesn't needed start. Off as a week and then it became a month but it started off in may because pays for two reasons as very important to the community on may seven eighteen forty three. The first japanese immigrants arrived in the united states and then twenty years later on may ten eighteen sixty nine. The first a transit intercontinental railroad was completed with more than twenty thousand. Chinese workers participated. But kind of. I mean we know that means the labor. It was hard grueling sweatshop. Dm near slavery labor else. Point where it's like you know. I'd love to see a movie about you. Know the like like like chinese folks building. What are those stories. Seen any of those building building the country. Guess i would love to see movies and series about that. I mean i don't need to see another story about some poor white person in the eighteen hundred struggling. I don't even see i've seen it. It's fine world war. I don't need any more movies about it. Like there's so many more other stories about american heritage and the experience that we should see so last week. How did we get to gaze as well. We talked about yasu k. Last week from netflix and as a refresher one of the oda naga who was literal gaylord. he is featured in the series. And he's the one that likes saw suitca and he was like okay. You dope like two samurai you ride with me and other new bongo was that they give replacing me. I'm going to blame it on my african heritage. Because i'm looking at these letters and that's be years being new bomb. Go get your cats would be for half a glass week saying the wrong thing so odin album. Naga cow that sounds. We'll use this historic lord's last gaylord in. He had nearly succeeded in uniting japan underneath one and he notoriously scoffed at traditions. And you know traditional things of japan's like i'm not about that and that's why it was even right. Well he was like okay. This black guy is going to be a samurai like he was like you know. Pack all this stuff. I'm going to do my best live. I'm not naga and also had unabashed. He was unabashed lover. Maury romero who was not in that series which. I'm i item about more. I rob meru was also the attendant. Hugh his was also a lover who helped him before. Su- coup which is when like you're not gonna let your enemy gets you. You're gonna cut out my stomach and then you like lover chop by head off. So my doesn't yeah had know he can die with pride and honour. Yes actually i. Also i mean love. That's how your your lovers had off. I don't know mori. Don't let my enemies get me. Why do you have an y'all live in a crazy life over their new like it's changed endemic. You never know you never know what the future holds twenty twenty. you know. That's the kind of world everything orders. Newark oh my boy. Don't be so mad but this'll be such a beautiful mountain movie like move over like that would be just crying just seeing them. Happy trump lovers last week gone to that nugget. I was like hold up what that sounds like some gay theorize. What's going on. And so then i was like let me put a pin in that and come back next week so here we are so less sock homosexuality in feudal japan so addo period also called the tokugawa era Yeah all right. So that spans six three two eight hundred sixty eight in saw the emergence of this when we get a lot of our the popular things from japanese culture that many of us westerners no samurais the geisha kabuki actors. All come from this period so a lot of arts and samurai which doesn't art to that you know that's the pooku there's an art like chopping off heads things like that so during the feudal era homosexuality wasn't necessarily an identity as it is today so you see a lot of different cultures globally who had a historic forms of clearness. We when they didn't have the name for it as as we have it. Just you know was abbott and it was a very encouraging of male homosexuality and bisexuality the way that we perceive it today and you also had in this period protections single mothers all so women also enjoyed a lot of protections and things like that but home declined as japan pushed to break out of the took ago isolation isolation and westernization would come along to destroy that. So that's ever going always walls so the samra during the tokugawa era which i it was part of in some ways almost homosexuality part of being a samurai buddhist monasteries embrace stay there was also you know male brothels that also associated with kabuki theaters and melanoma. Six rowdy was thought to useful for teaching young men virtue and honesty. We should for beauty an ozzy young gay man. I can attest like you can do suv. By virtue and honesty. I mean rookie. Kabuki theatre Traditionally female characters all played by male actors right. Yeah yeah even have so. They're just as playing gender and sexuality and they would march in folks. Who are you know what we would call trance. They would find a safe haven in the kabuki theater in that. They're so you've got. This is like a gale time. Sign me up so again. This is a normal characteristic. There is a question that some us and some of the men even hide wives and families. They were expected to but they also had you know just there other life and they would lead. So does this also mean that. This was a welcoming time for lesbians as well. Oh we have to remember. This is still patriarchy right. So women's freedom is somewhat limited right so their freedom to just go be theirselves like was not there as much to be able to just like their job was to take care of the children and do a lot of those things so this was not a perfect society in any way. Right about the yes. That's not there so it's only about the male partners so you know there's no there's shrines and statues the penises but not going to be like you know the vagina. Not as much as i know right okay so not so much. I did read somewhere that there were some like you know the story iron is actually mo- many stories like that where women would become samurais odd incident even dresses men and try to get those mail privileges. There was sometimes tease. So there were some. You know which makes sense like if you know. I'm sure there are women who are going to be like. Oh i'm going to press press. The boundaries of this problem is who writes history so there's a lot of those stories record kurds so we just lost Yeah similar to the live episode of minority corner but off man but mystery but actually this is really good because you're able to really excellent work out so well because you know since up about japanese history all worked out so from classes more than i would say the average listener awed here probably knows about you know. I'm sure some japanese listeners somewhere. It's like the average right the average so again you have the of meteo her white man. Okay you again. We're expert okay. So the roots of like well. How is this cultured so freeing accepting well. There's a few things. We look at their religions in in japan. So since shintoism which ways pants. I mean religion in back as far as a one thousand bc and it was quite sex positive in general because their their creation story sex precedes the birth of a nation and her people whereas in christianity about it. It was banishment and punishment. Like oh you realize her naked. Get outta here. There's a virgin birth lake. It is not very prudish. Sexist bad dow. Yeah so gent shintoism. From what i understand is very close to make sure and yep it is. It's a it's a little more definitely not rigid. Like guess right. You know the religion that we like our immune stu yeah right. So that's that also gotta lay this really great foundation for you know male male sexuality because there's no condemnation of this you know it's actually really silent on the topic altogether and so there's a difference. In perception of male male sexuality verse male female sexuality in general. You know in shintoism. All sexual love is unconditional. Good it's you know. There's not a negatively behind and then me look at buddhism which was introduced in japan in the seventh century about one thousand years. after shintoism. You know is buddhist monks and priests. they're supposed to take vows of celibacy right. You messed up. And you're surrounded by all these men and you're just like okay. I can't look at him. Bending over in that regard. And i gotta go get me some a dad and then oopsy. It's just like a lot and self control and a lot of with buddhist practices. You don't it's all about being present so if i'm being upset in feeling shame about myself about something well i'm not being present trying to you. Let that go and things man. You're human and you just doing the best you can in this life so and mean there's also there's also like the non-physical love for one another too young so you know that can exist without who the yeah without like missing for having left untouched matter. Whatever yeah listen you just got to be run. All the men's like this is bound to happen and there's not like a wrong or right there so so you have that and then if you move into tatra and i mean tnt which is like you know the idea of south in the sex act which could lead to the awakening spirit so you have all of this foundation because religion does really impact the way cultures move and think about things. So you have this. You know the table is set for like go for it. You know homos like do iota hang you do. It's an it's natural. it's nothing to feel shame about. Its natural one hundred percent and so you would even find it that it was happening amongst the monks there and you know what had happened is that there is this portuguese traveller which i think is very interesting because as portuguese traveler jasper villa or gaspar villian. A he in fifteen seventy one. He wrote these complaints. You know he was like oh. I went to go see. The buddhist monks went gone to china and he was like. Oh the same. Happening there And then he was like you know. The kabuki was going on and that was you know he was so a gas at what was happening and like just just like a gas about all. This is so interesting because nothing. The thing that happened in africa we had done years ago. Talked about homosexuality in africa and who went down there was like oh you. I'll stop all this stuff. The portuguese wind down there. And we're all a gas but also something that's like you know that's like you eating cookies and being like oh there you know all these cookies over here like how does he. How is gaspar knowing about all this unless maybe gaspar is getting involved and because of his religion feeling some shame and guilt about what he's doing right. Yeah and he couldn't keep his outstart. He couldn't keep his mouth shut. He couldn't he couldn't just enjoy. Enjoy the ride away or the live. Ride yours insane. He was like oh look what they're doing. And then father francis covera- kabarole in fifteen ninety six as while he was like they're so public about this and they're neither horrified or depressed by it because it's nothing to be horrified by because he's speaking his own truth because he knows what he was sucking that do he was feeling depress in. So whoever smokes delta bother frances. We smell you so the theories. It was coming you know. A bulk of it was coming from these monasteries. There upward of ninety thousand buddhist establishments during the medieval period from eleven eighty. Five to fifteen seventy two. And so there's a lot a lot of also men isolated around men and these these practices that are there and it's thought that so we're going to go on a ride so all that sounds really great. We're gonna go to a place. Where the side i ready and i just want to practice this of. I am just tally history. Yeah it's not your opinion. It's just i'm not condoning any of this. This is just where started. So we're gonna go to would not great place what we'll get to a good place. Okay all right. So you have these buddhist monasteries and in china with the buddhist monasteries around like there. Was this practice. Called non non shoku japanese translation of and so essentially you have a buddhist monk called the ninja any and jay and they would take on a younger boy called the taisho and they'd be like their acolyte and they would you know train them develop a relationship. There'd be deep thousand commit maine's And then once they reach adulthood they would send them out on train them in their ways but also with them. So it's not it's kind of like grace right. Highly the greeks and there were even some you know in some tribes in africa. They would pay for like a warrior would pay for us even have a dowry to buy like the young younger sign in groom them. So it's a bit of a grooming process. It's not great. It's not it's not great you know. But there's there's this practice is happening to leave children alone horse. Yeah you know. So then shoot. And this practice was also starting to get adopted into the samurais because of the as buddhist education inside for the samurais. They're practicing buddhism so now this practice is now coming along and by the twelfth century. The samurai had become the ruling class in japan. Their numbers were initially six thousand. A huge huge hundreds of thousands of them centuries later so a the same rights were everywhere. And you'd have this now this relationship between man and boy it was just it was normal. There also was not a lot of ladies around off ladies. They were not at the castles or the or the bigger cities. Were you know the the garden need to be happening. So you have a lot of dudes hanging out and they have this this practice that continues to go on and so in this eight. There's wars happening for a long period of time and they're just surrounded mostly by men and then eventually piece key. He came about and the semi required to leave their home in their villages to go to the castle's To help prevent a rebellion. Because like great car this land. We gotta make sure. These people don't rebel so a fellow we gotta get enga- mation and they would come on out and so it was row re written that you know Ito though it's a yeah Okay so ed o. It was noted. That atta was a city of bachelor's aso. Enter is is the old tokyo right. Yeah i know so. I watch anime. So yes you gotta learn. I learned and so all that. Say city of bachelor's aka gay right like it just so you had this practice that eventually adopted into another term. Walk shoot them and so a lot of influence right. There was this big into their practices. Were also used and so they. You know they were train. The younger guys right. Yeah yeah yeah it's just it's okay just counting history a lot. I know you're you're saying the fact like we said already we are not condoning any how we're going to the not great place to get to the okay that's better. They would learn arts life skills and then if the boy agreed they'd be the man's lover until they became an adult. I hate that part. I can just keep but we'll see something we'll we'll change. There was a lot of writing about samurais who loved each other. There's just a lot of writing of this time of like poetry erotic tales like this between meal lovers which i think is so wild and then by the seventeen hundred a the population was over a million and it was like one of the largest cities in the entire world so you have this influx of people and they needed infrastructure and so then you know the peasants would come and they're like okay. I need work. I'm coming over here. There's a lot of demand for everybody. He's coming to give them work. Would you all okay. You d okay. I too and they marvel that these gateways they're like whoa and so the walk walk shudo was seen as a high class thing to do. It was like okay. Mansi you gay. That's fancy okay. Let me see because you had to leak. It was a high class because you literally were like pay. You want to say it was like having a child because he was another mouth to feed you produce. It was in so it was very high class and so then it just started growing even bigger and then you had male. Prostitutes were in great demand. This is great. We're talking about adults great. So you got male. Prostitutes are flourishing. Their numbers grow in. Because everybody wanted that do. It was in high demand. They were just like okay. Where can we get it. We need more you get out in the streets. It just was prostitutes everywhere and everyone. Just you know second. Get nick right. they just around. The corner hires all and so then japan and entered in this period of peace. They didn't really need the samurai so much. They didn't really need the apprentice ships. Few okay so that started to start a base out and because samurais actually started the middle class started. Growing actress tried to becoming poor and having the tiger just became onto mouth to feed so like oh okay and it was cheaper for them just to get their stepan and go right down to the red light district and just pay for what they wanted and then you know go on about their lives and have to do training any of that stuff. So prostitution was booming and this was just like business was made it was just everywhere it was in the theaters. Many amateur kabuki actors just male prostitutes in disguise sometimes surprise. You can pay. You can pay this late after the show again and And so then. This is like the golden age of homosexuality and japan which lasted from sixteen fifty to seventeen fifty few so this is more so adults things ready to go to the right not lays airplanes right. This is great so yeah oh do you wonder what the number one cause for. Revenge killings during this period of was cal. Discord between isn't that why. Oh why lay makes sense. I don't fuck with the samurai like if you're dating. The samurai samurai cheat on them with a prostitute or another samarai. You were you're asking for it asking for a and the another great example of this would be a much better series to do than just like do we need. Another game of thrones spin off. This seems way more interesting to do. Give us this story. This sounds incredibly. I would love to watch something like another story. A different story from a different part of the world absolutely lot of lovers who were dying by seppuku. Bright they're like all right. There's just a lot of stuff going on and so eventually you know it was. It was mainstream and there was a sharp rise in prostitution houses in eventually to end up happening. Is the young. They started growing up and it was like well. I'm still attracted to men so they would still fall in love and they would get older so long hair. Practice of like the young male lover just was growing. It was like this is silly. This is this is dumb. Should never been doing this. And as long as you keep her youthful appearance you refine to be a prostitute up into your twenties and thirties south. There you go. that's like me. I don't want to be positive. I mean the only robert. It's still early fine job. You love right now and stop and maybe to come down into the second industry and t vote but then the government sort of cracking down on prostitution and it took a toll on it and so you know. Crackdown started happening. And also more women started coming into the city's so you know we need for male male the ladies which you know all right come on through girls come on through right but Yeah so you know guys were able okay. I can do this over here now. They have options options. Yes because it was a lot sausage sausage fest for good while in eighteen fifty nine. I japan open its ports to foreigners and that change things radically. Is it all down downhill from there from here. It is not going nowhere good after eighteen fifty nine so the mogae is it. The module restoration meiji. Oh see it's so good that you're here The meiji restoration happen in It's the it's the g. period. Right and e i j i j keynes's paying attention in our history class there and then in my fifth grade claverie awake so i became a big topic. Newspapers both in japan and bride called for the criminalization of male male relationships and the ruling elite was. Just you know they're like same sex. Love was a natural so this is huge. Turn and it was the fall the feudal orders so a lot of those traditions and that lord retainer bond like all of that was just sort of disappearing and weakening and just becoming more into the soap culture in the fringes like even the art in the literature and the culture and the poetry. Like all of that stopped. And so again you had westernization because they essentially were like okay. We need to keep up with the west so we got to cut out all this shit and you just have this like so. This happens in so many different cultures is it was both christianity and muslim. Traditions went in and made people stop living their lives that they were already living and being just fine and then made the miserable and destructive. There's so much violence and chaos in the world because people are so repressed from their gender identities their sexualities. And it's like people are living in these little straitjackets and they're not able to be their own free cells and now you're a lot of countries who now like you know. The west westernized cultures are like okay. You know you gotta be nice to queer engage people and these countries see that as call on his asian. But why would they have to realize is to uphold these queer phobic laws that is actually holding up the true colonization because you were free before. So that is our journey of gay samurais. Is you know about the gays. Samurais were you aware not fully. So thank you for educating you on well thank you for being along with the ride. 'cause you were able to be like oh it was a it was a joint journey down this history mobile because you were like laughed opd. Nope that's your driving into a tree. It's not so bongo. Quick break when we come back ding ding ding summer. School is in session because we have a quisling corner jess you are you riddled with guilt over. Your tv are pile. Shame book that you just can't seem to finish. Are you having regrets. Because grad school killed your love of reading. We're reading glasses and we're here to help. I'm alary and i'm brett lettuce. Absolve you of all your reading guilt. Second i don't like we'll help you dump. It can't figure out what to read next. We'll recommend something in your wheelhouse can't decide where to buy your books from wheel point you in the right direction. No matter what you read or how you read it. We'll help you. do it. Better glasses every thursday with corn was gonna quiz quiz quiz league with the corner. Some school. you know it's appropriate. Because i am in summer school so he literally well this little pop quiz didn't know this was coming but here we go. There are three. There are three portions of this quiz. I'm not reading nervous. That might well. It's multiple choice. Oh or multiple answers so these are the first one has a theme of comebacks. Nobody is ready for okay. There's a lot happening so number. One adam j the musical coming to broadway near you. This december could be true. Could not be through. One of these is not true. Okay michael jackson. The musical is coming to broadway near you number. Two kevin spacey is making his comeback as a sex crimes. Detective investigating a man. Wrongly suspected of pedophilia could be true. Could not be true. Kevin spacey is making his comeback as a sex crimes. Detective and a man wrongly suspect how to fill you up to be sure cannot pitcher and last one bill cosby's new comedy special shot from the prison titled there's always room for a q. u. a. l. o. u. d. e. would spouse. Quaint lewd is premiering on. Sorry true all of acting you know. Only one of them is not true. Which is why. I couldn't believe in one week in this was as lot which one is not actually true. My god i don't. I know they're confused. People who is making i feel like making. Mj broadway thing happened. I don't know if it's a good idea do it right anyway. I really it puts kevin spacey. One has to be false right because what kind of pr partisan would do that for him like nicely. Bat is the one that is all that is true. Yes do not shooting a netflix comedy. Special on there's always room for quail no at least one such so kevin spacey's week he has come back as a sex crimes. Detective investigating or man wrongly cues. That is not a comeback. Don't don't make a film could come and it will say i was really a my pros when he saw i got an email like. Buy your tickets for the michael jackson the musical coming to broadway near you. I just don't think there's been enough time and distance. And i just don't think you can do a jukebox. It's it's hard. I think it's hard for a lot of us to to come to terms with you know. Hurt people hurt people. I think you know there were things that happen. In his childhood that was watching this documentary about studio fifty four and he was there as a young kid. And i think that there are things that maybe happened and there are signs that there was abuse that happened to him in hurt. People hurt people. And so i don't know i. I watched that finding neverland documentary and this man taught me how to dance right like it was a hero. I just don't think we're it's time to go to the theater and see a musical. That will not talk about everything and just kind of spice and they think. It's better not to go with you. Because i mean you know we went to college together and stuff so you know like i i love. Mgm in a grew up. Of course we both. Did you know i just started being able to listen to the song scream. But not just because janet jackson's also on their like listen to the music just. I don't know that we're ready for us right. I think there needs to twenty years. It'll be able to have enough space to be like put it in like a museums thing like he put his career in a museum. And we look at that right like a statue all right next one so far you going to extra summer school because you are. You're not passing yet. I can't believe it what who was could idea. Why did he anyway. Okay onto some good stuff onto some good stuff. This is the good stuff. Coroner could be dhabi to sara ramirez. They them is joining the cast of sex. In the city. As a queer non binary character could be true could not be true. President biden brings the receipts calling out. Republicans are taking credit for relief plans. They voted against calling them out. Could be true choosy. Okay okay got maury maury loves it through seats. Republicans aka. Oh yeah yeah clowns. I'm like okay. Maury on the table. Mega taylor smaller. They sit outside. They get to sit outside in the rayon. Not they're not even gonna. Yeah exactly they're not gonna get a roof or a any because okay all right next one disney has its first openly gay character in kruah premiering. I believe this week could be true. Could not be true. And lastly the new sand man movie based on the graphic novel announces additional cass with preferred pronouns for its performers and its announcement could be true not true. One of these is not have these two weeks last one. I went all of them to me. Just flip the script. You're good okay. So i know sarah muris in the city yes summer trindad. I can rule out. Yes in some are kind of like. Oh i feel like this is just stunt casting and token casting. 'cause they will say they'll be playing a character named jay who will be a non binary queer stand up and podcast house. So you know. I'm interested and beforehand. I had no interest in this reboot in introduced this character. And i'm now they got me and some people were saying i in the last record of this that it felt like tokenism and stunt casting. I guess i've myself going to wait and see i. They have the right reiner's a possible. Second city has had many a reboot and they did not do well like in their sequels. Name you know had poor jay. Hud's character was token cossack. All she wanted was that fucking purse like her was like. Can i have that purse. And then she gave you up and alert. You one of the spurs sick. That's cerebral. I'd say a would post boots lakes from my hair as a same gratis purse. Or is it john travolta. They all blend together but yes. I think there's more in the have done. There was tokenism on their show with queer characters beforehand. And so we'll we'll see. I think we'll wait. And see i. m the friends reboot. It's all is look at the cast list. It's just a bunch of new white famously will come in. It's is it report or doing the reunion. Show what's happening. There's a reboot an actual. I don't know but like the we. Yeah because lady gaga is going to be in it or something. I solved the cast-list out. More people. Or something i dunno anyways. You're right. that is true. Yes yes yes why one is also true. I really want president and biden to bring out the receipt. But i don't know if he would. Actually i know what i think. My respect for him would go up if he actually does that. I'm like okay you're walking. You're talking the talk and walking the walk or whatever calories about what was the other two were disney has its first openly gay character and crew allah and then the sandman announces additional cast with preferred pronouns for its performers. Want those to be true. Some going to go with those to be true while president biden is going to surprise you because yeah absolutely did call through looking. He said some people have no shame. It's a great video clip. He was out a press conference. It is just really fabulous. He was was promoting his american jobs. Land and he brought out. He literally had a piece of paper and he's like you know my my republican friends in congress. Not a single. One of them voted for this plan. And he he's like. I'm not going to embarrass them. But i have a here i have. I have a list. About how back in their districts they're bragging about the rescue plan any brought out and how a list of their had their names just laughed about it. He's like you know they're they're going home and taking credit and bragging about it Watch the clip. Because like full uncle joe in these are the reasons why we're like okay. This is why. I work so it was a trick question. Your kerala does have a disney character. Gay doesn't here but it's on. Its first seven but disney keeps touting it as this. They're like they're like it's their first gay character will. They did that the last time when they were like in beauty and the beast. You know a guest on there like oh openly gay character star wars like they keep saying well so it's the seven but yea yea for that representation. We're here for and love. It stops in the sandman. They announced additional cast. Look at the pictures. It's amazing There's there's you know folks with the he like. I love it. It's just so great. And i'm like oh yeah we just need to adopt this leak in every announcement like your you know zoom title your email signatures like we just need to normalize that even more and made me that much more excited for the end man. Which was a graphic novel that i meant to read. I never did. But i'm excited about it. Well maybe you can start with it. Yes that is true. Yeah it's neil. Neil gaiman geiman. Gay men geiman. Neil gaiman his His comic series okay last quiz last quiz. This is titled what the fuck news so far. I'm failing okay. You're going to cynical and what the fuck news eighty female students at bardem trail high school in saint john's had their yearbook photos altered without their permission because they were deemed. Too sexy could be true could not be true. Little nas acts hadn't embarrassing wardrobe malfunction on. Snl his career is over. It's nipple gate. could be true. Could not be true the this year she doesn't twenty one eurovision winners were caught snorting cocaine on camera. During the eurovision telecast could be true could not be sure i and lastly making mccain's right attacks against the jewish community anti semitism are on the rise. Which one of these is not true. Well lil as his career is not over. I mean i he. He had a mishap. But it's not over. We're in handle the head of the. I mean we're not gonna as your society we're not gonna make the same mistake again so we're not gonna you know ruin his his absolutely right. It is performance was like i watched. Snl performance you know. You and i both barely watched. snl performances. we usually skip past. Say i watched this one and have to say i. It was so excited not seem the music video because like i don't do well with lake images of satan. I grew up in a christian family. So like i. I don't deal well with like anyone just. I couldn't watch that. Sabrina show because they're saying hail satan way too much like i just couldn't in so i don't fuck with that shit right so i'm like okay. Do your thing video doing that. But its performance was so gay. I it was. It was almost alarming for me because it felt like my worlds colliding. Like like my gay life which is usually like an a nightclub coming in to with like just you know network television. It was just a lot. It was like watching a gay. The number the i woulda choreographed just it was just. It was so much. I went to the school journey by the i was like okay or i felt scene and so exposed and it was. It was a lot. And then i'm like okay so again. Gen z. doing the most. I know totally like i. I haven't seen the video. Never got around to read because busy people have that. So you don't want to. But i do like the saw and I haven't watched. It's unlike you. I have watched this week's or less. Snl yet saw excited to watch. Yup well i want to highlight this so this is really fucked up that the school censored needy female students and they were because they had exposed shoulders and low necklines and so. Have you seen the photos. I it's it's i have. The photos are ridiculous after more. It's really bad photoshop. Where it looks like. It's just like a net and they just like the added like really terrible fabric onto it it just. It looks bad and you know. Pardon i mean. I'm not surprised are you is like leaving. The school districts have been telling women it tell telling not women but rule telling girls children that their skirts too short or they're they can't wear tank top because it's too revealing even though it's like hundred degrees outside lake like it they've been on bad bullshit for and the thing too. It's like one. Leave children alone right once again. Just let children. And you're adding ansley like. They're not sexualizing their bodies. There's wearing a cute little top right. you're we are. The ones that are saying boobs is sex rate. Those are not sexual instruments. These are just like you know. They're just they're on their body. They're just sachse. Meet little red meet sacks hanging out right we as the culture of the ones that are like as these things and what it does is it could create shame and these young women that there's something wrong with their bodies that like what you did was to as they're in this very like prime you know A period of and your your ingredients them their bodies or something wrong with that. You're doing this to men like it's like no the wrong conversations are happening. We need to teach men to like stop or bullies to stop sexual healing. Yeah i'll start with ogling at i right. It's really fucked up the the woman who did it. Who is the head of the yearbook like the adviser was a woman who made the decision to photoshop and can not consulting these girls and their family opened up the yearbook and thought like and meanwhile the those boys swim team run around a little snow in a little speed is no one's saying jack shit so it's like aids. Its australian sinoe. Let's police women's body or girl's body because that's been a thing hundred. Hope that changes. Yes i really hope. And it's slowly. Jesse is is doing their thing more. We did a The you came in you save the day there is now cave right through. Four is one for the books. Thank you so much and thanksgiving plus because he showed up. You're getting a plus zero. Thank you and that's the shows you'll ever able to get this content out to you and tell these stories you know the show must go on and there's a will. There's a way in for you. All greenery corner kids do anything so hope you enjoyed this episode. Gotta get outta here. We gotta get this episode into your ear holes so big. Thank you to maury obviously and thank you for that episode that you know it was. It was fun. We had a great time. Ed to sarah brown editor in our production coordinator louis fowler and thank you. All maximum fund members and our listeners. Or corner kids. Thank you thank you thank you. Thank you all for listening to minority corner because together with missouri. Maximum fund dot org comedy in culture are stoned audience supported.

barry jenkins george floyd christian cooper japan maury Maury casey mariah samurais Ryan junge binga george floyd jong amy central park Karen cooper franklin templeton internation Franklin templeton karen phobia Simone biles
In the golden age of streaming, does film history have a place?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:40 min | 2 years ago

In the golden age of streaming, does film history have a place?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And Bryce Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, Sunpro online software makes it easy to save time and money print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p dot com slash tech. That's PB dot com slash tech. With all these streaming services films knobs have to be in seventh heaven, right right from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. It's Oscar season a time when we celebrate the history of film, but what if you want to actually sit down and watch some classics that was the selling point of one streaming service film struck that AT and T recently shuttered fills drug showcased directors like Fellini, Kurosawa Kubrick. It was the darling of Sinophile for the two years it existed given that streaming giants like Netflix and Amazon seemed to be focused on making their own original content. Could the golden age of streaming actually mean that film history falls through the cracks and Hornets is senior film critic for the Washington Post. She has high level thoughts on the death of film strike and the future of classic film. She says film strike never released its subscriber numbers her best educated. Guess is about one hundred thousand compared to about one hundred and forty million Netflix subscribers that's tiny. But Hornets says the fan base for classic or indie films has. Value beyond sheer size. It's a highly engaged audience. It's a very loyal audience. I mean, they have value. So whether the movies themselves, quote, unquote, don't have monetary value. I would maintain that they do have value. You know, in terms of the people who watch them, and what they are willing to pay to watch them, and it's not just everyday viewers, but also filmmakers who care about access to a rich array of film history the day after films struck announced it was closing. I happen to spend time with Barry Jenkins who won the Oscar a few years ago, his movie moonlight won the Oscar for best picture. He's just out this year with an exquisite movie called spiel street could talk he is an ecstatic student of film, he's constantly reaching back into the cannon into the history of the medium to enlarge and elaborate on his own emerging vocabulary and language and so for someone like him he was Crespi. On that it was going away. Because you know, when you talk about people like Barry Jenkins or Paul Thomas Anderson or Guillaume or del Toro, all of whom came out very very vociferously to support the site a resource like film struck helps these emerging artists to find their voice. And then it's also educating all of us viewers in terms of what they're doing. I think it was sighted of Warner Brothers and their corporate overlord AT and T not to kind of see the value in that. As the new streaming giants court the best in the business to make their original content or today says showing support for the canon of great film could be a hook. I think that's what Netflix has proven this year so aggressively going after people like I'll find so Koran and spending so much on the Oscar campaign for his movie for people like Martin scores says he will these are film lovers. And I mean, I think as they're trying to impress these tours and convince them. To come with them because they love art, and they love or tourism, a show of good faith would be to express your support of this archival legacy work. I mean, I think that could really sway somebody. She says despite the demise of film strike. There are other ways to stream vintage movies art house and cult films and other non mainstream cinema. There's a subscription service fan door. Also, canopy with a K available with your public library card and the library of congress L O, C dot gov. I got admit I'm not a major film buff. So I asked Hornets for suggestions on what to watch something. That's not a superhero movie, she suggested not a film, but a TV show on stars. And I kind of freaked out. Can I tell you what I'm obsessed with it's it's it's not even the one. I'm obsessed with speaking of stars is counterpart. I'm totally caught up on her part. We did this last week. I just don't know what I'm gonna do. I'm beside myself. I it's so good. Yeah. There's out. I've pretty good taste. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, San pro online software makes it easy to save time and money, no matter what you ship or mail print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit PBA dot com slash tech. That's PBA dot com slash tech.

Hornets Oscar Pitney Bowes Bryce Sunpro Netflix jed Kim Barry Jenkins AT Washington Post Warner Brothers PBA Molly Crespi Sinophile Fellini Kurosawa Kubrick Paul Thomas Anderson Martin Amazon Guillaume
Best Director Front-Runners for 2018 Oscar Race - For Your Consideration

Collider Movie Talk

31:46 min | 3 years ago

Best Director Front-Runners for 2018 Oscar Race - For Your Consideration

"The following program is brought to you by your friends at podcast. One. Don't forget to download our new podcast. One out. Hey, everyone. Movie fans welcome to four your consideration. Collider videos award season show. For the next six months. We are going to be counting down leading up to the big day, the Oscars on February twenty four, two thousand nineteen all the movies that are up and down week to week, movies that are coming and going surprises. New additions, movies that have really staying on top. This week's category. We are going big. We are going to predict the five nominees for best director new. Here's the thing you're thinking. It's only September and we're predicting best director now. Well, this is not the first time we were going to predict best director. We'll do it again. And the category may change the five nominees may change because there are still movies we haven't seen. So today we're picking best director based on what we've seen and based on what we haven't seen. Gene because there some good movies sight unseen. You think maybe those movies really end up in best director for guardless. We are picking best director right now on for your consideration. Collider hashtag. Khader FIC. Okay. Let's start with you Perry, who is I won? I won no. The pressures. Well, this is like having the first pick in fantasy football, isn't it? Go with the obvious one. Actually, I take that back because my number one pick is screwed me over big time, but not here. I'm going with Alphonso corona for Roma. I think I'm willing to go as far to say that this one is a lock. I mean, the reason that we do predictions right now is because tiff gives you enough ammunition to make some real predictions that could hold through the season. But of course, is more movies come out even as their campaigns are continuing on in late December before the nominations happen, things can change. I don't think this name is changing in coming up with my list of predictions it's not just about is is a good movie period. I always liked to think what did that specific director bring to that movie that nobody else could of and Roma's an example of a movie that is just the brimming with passion and his style in that bring something out of that story that I don't think you would have been able to get with any other. I behind the lens. See, I agree. I mean, when it comes to l. fossil Koran and Roma I feel like this. This is a lock, not only is it a lock for nomination? I think as of now, as of slates attempt, I feel like this. He's a front runner. Now, here's the problem with it is only September and Jesse feel like he'll be able to maintain that front runner status for the next six months. I mean, that's a long time. It seems like Oscar season just gets longer and longer each year. Corona. He is the front runner and Roma is a beautiful film. I didn't have them in my one spot, to be honest. I had them in my to spot. He's a lock, no doubt like what he accomplishes with this movie is very impressive. Like it is a true achievement. Especially in terms of capturing time in place, but I imagine that he'll be jostling for position with with the other filmmakers in this category. I don't think anyone is like a runaway, like, you know, he has it in the bag so to speak. Other thing we need to mention is that this is a Netflix film to, and you know, there's that constant conversation of, yeah, Netflix is really getting into the game now more so than ever, but could the fact that its net flix release hurt his chances at all. That's that is an absolutely valid and important question. Now the stigma is still all what's Netflix and like, you know, you had a movie last mudbound you know that that still had a lot of presence during board season, but it was still seeing, oh, but here's the thing. So you know, I agree with you. Kwara bought to this movie. It's not just a black and white film, but there's no score and just like films like children, men in gravity, there are long takes uninterrupted takes, and it is an extraordinary. Unique film. It is Mexico's choice for best foreign language film and feels like a front runner in that category. So will that hurt stances, invest that are talking about this director? And that's what I think. I think that being a foreign language could actually hurt its chances more than being a Netflix film. Like I feel like the Netflix stigma is overblown because Netflix employs half the town like that's true. So I think at foreign language that they could hold that against it, but we gotta wait to see because general audiences still haven't seen Roma. Right, right. And a movie. Again, you're talking about a film date that Wayne movies, peak early. They have to not only stay on the radar, but stay at the front of the pack and two years ago at a telluride Toronto LA La Land premiered, and then this and that was like the front runner status for five months. And then there was like a backlash and then we'll be all know what happened there, but. Okay. So Roma. Alfonso Koran for best director. All right, Jeff. What's I had? My number one position. Okay. Bradley, Cooper, bright. Does number what number? I think stars born is going to be just like to steamroll awards. It is Bradley Cooper world, and we're all just living in it. Wow, you it's really, really that high above damage yoursel above fatherm Iran, we're gonna get to some of those names don't were you're going to get your your few minutes on Dame inches Elba. Yes. I think that. Bradley Cooper, if for sure. Home hitting a home run first time at bat. What do you guys think of his chances? Do you think he he makes the cut. So I have Bradley Cooper on Lila's well, not number one. Obviously not number two. I have him number three. When I look at my list, I consider my one two and three pretty much sure things at this point. And Bradley Cooper is one that I think could move up on my list depending on what happens when stars born hits theaters, which is very, very soon now because part of the reason why I think a star is born above most of the other movies that we're gonna talk about is one of those movies that could ride the wave from the early festivals to release an all the way through to the big night actually winning in kademi award is because it's a crowd pleaser, it's crowd-pleaser that earns every single a heart string tug that it does throughout the movie. And I think that's what's going to keep that momentum going for this particular movie. And I really do think that if I'm just talking about my personal opinion about the movie, Brad. Cooper has an exceptional. I still a standard by what he was able to pull off directing. Look, one of your three, three me metoo he's, he's his third on my list is what we share the same number two. The he is definitely. I think he's a lock now as much as I agree that that he's a locked for best director. I much as I feel like it is a populous film that will ride the, it's getting. It's getting great reviews. It's going to be a massive hit. It's going to sweep the Golden Globes because of the musical comedy category. The only thing against a star is born here is the fact that this is the fourth time the story has been done, and if you know anything about the other versions, I know we talked about this elsewhere on for your consideration, but I just feel like it doesn't really take any chances and it's not like it's not there no surprises here. It was what it was. What I expected as far as the story went. I mean, having said that it is absolute. Proficiently made. Probably Cooper did direct the hell out of your calling. This movie proficient it. It is perfect. What else would you call it? A much better than professional. I think it's fishing. I think it's it's, it's an exceptional film. It's a very, very well done movie. It just didn't rocked my world because it didn't. It didn't do anything that I didn't expect it to having said that again, lady Gaga and private Cooper, both. Terrific. And I think that Cooper is a lock for so we both agree on Cologne, and Cooper is LA. Okay. At one, two, one, three, it sounds like. So who will use your number two number two for me. And I think for as well is my friend Damian Chazelle for I man. I think you know if you can go from a movie like whiplash to La Land to first man and which is l. did with I man was he did something different something we have not seen in any other movie or TV show about the space race. You look it from the moon, the twelve part, each series. You look at the. Stuff you look at Apollo thirteen, even look at 'Capricorno one. This is a completely different film because of the it's so visceral and gritty, and raw and rusty and wait, chisel and scream, Josh singer did was they deconstructed the Apollo program? They deconstructed the space race by stripping, the polish and the gloss off of it and you, you realize you feel how dangerous it was like you look at the inside of the Gemini spacecraft. I mean, it looks like a Russ book. So well said, I mean, that's a good argument get because it is different and because you feel you feel it as much as you see it, I think is an extraordinary achievement. It is a giant leap for him as filmmaker no pun intended. I speak highly about this movie all day long, but I won't repeat everything I said on that last episode but also take into account the fact that you know LA La Land, best director for that one. Why we have these terms Oscar packages that when we see movies coming together a certain way with certain names attach. That's that's like step number one towards getting an Oscar nomination. And I feel like the fact that he is a history now with delivering great films Academy Award winning. I think that pretty much gives him an extra little nudge to be a lot. But I also think the quality of the movie period is a reason for him to be in the running for a nomination who knows maybe even a win. It kind of goes back to what I was just saying about Romo. You look at a movie like I man and you see his touch on it. You see his touch, it's different touch. It's insane watching space movie that I've never quite felt a lot of fantastic things about this movie in all different departments. But the thing is he's the director. He's the guy steering the ship, and he takes all of that great work and brings even more out of it. I know that when we talked us far off for your consideration, you're not. You're not drinking the first man coolly Perry, and I are, but do you agree. Exiling Susell could get an Amish in like he does does a good job with this film. I don't think it's as good a job as he did with lower land or whiplash. I had met my number six, six number six. I haven't getting snubbed this year. And I'll tell you why. And it relates to who I haven't number five obviously, and that's Adam McKay. Okay. So when I look back at the big short, Adam McKay was nominated for best director over Ridley Scott for the Martian. So I think that Adam McKay could do the same thing again that the that the directors branch could nominate him over the big space movie. And frankly, I think the Martian is just a better movie than I man. So, yeah, I have Zell on the outside. Looking in Martian is a completely different kind of movie. That's, I think, you know, the Martian is a rousing hero's journey on another planet, and it's a, it's a populous film, and and a first man feels daring and bold. And if feels like an arty film, you know, feels like a big budget, our house film, and I think that she's not writing among big budget and art house and really what better combination to get an Oscar nomination than that. Because you know, I mean, the truth of the matter is the wider release. The more people that see the more people that talk about it, the more voters that are firmly aware of it and make a point to see this stuff. And I think that's what gives I man and eggs over some of the other things that we've spoken about. I'm just not ready to say yes to Adam McKay just because we've seen even seen a trailer. The tone of that film is listen to think about the thing about vices. This again, none of us have seen. It's going to be quite some time before any of us actually do. But this is a film that I think has a better chance of getting nominated for director. I think it has a much better chance at the acting categories for Christian bale and for Amy Adams. And if you're comparing apples to apples here, the director category, Adam McKay and Zell the the acting in I man because it is it is a little on the understated side. This is eight director's movie. I band directors film that you feel this movie, and I think that is an extraordinary thing to be able to do something so visceral. But but for the sake of argument right now, we have both Chazelle and advocate on our list. Oh, you guys have McKay on your district of arguments for now get knocked off at. I'm not writing. No, but I feel like there could be a little backlash, the boy wonder. Okay, just hang on. Okay. There could be a little bit of backlash and that's the thing you want an Oscar thirty years old. The youngest to ever win that category, be someone else's turn. Maybe maybe, you know, the guards rubbing or nomination. We're just talking about r Parry what's on your list. So my number four is going to Barry Jenkins and Barry Jenkins I'm not going to go ahead and say as lock, but I think he has a very good chance one going back to what I said about Damian Chazelle his history at the Oscars. I think that plays in his favor and also because if Bill streak could talk is a pretty good movie. I did not take to it as strongly as many others did at tiff it for me. It felt like there was some sort of disconnect where I wasn't as firmly in the main character shoes as I kind of wanted to be. I think some portions of the movie were a little stronger than others. And you know, when you're looking at a movie like moonlight where everything comes together, so so beautifully. I don't think the same is true of if Beale street could talk, but I think there's enough momentum and there's enough buzz behind that movie to power at through to a nomination think you agree. Yeah. I also have Barry Jenkins at four in the same boat as Perry, where I didn't love the movie. I thought moonlight was better, but it is beautifully made. It's the same argument I would apply to Corogne and yeah, I just think that he's sort of becoming an academy darling Barry Jenkins, and this is an important film. And yeah, I think that he he does get in. I have him on my list as well. Bill streak at talk. He's on my four spots, and I feel the same way you do about Beale street. I liked the movie a lot, not as much as moon Lii and probably not as much some of the other journalists and critics at Toronto. But I'd like to very much. I feel like moonlight like it built a crescendo around motion the Bill to the end of really like left you with such an emotional feeling where where with Beale street it was a through line for the emotion, stayed the same, but just didn't Bill to a high like boom bike. It's hard to have that crescendo and movie when my hands down favorite scene in all of Beale street at talk is that family seen the beginning there is just so much explosive energy to when you go from that to everything else. It's it's hard to live with. Where you go the movie peaks early? Yeah, it does peak early, different kind of film. I mean, it's. Still up, beautiful. Lush, poetic movie, amazing performances tone. It did. I mean, it's definitely a terrific film, and I think that that the tone of the movie in the way that it is directed, what the the scenes are played out, the performances are allowed to marinate breathe. And I think that that is a testament to Baruch Jenkins as director, I think that he he makes the list here now even though we have five now who the Adam McKay for vice. Let's let's move that movie off. Let's move. We got Cooper Koronen Jenkins's are three people. We can agree on Zell leading to one over McKay for the fourth spot. Who do you have in? Who's the fifth person on your with? V for me is Spike Lee bought clansman. I feel like this is a movie that that not only is one of his very best since like jungle fever and ninety one or even do the right thing. In one eighty nine, I feel like this is a movie that place to his strains. It is a crowd pleaser. He brings so much to the table and just the guy has directed like eleven documentaries and twenty feature films. I might be off on the number on that, but this is a directors nomination that not only for the film that is for his career. This is a career nomination, and the movie is terrific. Balanced. A very interesting tone of humor, and it was also a profound and continental provocative, which is what I really liked about Spike Lee is he pushes those bright butts. But I think that this is the nomination that will not only honor the film, but honor his career as a whole Perry. I think that that's very well said, and for all those reasons, that's why he would fall somewhere between six and ten for me. Oh, there's, there's something. There's something about the reaction to the movie and I know it did. It did pretty well at the box office had a lot of positive buzz behind it. But again, we're playing that game with an August release that has the last all the way through all the festivals. And I think it fell just short of the power would have needed to push through all of the other movies. We started to talk about mere weeks later instead do you want me to say my number please? I've and I haven't seen this movie. Keep that in mind. I have Peter fairly for green room in my number five, Green Bay. Oh God. I wrote green room in my. Realization such as a different kind of movie lets you saw green room green pre book. Holy shit coddle. That's already started. So I'm confusing race than that. Of it's because of reactions like Jeff's and really, I mean, the reaction across the board at tiff and I have a habit of going to a festival and missing out on that that big audience with winner or the big winner of the festival overall and sure enough. I missed green book and I was so so sad about it. And one of the things that I did hear a lot about is he really could get nominated for best director. Just the idea of it being a crowd pleaser that everybody adored hitting all of the right emotional cords. If this one is much of a crowd pleaser as everyone says, it is, I really think this could be heavily in the conversation not just for best director, but across the board. I also had Peter fairly in my in my four spot and green book is not the kind of movie that features like flashy direction. It doesn't call attention to itself. I think it could absolutely be one of those movies that could even like win best picture but doesn't get a best director nomination. Or then you see like the argument that's like, well, what did the movie director. Itself, that thing that has been twice. Mistake, you know he, but the leap that he is taken from the gross out comedies that he's known for this is a complete one eighty for him as a filmmaker. He took the chance doing something different doing a drama and it again, it's a home run. I can't wait for you guys to see this because it really is a beautiful film, and I think he won't be able to be ignored this. The thing about thing about Peter Farrelly's this think Peter Farrelly. I mean, the guy who his brother directly dumb and dumber, and you know show how any now people might say, oh my God ball. I mean, what's he doing this? But look at at McKay Adam k mate. His name directing will Ferrell comedies like Talladega nights, anchorman. And then he does too short which gets nominate and put some like, you know, a career changer, a game changer for him. Just like green book is. A game changer for Peter Farrelly. So yeah, I mean, we have seen it, but you did and the movie win the audience award at Toronto which is like their best picture version. And you know. So the question is that number five spot. Okay. Does it on our list? Does it go to Farrelly or does it go to Spike Lee where mccay mccay. Okay. Right now, just for the sake I'll give you. None of us seeing this. I'll give you Zell in. Okay, Cooper for that Uber own Jenkins gazelle who do we, you know, it's between those guys spike McKay and fairly okay. And if we two to one thing it's Peter. Yeah. Yeah, I think I'm going to have to. I think I'm gonna have to say him because even though I haven't seen the movie, I think the buzzes so convincing on that one. Whereas I don't think it was again. I thought black klansman was great. I just didn't think the talk was powerful enough to keep go get to rebut the black, Lance Mottaki there. I love what spike brings to the table the spike 'isms that that he lends to that material, but I just thought the movie was good, but messy. See, I thought it was. Fully realized movie in a very long and it is it's it's working at least fifteen years, but I still have them at the seven slot. Okay. Okay. So so you both think that the number five slot on this list for today for the day be should be a great book with Peter Farrelly. Now I still think in obviously, democracy rules outnumbered here, so so he makes it wasn't for four the record. I do think that spike Lee's black lines from was an extraordinary film. I've really did love the movie. It was provocative, but it was also very entertaining. It was extremely relevant. Even though it took place in the seventies and. You know, I do feel like very strongly that that if the movie opened in August, yeah, it opened in August. And if it opened a little later by the had a better chance, but also the moves going to hit home entertainment. Towards the end of the year when this whole Oscar thing really kicks into high gear. And again, this movie this nomination for Spike Lee in this category would would it would be a nomination for a career extrordinary career of Boll, daring filmmaking narrative features and documentaries could say almost the same thing about Peter fairly Peter Farrelly Spike Lee make completely different movies, sure your family up to this point movies for comedies and comedy classics. When you talking about rewarding career, this is this is the Kennedy's first opportunity to reward a guy like that. I, I don't think you can compare the career award thing with with the two of these guys. The thing that crossed my mind though, especially talking about the release dates. I just wonder if it would have made a difference had they held the black clansmen to have a more prestigious tiff release. I know it played prior, but well, you're right and tiff. That's where the that is like the very definitive start time for award season talk. And I wonder if they would have released it Atip if I would have been changing my tune, that's a good point because the movie loving with Joel Edgerton version, Jeff Nichols that premiered of the canned film festival in two thousand sixteen I'm gonna came time for a word season. The move was was was very much overlooked. It peaked too early. It was a fall film. It was in a film festival in may instead of one of the premiering at Venice, telluride or Toronto. And yeah, hate to say, but timing does play factor in these nominations, which is why in most cases, picturing director, a lot of those. A lot of this have released after October, but for the argument's sake of this of this show today, again, this will change what we do best director again, and we will. We could have a whole bunch of completely different nominees here. But for the. Sake of this show. I won't to go with Peter Farrelly for for green book and say that best director in this category will be Fasel craw for Roma Damian Chazelle for floor. I man Bradley Cooper for a star is born Barry Jacobs for if Beale street could talk and Peter Farrelly four green book. Those are the names I still have are still of our personal lists, though that should be highlighted. So you wanna run through your person all room? Well, yeah, honorable mentions for me. Definitely a movie that came out in Martin still at the top of my list of one of the best moments of the year is a quiet place to, yeah, a populous film Hearthrow rower, but I feel like it's this year's get out, jock present sqi like that was a game changer in Khorasan ski is like a dark horse contender for Dr. Chris contender has is Bo Burnham for eighth grade eighth grade. You've got, you know, once in a while, you know, you see, you see indie directors really have ground groundswell of support and. I feel like Bo Burnham eighth grade such of loved film. I love to. I would love to see that happen. I think eighth grade is this year's sing street where it's just never going to happen, which is unfortunate. I, I haven't seen this movie either, but the one that I want to highlight as a little bit of a dark horse here is can you ever forgive me such great? There's no ladies on this list and there's no ladies. I think coming anywhere close right now to cracking the five contenders that we think are going to actually make it in there, but Marielle Heller if anyone has a shot. I think it is her in terms of female directors. This year. I would support that. I think it's a very, very, very good movie Melissa McCarthy and. You know, I, it just really gives a game changing performance herself. But yes, there are no women on this list. There should be. And I haven't seen. Can you ever forgive me? I do think that Merrill Hella represents the best shot at female director nomination. We still have to see Mary Queen of Scots from Josie, Rourke, and on the basis of sex from me Lido. So you know, there are other ones possibilities out there. What about like Joel Edgerton how they feel about maybe taking this race? I'll be able to tell you next week. I'm seeing later this week, the names, three other names that I had on my list where Steve McQueen for widows. Iago slant the MOS favor, right? I'm hopefully that this week too, and then Ryan Kugler for Black Panther. We can't forget about Ryan Kugler for Black Panther. I, I don't think it necessarily merits nomination, directing marvel movie with all the resources at your. You know if Black Panther gets anything other than like the below the line categories like Qassams, son in visual effects and sound editing and all that. I feel like the best shot four Black Panthers one of the populace film in best picture. But I don't see getting director. I don't see it getting best director clearly because he didn't make my top five. But but again, if I'm looking at the six through ten, I think he's still in there. I think we've had nine or ten. Yeah, I think that's something that's still being discussed and you know, with with what that movie represented, I think that's what could maybe who knows may make the difference in having sneak in there. Here's another hot topic. I've heard great things about human rhapsody. I've heard that it turns out really good, good. Bryan singer, there's no way he gets a nomination, right? Or Dexter Fletcher. I don't know what the credit situation is going to be there, but it seems like that that is off the table. Right. I don't know if that's off the table. You hearing good things about it and FOX's doing a screening of it on October sixth, and that's going to predate the world premiere in London, which I think is Tober twenty. Third, this is a movie I'm really looking forward to, and I think that Romney Malik is like a show in for best actor. Yeah, the whole brouhaha behind the scenes with the Bryant singer taking leave and not really finishing the film who knows what the credit will be, but that could change the game and really changed the face of this category. I think we could see Baheen rhapsody in the conversation not for this category though. Interesting. I tend to agree with you. All right. Well, well, that it's okay. So that's gory, right? Yeah, we should go through our personal as though. Okay. Well, what else is on your personal. You should say your top five at five. And then he should say is top five Alphonso Koran for Roma Damian Chazelle for I man Bradley Cooper for stars born Barry Jenkins for if Bill street could talk and Spike Lee for black klansman. That's my list. The only list you need right here on collider FIC. My list is l. funds o corona for Roma Damian Chazelle for I man, Bradley Cooper for a star is born. Barry Jenkins for Beale street could talk and Peter fairly, not for green room, but for green book. And I've got Bradley Cooper for a star is born l. phones Karoon for Roma Peter fairly for green book. Barry Jenkins for if Beale street could talk. And even though I haven't seen it yet, I'm gonna go with Adam McKay and vice over Dame inches Elon. I man just feeling at this point in the race for the most part. For the most part, we agree on on our lists. I. That we all have different number fives, but I'll say this about for your consideration. That's what's going to make this show so much fun is to see how these rankings are going to change over the next six months. So absolutely positively. Make sure you keep coming back to collider FIC keep coming back to for your consideration. Make sure you share our video. Make sure you share our podcast version as well and make sure you comment below whether you agree or disagree with our choices and join us next time on for your consideration. And until then f. lie sealer cavenaugh speaks. I'm Donahue with an AP news minute, George, we welcome your ready supreme court. Nominee Brett cabin is before the Senate Judiciary committee. He denies the allegations of sexual misconduct, Christine, Blasi Ford earlier accused Calvin of sexual assault. He has been waiting for this hearing my family and my name have been totally and permanently destroyed. By vicious and false additional accusation says he's done nothing wrong confirmation processes become a national disgrace. The constitution gives the Senate an important role in the confirmation process, but you have replaced advice and consent with search and destroy team Blasi foretold the judiciary committee. She thought Brad Kavanagh was going to rape her when both were teenagers, this pushed onto the bed and Brett cut on top of me to other women are accusing Cavanaugh of sexual misconduct. I'm Ed Donahue.

director Bradley Cooper Adam McKay Peter Farrelly Oscar Spike Lee Damian Chazelle Perry Barry Jenkins Zell Toronto Jeff Nichols Roma Netflix Brad Kavanagh Joel Edgerton football Alphonso corona Gene
Is This The Most Unpredictable Oscar Year Ever?

Little Gold Men

40:50 min | 2 years ago

Is This The Most Unpredictable Oscar Year Ever?

"Hello and welcome to little gold man at award season podcast from Vanity Fair soon honors present this next award nominees. And the group goes handy of food, and I can't deny the fact that you like me. On the. Mistake. Light. You guys won best picture. I am senior writer Joanna Robinson. And I'm joined on this special early Oscar podcast by Richard Lawson richer blow our chief credit, I don't want to get your title and our digital director, my Cogan, low, Mike, hey, guys. Happy nominations morning happy crazy nominations wearing this is a craziest nomination morning. I've ever been a part of how do you feel Richard d I would say craziest of all that. I finally get the jokes that the nominations presenters always make about it being early because I'm in Los Angeles. And boy it's early. I was watching that thinking doesn't everybody in LA wake up really early? I guess not not kumail. He was he had a lot of jokes about it. I'm staying with my sister. And I'm like, you know, like half a half awake. Like struggling to write us nubs and surprises post, and she's just like up like ready to go to the gym having a very normal morning. He's already been up and down Runyon canyon twice total. Yeah. Well, welcome to my early early morning podcast life, Richard on the way. Yeah. I I now feel your pain. I guess I mean, we're we're gonna talk about a whole range of things. But do we want to start? Maybe all saying our number one surprise whether good or bad, Mike. Do you have one? I think my my number one surprise is that both the elites operates yo and marina de Tavira of Roma both got acting nominations. And I did not expect that to happen. I was hoping that would happen. I was very pleasantly surprised. And so I think that's great. And my snub surprise is Bradley Cooper, not getting director. I think that that's really that's pretty wild. And and also not getting editing. So that really kinda feels like unless there's some kind of backlash to the nominations that that feels like it kinda takes a star is born more off the table than I would have antiquated at this moment for for best picture, the editing thing is interesting too. Because Romo didn't get in there either. But I think that Roma's surprise. Is acting nominations? I mean, you'll was less of a surprise. But a deter getting in there, that's a big deal. So I think that that kind of cushions the blow of not getting the editing nomination. Whereas Mike, I think you're right that stars for not getting editing or director, I think that movie beyond maybe song is done. Well, it's just tough to win without I mean editing, we think of as a precursor, but like it's really tough to win best picture without a directing nomination, unless you're gonna go for like a Ben Affleck Argo thing, you know, where you're sort of saying like what was me and everybody agrees, which I don't think is going to be available to this film in this very stacked year. Can you guys tell our listeners who may be this is our first words, he's they've been super dialed, NY editing. Feels like such a precursor for best picture will it just it bears out in terms of like past, you know, winner to nomination kind of ratios, but I think that like in a in a more broader may be cruder since people don't always necessarily know. What is so of the idea is that like well sure if I love that movie. And I think it's the best picture of the year. I guess it was also the best edited like that's kind of the conventional wisdom, obviously, there are editors in the economy who like know exactly what they're looking at. And that's why certain things get nominated and others don't. But I in the kind of like easiest sense. It's just that like those two categories more than any other especially more than director in recent years, where we've seen a lot of directors who didn't also, you know, didn't direct the best picture winner editing seems kind of yoked to a best picture win. Obviously there's been divergence from that in the past. But it does seem significant debt something like Roma doesn't get in there. The stars born doesn't end bohemian rhapsody does also if you think about it like the director. I mean, obviously, the director has final cut in in many of these cases, right? But the director goes out and manages the set and shoots the whole thing. And then really the editor kind of goes into a room and. Assembles the movie based on all that stuff. And so those are sort of the two key things to making a film. Excellent like its shot. Well, and then it's assembled while I obviously need needs a great screenplay. But we all know that that people go off of screenplays like what's the screenplay? That's written. You know, writers don't have the kind of power. They haven't TV the screenplay is like a beginning point. So the editor sort of makes the movie in many ways based on the available ingredients. And so I do think it's it is very tightly connected to the question of whether a film works and is excellent, Richard. Do you have like a particular snob or surprised that you wanna highlight? I was very surprised to see minding the gap and HALE county this morning this evening in the best documentary category. So I guess that also means is that the snub was won't you be my neighbor, Mr. Rogers documentary that may twenty two million dollars. This summer was kind of feel good hit in a very non field. Good time. I thought if that got nominated. It was for sure going to win. And so for that not to be in there and a tiny movie like in the gap, which you know, played the attribute a little bit. What was mostly just on Hulu? It's made by this young guy about himself and his friends from, you know, a small city in Illinois like that's a huge thing for that movie. So I was pleasantly surprised by that. I wasn't a huge fan of won't you won't you by neighbor. So I don't feel like burned by that. But I think that a lot of people do and. So why why why aren't you a fan? Maybe you can help me because I'm really let the deduct mentoring branches just perverse at the moment. Maybe you can talk me off this ledge, my sort of pretentious posture about about that is I think that won't you buy neighbor is an example of the subject of a documentary being great, but the filmmaking not being great. And I think that there's nothing that revolutionary about the way that movies put together, I think it kind of rambles, and it doesn't really it can touch on a couple little moments of darkness that doesn't really investigate. So I kind of wanted more from that movie. I don't I'm obviously like a child of Fred Rogers, like I love, Mr. Rogers. But and I cried watching the movie, but I think that in terms of filmmaking on a pure technical level. I don't think it was there and something like minding the gap, which is a bit more not experimental. Exactly. But it does things in a different way. I'm glad that that was recognized. And then what about three identical strangers was another big one? Do you think? The same issue. Yeah. Again, I would say for me. Anyway, that's a documentary that has a fascinating subject, and I won't spoil anything for people who haven't seen it. But. Is very straightforwardly made is not really doing anything new with the form. And you know, but you you do have a traditional documentary in the list in in in the in the shape of our BG, which the Ruth Bader Ginsburg documentary, which I feel like is now the front runner to win interesting. I'm still I'm putting my chips on minding the gap. And I don't know why. But it just feels like it's sad. Unexpected momentum. I know we like were fans of the of the film. But anyway, we'll we'll get to our like predictions at another time. I will save my own personal sort of like snub and surprise or whatever is though we knew is probably going to happen. I'm burned to see Nick Villalonga in this screenwriting category over Bo Burnham, who is just, you know, those those two justices together for my like major injustice if that makes sense and then. Pablo Pablo Laskey cow ski. Nope. A flood that. But anyway, the Cold War director in the directing category. It makes you really happy and excited that that feels like just something, you know, as as sad as I am to see Bradley Cooper snubbed there, which I am I'm excited to see Pablo in there because I think that that's an extraordinary film wild is that it's really wild house. Great film in there. I think and I think that's the kind of surprise that. I get really excited about it. Same with marinas nomination. It's sort of like, oh, these are people that like genuinely did such great work and they're in here. And I didn't see it coming so. Well, and I say it's funny for Vanity Fair nomination predictions. I put Cold War in as the ninth best picture nominee. And it didn't it didn't turn up there. But it did turn up director. So I was definitely seeing some momentum for an ended up breaking a different way. But that was that was pretty cool entry there and exciting. For film. And by the way, I don't know if you noticed that in cinematography, there are three foreign language movies of the five Cold War Roma and never look away. So it's pretty, you know, and then even the favourite has kind of foreign appeal, it's very sort of English Greek in that sensibility. So that leaves a star is born as the big sort of flag-waving Americana movie there. I don't know if that's good or bad for a star is born. Well, I think the note about both puzzle public housing getting nominated for Cold War end Caleb, helping nominee for the cinematographer. Never look away is that those movies both are directed by passed foreign language film, winners Florian von Henkel done Florian von handled on Donner's, Mark. I you know, he has a crazy name. But he he he won for the lives of others years ago, a puff puff hausky one for IGA back in twenty twelve ish. I think so like, they're they're not strangers to the Oscars. But I think. It is interesting, and maybe heartening that those movies did. Linger in the minds of academy voters in a year, where they had a lot of other, you know, more maybe more quote unquote, traditional options that they could go for for best director best cinematography. I think the Senate Matafi movie that people think was perhaps most blanked was first man a movie that did not do that. Well, this morning that people thought would at least, you know, rack up some nominations in the in the technical categories that got a couple here and there, but the cinematography one was I think a big loss for that movie. My big grudge circling. I man this morning is score like snub for score for Justin Hurwitz, his like, you know, really innovative and like attention grabbing but not distracting, I think score that really bummed me out though. I said this already on Twitter Isla, you know, I love dogs was sort of like plagued by controversy from the start. But I love the taiko drums score on dogs. It's an incredible thing to listen to. So if you wanna get like your blood pumping this morning or this afternoon, turn on the island. Dogs soundtrack I'm to go to Runyon canyon. And and listen to the sport. One thing that I was surprised by also speaking of nut will not score but song and something that are my editor in your editor joined by Hillary abuses pointed out to me is that not only did net. Flicks have a big who in terms of Roma getting as many nominations as it did. But the ballot of busters Scruggs got three nominations for costume design for best regional song and for best adapted screenplay. I don't I think a lot of people didn't realize that that was the doubted from short stories that the Coens wrote. And I think there's a Jack London story in there. But that to me indicates that I know mudbound, got cinematography nomination last year and is supporting actress nation. So there are you know, Netflix has been in the in the in the mix before a little bit. But the Roma combination of Roma and Scruggs getting in there that to me makes me feel like the the wall between those things as a road, you know, almost completely because to nominate Scruggs in a in a category so far down the line so to speak as costume design means that people are really paying. Attention to net flicks films and even ones that are not big sensations like Roma. So I think that's kind of an interesting precedent. That was that one at the Netflix strategy, which is let's offer certain award season favorites filmmakers, you know, complete creative control in an L, you know, a huge massive budget, and let them do whatever they want. And like, I it's it's just hard to ignore a Coen brothers joint. Not that. It's never happened. But it's hard to ignore Coen brothers. Right. It's hard to nor an quite own Joan joint. They're also like great niche things about the the project that they may. But it's also just like their history with economy means that you know, that's why net flicks is backing them. Right. It will end to your point about budget. Like in this case. It's what is it five or six short films that have to have their own caste thrown sets. You know, it's like this thing could not have been cheap. But people really liked it. You know, in addition to critics, I think like, you know, actual human's watched it on Netflix. And really enjoyed it. And and it's good. That's it's so funny that that song Tim Blake Nelson. Sings at the end of his little segment is is nominated, but I can get behind that. I'm for it. I would love to see him perform performance at the with the. Well, maybe that should kick off the whole thing. He'll be just Tim Blake Nelson's the Justin Timberlake of this particular. Enjoy a you were using the Alfonso Koran joint Coen brothers joint construction, which of course, was invented. By Spike Lee, who got his first director nomination today, which is like feels like a huge deal. And I think that Mike you were early on this. And I think you're right. That Koran is definitely the one to beat and he probably almost assuredly will win, but I would say of the five nominated invest director, which is Ron Spike Lee yoga's length for the favorite puzzle public housekeeper Cold War and adamant came for vice that Spike Lee would be number two. Look, this is what you're going to hear. I think because they're talking about it internally already. There has never been a black best director winner. And so I think you can certainly make the case for Afonso Koran for the just sheer achievement of Roma. And but I think you can make a case for Spike Lee for the achievement of black klansman, plus a career that has been I think. You know, a overlooked in certain ways by the academy and really as a historic award. So I don't think we've we've started even thinking about that yet. And you know, it could easily also not happen for a million reasons. But I think that spike should absolutely not be counted out. I think he has a real chance in that category. Yeah. And I think also, you know, something that people have noted with some frustration today is that the best direction categories all men, despite some, you know, very worthy female directors in Debra Granik for leave no trace or Marielle Heller for can you ever? Forgive me that giving the words like Lee Koran already house one would sort of at least maybe cushion that injustice some because it would kind of right another wrong. So I don't again, I think that we think about these things differently than, you know, your average academy member, but I could see that narrative sort of coalesce. They're gonna make a run on it. And and you know, it's interesting that Peter Farrelly did not come in director. It's interesting that Bradley Cooper did not come in and director or editing. Chris. Rosen our friend who's now the editor at TV guide, but a famed Oscar prognosticator who also sometimes has crazy ideas. But today he was saying wait a minute is black klansman actually, the the best picture front runner. I mean, it's very unclear who the best picture front runner is right now. And that's as crazy about today. Yeah. I mean, Roma in the favorite lead with ten, but Roma, you know, did not all of them kind of miss some things except for black clansmen has has all the nominations. You're supposed to have. So it's it's it's very interesting, and and sort of wonderfully open, I think today is the twenty seconds as of the twentieth just two days ago that the narrative for all the author per skaters after the producers guild awards is that green book was it. Like, this was it right start. Yes. Get used to it. And do it. Start processing we're here. We're green book it used to it. Like, settle your affairs. But then that just feels up ended by a lot of the predictability this year. Maybe what we're seeing with some of these unpredictable. You know, I was surprised to see Willem Dafoe in there. I was surprised to see marina there like Pablo like all these other things. So maybe some of these prizes could be the result of the influx of new people in the academy where we just don't know how this body votes quite yet. Yeah. I think so we're we're still operating with some of the old rule books, and we're not always fully able to see what this new blood and economy, we'll do and I don't know that that the other. I don't know for sure, but my sense is that the kind of guilds have not necessarily updated their memberships as aggressively as the academy has which which does open up some space there. So it's interesting and also I enjoy I really do enjoy a nominations morning like this one where a bunch of stuff that we didn't anticipate happens. And you can almost feel the academy members insisting that, you know, certain they're not going to be pushing a certain direction they're gonna they really want people to watch some smaller movies that maybe they haven't seen. They really like performance by Willem Dafoe that nobody's talking about. And they're going to use the power that they have to kinda like get, you know, get more attention for it. And I think that's fun. That's why they actually you know, it's like the used to joke about my dad used to joke about watching World Series games. Like, that's why they play the games you real-. You never know what's going to happen until it actually happens. Yeah. And I'll be curious to see in terms of like Roma's potential for you know, best picture. It also has the nomination in foreign language. So I'm curious. Maybe voters will think oh, we'll give it to it there. We'll give it some other technical things. And then best-picture might be sort of different animal. Mike you right? It is it and you said to but like it is fun that it's kind of wide open. And while there are certain movies of ice and other things that I'm like a little bit annoyed to see in. Oh, so represented. I think for the most part there's a lot of exciting stuff that like is worth kind of celebrating. Even if some cherished favorites are not in there like, you know, burning for some people or can you ever forgive me for best picture or something like that? I've assumed all along that the non-roma contenders. We're gonna be arguing strenuously that you can just give it foreign language, and maybe give it director. If you if you feel that strongly about it. But there's no need for it to win all three and that they need to start, you know, consider the other the other movies. So it'll be interesting. I mean, it's just such a strong show. It's a stronger showing than we expected. I think I did not expect ten nominations. That's really that's like quite substantial and a favourite how about the favorite being in there with ten nominations. I did not expect it to be it feels when we did the domination predictions. I did not have the favourite as one of the movies that could actually win best picture. But now it feels like it absolutely could win best picture just as well. It could be one of those ones that gets a ton of nominations and wins nothing. You know, it feels like on that weird faultline. Yeah. Shout out to a costume designer Mary Queen of Scots we're getting nominated for making most of our costumes out of denims, which is like the craziest costume story. I heard all year most of those period gowns in America has got some made out of Jesus. Just just amazing. If you look at it. So I'm glad something like so weird and audacious got nominated even if I it has no shot of winning. I think against I don't know like Ruth Carter for Black Panthers. Something like that. Yeah. That's fun. I mean, there are a lot of crazy things. Like, you know, we've been talking for about thirty minutes now. And not mentioned the fact that lady Gaga is now a best actress nominee at the Kerr. That's. You know, think about all the actors who'd never gotten that in in on her first shot, you know, she she gets in there. I think that you know, her purse data's the net categories weakened as along with everything else of a star is born. But, but you know, this was I think the ultimate goal in some ways for her to get nut shortlist in there. She has I think that's exciting. And I think that means we're I mean an end the song nomination, obviously, she's a two-time nominated Oscar-nominated person that guarantees the chill perform it at the show. Right. She has do now. I think so. Absolutely. I hope she and Bradley you're going to perform it. Right. I don't know. Maybe this is fruitless thing to guess right now. But like, how do you think Bradley Cooper's feeling this morning? I think he's annoyed because somebody said, you know, he was really campaigning for director not actor. So I think you know, I mean, look, I I don't know how annoyed you can be. When you just got a bunch of Oscar nominations, including best best picture and best actor for yourself. But I think that he was gunning for that. And there was a there was a time. When a lot of us thought that he would be. You know, the likeliest winner for best director. So so it'll be interesting to see how that all plays out. It's so interesting because we've talked about how Bradley Cooper was sort of willing and unwilling to play the Oscar game, you know, in terms of the kind of interviews that he was giving and it does seem. Yeah. That maybe he was leading heavier on his directing possibilities than his acting possibilities. But and I was I was team was t- Brad. So I'm sad to not see him in that direction category. And I don't you know, he doesn't really seem like a shot in the acting category. So if star is born gets all the soup LA walks away with exactly the word, I expected it would what I announced lady Gaga casting v-f dot com years ago, which is like best song. And that's it. I mean, that's gonna be kind of an amazing roller coaster of of narrative. Brad Cooper, you know. Yes, his chances are dimmer than they were already. You know, they were already kind of like we're losing out to Christian bale, but we've got a few weeks. Now if Bradley Cooper goes to every goddamn of. Ent- and performs a song. Or like just is in characters Jackson main like in wins over like, I feel like I feel like he could do a kind of blitzkrieg in sort of scoot past Christian bale. Somehow, I don't I don't think he he's down for the count yet. But it got it's it it'll be a tough road to to haul. Certainly he would be second place after Christian bale. Right. Oh for sure. And I think I think it is overtake -able just because Christian bale, you know, has won before. And and if this ends up being like the way of celebrating Bradley's accomplishment overall in taking on this project and making it work really better than probably anybody had a right to expect that might help them. I mean, there's there's a way of looking at this. Where missing director helps him with actor would be because actor becomes the way of acknowledging the chief. It was expected that it was going to happen. But you know, it has been expected for a while. But we haven't talked yet about how I don't know crazy or whatever you wanna call it is that a marvel superhero movie is in the best picture category. Like straight up best picture block band -ther. There. It is. Which is you know, hasn't felt crazy since last February. But maybe would've felt crazy last January. You know, like that, you know, the net narrative is one thing. But the marvel narrative is another that we should talk about. And it's not just you know, this kind of Aaron best picture nomination. Because people felt like it was the movie of the year, and they had to do it. It got production as I got costume design. It God original song. Like, it's it's it's in the hunt. I mean, like, it's it's there in a big way. And I think that I don't think that I doubt that anyone marvels like well now, we're we're we're in. We've you know, we've achieved this sort of new class distinction. And we're we're we're now like best picture worthy. I think that black bent there is sort of. A thing unto itself in a lot of ways. I don't think that superhero movies are now can expect to be at the table all the time. But like, yeah, I think that we've just been saying it for so long that maybe we've forgotten a little bit. Like, actually, how significant that is, you know, for a variety of reasons, and, you know, I'm I'm I'm if you had told me a couple of years ago that I would be happy that a superhero movie was nominated for best picture. I would have I don't know slapped or something. But here I am. And I think it's a I'm happy. I think it's a good thing. Nominated because into the spider versus my like one with a bullet and animated. So like, this is an and is the front runner to beat a Pixar movie in a dizzying mission studio movie. So like, that's that's crazy cool thing that's happening as well. For these for these superheroes. Not just superheroes. Superiors of color. Like, I don't know. It's just it's an interesting is an interesting turn for all of that. Yeah. I think something I'm maybe a little bit less. Happy about though, you know, it's it's a complicated thing is. It has a sound editing nomination to sound mixing nomination a best actor nomination for best editing nomination and a best picture nomination talking about bohemian rhapsody end, you know, all of that. And it's director is mysteriously not involved in that conversation. He has not been named when Romney mouth is one awards. You know, I think that that is going to kind of in an already sort of haunted Oscar year where we're not haunted, but sort of like plagued season like that's going to be sort of narrative. I think that is gonna keep rolling along about like, the problematic aspects of that film and its director and all that stuff. So I I guess I had sort of naively hoped that we could be done with that conversation because believe me Ramsey would get mostly blanked. But here it is it, you know, in kind of a big way. So get ready to talk about that more. I guess not angry book is like just sort of like the discourse will roll on Bill. The Oscar ceremony itself. And after depending on like, you know, would you be gratified, Richard? If like, okay, these nominees came it. But interrupts he doesn't actually like walk away with anything. When it's all said, I think the thing about rhapsody, you know, with the Bryan singer aspect aside. We we've said it before on this podcast billion times it made a ton of money. Everyone loves Queen and people seemed to really love Rummy Malik. So like, I guess it's not that surprising. That movie is big of a hit as it was. The academy kind of threw their weight behind, but it does seem strange and sort of telling that, even they know enough not to sort of acknowledge its director, you know. So it's it's the kind of question that we've we've been dealing with for years now about how do you talk about or recognize a movie that is good in certain ways. But it's makers are bad or someone in it as bad in. It's a really hard line to tread. And I think that the academy is obviously still figuring it out. And clearly they thought that enough of human rhapsody was worth honoring. And so they did I don't maybe that'll change in years to come. But that's where we are at green book. I think is a little bit more impervious to the controversy of for a variety of vaguely pressing reasons matter that Peter Farrelly was not nominated in the dark category. I think that's honestly more just about a crowded your that does not to be feel like any sort of statement. Now, it's very interesting. Both of these. Movies, and I talk maybe too much on this podcast about this kind of like progressive generation gap. But I find it very interesting that both of them are extensively trying to promote progressive, you know, narratives at least right ones about like be less racist or whatever. And the other one's about here is an iconic gay, but in a complicated way hero of culture. But the way that they execute it has kind of earned or the people involved in various other factors have. So that there's a have made it so that there's a one younger generation. That's like that hates them. You know? And I think that some of that is probably not even visible to the older generation in some of it the older generation finds irritating. But I think it's divisive enough that there's not there's not enough consensus to push them in all the way through to something like best director. So. It does make me think they've got enough support from the kind of older crowd of people who are like stop complaining to get nominations. But I don't I I'm now thinking that like I I really wonder if green book could win could win best picture given that there is a crowd of people, you know, at the end of the day, we're talking about Hollywood, which is a progressive place. And there is a sector of that group as sort of as much as like film Twitter woke Twitter can feel like a completely impotent for sometimes like there's enough people where I I would be surprised if it came through in one. But who knows there's also a lot of vote splitting this year. It's really I mean, there's just a lot of damn movies. Another thing that I was sad to see blanket. Few categories is very Jenkins. If Beale street could talk we talked a little bit. I think last week about the air around the narrative, we talked a little bit last week. I think about the narrative around Damian Chazelle berry berry Jenkins having their first films after LA La Land in moonlight were so close, and then what was happening in the race this year. Mike. What do you think of how Beale street was awarded or not this morning? I think look I'm really happy to see Regina king in there. And I think it's great that it God screenplay and the score is is very very worthy. You know? I think like I expect Barry Jenkins to get nominated and for many Oscars in the years ahead and probably win. I think this movie was I enjoyed it a lot I found it moving. But it's not like moonlight was like a spectacular explosion of creativity. That that just blew your mind and Bill street is something different. You know? It's a it's a James Baldwin adaptation. That's a little that kind of makes you come to it. And so I'm not I'm not shocked at the outcome. I'm I'm just glad really that Regina king is in there and hopefully still in the kind of front runner spot there. I man is is in a way sort of more. Prizing because I think it was a bigger swing in some ways. Just like it was it set out to be an epic. But also kind of introverted clenched epic. And that's a tough thing to pull off. And you know, I don't think landed with a lot of people. But I think both those guys will will do lots of great academy recognized work in the years ahead. I'm not worried about either of them. It's interesting because I saw someone tweet about the kind of like telluride factor, and like suggesting that maybe if Beale street had been at telluride, it would have done better because it would have been a smaller and like really industry heavy audience that could have fallen in love with that movie early. Whereas maybe got a little loss Toronto. And I think that there's maybe something to that. But at the same time, you bring up I man, Mike, and that movie was telluride, and it didn't really perform that. Well this morning. So so I don't know if that actually means anything, I don't know if the Toronto thing for Beale street was a mistake or if it should have played its cards differently. But I think that it's more. You know, kind of like we said like, it's just it's not it. It doesn't have the kind of seismic quality of moonlight partly because it was less of a surprise. Because we all now know who'd Barry Jenkins is an ex, you know, have, you know, all of a sudden have kind of level of expectation for what he's able to do. But you know, I think it will win something on, you know, Oscar night, I think that Regina king will win that award. So it will be represented where a lot of films like maybe like the favourite won't be at all. So it will at least have that. I think it's good that somebody like Barry Jenkins after executing like, you know, the most spectacular triple Lindy sort of, you know, dive with moonlight can make a more straightforward film. And everyone can watch it and talk about whether or not whether or not it lands. You know, a million nominations like he made a beautiful excellent film that deserves to be watched. And like an and and it's cool that he doesn't have to not everything he does has to be some kind of like. Awards bait thing either. I don't think. Yeah. I mean, if you end up on Cam collinses top ten list, your you've done. Well. Yeah. Yeah. But it's funny about the festivals. I mean, I could actually weirdly imagined. I man doing better if it debuted at Toronto and peel street doing better if it if it debuted at tell you, right. But that is a lot of sort of I guess ex post facto second guessing, so what are you going to do? But that's what what this podcast is all about. What else would we do the whole time? Is there anything that feels like you're so confident about after the nominations this morning that there that that you would you would bet your entire life savings, however, large or small they may be on. This thing went well, I don't know about a winning. But I think that the fact that solo Star Wars story was nominated for best visual effects is the beginning of people reconsidering that unfairly maligned movie, which is totally cute and fun and people hate it at it didn't do very well. But I think that this is the beginning of the solo redemption. Ark it I'm here for over Black Panther so weird and Christopher Robin. Also that that category is also a great movie, the voice actor behind Winnie. The Pooh should have been on for NASCAR. But you know, but oh well oh well Justice for cartoon bears year. Mike, what are you going to buy your life? Richard sidesteps the the betting here. I would bet my. My life. Save is not a lot. I gotta tell you. I'm climbing down. I would bet my life savings on on shallow winning song. Yeah. Sure. I would do it for into the spider verse winning animated Joe and the other one that feels life savings where the as Roma in foreign language cow, but not a lot most of them are kind of competitive. I mean, I could see Bradley taking on Christian bale. I could see you don't think Romney is a second like, not your opinion. I mean, Oscar chances wise, you don't think Romney is the second place in that category. Am I just blind in my am? I I don't know. I I don't see it. When I look at the performance for the math of the awards not from anyway. Well, I mean, I think I've overestimated a star is born a bit from the beginning. So and a lot of us, I guess underestimated bohemian rhapsody. So maybe so looking at the at the best actor nominations, though, are any or either of you also wishing that William to fo would play, Freddie, Mercury in a movie Rummy Malik would play Vincent Van Gogh. I would I would watch this. Yeah. On the will of defeat. I. Like, he's nation. And also, even though I shouldn't have been surprised him Rockwell's nomination for vice like Macy wonder, the Emmys zoos all the time, and maybe Osu's are going to start doing this where it's like, oh they got nominated last year. So sure put them in this year. I don't know. Like, I think there's a little of that. I think was willing to throw them. He did you know he won best actor in Venice. So he's he's like had that like early feather in his cap for that performance for movie that I think they're few people have seen. I'm sure you're right Joanna. Because because let's remember what happens during Oscar season. These people go around and shake hands with and do small talk with every single academy member that they're you know, publicists can can dig up. So. Yeah. When the next year rolls around, and they're like, oh, my both of those guys are awesome. Really cool people to talk to you know, like, yeah. That there's these are human beings casting votes. I mean, I just the Sam Rockwell for you know, an impression that that is like I catching in the trailer, but amounts. To like nothing in a in the in the like sea of what is this? That is vice is just I don't know. Like, I don't know who I'm who are mad is left out of that category. But I am a little mad. That's Iraq was in that category. And I like save Rockwall. Yeah. Well, we've talked previously about liberal Doritos. And that that was I think the thing that prompted it is I feel certain that there is a fascinating something to be done with George W Bush both kind of testing our assumptions and also really liked digging into just how dark, you know, the legacy of that presidency is which I don't think you know, was what he was aiming for. But this was this was not that this is like such a surface. Like, it was a great fun in Russian. Yeah. That was performed. Now. We see in SO. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. I think that some in the note though, is that both in as supporting actor and best actor four of the five nominate nominees in each category. Played real people. And I think that's like, you know, a star is born for same Elliott end for about the Cooper those were made up people. I think anyway, but like I think that the economy really responds to that too. So I think that like whether or not we think that Rockwell's level of like, I dunno embodiment was up to the up to snuff. Just the kind of I think that they just like when people just play real people, even if they're old people that never knew like Vincent Van Gogh like it just seems to kind of hold a certain weight for academy voters, especially in the mail the acting categories Bradley Cooper in stars born playing Oscar-nominated actors Sam Elliott, that's what I thought. He was. Oh, you're right. Yup. Yup. With the little Chris Christopherson added in for seasoning. Yeah. Let me that's true. Of course. Like all the actresses in the favorite most McCarthy, and can you ever forgive me? Like, it's in the it's in the actress side to me, Adams, etc. So you're right. That that and that to me feels like it all. Old Oscar voting rule. You know, what you mean? It's like if you do a bio-pic immedi bio-pic, you're gonna get nominated that to me if you asked me yesterday would be a stale assessment of how Oscar nominations are handed out. But the evidence it says it's still a thinks. Well, if you're grading performances, one of these e ways, I guess to grade it is to compare it to the actual person. Right. It's just like it sort of makes it a little easier to sort of since we're in a competitive environment here. I don't know. Yeah. It goes from essay question to true false test. All right. Well, is there anything else we want to say before we wrap up this this very special early morning for Richard? I'm just happy that we kinda now. No, we have our players on the board. And we can then start moving them around. I think it's been a weird year. And I don't wanna say I'm happy it's almost over. But I'm happy that we we've we've arrived here. At least I'm happy that it's kind of weird like I'm happy that it doesn't take all every box that we expected it to. Take and like genuinely best-picture feels like a question, Mark. I hated the narrative on Saturday that it's not just because it was great book. But like, you know, pack it up. It's green book. I'm like, well, how what are we going to talk about a little girl man for the next few weeks? You know, like if it's that. So those are my feelings. Yeah. It does seem open. I mean, it may it may gel pretty quickly. But it seems open. I I feel like there are at least strong rivals in most if not all of the acting categories the director racist suddenly super more interesting than I anticipated like there's a lot. There's a lot going on here. This is good. I mean, you know, it's good in the sense of like not being boring. I have some other good news on Thursday. I'm heading to Sundance. So I'll have a whole new bag movies to talk about for next year. So let's get the will Zac Efron be nominated for playing Ted Bundy, let's find out. Tune in next time. All right. Well, I have heard here and there, Katie rich. And I know that she is still she was still up and paying attention to these nominations. And I know that she'll be back before the Oscars come back. So you guys will hear from her and her all of her first man thoughts Oliver fresh I land. All right. So until next time Mike work, if you find you Mike underscore, HOGAN, Richard laws, if I'd all of us of any fair dot com, including our insta- reactions to these nominations you've got me on Twitter at Joe wrote. This this episode was edited produced by Danielle raw for the last time. What we're saying goodbye to our cage and wishing her luck on her new endeavor. But yeah, thank you and this week's award for the reason, we're gonna miss our editor and producer Danielle. We're off the most goes to Richard off. People don't always necessarily know what editing is.

director Oscar Bradley Cooper Mike editor Richard Roma Twitter Los Angeles Roma Runyon canyon Tim Blake Nelson Barry Jenkins Pablo Pablo Laskey Peter Farrelly Regina king Ben Affleck Joanna Robinson
LCB Ep. 295 - Top 5 Worst Things On TV, Young Sheldon Review (For Real), We Figured Out The Rock's Master Plan and The Lion King... 2?

Lights Camera Barstool

1:47:41 hr | 10 months ago

LCB Ep. 295 - Top 5 Worst Things On TV, Young Sheldon Review (For Real), We Figured Out The Rock's Master Plan and The Lion King... 2?

"I'm not I'm. Not. Dumb Net. Around. Fifty and beyond. Me Can get me out of this massive. Finish off your. Sh might pay. You can't handle the truth. Maybe, not. Maybe Fuck Yourself. Shoot. Your Kid. One poll. Dot. Day Of. What we've got here is. Saying yes. Well we're going we don't need roads. You're. All. Welcome the Lights Camera arkloef Assad to ninety five, five away from three hundred, the three, hundred episode. Is going to be Lord of the Rings, but before we get to three hundred. We've been promising that we would review this thing. I mean, you already know what it is. You see the fucking title of the episode we've been promising review this media property for. Years now, technically two years you can say years. for two years on. That is young sheldon on CBS. The frequent spin off too big bang theory one of the biggest shows in the country and the world. TRILL had seen it right? I'd seen the pilot and our rewatch the pilots day. So I've seen. I've watched three times. I've seen to total episodes. You've seen the CAN Jack I never seen it. We will talk about the first episode of Young Sheldon, the pilot and the most recent one, which is the finale of season three, which happened this past year they got they did the nineties episode for young show like the the entire Young Sheldon show is there nineties episode version of the Big Bang theory. Yes that's a that's an accurate. I'll I'll save I'll save all the clothes of episode is the worst. I immediately thought like they did not learn the mistakes of the. Fastest. We'll talk about it. So yeah, we are interview Young Sheldon. We're GONNA do a little TV episode we're going to do. Or Undo top-five worse things on TV. Ever of all time can be a character can be an actor can be a host can be a show can be a commercial just things. We hate basically the thing we hate the most from TV. I Young Sheldon not on the list. But we will talk about it before we get into anything quickly off the back she before we get into that actually. A lot of outrage today someone read one off the top here on. So brought to you in part by title knows someone who's losing something. We've got that for friend of Ours Program, K B loses fucking Shit every day whilst the charger today on the middle of a radio show couldn't find a way to charge his phone. He could use tile and you can tell actually for quite a while. So does my family tile great Christmas Gift Right Holiday thing that's not right away but it's kind of coming around the corner Grandparents have a lot of Cool Fin Bluetooth products that will help you track your things can text two keys in wallet basically slides, and like a credit card, use it in bags, put into the TV or any of that it will help you track. Where things go using Bluetooth awesome. Awesome. Awesome product had again for a long time different types of tile products have of a us one that try again just now one of many that I own a very cool thin one side in the wallet you'll never lose something like that. Again. Your Wallet Your Keys. Your. Phone. If you lose your phone, that's insane but the happens TV remote. That's another crazy one tiles awesome super handy, and helpful. If you can't find something and you have tile on that thing tile can help you find whatever it is can help you find your phone on silent help you find some that doesn't make any noise. A lot of. Want that correct yeah. limited edition Princeton colors I like the simple one sleek look matched cardholder. I can get a limited edition tile for yourself and everyone who's losing something tile dot com slash lights. L.. To shop the limited edition collection right now let's Talk T. I l. e. dot com slash lights fun exclusive designs they go fast you you gotta get tile is an awesome product and again I. It's weird to say how it's almost well first of all we are recording this in September but it is technically first tober episode and you will know that by what the song is at the end of the episode but we're we're within the holiday range or if you see something that might be useful get someone for the holidays tile is a I'm telling you the best thing we've ever had in the show. Thank you tile for sponsoring tile dot com slash lights. Link the little town to. Scott a nice nice jonty pleasant tone when you're looking for something as A. Simplistic logo to. Israel. Consider what do sailor all be your dream. All be. So the fantasy see. Anything going on before we get into news. Yeah. I've been I've been just chomping down Sugar Free Candy All Day Oh my oh. What's going on? Yeah. Well, I haven't gone to the toll of phase yet. Now now, a midnight, the empty gas phase. Where it's just that If. You feels like you're entire. So I'll make is being expanded and then you're just yeah, is a hollow middle like the fart lacks middle and I don't know. If, you think you're farting on a balloon and makes no sense but it's true. It's just a deeply like your expelling a lot of air but is deeply unsatisfying far. Yes. It's like a, it's a song without a course. At the business for it's not pleasure for. which you would rip at the did use far as the business far it's fine business. No, no too many fibers business for quick quick power for. got. To got to pivot on this part. Of. Go ahead Ken. Check, I'll get the mind less probably less than ten of what I WANNA know this because I'm going to be in the office next just. The little white lifesaver mitts everywhere. Now in the office everywhere you turn the corner they'll get one of those little individually wrapped the Spearman. Ganz. Are. They spearmint or pep pep appeal this entire office just chomping down on hard sold day. I pick one up at every turn. It every time I see when I just want one and they're filling in any way, but I just wanted. They, wash your hands satisfied. You are your pants and it comes out the dryer just a bunch mint rappers sitting in the drier. Yes. Nothing better tone. Howie Mendoza can't have representatives meant. Sorry. Straight out of the bag. Oh. God. The same for yourself sometime coming. There was. What I was gonNA say was What do you call that stuff was talking about the Eddie Mommy Pasta with the super high fiber and protein. So eight a whole box to for launched the other day and it was a mistake. It was shooting my pants for the next twenty four hours straight with the. Insight. Whatsoever. In like shotgun poops like it was bad bad news very full day though I didn't have even at dinner. I can. I can relate man like. Three years of my life were spent. Having concert diary until. I finally figured out I. I can't wait and like done a good job staying away but. The problem is like. East without that wheat in. Thank being healthy still beginning like seventeen hundred calories in a meal. With this is chick Pea pasta vegetables. It's okay right now still still Karbi so I'm thatched truly caloric and Carl. It's weird because it's like for you you're like poisoning yourself would like you weren't even aware of right. Yeah. Well, I know man like it was bad. Glam Lila it sucks and sex because like if you remember on twitter like. There's like a brief rand. I had like Ruin Nikki montage in Taylor swift got into a feud in like twenty fifteen. And? I like this brand that was like, Taylor swift had to overcome Celia disease in order to get to where she was at. Like I didn't really like I didn't get it right like I saw like the Cheerios box I'm like that's not a real disease. It doesn't sound real sounds made up like gluten like what the you know the signed you see bass pro shop it's like I if it ain't God gluten on, it's not in the menu or or whatever that just. Get that Hippie. Shit Outta here I was like that was like gluten gluten like that's made up and now it's very real. That's Karma for for taking that in. Now I'm one of the epic Vegan Guy was. I was I was like, Hey, you watch me eat these these eight pop tarts breakfast. Why can't I stop shitting? Somebody help me I. Mean the pop tarts will pop doors by I wouldn't I wanna a pop tarts for breakfast? UPTURNS by themselves probably two boxes. then. Then when it makes your stomach like telescope onto itself, your intestines kind of like recoil in like twist and get internal damage that's just not worth it man. Take the oeste someone say so we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA move on from the poop talk. Those those I'm glad we did it and it was very sort say space. Area for us, but it's a good way to lead into manscaping and their crop kit kit twenty crazy stuff happening twenty twenty. But there was a constant you can have and that's manscaping. They're on a mission to take care of your manhood low the weights grooming and hygiene products if you're female center your another holiday gift. They just released their new products in Canada. The UK and Australia we love Nancy talk about time talking about the Little Ball Spitzer, they released crop care kit, which is a formulation bundle to give you a plus balls is the ultimate male hygiene. Conclude Cropper's rebelled. The odorant name speaks for itself. The ball toner that's a spray was talking about crop cleanser to body wash a ball wipes the crab, the crop mop, the foot duster, which is foot Yoda read. Your feet probably stink folks keeps the Sticky Stinky Estate smelling Nice Lawn mower three point all their great product you talked about over the years here. vegan cruelty free di- freeze sulfate free Paraben free. So you know your manhood in good hands get twenty percents off reshipping landscape, dot, com co lights you take care of everything else down there. You'll be quite happy twenty percents off free shipping manscaping dot COM com with code. Lights. Moving in the news this is I didn't think would lead off with this. Line king to. The Live Action Lion King to in the works with Disney. Berry Jenkins is GonNa fuck indirect this thing Barry Jenkins of moonlight and if Beale, street and talk fame. Yeah. He got back and I saw people being very critical of him and I'll saw great tweet it was. twitter of fancy. So nine Senate like if it might have been if it was. Him He's a movie If if the Oscars like fuck you over so bad on street could talk you to would take the bag from Disney and that is a perfectly well put like he made two awesome fucking original movies that were deep. They were fucking gut wrenching heart-wrenching great movies all around one got a best picture of the other kind of got snob get the fucking bad you can. Go for it. I say on pumped about this but I'm kind of more. The fact that Jerry Jenkins attached. That's easily the most intriguing part about this news. It. It certainly more intriguing than a Pinocchio. Late. The Pinocchio or Yes in anything else like we always talk about where to go next and. The logical solution is just create your own live action sequels now, and you're not really tied to anything in the Lion King's had some had a prequel like a semi prequel liking. One. and. A half right now is like the it was basically the this loans. To this yeah this is to be. Yeah. So I mean this isn't the first Lake Freak will but certainly, well, it's like the first real prequel king late, one one and a half or whatever it was. With like basically the lion king through to Mona pufus perspective. Anyway. I'm more interested in know what we think the world of Barry Jenkins like you know I, support him getting money and. Certainly. I I would do the same thing. This come a no brainer right like you get to do this thing you because you're not tied to an original story you probably get like a little more freedom in terms like where you can go then like the actual lying remake which. One of the problems was it was too faithful to the original I did tried to paint by numbers and it was kind of boring in that regard. So I'll be really intrigued to see what they do with the music in this one because i. i. really really like it. They went the route were they just got one artist to like do the whole thing like. You know Kinda like John Tim Rice thing but like I don't know. I don't know who they'll get like that. That'd be Kinda cool. I just get like Lady Gaga right all music for it. I think the big problem with the the first movie was number one that just had no soul. There is no still that movie whatsoever and number two, the the really promoted movie like saying look, we have this all star cast or we're going to bring this movie. We have this amazing technology to make it all photo realistic and like the tech was cool. No doubt about that at all. But like the cast was so underused like you have some of the most intriguing and interesting talented artists in the world and you're not letting them shine and show their individual towns and that's that was bullshit in my. Opinion, and to me I think with Barry Jenkins, like being one of the most talented directors working right now as far as a dramas go as far as emotional storytelling goes I think he has obviously earned the right to get the back and I think ninety nine percents decision is that but also I think for him it could also be like trying to reclaim the lion king from being remembered from in this sense recently as the soloist piece of Shit that was studio fucked by Disney and now making the story again, which the original line story is this deeply emotional family story and I think that for him. My interest in this skyrocketed from zero one hundred because like liking if you just told me without Barry Jenkins being mentioned, making a sequel to live action, I can't you. I'm never watching that because that first one was just a solar pile. But if the second you mentioned someone like Barry Jenkins, their interest goes through the roof but I just hope more than anything. Else. That the when they hire Barry Jenkins their thought process was I'm not going to put this guy looks around him in red tape because he's a guy that I think he obviously doesn't have an incredibly huge volume of work. But I, think he's a guy that's earned the creative freedom to like not be fucked with by studios even one is the biggest Disney. Yet I I get what you're saying we love Barry Jenkins but. I still for me, it doesn't matter so much who's directing this as long as the music. Good the music, the music got to be good. That's like if it's not good, it doesn't matter if you get very Jenkins, it doesn't matter if you get Spielberg doesn't matter if you get Kubrick in there like if the music he's GonNa last one wasn't good and made one point six, billion dollars. The you're saying it was a good movie. No I'm. Dick wasn't good on. That's when it's still made a ton of money for God knows what reason but other than just having the name Rick? My arguments not the move is not gonNA. Make a bunch of money. You're saying just quality will and needs needs to have good music. I mean just personally I'm. For me. All these Disney remakes or whatever. It's like it's anchored in like how they adapt the music to the action to the movie and like I like the director has like enough canvas to work with. But like when I think back to Aladdin like I think the thing that was really cool about eleven as they did a good job of like the genie songs like friend. Like me like incorporating that into the screen, and that's why Aladdin was a successful remake whereas when I think of something like you know the Lion King, it wasn't it wasn't as it didn't feel as grand. So then part of it's just like like Barry Jenkins obviously brings a lot to the table, but it's music doesn't slap in that that's going to be tough sell. US, the cast of hit really well got a couple of songs that playoff the older ones. Yeah I agree it's this. This is a fascinating one and not in terms of like. Like Dunem fascinated by in terms of the spectacle the like this I'm just fascinated by. The. Making of this movie and what goes into it and what they're gonNA do like that's an incredibly intriguing. Even if you're someone who hates those types of movies you gotta look at this and go back Barry Jenkins like The step Berry Jane has taken here is very different. What he just did So there must be something here. You have to supervise taken the fucking bag which again, whatever that's good. I, the one big thing I think supports the bag Gurgaon is the fact that they they brought back contractually the same writer from the first one, which what the fuck did. That guy do what did the ride from the first linking because there's almost line for line the same fucking movie animated version. took the script and circle the good parts. That's one part where I'm not super pumped about. It would be Kinda cool though if they did like. I don't know just just give like. kind of like what Lamar did with I'm sorry. Black Panther Panther and then and also like beyond a the onset did it with lion king to where like she had? No creative control over I would say like. You know kind of an extended soundtrack or extended You, know even even the the black is king that was released on Disney plus was it was kind of part of that I i. I think just bringing on like a top talent like that to to do that in order to like basically curate or right most of the songs and I thought that worked wonders for both of them obviously like lion king, right like just in terms of like what you can include in the movie like your one new song in there but you pretty stuck with like I mean honestly, they're like antiquated show tunes, right? And we love him because we grew up with them but I I would expect lake I think that's why I'm excited about. This know prequel is maybe you wouldn't be tied to like the whole show tune Broadway type song like you'd have original music in there, but it wouldn't necessarily sound like. Elton John and Tim Rice wrote in Nineteen ninety-two. Yeah I I think there's something maybe to the beyond say thing her doing the new. Black. King thing maybe out and John would come back. I. Think there's something there potentially. Too much more to learn on that Disney all sorts of big news today, a relatively unknown actress, younger actors, Iman Villani might not be seeing her name right We play Ms Marvel and the Disney plus don't have much San that we don't really know much about her but more we get on that show give some details. A lot of people very pumped about that. Pretty other guy. Show for Marvel. Saw Ms Marvel five hundred times. Yes, cattle. I'm sorry I'm sorry. Yeah. But do you think he knew he had thinking about Kobe? Is like. I Made Fun of him. But now I'm Kinda like Damn I. Wish I would have gone to the theater that much the he had the he had. And plus releasing a group watch feature for Disney plus. That's cool. I think. Other ones have done it, but there's Always do this on Netflix on xbox three sixty with my friends we used to go on the networks in stream together on their party watch. APP and it was the coolest thing ever and then I think Netflix's in Microsoft odds about something. So they cancelled it and we were pissed off because like we are primarily mode of watching movies it's time. So I'm I'm for this. Isn't that crazy? There's some fucking technology and some things that were just so much easier and better like like. Earlier in like inst- like a great example I was instagram facebook that screwed it all up like UCLA The post instagram and you have it pulls directly to twitter. And? INSTAGRAM pitcher would show up directly then that stopped obvious reasons but like just simple things like that. So much easier. It's fucking. Companies. watch that remember fucking when you just log onto the Internet in like. Download an MP three within three seconds. Just go to the something awful MP3 forums and get a link to FTP site and you're good to go I mean obviously illegal but A. Different World Man. The Group Watch the group the group watches crazy like like you know I get it right like you put all your keys in a bowl and nobody draws your key in like you want to be involved. But. Nobody drew your keys and you just Kinda gotta stand outside of the whole thing and watch. God. I get into those good good. I'm used to that. It's okay. It's okay honey. You go ahead. No. I'll be honest I'm GONNA step behind the shadow you were you were so eager to get back to the group watched and I should have known there was like. Dude it's just it's just me. It's just me sitting in the corner with my ghetto, Hikari like lens reflection. Yes. Yes. No you're you're you're you're poor wife sending your husband into the into the orgy and you're like listen honey please please protection in your sorry honey I'm Howie Mandel. ME. Way. Pardon me does wonder if they'll like get Disney talent or Disney Jason talented do group watches and then put those on the service Akkad deadly see them doing like you know Kristen Bell and Josh Gad Watch frozen on the group watching the nuggets uploaded Disney plus. It's essentially like a commentary, right, but it's a commentary video. The ever deal with Hulu, right? Like disaster maybe go over. In that overlap on that is interesting and by that I mean I don't really know like there's this weird. Hulu Disney plus overlap is. I don't know it's weird. I don't know. I don't know I don't really know how to put it, but it's just strange. Like in Mauritius reading the to it'd be cool. But I just feel like it's the Sepedi PG thirteen. It's there are rated shit like it's weird. Oscar. Isaac Jake Joan Hall. So remake rebooting old things like godfather bad not possible. Shouldn't do it. However `bio-pics about the making of them. Pretty fucking. Cool. Oscar Isaac Jig Join Hall have signed on. To play a Guy Making of Godfather, bio-pic Francis Ford. Coppola. It's going to be pretty fucking cool. I can be but the making of the movie and I'm very much into this idea and for the most part through j Joan Hall on something, it's going to probably be pretty good seem Isaac really at this point in Barry Levinson directing to fucking I think this is as all the ingredients that amazing as twenty two because we posted this on instagram and all of the commenters flipped shit going why does it Hollywood has no new ideas no word uses could remaking shit it's like. Remain because not a bio-pic like Jeff just said, it was incredible the lack of thought before commenting but I think it's going to be sick. I think Oscar Isaac was almost with a beard dead ringer for Francis. Ford Coppola and. I think Joan all playing Robert. Evans is also pretty sick because he's what do you call it a very fascinating person that doesn't have enough. I would say shine in the public art considering how interesting life was. Yeah. I don't really have any thoughts other than I just I want to authorize to continue playing. Coppola to get to the point where he's making wines. I just want to see a movie about the the creation of his, his his his victory is finery and she shitting. Is. Yeah. Yeah Is it. What if the movie is him now going through his winery? And he he like every bodily, he takes off the shelf. Like. Reminds him of something of making. That's how it is just laying. Off, seventy? Could. Wine. Yes. Can Mind Mind benders. Yeah Sure I like that they just dusting off bottle is just blows on it. What's the year? Nineteen seventy-two. You didn't Mister Koppel. You didn't make wine back then. Allied. I've always made the one on the he's not tiny. Reo Ford. Coppola. Nick Make A CAMEO Like someone playing, of course. Yeah. Yeah He has to. Like at three year old cage, like how however old they would at the time. And then one more piece for another artery, the craft legacy. Horror movie directed by Zoe Lister. Jones to stand standalone sequel to the nineteen hundred six movie the craft. got a trailer coming from house. Jason Blohm obviously. Heavily involved. It's going to be dropping on Vod October twenty, twenty, twenty. New Mutants. Initially when I thought about when I watch. It's like new incident then chronicle that's like the exact vibe I got from his trailer. I Dunno looks kind of interesting. Right? I don't I. Don't think it'd be good i. just assume how stuff isn't good until I see it but I okay. You know which is something that used to scare me a lot when I was a kid but which is now or just like you know eagles that like, yeah I have a healing crystal Wiccan it's like. To me culturally they've lost so much of their venom and this movie looks like it's geared towards that demographic, which is fine and I'm sure it'll. Be Released. In theaters would have made of money to just like every other house or a movie this movie could not be less for me if that exit and that's totally fine but will watch it and I don't think I'll end up liking it very much. So like are is the the the witch craze the reboot of the witch craze does that still going on or is that over at the tail end? The very much going strong. And I think it's just watered down. It's like delude which is don't have the same level of a of the NFL some girls like easy state and she's like, yeah, I have a have this crystal that you know is going to give prosperity and do my ex-boyfriend her whatever. It's like there's no venom which is name or they used to scare the shit out of me when I was kiss. Gross in nasty and now it's like eagles. I needed, which is kind of hard for a while in the nineties because there was the craft and then there was. Several. Years. Sabrina Sabrina. The teenage witch and they had what was were the show with Shannon Doherty and was that show. You talking about the witch show right. Shannon Doherty's in. Shannon Doherty hold on. Yes. Charm charmed is pretty big right? That was more the name I think that would have set that off for me. While I was trying to think of listen Milano I couldn't think of that that name. So I went back Shannon Doherty the. Entire cast. EMBIID. Like the thing is if you're into that ship back in the day like he didn't admit it at high school like. been talk about it like if you're gonNA, like you were part of an offside social group it it's kind of unfortunate because the goth listen to the the the dope use it and I was terrified Marilyn Manson because I thought he was actually satanic and just turns out he just big old nerd named Brian that made cool music and I. Wish I like that Shit would have been less ostracized when I was in high school like it is. Now it's cool to be a witch. Now it's cool to kind of be Gothi. So I I get bringing back the crowd. It's the right time to strike on this. But I I am part of the Lee wrong generation on this you who? Whose first of all, you know who's to to oddly connected things you know who's in the craft the original Shannen, Doherty? Neve Campbell. She was in the lion king too by the way. So that's a weird connection, but also her character just got introduced during my rewatch of Oh. How in court please Leeann Harvey. Right Her also yeah. This is David D. companies first acting role and like three years, and then for movie role seven years, he stopped acting for awhile yeah. Didn't they make next month files reboot or something, but he wasn't he he hasn't acted since two thousand, seventeen ish. He's David Company is back. He's if you can back to company son's Yeah I, love that. That's one of my favorite names, the one of him looking at his phone from X. Files and just being over we confused by that's a great one. So that's that's the craft I I like that got a new part of the reason why we did this today by the way young Sheldon I'm fucking sick and tired of reviewing old movies like i. just this podcast was never made with the intention of reviewing old movies. And that's something I don't like watching all the way I just don't like I. Just not my thing. My there's a podcast that does it already does it well, very successful. New Movies. We have some new movies coming out this week and I got you Halloween soon with Adam Sandler. So we're going to really try to focus on going back to new movies as more and more released because I. I'm Buchan, tired or overseas every week it's officially broken me. Moving on. This episode's out. It sounds like, yeah. I just I was like thinking about, I'm like, fuck that's how much broke me reviewing young sheldon today that's like. I willingly says young shellman. Is brought to you by Roman. Guys. Tried thinking longer ways or longer ways to last waves to laugh longer. But thinking about Howie Mandel Thinking about how we? Do Posh Wang doesn't always work. Yes. The folks that Roman online men's health company that changing the game. Everyone knows Romany policy no Roman secret longer-lasting sex clinically proven to last longer bed US fast acting don't require a prescription Roman ships, swipes doomed discreet, unmarked packaging each twice package small enough to hide and your wallet forever you need it super easy to use take out of the packets I've been on let it dry good to go go get dot com slash light your first month free no, it's not true for just five dollars first month. Just, five dollars I'm sorry I o I o Roman five bucks now when you choose a monthly plan, get Roman. Dot Com slash lights fi bucks at the fucking steel for the swipes. Don't posh Franken like our guy. Howie, Mandel friend of the company to curious that comes back to haunt us. Actually he's a comedian. He wouldn't give a fuck you probably laugh at that. Quick hitting news items. Now, lot of random fucking news and I WANNA start off with this. When this, we may last a little longer on. The. Rock. We we talked about this show I I honestly did not remember its existence at all I didn't think. So either either a bit when I saw today I felt like a bit Yeah Young, Rock TV show young rock, the TV series from dwayne Johnson that treks journey from child to wrestling superstar has cast three different young actors to play the age of ten fifteen and twenty. So he's going to there's a show coming out about the rock and. Like the really like the life of the Rock. The most inventive title of all time. Hey what are you call? Show a young rock done. Don't even think about that one anymore. I I didn't notice existed. When's it coming out? I don't really see that but same. Same people who helped launch. It looks like fresh off the boat and don't don't try. Don't trust the bitch and apartment twenty-three to they say that what if? You don't trust the B in apartment twenty three. Amer in. That's a very good show by the way. Very underrated folks yet show. John Era era rather than telling the story in order like everybody hates Chris did the character along with the Star I mean Oh, go young rocks at the debut on NBC and Twenty Twenty One. That show. is going to be fucking huge that show is going to be the most watched show on TV item I would imagine or close to it for a while I'm not saying it's going to be good. That that is just that fucking plays right into it and I cannot wait until one of the characteristics of Sipa Teramoto, the Quila. Or like the logo is on something that says that Drink yeah. NBC's is going to give it a rock and entire night of programming because it will. It'll be it'll be young rockfall by the Titan Games followed by the Dateline NBC hosted by the Rock where he wears the titus shirts possible in interviews murder suspects. Then the another hour ruble Joel right after that. I this show like fresh off the boat and I like don't trust the B in apartment twenty three. I think it's fine like a seems interesting. DIRAC is obviously cashing in right I mean he's been continuously cashing in, but it feels like he's So I. I like I. Spent the last week thinking a lot about the rock because ABC every week. But the rock came out. He did he did something very uncharacteristic of the Rock. Historically I've always would have heard what I've read about the rock is that he has been a he's been a Republican and he came out and he adores Joe Biden this week which you know it has its has its own implicat-. Implications wearing a tight shirt of all time wearing the. Ball time. s trips. That immediately, sent me down just a brain spiral into the rocks get a run for office ten years like for sure to to to me. That was kind of like that was like the like I'm I'm going to I'm going to endorse the candidate now. In exchanges social capital for your parties help in like watching Mike Gubernatorial campaign, which eventually gets me to president but then I look like just show like the young rock like. This is kind of like part of that cash in where we actually learn more about the rock as a person. So like the conspiracy part of me faces all just like the most longest play presidential campaign of all time. Now you big delay call me an idiot in the rock will never be a president and you might be right but I can't help but think that way because it certainly seems like someone like him with like to be president. You I. Think you raise a great point I think that the good parallels for this young sheldon for him. It's like you know how every politician like Biden, just did it like they release a book when they run for office right the older that his instead of him doing a biography he did young young rock and for him I think this is essentially like what you the political statement is like I'm exploring and to see if there's an avenue for me to run for president is essentially his announcement of doing that I think you it's an astute observation, my friend. Just feels it feels like part of a long play in order for us to get to know the rock better which. We. We make fun of of celebrities on the show. We Poke Fun at the Rock because he's he's A. He's an all out pitchman, right? He's he's always working. He's always promoting something that's his job I respect that but it does seem like you're managing someone's celebrity certainly, like everything I've heard about the rock that he he's like. One of the nicest guys when the nicest guys to work with I haven't heard bad story about him through all the gossip shit I fallen instagram or whatever but you kinda gotta wonder like he's going to get overexposed at some point. Keyboard is GONNA be tired of Iraq and I think the rock has a little more range in that gas tank just because of who he is so maybe That's not something they even think about as compared to someone like Taylor swift but like I just wonder is working at would come out into twenty one we get the young rock and then we get the jungle cruise than we get the other stuff with the Rock in that he's been working on it. It's a lot of rock at him owing in the owns a football league now with his. Partner next wife I. Guess She's cheesy owner they join on own it. He'd be involved in that. So so who knows like it? Just it feels like part of this is kind of like all lining up for him to maybe not the presidency but maybe if he's like to run for governor of Florida to see how goes. Davis shaking in his boots somewhere. He would be a fucking direct to the ticket as president type of guy. I don't know. I think. Part of me feels just happened. So it's not like it's crazy. Yeah. Part of me feels like the deal. So it's a it's kind of like, okay. Like thing is like right now it's like you got to expend a certain amount of goodwill in order for you to like endorse a candidate right? You've got fans on either sides and you're going to alienate a lot of people probably temporarily 'cause you know we'll come back like they liked Iraq. But. Part of it seems like Hey. You know you have a residence in Florida whatever like just live there a lot of people have residences in Florida for tax reasons just live there in a river governor Floridian. Let's see. We can make Florida a little more blue I don't know that that was just my. Air C- of Licet your roper president some point. But like we need to get Florida to be somewhere where we can maybe have a better shot of getting electoral votes by our means necessary in. New New Ballgame in America folks. Out No I don't think anything you said is that crazy? Idol honestly. Oral that's what the Rod told me on the phone. This shows the show is going to be this shows either like here's the thing is you know how we say someone's going to be either bad or to be good. I think just one is is either going to be good or it's just going to be extremely media. Streaming video cards have fuck fuck ton of viewers. I don't think it's going to be bad i. don't think something like this with the writing and like the attention given to behind like in being attached to something like the rock. I, don't think he can afford to be bad but it certainly can be a hunger TV dinner how quickly they're going to be a really corny do smell at the rock is cooking thing like him like making flom as mom's going to be something I have raised eyebrow he's A. Rain. Right. Now, I have young Sheldon brain because I saw what they were doing with that show and I don't even really know the Big Bang theory. So that's probably know I just want the young rock to open up with walk of life just like. They did exactly that this is the ultimate like this take like distance Centerfield by John Fogerty is. On takes place in the past music but not like the too distant past. Ah late last year. Let's just see how it works. Okay. Let's see if this works. Our own. What's the ice, age song that they play. Shit or listen to this she. Yeah. That's me. My Name's Timmy. Moved to this neighborhood, you may be looking at me thinking. This kid's a little strange. You. GotTa look at my Worst. Just this would narration is like Damn I'm in the past. A semi me on my way by rusted root is that for me A sitting on my way, you hear that immediately think like, okay like A. What was happening in the past? Talking artifacts. We just moved to this snowy town for I really hot town and you know what? I'm not used to this I'm not used to having to wear jackets, but here I am in my Stepdad he sucks. Okay how how about this one jeff bear with me here. You know what? I was. Growing up in Westfield Hills. My friends. At work still there's No He's a little overweight, but you know it's the job. You also played three songs that are frequently used by rental car companies and commercials. All three of those. All right. Quick hitters before we get into our view of young Sheldon David Harbour and. Brendon Frazier. Yes joining or Berg crime moving including Don cheeto Jon Hamm was Steven soderbergh's left. He was not good. The fucking papers, the Panama Papers Panama. Papers One laundromat laundromat that knock good. But new high a great Logan Lucky Grant do heist movie. I. Could get into that I I, liked that so that's good thumb. Grew. I like him because he goes he goes all in on experimental shit but he's in his bag and crime throwers super pumped. A. Conan series coming to Netflix's apparently a fistful of dollars series apparently happening, and then lastly, Borat to had a sort of a teaser. It was borat talking over a pro it's a parody pro-trump thing I. It's it's really political I don't fuck feel talking about it. It's there's concrete stuff in the movie we'll get into it. We will review on here. It will be out on Amazon prime. So that will be an easier review for us. So that's that's cool. But it was piggyback find odd they released it the day after the election are the debate that was. I can't wait to get into the whole debate of whether or not it's problematic to voice Mrs Stuff. We wouldn't have talked about in two thousand six but now it's stuff you have to think about I'm not going to the boys right now I don't know if it is or not. I'm not gonNA roll the dice but I'm willing to entertain the conversation. That's why someone else can start the conversation then officials. Say with. CONAN. Landing. On Netflix, it can either be a disaster it could be pretty fucking cool. But if a movie which are not good, you just kind of move on from it. If witcher could work out I. don't see why Conan couldn't work out for Netflix, do the same what does seem formula whatever you with witch do they're just simply tongue-in-cheek action with some some little Fish you're and there. Before you. Spur. Is brought to you in. Three. Leader. Hip the Ri-. Products all products formulated by biochemist approximation, USA USA grownup. Dealt A it's federally legal version of THC. Their effects are a perfect Tibert of CBD and Delta Nine giving a similar buzz and all the medical effects. Medicinal Effects Have Dealt denied the laziness anxiety paranoia mental fog, and has all that stuff again, federally legal and it is fucking fantastic everyone who whoever gets this product from US or any? Barstool podcast loves it raves about this is the real deal folks three CI. is fantastic is it just the best in Delta Industry? They invented the industries so they are top notch. Again Hundred Percent Hampshire is fairly and available online at three DOT com. It's number three C. H. I. Like the First Chicago Dot Com. And some select retailers must be twenty one or older to purchase my largest went off by me to play certain song at the end of the podcast today in WanNa forget So yeah three. Dot Com is the place to go fantastic stuff from from three G. Adult Eight vapes, Gumy's tinctures, all that stuff They really are fantastic shoutout to three key. Next up. We're talking young shelter. So we why do even what the I don't fucking remember why we? Were going to review this in the first place what was the bet or what was like the proposition? I, don't happen. It wouldn't even remember it was it was a time. Go back if you will to to a time. Twenty seventeen. Destiny two was the hottest game out. Everyone was talking about the Star Wars movie that was GONNA come out that year. in Young Sheldon had just hitting the airwaves and at the time seemed like a very, very ridiculous show in now CONGRATS everybody you've normalized young sheldon. You fucking let Young Sheldon, your lives of the Big Bang theory off the air. So instead of his everybody involved in that show, just buying an island somewhere in in the Bahamas Jim. Parsons who I enjoy very much stays involved with young sheldon. In it's just part of our lives for the foreseeable future. Young Sheldon American Sitcom TV series from Chuck Laurie who's created everything on TV the series of spin off Prequel the Big Bang theory and begin to the character sheldon. Cooper. At the age of nine living with his family in East Texas and going to high school as a nine year old. That's the first access. What's what's like technically East Texas Jeff someone who's lived in Texas? I don't know what the technical term is. I would think Houston but I may be wrong on that because like I've never referred to as east tech like. Interest in Houston Dallas San Antonio Austin in West Texas. That's this Houston's always. I've always heard that area for to his southeast Texas. Yeah. That's that's probably why I what I'm saying really isn't right yeah. Well, he said he used they used to live in Galveston before they had moved to wherever they were right and because you prefer down there. Yeah because he did what was right Yeah. That's right. He told on the other coaches. Google East Texas like what's the? What's the Big City in East Texas? It's not it's not like well, I shouldn't say south south. It'd be like Corpus Christi, but but Galveston is a little more south. So I think southeast sounds about right The biggest city in East Texas is actually East Lubbock. that. Considered get access I was like, no, it's not joking are you from? Is West Texas basically. Yeah. Lubbock. Is Definitely was Texas I just thought it'd be funny having East that was on the. East Texas they're saying is. Isn't that where Nolan Ryan's from Lufkin. Well, I. Know Lufkin because of Dez Bryant and ski. Lane Abilene is East Texas okay I make sense. Houston seems to be I feel like Houston is technically East Texas though. Wait no lines from refused Geo County Texas. ooh that sounds cool. Yeah. HOUSTON HOUSTON CAN BE EAST Texas I'm saying right now. I don't know I'm in Austin night. That's. Houston Austin Dallas San Antonio West Texas. That's my. That's all I say it. Anyway fuck about young. Sheldon. We watched episodes, we watched the pilot episode. And, we watched the sixty fifth episode, which is the most recent episode which aired. In April April thirtieth twenty twenty first episodes, the pilot, Sheldon Cooper, and nine year old genius to summarize each episode Shell. This will talk about the first one I sheldon cooper nine year old genius begins his first day of high school in the ninth grade with his older brother George Georgie Cooper junior having shown more skills than a typical child is age. He skipped several grades on his first day. He questions his teacher informed students the rule breaking also. points out teachers a mustache, a female teacher. He tries to find his place new school in. Georgia. must deal with having a much younger sibling in his class. I was lot more things that go on in that episode, we'll get into them but I also ask you guys to maybe try and find your favorite line your least favorite line from the characters I think the worst fucking wine the two episodes happens in the first thirty seconds of this show. Monkey I love trains. Well. He's talking about the trains. Yes. The Big One at the dinner tables pretty bad too. That was stink monkey think Oh, that okay, that is well. Know when he's talking about Isaac Newton, he goes the only Newton's they cared about were weighing in fig. This wasn't even here that eight, hundred, eighty, nine. Texas by the way this isn't that I mean it is longer if you're if you're twenty four, you're she'll fuck up old man you piece of Shit thirty, six, old, eighty, nine was at that time to do. Yeah it was but it wasn't. It wasn't like Wayne Prime Wayne Newton years like if anything would have been like, George George Strait ears primarily new in years I agree you're absolutely right now it was prime fig Newton years like Fig Newton on in arguably at the height of popularity in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine no, give it to you I couldn't. I couldn't sense in popularity although we also talked about Newton's on. Doesn't Riviere or doesn't Trivia radio which I enjoy I like victims. I like as well. Yeah. REVERB Bros on twitter because I said, I'd like to leave him in my car for for during the day. Come back. Come back totally different point than we'll. We're saying we like them taking up. Point. Psycho, Shit Yeah, you guys like fig new and so why do people find a weird that I leave him in my heart? He's. The to the box just to. Cook them in your car using stagnant air you fucking psycho. Gotten to like three years later. Now, everybody's trying to like kind of painting the portrait of Psychopath of me in the left between between this and the proteins thing it's Just aren't allowed. You can't cook for yourself anymore you know how to take care of yourself food this. This first episode was kind of everything I expected the show to be. The sister son of a bitch was would rather shocking I found that. Believe like the average American household clung onto the show when. The sister son of a bitch. Hit a whole bit about his with all sending. I found that to be quite that was so fucking weird was other when they're in church? Like. We're didn't. She swear when were insurance? Yes. She's worth a dinner table too though. Yeah. The ball sending thing was while they're a mess so you know as A. Here's some context is a big bang watcher, right? So Sheldon Cooper is No he he's Bart Simpson of the Big Bang theory. He's the he's the heart of the show is a little wisecracker. He's he's Big Weirdo on the show, but he's a lovable Weirdo, and during the course of the show we get introduced to Is Mom who delightful in played by Laurie Metcalf, which in this show, the most clever thing about this show is that Laurie metcalf daughter plays his mom in this show. So from like a continuity standpoint actually makes that actually make somewhat a good sense. But then we also get introduced their hear stories about his Nanna and we get introduced to her in the show and basically just they they kind of go along with a everyone serving as a very sharp contrast to shell. that. That's like nobody's. You could. You could maybe argue that the most real person on this show is brother. because everybody else is just a complete stereotype of you know one like a a very devout Christian and his mom or a jock. NEAT head and his dad or rough talking curly sue like little girl and his sister, and then you know an old. Golden girls a blanche devereaux type in his grandma Dan. HIS GRANDMA'S FUCKING hot I. What save let's say. We don't meet the grandmother who we gotTa talk about the grandmother because. It was there was a lot of very surprising things going from the pilot to the most recent sixty, three episodes in between. And there were. Things that I was very surprised by. Rambo yeah. Well, yes. So Young Sheldon when he went super say into. In. Ball Time Chamber Yeah. I. Didn't even know he got the super saying one. So lot is happening. Episodes. I mean. Eight forty nine I wrote down I fucking hate this show. That's where it Kinda lost me. It was kind of moments I was like sad at points to I was like I just felt like it was. I was not really beat it's not positive then it kind of moved in that direction. I also thought it was a ridiculous joke that the kid play football his brother. Tiniest human being alive. Like this. Var Training rather being a football player undersized linemen by like two hundred pounds. Crazy. I know. We'll get to the last episode third season but his brothers like a completely different person I can buy. Crazy different. Is the all up. is you see all grow a lot because then three years in three years and kid time is obviously that's a lot of growth but. Each of here's here's what's wrong with the show right in. I very hypocritical because I think there's a lot of tangents to comic book movies in terms of the show requires you to come in with a base Phantom to the Big Bang theory for to work. So like that first episode with the law, the gags and the voice overs, you have to know who Sheldon Cooper is, and you have to know like a lot of the jokes on the Big Bang theory just in terms of he you know growing up in Texas in a on the Big Bang theory show it makes it sound like he's from more of a redneck environment than I. Think this one was just you know pretty standard suburban type deal but You gotta you gotTa know the joke you gotta know his mom because the show leans heavily on your knowledge of those characters and like what I mean is like. are like that too right like adventures of Finnity. War. Leans heavily on your knowledge of the prior forty, seven movies you just watched so. From. An entertainment standpoint league I get that like if you're a fan of the Big Bang theory, you might enjoy this show. But the fact of the matter is, is it it's it's it's just It's it's kind of what's wrong with like. Media. Right. It's just like you know something we're gonNA create the most bland inoffensive product we can do possible and in a Big Bang theory is like that too even though I like enjoying it like the young Sheldon pisses me off because it was like you're kind of stretch that premise for brainless entertainment with Big Bang theory, and now we're a different inception level down into another dream in the dreams getting kind of unbelievable at this point. I'm starting to get kind of like. I'm starting to get Kinda woke to shit happening around me and everything is really suss. They well, and I think bland is is probably the best. It's a super fucking bland show. It is such bland watered down like milk. Like essentially a bunch of shit that's drawn out for you. Right like the the radio shack thing that we needed to is probably the the best example like early on they disguise like Oh. If you take off your Bowtie Sheldon before going into high school, I'll take you to radio shack this weekend and you at that point you already like. Fuck are there's just fine I like nostalgia like. But you knew there was a set up for something and then the end of the episode. He says, I like what's incredible radio check in a world in a world of uncertainties. It's good to know that this will always be here as he walked into Radio Shack, which again then it's like Captain Marvel Blockbuster. Good example that's fine. But like. It's such a nod and a wink and a fourth wall break type joke essentially that you're like Oh my God this this show is it's it's like a here's the crayons color between the fucking lines type thing like that is the Choubey it'd be one thing if he had just like went to the radio shack whatever. But that line specifically, it's good to know that. Radio Shack will always be here. That's fucking Chuck Laurie reaching his hand through your television screen and like fucking choking you like, Hey, you get it. You get it because radio shacks gone. Do you understand the joke? fucking fool? It's it's no subtlety to that whatsoever, and like we can talk because the nineties episode. But at the same time, we're not fucking making trillions of dollars. Chuck Maury created. The worst ten, worth thirty minutes, of TV, in the history television with the finale of two and a half men so. I can I'll be. About it you think. You think Chuck Laurie has a way of reaching into people's subconscious in in in just. Like tickling the space that they didn't know existed because. I like none of the shit sounds good on paper but like. The show they're kind of elevator music at worst. And I'm talking specifically I'm Big Bang. Theory and two and a half men like kind of the two big chuck shows the two prior decades. 'cause because. I think they're I think they're horrible I mean. I don't know like I wouldn't classify either show horrible. I know people should on him a lot because I think they're kind of like the nickelback of shows like I don't think they're good I. Think they're stupid I think they're hacky but I think there's something there that can't be explained that Chuck Warri just knows like how to like get into people's minds and make them wash. This show is almost just some sort of like comfort slot. Upon their plate and the problem is like I think young. Sheldon tries to do that. But it's almost like it's unbelievable at that point because like when you remove style of humor for like an and it goes for more of like the the US type like family wholesome like we're all in this together but it doesn't have that same spirit just because like I said everything's. Predicated on the fact that shelled into one dimensional character from a Sitcom and. It it just stupid. I'm sorry and I'm over here. It's like it it. It makes me think about just the general condition of like pop culture and what's Popular Wyatt is popular and I Never WanNa shit on that because different strokes for different folks. But at the same time, it's I'm going to be a promotion about this show because I truly think like I will defend Big Bang theory but this is like so much more vacuous than that because it tries to be more than even what the Big Bang theory was trying to be. Then, we skipped ahead we skipped ahead to the last step the most recent, not the last I shouldn't going away anytime soon, the most recent episode. And I fucking thing you see Craig t Nelson's in the show all of a sudden. You. Know the first thing I noticed Oh shit coaches here. And I guess they close. So here's my thing I enjoyed watching that episode next I have no idea what the fuck happened sixty three episodes between who is that? Is He dating the grandmother? He's met him the grandmother or curly fighting or something. So here's what I think. Some of the things that I noticed may have happened the brother obviously got an a job at whatever at the wear store the Creek t Nelson owns fired I, think that the one teacher the introduce that at the bar whatever apparently hates him sheldon a lot and yes also the most important thing we find out is that young sexual sweet life Zack and cody. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That guy and then the more important thing is that young chauvinism sexy grandma which was sick. I wish we knew that ahead of time because God damn. So what are the thing I noticed? Some things I noticed the MOM s the daughter. So how's baseball going? So I assume that there's an episode of between here in which young show that has to find some sort of loophole to get his sister on the boys team. That's my sumptuous checked it. Grew look he's he likes loopholes. Yes so and the dad took him to Caltech. Obviously, for some reason was he may be interviewing for a football job there I don't know but then we get introduced to Wallace Shawn. As my other note. Yes Wall Sean, and Craig t Nelson adding this show. made it like said such a value add? That's crazy I went from like I. Don't WanNa Watch this time like I'd watch critique at anything same wall shot I love those guys i. didn't have time following kind do what the show is GonNa go like the there was like there's been three seasons which blew my mind and it makes sense because this came out in two thousand seven. But like I said, we've we've normalized a young sheldon leave let this continue society But I watch the whole episode just like, okay like so we're done with kind of him being at home now now, it's the episodes that. He's going to go to college or is now onto college part of the Young Sheldon experiment. But anyway, there's a hijinks like they paired off the grandma with the the older brother who like looked ridiculously older. I guess that's puberty for you and you know young sheldon was just the UC's up to his normal scam Dennis the menace jinx super fucking Dennis. The menace five got a great point. Isn't working rape. We know regular masses is alleged dumb, ass. Not a smart kid all. I just says the dumbest Shit Mr Wilson you know that's what chuck he's Smart Dennis the menace dilly bars. Dennis the menace become the this folks cartoon of Dairy Queen. I think it makes perfect sense I don't know why but I just think i. Two separate comments unrelated? I Love Dairy Queen old ass fucking brand though super fucking old brand like an an old dairy queen looks like. It'd probably would. But old dairy queens is such a blast in the past when you come across one so it makes sense. You just imagine the like Don draper making that connection like pitching dairy queen executives back at the old ad firm being like. Got Real Shithead Kid Kid? LOVES TO START TROUBLE REAL PEACE Shit. But he's redeemable in the thing that can redeem him soft serve. Rural Dennis at all Dennis, the menace package soft serve ice cream. When we tasted that first bite a soft serve. We think about the time Mr Wilson threatened to shoot us with his remington eight eight seventy. prepackaged dilly bars. Next. so That I wrote down this this is the thing that stuck out to me. The most though is that. He has this the this whole thing about a letter finds a college letter in his mom's like nightstand, and he goes through the ladder and all that Shit. But. The way he delivers, it's consistent delivery of the Young Sheldon character which I only imagine and I'm sure you can back me up. That's what Sheldon doesn't. Big. Bang theory where. He's his sister aunt you open the letter and he says the US. Postal. Services Agency males protected by federal law, and then he calls the law office and it's this whole fucking. Family Guy. Made Fun of for like. Raunchy that one time I was Ted Danson's barber. It's like that shit like constantly like every thirty seconds that is that's the young sheldon thing. It's just him being a nerd and it's like Oscar what a what what a silly little nerd this guy is. Continuous and over now, my thought when he made that joke about like mail fraud, I'm like there have been sixty three episodes of this and the people fucking love it. They love it. I C I can't imagine watching sixty three of those because that just has to wear on you. Like, that's the. This whole bid is as being a smart ass and like in not a charming smart, ass. But like an abrasive smart and I don't I don't like that sort of thing. But I do know that there's a huge market of that love that like parents love that Shit I think part of the reason that Young Sheldon is as successful as it is, is that it's very easy to watch. Out assume from any age and any demographic, it's easy enough show to get through and like like you said I think truly you mentioned it shook. Loria has like this this ability to like reach into you anyone's psyche and I think what he does is he's flips off the switch your brain and I think that young sheldon and soon extent like Big Bang theory are great examples of that. But the thing is. Behavior. I like that's tolerable for me in Big Bang, theory because there other assholes to give it back to him and they're all dolts lately Leonard's is roommate and winners curmudgeon just like I am and he's there to make fun of Sheldon and in this show like his sister serves as the Leonard like she's she's the old sheldon straight I don't know who's a straight man. They're both straight men they're just different types. Bit. The thing is, is like I just have talked about it before I just have such a low tolerance for the super smart insightful kid trope. That Olympic like Malcolm in the middle like. I didn't really love Frankie Muniz Malcolm character. I liked the dumb ass younger always older younger brother like I like the fuck up way older brother and then I liked the. The reese brother was such a dumb ass like in. That's like that's the purview for a kid like kids are stupid dude like charter like project on these children characters and make them like super inciteful kind of like you know when people say like, Oh, did the truth always comes out of the mouth of childlike? Yeah. Sometimes, kids will say inciteful things but most of the time they're just sitting in the dumbest ship possible and we should let kids do that because eventually they're gonNA grow up and learn and that's okay. But like in entertainment I just I've always personally hated. The Super Smart Kid in. It's just extra grading. It's like nails on a chalkboard for me because I think it's Lazy I think it's much harder much but also much more interesting and that's why like lady bird so much use a total piece of shit. But she was redeemable and that's the issue is like it's kind of like the sheldon character. It's like everyone else around him the fuck up because they just don't understand his genius but at the same time, it's like he's a great character I get why people like it but the same time I totally don't it's baffling. I. I just I tried to go with an open mind. You know I really did and I think I think your dislike of it. Makes me feel better that I'm not just being curmudgeon and ask because you enjoyed the other version of the show Right like like that but that makes me feel better. About my thoughts on the show. That I'm not just being an asshole about it because again, you like the regular version. This one just doesn't just doesn't do it for you I just I, couldn't. I just couldn't find the patients for this, I? Can't find the enjoyment I get. Why people enjoy it. Don't get me wrong if you like it I have no issue with that but for me. Everything I fucking expected except for Craig t Nelson Wallace Shawn yet did not expect that. I was stunned sick. What criteria I was like all right correct. Dino's Wallace Shawn Bobi out of my fucking seat cookie. Believable. I just what I don't get is the thing I hate about this is I guess maybe the Sheldon character lends to it because the way it's written is I've used a super genius. He goes to college at a very young age. Why do they start like? Why didn't they started like Young Barney Stinson Young Ted most there's a whole young universe for them fucking CBS to explore all their care. INTO ME For. Young Charlie. What was it Charlie? Batch no nutshell. I was GONNA say Charlie batch. Charlie Charlie Badge before it became a quarterback Charlie what is his name? What's Charlie Ashley she? Charlie Oh no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no, no. No, it's Charlie. Be something I think Charlie. Parker. You're. Right Charlie. Charlie Harper. Harper. I, wanted to close. Yeah. I don't know. Where to go. You there he said. I have to pick my nose real quick I got this. Oh, you didn't want to show us? Pick knows. Booger that I think is connected to my brain. That's young. Sheldon. We finally reviewed serious again watch those episodes. There's one person listening who goes there wasn't Craig t Nelson while they're making that weird fucking could could not couldn't even pretend to make up. On being this. Is. Unbelievable. Video, do you think there's an alternate universe where Craig t Nelson GETS CAST is WHAT'S HIS FACES CHARACTER MONIR? Family. Oh and O.`Neil. The that seems like that's a swap casting. I don't find him as cremony as. Like I wouldn't see. The show. Oh. Yeah I like to see even. O.`Neil Craig t Nelson Buddy cop old older person movie call old people. But now we talk about like dogs there's a there's an old person genre that that like older people like to go to just to. See the older people can still do it. I like to see them in a buddy cop movie solving case together was a was the movie that create Tinos misery headed giant Boehner. And he got pulled over was that not good wife was Bookstore Book Club Book Club. Book, Club, the the officer pulled him over and he used he was staffed up. Officer. was giving me some dome in the car. No He's got that Sh- meet. Road Dome. I'm sorry. It's hard to impersonate me as a great was is he does. Coach. We. Incumbents Oh. Hey this is me coach their bets I told the story recently I think so I won't tell it again. Did I about the person my my dad meeting the person from my? My my sister's golf coach in high school. I stand on here. With. My Dad, my sisters golf coach in high school's out and they had a replacement for that tournament and it's like the classic like. A coach Texas thing and my dad was tournament and he walked up in man I won't say her name walked up and matter and my dad's like, Hey, how you doing Mr Low end in said his name and she goes, Hey, coach nice to meet you like walked away. My Dad was like blown away by that like coach Nice to meet Ya. That's a ball. That's a coach move I like that. What else coach Nice to meet you just walked away. Great move. All right. Let's do top-five worse things on TV. I like there's people you're. Listening to this now, tweeted out people know but we tweet posted the link to vote for this. Didn't say what we were viewing and I'm curious we tweeted a picture of a plaid shirt in one person. Guessed it one person guess what we were reviewing. But. I don't think they thought they were right. So I'm glad we finally I'm glad we watched him. What Network tv not that you don't know thirty minutes but I feel like for you especially having the show be like six minutes shift flew by would imagine you'd I blew my fucking rain are the water mike wait it's over. I gave literally I. My brain couldn't syntax I'm like wait I'm already don't to episodes. It's only been forty minutes with just that's that's what I. That's the first thing I thought of my Ken Jackson. Stunned when he sees short this, even watch much. Action. Fuck. Down to I was GONNA say if I had to watch on TV there's no chance I would survive it but watching it on HBO Max. was like so easy. It was easy because I always had this I was I almost ran out of time to stop the first one and then I looked I was like Oh my God it's Don I can get through to more of these. I wanted I didn't got one more. All right. Five worse things on television can be anything on TV that used to be on TV. We'll do Ken Jack. Myself trilled in the Audience Jack Number five words thing on TV. Number five, I'm going to go with the. Ama- list here I'm just GonNa say the good doctor I don't know I. Don't know anything about the good doctor. I. Just I see Freddie highmore his face and I'm like, why do I know pretty high? Moore's name this guy's face sucks. The show looks like it sucks and the only clip of scene was when he couldn't do his job because he was too horny and I just don't want anything to do with the good doctor. So goodbye forever Horny Horny character I've only watched the most I've got into one episode was after the Bachelor was over it's it's a it's a classic show for after the Bachelor and He. He was walking down the the corridor of the hospital and he goes he goes sex sex I love sex and I'm like, Oh, my this but is this show I thought he was just doing surgeries. It's a big. Number five for me is an episode of the price is right without Winco massive disappointment. There's nothing worse when you fire up the price is right you don't get plink plink Oh should be on every episode. Every episode of the price is right should have plink Oh, number five was almost genesis laugh from friends, but I decided to leave it off. Felt like that was too cliche. But when they don't put point going in the price is right I feel like I've I like the price actually have wasted my time though. It's just missing its best feature. You wouldn't. You wouldn't have not have young Sheldon in Young Sheldon. plink on the price is right trail number five. Number five for me the view. View now the cast is looks hord. I. Just I don't have. I don't like the view. And then also like to be fair also the the male counterpart Mario Lopez or whatever that was I just think I think the format of getting celebrities together to discuss stuff. fucking cares. There's a lot of shows like the view to the talk the. Real real show I, I have I've heard many stories I worked at the same company in that same building is if you have heard many stories about behind the scenes of that show won't chairman now I'm sorry I've just I've never liked the view I've I've always been a big Barbara Walters Fan I. Loved when Barbara Walters did twenty twenty hugh downs as my favourite show when I was ten, I don't know why love that Shit I thought the view is beneath Barbara? Walters show? Come out and say it you're you're watching view wall fucking eating your your car roasted FIG Newton I'm not watching the view because I don't like the view united here. My pick whatever the Barbara Walters show was whatever I do love a good one in. A Good Barbara Walters countdown. Chichi used avenue an annual show where soon Barbara Walters ten most interesting people or whatever. And and it'd be like number one Jim Carey. I'm interviewing Jim Carey. Interviewing Barbara Walters is always famous for the young ones out there for for making people cry that was that was kind of like what she was known for. didn't Sharyo Terry play her on SNL whenever she did I. think that's who yes Barbara Walters I. Like I only saw Barbara Walters one time when I see when I worked there and she shuffled into the elevator and her slippers said hello, that was it but that was a nice hello. Hello. Inter slippers respect. Audience Number Five, this is not a real number five, but it was technically the fifth vote. Joey didn't watch nutty own stuck at Joey you budget I had to keep it here because you're liars. Joey. Ten people. Watch Joey. Didn't WanNa January. I didn't watch doctor so I can't complain but still yeah but but people voted for no the the haven't seen commercials for Joey they good doctors all over TV. Over like Internet you twitter all that Shit Nobody Watch Joey. Joey knows that they never really referenced anybody from the show friends. Bananas Move Is Like to try a tight a little bit. Kendrick. Number Four. Number four I'm going to go for that one dancing with the stars season where they had Sean Spicer. Only, because my introduction to it was when I just see him come out wearing the salsa dancing shirt. Yeah and I wasn't enraged as much. Just like like so like just disappointed with the entire world like this show is not that great but seeing Sean Spicer waddled out and do a little jigger whatever I was pissed off at him pissed me off so much. That's not. Your and it's an attack on ABC programming right now you're going down the list right now it's not don't them yet either. My number, my number four is the gaseous don't be as far from Aaron Sorkin of all time the newsroom. New Coming I. Know I've talked about before. But if it's a bad TV list I have to put the newsroom. Not One season, not one episode of that show was ever intriguing or compelling to me. It was it was every bit of garbage that didn't make the west wing tossed into a dumpster then thrown on onset for HBO, it was such monologue garbage. It's the worst of Aaron sorkin somebody who I as a viewer. His writing worship it's great. As, he's a bit maybe everything. He says he's been. He's a bit nutty. Something the other day about politics are like Jesus, Aaron Sorkin, but in terms of how this guy writes and how like Steve Jobs to Molly's game obviously, the social network like it's the fucking Creme de la Creme of writing but the newsroom. was. It was Gar. Make cream it's like the worst hypoc Sour I don't fucking now garbage hurdled. Mr Low. Fat Sour Cream Mr Pilots Sir. Let me be the first one to tell you that a should and Ford and noted. What's Will mcevoy. knocked. and. Then that's stupid clip from the beginning that pilot that goes viral once a year that says. This MS monologue about America will leave you speechless. Wear things are stupid. Show their unlikeable characters trill looting. I believe. Okay. So I might get this. Wrong. But at the top of my head I, think it was mad men season six that was the one with Linda, Cartolini's character in. Just kept like he's like the show just got into this depressing Funk which year say being depressing was kind of the point of it but it just kept doing the same thing with don draper like I thought this was a season that didn't really need to exist kind needed condense it at the end I hated look I, Love Linda Cartolini I hated the Sylvia Rosen don draper affair or whatever. I just fucking hated that season. I remember that one I don't know if that was I think you're right though season six but I remember that wound season we're Scottish right into a funk. Madman sees six audience number four, post 2016 late night TV shows like late night talk shows I would agree. I would. Agree. I think all all absolutely allowed to voice political views like this. This show's lost so much creativity and I'll throw snl into that fucking bucket. Everything. Based off of all all all political. The fucking climate and that's what those shows do. But they they all for the most part kind of lost. Their interests. They weren't escape. That's again. Why always like Cohn enough that Conan has made jokes too. But CONAN adapted to be something different during the time. That's why I always like Conan always escapes but SNL. We always say, but like the political climate really broke a lot of comedians brains and I think the fact that it broke so many writers, brains like that influence a lot of the talk shows. I mean. Yeah all and then well, I think part of I think part of the default is to go for relate to the stupid lazy Kofi Joke or whatever. Right instead of making like in that's like that's been my problem with the clips I've seen of Colbert is accused. Kobe report used to actually be in my opinion like very good satires very money. It was very pointed at that. A lot of that was based upon that that whole like crossfire Arab political analysis where Jon Stewart went on and just eviscerated those guys on that show and I I enjoyed that and to see him get up there and just be like hey. Kofi fe hamburgers. It's just not. It's not like it's It's not good. Not. Healthy. I agree complete I. Mean it's very you know. Talk about fucking politics but depending what happens the election like there's a scenario where? They talk about. By like A, there's a lot of people like what is there fucking identity as come it's the how do they make that? He'll turn immediately I don't know. I don't know I would just. I would just go straight I. Mean I think you just go straight on the by train in you just start doing like you just go back to Joe Biden. The ice cream cone with the gators on. God in remember the birth Joe and Obama means were. Like all remember Obama's Joe. Don't don't go and do pooh-pooh in someone's yard and then Joe's like already did in Obama's like oh Joe. Joe At. Yeah. That's the mean. The format Number Joe. Let me be clear Don't don't go tinkle into a water bottle and throw it. Pupil Putin's lung. Okay Number three number three. Ken. Jack. My number three Jason Witten as an announcer maybe one of the worst runs anyone's ever had in the experience of being a football announcer. It was it was hard like near impossible to watch. He was that bad I don't even know what network did it on but. Fuck. Was He he fox? Jason Win was was Monday night football. was winning a football. That's right. So anyway, I just remember every single time and a watch this game and I guess this makes sense Monday night football because I was just thinking I I saw an like What do you call it a disproportionate amount of Jason witten during those years it's because I guess Monday night football but he was so bad see got everything he called was wrong. He never got anything correct. He'd never offered zero insight for someone that is ranked among. The top tight ends ever Isa. So fucking useless man I'm mad I didn't put fucking Dennis. Dennis. Miller Monday night football was a treat. Going back on that now. Can Treat. Sham. Definitely putting Chris Berman. Yeah. Baby. Awesome powers on their pencils like were. Metternich but stained for voting the. Diet of worms Al. it's crazy. Clemens on. Them Up. For. We played a clip for Dennis Miller equipped football not that long ago number three for me is Jay, Leno booting CONAN Fuck Jay. Leno. That's all I'm. Going to make its way here on know that was such bullshit man that was such garbage fuck in. Your ten thousand go play in your car's starboy. fucking. Car Boy trail number three. Number three is like. Eighty percent of the shows that have ever been after South Park on comedy central. So, here's a list. So the legends of Chamberlain Heights is one a little Bush was another only Americans. Of the Americans was not bad of the American out the bed I enjoyed. Okay. So Maybe we're close to eighty percent still John Together was okay. shorties Washington shorties was the Wadey laziest thing I've ever. Seen a brickell Berry yes. He imperial has been after them as well but I just feel like I feel like a lot of the ship that they try to get people to watch was They just shoved out the after South Park has TV's are still going to be on. That's the only reason people make appointments with comedy central or have been for the last twenty years. So. What should I write down for this? How did you put it most everything that? Most Elliott percent of comedy central. South? Park or come on South Park Yeah in the same room. Same rule can be applied to shows USA tried to launch after w e Rawal Shasta. Nasty. Actually she asked me nasty actually this know Shasta mcnasty is my pick. I'm sorry. Oh my God. Okay. No no shopping ask Shasta mcnasty. One of the worst thing. One of worst shows ever shown a television. was that is Google Shasta mcnasty. One. Yeah. Awful audience for number three. Pick the masks singer Damn. I. I'd never heard many people that either didn't like Mass Stinger or neutral on it, and ate it the messing that the thing about the Messinger is it's a it's a television buzzfeed article they have to click through. But it's time. So you don't get. You GotTa wait you gotTa. Wait seven days to get to the next thing, right? Yes. That's the thing. They they've just done a buzzfeed article on television and that's the mass singer. Fucking comp get Jack Number two. My number two is going to be, let's say. The later seasons of lost. So here's ABC Kung back into the mix. Oh Yeah. Later seasons of loss Alabama SPN to the. Walt. Disney Company. Exactly. So the point is. The layers of loss were so fucking disappointing like unreal considering I L- I adored that show from the first. Especially, I'd say the first three seasons such great television interest appeared out in the fucking nothing and it just it. It's death crawl was like, what do you call it? What do you call it? The death rattle death rattle stat like Jeff Riley like the dying breath was just like a fucking like a gase not even gas is a whimpering silent Fart? stunk aided it. Yeah I. I. I I never watched lost and I think it's because people hated the fucking ending so much and I know or most people did right Yeah. The the I would say like the consensus opinion that's just isn't worth me and I know the first seasons are great like I know the show is so tied down to the mystery and the review on the intrigue that like that doesn't do it for me like if you tell me, it's bad like I'm just. I can't watch that show. Like I can't I can't go through all those scenes to get to an end that people don't love. I don't know it's different ways. Seinfeld. Last Seinfeld episode like that's just comedy for years right. Self contained episodes when this everything is working towards that final goal of getting to the end of the fucking story in this I think the only good reason to watch is there is really good acting and some of the storylines are fucking harsh. The scene where with those you're watching actually can spoil. It's fucking loss when when Ben's daughter gets killed good Lord, I was shocked my life scrape some great writing in those early seasons. next up for me number two fucking kids cooking shows. All of them. All of them. Especially Matt Nothing Worse Than I. Think Master Chef Back and I watch Gordon Ramsay and it's a bunch of fucking kids. Making Creme Brulee. Why do you hate it to just 'cause there's doesn't you know it? It doesn't I like cooking just because I couldn't competitions I preferred regular cooking shows because I love to learn stuff from food network kids couldn't competitions I. Don't I don't learn much like there's some basic stuff but I just. There's nothing really elevated. Some of the kids are impressive but I just I get into it and when there's so many, it's not like it's one. It's every show a kids version kids baking competition kids cook off kids master chef like God. Why? We need that true number two. Number two is It's like commercial breaks specifically on like MTV or former or current Viacom network. Stations. The commercial break always seem more frequent and longer on like MTV and vh one than they did on any other. Show? It. I know this isn't a very juicy one but. There is a distinct feel to commercial breaks to. For. Like MTV all like the Viacom Shit right? Just the commercials have a different vibe to them I don't know what it is. Number two number two for the audience Ted Moesby. I show that's add successful as harmon. Your mother was he has to be like, maybe the the least interesting in the useful made character maybe ever among successful TV shows. That's another show like I haven't watched. But like if there's one thing I, know about that show people fucking. Hey I was not surprised when I pulled up the list. That's what I saw I was like. All right. Well, that's what been told. But he pulled he did poll. Incredible. One fucking. Slade. Bro. Number Tucker Max diaries forward. Five Ted Moesby. Upright. Ted here when I was when I was banging meet. Just know that. I wasn't like Howie, Mandel I always reach for skin. Oh A skin. No no Tucker. Max is definitely a rubber guy like you ever be like an old man that loves center are. Rubber it sounds so gross when you say like that eight that. Okay. So we're on my number one pick, right It's an easy pick for me it season two true detective one of the most disciplined. Seasons of television I've ever seen in my entire life especially. Like seasonal true detective was one of the greatest seasons of TV I've ever seen. It's so fucking good at interesting and then season two is unwatchable bad. It is incredible. How far down a fucking cliff it went like seasons. Rebounded in a sense because season two sucked. Like A. Third true detective. Laughter. To the lead up and build up with huge. Huge for that. Like it was it was a massive lead up and like the memes like true detective season two, it's like Bert and Ernie. It's like whatever like people will fucking did everything and then it's just a bummer like it just didn't end up and then there was like three of them and it just ended up not being what people expected or want this individually. Okay. Moments in it I like the scene where call very beats the shit out of the Guys Kids Dad and What else there's a cool shootout scene but like other than that man, it's just it's a bummer. A bummer. I like Vince Vaughn looked at the ceiling and deliver monologues. Yeah. These fucking Shakespearean monologues characters is supposed to be the scummy mob underboss like fuck off and Goddamn? Hated that My number one. First off get-well-soon. get-well-soon. But faulk. The cake boss. faulk the. I've heard nothing but bad things about this guy nothing but bad thing to stiffen people left and right cakes stink they stink. He had that show on food network and it was the most rigged competition in the history of competitions like like Olympic like Russian judge Joe rigged absolutely rig because they wanted to season three the ace of cakes duff Goldman mopped the floor with him in the first season. Did it again in the second season? Unrealistic not lifelike garbage cakes from the cake boss one each time. It pathetic. The cake boss stinks and obviously he's part of one of the greatest close by my second favorite quote of all time outside of I cannot sanction poonery when he got arrested in Hoboken for his Dui which not great and I am sure he's. been better from that but. He said he can't arrest me on the kick boss. I've loved that Reese Witherspoon did that too she I seem to remember her getting pulled over and saying, do you know who I am? Yes she did that's fucking cake boss. Yeah. But I see in the cloud to say that yeah. That's what I'm saying is like messing thinking you're on the same level as reese Buchan, Witherspoon. The proprietor of Jaipur James You don't even deserve to be making the cake series Witherspoon your cake stink. Mediocre I watch Halloween, wars on food network people making better cakes and then buddy velasco could ever wish to make. Buddy Philanthropy Rostro for cake. Boss. Number one my worst thing on TV true. What's your number one? any comedian doing a bit on an Nfl pre-game show. mattered. Idiot any of. Rob Riggle, I like Rob Riggle. Did Make Robert on funny with Frank Kelly Endo. Was Fine. A mad TV anytime is posting cringe posting by pick of the week is the cheese and Terry Bradshaw Fat. Guy. That's the same thing every week. Yeah it. It's like even that like extends down like I. Don't know much about Cooper Manning, but they tried to do the funny thing with Cooper Manning. It's just not. It's not funny with hurry ESPN DOT COM. Oh to. Yeah. Yes, you. The the the most awkward thing I'm never been just haunts me when they do the cutback to the guys at the dudes rock at the table in they're all like laughing. You think they're laughing because it's funny. Think laughing because it how fucking stupid it was. Combination probably depending on the eighties always the most uncut it's like. Terry Bradshaw when he was really uncomfortable with them would go That's funny. That was funny. Now that was funny and then you could tell the more and more he would emphasize the that was funny. It was very rare that he would say that because he thought none of them were funny and if there was enough a joke on someone else at the desk, he would like confirm like, okay that one I, was cool with they. They progressively got more and more uncomfortable. Those I mean I swear to God. Those segments would find a way to to make John Milady unfunny. If go in there and they would just not like Sasha Baron Cohen sign up for it become the funniest human just by working with the producers of the segments. Absolutely absolutely. Number one for the audience. What is the good fucking pick televangelists. No. Trying, get pick. WHO's your favorite television joist? The one who still owes. fucking. Doomsday Book Oh Jim. Jim Baker, we doomsday bucket from that guy pre cova. We never got it and Actually Doomsday Cova turned out to be doomsday. We've been fucked because he'd never sent us that God Damn Doomsday Kit do you know? Jim Baker like. Do. You guys remember Tammy Faye Bakker who used to be married because she was bigger than he was and she passed on but she's actually she's actually somewhat of a of an icon in the LGBTQ community. Her do you she has, but he says he he cheated on her right with like a secretary something I think had like some. Yeah I know we had a lot of. Police, charges, or something like that, and then he had quit, he start selling silver like liquefied silver for people to drink as a medicinal cure like he's a fucking psychopath. My my favorite televangelist Jimmy Swaggart. Them Up. Look them up. He was he was the one who is Caught Cotton, a prostitution scandal, and he was one of the all time just greatest the I of send like apology speeches of all time. Oh. He. Got A frost. Wow. Yeah I think Susan Baton Rouge or something like that. Think it's out there. Baton Rouge. But yeah, he's got like look. I feel Jimmy Swaggart was one of the characters that went into uncle baby belly I mean I think there are a couple but but I think there was a lot of Jimmy swaggart uncle baby billy. That was fun. We finally fucking all things off my list GEICO commercial with Dina Zell. Man Doing one about the taxidermy geico commercials in General Janez Laugh Laugh tracks was an audience pick hardcore pawn. Jane Lynch Hosting Game Shows I can't stop seeing that editor. Talked about it we just the the half and Robinson I just can't. I can't do it I didn't watch the week. It's like I won't be I won't be watching supermarket sweep though that will be watching. Very excited for that. Anything else I don't organ review. We may I think we're GONNA just do like October horror movies for the month. Should went up. but it is October. So we are ending this this podcast with the song. Oh All right. I will decide what it is though. But it will be a horror type thing we'll. We'll go down that road. We don't do enough or people yelling. Absolutely justified. Yell. For candidate control I'm Jeff Hello. We'll talk to you next. Week at the box office. Free. Labor. Free. and. Midfield.

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Movie and TV Sneak Peeks: The Underground Railroad, The Killing of Two Lovers, and Georgetown

Why Watch That Radio

30:05 min | 2 months ago

Movie and TV Sneak Peeks: The Underground Railroad, The Killing of Two Lovers, and Georgetown

"On this episode of why watch that sneaking around sneaking around sneaking highly part and midsummer. Which i didn't you know midsummer's upholder talking about that and in people's like serve that little you know. He calls his hat something. It was terrible. But i had to laugh it. No my well. Sometimes you've got to laugh at the was anyway. I'm not talking to you about how i got into anything you know. Watch my work. Al-said monitors kim says. Hey don't criticize my daughter. And that he better not smoke in her house his wife. Toni tanny donate. Why watch that isn't podcast. Between the critic and referee go to head on a quest to discover the best movie and tv shows hollywood has to offer expect the unexpected from critic clone. Nothing gets past the rat. We do all worse so you don't have to welcome to. Why watch that this episode of. Why watch that is supported by entrepreneur. Meal plan it helps leaders and professionals feed their bodies and businesses. Well you know critic. I got a chance to attend a wonderful. Em p. los angeles and it was so amazing because brandy cochran was able to gather people all sorts walks of life. We're able to gather together. Have real talk and some real good food. It was a hit. Its food for the soul and the body which is so hard to find so if you wanna learn more about entrepreneur meal plan whether you're entrepreneur or not go to entrepreneur meal plan dot com alive stat. Sneak peek were sneaking. Oh were sneaking sneaking around you that is from the Best little whorehouse in texas movie. Version dolly parton. Break reynolds sneaking around you. Do i do know of sneaking around sneaking sneaking daily part. Oh those are good. I like i like the best little whorehouse. Anyway we're talking about no listeners. We're talking about a. Tv sneak peek and two movie. Sneak peeks so we're dishing the business you're going to hear it i. We'll tell you how you can watch these things. And what may appeal to you if you like this for that. So let's first start with a tb sneak peek on geo coming to us from all my gosh one of our favourite directors very jenkins. We're talking about the underground railroad. Which premieres friday may fourteen o. Oh this is a limited series Thank god i mean the thing about it is week. Did recently have a tv series. Dealing with the underground railroad was called underground new so we had two seasons of that in fact. That first season was stunning. I just i enjoyed the first season young underground in the second season You know it wiped out. I couldn't quite keep up but this is just one and done that is it. It comes us. A like. I said from barry jenkins we'd love barry jenkins academy award winning berry jenkins he dipped in writing here and there to tell a play there and Another slew of writers also on his team the cast maybe not as except for course. Joel edgerton He is not a slave in. If you know. joel looks like He is not backed these playing something. A you'll talk about but the cast That i'm referring to his We know that air. Pierre is starring in this chasing dylan is starring in this To certain imbed do is starring in this among other people. I mean we have you know. One of your favorite. Will jackson harper showing up at some point and here like we. Who is that you know. The good place will Will patterson and mattison. I was going to say yes. M patterson and midsummer which i didn't you know midsummer's a whole other we. We're not talking about that. So yeah he. He's definitely showing up and along with peter mullan. It's a lot of people cop in either bullet is always i just i. He's another person. You kind of want to cross the street a little bit. But anyway with that being said barry jenkins this is huge. Now think of it think of it. Think of it amazon. Prime got buried jenkins fan steve mcqueen To be on their platform. Is this something we're running to see. We already have prime. Do we been through this now. We know that the underground railroad is going to elude to obviously slaves and that's always or normally a hard watch so walk through this. What can we expect our watch Now this is based on. I think won the pulitzer. Yeah the novel of the same name by colson whitehead which is on my list to read. You know you'll read this so long at list So i haven't read it yet But i did make it to the fourth episode of this show. So what we have is at the centre. Cora and caesar core play by two. So and caesar play by. Aaron and caesar comes to her and says it's time run now. You know what that means. That's right so it is an alternate timeline. So we are in the eighteen. Hundreds there is slavery in the south and so on but things are quite the same now chorus i am what is she going to follow him. Now her momma is gone left her. Okay so there's something going on with you know escaping slavery what. How could a mother leave her child now on this plantation that they're on their two masters one of whom is more lazy fair than the other. Their brothers in the one who's a little more permissive. Has the north plantation of one has the south. And you can imagine what's going to happen that'll necessitate keira saying okay. Caesar let's go all right. And how they work their way up north while it's called the underground railroad but what does that mean. I won't tell you is what you expect. I know you said this is an alternate timeline. So it's alternate history so things aren't exactly the same camp. Okay so i won't give it away 'cause batter to discover that if you haven't read all of that bad as see if actually all needs so what happens is they're going through the underground railroad. How's it depicted and at different locations. Essentially what the show explores different historical atrocities for black people not just from slavery. By experimenting on black people medically and so on okay now hot on their trail are two slave catchers. One of whom is played by. Joel and joel has an assistant. Who is a little black kid with a hat. Okay stay that. And if he asked us you'll know the import of what i just said because their seed when they enter into like salute. I know what you would call it. And the innkeeper's like serve that lil a you know. He calls his hat something. It was terrible. But i had to laugh it. No my sometimes you got to laugh at it was anyway and so you know joel's characterists way doesn't treat him as an unequal. They are equals. They are together catching slaves. Okay this located. Don't if you see him coming to your slave run okay. How did they tracked them. Is it possible. And they wanna know bridge way. Wants to know. What is this underground railroad world. I'm hearing about where is it. How do you get to it. What is going on. No one can seem to tell them. Here's what say as a review if you've been to do a slave story let's think of the successful ones even underground first season. You said ref. Let's think about twelve years a slave. You know if the out roots. When i pulled out in the thing is it is not slavery that were watching concerned about it. Is the people the characters were slaves berry care about. In routes we see him in africa. He's free then down. Next twelve years slate these free north they come and get them smaller the man down at the south and they're fighting for their freedom and underground we see this relationship mob. Dr sun is there. The mass says involved all of that before they run. Watch him underground railroad. It was just to me okay. these are some slaves. That's how it felt. These are some slaves and they're dealing with certain parts of history. And i know this history. I don't need to see. So what's the hook. I couldn't find him cutting. Find now some of the diction here. Now you know refugee normally one of those him know they say and all live. I'm sorry to so wonderful acting half of what she was saying. I didn't know what it was now sees a south african actress doing southern it. It is southern but you still have to enunciate. i'd i would have to have subtitles for some of that. i'm sorry anyway. Barry jenkins directed every episode. Everything is beautiful. it's very jacobs. Yes it looks beautiful. They start with the scene that might fall into the style of what is happening. The the whole color is a kinda like sanded down and like this warm kind of sunlight coming in like a beautifully done. Yes but is it worth it. The world needs to be more clear. I ain't readable. It's like it's like if you read the book you probably get it. Kennedy's people okay. I was waiting for to take off. I wanted it to soar. Didn't now we go to some recent entries. The good lord bird bright. Don't showtime yeah. I would say this is a little more intriguing. But what i was really thinking about is the handmaid's tale. Oh interesting interesting okay. Similar level of execution overall where the handmaid's tale though like the first season was good. Then you keep watching vacant. Can we move forward. That's how i felt you can be like booth. Why am i doing in all of this torture already seven. I'd say about twelve years a slave. That was clear. We all rooting for chula. That is just so. That's what i'd say about the underground railroad. If you've read the book i would say check it out just so you can see berry jenkins vision of that if you haven't if you're in the mood it's right there on prime video. Yeah it's right there free for you if you are a prime member now. Let's move on to the movies. Georgetown you saw this back. When i took knows this guy's georgetown you saw this in twenty nineteen at the tribeca film festival and finally getting its theatrical release along with availability on digital and on demand on the fourteenth. It's available on theaters. And then after that a couple of days you could fish around and find it digitally if you want to explore that avenue now this is christopher walz crisper waltz direct dating this out christopher when you think of him you think. Oh he's an actor right like us. I don't is he a director. Well we have talked about recently. I'm show a lot of actors. Moving into directing Is he a blender interesting question. Well you know he is an artiste at. I love his interviews because people are like. Oh how'd you get into the character. And he was like a. That's my work. I'm not talking to you about how i got into anything. Watch my work. Yes so he definitely is of an artist shall we say But you know not only. Is he directed. He's also starring and of course you're going to make that happen but his written by david auburn And the cast alone is just worth giving it a shot. Vanessa redgrave redgrave annette. Benning corey hawkins. Who's been doing some lovely lovely work Along with a lot of other actors and actresses that you will recognize Some of them being you know. Americans are just from across the pond and honestly the reviews. Aren't that great So what you got to say. Bravo now look at the beginning of georgetown. We're told that while this film cannot claim. To tell the truth it is based on actual events and there were introduced. Oldrich motte playback kristoff and he's a man who's he stressed in some sort of military uniform. He's overseeing some sort of military exercise. Why i mean what does that. Then we see all rich at a dinner party in an expensive home in dc each georgetown neighborhood and he's servants some very important guests who worked for the government in several capacities. So you think minute. See some sort of waiter what is going on. Well no no because these are talking about him as he serves them and they each state howard portent he is as a man with various connections counts but they don't seem so clear on exactly who he is and then he sees has guest for dinner but as he does so woman who seems quite annoyed into the house and then it's sheets going upstairs to the bedrooms all rich russia's pastor and says hey he has the wake up we come to find out is his wife. Elsa brek journalist who lives off of her first husband's pension and was played by vanessa. Redgrave go point there. That is so he enters the bedroom leaving the woman who discovers her daughter amanda standing outside and then after that the dinner proceeds with elsa and amanda attendance as over cheese just wrapped in a row now attended to the guests but he's meticulous about hiding all of his efforts so we see him russian. They don't however none of this impresses. Amanda who's a harvard law professor. Who's played by annette benning. Of course she is and so before. The main courses finished amanda heads for the door with her mother followed behind her. They have a little argument about over overage. Amanda does not trust him. Of course not i mean else's ninety one riches while he ain't ninety one. Okay i'll tell you that. And the man leaves but she showed a lot else that she'll help her get away from over whenever she's ready she'll even leave harvard. That's what is required all right. Okay all right so the party is over. Prepares to have a smoke. can he bad mouths. Amanda elsa admonishes him says hey. You don't criticize my daughter. And that he better not smoke in her house so that this is not a lovey-dovey relationship now this Over to leave the house and both for wall. Abc's weirdest uniform again and it's just as curious as it was before and then while he's out something on l'armee him. Paramedics arrive at his else's. Hold because elsa has died boy bay and not too long after that in a conversation with amanda alridge fouls to frame. The person responsible but amanda knows who did it. She knows that the culprit is also and let's georgetown launches into how much became. He became by going back to win australis when he was a fifty year old intern for congress. Look where yes happening. Heard it right look at that. It moves forward from. How bet went elsa who after tiring of him helped him become a would-be diplomat to how he then inserted himself into the iraq war of all things culminating in just what or who caused else's death. But i do have to say as i was watching this could find hook wasn't exactly you're was watching what i was watching. But what import was outside of it. Being a curious story about a strange untrustworthy adjustment mad. I just couldn't quite grasp it which vitamin because it was unclear which john raw georgetown was attempting to fit adding. Is it a thriller zip so it spectacularly on that count. I mean it's clear who killed outsor- from the start and so there's no suspense doesn't matter what the music's doing maybe at some sort of black comedy instead but if that's the goal it was an odd one because it takes about an hour for to have anything funny plus the comedic moments aren't enough for them to matter anyway. I mean the tone is just too muddled and dark for this film to click in the humor department so the experience of watching georgetown as a confusing one and while. I'm sure that christoph waltz. He's credited a seawall. Says by the way i'm sure idea of where he wanted to take audience it speech filled. Derek to'real debut but execution falls short. He should've just made this a flat out comedy. That would have been better after all. It's best moments when it goes to the laughs. Especially when it reveals the true nature of ulcers and else says relationship. Fortunately no most of it seems are underplayed and naturalistic which kanders and atmosphere. that's unnecessarily dour and so despite kristof expert cast but redgrave net bidding am corey. Oftens like you said. The narrative doesn't take off. The result is the kind of film. It's this kind of fill the kind of film that only a talented yet. Misguided person can make an unsuccessful in confused film. It's made with care okay. It is Figure out how to watch that if you want to do that. Now let's end this with one more sneak peek and this is coming to us from neon who is sort of you know they are like the edgier eight twenty four you know neon at eight twenty four at eight twenty four kind of lands more than neon neon is like. Oh this is crazy and strange. And oh my gosh. I don't understand and then it also could be just. I don't want to understand. So leon really does have an interesting taste but it is going to be released in theaters on the fourteenth as well as on demand. So you have a choice. This is coming to us from robert. mccoy on and he wrote it. He directed he produced by golly. You know and This premiered at sundance twenty twenty. So this was the year that we were going to go but didn't go and thank god. We didn't though it was Definitely i think. I bought a ticket to this if i'm not mistaken And the cast. I'm gonna do my best not to go to rectify rant. Oh i've gotta deal clain crawford is he. Looks like ricky schroder blade brothers and okay with that. I'm okay with going on air and say that but he was in rectify and his wife. Toni tanny audi and he just did. I mean it was so good Six little measly episodes per season slow measly episodes all so great is on net flicks it. It's on net flicks mccann richly was on. So this is a sundance. No we're not a let me get off tip chris. Coy is also in this Who is the wife. I'm not sure separate the mowafi. Okay yet because it didn't really list out. I'm like i don't know who you don't. Everyone is along with other people. I'm interested to hear what you have to say about it. Because the critics are looking this up. They love it and you. Sometimes you don't agree with critics so at no time you know you. Well we'll find out won't are you licking it up now to say no chris coy. He was in the dupes playing a different character. Now okay in this movie. We have david play by clean. He's living with his father again as he and his wife nikki played by septa taking a break from their marriage. Boy i have one two three phone children okay. A teenage daughter and three younger sons. And they're staying in the family. Hold with nikki. But how are the kids handling all of this. They got a teenage daughter. Now for david and nikki they seem cordial even the rexel there were going to you know but they did allow each other see other people during all natural. Yeah who excellent all. Oh i've been made both do it. Okay i'll tell them neither. Oh only one who really wants to save the marriage who isn't quite as invested and then there's derek lay by chris. He takes an interest in. Mickey let's how come back. That's all i can give you now. This man died crappy. Little flat slinky streaky. New would come and find. If i told you more i finally and i would say stay far away. Anybody who goes further far away if you wanna watch this now. This is an in wide-screen again. Raph we have the box okay. I'm living in limited nakada bowl so it widens once in one particular scene for one particular reason and i just caught. I was like wait a minute. Screen is wider. Then it goes right back. So what's happening is it's filmed in utah. It's winter time. Open spaces all compressed. Yeah this is sundance project. Yes uh-huh and you get the feeling that you're watching something that's not quite of this time. Even though it is contemporary the focus is on. David drought where he goes. Howard reacts to staff who encounters and as the film unfolds. You start to understand. David's perspective quite well but how does that relate to the tidal island. Say anything killing in two lovers and say no. You turned up again. you think. You're know quite clearly. Mattel you lack what that is about but by the that title takes on a completely different meaning. This is the kind of film that just it just keeps you edge even when stuff seems okay. You're like wait. Isn't isn't the contrast between what david seems to be prepared to do and who he is with his family so effective i was invested. Runtime is brisk really. There's only one scene where i felt. The tension ratchet down a bit but that was on purpose. It was on purpose overall. This is urgent without being too arjun and surprising in a profound way. It is the best kind of indie movie. This is it okay. I'm still kind of shaky from just and you'll see you'll see because it flips like it really flips and you don't quite know what's going to happen there. This is the best thing. Claim crawford is unrecognizable. He has a full on beard when he hops in that. That set truck when you see this opening and then he's there with the spotted because you think he's one guy that guy and he's there with his father like no and the kids how he relates to them is. Why and what's going to chris coy. I'm gonna be quiet for give stuff away. But i would say everybody. Yeah i would say however you wanna see this see it so if you are indeed buff you probably want to go to the theater. That's what you do anyway. If you're not you're feeling adventurous or rather stay home. Works perfectly and whole okay. You can like just let out all of your motions at the end as that what you did. Yes i was at a moment. You had at the end the booed like oh i think i did. I squeeze your hand. I don't know you've sat over and exhaled so that's the killing of two lovers. I really was thoroughly impressed by thoroughly out. Well there you have it one. Tv sneak peek to movies. Sneak peeks there's so much snaking around going on here you never know what we're gonna sneak up and watch again. Thanks for listening for additional resources visit. Why watch that dot com good idea and we'd love to hear from you so go ahead and leave comments feedback and you can raise. We'll see you next week see you.

barry jenkins berry jenkins georgetown Toni tanny brandy cochran joel jackson harper colson whitehead jenkins patterson caesar amanda Dr sun elsa Joel edgerton peter mullan christopher walz mattison dolly parton david auburn
Moonlight with Ryan Daniel

Cineflek

1:19:16 hr | 5 months ago

Moonlight with Ryan Daniel

"The odd fifty percent of it. As far back as i can remember. I always wanted to be gangs. More however buddy and welcome to another episode of sit. Affleck i am. Ethan colbert and i am. Claire curtis clara is you. May you may notice a big enough where is permanently joining the show back by popular demand and welcome. Welcome to your first intro. Thank you this is fun. It's like they're you official pastor. Now you have a real mike now on everything and you look you look superficial for sure in tie-dye hoodie. One hundred percent solid hoodie. So clara an i Were joined on this episode by our friend. Ryan talk about moonlight which was a really fun. Conversation what a guy. What a great guy and a really fun conversation but yeah what are you movie. Yeah we're pairing it with a take on the drink sex on the beach and calling it a hand job on the beach which is just a sex on the beach but blue so we put some curious our in it and in honor of a very poignant movie in the movie moonlight poignant scene so you can find a recipe for that on my instagram at pod or my twitter at santa flack that is announcement number. One announcement number two is next week's episode clara. Who were having on next week karston. We're having carson rehnquist really fun so so B.'s got a great youtube channel. I'm really excited to chat with him a few days from now. So we'll be having him on and discussing the movie climax by What's what's the guy's name gas bar. Gaspar noah noah. Yeah there. Yeah so so we're doing. We're doing climax talk carson. That's going to be great. I'm really really excited. That we're gonna the episode. Thank you to my patrons jaden. Stephen sydney isaac griffin ends zach If you want to join my patriot on go to pedro dot com slash sin affleck any other announcement. You have clara. Oh i'm just excited to be here. We are happy to cool without further. Delay ended this week. That was glaring. Ryan both welcome. Back to the podcast. Thank you for. I don't wanna say person. I feel like ryan should say i i because was wrong with berbie already doing great. Yeah we're doing great. We're doing great. Thank you guys for both coming back and talking about moonlight. I'm honored to him. Speak about it with both of you. I feel like i'm so self conscious about my words. Right out is everything that comes out of my mouth. Sound weird you know. It's just such a poetic movie. Were really it is so now. It just feels like we can't do a justice. No it's true that's true. I guess. I guess we should start with like what was each of your first experiences with this movie Like like like had you. Had you seen it in theaters now yeah. I hadn't seen in theaters either. Oh really okay. This was this was back. This came out back before. I say film buff and everything so i saw it actually man like i remember. That was the first year was interested in the oscars so i was going watching every picture movie and at the time i was super underwhelmed i was like i don't understand this at all i don't i don't like it. This is weird. And then i didn't. I decided to give it a second chance to. I think two years later. And i loved it and then this is my third time watching still love it so amazing awesome my situation with it is weird because i didn't see when it came out because i i was in like a weird relationship until i didn't really get to pick the movies i was watching. And so this is like not up my partners eilly and so that was fine. But so my introduction. To moonlight was the oscar fiasco with moonlight. Which i was like. Whoa what's going on. And i hadn't seen la la land at that point either so i just i what happened. Yeah i remember watching that live and then and then just like and then just being like constantly refreshing like google every like every like every two minutes and then just like the war invades taking the envelope home. I'm like why is he taking baby. What with crazy. How did this happen. Why would they have read the wrong name. It was it was like wild watching it. Go down absolutely absolutely insane side note just like one of my favorite themes on the podcast has been like twenty twenty one bryan shitting on like twenty fourteen. Two thousand fifteen ryan. It's just it's yeah. Yeah you'll you'll see shit on my younger self koi. Yeah i was. I was i was. Oh my go- well well. We have a group like our facebook group chat. We the photo. No okay going. The photo the photo. That i found 'cause i was just like oh for adding each other on facebook. Like the best thing to do is go to profile pictures and click click the left arrow like start at the beginning. You know so. I did that and And yeah there's there's one of you like on a boat. I think where you're like you've got is like wrestlemainia desert shirt. It's like. I was saying it was great right. We love you. We love right. I was talking about how i watched moonlight for the first two great. So i'm asking fiasco. I like watching it during the oscar hype and then life was crazy and i wasn't like watching movies so i didn't. I didn't see midnight until twenty nineteen which is crazy but so this cruiser. Moonlight is like the tenth movie. I watched after i. I got letterbox. And so it was like what i was just finally sitting down and being like these are the movies that are like crucial. The cinema that i'm missing. I have to start watching them. And so i was like moonlight has to be one of my first ones like i love a twenty four like i need to watch this and so then i did and i loved it so much i cried and i cried and i cried and then i realized it today and i did that again. I just cried the whole time. You know not i feel i feel. It's it's an emotional journey. I i still cannot believe that this one best picture really i. It's it's absolutely insane. It doesn't fit with like what you think of that. The academy likes at all and just like revisiting it. I forgot how like india is like the academy. Doesn't war like this is the kind of movie that like winds festivals doesn't win oscars sleep totally. It's still crazy him any. It was yeah i was. I'm pretty sure one of the if not the adjusted for inflation actually adjusted for inflation. It was the lowest budget to ever win. Best picture budget was one. Twenty one thing. We five and four. Yeah i had yes. Technically technically rocky was one point one. Oh adjusted for inflation. It's a little bit more so depending on how you look at it but it's still really really impressive crazy that even unadjusted you have to go back to nineteen seventy six exit. Yeah true got to get a movie that that would that that costs that little money. Yeah and and it's amazing. The cast that they were able to get marshall. Was this movie made martial law. We're famous but still i mean the cast that they will get with with janelle monet and the only harris. I guess i guess those are really. The three only known actors though prima about but the performances are all around amazing. Just incredible i love it even from the unknowns. The acting is amazing in this movie. Yeah it totally really impressive. And i think it works. I think it works so on its favor because like the movie in general is so like raw but like having not fresh talent on screen for all of it like makes it even more so because like you don't get to look at these actors necessarily be like. Oh i know that guy from star wars like. It's just like right. Now this is this character and lighting. It's so good folks star wars. Say that are you kidding of any. Everybody's turned off the podcast fighting words. Yeah no the acting in. This is absolutely spectacular. I mean all around Mahershala continued to impress on this watch. But like i think for me. The biggest thing that i forgot i should also say that i like just going back to where we started with this i did. I eyesight like a local feeder like in my town and and and it really caught me off guard but yeah i i think the thing that i forgot the most about it like this time around was just the pacing of at all like i forgot how little mahershala we get. Yeah i forgot how like like thirty minutes of the movie is like old. Sh chai ronin the diner. You know what i mean like. That's like narrative minutes of the movie. Yeah so like. I just i i think the biggest thing that i forgot was just like how it all like unfolds. Yeah obviously i would agree with that. I like i remember like how concisely they break his story into the three parts. But i don't think. I picked up on as much like how cohesive it still feels despite that like yeah. I had deposit at one point to get food or something. And like i was at the hour mark and i just finished his like section as teen and so like his childhood in his. Adolescence are condensed into one like literally one half of the movie and then the other half is him in his adulthood. I thought that was really interesting. How like we get so little with his earlier. But i feel like that stuff is so affecting which is really cool. I think i think is really cool. I kinda like there's a way you can kinda split these three sections until like how they like portray sharon and in certain part of his life. He's in so like the first childhood section. You know it's like about how fragile he is. You know and how you know. He's just he's just becoming a kid. People are making fun of him for being gay. He doesn't even know what that means. Like you know he's so fragile point and then when he moves up to being a teenager that whole section is just about how he changes from being the shy kids. Like this guy who doesn't really wanna take shit from anybody anymore. Totally and then third section is like how complex he'd be comes because he's trying to put on this facade that he's this big hardened guy when really he has never been able to be himself because of this like over dominantly like male strong miami that he lived in and you know if he actually decided to be himself he would just get. Put down ford immediately totally. Yeah i like totally. Yeah i think that sums it up so perfectly like you ryan's great right right so good for page to was saying that he did That it kinda took her out. How different the actors were in this movie for me like i. It was jarring at first. But then i sort of like adjusted to who. The new actor was their performances. Were similar enough that it drew me back in but was that like was that ever jarring for you guys or did you feel like you sort of like okay with the transitions in age. I think for me it worked and it worked for me because it even though it's different actors portraying like the same character. It almost reminds me a little bit of like boyhood in that. Like we're getting this this actor or young age through his adulthood and obviously that's a little more continuous but you're still getting those jumps and so it reminds me a little bit of that in. How like we're jumping from such like different points of his life. But i think honestly the actors do such a good job of like giving this new version of the character while still building off of the previous one we were just encountering where like its underlying. It's there but it's not like over powering. So i thought it was definitely noticeable in a way but in a way that like worked for me really. Well yeah i was. I what you exactly basically literally. So so like how i said. All three segments are so different is like You kind of want the performance to be different because the stage of stages of his life or so different. So much and actually. I found this out on little fact. Barry jenkins kept the three kevin's three shiraz away from each other so that they would not try to imitate each other's performances. Because i think because he wanted them to each have their own take on the character which makes sense because three different takes equals three different owns which is exactly what they wanted in the first place because you want him to change over time so i actually think it works perfectly in the movies favor. Like really well actually. Yeah that's really cool is now also i love that. He made some crazy director. Oriel choices. I mean like. He makes the city like this. This very very poor part of miami looked so beautiful. Like it's just like the way the way he shoots. It i i. I haven't actually seen if beale street could talk that heart of the criticism with that movie. Like aac criticism of beale street. that have heard. Is that the beauty that he portrays of. I think memphis and that is like is like it's it detracts from the story and here at least i feel like it really sort of adds to this like feeling like you're in a memory. Almost if that makes any sense. I can speak on that a little bit. Actually because i i know a fun fact which is not so this screenplay is based off of like a player that Oh i'm forgetting his name. But a playwright wrote a screenplay for a play essentially about the story and it never got made But the thing that's really interesting is it's a direct depiction of this playwrights life and he grew up in that city that they're shooting in and berry jenkins did as well so. I think that's where we see a lot of that. Like almost like romanticize. Ation of liberty city. I think it's what it's called Is that like this. Is where like barry jenkins grew up like. It's his community. And so i think that's really need is like they shot on location for certain things and so what we're getting is like a little bit of a love letter to like where he grew up and like the community he was a part of and i think dots like really cool to see and i definitely think it works in the favor of the movie because it almost kind of counter acts like the sadder elements of like what we're seeing with sharon stories. That were getting this beautiful backdrop The sidon so like they kind of balance each other out in a way that like isn't too overwhelming. Yes yeah. I i to add onto that. Give a little bit more context. I saw a quote. That barry jenkins said and he literally called his childhood a beautiful struggle sole reason that he lives in an area with he said a beautiful green grass beautiful golden sunsets and an awesome neighborhood where dark things happened. And so all of that. He considers like he really put into moonlight which you can see it but it's so beautiful like such beautiful movie. I read that he I read the crew was super worried about like tooting in this neighborhood because they shot like eighty percent of it in this neighborhood pick it like neighborhoods still quite dangerous but like after like the people in that neighborhood learned that barry jenkins was from there. He was a story about them and stuff. They said like the locals were like amazing to them like pets. Tammy harris said it was like one of the nicest like ted. She's ever worked on like they're all just amazing. I saw. I thought that was really cool. I'm other eight twenty four movie that this sort of reminds me of now that you were kind of talking about like romanticize life is a florida project only similar dollars but also kind of like the hand held ending in a command to citation of like this. This poverty in florida have have seen that movie. Yes i love that movie tastic movie. Oh it's so good. I saw that one in theaters with page and page is still have tears coming out and the guy in florida projects part of working at him. He he might have done that. That movie was getting out of time. But i like to know that is just like yeah. That's been happening all week. Exactly movies both just like get you when it's when it's done yoga. Do we want to dive into the ending now. Because i'm just think about it. But i don't know if we wanna like we can save that for later. Let's do it. Why did you think of like how it it's very. It's a very like anticlimactic ending and a of ways but it satisfying but it's it's a. It's a quiet ending for sure. Yeah i i think what i love about. The ending is just that it kind of it's kind of like this This nudge of he's finally gonna try to be who he is you know. Maybe he is kinda going to but then again you don't really know that's what you hope i guess but but it is a little bit ambiguous. It's i love the ending though. I love the energy because it does. It gives you a sense of just a full circle like a really beautiful like reconnect. I guess i don't know it's hard to explain. I definitely agree with you on. I really liked the ending. Because i mean the moonlight specifically but like the moon has this weird like significance throughout the movie in that works in cycles so i almost see the ending as like to the beginning phase of like what. This movie is in. That like chaperone has gone through so many different phases. And we've seen him change so much in the ending kind of alludes to the possibility that he is now rian bracing his most fragile self which is like his childhood self in that like he's not corrupted necessarily by like the anger like the toxic masculinity that he's grown up around and so like i think that alludes to like a full circle type of transition. And like i think that's so like it's definitely quiet like you said ethan but i think it's so powerful address asure like the acceptance of like are smaller selves. Like i think that is like one of the coolest things ever is to like. Look at the youngest version of ourselves and like show like love towards version of ourselves rather than like distance or like annoyance in. Just me like you are so small in like i wanna like levin cherish you like india now yeah no. I think that's really good point. Yeah that was that was really this is this is why i keep having your back. You can make that. I'm so sorry. I think the thing that i realized as you're making your point ryan was was that like it's almost like every chapter is about some inciting incident then ling insides change. Change happens in the middle which is really really interesting. So it's like every every chapter is about like you get charoen that stuck in his ways and then you get the thing that's going to change his life but you don't actually witness the change. Ooh i love that actually like yeah you sort of assume that he starts to accept himself. But you don't really know at the end in what capacity. He's able to do that and like yeah is he gonna stop selling drugs. Yeah i don't. I don't know i. I think that's a good way to put it. And i think that's another reason why this movie kinda challenges. What we normally get from like best picture winners. Is that A lot of time like they're good movies obviously because they're winning best picture but a lot of time. We get more linear timeline. In that like there's a lot more exposition and explanation of our character arcs and we get like a clear view of that whereas in moonlight. Were getting like you said like kind of almost like the beginnings of change and then we're getting the end result and we're not necessarily seeing the toil of our protagonist in what that transition necessarily means. We're just at the point where they've already transitioned Which like that's something. I prefer in films is like the kind of stuff that like challenges conventional narrative. I definitely find it like more exciting in a way. I guess no for sure. It's almost like watching three separate narratives that are all. It's all one linear story but the separate parts are all completely different so it almost also helps not. This movie's boring by definitely helps the flow and it helps the pacing too. 'cause it's like you know once you're done with young sharon it's like you really want to be done with. Young rose only been like thirty minutes but then we move onto this next year. When you get to meet this one so then right over again. You get to meet him. See what what's different about him. You know what's different about the other people around him especially the mom character may have even changed more than him actually. Yeah but i love. I love that they did that because it really did make it. So like just seamless in smooth and it kept it very interesting which is just bonus on top of all the other amazing things that it does. Yeah totally jaffer. Sure not only that like it's like the first time like an all black cast has won best picture. It's the first time like an lgbt bluffs. Love story has win best picture. But it's also. I mean like aside from all of that. It's not as if they tried to fit those two elements into a classic oscar beatty story right direction and the production and everything about it is just is just really really out there and irrational but it really is one of the best executed movies i've ever seen like the fda the execution literally could not have been any better like honestly. I totally agree. Barry jenkins was perfect. Absolutely perfect just yeah. I love him. Live action lion king to we all make mistakes. Think he's to get his money and then he's going to give us something. Yes berry berry crazy. Berry jenkins's directing the sequel to the live action lang came. Okay sorry anyways like moment. Yeah so i just the real conversation i apologize. We didn't get any any any. Just like pats off that on like this structure or anything. I think the one thing that works really well about the structure is we're getting so many gaps it also allows the audience to kind of see themselves more narrative like the less like no direct exposition. You're getting obviously like the more room you have as an audience member to like. Draw your own connection to a character like we don't know honestly a ton about sharon or any of the other people in his life except for these brief blips and so then we get to fill in the gaps which like allows you to kind of connect more in certain ways like. There's certain things that i see in him. That i'm like oh my gosh. I was the same way as a kid like an in it's because xyz for. I wonder if he experience. Oh things to and it's like i think that's really cool because in some ways moonlight can be can on the surface level be viewed as harder to like connect with because it is such a specific type of story. But then when you're actually in and you're watching it there's so much room to connect to it like emotionally which i think is because of the structure. They're giving us. Did either of you have a favorite chapter a good question. Was there one that stood out in particular. You see the thing is i have. I have three favorite scenes from this movie. Each of them are from literally. Each of them are from after yes. Oh i honestly i would. I would say. Probably the shiran section the second section. If i had honestly like i can't i can't imagine like that that that section just breaks my heart so much because i cannot imagine opening yourself up to someone like you've never opened themselves up Like you've never opened yourself up before and having them literally like punch you in the face the next day. Yeah so and it's also roy's you it's also the section where his mom is is at her worse. So that's really like the toughest at least i would think that would be the toughest section For sharon definitely the mo- definitely the most compelling part of the story. I think. I was going to ask you. Guys what gret scenes you like the most. Maybe we'll get to that next. And you can run through your your top three there ryan but i think i think my section was like the child section. I wish i got like pardon me just like wishes. I got longer with that kid. Yeah i mean. I think i think this movie does a good job leaving you wanting more but i i really. I really did want more with that. One like there was the second one the second one wrapped up. When i was just like. Wow am i gonna. he's a man and it was. It was the point of it. But i just like yeah i i feel like that's the one i would just really long for more with that. With that character there was definitely a fantastic dynamic between the kid and and -mercial ali's character one down. Yeah yeah i let one. And i loved his dynamic with janelle monae as well like them as like this where he's just kind of like a little bit like all swagger and she's like so like caring and thoughtful i was like oh i love this so great and their house was so cute i get however knew who she was in the second chapter was like. Oh you're going over theresa's house. I'm like how does how does how do people know who has thirty year. Old is my guest is because they seemed to know that his mom was some kind of addict they probably knew that he didn't spend as much time with her. You probably spent some time somewhere else. Somehow you know. I'm guessing Yeah well it is a tight knit community. Yeah so i. I think i think that's a big part of it and like it alludes to the fact that like she and warren where like a long-term like they're a serious couple and like if anything out of anyone in that story i would say one was probably the most well known in the community for being a drug dealer and so like obviously there is an association with theresa and like when i mean. Obviously we don't really get much of anything about how one died or like what they look like. But like even sharon's mom said she was at the funeral so it's like i would assume that was a whole community wide event and so i think it's probably just like that association theresa had with juan is like why like everyone seems to know who she is in like the implications of like. Oh priced allows money and like all of these things that are like the brought up steadily without like fully addressing them which is very interesting. Yeah to- what was your favorite chapter in clara. I think i have to go with the third block. Because i know three different answers i know is all yeah true absolutely i think i like it because it takes the most significant things about parts of one and two and like almost like amplifies them in a way of just like it really expresses like the long term effects of like what we consider like our biggest moments in like our childhood and adolescence and like how it true does affect the person we end up being and then in addition to that like the way society also like builds on and how the to like are trying to coexist but usually one does end up giving out to the other and like with sharon. We see like hyper masculinity kind of win over like true self which like we see him getting to explore in different ways in his childhood and adolescence and then all of a sudden he's a man and he's this big tough guy. He's got a car that he blasts music and he's doing exactly what juan was doing in like you when you're watching him growing up you kind of have this. Hope that he'll break out of that cycle and then we see him in that cycle and so we're having to to confront that situation and then there's so many different elements of that like we see him essentially repair his relationship with his mom. Or at least start that repair we get like closure with kevin like there's so many different things that fall into that section obviously because it's the longest so like there's obviously a lot more that we can look out and be like. Oh this is connected to them blah blah blah. But i just think it's the most profound part of it for me just in how fully like we're getting the full picture of who he is. Which like. I love more than anything partly. Yeah i mean that's true but at the same time like even though it's a long as it has the least number of plot points. This is like the scene where he's in bed. He gets a phone call. he goes to miami. He sees his mom he goes to the diner he goes to the guy's house like that's that's that could have been. I'm not. I'm not saying it should have been destroyed online. Nobody like it. It's it's drawn out in this way that like the other sections. Aren't i feel like i. I feel like the adolescence. When probably has the fastest pacing. But i mean it's almost like he is like a teen like he's got hormones like he's he's like goes trying to beat these guys up and so you got a lot of fast cutting you get a lot of fast. Cutting you get like tow like cuts between scenes. You get like a lot more. That happens over a short period of time. Yeah and and it's interesting. The way he sort of changed each Each section sort of pacing to fit the time he was in. I'm in the third is reflective because it slows down in the characters looking back and so you're also like given time to reflect yourself on your experience like movie if that makes totally. I think that's absolutely spot on. And the and the like hello stranger song. Eleven also completely random but the last shot of the movie is one of my favorite last movie. Oh my god. It's so good. Got so much pages like kobe up or are they just like friends now. And he's just comforting. I'm like they're like they're they're they're probably hooked up like i don't know worry like it's going to happen. She was like why are they. Just like buds buds again. It's like that's what you want. Don't worry now. The last shot is is is great. But it's odd because it's not and this is gonna sound like backhanded compliment. But they something beautiful but like a not super memorable ending. It's because it allow okay so like allows a story to live on like like david. Lean famously did this with lawrence of arabia. where like he starts with the death of lawrence. Claire watch lawrence of arabia. Okay thank you. I'm glad we end figuring anything before like nights but like it starts with lawrence's death and then cuts back to him alive and so it has this it has this ending that if you ask even people that have seen it like like four or five times. What what happens at the very end of the movie. They're like i don't really know like it. It allows us to live on in this way and for me like i actually didn't remember the ending that well because it's not it's not like it's not the copyrights spinning the top or anything and so it's just it it allows you to fade out of the story in a way that like feels like they continue their lives if that makes the movie ends but the story continues absolutely exactly put it. I like that any thoughts non-member things or anything else. I don't know you guys just take over the pug welcome to clarify that flack clearest owned. I think you have to make a competing. Podcast running time and up again if i bring up three times then it'll happen anyway. I don't know no. I can't even add to that because i think that sums it up so perfectly in that light. This really is one of those stories that we get dropped into and like we just have the privilege of being there in time. We're getting and then we are taken right out of it and then we kind of have to just sit in these emotions. While sharon his life gets to continue on and like we just don't get to know and so it's kinda like okay like thoughts on thoughts on favorite scenes. You had you had car. So i guess i'll just i don't really have in order for these of chapter so the first one for teaching charoen how to swim which was apparently authentic as well. The kid didn't know how to the hackers. And i thought that was not only a beautiful in real life but like it's just such a beautiful scene like it really is The second one is when sharon's mom is asking him for money. And i know you have money sharon. I know yet and that that was just the most. That was the most heartbreaking part. I think of the entire movie And it can show well done in so we'll act it to like that. These went for and the third one was the mom at the rehab center. Now online ov sorry. But here's what is have a co if like so. Sharon's mom says. I don't care if you don't love me you're gonna know that i love you and Sheds one single tier and says i hate you mama. I was like that hurts. That hurts and then right after. He says that his mom's struggles to light a cigarette. And i was like. That's cinematic perfection right there. That was the most heartbreaking thing i have ever heard in my entire life and then they hug which men's did even worse and you're just like you're no you know that's like the first time they have had any kind of like physical contact in like years and not just like breaks me even more and white. Yes you think after that things are getting better like do you think that's a that's a healing moment that he said he hated her. Do you think that's like part of me. Says from here get a little bit better with them. The other part of me says. I don't think he wants anything to do with her. You know. I'm not really sure. I'm conflicted the way it ended. It seems like it was like a. This is how i feel right now. You know but things can change your definitely. You know you're getting better. You're at this place. You're staying at this place but i'm not really. I'm not entirely sure. I would like to think that from their their relationship can build. But i definitely think it alludes to the possibility of redemption for them in that like when she starts asking like on the streets it on. He kind of doesn't really answer but does at the same time in she kind of goes into the spiel. Like you shouldn't be doing this. He has that moment he likes starts to get up and he's like i'm just going to go. I'm i'm leaving. And then she's like no no no like police die. Police say 'em like he's he's an adult like he could just leave but he chooses to stay and that's where we get this profound moment of her like talking about loving him and like there's this tension in his as for that and he stays to like help her in this vulnerable moment afterwards of like lighting the cigarette and then like he. He's the one who initiates their embrace. And so i think that all eludes even without him like saying to us ever getting that like confirmation. I do think it alludes to the fact that even if it's not this moment like there is still hope for them and i think it ties in again to how i honestly i think that actually kind of starts his eventual like transition that we see at the very end of him re embracing his smallest self in that like dot moment almost starts not for him because like he's just a little kid and he never had his mom the way he needed his mom and now he's getting this moment of like love from his mom just like full unconditional love from his mom and so i would say that almost like begins the trajectory of that we see of him like getting to reconnect with kevin and then we get the final scene of him turning around and it's his younger self and so i feel almost starts that for him in a way. If that makes any sense am change. My answer like us to just be like clara monologue like millet has like really well put and like i really especially like what what you're saying about like embracing his younger self just like this idea that he was always this this this kid that needed love and like finally starting to heal that like inner part of himself like always needed love. Yeah it's so good grand. Thought that i just had i i. I tend to be like when. I'm when i'm nervous. I tend to talk more and not less. I tend to be a talkative person. And so for me. Like i tend. I tend to not relate to not talkative characters. Like i'm i i like drive but i'm not the biggest fan of dr partially just because i'm like why is it ryan gosling just like saying stand. What people are saying to him. A really frustrating to me. But but i mean like. I actually don't have that problem with this movie from reason. I mean like because when he's when he's when he's not talkative as a kid. I mean you kind of you're like okay. As a kid and like i sort of feel like the way the way they laid it out like the stuff that he's saying is is like profound and like surprisingly honest and so like even though he's a man of few words like he says things that are like oh. Wow like okay like that's that's how you feel unlike. That's that's that's always like what i would. I would always like to be that. Like i would always like to be like the clint eastwood that like sits in the back. And someone's like what is he thinking. I'm like would say like four words and they're like wow let profound i just ramble and i usually repeat my point twice like i'm doing now but i always wish i could be like man a few words just not. It's just not in the cards for me. That's really interesting. i'm the opposite in that. Like i in like group settings of it like of any setting. I get really overwhelmed and so like i get really quiet because i'm just like i just wanna like listen to everyone because i feel like if i'm going to say something everyone's going to be looking at me and so i need to have myself like well articulated but then i never think i'm well articulated enough and then i just don't say things so it's a miracle i even talk on this because i like the most weller going to say. I don't think i've met someone. Well titillated stop. I'm really cry. I don't like compliments. I definitely think. That's i think this is partially me. Like projecting like my own life experience on shire character. Which like like. I said i think is i. Don't i don't want to put words But like i do think is part of the intention of the film but like a lot of what i see in him relates back to like this really bad relationship. He has with his mom. Like i definitely noticed that in like kids who experienced that kind of like emotional distress in the home. They typically do end up becoming quieter kids because if they're not seen or like not heard than it's less likely for them to get noticed by the people who were like assaulting them with like verbal harm And so. I definitely like pick up on that a little bit with him. And then it kinda just carries on into his adulthood. And i kind of relate to that like i didn't have the best home life in so like i like a really loud kit up first which is different than him. Obviously but then. Like i really quiet and so like it's really interesting seeing that like portrayed on screen because i don't think that's a version of like a rough upbringing that we get a lot of like normally with like coming of age movies like even if the kid has this like difficult home life like this quirky like very well-spoken outgoing kid who's like just trying to make it in the world and yes i'm rooting for you. But then like with this situation like we get a character who isn't talking a lot and like almost challenges you have like. Are you going to support chaperone like a character if you don't get to hear from him a lot and it's like it works well because like obviously we're all like yes. I want you to. I want you to thrive like i want the best for this character So i think that's really interesting like i. How quiet he is. I think it helps that we get so much you know. We learned about sharrow not really from him but from what happens to him and other people around him. Yana realize what this situation is. And so it's it's you know it's hard to be like well you know. This kid doesn't talk much but like you're still. You're still on his side. You still put yourself in your like you know. I just want him to break out of this. I want him to get to the point where he can be comfortable in his own skin. 'cause we we all wanna be it in one way or another. We all want to be comfortable in our own skin and so we want to see that for other people as well and we'll just see how much he's struggling in the people around him and everything. And so i don't think yearly has to say much for us to be like. Yeah go shut road like shit. Yeah i actually love that. The way you put that because i think that's so accurate in that like what we know about him is through the people who are in his life specifically i would say about his sexuality as a whole like we never explicitly says like i'm gay but we hear his mom saying we hear like his peers like malcolm for it like there's all these implications of his sexuality that like we're picking up on as an audience member and like there's events that like allude to it like how at the end he says the kevin like i've never been with anyone else like it's just been you which is like honestly like Like such a sad thing disabled also like low key kind of really romantic away But no i think that's a really interesting thing about this is not like this is such a major story for like lgbt representation but like we never get that moment of like our character explicitly. Saying like i am gay like we're just getting kind of everything around. That's fear of it. I think going off that to the other thing that you don't ever get is kevin expressing feeling Sharon this is really interesting. Yeah because i mean you're like like so much of what you're assuming is that he. He called him because he heard this romantic song. And i mean it's all it's all implied in the. I mean you listen to the song you're like oh man but but like but but it's all it's all implied like you never you never get a moment where he's Where he actually tells him that he's gay. Let alone that he. He has any sort of like like romantic feelings toward which is interesting. Yeah i mean like like i think. My interpretation of of his character was that he was. He was trying to mask his sexuality by putting around with all these girls at school and stuff sort of like like trying to force himself to be straight. But i mean for all we know he could have been by and could have also enjoyed that. But like i mean that was my interpretation. You don't you don't know much about his his sexuality either at all i guess oh absolutely yeah he does. He does say that he has a kid at one point right. Yes yeah so that almost it almost makes you think that he wouldn't really mentioned that if he wasn't saying something like you know as if it was like he was trying to hide himself at the time you know what i mean. It seemed like he was almost trying to be like i get it. You know metoo. I'm in the same boat. You are kind of thing. Yeah so but it's all very implied. It's all it's all. I get deep levels of implication of like. I got a kid. It's like. I don't know i don't know yes This movie definitely. It doesn't make it easy for you. It makes you think it definitely. It gives you the pieces. You just have to put it together. But i liked that. I hate movies that that you throw it right in your face. It's like i understand. Let me figure. And and like i said with the first time i saw moonlight. I didn't get it. I i really. Why wouldn't say. I hated it. But if i were if i had letterbox back in the day probably would gotten like a three or something like that. Two and a half. I was just saying not really feeling it and hooking ryan the worst but the second time i watched it i was just like i totally get it now like i absolutely understand it and it was i honestly i feel like most people probably don't like this film really. Just don't get it at the heart of it. What it's really trying to do totally absolutely yet. Yeah i mean. I think the other thing that like that also came to mind there because because like i also like movies that make me i mean. Sometimes the most powerful like political statement is like no political statement. Like in this case. Like you're seeing this. You're seeing this story. Play out You're you're telling the story Pie out about this poor black gay kid and you you learn to love this kid and it's an. It's laid out in a way that i think almost anyone of any political belief would have have some sympathy for this kid unless unless you're ultra radicalized and and like like sometimes like just creating an emotional bond with someone and i like a story that you're not used to hearing is like a more powerful political statement than i mean spike lee for instance and i don't mean to just compare like the two most famous black direct but like but like but like spike spike lee. For instance like constantly tries to hammer home like passages that. He's trying to get across in his movies. But i almost like prefer. Generally barrel jenkins approach of like kind of leaving things implied than leaving your interpretation. Yeah i agree. I prefer subtlety. I do love spike lee's movies but some of them can be a little bit too in your face. And although i haven't really seen too many barry jenkins movies i don't even has to too many. I think three years three at this point. It's it's just the subtlety of it honestly ads with taking away. What you would be you know presenting to the audience to make it more obvious. You're actually adding to the movie by making it less obvious. I think it really does make the movie. More compelling in a lot of different ways yeah i think Yeah i think. I think that's a great point. I think i think the other thing. If like just staying in that vein of like buried jenkins like versus spike lee. 'cause i i love both of them like i i really like spike lee's work but i think they also are a reflection of the time that they come from legs. True spy pointys. Filmmaking began at a point where like there was racial discourse but like it almost like wasn't this like constantly talked about thing in the That's coming from like totally like privileged. Like i'm a white girl that grew up in the nineties type of things like who i don't know but like in that sense. I think it had to be more aggressive in your face of like what his point is in his films are always very centered on discussions of race discrimination and like those hardships and like i think that has carried over like into his later films for sure like i definitely think all of his films are very on the nose but i think that reflects a lot of like where he came from whereas jerry junkins is a little bit younger and like his films have come up in a time where like we are getting dot open and honest and constant discussion about racial inequality and like the struggles of like the block experience. And i think it's allows him to have a lot more subtlety in his work. Because there's less having to explain to the general public like hey black people have it really hard in our country totally. Yeah i thought. Spike lee made movies like malcolm x. Like of course malcolm x. Is going to be. It should be in your face. It's supposed to be so. Yeah definitely yeah. I don't either like at the same time. I don't i don't mean to insult any way. Yeah i mean personally. I have a lot of respect for him as a filmmaker. I guess i guess. I just find that like if you're trying to get a political political message across and and both political messages like i agree with. It's just i find. I find that like princeton's like if i don't know if this is to tin if this is like too often tangent but like it's fine sonoma and black clansmen were competing in the same year for like an oscar. And like if you think about like i was really frustrated with black klansman's ending specifically the way like like spike lee cuts back to like and charlottesville just happened. And that's why i've made this movie and you're like i knew that like i knew that because you're making a movie about clansmen and twenty eighteen like of course it's because we're living in a trump era like i get i totally get thank. You don't need to connect those dots for me. I like to connect those dots and like roma i. I mean like as a super different story but it deals with like a racism and class struggle and like it was so much more sort of like nuanced in layered. Let us make your own decision about like about like what you thought of. How dynamics work done if that makes sense. But i feel like perry jenkins falls more under the funds Side of things where he shows you this really hard life and then sort of lets you make up your mind about it. And i mean because he's the author like you're you're you're likely to agree with them but like he's he. He leaves those dots for you. That connect i guess. I think the other thing. That's interesting between like spike lee. Berry jenkins is that berry. Jenkins is still so new that a lot of the time his audience is going to be a more. I would argue a more like leaning woke in quotes type of audience because like those are the people who are typically watching like indie cinema knots like it like even has ended up being a like success for its light calibre like it still like arguably an indie film whereas like spike lee has been around long enough for like. He's just kind of like a goto big name and so like he does a lot of time have a way broader audience and so i could see it being not as well like spike lee almost having to like hold your hand through what he saying because it's more likely that he's getting somehow those people that like aren't willing to acknowledge or like are just ignorant to the fact that like these things going on and so he's like okay we're just gonna very gently shoves right in your face. I really show like how far like they're still a very long way to go for inclusion in filmmaking. But i think it does allude to the fact that their husband some kind of progress which is really exciting absolutely within the past few years since moonlight picture been. There's been great improvements and of course there's still a long way to go but i mean six years ago big difference speaking speaking of black directors. This is a little fun. Got a little trivia for you guys at the time at the time barry jenkins when he was nominated for best director was the fourth black man to ever be on their best actor. You guys know who the previous three were and there have been two since then. Do you know who the two since our. Oh i will try okay. I'm say spike has been nominated. Syncing because i think it was nominee for black klansman. I also i also think spike was nominated at one point before you actually wasn't surprising not nominated you've never had a director non that okay. I'm gonna say john singleton is on there. Yeah that was the one i was gonna say. All right. denzel does denzel nominee for now. No nope director. Yeah wasn't he was didn't the dental direct. No he wasn't. I didn't he director. I think he directed fences really interesting. We all open letterbox immediately. Okay this is a good quick for him. That got a lot of nam's is a way. Did we say no it you johnson. I don't think she got nominated. Though they're all they're all men who have we said. So far you said spike lee and john singleton very jenkins It's steve mcqueen. Yes how can i leave off job. Yes i'm steve mcqueen early to china there's one more prior one more after. Oh no did jordan. Peele get it forget out jordan. Forget oh i'm doing so bad and about we both have to and there's one i'll give you. I'll give you a hint for the one. The movie came out in two thousand nine. No up for so two thousand nine. That's the hurt locker avatar year. You're gonna say it. And i'll be like oh yeah. Of course it was. It was lee daniels for precious. I am i love. Precious showed was like how like every awards ceremony. They had to save precious based on the novel. Push by sapphire. Not every every single of does like wow all right full yes is not full interesting interesting. Here's two more nominees. I know i help in the future. I really six a criminally low number six. That's honestly insane to think about considering. This is the ninety third year the oscars. Can i bring up one of my favorite scenes that we haven't brought up yet okay. I'm taking over here. We go to clarify welcome. That was like one of my worst jokes. I've ever made no such a joke. Okay so one of my favorite scenes is in chapter two sharon at like very end where we have the scene where he just got. Beat the fuck up by kevin tyrel and all these other guys. And he's done his little ice bath type of thing and then he is back at school. And we're getting just like a tracking shot of him from behind. And i love the the scene specifically because of what they're doing with the score and like there's just all these different instruments that warmup orchestras do before they actually get started and they're all kinds of just testing we get that instead of like an actual score and it just it makes me so anxious which i like normally i'm like i don't wanna be anxious but i love it in that moment because it just feels so powerful because like you just don't know what's about to happen like he's very clearly like set on something and then we get the most insane seen ever of him throwing his backpack down and then like the music stops and just see him. Beat the shit out of tyrel chair and you're like holy shit like we've never seen him act like this before like that's crazy to see from his character and like i think that's definitely up there as one in my top three scenes just because it's such a shift in him alludes to what get immediately after with like who he becomes but it's just like so well done because of the score i think and like the fluid motion of it all like. We're never getting a moment. Where like we stop and think about like what he's about to do. It just happens and you're like whoa so. This is the second movie that ryan is done. That involves Chair throwing all. My god is a we along as symbols. That was a good conversation. The breakway chair in this what. what are we thinking. how does it live to fletcher's teaching methods You know. I think a fletcher used that method. Be a little more thorough to finish the job a little bit of brain damage so funny yet. I'm super like i was i. I wrote the my notes. I just wrote the score and all cops surprised it took us this long to bring it up. It's a it's amazing so good is crazy. I think nicholas patel has hardly sunday definitely wasn't on my radar before this his. I love his score for moonlight. But i would say honestly of his to that. He's done with barre barre jenkins i prefer If beale street could talk score wise. I thinking that beale street score was really good so good. I think he like finds this really powerful flow in moonlight. That then he like brings into if beale street could talk and like a slightly more refined way that just just. I listened to that all the time. I love it. Love any any other dislike rando thoughts on moonlight I actually have like a weird question for both love just because like obviously this is like a movie where i can connect to it to some extent but like also like not a man obviously So i there are certain things about that. I can't quite really like one of my favorite things about it. Is the like relationship. We see between sharon and warren and like how he becomes dislike male role model for sharon like he needed at kind of the most in like his youngest years. And so i was wondering like what you guys thought about that. And like if you saw like any relationships in your own lives that reflect that or like if it just like felt relatable in any sense if that if that. I don't know if i made that question makes sense okay. Okay like as a man. I'm glad i can explain to you what it's like to be a man. I mean it was. It was portrayed really well it's not. It's not something triggers anything in my life. I think because like my dad was around in for him. It's very much about. It's sort of finding his own father figure. Essentially i didn't really i didn't really totally relate to that but i thought i thought just the dynamic of i mean i think i think there's a thing that's also portrayed in this movie. Were women tend to be more sensitive in open and select therese's very much like tell me how you feel and tyrone and water just kind of their together and there and there's a lot left unsaid but they just kinda they're just kinda with each other and i felt like dot dot felt really real to me interesting. There's nothing my personal life. That specifically took me back to that. I guess totally now. That i now that i think about i think i have definitely a similar scenario but switched so i have a little cousin abu. I call my baby cousin. He's not really baby anymore. He's eleven now when he a few years ago. I think it was like eight years old. He lost his father. And ever since. Then i've kinda you know. Whenever i can you know i go and see him and i go and he calls me a lot to play fortnite and stuff like that and i try to step in i. Do i do what i can because i love. I love that kid. So so. I guess i can definitely see that kind of connection between some. I mean it's a little different because we are related but totally but that connection is definitely. It's definitely similar. Feel it's gone. Yeah that's really sweet right. I love that l. of the your friends with them and everything it's awesome. It's a special. I really like that accused. I that kind of leads into another question. Though about their relationship. That i find interesting in that like we see like one kind of god of his way to lake. Be there for sharon in some capacity but at the same time like he is the drug dealer in the area unlike. Sharon's mom is a drug addict. Presumably buying from him in some way or another and so like does not at all like affect the relationship between the two in your opinion. Because i don't know how it definitely it definitely does. I mean it's heart. It's a heartbreaking scene when he's at the table and he's like so my mom's on drugs and you sell drugs so yeah like i. Yeah i think the kid walks out and he's just like that's that's herschel. He's best acted seen in is. Isn't that the last time we see those two interact is. It is which is what which is why. It's sort of shocks me. The your to believe that. Their relationship became so much stronger after that because they clearly grew past that. But it's like it's it's it is an odd sort of place to end that chapter on because you're if you're if you're to leave there not not bring it up again. You would assume that. That was kind of the end of things i guess. Yeah i would think that You know if if he wasn't selling drugs she would probably be getting them somewhere else anyway. So so that part of me is like what the big deal but then but it's still it's still kinda change. It does change the dynamic a little bit because it almost makes you think like in even if it's a small way he's kind of responsible for some of his home problems that he's literally going to one to to try and like escape away from. Yeah so his escape is actually part of the problem in the cycle. You know so. It's it's interesting. Dynamic is definitely a little bit skewed in because of that. But that's bring it up. Because i was like i didn't i didn't really think about it when i i watched the movie but like now on a rewatch like obviously you get more time to reflect on like the dynamics and stuff and so it was like definitely something that came up to me of like dang like he seemed so genuine in his desire to be there for him. But it's also a little bit like is one only doing this because he feels guilty. And i feel like that's me being very jaded and cynical but i think there's a major part of it. I love the sun comes up to knock on the door. I must be like the third time he comes to the house To knock on the door. And and i and like wan's walking up with with like a gun. He quickly puts away when he realizes the kid but he's just mean it it. It really drives home. That contrast between like one's career. I guess in his relationship with the kid i like also think one was pretty woke for like to assume it was the nineties right. Yeah i think it was like the eighties or the nineties pretty. It's pretty woke for the nineties. Especially when you know the kid asked him like what's like faggot and he's sort of like he he explains it in a really like that's amazing disarming way almost i was. I was sort of impressed by his explanation. And unless you want to and the now don't go now. It's a. It's a really. It's a really heartbreaking scene and it's and like i think it dry i think it also drives home the fact that like i mean his homeland his lake. Sharon's homelife is bad. But it's not it's like tests movie isn't the blind side like he's not going to like sandra bullock's nice house. He's minutes all like well. Like i get all these like my own room and this is all you know. It's like it's like it's like one still one a nice house but he's still a drug dealer and like you still involved in this in this life that they wanna get out so it's like it's almost like you can only get out of it so much ye-ye-yeah and she does always bring sharon back hall like he always goes home at a day like there's never that moment of like you should just stay here forever like obviously. There's the implication that he can come whenever he wants to visit but lake. There is the implication of like. We're not your parents. Were there for you but like you have to go home. Which is interesting to see definitely interesting any other points you want to get through before we wrap up the podcast. My last big point that i had written down is that i am thrilled. That naomie harris was in this because when she got the script she didn't want to play paula. Like at all she was like. I don't. I vowed that i would never play. The stereotypical like black woman addicted to crack like. That's not a role. I want to perpetuate any further and film. And so but then after sitting down with jenkins and like talking through the heart of the character and like what we see her go through like then she kinda signed on and i think she portrays like this sense of like wrath against like the world as a whole and then like digging into sheron as like her target like so well like i love her performance in this Was she nominated. I don't remember she was nominated. I don't i don't think so. She was might have been the only she you know she was. She honestly robbed. She has such a good performance and she did. She felt everything all three days. Really know that. I three days in between her specter towards. You're going to tour for specter. And she really filmed in three days in between sane and you get a performance of that like that good. Are you kidding. that's crazy. No yeah because it's probably up. There is like one of my favorite like supporting actress performances. Like it's it really is I love her also know. Ju just total side. I think it also just reminds me how long it's been since we've had a bond movie that like the last bond movie came out during the filming of moonlight like it wasn't even like the it's crazy and it's been that long but wow you have to point anyway. Yeah no. I mean like really short amount of time and apparently did to shoot at a sequence. So it's amazing that they were crammer her her character line in there. She was able to give that amazing of performance a little time. I want to throw out one more piece of history that this carries pleased in that. Is that Dede gardner who is producer on. This was the first woman to ever first woman. Sorry to ever win. Two best picture oscars the other one was twelve years. A slave desperate goal dads for her. Wow also brad pitt. Did this. And i think yeah mine executives volved alden twelve years a slave but brad pitt is is plan b entertainment. If you've received that like they look like he does he does a lot. He doesn't look like a lot of really really cool. Andy projects like i mean. If you didn't have enough of a reason to love brad pitt. Now truly he. He produced moonlight. Yeah he's the best he's the best. We all have brad pitt shallow. Brad pitt brad pitt. Yeah that's awesome. That's awesome for sure Do you fall in the moonlight side of the moonlight. Lowland s i. I do now. I didn't a few years ago. But i do now. I have from the beginning. Yeah i even before. I saw either one. I definitely i definitely felt on the on. The i definitely fell on the on the law side of things up. I now i i mean i just. I just watched both recently. Both recently for the podcast. It's interesting and it still. I still think they're both. So it's it's. It's so weird to me that these two such different movies are intertwined because of the disaster. That happened on stage. Like yeah like that. Like the revenue spotlight art intertwined even though they were like the talk that is true competitors. It's because of this weird mishap. That movie's just like forever. Locked all right but Both beautiful and have have commented in the color palette both both honestly beautiful stories that i think we live on for a long time so i absolutely agree So so y'all drill in character And have a bryan fletcher was amazing. Was get out of here clear. I had a quote. I have one but i think mine we have to end on so i will. I'm refusing to go first. Okay so ryan has to go first. Okay i already said this quote. But i'm going to try to do it in character. Okay okay you ain't got love me but you're know i love you. Thank you thank you. Good good good okay. So mike why good. My quotas breaching conventions a little bit. But i think it's perfect so i'm really office. I'm excited here we go. This is not a joke. Moonlight has won best picture. Moonlight washer. Thank you. I was thinking. This was a great episode. I thank you both for coming back on this. I will be sure to be back when there is a movie with a chair being thrown major. And hey guys. Have you ever thought about launching. Your own podcast. 'cause i a couple of years ago i was trying to figure out to launch The sin affleck podcast looking around and I had a lot of questions of just. Like how do i record. Upload who can like distribute the episode and anchor made it just super super easy Anchors the one stop shop for recording hosting in distributing your podcast pest all. It's one hundred percent free in ridiculously easy. To use. And now anger can match you with great sponsors. Who want to advertise on your podcast. This means you can get paid to podcast right away. In fact that's what i'm doing right now by reading this I've been using anchor for a few months. Now to distribute the podcast. And it's just been very very helpful for that You can go on Anchor dot fm slash. Start to join me and the diverse community podcasters using anchor that's anchor dot fm slash. Start look forward to hearing your podcast. Thank you for listening to another episode of affleck. We'll see you next week.

barry jenkins ryan sharon Ethan colbert Claire curtis clara santa flack Gaspar noah noah Stephen sydney isaac griffin berbie oscars janelle monet clara carson Mahershala oscar berry jenkins miami Tammy harris
Barry Jenkins on The Underground Railroad

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

1:17:04 hr | 2 months ago

Barry Jenkins on The Underground Railroad

"Y'all i'm shay serano brandon jinx jenkins. We have a new show called no skips with jinxing shake. We discussed the most unstoppable albums in hip hop new episodes. Drop on thursdays. Only on spotify. This episode is brought to you by wells fargo wells fargo is proud to support women and diverse small business owners leading the way to recovery. Find out more at wellsfargo dot com slash together. This episode is brought to you by comcast over the next decade comcast is committing one billion dollars to reach fifty million low income americans with the tools. They need to succeed in a digital world. Learn more at comcast dot com slash education. Welcome back everybody. This is larry wilmore. You're listening to black on the air choosing this podcast. Listen to as always tried to have fun smart conversations with things. I'm primarily interested in hope that you are to. You never know what you're going to get here. We seem to be having a lot of directors lately. But you know i love talking about film and writing and that and we have another one this week. This one of my favorites you guys buried jenkins who has directed limited series called the underground railroad based on colson heads. Brilliant pulitzer prize. Winning a man who. This thing is amazing. it's amazon prime. You guys really need but our conversation so much fun. I can have conversations like the one that i have with berry. I just had recently just just forever as you could tell we going for about an hour so i hope you enjoy that especially for the people that are kind of interested in that area and everything very. He's such a interesting filmmakers such an artist too and i think you'll enjoy that conversation. Yes since it over an hour. I won't take a lot of time right now. in fact i'll keep it kind of like next week though when we come back next week but when we come back i wanna talk about what's going on in texas. There's a lot of shit going on there in. i believe there. There's an attack going on in the country right now over women's reproductive rights and that is very concerning to me. Something's going to happen in the next couple of years with the supreme court and everything i think. The right definitely has their targets roby way in an aggressive way that i've never seen in a while and that's a premium courtroom. The you know conservatives. They were not fucking around. You talk about packing the court. They packed that mother. Fucker man with mitch. Mcconnell just change in the rules and not letting obama habits pick because of course it should have been an obama pick and then Change the rose again. So trump got the extra pick for any conybeare that should have been a Biden pick there should be to liberal judges instead of conservative runs and believe me. That is no accident its purpose foam. It's one of the reasons that i think conservatives get out to vote with the most fervor i think they get out to the mercy fervor for the issue of abortion more than any other issue and connect that to conservative judges. Because that's the issue that the care about most there's other issues too that they want the conservative of bench to be leaning right but that one man they are not fucking around and if we have that same that same type of thing on the left. But there's gonna be. I'll talk about in detail. I i'm going to do some more research. And what's going on before i start talking about him but texas is kind of where it's pretty berry now. But it's him and other places so we'll talk about that next tempering. Now guys my lakers are in the playoffs. You know this is a happy time for me and it's fraught. I got a lot of basketball judah. Call it judah basket budget. So i'm very happy about that end. There's another thing going on has very bizarre and arrow think about this. So let me just give you a little context for it. So i'm not a conspiracy person. Okay i told you my whole theory for conspiracy. Some of you go to be out there. I appreciate that you know where i believe. A conspiracy theory. People that engage a conspiracy theories they always went to the demand evidence for the obvious. But then once you to swallow the pasteurize. That's my kind of math equation. For hell all conspiracies work from the nine eleven to you. Know we didn't go to the moon to whatever you know but guys what's going on with the whole alien thing right now. That used to live in. This land of conspiracies though i was always fascinated by ufo's and all this kind of stuff. Even when i was a kid. I read a tons of buts about this whole roswell thing fascinating about this. I've been on both sides or i go I don't know. I don't think they should israel and i've been in i was like this is definitely real their their housing body somewhere. Been all over the place you know. Because we don't know whether to trust government in this situation we know the government likes to cover shit keep shit secret but at the other hand we also know shit gets out. You can't keep secrets to look but the the ufo but then there's also signs you know what could actually be true scientifically in. Could we actually physically be visited by other paint or whatever. I don't know that seems kind of outrageous. Does life actually exists out there. That seems more likely than the someone visit us. Does life exist. Seems more likely than can someone visit his an with someone and has that already happened. There's been other theories of some of these. I think i made up years ago. Where these inter dimensional things were these. Let's call them. Anomalies that we're seeing and experiencing they're not really craft from like deep space going through a wormhole getting here they're actually in this space bend a different dimension and sometimes they crossed dimensions and they become visible and cross back in other dimensions and that type of thing. Some people think that their time travelers. Oh my god the time. Travelers become back to or just about excel people think These aren't all these. You know these people. Some people think that they Like live in the bottom of the ocean and there have been reports of. Ufo's going into the ocean and coming back and it's like what the fuck what him in. Some people think. They're alien basis on the dark side of the most what to think. There's so much it's crazy. It's crazy crazy crazy. All of his crazy. But and then there's area fifty one of course. Which is that where the government is hiding things you know harry. Reid came out and talking about. He saw some shade area fifty. What shit harry. What kind of to see it area fifty one tell us stop speaking in riddles and now obama is saying. He wished he could say something. We'll say it obama. You're not president anymore. What is this riddle talk. You know so. I hate this but something's happening you guys. I don't remember the government going this far to acknowledge that their shit really out there and that their shit that's really happening and my head is in tizzy. Because i'm like well. What does this mean would about to be revealed to us. Are we embolden like reverse engineering and technology. That type of thing. Was there some accidents that happen and maybe the other things are novelties. Nominees but there are certain things that happen. Could it be possible that we're visit. Maybe not by beans but by drones like the way we syndrome lamar's if only i don't know you guys. I really don't know what to think right now. I'm in a very very tough position. I have no idea what to think about this. I'm in the rare position right now. Where i feel anything can happen. Information could come out where we can find out on. This is all bullshit. Here's what's really going on. The government has a lot of secret shit. And they want you to think. There's aliens out there to divert us away from the real secret which is developing weapons. You know that people have no guard again so they want you to think. There's aliens out there. So they can develop stealth technology and stuff like that. And that's what's going on harry. Fifty one completely believable. I got no problem with that. Theory it does make sense doesn't explain sightings around the rest of the world but it does explain things that maybe happen here then. There's the other thing that i feel could have in two were although i it's hardly there's a world conspiracy to not talk about something that's hard to believe but sometimes we know things tend to happen all at the same time around the world. I've talked about how i believe things. Cluster we have clustering moments in history. Art happening cluster. Science happens on clusters a political movements. Kinda clusters by cluster. I mean they all seem to happen around the same time. Learning how to fly can happen different areas at the same time. Why why did we certainly think about flying at the same that who knows what this. Ufo thing what this information is revealed in the same way that it's real. What if they should real you guys. Have we been just set up by cove it in some way to be ready to behave globally in the same way. I don't know now my brain is going to places you know. But i know it would be a letdown for people. If it's the first explanation but what would happen if it is the second. I mean if something really is out there that is different. What does happen you know. Many of the theories are that they can't really share these things with us. this series. Where for the fifties and sixties. The government can't really share things because chaos people ride in the streets wag. The biggest reason is because people would have to rethink religion in the role. Religion plays in the life. And whether or not that sheet is real. Wow that is something. And that's not entirely wrong. I think a lot of these existential questions about these tethers that we have in our lives whether it be. Religious tethers metaphysical. Whatever if there are these alien beings from another planet are gonna probably overturn a lot of these ideas or make you rethink. Maybe they'll make you believe in a more who knows but shit is certainly not saying shit. It's certainly not going to be the same. If somehow we are face to face with an entire new class of creatures it would be fascinating. I'm all for it there. You guys i am all for. I'm all for expanding our ideas of what our universes the universe has both gotten bigger and smaller smaller in the sense that everything is closer now to we have more access to information and that but bigger in the sense of what we consider the universe to be more infinite now than it ever has been the universe indeed is expanding we you know as a culture the things of care about may not have expanded. The universe certainly is and it would be interesting if at this time when especially here in america. There's so much going on. Culturally were added some time. We're at some kind of cultural transition right now. I don't know what it is. But i think years from now the review people might say. Oh yeah yeah. That shit was changing during that time. Wouldn't it be interesting though if something like this happen right now. During these turbulent times very interesting food for that. I thought i would put it out there. Let's keep our eyes and see. See what happens you guys. I mean you never know. I never we never thought it'd be a global pandemic greg. This in the whole world would be in lockdown. I mean if issue of oh thing turns out to be something. I'll have to get more that's do do. I will promise you if it turns out to be something. I want to get an alien and actually because i got a lot of questions to them. That's what i got okay. We got buried jenkins coming up to talk about the underground railroad. But i this this episode is brought to you by legalzoom. Whether you're starting your own business registering a trademark or filing a patent legalzoom wants to make sure those milestone moments done right. That's why they have a variety of services designed to help you set up your business or protect your intellectual. Property is simple streamlined. It's ready when you are so whenever you're ready to do something awesome. Legalzoom is here to make it official legalzoom. Let's make it official. Legalzoom is not a law firm. Welcome back you guys It is my pleasure to welcome his gentlemen to the show. It might as work for a while. now. I mean from beautiful midnight bill street. I mean everything he does is like this beautiful. Just lush portrait. And he's done it again with the limited series amazon. The underground railroad based on colson. Whitehead book that was pose prize winning. I believe and mr barry jenkins welcome to black air. Hey thank you for having me man. It's a pleasure it it's such a pleasure You know i'm a big fan. I gave you got the dvd or berry. Go take take the man. What an achievement. This is you have to feel proud to have this On the air right now and yeah. I am proud man especially because it was It was such a heavy Such a heavy to bear the living. And yet i do think that you know when i watch it or when when people watch it you know all that effort is very clearly on the screen. So yeah i am. Proud of is the best way to describe the feeling i have towards it. Yeah that's great when you can get it on the screen and all that effort is not off the screen that is a winning thing It's funny because i hosted the national book. Awards the year that costa one for this for underground railroad and I remember at the time you know it was such a different environment. You know than it is now yet. We were just coming out of that. I just finished in the nightly show but we had just come out of a lot of things with police in other kind of stuff until a lot of You know. I would say the undercurrent of racial issues was kinda blowing this summer. Kind of in that right now. You know not not bad. It's ever gone away. My lifetime you know so to speak How did you know you wanted to make this. We were you a fan of the book when it came out that you get a did you know about it before. It was kind of a combination of all that. I had been a fan of colson since his first book. Intuition is not actually tried to adapt intuition us around two thousand nine to ten clinton get a hold of it and as a kid always been obsessed with the concept of the underground railroad. At when i heard the words. I saw black people on trains underground because the education system didn't fill in the gaps. I was allowed to have that vision For maybe a couple of weeks and then we got to that chapter during black history month. And i realized that. Oh this is what the underground railroad actually is But that feeling. I a kid always stayed with me and so i heard about colson book before reading it. I just heard colson. Whitehead wrote a book about the underground railroad where the railroad real and i was like. Oh i have got to get my hands on that. I actually read the book before it released and before. Moonlight released as well alone jumped on costa as bra. You gotta let me have this And so we met. And i told him. Don't do it as a film. I wanted to it as a limited series and that was even before moonlight premiered. And so this thing has been with me since before. Anybody was aware of who barry jenkins was which i think is a thing because it wasn't dictated by the success of that film. It was already in process absolutely which is great. Which really shows. Because you bring such a ano- there's a familiarity may be is the right word with with wanting to destroy. I mean it's such a. it is such a live metaphor anyway. Underground railroad in the movie works on so many different levels with. I don't wanna use the word fantasy as much as i think. Alternate is probably a better word But this notion of that. Underground road has fantastical elements that have to be the right tone in the same movie with the realities of slavery. Correct yeah correct and you know as you said the book warm pulitzer prize and national book. I believe so. It's a damn good book you know howson's done a lot of really diligent work to make sure that in the you know alternate Alternate reality or the alternative history still based in some element of truth and so. I love that. No-one libra tastes in this book to a certain degree And i even said we were making the film or making the show. Excuse me yeah you. No one's going to levitating are what real trains running through actual tunnels Again because when i was a kid my granddad was a longshoreman. Him put on his hard hat and the steel toe boots and go off to work. And i thought oh. Yeah people men like him. They built the underground railroad in. I think in adapting the book to the screen. Visually wanted to translate the things that i saw a child and it is a challenge. You know as i'm watching and the book is so fascinating too and it is funny how you think something's might be able to work in a novel. Pecan they really work. When you dramatize it because there is and you know this as director putting something on its feet is completely different than when it's on the page every rehearsal you find that out right. Did you have any concerns about like. Were you intimidated by any of this berry when you were first a putting pen to paper and and kind of planning out this whole limited series. Yeah i was intimidated by two different ways. The scale of it for sure you know i think of a feature film was very bespoke of process. You have four months to try to figure out forty scenes So you can give each seen. A great level of detail is almost like to jail. Just going to a private school where you have one teacher for every fifteen students. The eagles the big public school. Now you've got one teacher for every fifty students and so it's much more difficult to keep that same kind of bespoke education. The give the same attention so in that degree thought. Oh this is terrifying. I know how we're going to manage this. And then of course. The subject matter itself is very very delicate. Very triggering very explosive. And i knew even though. I don't have the same amount of time that i normally would have to work each of these things. This was a feature film. I have to almost get the more time Because the themselves are so incendiary the images so triggering that they demand extra special attention. What was the writing process like. Did you work with carlson on the writing process or did he advise you at all. Was he just there as a safety beacon if you needed him. What was that like. He was there as a safety beacon. You know he was really cool. You know one. He was writing another novel. That would get him a few was. But he's a fan of of cinema and colson is very very good about. What are the kids. I stay in your lane. You know he was like the book is mine and the show is yours as you said as you put us quickly i will be a safety beacon if you need to know more about this and more about that or of questions about anything. Reach out to me. And so we We adopted or adapted but we began the process in a writer's room. There were about five or six of us in it was eight weeks. This is a really intense writing process. And we just pull the book apart and tried to figure out as you were saying what can go from the pace screen and travel transition intact and then what else can we extend off of it. And anytime we're going to veer away from the narrative. I would reach out to colson and go. What do you think of this. It's your world your characters. does this fit in. In every time he was very supportive. There's only one idea at that. He that he shot down. It was a terrible idea. They now in hindsight the there's like the character grace Fan rigs great care the show. I just thought oh. Maybe there's a world where she in this kid homer are fraternal twins Because there were these instances were there were brothers and sisters who were separated. Families were split up all the time. What if there's a way that you can draw this line where you realise very late in the narrative that these two were these twins were separated at birth and grace ended up on the run and homer unfortunately Ridgway it was a terrible idea. He shot it down very quickly. That is a interesting thought though. How do you determine especially in a writer's room which is very interesting to like what makes what's gonna get in. And what actually does it make it there. How do you make that determination what needs to be in there. Like what can not get in and what If we get an in that'd be nice. Yeah it kinda works through. I try to work from my gut. Read the novel already. I'm seeing things. And if i can see it. 'cause sense from the beginning right exactly because tell a novelist everything's being told and then in cinema theoretically everything's being shown so if i can see things that is authors telling me boom. That's and then it's like what's the organizing principle. What what is the story about me. In the case of this book it was about as idea of parenting this relationship between a mother and a daughter and so with the character. Grace for example. I thought we needed to insert this character. Who is in the book. Because even though core can't learn the biography of why her mother abandoned her air quotes is for radio. Wire mother abandoned her. She can learn through going through her own mother experience. You know what it demands of a person to be a mother the the sacrifices you are forced to make some times so that was one where it's okay cool. This is completely outside. Inherited the book but is working towards the thing. That is very much in the book. So so that lives and then beyond that it's consensus Elegant intellectual consensus you know. It's not like rotating the boat okay. The six of us this thing. It's in more about as we talk. You realize we're all gravitating the wars towards the same things and this idea of the great spirit was something that everyone in the room which is sort of a an enraptured by And so that was one of the things was like. Yeah that's gonna make it in and then you go through the process and there's some shit that we wrote scripts for that we just couldn't afford to make out a it's it's a very tricky process. Wow that is complicated One of the things. I'm struck by is Other brutality that is unscreened and I've always insisted. And i've even told my kids as i said no matter how brutal depiction is of that time. It's not as brutal as it actually was because the real actually can't take it actually can't take brutal those times where and there's some brutal depictions of how people treated you have one particular sequence. We hear those interesting. The book actually doesn't go as far. I think as you. Do you know what i win. The slavers returned that sequence. You know. But but i'm like yes berry you have to show the horrors of this place you know in real terms but go ahead. What's a couple of things it's show versus. tell you know. I don't have the luxury of telling an audience. This thing happened in. This is how it felt the only tools my disposal. Our show colson Is very is a very Honest but also a very respectful writer respectful of of the reader's experience. Because i've heard him described those passages. I forgot that there so short in the book. You know the beating of the boy chester. i believe like to lonzo. You can miss it. Yeah and the and the emulation of began three. the scene. you're listening to is only like one line. I believe and yes. Those things are catalysts. Mike my main characters give all hope. It takes an extreme act to motivate heard. Go you know what no. I can't keep up this much. I must leave this place And so. I don't have the luxury of telling them. Colson described it as dead pros because he can write a sentence. I mean he can write his ass off. He has when he when he comes. Upon these moments of retali- he says pros. He does information. He just gives you the information. Then he moves through it. You know. i don't know if there's a i there's an as a way of relaying dead imagery although i will say my my earliest dealings with these kinds of images are these photos from the aftermath of lynchings. Jim crow south. And you always see. A group of white spectators were looking directly at the camera. Which is really interesting for the way. i've gravitated towards making my work. And then my esther is in the background already. Passed already brutalized. Inanimate and i thought there was something almost disassociate of about that about never having to really understand and really process what was done we always get there in the aftermath. And so i thought this is an opportunity a one because it is. It is a motivator for my character and that was the principal from me if the trauma is a motivator for my character to act than i will show it and then in showing what else can i say about these images because after the first episode as we go on repeatedly repeatedly when there are acts of taliban we either cut away and imply with sound or we lead a character. Tell the story. But we don't cut to the thing that they're telling thing they are saying. But in that first chapter i felt it was necessary for the audience to experience. You know what my character was experiencing so they can understand why she makes the choice to run. Yes it's very effective. Both from a story telling point of view. I think from historical point of view. One of the other things about this in even colts were to is so much has been lost during that period. You know. And that's what i meant to say earlier to like and i'm always fascinated by just the ordinary lives of people and some of the fantastic things of course but the ordinary lives of people are very interesting to me into know that there are characters like hero you know that existed there and the conductor in many of these types of characters or the head of the people in indiana there at the table. Gloria and john. Ballantyne love that scene. That made me. Think of the picnics. When i was a kid we have zinc up the evanston picnic. That here in pasadena. The black people that moved to los angeles and wanted to keep that touchy. Was it almost exactly like that. Seem you know that. Kinda richest What will. I'm sure it's a tradition. That is that is handed down. You know from those times And that's one of these. Why i wanted to make this as a television show when not as a feature film yes so that we can have the space to have moments like that and that episodes a little bit long. But i'm like shit. People have gone through hell to get here literally. Give the picnic watching beautiful. Black people drink the wine at bam. Did you have any issues with actors at all about a win. Did you shoot this. We shot this from twenty nineteen to march twenty twenty and then we stop for kobe and we finish september twenty twenty and in september. How much more did you have to do. It was just a week week of were so lucky because like wendy. He should this. There's no way he could democ. No we were super super lucky. We got one hundred and twelve days before we before we stop and then we had one week to pick up in september. Oh man it's great I was it what the actors with a lot of this material. You know once again. We're in this time. There's the you know the use of the n. word the hard are is. You know you know it's interesting. The hard are actually wasn't wasn't a problem. I think the the cast and the crew one. We had a therapist a guidance counselor on at times and we began the process by telling people who that was the resource they use. We also told people is a typical set. Yes the director calls action cup. But if there's anything you were doing the you feel uncomfortable about or anything. You're doing that you feel is getting the better of you stop. You don't stop. You can stop the whole thing and we will take whatever time We need for you to gather yourself and decide if you can continue doing what it is we are doing. I think that really empowered people So the hard are wasn't an issue because everyone understood we will making this thing Together there were some people who didn't want to Be in the show or tackle the material because they felt it was too much for them. And i also respected respect those choices as well so it was working with the actors. I think we create an environment where everyone was always reminded that the most important thing was for them to remain whole and so we didn't have a lot of issues in that regard. How did you find kara. It was through a long long process. I mean we searched all over the states of course and then all over the world a casting. America crecy if you tape in and you can show me the character. The part is yours but With two so because she was south african we brought her in for for digital. Call backs. it came down to her and another young woman Was going to be a really big a big movie star sunday in a new york-based woman By way of north carolina and to sela to still got the part and i knew that at the beginning of the series very typical for my work the main character wasn't going to able to verbally express herself as much the characters around her and so i needed somebody who communicate a lot you know what their posture with their eyes and somebody who could go from looking sixteen in one episode to looking sixty six in another episode. It's crazy. I mean she looks twelve lecturing. You know but The nonverbal stuff. She does authur. This is amazing. you know. I mean we'd brought taliban show tell that that scene tennessee is one of my favorites. Ridgway's telling her the story of what happened to her friend lovey. Instead staying him and instead of cutting to what he's describing we just go to her her face just does all the work in its one unbroken ta take every year that drops is real. I mean she just like she just hasn't muscleman you. I love better way. Bury's you get such great performances out of actors you know and you really do The karen does respect in uses all of that. but it's married by this rich palette. You know it's man. I mean some of the shots in here. It's like looking at paintings. Thank you run. Where does said vision. Start with you know a are you bringing that in the beginning to have that type of thing or is some of it imagined in the moment. We're take oh. No no i. We have to look at this a completely different way. Some of its imagined in a moment a lot of it's preparation you know. I've got a really good team Working with me right now. You know some folks who have been working with since my very first film James lacks cinematographers Roommates in college and it shows you know our life becomes like a mood board. I have on his paintings and photos at the my office. He has all the same ones up in his office and even new ones. Or just we're thinking of the show and we're looking at all these references. Were trying trying to coalesce into what we think. The picture of the thing that we're creating is especially from adaptations kinda dope because read the words on the page and you're already seeing things and it's like okay. How can i manifest. How can control the elements. Emma disposal to get this picture out of my head onto the screen and then more free burger production designer as well. You know he does a great job of just going deep and trying to build the world you know. We did pre production at his elementary school in savannah. And it was set up these military barracks and so the art department had one winning james and i had another wing costumes at another wing as you could. Just walk down these halls like you're going to recess elementary school now. The walls are covered with photos with references and And it was nice because you can see us all just walk these halls and the images started coalesce But then sometimes you get on set and it does come to you. Spontaneously the very first instance brutality in the show. The boy is forced through the declaration of independence. James and i were at lunch With the steady cam operator ajar really great young guy in realize i think we need to make this wanna lean into the tension and i want to be something very truthful about this. I don't want any cuts. From the moment they come on moment that boy sized declaration. I don't want any cuts then when you realized the brutality is about to begin. I want to disassociate ourselves from that reality. And that's when we went to the porch resin that kind of on the day And so i think it's always about like preparation preparation preparation preparation because i grew up with a football background. Yeah me too actually. After you run those first ten scripted plays nelson okay cool. Let's see what the defense is doing exactly. And now let's start ogling so sort of function something like that with one hundred and sixteen days man. There's just no way to prep All that work and so you do get to the point where you have to move more intuition than than do planning but that intuition is informed all that preparation and everything so it's informed intuition if you will which is kind of. It's really the best kind. That's how you kind of get in the zone. Think too you know when you're in that space where you don't know where these ideas coming from but they're the right ideas owned by that that preparation when you're looking for a new home. We wanna make sure meet your needs. 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Rocket can get started online at rocket mortgage dot com slash larry wilmore call for cost information and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states n m s consumer access dot org number thirty thirty. Today's episode is brought to you by ziprecruiter. Recent data shows that out of all female owned businesses. It's estimated that one in three is owned by mom one of the ways. Amazing parents find time to hire for their businesses plugin families with ziprecruiter. And right. now you can try for free only ziprecruiter dot com slash larry. Talia goldstein is a mother to and she's also the founder and ceo of personalized matchmaking. Company three day rule constant growth means. She needs to hire several matchmakers a month. So she uses ziprecruiter ziprecruiter's powerful technology helps her people with the right experience and actively invites them to apply and tell is not only employer who loves ziprecruiter. It's no wonder that four out of five employers who post on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire you can try ziprecruiter for free ziprecruiter dot com slash larry that dot com slash l. a. r. y. Can you talk about as director for people that may wanna do this type of thing or interested in it I love hearing all this. Because many directing isn't just making a film it isn't just trying to make something look real people. It's not just say. How can i make this. Look real you're bringing in. You're bringing an interpretation to this you know you're you're creating something force. That is an artist vision of something. Can you talk a little bit more about that. So people can understand that difference. You know. I think as especially for the way that that we were. And when i say we talking about primarily myself and the cinematographer james laxton. We're after feeling feeling and we're always starting with. What does the scene feel like you know. What is the character feeling right now. And what role can the camera play and translating that feeling to the audience and sometimes with this show where we're things really began a click was when we could start to understand. It's not about this one characterised feeling. It's about hobbies. Characters are sharing the space And i think some of the more successful moments in the show are when you see the camera and the actors of sort of working together to create this feeling or as you said to translate The feeling of what was happening in the moment when it was happening in the story into and images Because i think what you're talking about And this is what. I think about of directing. It is not just enough to tell a story to tell a story. Then i would do. A colson does and just write it down. I think that's probably the most the most direct way to tell a story we're doing. This is an image. Is you know the something else. This is right in front of evocation that is that is happening in so we're always trying to be aware of yes. This is what the scene is about. How does it feel from that feeling to make a craft choices. I was going say creative choice but to make craft choices because as hard about the ship right. You had forgot how to shoot you. You losing the light right take takes two minutes to get to the whole scene. If you're trying to do it all as a master shot you might get five passes at it whereas if you break it up you can maybe cover a bit more ground. Get a few more takes sense so all of that science all that scientific math is happening And yet you still have to be somebody who's working feeling so. Yeah yeah it's interesting. I used to teach Film courses before. I made moonlight to be honest and then i got too busy but it is something that i really love doing because trying to demystify what it is. We do what we do. I think is really important. Because when i first got into this from a very poor background just poor as far as resources go so i i was way behind craft wise When it when it came to doing this and not understanding the craft was limited it was limiting my creativity. It was from my voice. And so i think it is important to speak about kraft with certain degree. That'd be beholden to. It completely agree with that. You know and i love your notions about storytelling people interested in writing directing that kind of thing. Especially you don't have to get stuck with linear storytelling versus what i call it. A plot driven beginning middlemen. Sometimes like i feel good stories are just following a character's arkan and many times at the end of some stories in you do this with your to is. I think you get kind of a good start in when the end is what the movie is about not so much a resolution but it gets stuck you come to a resolution of feelings about this whole thing no bre why am i doing his pocket so late in the press. Run because i know i agree. Man that's the that's the day new mutt is. That could salt exactly. Yes now when. I was in film school when i was trying to catch up to doing this. I realized very quickly the films that all my peers are watching that. Were extremely linear employ dress. Very also very very big budget as shit i. I can't do that. I can't do that right now. And so i stumbled into all these foreign films. Which were these films that seemed to be made from. It was like the by any means. Necessary what resources do you think of. How do they know what scene is next. I don't understand this exactly. I wanted to stand it. But i feel it and that was what it just jumped into my head to jump into my gut and i was like all this is a. This is an interesting way of working. I can do this. And i began doing it and now it's sort of been this weird trajectory were now. I'm slowly drifting back to more linear sort of plot driven. Kind of storytelling. Doing it my way to think is very frank. Shows a very frankenstein kind of show. 'cause do take you on a journey. It's a road movie and in some ways. It's very epic and yet it still some some episodes like wait you know. Am i moving forward. I'm gonna be moving forward and story terms. But i'm moving way for and and emotion and intellectual spiritual development And i think about those things. I think especially with a show like this. It can house both those things like a stall broke us that one well. The north carolina episodes a good example. You know that yeah it could. It could push the platform there may be but also it does something to kara core. That was one of the ones where i wanted to. I went to punch colson. Because i'm like she's in the attic for seventy pages. If i can't have a four hour or the attic it's not an frank because exactly i can't even have a sixty minute. Episode was just her alone in the attic. I would have to do things she have to have visions and be talking to people. And that would kind of break like what we're doing here But a limitation became an opportunity owed. She's forced to go through this process of learning about maternity of having to live out the active mothering because his little girl. Little girl is tough as hell. It almost doesn't need mothering. Which is because core is also very headstrong and thinks she doesn't need anybody thought it was a really wonderful opportunity men. There is some scenes in the episode that we filmed and we had to. We had to cut that. Which is so after martin goes in and dynamites the mine he comes back home and he calls the because core in grace down from the attic and he's sitting there he's sweaty. He's covered muddy just rocking and he tells the three and a half minute monologue about how his father more or less forced this legacy absolutely no. He doesn't think he is strong enough to do it. And at the very end grace looks at him and she goes you. You feel like a slave in core looks at her and goes just looks at her. Doesn't say anything up in the attic and we had to cut it bro. Red carpet to damon damon heron. But i do think you're right. I mean she's physically stuck but emotionally intellectually. I think she's making these huge leaps in took so much that she sacrifices herself at the end of that episode. She comes down and tells a little girl to stay. Yeah there's yeah you don't need a lot of platt. You know to be telling that starting sometimes i teach writing and that kind of stuff i try to get writers to understand the difference between platin- store and i say this definitions. They're not necessarily difference out there. But i would say the. The story to me is the emotional journey. Character takes on the plot events to tell that story and sometimes you can have movies with very little platinum story and sometimes movies with a lot of platinum very listeners. Well what do you mean by that. And say we'll give. I'll give you the example. I'll use to spill big movies. Close encounters and raiders of the lost art. Same director that said Raiders of the lost ark is a platform. Removing all kinds of stuff. Happened to indiana jones. Snakes come in all. But he's basically the same indiana jones. The beginning of the movie is at the end. So there's very little story in my mind up. But that's kind of the form of the saturday morning syria which is based on. You don't know a story. That's why they're hard to write because it's hard to write good plot twists that keeps an audience engaged. That's not yes it is. It's really different close encounters on the other hand. There's very little platte. You know you know. Richard drivers sees something and then he goes to a mountain like that's about it in terms but he is almost a different richard dreyfuss in almost every single scene of that movie that anyone even more. The story is amazingly complex of the journey that this character takes macaire took. The end leaves his family and his kids. The character getting would never leave. His kids are gonna spaceship with alien. It's crazy larry wilmore's exactly here for that's fucking perfect. I mean it but understanding those tools you can write a singlet girl in an attic. Because you know. It's that to be patrick. Well and i think that the way that this series goes on because the first two and a half episodes of the first three episodes yeah so much plot so much exact story so much you think it's this thriller that your and you go wait. Is this a thriller because that middlesex switch and now all story very plot. Because it's exactly right there just walking from eight to be in on this walk. You're getting so i mean. We core core encounters basically gandhi countless gandhi. What is this many movie inside of this. You know what happened. That episode was intended to be one episode tennyson. But this this calvin. Leon smith who plays jasmine is one of those young phnomenom. He showed up and it was so clear to me because those things were in the script to film them to where they're they're more plot than story. Aspirin does this and then he does ran. He doesn't but but but the way dowsett way he looks at her and way he speaks to her. This is story is watching him and she had learning. She learned from his example. Yeah it's going to be able to sit at the table in the next episode and just wait and wait and wait because she knows is gonna come a moment. I mean and and so in domain the episode. We just kept changing the The visual language of how were filming him and sort of allowing these moments to to just live and play because in living his life. He's giving korean example of how to buffer herself in how to strengthen herself to sort of Standing endure bullshit. That ridgway's is spitting and the man created an episode at. Your right is not heavy on plot. Oh my god. So heavy on the larry wilmore school ashtray. I got fired for it at the time. But you know the thing. I do think it's a privilege to be working At at the time that i'm working in because so much of these very stayed modes of story formats. They're all just peeling away pulling away and so you after. You can have a show at times like a saturday morning cereal than at other times. It's like the off off off off. Broadway production angling you know of of two inches and a cat and they can yes In that i wanna make can as a hell of a title. I'm gonna have to get on Yeah it's it's so fascinating to mean that actor. What was his name. Calvin leon smith. I mean he just special effects. Did he get that skinny. The worst special effects there were there was make that supply and then we did do special effects on him. in in post production But what i'm really happy about with his performance is he didn't i. I was in love with this idea of extended extended moments in time. I think what you in certain edit into a scene not that these two pieces of time can't both be authentic but you know they're not the same piece of time and so i kept trying to find ways to as opposed to cutting new shots create new shots because where the actor is if it's it's the same across the duration of a take and calvin just it's such almost called him jasper to such a good job of really living in the moment that this This character was having. And i think because of that the way time passes in that episode is different than the way back snobby other episodes. Yeah and the other actor. The who's the actor that played hero. He wrote he writes. In my caesar. Or or not. Saying i keep saying and i meant to say homer because he is not my hero hoping that was going to be my point. Yeah he's played chase chased dylan man. Who was a young dude. Who he's he's eleven now ten at the time of filming which is Which is thinking back on it. Pretty pretty extraordinary. Wait just been. Here's ten years old ten years old. That's crazy it is man and and you know he's got a really strong family and he's a really smart kid because some of the stuff you know i'm sure it was quite tricky for him To do but you know joel. Edgerton who plays ridgway is also a director. And so i i really felt like that was important because once you call action in the director isn't doing anything it's incumbent upon the actors in the scene you know to find the truth navigate the space and i think joe was really good at helping chase like understand the process and in responding to a chase doing because sometimes it's not a typical process. You don't want you set a kid. The kid is going to do what they do. Enjoy was really good about you. Know reflecting the energy at chase giving will he had such a stillness about him. I thought maybe he was an older actor. Who you know is say. He looks like he's ten going on seventy five year old. So you know Yeah it is such a this amazing journey the whole thing and I guess you the gulliver's travels odyssey of it all How much of of that to you as a storyteller is part of this. Or is that just something that just is alongside it it to me it was just alongside it. Do i think that in the novel those those associations much more present because again it's more telling Unless showing in the beginning we try to hold on to to quite a bit of it But then i think it only lived was season and so i think once caesar's is no longer driving the narrative that element of it kind kind of pills away And so yeah. It was one of those things where i thought that was thought. The association was beautiful. And and i love that he got delivered line In the fantasy moment you know be strong safe my heart i am a soldier i've seen where seis than this I thought there was something even for me I took that line personally thought I agree i agree. And we have to be strong until the story Was the way a process it for myself. Do you think it's important for black storytellers now. To tell these types of stories. Is i think so i think absolutely I don't think everyone has to watch them I think that's where i'll draw a line. I completely understand and get that for some folks. These stories are too much They have enough in their daily lives. And they know enough about the history that they don't need to re engage I think for me as a storyteller one. I felt a personal prerogative to use my voice and to use as miss toni morrison refers to use language to reclaim in reconceptualized. Honor my ancestors. That was a very personal thing. for me and if there are other folks out there who have the same impulse that they can engage this work and it can be something that they can they can hold onto or look towards to either reconceptualise for themselves. Reclaim for themselves. reprocess Some of these things as you said earlier so much of our ancestors images and narratives have been lost Two time lost the historical record. Their academics would do wonderful work to correct that but again. We're watching more than we're reading right now and so i do think it's important for black story. Tell us to take these images. Because i do believe that to a large degree. Or saying i can't say always. But i can't say my experience most often. We are going to take a different kind of care with these images our ancestors than maybe other folks would and there seems to be a conspiracy. Let me come back. Not even not that other folks would that other folks can. There's just something about being on set looking at someone in seeing your grandfather seeing your mother seeing your auty. Seeing your cousin that inherently is going to force you even four. She was going to be instinctual to look past the surface of either what they're doing or what's being done to them and see the whole of them and i think these really lovely things come out of that. I was given really quick example. Analytic about to you thought last episode. There's this burial seen. We had all these advisers and all the shells on the ground. Just a really wonderful wonderful image. And i remember warning the camera to be outside. I didn't want to invade space of what these folks were doing in this actor recoup cooper character jockey he just got down on his knees unprompted in places head to the soil and he inhales the earth and there was just something so just so beautiful. I cried action cryan. It is one of those things not that not that other folks would. But i think can you know. I don't know that other folks can assist imprinting. Julie it's just different. 'cause i'm not mad at filbert directing the color purple at the time. What a great filmmaker to bring that to life. I was not mad at that at all and my grandma had this color. Purple sort of like it was a woven like thing of the poster that she had frame. It was on her wong for the entirety of my life. The entirety of my life Yes oh i i. I agree and also too. I made a movie. Like you know what i'm saying and so i can't talk on both sides of my mouth. You know but you do the work you do all the work and you empower the folks who story It is that you're telling you know the people who can't stand on set and actually see themselves and the other characters Without this remove but point. We'll take larry wilmore school system as well. We both do it right here. You know I think there's another observation. I have right now. There seems to be a a conspiracy of creativity Between more than just american blacks but found global black attack led by british voices African now south african as you point out you know and that's going to be interesting too because the these experiences that were dramatizing are particularly american but Unique you know what i mean know. I do know what you mean especially as someone who's who's traveled Know exactly what you mean. You know when when i leave these shores you know. I'm no longer african american right off. I'm walking through brussels on site. You know i'm black. Or i'm african Root of of my people is what is what is most visibly seen referred to it as the black attacks allies. It's the same with everything i think. Especially with filmmaking. The tools of this medium are very expensive and even though there have been pioneers. Like brother michel gordon parks His era There have been people the vanguard breakthrough but by and large these tools whether through commercial capital but we just don't have access to them at the same time that other folks have access to them but just like with the instrumentation that ultimately create jazz once we do have access to them all these new ways of working. These new ways of seeing these new ways of creating of course bubbled to the surface. They flourish and you're right globally right now. Black folks have the tools In a love that we live in a moment right now you know especially speaking of the cycle with these limited series. Whether there's our show or steve mcqueen show small acts or or mechanical show. i may destroy you. These three completely different completely different articulations you know of what it means to be a black person in the world right now. Very rich depictions of each each of us three our own personal representations of what it means to be a black person in the world right now and there's something so fucking beautiful about that. I'm just is i. Keep a note. When i'm doing these podcasts. Because one i wanna make sure tracking what you're saying. I don't wanna learn some shit. Them black attack rubber. Like of also that you know we're not just defined by Wipe victimhood the liberation of black individualism. You know and ideologies in those types of things in personalities and all those things which is so nice to. They can exist outside of that especially in historical context. Which i think you're gonna see more of which likes small accident. My heart good. I mean the episode where. It's just them dan. You know the the party opera. I'm rockin about that is there. Yeah steve steve put his foot woman he put his he did he did he really did. What type of a films would you like to continue doing. I'll make a distinction. Do you do you like this big scale and the tools that you able to work with here or do you like more than intimate type of moonlight which i'm assuming is more of an intimate process. It's interesting. I've tried to to to blend the two On this one at least this felt the most like making moonlight to be honest. It didn't feel like making bill street. This felt the most like making moon because even though we had much more resources they were spread out over much longer period of time. that's true all these episodes. That's exactly four days where it felt like oh shit Rutted in gun just got to get this right. You know we we gotta find a way to you. Know to to make a dollar out of fifteen cents. It's interesting. I kind of have an appetite for both now I think they you know. I mean i'm not steven spielberg and won't ever be look at his career. And you see that as an artist there are times when you know he's going off the real big block of wood and there are the moments when there's something very small intimate you know. I got a couple ideas. I'm working on right now Because i do feel this edge to return very very very very small. Just romantic film. Yeah that's great About consenting adults Also too because sometimes it's it's actresses. There are people that i want to work with. No and i'm like well you know i haven't seen this person do this thing as like oh well dummy and create a bustle able to do that thing and so i think. I don't know that. I'll ever do anything as as big as this again. Although i'm doing this lion king movie. I don't know now but i have an idea berry wanna do. Hey larry wilmore productions homes but yeah i. I think a little bit of both going forward is going to be. What's what's best for me because emotionally. This one took a lot outta me. I can imagine doing this four times in a row. That would not be healthy. Yeah just wouldn't be. You said romantic comedy or romantic drama. Dramama- you don't even know me. The shouldirefi funny is That world people find funny and and so two to me. I laughed my head off when when ridgway Seasonal mammalian using the magic shave. And he goes he goes the pilla tori and then he goes d pillow story. Cracks is so sassy But i'm thinking get off your face. It's been onto exactly exactly exactly. That's the putty seemed to be some. I'll use the word anachronisms in the two. Were you concerned about that at all. And i know some of it is artistic and somebody's like i'm like wait. What period is this train station. Exactly where are we right now. You know i think sometimes it's fun to the ploy that stuff you when When when it's a you know sometimes the absence of something makes the presence of it. Just the brief appearance of it. You know that. We are impactful favorite filmmakers this french direction claire deneen. She has this film called friday night. And it's a very very you know it's romantic but the style she works in. Nfl it's almost neorealist and then these two characters but these characters they meet they have one i stand and then they go out to dinner after the total strangers. They meet on a transit strike and the woman is sitting at a pizza shop and her and her lover of this count levers sitting there and she looks down at the pizza and the anchovies on the piece of tone into a smile and winkler. That's it so it just makes no sense but it's perfect but it's perfect and so i do think these these anachronisms can sometimes. I don't know it could be a bit of levity. It could just be a burst of burst of light or in the counter. You know it can be a burst of horse. Yeah i lean into those things you know where she gets the tennessee. In the writer's room we decided core as manifesting. All these things you know. I think he's a bit progressive. She's controlling the narrative to a certain degree. She gets north carolina. It's damned because she has a block. This is why we come back with grace now. Grace gets to the same damn but everything about her is an opening so now the firefly's come through as she just goes on through. Core was ready for that she needed. That block wasn't ready to leave. Caesar behind as she needed to be his attic. And meet this little girl so she could go on this journey of mothering and so when core gets the tennessee station. She just been through hell. So yeah. they're shark choudhury wide and straight subway title. I like wait. Where are they exactly one hundred twenty fifth street. Where are they. You know i that for for as heavy as the show is at times. Also i think in a very grounded way playful at the same time know. I i describe it as a horrific a fairytale brothers grimm. Yeah and i think those i think the housing of the show is strong enough. It can withstand that it can contain it all. Yeah i think the new york times you I'm paraphrasing something. Like you give us this beautiful picture without seeing things up which at that. That's really accurate. You know because. Like i said there's the type of talent not just the actual physical brutality but mentality and things that are going on yet these gorgeous pictures of it. You know this the dichotomy that it's really really striking you know that that was. That was an interesting one because we miss thing entirely in the state of georgia which was a slow ending state. yes and so You know we were doing these scenes and the tree has been here for hundreds of years. That tree seen alette exiting the lot. The sun is setting the spanish moss on. It is gorgeous you know. Is it now incumbent upon me to make a not pretty to make not even pretty to make it not beautiful. The beauty was there was always there. While these horrific things were taking place To me it would have been even less truthful to try to do. Whatever kind of magic could remove that beauty from the setting We just turned the camera on. It's such a natural metaphor for the country. You know in so many different ways and the thing that that people have tried to wrestle with you. They seem to attack from the wrong way where they went to just maintain the beauty of the of the hazy rear view. And not the you know some of the of the of the windshield. I'd say looking boarder that you know but all of it is what makes this this. You know all of it. It's not just one thing. And also. I did appreciate i think it was. Yeah the north carolina. I did appreciate those white characters into you. Know seeing that that care to wrestle with something you know. Even ridgway is complicated for the type of character that he is. He's not just he's not just that simple type of person that we see like that too and i and his father such a great character also united appreciated that you know i thought know. This character clearly is obviously horrific and even But i think we live in a time right now where we need to show how and why. I think that's the best way to there. Might be somebody in our lives was on that path. I mean especially right now. There are all these people this extremism and all these little little hot spots in these secret groups and whatnot. Maybe there's somebody in in your in your household who was sort of drifting towards. This is how the stuff happens. I also was interested to looking at his childhood. Because you know abbas spoken about it As much but the age that ridgway is end the great spirit episode is more or less the age that core is in the main storyline yet. Look how different the world is for the two of them. Look at how different the choices. They are allowed to make our thought. There was something very interesting about this. Your between the two of them because clearly you know he ends up one way And through the struggle to reconcile this amendment with her mother and the stories of freedom she ends up another way. But i thought looking at that because again there's two different americas sometimes It was a it was a way to even unearth a little bit more about the character and say something about that the country we live in. Yeah i'll say just went. I said it's so funny because just wrestling with the idea of as you were talking that nature versus nurture and it's funny how to be both come out in a lot of these stories to where you know where the weicker insisting that nurture has nothing to do with this. It's all nature the order that we're all in this is all determined by god. There's destiny here. We are meant to be masters and and the evil that i am. You know laying pine. You has nothing to do with my upbringing. This is out of my encino which is kind of interesting This whole thing. I'd rather at in you know it's it's i think it's also tough giving a reasons why people are evil too like i have a problem with both of those things. That's why shakespeare to me. Iago said it best when he just said. I am not what i seem. And sometimes it's as simple as that you know. I am now what i've seen. Those cats homer in ridgeway such 'nigma to me because you're versus nurture. How does this cat end up. This quite explaining. How does he end up. This person doesn't it. How does but but but what does omar's aluminum. And i'm omar was massey on the wire you wanted to be one way but it's the other way we assume he grew up in the cell of hatred but now it's actually the other way the other way human nature is the is the little bit of thing in their them just makes everything more fucked ed pages able to understand completely. You know but it's it's very interesting. That's why the guy keep writing these things. Keep making them. Yes sir i wear. It just went off we. He was thinking about something. What were you thinking there. I was just thinking again about You know about what. 'cause i often talking about you know. Oh this show is about the past. But very relevant to the president and this idea of american exceptionalism and just the extreme divide You know between you know what it is. And what at eight right now. in this country And just trying to understand and making the show and dealing with this character all the characters in the show like like how how can we. How can we arrive at a point where we can look at. The ship is happening right now. You know look at all these folks congress. All these people were electing nc. Would you say the line from the from from iago. Ma'am seem i am not. Would i seem that. What am i. I think so often. We just accept what the things seems in think Were the real progress of the real. The real progression say is. Let's get past. That was pass things seem. Let's just continue and continue to look evaluate reevaluate contextualized. That we can get to the point. Where maybe we can start to see what things actually are to see what it what it really is. And i think that's what the process of making the show was for me. I appreciate you being here. And give me This time. I want to ask you one more question. 'cause there's some people i don't know who the groups are. But they're concerned about the these types of depictions. I think some people call porn indication of black tragedy in that nevada but black trauma porn smack trauma. Warren yeah i. I don't agree with that. I have a different opinion on that. But what is what is your take and then how do you was was that in the air at all when you were making it is it. Is it kind of around. Now do you have a reaction to. It wasn't in the air when we were making it one. I was just too damn busy. But but then yeah especially this year Steffi been something that. I've heard quite loud. I think george floyd thing it was out there so much you know. Yeah and it's partly why. I wanted to make this as tv. Show not a feature film. I wanted to be an elective process for the viewer. And if there was anything that they were they were seeing that they weren't able to pause fast forward et cetera. I think it has to do with intent. I think it has to do with intent I think it has to do with context. I think we can't consider any image that involves our as as any image That involves the pictures of trauma as pornographic Because i think if we do assume that default than were might dissipate in the erasure of anything having a story of our ancestors a largely has a lot to do with enduring in overcoming the trauma. And so do think people's concerns are valid. Because i can't say for anyone else. Where's the line that you have to draw for what you can handle what you can process And so i think it takes a intern and contextualisation so when the voices first appeared. Hurt them You know kind of hurt. Because i felt like oh. This is not what i'm doing. You know i wouldn't knowingly willfully do this to you and yet. I can't say what was done to that person in engaging images like this and other essences and so i get it i get it. Yeah for me. i think. There's a distinction between sympathy and empathy. And i think it's easier for people have sympathy for something but until you can truly understand experience mental paying. Can you get to the empathy part. were changed. I think happens through empathy more than sympathy. I believe but then you go. We have a great empathetic filmmaker. Here very i appreciate talking to you. You're such a great dude. And i just loved like i said i just love your stuff. It's it's really you watching like artwork on the wall. It's moving. I mean really is just ingrate room that it ended so thoughtful and just sensitive everybody see underground railroad as berry. Says you. don't don't watch it on city. Some of it's kind of tough but it's offering interesting and based on that great book. I wish you the best m. Let's stay in touch and let me know what's going on. Yes sir. we'll do mine. It's been a pleasure. The pleasures jacob. Everybody takes to stop by with industry leading technology. Rocket mortgage offers twenty four seven access to your loan info and the tools information and expertise to help your offer compete in a crowded market visit rocketmortgage dot com slash. Larry wilmore because when you need mortgage that fits your life. Rocket can call for cost information and conditions equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states in m l s consumer access dot org number thirty thirty.

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Amanpour: Chuck Hagel, Barry Jenkins and Stephanie Murphy

Amanpour

57:03 min | 2 years ago

Amanpour: Chuck Hagel, Barry Jenkins and Stephanie Murphy

"Tired of spending hundreds of dollars for prescription glasses. Xeni offers thousands of affordable. Eyewear styles starting at just six ninety five. No ridiculous markups. No hassles. Just quality affordable. I wear delivered right to you visits. Any today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. Hello, everyone and welcome to almond for his what's coming up. My fellow Americans. Trump makes his case for a border wall. Democrats say it's full of holes and the impact of the shutdown mounts. What are the national security facts? Former Defense Secretary and Republican Senator Chuck Hagel tells me plus. In mall Chua's times America through the updated lens of the great James Baldwin. I speak with Oscar winning director. Barry Jenkins about adapting. If feels street could toll and a new voice for that endangered species, the billable center democratic congresswoman Stephanie Murphy on why now is the right time to serve. Welcome to the program, everyone, I'm Christiane on four in London security at a prominent airport in southern California is deteriorating. Thanks to the government shutdown. That is what's an internal Email by an official at the Transportation Security Administration publicly. The TSA insists that security is strong, but hundreds of screeners across the country who are not getting paid a simply calling in sick. And that is just a small piece of the very real crisis. That critics say the president himself creative to get funding for his border wall. And no solution appears in sight and today, the president hinted again, then he might in fact, declare a national emergency to bypass congress and get funding for that wall. We're all working together. I really believe the Democrats and the Republicans are working together. I think that something will happen. I hope otherwise we'll go about it in a different manner. And I don't think we'll have to do that. But you never know. Democrat Nancy Pelosi now speaker of the house of representatives continues to stand her ground, and here's what she said last night after the president's address from the Oval Office. The fact is the women and children at the border are not a security threat. They are humanitarian challenge a challenge that President Trump's on cruel and counterproductive policies have only deepened. And the fact is President Trump must stop holding American people hostage much stop manufacturing a crisis a must reopen. The government. But the government is shot. It is the second longest shutdown in history. And it comes amid two other escalating crises in Syria, the president's pledged to immediately withdraw American troops is on hold has its own administration. And a key ally. Turkey squabble over this move at all of this is being revealed that special counsel Robert Muller believes that former Trump campaign manager, Paul Manafort, shed, private campaign, data and discussed Ukraine policy with someone closely linked to Russian intelligence. So what are we to make of all of this? And what are the facts as a former Republican Senator and as Defense Secretary under the democratic President Obama Chuck Hagel has just about seen it all and he's joining me now from Washington Secretary Hagel welcome to the program. Very scarce yada. Okay. So let's start with what the president has mooted yet again today after not saying it in his Oval Office address, he saying, well, maybe it's going to be necessary for me to try other means such as declaring a state of national emergency to get that money. What do you think the odds of that are and what will actually that mean? Well, I the odds are not very good that he will get that money for all the reasons I think most people understand. The presidency. The executive office is but one of three co equal branches of government. All money is appropriated I through the congress. And I think it's been pretty made pretty clear by the democratic leaders and some Republicans, by the way in the house and Senate that they want to open the government, I which is the responsible thing to do. And then deal with this issue a second. This is another example, I fear of Mr. Trump's continued way to govern distort distract divide that's dangerously irresponsible at a time in the world when the world is so off balance and so- combustible and volatile. So where this goes, I don't know Cristiana. I was secretary of defense. The last time we had a government shutdown nineteen days, it has consequences ramifications everywhere the ripple through our country. People economy, and it's a very dangerous thing to do. So let me ask you. Because clearly the president has talked about it. And he said I was our declare an emergency. If I can't get a deal with people who are being unreasonable. So he's obviously saying that the Democrats are being unreasonable. And if you can't get them to cave to his demands, he'll he'll do the other thing. And he said, he'll get it from the military. So as a former Defense Secretary what indeed what impact will that have to take that money away from the military? Well, legally, he cannot do that Christiane that money was appropriated for very specific reasons. I to the fence department budget. He can't do that without authorization from the congress, which I doubt he will get he's playing a dangerous game here. I don't think he can win this game. The smart thing responsible thing to do is to open up. Our government quit Kolding our government, and our people hostage and all the consequences flowing from that. And then pursue a some kind of a compromise. As we go forward. That's the way we do things in a democracy. This is not a one way street. It's not a one man show, which I don't think the president has quite understood what? Well, let me let me ask you because as a former Republican Senator what would you say to the Republican leadership in the Senate right now, Senator Mitch McConnell, for instance, you see? Amounting number of Republicans in the house and the Senate sort of breaking away or voicing concern about this continued shutdown. What should what what would you do? What would you advise the leadership of the Republicans to do? I would advise to say to Mitch McConnell who I know very well. Mitch let's understand what we are dealing with here. I why would we hold hostage the government of the United States and put everyone through pain needlessly with significant adverse consequences that ripple to our economy second. Let's let's take a mature look at the issues on border security border security is essential. Of course. It's critical. No one denies that. But border security is only one part of immigration reform. It starts with a pathway toward citizenship. It's many dimensions in two thousand and five the Senate passed an immigration reform Bill. It was my my Bill. It was the Hegel Martinez compromise. We got sixty five votes bipartisan votes, the house would never take it up. So it died no conference, but border security. How do we defend our border? All the different variations. Of that of that issue need to be explored. Maturity, let's all get together. And do what's right for this country? That's what I would say the leader. Okay. So I want to get into the debate on immigration reform in a moment, but first to the actual physical act of border security. This is what the president said today from from the Oval Office. This is what he said about walls. We gotta get the politics out of this and go back to common sense. You know, they say, it's medieval solution a wall. That's true. Medieval because it worked then and it works even better now. Well, I mean, you know, he has a lot of supporters the president. He has a base who believes in him. He has a solid thirty eight thirty nine forty percent of the American people still behind him. And that's what he believes what are the facts on the wall where do the illegal immigrants come from? When do the drugs and the smugglers and things like that come from. Well, you look at that two thousand mile southern border. We have a wall is not the answer or a large fence for all two thousand miles of it. I mean, there are state's rights issues property rights issues geography issues that get in way of all of that. So partly offense, which we have down there, by the way Bush supported it Obama supported it. So we have miles and miles of fencing and some wall. So that's part of it. But there are other dimensions to it illegal drugs. Where do they come from where where do the problems come from in coming across our border illegal drugs? Come more from commercial exchanges hidden and trucks that come across that border legally, by the way, and through the seas through monitoring on our coasts, we can't we only get about twenty five percent. Of the legal drugs that come in. We think by boat. So it isn't all the southern border. The northern border has also some issues about who illegally comes in there. But the numbers that most recently provided by the State Department show, the numbers aren't anywhere near what the president is talking about as to people coming into this country and illegal problems of drugs. And so on a lot of the problem that we have are the eleven or twelve million immigrants in this country. Who do not have a status who never went back to their country after their visas were up. That's where most of the issue is with eleven or twelve million. And actually, I heard something extraordinary today that a lot of the so-called illegal immigration is from overstaying visas and one congressman told British outlet today that most of those who overstay a Canadians coming from the north and. Not and not from the from others from the south. But let me ask you. This look many people believe that what President Trump is doing is all politics all reacting to his base, but equally others believed that this issue of immigration is a deeply held personal conviction of his and of the people who is surrounded himself with that. They would like to go back to the house in days of America majority wide, you know, the house in days when there wasn't so many foreign born Americans in the country, and this is actually just a precursor to restricting not illegal immigration only been legal migration. Do you believe that to be you know, what's really behind this? Well, I think that's part of what's behind this. Because there are a lot of people in this country who believe what you said, but the reality is the demographics in this country are moving in a direction by twenty forty five certainly by twenty fifty white Caucasians in this country will be the minority. That's just the reality and the immigrant population coming in from all over the world for two hundred and fifty years of American history has enhanced America, it's made us all stronger. In fact, we've all come into that way. We're here because of that. I don't think we should fight that. I think we should welcome. That certainly it needs to be done legally, certainly our borders need to be protected and secured, that's not an issue. The president distorts that all the time, and he gets figures that are just not true. And and when you do that, then the. Substance in the centerpiece of the issue gets lost because people veer off into the other directions that they chase things that just aren't real in our true. Let's look further afield again as former Defense Secretary you had to deal with all sorts of issues, including obviously, Syria. What do you make of the sort of back and forth sort of whiplash? She Syria policy this gone gone around for the last several days. I the president announces that troops would immediately come home. Then there's a huge backlash bipartisan, and sort of graduated then you'll be within one hundred and twenty days, and now it'll be conditions based just where do you stand on this issue right now? Well, first of all, I think the president really doesn't understand foreign policy how it's made interest consequences allies. And I think the proof of that is certainly in whatever his so-called Syrian policy is confusing at best certainly chaotic dangerous, especially in a chaotic part of the world. When you make a decision like he did initially and you make that decision via Twitter, you do not consult your national Security Council. Your experts, you don't consult allies the consequences of that decision are astounding as he has found out the last two weeks. Timing of it was terrible. We've got to find ways to find diplomatic solutions work towards strategic objectives. Using your military isn't going to isn't gonna fix that. We found that out after eighteen years in Afghanistan, fifteen years in Iraq. And unless you work toward that with allies with the nations that are there will be failure. He doesn't understand any of that. So he's had to retreat and disastrous meeting meetings that the national Security Council adviser Bolton had in Turkey. We're embarrassing for America. Aired iwon Skuld any mayor anyone wouldn't even talk to him. He he was saying Bolton was saying things that Turkey must do in order for us to leave. Well in America says well a country must do this before we leave somewhere. You've got gotta be very careful that certainly. Smacks of arrogance and other dimensions of a foreign policy that you do not want to have. So so I think it's just dangerous. Confusing. And they've got to understand they've got to find ways with allies to deal with these big issue to be fair. It appears that John Bolton was trying to make sure and correct me if I'm wrong by reading the riot act to Turkey the day didn't go in and slaughter the Turkish or other the Kurdish forces who've been America's strongest allies in the fight against ISIS on the ground. But as you say, Don doesn't like to be told anything by anyone, and this is what he said, we cannot accept the comments made by Bolton in Israel Baltin has made a serious mistake. And whoever thinks like this has also make made a mistake, we will not compromise. So that brings up a whole load of things that you touched on this administration's policy and its relationship with. It's allies. What do you make of America's the status of America's global leadership right now? Well, the status of American global leadership now is really nowhere. We we we have retreated in especially the commentary. The president of the United States has had over his first two years in office this America first a gives a speech at the United Nations America first, you're all freeloaders he says the NATO to our allies. I'm going to revisit all of our alliance relationships are trade relationships you've all taken advantage of us. It's a unilateralism in a multilateral world. That is very very dangerous on Turkey your points about air to one. I last talk when with air to one when I was secretary of defense in the fall of twenty fourteen I've known him since two thousand and two when I first met him when he when he first Justice development par. Swept into power. And he said to me, then he has said this constantly. We believe the Kurds are our number one threat. Now, you can disbelieve that you can tell they're not your number one threat. It's ISIS are way you want to do it. But that that is Turkey's evaluation. So what you have to do is work with Turkey to find ways around that. So you can protect the Kurds, and you can accomplish the things you need to accomplish let me then to be absolutely spot on this debate. The Obama administration did not acquit it self heroically over Syria, you were Defense Secretary in that administration. And as you very well know that was a point let's say twenty twelve or whatever where the the facts on the ground could've been changed and Russia and Iran would not have been the dominant leading to acids almost total victory. Those are the facts and your administration did not. Did not do what it could have done. So I want to ask you this at this point. A senior commander told me at the time. You know, why would it not have been an America's strategic interest in the in the at that time to to take out these people who could have fought with them or for them. Take them next door into Jordan train them up not for six days or six weeks, but six months and send them back to do this work your administration. Didn't do it big mistake ride. And here we are all these years later. Yes. It was a mistake. I think it was a big mistake. I think it was the biggest foreign policy mistake of the Obama administration. We met for many months on this and had a decision agreed to with which the president had had ordered a strike. And then pulled it down. I think when we did that that signaled to Russia and other nations that first of all the president of the United States word is no good. And that's always dangerous, but that's signal to the Russians you can have Syria. And it was dangerous and matter of fact, when I left the Pentagon in February twenty fifteen one of the differences, I had with the administration was over Syria. I'd written a mental which the New York Times got a hold of a memo to carry and Susan Rice and others in the administration saying. We don't have a clear Syrian policy. I was being hammered on it by our NATO allies by our Middle East allies. What is your policy? What are you going to do? What are you trying to do? We just didn't have one. So you're right. I think it was a fundamental mistake. And I guess the question therefore is you just say they Russia could have it will now President Trump has said we'll Iran can have Syria. We don't want. We don't need it and the bottom line is. And I'll read you these stats that, you know, forty eight percent of Americans support withdrawing from Syria. Thirty three percent oppose it fifty six percent of Americans support bring home half troops from Afghanistan only twenty six percent opposed. So in that regard, the president has the people behind him. Well, that's right. And it's a pretty basic equation here. Christiana Americans do not will not support long wars long drawn out orders, especially in a place like the Middle East that I don't think has ever been as unstable and volatile combustible as it is now so have ghanistan is close by eighteen years and Afghantistan Afghanistan's worse off today than it's ever been the mistake that Trump is made in my opinion is right when we're trying to work on a diplomatic solution when we have a diplomatic representatives meeting with the Taliban and others to try to find a diplomatic solution. Then he talks about withdrawing troops pulling troops out. That's not the time to talk about trip draw. So I think Americans are just fed. Up with it. All I think that's reflected in the congress a lot of Democrats and Republicans feel the same way. But I think Trump makes it worse by the timing and and not giving the diplomatic effort and putting that in investment to try to find that solution. It'll be an imperfect solution. I don't think we wanna balkanize Syria. I don't think we wanna balkanized Middle East where the boundaries does don't matter, and you have a little of this a little of this a little list. That's that's what's dangerous, you'll never get rid of ISIS, for example, or Al Qaeda or a half a dozen other terrorist groups with that kind of a world, and it's important to note that ISIS is not fully defeated. It's definitely on the back foot. But the Pentagon even just said that it is not defeated could come back. Well, Saturday Hegel, thank you very much. Indeed for joining us. You know, what's smart kicking off twenty nine thousand nine hundred by planning out, which rolls you need to hire. For and you can start by using the smartest way to hire. Ziprecruiter. Ziprecruiter's powerful matching technology finds the right people for you, an actively invites them to apply. 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Visit Xeni today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. That's Z E N N. I dot com slash CNN. Remember to create an ad like this one visit pure winning dot com slash CNN. Now with all this turmoil. Sometimes it's best to zoom in all the way in on love, and who better to tell that tale than the novelist James Baldwin whose exceptional would perfectly captured. And critique the America of his times, those were the nineteen fifties the sixties the seventies. But sadly, it is all still very relevant today. And the director Barry Jenkins who won an Academy Award for his film. Moonlight has just adopted Baldwin's novel. If Beale street could talk for the big screen, and is considered another major Oscar content. Here's a clip. Can we got a? What brought you can trust. Just it all the way. And Barry Jenkins joins me now from new Oakwell come to the program. Thank you. So we just showed a bit of the trailer. But even in the trailer, you can see sort of an exceptional lens on black experience in America. There's so much joy the focus on this love that you focus on. There's a certain naive Ted that you focus on. What was it that made you want to adapt this particular Baldwin novel? For me. I've always been a really big fan and Mirer of James Baldwin's work, Mr. Baldwin had quite a few voices. He wrote in but two of those voices in particular that always stood out to me was one voice that was obsessed with romance romanticism interpersonal relationships and the other boys that was just as obsessed passionate about pointing out his stomach injustice, and I felt like in this book, if they'll streak a talk those voices were perfectly fused, and the story addition Fani, I mean, they really are perfect. If you so tissues, the young go. She's nineteen phony is her boyfriend. They've known each other from when they were little little children, and they grew up into this really deep and sweet and wonderful love. And then he gets framed full a rape that he didn't do that his family is trying to get him out of jail full. But his this moment we wanna play a fairly lengthy clip of tissues family, telling funnies family that she's actually pregnant. Just listen. A child is coming. His cringe. Understand you. It's your grandchild. But differences and make how it gets here to challenge got nothing to do with that. Ain't none of us got nothing to do with that. Take your which you. Is such a remarkable scene in such a remarkable event for family to stick up so dramatically for that unwed pregnant daughter and to kick the other one out of the house. Tell me what you were saying about the African American family in that scene. You know, one has taken directly from the source material. So Mr. Baldwin brings these two families together in the novel, and I felt like that scene. So powerful in the page that would be just as powerful on screen anything for me. It was a few different things one in particular is, you know, we have eight, you know, black adults, you know, sitting in a living room confronted with the same situation. And we assume that black people are monolith. And they all think the same way respond to the same stimulus in the same way. But I think in the sequence we see these two families from the same place in the same time take very different approaches to how to deal with the situation in the circumstance and for me as a director. You know, I love getting into the nuance of interpersonal relationships in think, Regina king, and that clip and Ozzy new Ellis just do such a great job of as two black mothers, you know, responding in very different ways. But have to say as much about themselves as people as it does the situation in front of and Regina king. We've already pointed out did win a Golden Globe as best supporting actress in that drama and remarkable in his speech was remarkable to she actually said something I think she said that as a producer. She would gosh, I'm going to get it all wrong here. She says that in the next two years, everything that I produce I'm making a vow that it's going to be tough to make sure that everything I produces fifty percent women, and I just challenged anyone out there. Who's in a position of power to do the same? I mean, taking on the whole issue of women in film today, obviously in the post metoo environment as well. What do you make of that challenge? Is that something that you would take up? Yeah. Yeah. My company pastel agrees regina's mandate. And we have taken at ourselves. You know, we'll make up half the we'll be going audience. You know, they make up half the population in a Sundance on this phone will this year, they'll make up half the directors in competition yet they somehow end up making only four percent of studio directors. So how do we get the four percent to eight percent to twelve percent? It's by creating mandates like Regina stated, you know. A rejuvenate who won was the first woman to win. First black woman to win the directing prize at the Sundance film festival. She started his show on own called queens sugar. And she made the mandate that every director of that series would be a woman, and what's happened is the women who directed on queen's sugar have gone on to direct episodes of other television shows in created their own television shows, including they had the aptitude they have the talent. But they did not have the access regina's mandate is about creating the access because the people there and even Oviously Frances McDormand when she one hundred asked Oscar talked about inclusion mandates. You getting a notice support from a lot of corners. And I wonder whether you think this explosion in diversity is real. And it's here to stay. You mentioned Abdugani wrinkle in time, Spike Lee, of course, black transmit Steve mcqueen's widows, boots Riley sorry to bother you. Ryan Kugler Black Panther all these films making so many waves over the last year or so. I think it I think it takes a multi pronged approach. And I think also we have to look at things over the duration of time. We've had these moments of diversity and inclusion that have popped up over the course of the last few decades, but they're reduced to moments. You know, they're not they're not an actual process. And so I think right now we're trying to build a process while use Eva is a perfect example that show queens sugar is now in its third season. So relieved that's about thirty episodes of television directed by women. Typically, women are ten percent. I want to say of television directors. And so I think by creating a fertile ground. You know, where these directors who have typically been excluded from the process can be included to prove they can do the same work as their counterparts. I think that's the way we have a continual progress that becomes a direction. I'm sincerely a destination. You seeing that happened in the US with voters rights laws, which we assume we didn't need after around two thousand two thousand one and now very quickly realized that taking some of those laws those legislations off the books I've had very adverse effects, particularly in the American. South, you know, berry. I mean, it is almost extrordinary for for for us to be able to compute that this this. Well, I mean, you yourself talk about a really unpleasant racial epithet being hurled at you. Or you heard it being discussed about you, even at the very height of your moonlight success that you were an Oscar winning director. And you yourself had to you know. Well, you will you were insulted. Yeah. It's it's a reality of life. I mean look now as ninety percent or ninety nine percent of the American population going around hurling, racial slurs. No, of course, not. But I do think these things still occur if they can occur to someone like me in the situation that it did. I can't imagine, you know, what happens to someone who's working shift know at McDonalds, you know, or to a woman who was making her way into a fortune five hundred hundred company, you know, how do you rise through the ranks when there's so much of this, passive aggression hurled against you. Leon's? You also about the topic. You've talked a lot about women. But also you take on black rather male masculinity. You did it well blackmail masculinity. Frankly, you did it in moonlight a young gay, man. Boy, growing up mother was a crack addict is the first time that character has been so portrayed and again here in feels street could talk, you know, the quintessential love and goodness that, you know, the male character phony displayed, even as he was being railroaded frame for this crime that he did not commit these very special portrayals. I just happened to have the honor of adapting really amazing writers, you know, Terrell eleven mcrainey who wrote the play the moonlight is based on his MacArthur genius. And James Baldwin is a genus period. So in a way, I'm kind of cheating, but I think that both between myself, and the actors were looking to just basically reflect the world that we see, you know, black men have innocence intended in their hearts, you know, but we rarely see the innocence and tenderness rendent, you know, mass media. So I think for us when we're making these films it just about reflecting the characters that we see in our everyday lives. You know, Bryant Henry stuff on James, you know, a very warm. Very just amazing young men. I think they bring part of themselves onto these roles, and you absolutely right. You know, part of what I love about. This job is going to be up to me to show all the multitudes of blackness working from this book budge aims Baldwin, which does contain multitudes. We can speak to both them the light and the darkness. Of this particular aspect of the black experience Comey. Look you being modest in a way, I mean, yes, you are standing on the shoulders of these great writers. But you get your choice to make these films and particularly to make them in the cinematographic the way you do the cinematic way you show the characters you have them look straight into the lens, describe the choices you make when you actually. Say shoot. Yeah. You know, part of it for me is I think, you know, literature is a very powerful tool. You know when you read a book everything's activated. The author describes a smell you intellectually reflect with that smells like in your head, the author describes a line of dialogue, and you hear that in your head. Everything's activated. I think watching a film can be a passive experience, you know, until you have to look someone directly in the I very rarely do those moments. When people are talking, you know, sometimes the actor and the character just fuse and become one. And at that point, I want the audience to as they say walk a mile in the main character shoes, one of the actors in this film, KiKi lane plays the main character is the first time in a future film. And she described it as very uncomfortable process. Actually, it's what I'm doing right now looking in the monitor here because acting as giving and receiving and typically in a scene one actor gives the other actor receives and they give back, but when we're we're doing these direct to camera moments. The actor was looking directly into the camera and nothing's being given back on. Until the audience is sitting in the auditorium. Now, the actress giving in the audience member is directly receiving and I have to believe that they then give something back. And so now, passive empathy has been turned mutated into, active empathy. Whether you give it to yourself or your audience member, I don't care who you give it to. I just want that direct engagement. That's why we do these moments. And on larger level is that what you're trying to build this engagement between different elements of society at a time. When everything is so polarized, not dimension, the enduring racism. Do believe. So, and I think it was one of the main reasons why I gravitated towards this book, you know, if you go to a desert island, I wouldn't take any of the films. I've made with me, you know, because it's not about me. You know, what they could film is meant to be shared, and I also feel like to in this novel, Mr. Baldwin is impacting so many things, and I think he's implicating all of us in a certain way, funniest falsely accused of a crime. He did not commit, but he's not falsely accused of anything he shows on a police lineup, and he's placed in a police lineup by an officer who's decided to manipulate the system because of that the actual victim in the story has been disenfranchised in the truth or Justice is not what's at stake is not what the system is trying to arrive at so I think in that way, Mr. Baldwin points out, so many of these things that are they gonna making the film. I'm hoping that we can just raise a mirror to show the systems we've chosen to engage in or this three elections, or whether it's through the way, we vote all these things in a certain way, if they're not serving us who are they serving in. I think ultimately we're all being disenfranchised. On some level. I couldn't believe it. When I read that you wrote both moonlight and if Beale street in a six week period while you were in Europe that that's unbelievable. I've tried to replicate it in for me. Now, it is unbelievable because I can't conjure that magic again. But you know, I was at a point in my life where you know, I hadn't done very much. It'd been awhile since I've been creatively activated in emulating James Baldwin. I decided to go to Europe and somehow over the course of six weeks, I wrote the first draft of moonlight and this annexation of streak it's ach. Now, I didn't have the rights to the novel when I adapted it I don't recommend that. But sometimes you have to put good energy into the world. And then the world response. How did they respond only got a few seconds? How long did it take you to get the rights? About four years. Right. Well, good luck. Because I said it's a contender all the awards weld of the Golden Globes. And we'll keep what she knew work. Thank you, very. And just a quick note. Tomorrow, I'll be speaking to another celebrate director. And that is Spike Lee his new film. Black klansman is based on the incredible true story of how a black police officer infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan that is tomorrow. But I our next guest perfectly illustrates the American dream. Stephanie Murphy was brought to the United States as a baby when her family fled communist controlled Vietnam in two thousand sixteen she became the first Vietnamese American congresswoman paving the way for diversity for the new generation of the Democratic Party. She enters her second term, she told Michelle Martin that the US Mexico border should only be one factor in the conversation about immigration. Congressman thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me on Michelle. We'll talk a little bit about your personal story, if it's okay, I understand that you came to the US when you were just six months old with your parents that you had to be rescued at sea. And I just wondered obviously, you were baby. And you're too little to remember it. But I do wonder what if anything your parents told you about that journey well in the aftermath of the end of the Vietnam war. My parents were persecuted by the Vietnamese government because they had been affiliated with the US military as well as with the South Vietnamese government, and they just didn't think that they could raise a baby and an eight year old boy in this country where they wanted for us freedoms and opportunities and they feared for their lives. So they got on a boat in the dead of night and escaped Vietnam by sea. And when we got to international waters, we ran out of fuel and while we were dangerously adrift, a you. Navy ship responded to our SOS call and refueled and resupplied us enabling us to make it to a Malaysian refugee camp, and from there a Lutheran church in Virginia sponsored my family's passage to the United States where eventually we became proud American citizens. What effect if any do you think that that your your origin story as an American if you don't mind, my calling it that what what do you think that that had on you, certainly my experience my family's experience the ability to receive both the power generosity that defines America has shaped my life, and it makes me deeply patriotic in deeply grateful to this country. It's the reason why after nine eleven I left my private sector job and went to work at the department of defense. And I think it's also the reason why in two thousand sixteen where I when I saw this country heading in a direction that I didn't recognize rhetoric that didn't comport with the America. I knew I left my private sector job again. And. Sided to run for public office. What was your you Rica moment and 2016? Well, you said not just you know, what somebody needs to do something about this. But it's got to be me. I'm the one who's got to do something about this. What was that? Like what what was that moment for you? That moment, you know, two thousand sixteen. There was so much hateful rhetoric in this country and government didn't seem to be serving the people anymore. And I was uncomfortable with it. And but it was really the on June twelfth of two thousand sixteen when a gunman walked into a nightclub in my community and took the lives of forty nine innocent civilians that I decided, you know, something had to be done. And when I found that the Representative for my community had taken a check from the NRA just two days after the nightclub shooting. I decided to launch a long shot campaign against this twenty four year Republican coming. I a lot of people told me that I was crazy. But I think there's a fine line between brave and crazy. You know, it was funny because a lot of people say that your campaign in two thousand sixteen was something of the template for a number of the women who ran in two thousand eighteen so what do you think were the? The factors that led to your victory. I think that it was a template because it opened the party's is to the idea that you could get somebody who'd never run for public office before but who had made commitments in their life to serving their communities and had rich a life experience to bring to the job and came at it with an authentic voice. And I was really grateful to see how many women they recruited for the twenty eighteen and how many of them have become victorious, and we'll be joined have joined me here in congress. And now you are the head of something called the blue dog coalition. You one of the co chairs, but you are the leader of this gets you just describe what this is for people who don't know because I think a lot of people think of the blue dogs as being, you know, so than white conservative men who were trying to preserve a certain place in the Democratic Party. So what does the blue dogs stand for now? Blue dogs have changed over the years. Years, and this certainly isn't your nine hundred ninety s blue dogs anymore. And it's not your two thousand six blue dogs either. We even though our caucus has changed over the years. We are still unified between be hind two principles and the first one is fiscal responsibility. And the second one is a strong national security, and I think at this moment in time where we see twenty trillion dollar debt and fiscal irresponsibility by the Republicans. There's a real place for democratic voices to make sure that we are keeping our fiscal house in order. So that we're not mortgaging the future of our kids, and that we aren't undermining our national security or our promise to our seniors and then on the national security front coming out of the executive office. We see a lot of haphazard and often hasty national security policy as well as trade policy and foreign policy, and it's a moment for congress. I believe to exercise its. Article one authorities as a Coequal branch of government and begin to check some of these behaviors to ensure that we are safe here at home, and that we are strong abroad, so fiscal responsibility, strong, national defense, let's Joel down. What does that actually mean in the current environment right now the interest payment to the debt is three the third largest payment that undermines our ability to invest in our national security undermines our ability to fulfil our promises to our seniors. It undermines our ability to invest in our infrastructure, and all of these things that are so important in this country. And so we need to make sure that we're taking care of that less. It really create a future that's unstable for this country and a strong national security. It's a smart and strong national security where we partner with our allies. And we make sure that we're not emboldening our adversaries. Unfortunately, a lot of the actions that you're seeing out of the White House this these days are. Alienating our allies in emboldening our adversaries. So let's focus a little bit on domestic policy in part because many of the people in the freshman class who have joined your ranks are people at a lot of the people gotten a lot of attention are people who are avowedly. Well, they'll say that they're socialists that they believe in what they say, you're very different things, they believe in a different taxi taxation policies, they believe in investments in things like, you know, services healthcare infrastructure, how are you going to work with this group? Let me first say that I think one of the strongest points about the democratic caucus is that we're abroad ten caucus. We have lots of diverse ideas and passionate individuals and that makes for a better caucus better debate on the issues and for a better country. I'm focused on making sure that in this divided government where we have a Republican held Senate and a Republican White House that we advanced policies that can address the issues that are. During my constituents today, the cost of healthcare, the rising cost of housing and education, all of these things that we advanced legislation that addresses, those issues today, we're nation of laws, and the only things that really matter are the ideas that actually become law. Okay. But your one of your colleagues one of the colleagues, it's got a great deal of attention example, Cossio Cortes says that she believes in higher marginal tax rates on the highest income citizens the highest income tax payers now, let's just let's just establish his fact that there are a lot of people who are distorting what that means for their own political purposes, but it's a small business person yourself, you'd perfectly well know what that means. It doesn't mean taxing the highest doesn't mean taxing every dollar at the highest tax way. But it does mean taxing the highest taxpayers at a higher marginal rate is that something that you'd consider. I think that it's really important that all of these voices are heard in certainly her voices, an important voice, but is one of many of the democratic caucus and what the tax. Rates should be is a debate that we should have. But I know for certain that the Republican tax cut that gave tax cuts to the wealthiest among us and to the largest corporations and blue giant hole in our that was the wrong approach. And so I'm looking forward to working together with my colleagues both within my caucus as well as a cross the aisle to figure out what is the right level of ensuring that we have revenues that will allow us to make the outlays that are so incredibly important to the future of this country. Is it true? Also that you invented a of an hold a patent for a design of. Let me get this. Right. Softball pants is that right or baseball. Is that true that you design them and hold the patent for them? And that is true. And I think it's a reflection of one of the things that's great about America. Is that it's about innovation? So I bumped into a problem where women's softball pants were essentially men's baseball pants shrunken and made pink and that really doesn't accommodate for the body shape of a woman. And so I read Zayn to the pant in collaboration with my husband, and we were able to secure design patent on it. But I think that's a reflection of a broader narrative about America where you run into a problem. And then you find ways to innovate a better solution for it. And I certainly take that approach to legislating is trying to find innovative solutions to move this country forward. Well, what are the reasons that I bought that up? Is that your story is so compelling, and yet there are so many people who believe that the system no longer works for them that the. Path that you took education owning a small business. There are many many people in this country believe that those paths are either closed to them or that they don't work for them anymore. And I wonder what is your message to people who feel that way, especially younger people while I think that's one of the most dangerous and destabilizing things to our democracy is when our constituents no longer believe in government and in government's ability to serve their needs. Our democracy depends on engaged citizens. But when they become disenchanted, they tend to disengage, and that's why it's so important to engage with this next generation to listen to the issues that uniquely affect them and then to find ways to create pathways. So that the American dream is still achievable. And that's definitely my focus to that end. You also belong to something called the future forum. What are you hope to? Do with this group which has added to its membership in the current as well, I'm really proud to be one of the co chairs for future forum, which is a a group of fifty fifty of the youngest members of congress. So what we've done is we've gone out across this country under the leadership of Eric's wall. Well over the last four years and visited fifty different locations. We'll continue to do these things we meet young people where they are in coffee shops on college campuses in their communities, and we listen to them, and then we bring their messages back to congress in amplify their voices, and then seek to find ways to address their issues through legislation and one of the initiatives, this congress that future forum has engaged on that. I'm really particularly proud of is the automatic voter registration. We were able to get into the HR one one. What's so important about automatic voter? Station is that it makes it easy for American citizens to be registered to vote into participate in their democracy, and that's incredibly important that a generation that's used to instantaneous, you know, needs met on their smartphones. Also, expect an easier route to being able to vote and participate in their democracy. Now, you've been a congress there already is some said one term, and this is your second term. I have to ask you if you feel in any way, a divide between you and a number of your younger colleagues and some of your colleagues who have been there awhile. I'm chuckling specifically in the democratic caucus do you feel a divide? Do you feel is there a generation gap and the Democratic Party? I think the combination of more mature voices with the younger generations voices is a good thing for our caucus and for our government. And I I also think that you know, there's some things that are core. Competencies of this next generation they have the benefit of having grown up as digital natives. And so are can bring that tech fluency to conversation into the scaffolding of what our tech infrastructure should look like in this country. And I think that's a an additive thing. Well, okay. But are they listening to you is the question, I think in congress there are four hundred and thirty five at least in the US house foreigner and thirty five distinct voices, and I think when you work hard, and you're willing to find folks across the aisle and within your caucus to advanced issues, it it's impossible to be ignored and finally bef- while I have you. I do want to ask you about the government shutdown. What are your constituents telling you about this? My constituents are suffering the unnecessary political drama that the president and the Republicans have put up over a political symbol of Nash. Security that lacks the real conversation around how we secure our borders. And so I have constituents who are worried about their next paycheck. And it's the utmost irresponsible thing for them to be held hostage to this political game brinksmanship, I'm curious though, if you think that if you are at all concerned that you may be right on the substance, but wrong on the politics. I mean, the fact is that the president's argument is simple, which is border wall. Good border while equals national security. And I wonder whether you think that, you know, the president may be wrong on the facts. But he has a compelling argument for the public and that at the end of the day that they'll blame the Democrats for keeping the government closed and not giving the president what he wants as an former national security specialist and somebody who lives in Orlando, which is one of the busiest airports in the country as well as in the state of Florida, which has thousands of miles of coastline. I understand that. Order security is more than just the southwest border wall. And so what I would like to do is for us to reopen government. Have an honest conversation about how we address border security recognizing that it is only one factor in an overall conversation that must be had in this country regarding comprehensive immigration reform. We need to address this issue, not just through the southwest border wall, but through reform of our visa systems and through finding pathways for status for undocumented individuals who are currently living in the country as well as ensuring border security all across this country is congresswoman Stephanie Murphy, the democrat of Florida congressman, thank you so much talk into us. And I I certainly do hope we'll talk again, I look forward to it. Thank you so much. Of course is the congresswoman said America is in urgent need of comprehension, comprehensive immigration reform. But debate on the solution is not even started. It's fath- off from side. And the shutdown does continue that is it for now. Remember, you can listen to a podcast and anytime you can see us online at I'm on dot com. And you can follow me on Facebook and Twitter. Thanks for watching. And goodbye from London. Hey, Sekou Smith here from the hang time podcast. Join me, and my main man John Shuman every week as we break down, the latest, NBA, news and storylines with. Yes. From around the league, be sure to subscribe to NBA hang time on apple podcasts. Spotify an NBA dot com slash podcast for new episodes every Monday and Thursday this season.

president America United States James Baldwin government congress director Syria President Trump Turkey Senate Secretary President Obama Chuck Hagel Oscar Democratic Party Barry Jenkins Middle East
Trump's Fear-Mongering Oval Office Address & Schumer and Pelosi's Awkward Rebuttal | Barry Jenkins

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

28:09 min | 2 years ago

Trump's Fear-Mongering Oval Office Address & Schumer and Pelosi's Awkward Rebuttal | Barry Jenkins

"The you're listening to comedy central. January ninth two thousand nineteen. From comedy central's world news headquarters in New York. This is the daily show with Trevor Noah, here's the. Everybody tuning. Thank you for being here. I would guess not. I'm such a big fan of his he is the writer and director of if Bill street could talk berry Jenkins's, he everybody. Remember him? You may remember him from last year's Oscars when he joined lowlands award out of their hands for his school moonlight. So we'll find out who's Haas guy. He's gonna take away the sun. It's gonna be fun. But first, let's catch up on today's headlines. The government's is shut down. But the mullahs investigation is still going and yesterday we got a surprise look at where it's headed a slip up by Paul manafort's lawyers has revealed new information about his contacts with a Russian during the Trump campaign while Paul Manafort was serving Donald Trump's campaign chairman the documents reveal that he was in contact with a man by the name of Constantine Kalinic and associate US officials believe is linked to Russian intelligence. These new details come in a document that was filed by manafort's lawyers. Some lines were blacked out or redacted, but it turned out because of a clerical error. They could easily be read simply by copying and pasting them into a new document. Oh, wow. Okay. I don't judge. It's hard to enter the PDF. I don't know if you guys know how to I don't know how to do it a second of all that. Sure sounds to me like Donald Trump's campaign manager was colluding with Russia and giving Russians polling data. So that they could target American votes would have been vital because you know, Russia didn't have much luck with their own polling. It was probably them on the phone like L will Mr. Williamson the Steve from glorious polling in this three. Who do you want for lead, a strong, Trump or Clinton walman? But the funny part of me is that we found out about this. The only reason we found out is because manafort's lawyers didn't know how to end a PDF. That's insane. So Manafort was colluding with the Kremlin when he should have been colluding with kinko's. That's funny should have been moving on. Some other news diamonds the little stones that we strapped onto our fingers. Kind of weird when you think about it like that. But people love them. And now they can feel good about it to Tiffany will begin revealing the origins of its diamonds to show the so-called conflict-free starting today the region or country of origin will be displayed alongside the selection of diamond rings customers can store employees for information on all new source stones for some most will be one to have is to have customers that few in buying a diamond look only forty beauty and this value but go so Ford with us about Soviet supply. Chain sounds amazing. I like this guy, basically, his new ad campaign is shop here we. You didn't kill any Africans. I like that. This is good news. You know, of course, knowing rich people. I wouldn't be surprised if the new fed is going to be getting the most unethically sourced diamonds. There's gonna be some rich lady. Who's like, oh my God. Ashley did he buy your diamond. It's three carrots and six dead Congolese. Oh my God. He's the one. It's good that they're doing this for diamonds. But they should really be doing it for all products. I think we should try. I mean diamonds just get the attention because everyone so blood diamond right, which exposed the corrupt exploitation of native, laborers and also the cashiers horrible, South African accent. Maybe you guys don't remember that. But we Africans will never forget. He was like we gotta go back to those blading get the dorm in get the Blidi join ins, what are you drunk or stray? And what are you doing? They should make a movie with Leonardo DiCaprio and forest Whitaker's character from Black Panther. And then they could just you like bad accents together. All the Blidi diamonds in the students of the. The hell is Blick. Moving on. Of the. The what's moving. Here's a story. That was big news over in the United Kingdom. Are you guys fans of Harry Potter? What happened is that offer JK rolling decided to announce for some random reason that hug what's didn't always have bathrooms and in the old days, which is an and wizards simply relieved themselves wherever they stood and vanished. The evidence. Ready J game wherever they stood. I mean, it's great that you vanished your Dookie. But I I had to watch. You squeeze it out for like eight minutes in the middle of potions class. I mean, the flow is clean, but my mind is scarred for life. Why don't you make it disappear in their tummies these wizards? I don't understand. So. Yeah. Basically, according to Jacob rolling wizards were just shitting everywhere. And that doesn't make Harry Potter more appealing to me. But it does make New York City CMO magical. Yeah. Because I'm like I post the wizard on the way to work this morning. All right. Let's move on main story. Today is day nineteen of the government shutdown the streets are piling up with trash food is going on inspected. And in the capital, they're being forced to use both sides of the toilet paper. The Washington Monument is even walking the streets just to make ends meet. And nineteen days. We're only two days away from this becoming the longest shutdown in American history, which I think Trump is secretly going. That's right, folks. Mine is the longest. So today at the White House, the president met with congressional leaders to try any go she ate an end to the shutdown and Trump shut that down to. When fortunately the president just got up and walked down. He asked speaker Pelosi. Will you agree to my wall? She said, no. And he just got up and said than we have nothing to discuss and he just walked down. This was what President Trump had to say about it. And you said, quote, just left a meeting with Chuck and Nancy a total waste of time. I asked are you going to prove border security, which includes a wall or still barrier? Nancy said, no, I said Bye-bye nothing else works. Say what you want about drugs. Some of the things that he does a pretty bad ass. Right. Because that's always been a dream of mine. I'm not gonna lie. I've always dreamed of walking into meeting me. Like, are you guys gonna give me what I want? No this meeting's over by by. Like walk out. I'm out. Yeah. Oh, sorry. Wait who've antedates parking. Because it's like two dollars. I got a ten I don't break. Now, if you are disappointed about the breakdown in talks, but you must have been really disappointed last night's. When President Trump went on television for his very first Oval Office address in primetime all day. Everyone was speculating was he gonna declare state of emergency. Was he going to reopen? The government was he pregnant and Mexico was the father. But when nine o'clock rolled around all we got from Trump was basically, another immigration, stump speech, and like, not even one of these fun ones way. Like jokes. Imaginary giants or whatever he's doing. Instead. We just we just got a a low energy Jeb version of Trump, my fellow Americans tonight. I am speaking to you because there is a growing Umana -tarian and security crisis and our southern border. All Americans are hurt by uncontrolled illegal migration. The federal government remains shut down for one reason and one reason only because Democrats will not fund border security. This is a humanitarian crisis a crisis of the heart and a crisis of the soul sold. Crisis of this whole you don't Trump to practice that word hard because he's never said it before right? He was probably reading a draft of the speech. Like a crisis of this show sold sold. You guys just make up this word. I love it. Give me more nonsense words like this. I love it. So. And look for all the hype the speech wasn't even that long. It was only ten minutes and eight minutes of it was just Trump's sniffing. This barrier is absolutely critical to border security that defends our borders. And we opens the government Democrats in congress have refused to acknowledge the crisis. You're slipping so much. It sounds like he's trying to get all the drugs off the street himself. I'll get rid of that bring them to me. But even in that short, ten minutes, President Trump manage to pack in a lot of scaring the shit out of people about illegal immigrants. Our southern borders a pipeline for vast quantities of a legal drugs meth heroin cocaine. More Americans will die from drugs this year sex crimes, violent killings murder. Raped beaten, beheading dismembering blood blood could not so much violence thing was on TV at nine pm doesn't belong network. This was an HBO speech should have put up one of those content warnings first. So you could get the kids out of the room, you know, and now to be fair to be fast. You can read I like that. Scooby fair. Trump isn't making up these crimes, right? Let's be honest. The sad. Truth is some illegal immigrants have done very bad things. But if you only listen to Trump, you get the impression that everyone is crossing the border just to come in murder Americans. And we know that that's not true. You could you could just as easily pick stories to make immigrants look flawless. I can show. You a headline about an illegal immigrants who save someone's life story can show you another story of an undocumented business owner who went on to create jobs for Americans who story and legal immigrants who even went on to become the first lady of the United States. I'm sorry. I missed I'm an immigrant who maybe didn't have the right papers at the time. She was working in this country at the time. But as a nation America said we can't let those cheekbones got away. We need those cheekbones America can be best, and she stayed and Democrats New Democrats knew the Trump would spend his whole speech fear, which is why they demanded equal time off the his speech to give their counter arguments and right away in classic democrat style. It was well-intentioned, but real oakwood that eating I appreciate the opportunity to speak directly to. Okay. Okay. I'm sorry. Sorry. What the hell is this guy? Why are you sharing one vote him? You guys really are socialist, what are you doing? So why you look so grouchy? What is this? It looks like the hostess at I just told them. There's no senior discount. I'll be honest with you. I'm gonna waste your time. You don't even really need to listen to the democratic response because for them. It was also the same things that they've been saying the whole time immigrants. Good are bad emojis. Are problem attic, it was all the same stuff? So the truth is we didn't learn anything yesterday except that American needs funding for a second podium and breathe right strips. That's what we do know. That's what we do know. And right now, it looks like the shutdown could go on for a very long time because both sides feel like they have a mandate from voters, right? Trump could say that he won the presidency promising a border wall. So he has a juicy to build that wall. But on the other hand, he'll promise that Mexico would pay for it. The Democrats could say that they just won the midterms in landslide. And they ran against the wall. So they have an obligation to stop its. But the one thing everyone should be able to agree on is that none of this should shut the government down. This is politics. This is what you're supposed to be discussing. It's your job and disingenuous for President Trump to try and blame the shut down on the Democrats, especially after saying this in proud to shut down the government for border security. I will be the one to shut it down. I'm not gonna blame you for. Unless it goes bad. Then I'm blaming you guys. Bye. Bye. And the frustrating thing is that illegal immigration is a nuanced complex issue. Right. Something I feel like we've completely lost now as people, right? It involves asylum-seekers visa overstays, DACA kids, the dreamers so much more easy issue. But because of Trump no one is talking about that anymore. The whole debates has devolved into wall or no wall caveman congress. There's one thing we know it's that nothing will stop immigrants from trying to come to America place. That people dream come to because people were trying to make a better safer life for their families will do anything to achieve that dream. And I know Donald Trump understands this because of this video we found from fifteen years ago never ever give up. Don't give up don't allow it to happen. If there's a concrete wall in front of you go through it, go go around to the other side. Control center by Kabo is the one remote that does it all this holiday season. Help your loved ones. Take control their TV with the gift of control centre, control centre, cleans up, your home theater. So you can control everything connected to your TV with one easy to use remote. And stop wasting precious. Time searching for shows plug in your streamers Soundsystem, cable or satellite. Evening's game console and control center handles at all it's easy to use for everyone. Even your father in law who can't get the game on. There's also a fine my remote feature. So you don't need to panic. If it disappears into the couch control center works with Amazon, Alexa, and Google home. So you can even watch TV hands-free relaxes holiday season and enjoy stress-free TV with control center shop now and get forty percents off control centre with promo code ears. That's fifty nine ninety five forty percent off regular price of ninety nine ninety five control centers available at C V, O dot com and best buy control center by kava wonder that does it all. Let's take to get into business and talk about Amazon. They're the reason you were able to do all of your holiday shopping without wearing pants that shit doesn't fly at best buy trust me. I've tried and now Amazon is finding new ways to keep you coming back. Amazon is sending shoppers free samples curated to their tastes as part of the companies push into advertising, axios reporting products free of charge that you may like are gonna show up on your doorstep, and it's all based on your purchase history on the website. Okay. I like the idea but house Amazon going to send you a supple of something. I mean, I get how that would work with food or shampoo, but Amazon sells everything gonna send you like Hoffa TV. The handle of a coffee mug just the tip of a dildo. Like if you enjoy this sample, you'll love the shaft. But but free samples on the biggest story about Amazon today because just this morning, Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO and the winner of capitalism announced that he and his wife MacKenzie getting divorced. This is a huge deal. Jeff Bezos is richest man in the world and under Washington state law. He has to slit everything he's earned during their marriage. Fifty fifty MacKenzie bazo will get sixty six billion dollars. Yeah. This is the biggest transfer of wealth since Warren Buffett left his debit card into McDonald's drive-thru. Six billion dollars. I can't imagine having that much money. Let alone news ING that much money. And you're really rich. Trevor I mean, there was a whole week where you just paid us to speak for you. Jeff basis will be. Don't worry about Jeff as okay, he'll be fine. He he'll he's still going to have sixty six billion dollars. I mean, he's not going to be one of those divorce dad's eating spaghetti O's over the sink of a studio apartment. He'll be eating spaghetti O's over the Mediterranean from the third story of his yacht. Which reminds me this story is brought to you by spaghetti os. Spaghetti O's too this hard. But so is boiling pasta. Actually, does he some of us like spaghetti O's for the flavor and the shapes, you know, but whatever you think the divorce settlements is fair. Oh, yeah. Definitely a marriage is a partnership MacKenzie. Bazo spent twenty five years, helping her husband grow his business and grow his swagger. We look at that. He went from pleaded pant salesman to jacked up arms dealer, right? Yeah. It's totally fair. But that chapter is now closed. Okay. It's over now. And this next phase is crucial. You have a wealthy person. Navigating a painful time in their lives unsure about what to do next. And here's where I cannot stress this enough. It is so important to get married again right away. Spine some someone blonde who will take care of you know, like like a city gal who also feels at home on your private island, someone who will divorce. My husband at the drop of. Oh. Well, we'll wait great. Does. He does he come up with. Come on the show to pitch yourself as a spouse for Jeff Bezos. Well what? No, how dare you Trevor. No, I am pitching myself as a spouse for MacKenzie basis. Yeah. Is beautiful. She's an accomplished author. She studied under Tony Morrison and Princeton. And now she's worth sixty six billion dollars. Elliot's. She writes. Yes, no, yes. Now, she is worth sixty six billion dollars. I mean, you says she's a whole package MacKenzie. Komi I could be on a plane tomorrow or today if you use prime. Mackenzie. Everyone will be right back. Welcome back to the daily show. My guest tonight is an Academy Award winning rights producer and director whose latest film is the critically acclaimed. If Bill street could talk please welcome Barry Jenkins. Welcome back to the show. How much congratulations on the phone? First of all, we don't just lost night you received an award. I mean, the film has been nominated for everything from Golden Globes to kademi awards Regina one that amazing golden goal for her performance. Let's start at the beginning. If Beale street could talk based on James Baldwin novel that is not an easy thing to achieve to turn. Not just a novel. But James Baldwin book into a film, where do you where did you even stop? Yeah. I started without the rights to the novel. I'll say that up front. I just went to Europe and decided I would adapt it and not thinking we'll have to get permission from someone. This is the published tax. I'm just gonna do it. So I did it and came back and realize oh, and now you have to actually legally be able to do this. But for me, Mr. Baldwin at many voices. He spoke in the two voices that were most prominent to me, the one voice was obsessed with sensuality romance and a personal relationships and the other one just as passionate about stomach injustice and. And this book those this relationship between this young couple Titian Fani, and I felt like that was just like the best vehicle to blend his systematic injustice. All these things he said about American society and the things that bond us and bind us and living in this country. They would just fusing the story of these two kids, right and many people may know James Baldwin. You know, obviously is being brought up in conversations around Tallahassee coats, people may know, his essays. But but not many people familiar with him as a novelist, and the story was really interesting because as you say, it's a story about Tisch and funny, it is it's a love story. But it's a love story that is taking place in a time in America, which is familiar to some today, but was really more intense before when you really could not be a black person living free in the United States. You know, we talk about like aggressions microaggressions. I think to think of this period the early nineteen seventies is a period where you know, black people with now arrived. We're rights movement has sort of come and everything is great and Vietnam is happening, and it was almost like clapback, whereas. Okay. Now, you have these rights. But now we want to show you just how we can still act. You know, all these aggressions this young man in this book Fonte gets caught up in the system that is very easily manipulated. And that's system as I won't spoil anything in the movie for you. But what happens very early on? We learned that funny has been accused of raping a woman. Right. And the story takes place in Harlem and the Bronx, and he's been accused of raping a woman, and he has an alibi. He's alibis this because they are black people, unfortunately, and you see how the story plays out. But what's interesting to me? The story is you have characters who his family who feel for the woman who has accused him of rape when you writing that. And when you creating that why is it so important to have that moment where you have people whose lives of being destroyed because of somebody else's accusation. And yet they are still sympathetic to the women's cause. Because in the movie, there's a scene where one of them says, do you think she was even raped and the woman her friend? Turns tissue sisters too. And said system don't have say that. I know what women go through. She's not lying, but I know funny didn't do it. Was that difficult to create and why was it important? It wasn't difficult to create. I think it's a function of James Baldwin to be brutally honest. And I think, you know, the book is about trauma in a certain way. And I think these things were going through in America right now are also about trauma talking about acknowledging it, and then creating the tools to deal with it. That's what thing in this book. You have all these human beings because he's Baldwin who have access to their full humanity. Right. So acknowledging this woman's trauma. Does not mean that were also denying Fanis innocence interesting and really when you break down with happening in this book find he's not falsely accused of anything these people have never met. He's been placed in a police lineup by a cop who you see has been dead against him right in the system is so easily manipulated that all the takes us for this cop say this person was here and now you're trapped. Right. You caught up in the system, and what I loved about making the spill, you know, I'm not a woman James Baldwin is not a woman. Check, my direct Royal ego and trust Regina king KiKi lane on new Ellis. Tiana Paris, Rio's all these women. And there was a point where I was like can we really do? What the stuff, you know? Can we really touch all this very sensitivity of grenades has left us? Right. And to a woman they all said we have to acknowledge this. If we don't acknowledge as women's trauma that is more of a trigger than trying to remove the trigger from the narrative. Right. And I think when you process it that way, you can very clearly see songs treating everyone as a human being aknowledging -nology. Everyone's trauma can really get at how these systems just the franchise all of us. What what was interesting about the movie as well is that I've seen many movies that tell the story about black people's pain or suffering. What I haven't seen a lot of stories way, you are experiencing black people living life as a combination of pain suffering joy, you know, love passion, all of these things taking place similar Tena asleep. A lot of the time. It feels like it comes with the filmmaker. But do you think that it makes a difference in who is telling a story as to how they see the story to be told. I think it does, you know, this is a very simple story. And I think we've seen a version of the story where character Fani is dehumanized right in the wrong hands. That's the version that ends up reaching the audience. I think the hands of James Baldwin and these actors, and I guess alternately myself the humanization of characters comes part and parcel. So you're right. There is joy. There is love, you know, there is birth to be honest, despite the despair that the characters are undergoing into me that was a part of like really sort of endeavoring to bring Jiang's ball screen, and he's a very interior writer so about the interior life for the characters. Yes. But what I love about working people like yourself, you're wonderful actor as well as you can take all that interior language. You know Hemingway before it towards the iceberg, all these things the surface and bring it out. So a person who walked to the auditory, but understand that young man like fawning, which Stefan, James place Fani base. A lot of his character on the ordeal Khalif Browder, and I'm sure. Your audience knows exactly actually Browder is. And you can see these two hours with this whole world of possibility that is unfortunately being corrupted corroded by the system one thing that's really powerful about the entire phone. And I honestly would tell everybody to watch it. It's not just beautiful in the way, you've shots at congratulations to acting phenomenal the storytelling beautiful in different. You know, we we live in different times and in different periods. It's not just linear. But when I really found fascinating and different was that. There was no bad guy. Right. It it really was a story about a system that has been created, and we all living in and experiencing different levels that seemed like a very conscious choice because it was these families were experiencing the system, and it wasn't like there's the bad, man. That's get him. And then the story is saved. We we've been telling stories cinematic least for about one hundred years, and somehow some way over the last twenty thirty years, the the format of those stories have been reducing been shrinking, you know, there are good guys and bag is. And that's it. You have it that way is really easy to stand outside the story and go, okay. I'm with the good people, and those are the bad people. So this problem is not mine. Right. There's no bad person. You know, when everyone is very gray. And we can see how we all play a role in the system, then it comes from the screen, and it goes into your life. You can understand. How would I go to the ballot box? I am now empowering the system even to participating in it. I definitely am James Baldwin published in nineteen seventy four he knew all about systems as why the story is still relevant to today. It's an amazing story. You're truly one of my favorite directors again. Two is now in the nationwide, and tokens everywhere genuine, you really wanna watch movie Jenkins. Everyone. Daily show cover Noah. Here's what's valley show. Weeknights at eleven ten central on comedy, central and the comedy central watchable episodes and videos at the daily show dot com. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram and subscribe to the show on YouTube, exclusive, content and move. This has been a comedy central podcast.

Donald Trump James Baldwin America Trump Trevor Noah US Jeff Bezos Amazon Mackenzie New York president Paul manafort Mexico President Trump Barry Jenkins Russia writer Trump Titian Fani
Capitol Insurrection Fallout | Barry Jenkins & Logan Paul

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

39:14 min | 2 months ago

Capitol Insurrection Fallout | Barry Jenkins & Logan Paul

"You're listening to comedy central step up your home decor game at home says the newest member of the homegoods family everyday. You'll find game changing savings on rugs lamps and chandeliers furniture and more for inside and outside your home. Make your backyard. The envy of the neighborhood home sense is a new shopping on every visit. New finds arrive all the time. So it's never the same store twice for brands. You love at prices that make sense. Take a virtual tour and find a store near you at home. Sense dot com. Hey what's going on everybody. I'm and this is the daily social distancing show. Today is wednesday may nineteenth. And the big thing. Everybody's talking about today is the lineup for lollapalooza. Twenty twenty one. Which just dropped. And because i'm going to be honest. I don't like how they designed these music festival posters. You got all the big names at the top and the names gets smaller and smaller and smaller. Like i'm taking some some spotify. I exam and i'm sorry like i don't think the foo fighters need the help the big bold font. But if you ask me. All the bands should have the same size font. Because people don't go to music festivals just for the big headlines all right the goal to music festivals to drugs in a field. I mean look at this thing. The prince at the bottom of the post is so small it almost a lot of producers trying to hide something. You like wait a minute zimmerman. I knew it anyway on tonight. Show andrew cuomo cashes in on covert republicans are ready to move on from the insurrection. The bay caused. And if you're watching this at work you might already be dead. Plus logan poll. And jerry jenkins are joining me on the show. So let's do this people to the social distancing show from trevor's couch in new york city to your couch somewhere in the world. This is the daily social distancing show with trevor dome. Here's let's kick things off with a new study about jobs. Do you worry that your job is killing you. Well first of all congratulations on being basic and second. You may be more right than you know. The world health organization says working long hours killing hundreds of thousands of people a year. It says the trend may worsen due to the covid nineteen pandemic. A new study showed seven hundred. Forty five thousand people died from stroke and heart disease associated with long working hours in two thousand sixteen overall. The study concluded working fifty. Five hours or more wink is associated with higher risk of stroke and heart disease the study did not cover the period of the pandemic but who officials say this surge in working remote and the economic slowdown may have increased the risk. That's right people working long hours. Could literally kill you so the next time you'll boss asks you to work late you go ahead and report him for attempted murder she at the same time. It's kind of weird because walking can kill you but then you also need money to stay alive which is why it's so important to find the right balance by stealing. And i know the study makes sense. But i'm suspicious of the world health organization here right. It's like one of the researchers just got caught leaving early on a friday. Actually i did a study on this. And if i don't go out for drinks right now i could actually die. Yeah jager meister specifically by the way. Don't you find it funny. How everybody's response to this. Is that if working too long. Kills you then. We have to stop immediately but when a study comes out that says drinking too much eating too much desserts will kill you then everyone is like yeah look at everything kills you. People want too much. You've got to live a little in fact usually when we find out something could kill you. That just makes a cool and dangerous. You know so who knows. After this reports working long hours that could become the new thing that only bad boys do young. Man you can't be staying up all night working on spreadsheets. It's not good for you. Just try and stop me old man. Now if you're thinking about getting away from work with a nice trip somewhere just know that. Getting on an airplane is about to get a lot more uncomfortable. According to the federal aviation administration airlines might start wing passengers before flights. The faa says it's to ensure safety on aircrafts. You're curious may need to update the average passenger weight. Which would be done to random voluntary surveys of passengers. According to the report the weight of the average passenger and their carry on bag will be raised from one hundred seventy to one hundred ninety five and increase a twelve percent. Okay wait hold up. Airlines could stop asking passengers for their weight before they on the plane. No no no no. You can not doing this right off. The we'd been stuck inside for a year eating nachos and our bath tubs. And please. don't tell me. Oh they have to humiliate the people to keep the plane safe. No how about bowing to remove the automatic crush feature. I then maybe i'll start doing some crunches and also i don't know if the airlines realize this but it's not gonna work. You can't trust the measurements. That people are going to give you gonna ask them weight waiting. You think they're going to tell you the truth. Planes are going to be crushing. Left and right Why are we going down. Everyone said they were doing keno. Because let's be honest. Who's gonna volunteer for this. The only people who want strangers to know their weights of the people who want to show off their weights. Yes sure of course you can weigh me you know. I actually still fit into my college airplane seats. I will say that this is. This is one of the stories that shows you how different america is from so many parts of the world. Because if you did this in africa the shame would be completely reversed because in africa being overweight is generally a sign of prosperity. So if you shop at the gate all skinny african agents were just on roasting you. What is this. What is one hundred and forty pounds community in in your life. Are you not married. Go back to the food court. Go back to look at this one No he's suffering and finally. Let's talk about andrew. Cuomo the governor of new york and while he still governor cuomo got a lot of criticism last year for his self congratulatory book about the coronavirus response. And now we're learning. Just how much money he made off of its tax records released this week revealed. That new york's democratic governor andrew cuomo is set to earn more than five million dollars from crown publishing for his book in which he shares his leadership lessons from the pandemic this despite harsh criticism of cuomo's handling of the pandemic accusations key and his administration covered up data about nursing home deaths and despite reports that the state's attorney general is investigating whether cuomo inappropriately or even possibly illegally used state resources and staffers to help right and promote the book. Wow really andrew cuomo got five million dollars for a book about how well he managed the crisis. I mean that's gonna make him one of the highest payed fiction writers of all time and you know once word gets out about this. You know there's going to be a lot of people thinking Maybe i should kill. Everyone's grandma's a lot of money and even though five million dollars sounds like a lot. Keep in mind. This number is coming from andrew cuomo so in a few months we'll probably going to find out that it was a niece three or four times higher than that now the news of cuomo cashing in on the truth of how he handled. This comes right as cuomo is also fending off charges of sexual harassment. Although judging by this new training video his office has put outs. He's dealing with that issue head on welcome to the new york. State governor's office sexual harassment. Let's start with the fundamentals. What is sexual harassment. Harassment is not making someone feel uncomfortable. I just made you feel uncomfortable. That is not harassment as feeling uncomfortable. That's right people. Feel uncomfortable all the time i to the beach. I get sand in my shorts. I'm uncomfortable. am. I going to sue the beach. No now that we have very clearly and accurately define sexual harassment. Let's answer some common questions. Touched anybody any female. In the governor's mansion have i touched people. Yes of course you touch people touching myself right now. Is this sexual harassment. Think so years another situation. That might come up now. Is it possible that. I taken a picture with a person. After the fact says they were uncomfortable with the post and the picture being uncomfortable is it sexual harassment. Both parties need to agree that they're uncomfortable. That's what's called a consent. Let's keep listening together this concludes. The new york governor's office sexual harassment training. You now have all the tools you need to sexually harass anyone. We're supposed to train them not to sexually harass. Let's move on to our main story. It's been a little over five months since a violent mob stormed the. Us capital took over the floor of the senate and pasta law giving tax breaks to in cells and even now the fbi is still tracking down the rioters sometimes in the most hilarious ways possible. Another new york has been arrested accused of taking part in the riots at the united states capitol daniel warmest of alden was arrested last night for his alleged role in the riots inside the us capital january fixed. Now here's the official. Fbi complaint which started with an anonymous tip from someone who says just six days after the insurrection. They overheard warmest bragging to his dentist about his trip to washington even playing videos of his experience that day. That person told the fbi. They could hear warmest about how he smoked marijuana inside the capitol and how he refused. Police officer's instructions to leave the building. Okay look look look. Wait wait wait. You can laugh at this guy. But he's not alone so many capital rights have gotten busted because they bragged about it afterwards. Which honestly does kind of understand i mean. How could you not to tell people about the craziest. Most interesting thing you've ever done. You stormed the capital. You have to tell people i mean. That's why i could never be proud of heist so trevor. How was your weekend Broke into a casino. Volta was the most exciting thing ever man. I'm not gonna crack. The ball. Got the money and i was like me was while right. You can call the cops now. What's surprising to me though. Is that this guy confessed his crimes to his dentist. I mean how can you be that opened with your dentist. I'm scared to even tell my dentist. I haven't been fussing would really blows. My mind is that someone could even understand anything. This guy was saying to his dentist. Have you ever tried to have a conversation with the densest. All right just open wide. I'm gonna move your tongue over here and tell me. So how's your summer. Been going higher on wildland Allah while the fbi is still working on everyone who stoned the capital. that day. The ones that they have already found a working on staying out of prison. Like remember this guy and the most effective anti-fur of all time. Well his lawyer has come up with one of the most novel defenses. You will ever hear the attorney for jacob. Chan's leave the so-called q. On shaman who stormed the capital on january six is drawing criticism over remarks. He made when he was talking about the defense strategy for his clients. But i want to warn you. This is offensive. But they are his words. Albert walk in says quote a lot of these defendants and i'm going to use this colloquial term. Perhaps disrespectfully but they're all effing short bus people. These are people with brain damage. Their effing retarded there on the goddamn spectrum but there are brothers. Our sisters our neighbors. Our co workers are part of our country. They are bad people. They don't have prior criminal history f. They were subjected to four. Plus years of god damn propaganda. The likes of which the world has not seen since effing hitler. God damn people. That's his lawyer saying that shit about him. You gotta admit that's one hell of a legal strategy ladies and gentlemen of the jury. My clients seems like a brain dead it who can be convinced into committing treason. I rest my case obviously people. This is the craziest thing. I have ever heard from a lawyer in my life. I mean this guy managed to use inflammatory remarks offended entire group of people and completely distract everyone from what his client was caught on camera doing. Donald trump is probably sitting back watching this like. Where was this guy. When i was getting impeached. I also susceptible moron. You know what's weird though. Is that even though. The loy used all these horribly offensive words in a strange way. His heart is kind of in the right place. Because what he's really saying is that we shouldn't criminalize mental disability the neuro- divergence and the easily manipulated. He's basically the most unwell quote person in the world. It's sort of like an old man. Saying well i say the blacks are every bit as valuable as normal folk nigger lives matter but people. It's important to remember that. A mob of morons doesn't materialize out of nowhere people encouraged and inspired these morons and they make security decisions that allow these morons to break into what should be the most secure place in america. I mean aside from wherever grundy held her wedding which is why many people in congress are saying. It's important to investigate how this happened will. Interestingly enough other people in congress are saying it's better not to ask congress voting today on nine eleven style commission to investigate the january capital attack house minority leader. Kevin mccarthy came out against creating the commission yesterday followed later by a formal recommendation by house. Gop leadership for members to vote. No senate minority leader mitch mcconnell just announcing on the floor that. He opposes the bipartisan bill. To form a january six commission as it is currently drafted for consideration of made the decision to oppose the house. Democrats slanted an unbalanced proposal for another commission to study the events of january. The six and a statement former president. Trump said republican. Lawmakers should not approve the commission calling it a democrat trap is just more partisan unfairness and unless the murders riots firebombings in portland. Minneapolis seattle chicago and new york are also going to be studied. This discussion should be ended immediately. I'm not gonna lie. My man trump is right. How is this commission just going to investigate january sixth when the so much other shit to figure out like what happened in portland. Who killed two puck and biggie. Who's the monster who created jots. The people need to note of seriously though. Is trump really tunnel. Riots out of this commission. I mean look. I'm not surprised that the gop leaders are trying to derail this thing. You know investigating the insurrection. Needs the republican party. Have to take a good hard look at itself. And if i was inch mcconnell looking at myself is the most thing. I'd wanna do look investigational. Not republicans are gonna have a hard time convincing. Most people that the capital attack was no big deal which may be why. They've made their own educational film to tell people what really happened. That day on january six january six one really happen. Hello children you might have heard some crazy things about what happened on. January terrorists heard from president trump and began storming capital. Violent armed insurrection. Knowledge is power. So here's the true story of that eventful day. The sun was shining and thousands of patriots gathered to peacefully protest huddling around that classic symbol of nonviolence anew sin gallows ahead twisted zero threat right from the start with zero press on january sixth. I never felt threatened. I because i didn't think from two men who the protesters didn't chant about hanging death. These people were not threatening their actually nonviolent. These americans you're only crime was supporting donald trump. The doj is harassing patriots across the country. That's right just a ragtag. Merry band of freedom lovers and you know they're peaceful because they run piece restraints and peace spray and they tapped this one police officer with their freedom bowl. Some of them went in and there. They hug even using the police guards you know. They had great relationships. You know you didn't know the tv footage was video. Come january the six actually think that was normal tourist visit and he would know because he was there to greet those tours receptionist reckoner. Could it be more. Accurate to describe is a model of misfits solid americans and they're deeply frustrated. Those people that love this country truly respect law enforcement And that's everything you need to know about the events of january and if you have any other concerns remember it's best not to dwell on the van all right when we come back full. Make barry jenkins. We'll discuss his new series with underground. Railroad is an actual railroad support for the daily show with. Trevor noah comes from norton. Three sixty with lifelock. Did you know that. The average person was connected. Roughly seven hours a day and sixty four percent of adults admitted taking online risks for convenience all that browsing banking and shopping makes life easy but it can also expose personal information making you vulnerable to cybercriminals. There's a lot to your digital life that can put you at risk. That's why norton three sixty with lifelock makes it easy to help. Keep it safe with device security to help block hackers from devices a vpn for online privacy and lock identity theft protection to help you keep. What's yours no one can prevent all cybercrime or identity theft or monitor all transactions at all businesses but with the all in one protection of norton. Three sixty with lifelock. You can be less worried about becoming another stat. Save twenty five percent or more of your first year at norton dot com slash the daily show. That's norton dot com slash the daily show to save twenty five percent. Welcome back to the daily social distancing. Show my first guest tonight as a kademi award winning filmmaker barry jenkins. He's gotta talk about his incredible new limited series the underground railroad and why filming it's one of the most challenging moments of his career. Mary jenkins welcome to the daily social distancing. Show you have good to be back. You are one of the most amazing filmmakers that we have had the pleasure of experiencing in our lifetimes It is not often though that a full. Make such as yourself goes. You know what. I'm not gonna make a movie about the underground railroad. I'm going to create. This is a ten part television series. You know part of it was when i read Colston's book Why it's pulitzer prize winning book I knew that it needed a certain amount of space. A certain duration of time story properly and fully on but also to knowing the subject matter of the book dealing with the condition of american slavery. i felt like i wanted to create creative work of our where. The viewer had a certain degree of control movie theater. You kind of surrender yourself. You're you're held captive by the experience you among strangers. It's very loud and very big. You can't get away from it whereas this if it's something you seeing the mic you'll compl- you can pause. You can fast forward or if you wanna see it again. You can rewind every movie that barry jenkins makes makes people feel. This is a story. That's that's i mean. It's painful for so many people choose expose uncomfortable in so many ways. I'd love to know when you're making the movie. What's the environment like. Onset is it. Is it always like morose always like depressed a rather than trying to creep around it. We addressed it head on you know. We had a therapist to guidance. Counselor own set at all times. We tried to always check one another. You know to make to understand that we were a community telling the story together. And then yeah. It wasn't morose on sat at all times. You couldn't be because one. We knew the journey. That we were on was was very long hundred. Sixteen days is no joke In in in in addition to that we also why we were there in. We knew that even though some of the scenes that we were doing were very heavy a brutal and in some ways horrific. Our reason for telling story to me that was autographing into there was always some way to remember to hold on to light I would be remiss. If i didn't bring up the fact that the star and and really the face of this series is My fellow south african to sue you have just expressed all of you. Admirations love four. And you know there's so many sensitivities around where people from what roles they're going to be playing and who stories. You're going to be telling so. I'd love to know as barry jenkins when you choose the people and when you lay out the story how do you pick who you think can best represent what's happening on screen yet to be honest. I don't feel like i'm picking them. They're picking me in a certain way or they're they come in. They take the role With this character. Cora was a couple of things one a new. The actor had to be strong on needs. You feel can withstand journey but also to. I wanted someone who could show me all the many facets of course personality of her her heart or spirit came down to two so at another young woman. was not south. Africa wasn't as looking for south africa's play his part. Trust me be ally. I in the series was not played by someone who's not african american She she was man she was she understood. The character to me is always the most important thing. You also have a responsible. Responsibility would argue to protect the audience. You know a lot of people have written about how in in in the history of american film and cinema and television you know black trauma has been something that has been just freely doled out. How do you create a story where you're going. This is not just about you. Know the poverty point of it all. It is a story that happened and it includes this violence and this paint. How do you find that balance of figuring out what we're trying to focus on you don't. It's tricky. I try to be very open. Listen to the conversation happening out on the public sphere to make sure a half. I'm aware i have my finger on the pulse of people sensitivities. I want to acknowledge them. And let them dictate how i work. But i can't deny can't get in sculptures with you right now go. I didn't know that. I know and still that would be a lie So in the course. I like to making the show any of these scenes well first of all curate and go what is absolutely necessary and essential to show in what can be told and sell the book these acts from towns that she witnesses there catalysts to get to the point where she decide you know. This is too much i have to go so i decided i need to show those things. She sees them. The audience has to see them beyond that. There were into tell you know. Ridgway is telling these stories battalions of cutting to them which is going to chorus face. We're going to your country woman's amazing face in everything you need to know about how that feels to performing with with her is with her shoulders so it was about staying that but it's interesting because trauma cuts so many different ways is tricky. I say in the first episode and we do have these acts We filmed an extreme wide. The only time anyone's whipped in this first episode at night. You can't really see much. And then we come off. The acute trauma in we drift over to the people forced to witness to show trump visit opponent. One million voters into the whole community. That was away a thought. If i'm schilling what on earth always being awful that way. An tricky thoughtful and In my opinion and the opinion of many other people masterfully executed. barry jenkins. thank you for the time. Thank you again for an amazing amazing production and hopefully we'll see you again in the future. My friend he's not gonna show bro. I would love to walk with. Oh we'll do it. We'll do it for sure appreciate you want to thank you very much. Don't forget underground. Railroad railroad is available now on amazon prime video. Right when we come back youtube star logan. Paul we'll talk about his upcoming boxing. Match against floyd mayweather. His strategy don't get punched. It's crazy how much we have to pay for outdated impersonal healthcare and even crazier that we all just accept it. It's time to face facts. Healthcare is backwards. Luckily there's forward a new approach to primary care surprisingly personal and refreshingly straightforward forward never makes you feel like just another patient backed by top rated doctors and the latest tech forward gives you access to personalized care whenever you need it. Using in-depth genetic analysis in realtime bloodwork forwards top rated doctors provide you with in-depth insights to better understand your genetics mental and physical health. They then create custom easy to understand plans to help guide you to achieving long-term health with forward you get unlimited in person visits with your doctor and access to care anytime via the forward up offer. One flat monthly fee. It's time to stop accepting backwards. Healthcare and start moving. Your health forward visit go forward dot com today to learn more. That's go forward dot com. Welcome back to the daily social distancing. Show my next guest is logan poll. He's a podcast hosted content creator an entrepreneur. Who is now trying to conquer. The world of boxing logan paul. Welcome to the daily social distancing. Show how are you man. Thank you good man. I'm doing good but but you. You are one person who i never know how you doing is is the best way to put it. You know you've got a name. The gets people reacting in some way shape or form. You say logan to some people they go. I hate that guy. I wish like a safe would fall on his head from from a building. Some people you go logan paul. They like man. He's the funniest craziest. Dude i love him so much. Got the craziest gags or whatever i'd love to know from you. Who do you see. Logan poll as well. You're right i my name can definitely make people feel both things But i think it's because i've given them reasons to feel both positive and negative things about me. You know it's it's like either way it's my fault and At the end of the day. I like the idea that i make people feel You know i've always wanted to be a big entertainer and that's the answer to your question. Who is logan paul. I'm entertainer and entertainers make people feel. They make people care in some way shape or form or invests their time and energy into watching this person. And so yeah. I'm an entertainer. That's living a very real life journey like the rest of us but most of most of my life has taken place in front of the camera as a fault of my own It's a blessing and a curse man. But it's fun one of the things. That's really intrigued. Me about this generation especially like. Let's say youtube is is it. It was unstructured world where you had these young kids who on camera just having fun with their friends and then it was a big community than a bigger community. All of a sudden you guys were worldwide superstar getting million dollar checks and i really wanna know on a human level is not able to prevent yourself from getting completely up by getting that much money from just like this crazy world because it seems like so many youtubers have the story where it's like man when i was young. I did this crazy thing. And i'm sorry and i did that crazy. I don't know you chula who hasn't had that. So i'd love to know what that experience has been like for you as a human i don't know much know about my career but it's me up It turned into a version of myself. That i did not like it was the worst version of myself Which was a shame. Because obviously when i started making videos at eight years old. It wasn't to be a youtuber. it wasn't to to become famous or or even make money. I just liked making videos. I like the aesthetic of putting something on a screen and capturing it so my friends could watch And then it captured the attention of of a pretty large audience. And i fed into it. I became the thing that i felt. the internet. wanted me to be which which was over the top Centric extremely loud shocking Humid which sometimes works and sometimes is the worst thing in the world. I heard you say that you think you being youtube is hotter than being a professional boxer because of the toll it takes on your mind and your body and what. You're trying to keep up with as as logan. Did you ever think to yourself at some point. Man this is. This is pushing me too far as a human being. Even i'm not comfortable in this world anymore yet but it took me shooting myself in the foot and destroying everything had built to realize that because like i stand by that statement. The one thing. I'm really good at is working hard. And i'll often overwork myself without knowing what i'm doing even even just right now training for floyd mayweather like my coaches have to reel me back in because i will run until i get shin-splints in blisters on my feet or throw until i. I'm sore for the sparring. The next day like i just don't know when to stop. Do you think. Do you think you're trying to prove something to yourself or to people. I almost feel like boxing has been part of that journey for you. Where you've gone. I'm gonna take out this rage. I'm gonna. I'm gonna direct it into something that has disciplined something that keeps me a little more calm. I are you proving something. Are you running away from something. Are the demons that lou. Logan is battling myself. It's myself this whole boxing. Journey is me trying to achieve that next level within. I've always been my own worst enemy I i am constantly battling this and so boxing. The use the word disciplined but the discipline of boxing in pushing yourself both mentally and physically which has been a journey of mine for the past three years. now is like really crafting. A person that i love. You have made either the worst decision of your life or the most interesting decision of your life in agreeing to fight the greatest pound for pound boxer. The world has ever seen floyd mayweather now. A lot of people are saying. Well this is. This is stupid. It's gonna be publicity stunt first round first minutes logan's going to be on the ground. People doubt you all the time and time and time again you come and you surprise people but floyd mayweather is floyd mayweather. So question number one. Why fight floyd mayweather question number two. How much of a chance do you actually think you will have in the fights Questionable why fight floyd mayweather My kids kids. We'll talk about this like generations to come. We'll talk about this moment in history. I when i accepted despite understood the magnitude of what a a special event this was like. You don't turn down to fight a specimen that is floyd mayweather the great the greatest fighter of our generation like my whole life has been overcoming challenges that have been thrown in my face and exceeding expectations. Surprising people. Doing what could not be done ryan. This doesn't feel any difference in the. I've i've never been in intimidated by by void or let alone anyone and so how much do stand a chance of beating him. I think i stand a chance. You'd be lying if you said it was impossible. He's human. It's a fight. Anything could happen. A thirty pounds heavier half his age. A foot taller like i worked my ass off. You know I don't know anything happen. I've watched a little bit of your journey. As as a as a person as a youtube as boxer as a pod cost up and it feels like you have expressed remorse and also a wished to become more of a whole person as you grow older. I'd love to know for for for the kids that have grown up on. Logan poll one of the mistakes. You wouldn't like them to repeat that you made is a great question i would. I would urge any young people who consume my content to really really really lean into being themselves. Please do not the end who you are or who you want to become for other people even if you've found success doing that before stay true to yourself. It's so cliche but often times. I find like cliche things ring so true. And that's one of them. Just stay true to who you are. And don't veer off the path. Well all i can tell you sir. As good luck man people are going to be watching because they hate you. People are going to be watching because they love you but as you say people are going to be talking about a good luck to you. Good for the fight and thank you for joining us on the show. Yep thank you the showtime pay per view boxing match between floyd mayweather and logan poll is on june sixth right. 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If Beale Street Could Talk with Barry Jenkins and Paul Thomas Anderson (Ep. 176)

The Director's Cut

34:31 min | 2 years ago

If Beale Street Could Talk with Barry Jenkins and Paul Thomas Anderson (Ep. 176)

"Hello. And welcome to another episode of the director's cut. Brought to you by the directors guild of America. Featuring today's top director sharing behind the scene stories of the latest films and insights into the craft of directing please take a second to subscribe to our podcast on itunes or wherever you get your podcasts. This episode takes us behind the scenes of director. Barry Jenkins new drama, if he'll street could talk based on the acclaimed novel by James Baldwin, the film tells the story of Tisch a Harlem woman who strives to prove the innocence of her fiance while pregnant with their first born child in addition to if Beale street could talk Mr. Jenkins credits include the feature medicine for melancholy and episodes of the television series. Dear white people he was nominated for the two thousand sixteen DIGI award for outstanding directory la- chief -ment in feature film and the kademi award for best director for his film moonlight following a recent screening of the film at the DJ theater in Los Angeles. Mr. Jenkins spoke with director, Paul Thomas Anderson about filming if he'll street could talk during their conversation. Mr. Jenkins discusses how he cast the film's to leads KiKi lane and Stefan James, the careful attention he paid to creating the Harlem portrayed in the novel. And how he. Rex immersive closeups of his films. Thank you very much. Hi, hello. Mr anderson. We've only spoken on the telephone. So this is actually a first time meeting. Yes. But you told me on telephone that this is actually borne out of the same kind of insanely creative session that moonlight is born out of that you kind of had twins at the same time. This one came afterwards. That's fucking nuts. It was it was a nuts. Nuts summer. I gotta say somewhere twenty thirteen. And I was just don't know. I was just fed up with myself with everything, and my producer, availa romance ski this film and moonlight. She was fed up to and she said, well, what do you need to do in order to create? And I was like, oh, I need to just plenty out of Miami to go to Europe for like two months, then just have no distractions and she got together eight thousand dollars and sent me off to to Europe. I had a round trip ticket to Brussels. And the idea was actually just about this film. I wanted to adapt this novel in moonlight was thing. I took just to get me writing. I thought oh I'll start working on this play adaptation. And then I'll get to the thing. I really want to do which is novel. But when you don't have any friends, you don't have any any real money. You don't know anybody you don't speak the language you kind of just like work in so ten days later. Moonlight was done the first draft. And then I took a trip to a train to Berlin. And wrote. First draft of this. Bad. Yeah. I mean looking back on what? Yeah. They're not all like that. I tried to replicate that now. But so then go back to your relationship to Baldwin and this book because this I don't know everything about him. I don't know much about him. But this is later in his life this book, right? Yeah. As later in his life and kind of after the the literary glow on him as a fiction writer. I kind of dumbed I'll say, honestly. And so even myself being someone who consider themselves like a Baldwin fanatic. I hadn't read this book. I'd read Giovanni's room the fire next time. I'll go tell it on the mountain and another country, and a friend of mine who works in film with sound designer named. Julia Sharar, she sent me this book and said, I don't think you've read this. And I think you should because I think there's there's an amazing film in it. And you'd be the perfect fit for it. This is premature lights it was when I've only done this twelve thousand dollar a feature budget called medicine for melancholy is the only thing I made at that point. Thank you Jenkins aficionados. I like all twelve of the people in this audience. But what I read it. I saw the things that I let me to fall in love with Mr. Baldwin, which was is very sensual poetic voice that dealt with romance and relationships in a very sensual away, very visceral. But then this other voice that was just as viscerally a tune to sustain injustice, in the way American society is played a large role and the degradation of black folks the lives of black folks in America, they were fused really organically and this novel, which I would say is not my favorite James Baldwin novel. But as a visual storyteller, it was the one that I felt had the richest material for me to mind, right, right? Sometimes it's working not what the best source material that could have to adapt to film. So. I can imagine. That is the does the book follow a similar structure in terms of flashing back that you are kind of within this relationship in past and present. And it it it does. But it's not exactly the same. I mean, the book has maybe in some ways in even more radical structure, not in the film. They're both non linear, but we didn't. We couldn't follow the same non when your principles as the books was a bit divorce. Right. Okay. So the romance at the center. Where did you find these two faces these two remarkable young actors, right? I mean, let's start with them. And then we'll get to everybody else because it is like I every time somebody appears on screen. You wonder like who the hell is that? And how can I see more of them, you know, so just start with these two young actors the biggest thing for me when I first read the novel was it was clear to me that Titian Fani are soulmates, and I'd seen a few depictions of young black people the soulmates, but not many, and I certainly haven't seen many in cinema and so right away in the casting felt like immediately when the movie starts because you know, it takes twenty hours to read the book, it takes two hours to to to watch the film, you need to know these two people are soulmates. And so that was the primary thing I was looking for and it had to be in the faces and the gestures and not so much in the dialogue, something you can feel you know, that's a different kind of belief in something you told and you believe so. You know, when I write the scripts I very rarely see an actor in my head. I think casting especially watching your work as a meritocracy, and I wish is hoping someone would walk in the door and show me who Tisch is. And and KiKi lane who plays Titian this film was her first film role ever, which is insane. Because she has to carry the whole damn film. You know in the in the movie to speaks with two voices insane. She's like this very young girl experiencing you just about everything for the first time. But then in the voice over she speaking from a woman whose evolved, and he's experienced the girl has become a woman. And so I was looking for someone who had that duality within them in KiKi lane showed up very late in the casting process. And she just had all those things and then stuff on James. I'd seen him and Selma. And I'd seen him in race. And I actually didn't think he was perfect for the film because he so just like very he played Jesse damn Owens. And so it was it was almost like to refined from what I wanted for this character. But you. I think castings America Crecy any like Luda LA 'cause he's from Toronto. And he's like, I will I will put every seed in this film on tape as what he said to me. And that's it. That's unnecessary. However, I saw the tape. You said I got some thoughts, and he went off without me, and he re-taped and every note, I gave him took it and let me put them together for chemistry read, and it was clear. Okay. These two young people are soulmates. And then it became about building these families around them. Right. Well, the casting process so as president of the Regina fan club. President. I'm card carrying member have been for a while. I mean, I'm by the way the scene of the year, we talked about this briefly by far by Maya mile is is her going down to Puerto Rico and putting the wig on and taking the wig off. That's like one for the history books. It's really really so moving when did sheet when did she come into your mind as as that's going to be my, mama. So once once we cast, and that's exactly how it wasn't. Once week has a KiKi and stuff on then it was about building these families around them in from either says idea in the book, that's very clear where Joseph and Sharon tissues parents. They're basically like almost mirrors of Titian Fani. Yeah. They were the same age when they met they were the same age when they got married, and so I was looking for someone who very clearly be the matriarch be generation beyond. But still in some ways, look almost young enough to be this woman sister to be this girl sister. And I remember watching Regina king growing up onto two seven, and then watching her and all these movies and TV shows and just always feeling this connection to her. You know, she's like must sister mother kind of end in once we hit on her and my head. I was like, okay. It's it's her and nobody else, and and thankfully, she loved the book. Everybody in the film loved the book, and they were really diligent about the source material being a part of their their characters. And once I had the first guy with her, and she gave me so much debt. You know? About the script. And what was what was not what was in the book and not in the film, and all these things, and I said to her or something, but her Schlitt said to me on moonlight, which was it's not in the film, but it's in the performance. And once I said that she was like, okay, cool. I'm with you Ryan. We went down the road. Wig as her idea, actually fantastic. Well, because in the in the book, and the book is a shawl, and I was like we were both having the Skype. He was in Mexico in Montreal. And I was like this thing. She's like what about this thing with the Shaw? I was like Yay. I know we're definitely going to do it. But I'm trying to figure out a way to ground it. She was like, I think it should be a wig. And I was like, you know, what? Yes, I think it should be a wig and the whole thing just came alive. Yeah. Fantastic. And and and daddy would and just talk a little bit about him Colman Domingo. I mean, both the dads in the film Colman Domingo Michael on her just yes. Yes. You know? It's a, you know with this film. What what I really love was once we found KiKi and stuff on then it was about who are the actors that just feel like like, these families a certain way and an opponent was so great because it wasn't about trying to find like the biggest and brightest faces. It was about building a family Ryan between Argenteuil Ellis who plays Stefan's mom Michael beach who plays his dad, and they Colman Domingo. I just felt two things one. I wanted to keep the language of the novel intact and some of the language can it can break in the wrong hands. I felt like all these actress could do a really good job of preserving the language, but making it almost lived in which I think contemporary makes a contemporary without updating its twenty eighteen yet. And and Michael beach, which is a phenomenon that Colman Domingo can. Ounce. He could read the telephone book, and it'll sell like listening to like like r&b from the nineteen seventies. You know? Yeah. And and then once we had solidified that element that we got ta on a Paris. We moved on to building up the satellite characters, right fantastic. Really fantastic. We got so much to cover. What just before we go out before we go off the actors, and the whig this is like the best hair makeup. I've seen in a movie. I mean, her hair, I lo- alone. You know, some those who who who did you who did that? And who did you work with? They're they never get a. Yes, it's cool. But it trivia, so one of the novel is so detailed about every damn thing. You know, the Harris describe the clothing's described just so many lush which details I think Mr. Baldwin was writing from his memory of his childhood. He wrote this in France. But I think he was trying to be really diligent about reflecting the neighborhood he grew up in so so detailed, and I remember I was on the award circuit with a moonlight. And Jeff Nichols. Film. Loving was was touring as well. And so I kept meeting the people who worked on loving. And I remember thinking I love what they did with Ruth's hair and the spin on met this guy named Kenneth Walker. Who's like he's in his eighties. Any industry forever? However, his first job in the industry was on a show called two two seven which was also Regina kings first job in the industry. And so this movie is like a reunion for the two of them. And he just had such a good time because I told him there is the scene Kenna where it's like the black is seen ever in the world. And when these Mont when the mom walks in the front door, her hair has got to be pop. It's the scene with the two families in the beginning. He just got it. And he has such a great time. And you're right. I love to shout out Kenneth Walker. Amaze antastic must go to water all over. So just just talk for everybody about two of your clearly sort of greatest co-conspirators cinematographer and the composer who are people that you've been with from the beginning. Yeah. So so James Laxton is the cinematographer on this film moonlight like you shut it off him. M medicine for melancholy. I mean, we went to film school together. So I've known the guy since I was like twenty years old, and we just have a way of working at this point. And was like a like, a a second second language that we share, and we always approach the film's not from the prison of what's the John Ritter. Or was the story form, but about the characters, and I think especially writing these two at the same time, I feel like moonlight is about Sharon's consciousness whose native consciousness, and you'll street is about tissue state of consciousness, and it's really nice when you work from that prison because it opens up so many of these aesthetic things that aren't grounded in the melodrama or in the queer coming of age film, the grounded in the way the characters feel. Yeah, James is really good about that. And the same thing with nNcholas Patel who is the composer or moonlight NAS composer on this which I didn't realize it. But we were at we're doing something like this Nikolai in Belgium for the the world composer awards whatever and afterwards became off stage and a composer in the audience said so am I to understand? From your talk that you never heard any of Knicks music before you guys worked together are moonlight. Never Kurtz me. I was like no actually I hadn't heard any of his music before we did moonlight. But there was a vibe, you know, I had a meeting with the guy. He understood me. I understood him. He understood the film that was all it was and yeah. And I feel like with James and myself with the editors with everyone, we just approached the film's as though the past doesn't exist, and whatever the vibe is isn't that piece is what's going to rule the day? Right. Right. I mean, the balance between the photography and the music and everything is this. You know, there's this doomed nature to everything. But you never shied away from giving us the romance so beautifully that it's beautiful when it needs to be. Yeah. And this one I felt that was that was really essential felt like it was absolutely essential. I think it's what Mr. Baldwin is doing in the book, you know, the the lives of black folks in America has always been rooted from the very beginning of our history here and some element of despair. Doug Dacian, I mean, literally tortured and yet there's always been love. Always been joy and always been family. And I feel like in this book. I think balden is making a thesis statement that that that love that joy is a life force. And it's the reason why we've been able to survive despite this degradation. So it's really important to me to lean in to the life force that love and romance and not feel like, you know, as a fancy director. You know, I can't be sentimental about being soulmates. You know, when the movie wants to soar when she's thinking of these better times that movie's gonna damn sore? So yeah, how what kind of what kind of dialogue. Did you have in your mind with with Baldwin, you know, in terms of being? Being respectful to this book. But also, I also got to make a movie, and there's things that I have to do to change it. Did you have to go to work every day and have a little dialogue and your head with him and say sorry about this woman. I'm going to have to cut it or I did because I I like to be really loose onset. You know? I think when you get there on the day what you're doing on the day rules the damn day. And so when you're working on an adaptation when you have this text that has existed for forty five years. That's a hell of a thing to overrule on day. Exactly. But what the actors are doing is always the most important to me, always the most important. And so there were times where I worry that we were drifting a bit too far away from the text or where I was leaning too heavily on the visual dynamic, you know, of the storytelling mid not allowing out of the dialogue with performances as Mr. Baldwin dictated. Them's ruled the day. But ultimately, you know, the clock is ticking. I mean, you know shit. I l you know, the clock is ticking. And you gotta get the scene and so at a certain. Point instinct takes over right talk a little bit about that. Just the practicalities of having to go back and recreate Harlem, which just beautifully done with the design and everything else. Yeah. Our production is on a Mark Friedberg is just old old school. And he just knows every damn thing. I mean, he was so essential to we didn't have the budget to recreate, you know, the Harlem as it wasn't nineteen seventy four which was a very rundown place. You know, the city of basically just given up on Harlem, they literally will not send you know, the public waste collectors up to Harlem to clean up the refuse. And so the kids would just make playgrounds out of it. You know, all these vacant lots and rusted out cars, we did as much of that as we could. But what what I said to Mark was it was going to be a Harlem of faces is the landscape of faces, especially with the way James that I work with all the portraiture. Yeah. But also of the interiors, and one of my favorite all these all the interiors in this film are sets they're all either on a stage or we found a Brownstone in Harlem that was being flipped gentrification or no one and Marcus. So smart. He's like he's like man before you flip this house. We will demo it for you. And they were going to build a James Baldwin movie in it. And there were what after when you sell it. You can say a James Baldwin adaptation was made here. And we got the deal. It was awesome. Yeah. And then Mark brought the place down to nineteen seventy four code and just brought all that patina. But my favorite is Foti's Bank street flat were were Bryant. Harry Henry shows up in the film, and they had this twelve minute conversation. That's also on a stage MR Mark, which is so particular that when they're sitting at the bathtub as dining table, if you look between them, there's this crack in the wall because it's a basement apartments or the foundation is off and Mark brought this eighty four year old draftsman like out of retirement because he was the only one he would trust Bill that crack in the wall on a set yet because he felt like it had to have that authentic character to represent the Harlem at the scale that we were representing it. So really awesome guy, man. I mean, Mike elaborate is on. This film, which is like the best. I feel really privileged to work with them. There's one of them right here. Your editors in right over there. A abso-. I didn't hear any point during this discussion. Joy stand up for the people. Yeah. Well, and and I'll say, oh shall joy out. Because you know, I have two hundred is joy, join melanin that Sanders. Joy, actually cut that twelve minutes sequence between a stuff on James O'Brien Tyree Henry, and and the and the thing with that sequence was we shot it, you know, standard coverage shot reverse shot all bit we had two cameras, and then in a certain point and enjoy thank you for figuring it out at a certain point. I was like, you know, what it's not. It's not good enough. You know, it's not going far enough. I didn't want to break the energy between those two men. So we took one camera out and put the camera on a slider instead of cutting between them, we started passing the energy back and forth back and forth. We did it what three times joy did it three times. And so we got this twelve minutes. See, and I'm like, but make the three times be the scene and not like twelve times that we did it was standard coverage, and she did it. So thank you, my dear you defeat done. Thank you. I can imagine that. Yeah. I can imagine get an editorial kind of headache in this film. Just in terms of you get into a situation because in a way you have limitless possibilities by because of the flashback. How challenging was that when to go when when to move when to move left when to move, right? How to go forward? How to keep moving forward without us feeling that we're we're stepping back. It was extremely challenging. It is the most challenging thing about making the film to be brutally honest. And it was a thing where as you say with most films there is two or three ways that the movie can work. Yeah. But this one were like fifteen ways movie could were again. And it was about really watching KiKi watching Tisch and really solidifying that the movie wanted to be framed through her her consciousness, you know, she's essentially in purgatory findings in purgatory and every now, and then she wants to get away from that and have these flashbacks. And so it was really tricky. And it got to the point where very late in the process. I would wake up every morning at six AM and watch the movie. Because the only way to really know if this move added up to this was to watch the entire thing. And so every two our watch I would figure out another two minutes of the film, and it was like over the course of the last like two months post, just like watching the entire film over and over and over again to make sure that this was the version of the film. That was correct. This was the version that on at the aesthetic contract with Tisch, right? Very difficult, man. Yeah. I bet. I bet. Now few other things I'm very jealous of your close ups. I mean, I I've tried it show house Addison. The house Addison close up. Well, you know. I think there's a long line of people that have really tried to do Jonathan Demme close ups, and I'd try all the time. But I have to say you got it right better than anybody. They really so jets. How is he doing that? I've tried so hard. I mean, absolutely, I suppose it has everything to do with the right faces. But yeah. On top of that. I know that it takes more little bit more than that. Although something to do with casting. I am casting four faces that are open that will invite the audience end to be honest other. The other thing too is I don't try to control it like, I'm not directing those moments. Yeah. Yeah. And what happens is I don't plan them myself. And James, we don't plan them. But every now, and then I think there was a moment where you know, acting is performance as an intellectual thing. And so there's always a distance between the actor and the character, but sometimes onset. I'll just find a feel this moment where the actor and the character the distance shrinks yen. There is no space between them. And what the audience is seeing if they're looking directly at them as just. The soul. It sounds like both bit. But but I will say if we do like eight of them, maybe four of them will end up in the film. And so I try not to devote too much time to it. Right. But there's just this moment where I feel like the actors everything just peels away. And all I say to them is can you please just do the same looking directly into the camera. And usually there's no dialogue involved because I think if you introduced dialogue than the intellect kicks back in sure, and I don't know what it is that we we never know where they're gonna go when we shoot them, and we never know when we're going to do them. But I just feel like there's always a moment especially in these last two films. Why I the audience needs to look directly into the eyes of the characters it. Well, it's a really feel what the characters are feeling. And this woman wrote this this profile of me in the film and the New York Times, and she made an observation that just never occurred to me and actually looking out in this room, kind of applies to you guys. She said, you know, in these moments where we use these close ups when it's not like a high moment of drama, you know, it's just people in repose so to speak that it's such an. Intimate look such an intimate gays that for people who aren't people have calling for people who aren't black. It might be the first time you've ever looked at someone for the sustained period of time in this way in there's something very radical in that never occurred to me, and she said, and if you are a person of color or a black person you are seeing someone you've looked at all your life. But you seeing them in a whole new way, and we do these scenes the idea is to make it radically immersive. Whereas like, not even about the fourth wall. It's just about this giving and receiving the actors on set of giving and receiving to one another and the audience you guys just receiving. But when the actor looks directly at you from the screen, then you're giving back as well. Yeah. And so never know where they're gonna go. But when they work man, they really share. Yeah. Enjoy an I we're trying to figure out the ending of the film because the last thing in the film is the one thing that's not in the book. It's something that deepened post. I realize I need it to really close circle of the family's journey and the only way to get their editorial was through those close ups. It was the only way it will work without this close ups. It just would not work. So I'm glad that we did them. The the only one that was planned was one what Regina with the wig didn't tell her. But James knew we were going to do it. I want her to stare onto my my my camera forever and ever and ever sees really. She's like, it's well, it's a way it's three D without glasses at a certain point. You know, you really you are getting it from and soap submit by mistake by mistake. We showed this an eye Amax NBC. Uh-huh. Oh my goodness. Because we shot it on Alexa, sixty five Jerry the actor ratio was to buy one. So of it's what they call lie max, which is one point nine three enough four by three. Yeah. It's like a perfect and Lima caps out at two point nine k so we're like way beyond specs the close Virginia and the whig. Oh my God in the mirror. It's just like, yes. Yes. Like human vision. I like to call it. Yes. I I just wrote my heart there. I'm what else do we got? Oh god. I we could go all night got Regina. I just briefly there in the SIS the other family the sisters come on their great. Great great. And the mother who can't I love how she collapses in her arms. It was like like like, you know, when they would carry James Brown off. And he just couldn't, you know. No, I I was talking to somebody about the scene because there was a critic not a critic there was a person who likes movies who's like, I don't know people were laughing at this. Should they be laughing? I was like, of course, they should be laughing. It's gang ridiculous. And when I'm at like, family, reunions and things happen. You know, the people in it are very serious, but you see aunties and uncles over the side like laughing because it's ridiculous. And I think when Mr. Baldwin wrote the sequence he was thinking of James Brown being carried off and then throwing the Cape off because because it is a as as vicious and brutal as some of the things that are being set. It's so heightened that it is ridiculous. And I think being able to step outside of it. And look at it. And it's ridiculous miss. As is what makes it not the be all end all this family. These two families are going to have another sit down together they just have to have to write because of his odds new says that child child. Yeah. Well, her only way of dealing with it is to just create such a dramatic. Situation if she has she's so she's got no other way to deal with it rather than cause a ruckus. I it's it's one of my favorite performances in the film, because it's it's a very complicated thing to do especially for new being a mother, right? It was the way that character behavior is not a way that she felt she would behave, but we did have these long discussions about it. And we got to the same place where the only way she can process it externally, and she has to process it in the moment. She has to do something is to just blow it all up. Right. It's to blow it all up and most most of what she's saying to share into KiKi, she's kind of saying to herself in a certain way. Absolutely. It's a very very nuance. Big. But nuanced performance. Yet doesn't the best kind though, aren't they? I mean, just in a in a pragmatic talk. You said that I thought of the the breakfast scene in in phantom threat, right, which which is very nuanced. But also very loud. Yeah. Yeah. I like it when things are big but also nuance. That's the best combination. Really? Because you want to get, you know, it's a movie after all you want to get your money's worth. You know, we don't want to like exactly get go subtly through this. We kinda give him some some good stuff. I just love coming from moonlight. Nobody expects in the first thirty minutes to be laughing their heads off. And a Barry Jenkins film that I I thirty minutes is king ridiculous. Yeah. But two things I wanna make sure cover is that I love and did it in moonlight to you just got the guts to hold on intimacy. Longer than longer than than than any than most people would. And you carry us through it potentially being uncomfortable to call me, helping us calm down and showing it something that I personally do love to see if it's done. Well, I mean normally don't wanna see too much intimacy. Sometimes if you know because you can feel like this is this is fake somehow, but now twice now you've you've done incredibly long takes incredibly long scenes of people in in their most absolutely most intimate situations. Where'd you get the guts to do that? That's pretty great. I mean, it it's because it is. It's got see, you know. I mean, I have final cut. So it was helpful with the guts. But but I think in both in both films. I think you're talking about the the scene in the second chapter of try on on the beach. And then this one went Titian Fani, I make love it's just such especially with the way the movies built up to that point. You know, it's so rapid you're cutting back and forth from this first date, and then with the families all the emotions are very heightened. But I think at the core the film, it is about this girl, you know, an all of her first experiences, and to me, it was really important to really illustrate how tender the romance between these two people are and to honestly present a depiction of for sexual experience. That was tender into me the way the best way to do that. What's your just be with her the experience in give her the space to grow? With it. And so as comfortable as the audience is, you know, as coming to the bed, and we're in this master shot. I think you see her slowly also really settle into her body. Yeah. And kind of take control of the scene, right? And to be honest, an in a very passive way. But still she is dictating the pace. Now, I'll out myself about the scene though, especially directors talking that whole scene could be one shot. Yeah. He he gets up to go to the record player. We don't cut away we stay with her. We sort of pan over he just a soft, focus, blah. And you don't see him put the record on. Then he comes back, and he's like so money. He's like coming back into focus that he comes to her. And then they go down to the bed all one shot. But then I showed it to some of my female friends who work in cinema. And they said if that was a woman at the record player, you would cut to her because you'd want objectify her. Now, if you try and tell this movie from a female perspective objectify him, right? And so we had the coverage. And so we cut and I will say it. I'll give joy credit here. Because it was like we wanted to see here we got to see. It's so we we cut the stuff on with all his muscles and his tidy whiteys. Talk about arguing over post. It's those tiny details. Yeah. You got to give the underwear some coverage you'd have to serve guys like apparently apparently. But, but you know, what I think we did that in every scene then it would fill indulgent, but there are very particular moments. When I think is essential to really again ground the audience and experience the characters especially with this one with her journey as you as you got them, we got to wrap it up. But as you back to these two actors, you have them you've sending them on their path. Are you going to rehearse with them? Are you gonna let are you going to hurt them just enough? You're not going to rehearse with them. What is the just give us how you set them off on that? It's been my thing to not rehearse a lot has just been my thing. Botha? Moonlight was no rehearsal at all. This was one day every hersal. It's just not been my way. Anyway, I don't story Boorda shot list. But I don't story board. I used to work in advertising, I used to feel like if you have boards onset, you were working towards the boards, and you want working towards harnessing what was happening on the day. We set so very minimal rehearsal and. Digital? So it was like the first is the rehearsal kinda like how I like to say. And I'm always trying to feel what the actors are bringing on that day. And then work from that. With what I have in my head was in the script and ended up at the the best place. So it wasn't a lot of rehearsal. But what happened with this film? I talk about KiKi in particular was KiKi is this new actress who's never been in a film when so we surrounded her with all these veteran actors, and you can see them nurturing her to the process of understanding what it takes to be the lead in a film, and then nurturing than bleeds over into the dynamic of the family owned scream. And so it was just as really lovely the handicaps become the strengths in a certain way, the limitations become the strengths. And so I tried to create a really safe space with them. But no there wasn't anything. I could do just like try to rigorously get them up to speed, right? Great. We have to wrap it up. Well, thank off that trip to Europe because we got moonlight. And if Beale street could talk Barry Jenkins. Thank you guys. Thanks for listening to another DGA QNA if you'd like to hear more from director, Barry Jenkins, checkout episodes, sixty three to sixty five which feature Mr. Jenkins discussing his DJ award nominated film, moonlight alongside other nominees such as gaming inches L and Denise Villneuve at our meet the nominees twenty seventeen feature films symposium, you can find past episodes of the director's cut wherever you listen to podcasts and be sure to subscribe. So you don't miss Nep aside. Thanks again for listening, and we'll see you next time. This podcast is produced by the directors guild of America music is by Dan, Wally.

James Baldwin Stefan James Barry Jenkins director Harlem KiKi Tisch Europe directors guild of America MR Mark Titian Fani America Brussels Colman Domingo Paul Thomas Anderson Regina Sharon Los Angeles producer Berlin