24 Burst results for "Barry Jenkins"

"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

05:41 min | 11 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"Okay i said. Yeah i'm fine. She said no. You're not you're not okay. What's going on. I go You know it was near the infant The first chapter georgia we filmed the first and last chapter georgia and mabel back to back because when the locations so i was carrying all that around right and i was saying to her Yeah you know. I'm good because no. You're not gonna i know i know. I know i'll deal with this weekend. I can't let the crew. Yeah right you know. See me not not keep it together. She goes yeah. You try to keep it together for the crew but who's going to direct the show when you can't keep it together For you yeah and so. We sat down. And this is like you know ten. Pm at night on a split. We're like thomas right tire But she would not let me. Go back until i told you released. I did release. i did i did. It was There was the day before there was an actor who does something. That's not even violent here. I'm in the very first episode when The the the the owner of the plantation brings the kid over to read the declaration of independence. There's one enslaved man prideful who grabs the kid and says hey this boy can do it. You know he's with michael that he pushes him into the center It just unlocks the actor who had to grab a little boy and he just he had a hard time with it and so she went and talked to him and seeing how. This is a really gregarious guy. Seeing how affected he was by. This thing isn't wasn't even wasn't that he was a whipping some while. Yeah but psychologically. He placed the child in harm's way in he he had a. He had a hard time separating himself from that. Yeah and i just realized you know. I had this thought was like you know. Am i doing the right thing by bringing all these people into the story we talked and you know she had to say was very smart and she wants. She had already talked to him in an served her function. She done what she there to do. Because we pause when when when i saw him do that that he was losing an asset to her. You need to talk to him and so we pause on that day. Yeah in this. Hey because i had then. It's it's weird when you're doing. These things like spiro transference. Especially when you're all together you know it affects one affects us all and yet i was having at this person there who was really wonderful them there to make sure we can all release here. I was. I wasn't releasing a damn thing. And so yeah she She pulled me to the side. Pulled me to the side and and we got through it and then we cut moving i. It's whose decision was it to hire that person you know i will. This is where. I will give the studio credit. How good this study on credit from the very first meeting. Because i knew we're going to have an intimacy coordinate right but this was something even Even above that studio said yeah. We're gonna have to have a therapist on a trauma counselor. Listen to soften. Her technical term was a guidance counselor. But she's a licensed clinician in an. Yes she helped a lot of people get through some things. Wow so heavily. Used ohio You know isn't heavily. Used in the beginning this. I'll come back to the the answer i was gonna give about. Shame heavily used in the beginning as we got further and further into it less and less Especially amongst the The the black actors and the cruiser. Because you you teeing up this this idea of shame you saying what has been the response and the community saying how there's people reject the show sight unseen because they don't want to deal with the trauma it elicits these feelings of shame and in making the show in the beginning i would see miss white go over and she would talk. She'll be talking to the black cast nor embodying the enslaved and then as we kept going and kept going up going i would see less of that when i would see more Some of the white crew going over also white yeah In one of the things. That was very clear. Not everything we did. was shameful because there there was some very tender moments in the show. Yeah there were some very empowering moments in the show right but when the shame did reveal itself it was very clear. Let's begin as a black person out. Shame is not hours and that was something that became very very clear to me Not i knew that intellectually but to to feel it I think was a was a very interesting in that. It took a minute. It's a commitment. Yeah yeah it took a minute because we we hide these images You know even in scouting the show of the plantation houses exist right on the same properties. The slave quarters have been erased and so we built it from scratch and you build these things and more free. Production is a really wonderful job when you step into them and see them. The twelve people living in a shack who What human being subject. Another human being to this well. That was the other thing that i'm sure it's in the book. The constant referral to it. Yes he or she. Yes but that was in the book we actually dialed it back a little bit and some of the things in the georgia chapter in the book. You know and colson lying about anything. It's all rooted in truth But yeah the Again he won a pulitzer for the book Job great job turning that phrase Yeah no i mean the. The whole thing was amazing. It had a profound effect on me. It was a pleasure talking to you. Thank you pledges online. Hey man did did you. Did you do the whole intro with the what the fuck guys. What the fuck. I'll do that before. I do these separate now do that later. So i can you know Figure out how to set you up. The argument happened. It was great talking to.

georgia mabel spiro thomas michael ohio colson
"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

07:57 min | 11 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"And she doesn't know that that kid lived she doesn't know and she just had to take the. What was the way that that actress played that we know you start to realize the the the the burden of of of inexplicable Violence ongoing to self and others and no way to get out of it that you know what does that do to the heart. The in terms of e there's no way to even process that grief so like but somehow another asterix you'll make it work. I mean there's no way to process that grief but when you really sort of like map out what you've seen you know. This is the generation of women that give birth to the women who give birth to mlk. Yeah you know who's your who create this movement that opens malcolm x. The this is moving this environment to wbz boys. This little generation women that give birth wbz boys that open this movement that does create to some degree a more perfect union. Yes to some degree because you you go from eighteen sixty five to nineteen sixty five and nineteen sixty five is fucking huge for the complexion of this country is not just the civil rights of black folks is also the immigration act. You know that that brings all folks opens all these opportunities and as this ricochet effect over the whole world and the women who gave birth generation. This is what they had to go through. I started to feel regularly. I felt that. I felt like you know like when you see in that generation is probably mostly gone but you know there were suggestions in you know in some of the waiter episodes when you know when you rise in the city and i can't i can't remember exactly what it was where you realize you don't know until you sit down with like an old woman you who had like it's like it's also in the same sense of holocaust survivors right that you know like something that the survival Dr doesn't really have time for grief. It doesn't no it doesn't right i. It doesn't because if it is unfortunate because you know These these psychological effects that we know so much about now. We don't know everything about her own. God they must have been just like over overrun with ptsd. Exactly righteously so much so much psychological trauma More almost in a trance. Exactly writing almost in a trance grabbing almost in a trash dying a trend yes undoubtedly and so you've right and i think one of the things that's really lovely about to so's performance. Who plays cora as you can feel her. She's leaving all these people behind but she's not leaving them behind right. That's why these faces for so much throughout the show. keep records keeping. She's carrying these people with her. How does that manifest itself. She falls down the ladder ridgway's lying on his back. She gets on the handcart she could go but not gonna not gonna repeat. I'm not. I'm going to close the circle. The cycle of abandoned eight and she goes back. She grabs that girl. Doesn't doesn't happen in the book. She goes back and she grabs that girl And she takes care of business and she takes care of business which also is not in a book but that was the weird thing is it doesn't read as as justice it reads as this has to stop. It is this has top in. I remember we were doing these portraits. We cut to as she's walking and we just started doing those mark. We're making the show. And i looked over at the background. Act was one day as i fuck. They look amazing. That even the right word. I look at them in a feel things. We just have to pause doing and capture this and as we started filming them when they're all standard still. They're all still. I remember saying james. The cinematographer aquino what she's going to get off and handcart which was gonna grab that gun. She's gonna be walking towards him and we're going to see avi spaces. She's gonna stand over him and we're going to see all these he's got me running fucking my off now. We're going to see obvious faces now what. I didn't plan when i can never plan. Is she pops him and two so this young woman. She's so amazing she cries i. It's not scripted. Whatever emotion the came out of her. It's what came out of her and every take she would stand over him and shoot him. You know we had these quarter loads and then these tears will come. And i was like yo i. I didn't expect you to release that a new release. Something yeah you know. I didn't expect you to jump in the air and whoop and holler at five. But i didn't expect that every single take finance right because that is like all the grief you were talking about all these things. She's carrying all these people some. It's just gotta stop. yeah and when it stops. It doesn't take the pain away right. Doesn't take the pain with this washy releases that emotion released that tier but it does stop this thing And the journey goes on right Yeah it's it's really. I mean making the show was this is how how is it like you. You seem to feel and i think rightfully so that you know you. You did a great job. I'm i'm happy with the ship. It definitely has a masterpiece. Feel and it's and it's thorough and it's affecting and you know it is of its own What how is it being received. I've no idea I have no idea the critically addict. Great Probably i think thorough is the right word. I i do feel like it's a. It's a thorough piece of work And sometimes you go to work and you're like oh do my best today. I think i did the best. I could and that that whenever have that feeling authority good. You did the best i could. I think bill shrewd. I could have done a little better. this one. I did the best. I could and just me. Yeah pig this is. My personal opinion is great You know. I wish more people were watching it. I wish more people were. We're talking about are you. what do you sense. How is it landed in the black community. Do you have any sense It's interesting because right now. We can't physically go to any community i miss being able to go to. Qna's you know. I would love to have gone to chicago. Atlanta detroit you know citing auditorium. React to people about the show What i get incoming on social media Is very positive before the show came out what i got. Incoming or social media was very negative. People just reject these injuries Sight unseen people. Just don't wanna be reminded of the grief that you talking about. You know of the wait. People are ashamed as seeing these images of degradation subjugation So much so that. They don't even want to wait through those images to get to 'em i hope. Tenderness right One of the things. That was really really just like to shocking to me personally making the show. It was something i knew. But it's one thing to know something into feel it Which was we had a guidance counselor for the run of show we have therapist was always on set woman who won. They pulled me off momzette because she felt like she could see that. I was carrying too much of the trauma of the show and not processing. It pulled up set. mike really. Yeah pull offset Because we empowered her. We said this yes. The director says actions has cut This woman miss kim. Kim white yeah She supersedes me if she sees you Cannot do what you need to do or that. You need to process something. She can stop everything handed. What does she put me off own. So that man but what'd she say She said She said are you..

wbz malcolm ridgway cora ptsd aquino james detroit Atlanta chicago Kim white mike kim
"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

09:06 min | 11 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"It's not planned. After the the the the the enslave man jeff jasper escapes in yellow fever. Camp kneeling the cross ridgway finds them no time pat and then the very next seen the little boy homers just standing by a lake in ridgeway walks up to him and he has them these keys and he says these words to he says You know it's just you and me and then he goes on this mantra. You have to be strong like me. You have to be watchful like me. And then he says you have to take pride and you work because so much of the indoctrination of american exceptionalism much of the indoctrination of all these things. We're hearing this idea of making the great again you know. It's about this pride so much of. I don't want to be ashamed of this. I don't want to be ashamed of my that. So much about the surpri. These montrose is repetition. And i thought i'm still struggling understand what this relationship between this man and this boy is. But i kind of know something about it when it's grooming it's indoctrination it's seduction. And so i thought like me like me. I just want these words and so as we were filming on the day. I went to the bathroom when it came out. I texted joel lines. And said i'm not gonna tell chase what we're doing but if we get ahead of the day was going to be this beautiful. Little kid takes a little kid. How old is that kid. He was ten when we filmed. He's probably eleven and a half because he he seemed It was interesting. That character was at in the book in the book. Yeah because like you know. It's weird when he when you think about you know how the idea of of of ta-ming comes his created. And then you sort of see this little guy dressed up like that. And you start thinking tom thumb right knee then because he was really a little man and seemed to represent something. Very insidious very insidious and also to There as items wonder how certain people again come to be the way they are. And i think going back to childhood is always I think it really important that the only way but a really important way to excavate some of those things. Yeah so yeah. The characters in the book. I was very afraid of this character. You know i think it's It's a it's a very difficult thing to have a child. Doom child actor. I'm some of the things that this character does and the show And also too. You have to be very aware. What am i communicating Because you know. I don't want anyone to hate this child to hate this child. The child playing with a weird fucking thing was is that i think the most the most endearing and strangely empathetic moment. That you have with that kid is when he he handcuffs himself to sweep That's in the book. Do you know what. I do know what you mean. It's when i when. I got to that moment in the book i was like i mean it says it says everything without without verbally saying anything. Yeah but it says well he become sort of this mythological character like you can't you don't look totally as a child until because usually with a character like that you need to break. And when he does it's because his master is is gone And then you then the again the there. That character deserves empathy Because he has a future. That's different now. That's very different. Although a joke about the kids going to be just fine he's gonna clam about it. They're gonna he'll figure to worm his way into some of the some of the person's heart the kids going to be just fine but he just seem to be symbolic after a certain point. I don't look at him as i didn't look at his humanity as much as what he represented. Yeah i i agree. And that's the place where where i land with him. You know the thing is You know joel. Such a great actor and joel and chase You know had such a wonderful way of working together and when you're dealing with a child actor the adult in the scene with the child is helping you direct direct that person. And so you know credit to joel For the wonderful work chase does in the show And it was clear to me once. I started badgering colson. The author that yeah. He is a symbol of certain things If i ever got to the bottom of what what he symbolizes. i'm not sure sure. Well i mean now. Just the evolution from If beale street could talk towards you know accepting and challenging self with the awesome responsibility Which i have to assume you saw Underground railroad as being Did did the experience of working with with baldwin's texts specifically and and honestly in bill street sort of awaken your Ability to to sort of take on that responsibility it did it did. And but in. In the way i expected You know because mr baldwin is no longer with us you know. I couldn't call him around resource to ask him. Is it okay if i do this. What do you think of a do that. I just decided to very very close to the taxed with the exception of the ending and it wasn't until way deep in the process. And i'm sure you've been through this testing this and testing that that i realized oh shit i have to take the ending and like i i now. I can't hide behind the text. I have to take it. What was the ending. The ending in the book is brutal. It's the Fanis fanis her. Mom her mom comes home and basically tells her that fanis dad has killed himself in that induces her to go into labor. And it's implied that fani just stays and rots in prison. And i thought i can't in this film filmed it that way. I can't have this film end on this child coming into the world with the father who's essentially lost and a grandfather who's essentially lost was literally lost as well and so i went in and tried to have again fact. Now i'm thinking of this book is fiction but if you say the translation yes what actually happens in the book. But what's the truth of what happens in the book. What's the feeling i can arrive at thinks still speaks to what mr baldwin intended but was the ending that i felt like represented what i want to say with the book and so i came up with this alternate version. It's it's not like it's a happy ending. it's not a happy happy and ended sell it out. no. I didn't sell it out. But i did have to have to take possession right because because really as you're saying it you know as you speak it because i didn't read the book that it's clear that that baldwin was was doing that for a fact he was pissed. Yes so so what you did. Was you know just shave off that. This sort of self inflicted violence and the violence of of of faith. Or whatever and you you made it an intimate reality of what probably would have happened And so then. Moving into underground railroad. Because colson was there i decided right away the texas taxed and the show was the show you know especially working with a group of writers we had a writer's room of a really wonderful people are very small one. You know where. Where do we see ourselves on this book. You know and where. Where's the edge of the book but we feel like the edge of the show can be here been so. The young girl was in the attic with her in north carolina. It's not in the book at all. she goes into the attic and she's in the attic by herself for like eighty pages and i thought oh i can't have the audience sitting in here with this woman for for sixty minutes She has no one to talk to but also it was a great great moment. I thought coulson created a great window. So much of this is about this woman maybe coming to terms or find some way to understand the sacrifice. Her mother had to make so. She's in this environment. Now she has to mother so that's why we decided to put the little girl in the attic with her. Once we did. I also realized oche it. I can't leave that girl behind. You know i don't want to know my consciousness audience. I you know. I i mean and then you kind of go back to this weird. You know like like after you do leave or behind you. What did you give us fifteen minutes. And then all of a sudden it's like back door which which in everything about that episode is filmed in a way that idea of giving us a break she gets dragged out. I know i know but good. It's good it worked. Which would you rather. Would you rather see unit and assume that little girl burned to the ground. I didn't know how much car could take the true you do. I mean that's a moment where you're like you know how. How does this spirit survive this right..

jeff jasper joel lines mr baldwin joel ridgway ridgeway tom thumb colson fever ming Fanis fanis fanis pat fani baldwin chase coulson texas north carolina
"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

06:29 min | 11 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"That's one thing. But i think we should really be talking about truth to a certain degree in colson does by as you said taking these events that that did happen but sort of h- having them happen out of sequence tied to this huge allegory of this train running underground. He's allowing us to get at a certain level of truth that wouldn't be possible. Otherwise so and when you approach that systematically i mean you had to make a decisions for the entire ten episodes that we're going to carry all the way through like you're so aware some decisions but man The beauty and you know. I'm going to double back myself. I was a film. I think the process of making it maybe be did feel like a film to a certain degree Because in the process of making it so many of these choices they kind of happened. Organically where i would be working on set with the actors and the crew. Certain things would happen you. I realize oh. Let's not in the book and it's not script but it's something that i feel like. We have to do like what. Oh my god so many things it was happening and improvisation or just kind of kept going in a moment some of it happened in an improvisation of it the thought just popped up some of it was just like Being the termite and seizing the moment you know One of those things was one of the biggest ones. Have you seen the whole show. The okra seeds that she carries from beginning to end Isn't really in the book. Not that pointedly. That it's okra. She has the plot but she doesn't plant the seeds at the very end of the story. That was an invention because the prop master on the show came into my office and showed me a pot of okra seeds. Yeah and he said barry. Do you know this is yeah. It's okra but it looks dead. He goes he opens the pod. Obviously drop dropping my desk and he picks up and he goes no matter. How dry it gets if you plant it will grow. And he just walked out. And i grew up eating okra. I know it's this This vegetable see comes from the content of africa the enslave brought with them. It was this form of sustenance. And so i have this thing this legacy go. Oh shit. I gotta write that in so many things like that. That happened and it was such a a grounding point such a grounding point and that was the thing with dealing with magical realism but also dealing with a subject that is rooted and some truthful depiction of history. I had to be very careful about. I had this mantra. Nobody's going to advocate and the show going there are going to be trains running underground but they're going to be real fucking train right. There's not a single. Cgi trying in the whole show. it's real trains. We built tunnels above ground above train tracks and drove actual trains through them. And so where are these very grounded elements that i can turn into a sort of magic. Not the kind of magic was hocus pocus The kind of magic. That and i saw but the kind of magic that someone just putting faith in an object that has meaning to them and then it fortifying them through this journey and that's what the overseas were date but it sort of reads like they're through that theme or having that that that proper that piece of magic allow these things tended to manifest as almost folklore has almost likes like stories. That could be told that are ambiguous right. There's one of those things where it. When i first picked up the book i wanted to understand you know how. And why does this woman leave. Her child. Behind me and it was clear that it was the world the world was just too damn much right now because growing up especially my own personal story. I grew up with the mother who Was not there in the home and dealing with so many different Very difficult things. And i never understood why still i was in my twenties and there were certain. Certain conditions In her world in her life. That to i think a very similar kind of psychological or psychotic break that led her to this This this this choice To to to abandon me to to a certain degree So it was really important to me to build this world. Because i didn't want the to be punitive towards the mother towards mabel towards cores mother. And yet i wanted to really present This world that these black women Both core and mabel forced to endure. And while cora has the strength to get through it. You know mabel Unfortunately not but that redemption doesn't come till the last episode true. I know i know. I know make you wait for it. Yeah but in in your own life though like you know what. How did that did an anger manifest you through your life. Not an anger. No i've just never been I guess an angry person really. I just haven't haven't ever been a one this too much in the present moment to deal with to have that energy a hops awards. This almost fictive thing because for awhile. My mother just wasn't Wasn't there also to something instinctively images new not to blame her. So no i i. I wasn't angry. There were times where i be in certain situations where i would realize other people that certain things in their life that i didn't have in my life And yet i didn't feel bitter towards those people I just had to find a way to fill in those blanks. Do you think the the idea of not blaming because somebody must have been there to to give you support of In order for you to not have a need in your heart to right up to a certain degree. Yeah i mean but also i was just a weird dude man. I was just a weird dude and And i i was. I've always been fortunate to have people in my life. You know whether it be you know my older sister exactly ten years older than me. Can i thought who also went through a very similar Experience of growing up but also these teachers. These coaches has why right. You know when i'm on a set. I'm kind of like a football coach to a certain degree. Those the father figures that that i grew up with But yeah there were. I didn't raise myself. I absolutely why. Because i think that that's that speaks to like you know what is sort of amazing about the balance. You're you're kind of keeping in in all ten episodes that the the only counterpoint to the brutality and the hopelessness is you know a sense of tenderness and love. And and you don't even. I don't even think you lean on faith that much. It really is about some sort of like you know. Ptsd sort of acceptance of what is happening But also this sort of need for community and the idea that they'll survive..

colson mabel barry africa cora football
"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

07:35 min | 11 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"From there and was like it's one of those places like i don't know always how to To sort of appreciate things in life and then are in. I had to force myself today. Real one of the best fucking meals ever. It's nice when that happens man when that happens. That's spot are you able to do it on. General are you just like work minded just like work minded but sometimes it hits me. I remember one time wasting in the bay area. Who i went to this fancy restaurant just for lunch which it was like one of the piece of joints. It was like the sister restaurant. The boot and shoe okay. The buttons julia had a salad. Yeah fucking salad. Yeah it was the gasoline and you. It i remember it was so damn good food up on me. Yeah so like. I don't know like the whole story. But where did you grow up. I grew up in miami florida raised. Man i don't know what to do with florida do you I know and from there. And i'm in certain way i'm very proud to be from the i wouldn't be talking to you right. If it wasn't for florida state university. I went to film school. And all the programs the state put into place like me who grew up poor could actually go to college and yet damn wild sinking. It's full of weirdos. My mother's down there and i i've grown to appreciate it because of the You know i. I guess diversity's a nice word for whatever the hell happening there But there's like So many people so many freaks and so much tension so much tension and there's certain areas of florida the kind of are like the frontier. We'll just go to get space and do whatever the fuck they want right and more power to them to have a place where i can do that but this thing is like come on. It's getting crazy especially with the senior population. That's down there easy. Y'all can't. I can't look at that guy anymore. Disentis again look at. Yeah but that aside so but do you find that. Florida has defined outside of college. She your childhood is defined your vision somehow vision. I i will say i think got to find the way i see light. Yeah there was the cinematographer who passed away. While i was in film school year and me being a film nerd and this guy named con conrad hall Great cinematographer show a lot of films everybody's seen hooting that won the oscar for american beauty cinematography and remember reading this article having american cinematographer white guy but he was from fiji And he always said the way he saw. Light was driven by how he saw light as a child which was very bright. Bright sort of like really Bursting sort of sunlight and grown up in florida especially in miami. It's the same thing. Kind of like the most southernmost point you can be in the us. Yeah so it's a very particular way of seeing light. And i do think that affects the way. I like my films. Well i mean. I i find that like in watching all the films. I gotta be honest with you man. I mean 'cause. I had a like some sort of event happen over. The last couple of weeks i watched all of Underground railroad from the beginning. Thank you and i'm just a white dude. A middle aged white dude trying to understand and do the right thing. But i don't know that you know from the you know within ten minutes of that Film which it seems like. It's all one big movie in a way is it. I think it's a tv show. But uh i don't. I don't correct when they call it a film. I think i see it as a compliment. A certain way. Well i it just seems like it. It just the process of it all of it. I mean it's obviously. They operate each episode separately. But it all is moving towards something it is. He's right and it does not feel like like a tv series. Why you're you're going. I wonder what's going to happen next. View all right so but nothing somehow the the the way that you film things and your sense of composition color tension of it. I don't know that i've ever been able to experience a a painful human empathy For for the struggle of slavery bike. I understand it. I feel bad but the it created something tangible in me. And i was like. Oh my god all the way through that the undercurrent of how you're depicting the violence the brutality and just the the abuse on every level really sort of somehow or another made it real fresh human and an horrendous a compliment. But do you wanna say his i. I have heard the some people can't get through the first hour of the show. And that's interesting to me because i think back on my senegal. Well i i wonder what it must have been like for them to get through the first hour of their lives. Yes this was. The this was the the the beginning middle and end of their lives with live underneath the tyranny. This experience. so if you can't watch more than an hour of the show some respect my astor's names as the kids say yeah But i think you were talking about was kind of the point for the group of us who made the show. it wasn't about presenting the spectacle of the condition of american slavery. Which is something that has been done. Very well right And and for very pointed reasons and other works on the subject in the past. I think we want to present an experience that was in some way because nothing can approximate what it must have been like to have been my ancestors right but still to bear witness what it must have been like to have been my ex ancestors and to do so in a way that she could understand the struggle. They endure the things they withstood. And i like to say the things they did the things they did The creations they made and the families they protected and foster so that i could sit here and have this conversation with you bre via with you. Well that was the balance right. So because i mean i knew i didn't read the book and so You know it appeared to me fairly quickly to to to sort of unfold as an allegory of some kind And and you know. I i can understand that all the way through that there were there. Were launching points from historical fact And those were were fictionalized to affect some of them And then the the idea of the railroad being a real railroad sorta like a this morning. I'm hiking. I realize i. It is sort of a a purgatory. And then you only get out and you're in hell again. In his interesting. You mentioned the fact out in the idea of fact and fiction is something that that i've been talking to a lot especially with the author. Colson had a really really smart cat. Yeah harvard educated pulitzer prize winner. He's very smart individual but he talks about the difference between fact fiction and truth and some of these facts that we've been given. Yeah we've been given by the people in power you know. I think there was was an article that came out about two months ago about the textbook. That was still being used. And i wanna say louisiana mississippi somewhere region where the textbook was telling kids high school students that the american slave trade was a system of conscripted labour. You know really. It was being framed in this way. And i thought about that and i realized oh if i had only read the novels the fiction of tony morrison as a high school student. I would've gotten close to the truth experience than reading the fact based textbook and so i think this idea of fact and fiction. That's one thing. But i think we should really be talking about truth to a certain degree in colson does by as you said taking these events that that did happen but sort of h- having them happen.

florida Disentis con conrad hall oscar for american beauty cine miami florida state university bay area julia fiji Florida us colson harvard tony morrison louisiana mississippi
"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

02:18 min | 11 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"The smartest way to hire barry jenkins is a true artist and inspired artists. And i really need to to set this up properly. 'cause i i imagine a lot of you haven't watched underground railroad. Maybe you haven't made it through the first two episodes. You might not make it through it all. But i do want to make it clear here. We talk about underground railroad a lot. And there's no regard for spoilers in this conversation and to be honest with you. It doesn't matter that the series is more of a kind of poem a visual poem both elevating and horrific and the journey of the narrative is. It's important but you're not watching it to see what happens. You're watching it to sort of be taken somewhere and and be sort of informed educated elevated in horrified at the foundation of institutional racism. Being americans wavering. So i wouldn't get too hung up on. This is an important piece of art. And and i'm talking to the artist so i want to be able to dive into his intentions and and talk about his vision and And i saw the whole show. So i'm going to engage with this and i believe if you listen to this conversation it will enrich your experience when you see it if you choose to watch it and it's just i just wanna make it clear. It's not a matter of it being spoiled. It's about having a deeper understanding of why he did what he did and executed it the way he did. And it's not going to ruin it for you. But i do suggest you watch it. Underground railroad is now streaming on amazon prime video. And this is me talking to the director and writer of this ten episode piece of art berry. Jenkins place prevail giving. Yeah so fucking. I'm sorry just ate leftovers.

barry jenkins foundation of institutional amazon Jenkins berry
"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

01:49 min | 11 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"I didn't get to go to temple square and and see space. Jesus the giant statue of jesus in front of like the space landscape which i enjoy doing i like walking around telescope i like seeing the the tabernacle and The the original church there. They've built scaffolding around the temple Temple square in salt lake city. But i believe it's a launching pad. I think that. I don't know how one gets into the ship Or which ones are going up if it's only the You know the underwear crew. I don't know but it looks like a launching pad and For that would be interesting. If if the mormons gone to their temple into space in everybody in the world was like they're the ones they're the ones that are making the move there making the move to the new zion. A mormon planet folks a mormon planet. They're getting out space. Jesus is going to be installed on the top of the temple and it's going to shoot off a ship if they can get through the smoke haze from half of my state burning. Cause come on you guys. You know if you believe in. God believe anything. And i don't mean that is insulting. I'm just meaning that. If you believe in god and opened that door you better be pretty fucking vigilant about what goes in and out seriously. You gotta be extra vigilant. If you already believe the big bullshit you gotta watch out because a lot of little bullshits gonna sneak in their next thing. You know your soul is going to be filled with all kinds of bullshit beliefs and you're not going to know what's real so i'm saying like keep your god. Just watch that door. Watch that fucking door some things in life we like to pick out for ourselves so we know we get the one that's best for us..

temple Temple square temple square salt lake city
"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Watch

The Watch

06:22 min | 11 months ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Watch

"I think it was ultimately about the transactional nature of relationships specifically in this place but maybe in life itself that your happiness always has to cost something from someone else. Yes i think you're exactly right. And i think that the peso's at that moment was well delivered and powerful and i think i i think that i have given the show short shrift in a lot of ways because whether it's because i myself am to a degree one of the shows targets. I think that the i. I think that i- downplayed target target audience or target of like. You're the kind of ours and that would be satirized. Well as a as an upper middle class married white person who loved to vacation in hawaii as soon as possible. Yeah and i think that Any any sponsorship deals. Get at me. but i i. I think that. I gave short shrift to the significance of a major week-to-week. Hbo series being this incisive insightful. About issues of race and class in the contemporary in contemporary capitalist economy. You know. I think that maybe because we're extremely online or whatever like some of the stuff that was in march mouth for example or the played out with paula. I'm like yes. These are issues that we either grapple with when we talk to people were read the atlantic or whatever but like these ideas are hopefully present in our minds. It is incredibly difficult. I think to articulate them in a generous creative storytelling way. The way mine white did. And i think that when the show premiered there were people who were correctly saying oh it's it's very much a contemporary upstairs downstairs which has become a you know a catch all term for story a certain type of storytelling for downton abbey but it refers to literally show with that title. Yeah there was about a british manor house. I believe In the the the rich people lived upstairs and the serving staff who lived and worked downstairs right and what this show does that advances the narrative quite considerably. I think and sometimes savagely is be like there isn't upstairs and downstairs but only one of those flights matters ultimately upstairs stays upstairs upstairs. People can take a couple of steps down into the basement. They can look around. They can befriend people. Do use my favorite titanic metaphor. They can even check out the folk dancing happening in steerage. That's cool at the end of the day when the boats going down there helping themselves to the rescue vessels you know what i mean and they are doing it together and for each other and there is a base to return to again. That's a very effective part. When paul is just like this is this is your tribe at the end of the day. Like this tribe and like. Don't pretend you're my friend. And what the show. Did i think very well that. I was not fully cognizant of because i hadn't seen the end of it was that genuinely characters like olivia returning to her mother's embrace There's nothing quote unquote wrong with that right. Like olivia has behaved in ways. That are that we may view negatively or we may have feelings about how she acts towards everyone but her crying and being held by her mother like that's objectively that's in her trying to reach out to pollen the same way like these are kind gestures but i think with the show forces to consider and i really admire this is what are the of what value are individual small kind gestures in a completely broken system that choose people up and spits them out and the people who got spit out are uniformly not white or in the case of armand you know in the service industry on the right side of the stairs. Yeah i i guess. I'm curious as to whether or not you thought that that perception that mike white's kind of worldview was limited to people on vacation or people. Well i think that there's something really remarkable about when you're on vacation you're incredibly vulnerable right and you're in this weird thing where you're like especially if you do something like this and you're like i'm spending a lot of money and because i'm spending a lot of money instead of being relaxed because i've spent this money and i'm just going to let it happen and take like let myself be taken care of you. There are people who become sheen's there are people who are like. How am i being screwed. How am i not getting. I thought i was paying for. How am i not getting the experience. I thought i wanted. I thought there was going to plunge. I'm not saying china's right. Obviously i'm saying that. That is a common pathology that you see when you go on a vacation you see people who are like i mean i just got back from vacation and let me tell you like people are very agitated with with customer service in a in a way that pretty disturbing out there in this in the street so which is why we all respect the fact that you duct tape yourself to your seat on your flight but i was just preemptively doing it. Yeah i wore six basques and just duct tape by your face the duct tape but yes i kept trying to like make someone an air marshal a citizens air marshal siring just like now. Did i think that. I think that's right. And i think that it's again just a very canny framing for a show like this because the thing about vacations is they. Are it once you know radically freeing but also that can be terrifying and in a way only quinn had the type of vacation experience that everyone lies to themself about wanting to be transformed to step outside of who they were and to you embrace it and to choose it and to be freed what most people want out of vacations whether their vacations. Are you know Coddled and luxurious like a white lotus property. Or if they're like i'm gonna go sleep in the jungles of nicaragua trail or whatever. There is a level of it which is controlled by its definition as a vacation. Right it is a. It's jumping off a bridge with a the bungee attached in going on a roller coaster to be scared but also to be safe and we saw that play out i think in ultimately kind of compelling ways with the mossbacher and with jane and rachel because they went right up to the edge of themselves of their fears of their or their everything honestly and.

olivia Hbo paula hawaii mike white armand paul sheen china quinn nicaragua jane rachel
"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Can totally immerse the audience in the south gate of the show and between on ali ali. Blanca are mixer that waters them. Vinick joy in alex is really way passing things around the thirty minutes ten minutes intimidates. His there i guess. Twenty minutes or in we would just have funds be like all that envel- it episode five l. Its way the top of episode nine gay remix this thing in the back. It was really really. It's hard to save is fun when it comes to the show but it was really cool because it was driven lining exciting to do decided and it was driven by. This is what the world might sound like her zoe to get the audience. Really identify with our. Because it was seamless. At times. And i couldn't tell our m. i listen to music and my listening to in and it didn't feel like even the crickets i grew up in texas so i've heard but they sounded that they would been treated at times and it was just a they were musical it was. It was pretty stunning. Piece of sound design. Kudos tilt your whole team. Everybody that thank god. They live near lyon. Maybe you should just enforce that next time on your next movie you must live ten minutes from sound staying up what i wanted to Get at the end was for me was and i hope. It's not a spoiler but just would love for you to talk about the end of nine because the end of nine was as one of the more powerful pieces of cinema experience. I've ever had was really i was by myself. I think i'd mentioned i was up in the country. I was watching that. I finished it and i took this very very long walk in the woods. But i'd love for you to talk about it because for me what it was beyond the piece of cinema when i was about rewriting american history and you know as a much younger man. In nineteen eighty. I remember reading howard's ins A people's history of of the united states was like oh We've it's just been a mythology it's all mythology and it's you know history written by the victors And it was the first moment in my life where i went. Oh we we've not been taught the right history. And that was that first moment in my life of that and then when donald glover's song came out it was like this is the next history lesson for me. Amazing history lesson that started with you. Know i mean the whole journey but in that sequence going down and then all the images that are laid out before she got the gun and even after shooting the elimination of these children's faces so you could just talk to us about. Yeah it was it. Was you know part of planning on planning because because about set all blue. You don't have to be planned to be shot. Zayn at shot listed in me was sort of a mirror of making show Self you know which is so much of the history especially kid grew up in this country public schools so much fish me has been written has been delivering. You know has been framed through the president of men like ridgway you know whether they were the slave hunters whether they were biggest center. Senators the jim crow south. They told us. No one's fishery is and this character late so beautifully in hanging asleep bunch Is just wanting at the mouth. He's just always cosby telling us you know what the country is in the will you hear then becomes almost Prophecy there's a void of experience or of knowledge when it was pushed back. Roy sometimes spill.

ali ali Vinick Blanca alex lyon donald glover texas Zayn howard united states ridgway cosby Roy
"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And take my neck. That pool of that focus back to her is back at the right moment. The james and i are sitting often on next to lawrence and related candidate tactician tapping him on the shoulder. And it's kind of like you know it's the so many resources play. it's not a game. it's not a game but when it's very fluid and elastic in really can be in everyone. You know just talking about the episode another. Will you tell me what was the next thing you want to talk about. The other the other thing is corre again. I mean because i was also the depth of her emotion. Then hearing that story. It's as if it really did take place that she didn't know by provoking him he would go there. And just saying the name lovey was especially asking homer the whole thing the other is caesar in nine and a steady cam shot also When first of all you go through the people and it's the one time. I think that we're in a pov that she walked into her own. Pov that talking about eight yes. It's it's the railroad station. Yes and then she goes to see caesar on the tracks and then it's that moment that they have together Where this beautiful lines. I wished i remembered exactly. I say the dancing. She says how long it's gonna last as long as you which feels like a direction you've given actors before so as long as you even though you know the lights about to go and use the detriment of the end but that moment to it's a three person seen again is just you're kind of going around. But then he just uses his fish massive shoulder to come back to her. And it's just a sort of a beautiful choreographed very very simple shot emotionally so absolutely connected to what she's doing and again. Those tears are these tears of longing and joy and the tears were these tiers of enormous pain and guilt yet that that one. That was very early reactions. Different operator jarrett. germs show. I forget the other guy's name was priss couple weeks but that was an act of necessity. It was one of the few things that we shot. Way sequence has that that location is also where all the underground tunnels built. It was at his rail zim that has spinning platter. Worry with all your load on these trains. They have their own internal on that were trains. Because good reasons. You can't.

corre lawrence homer james jarrett
"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And that close to lends it just looks like this almost phantasmagoric sort of. It's literally time coat time slipping and so i walked over day. Don't get in trouble with give press that's going to be not in whenever whenever the ac reproductive. Liz janes knew we was cut off you. How what i'll be time code autofocus. We miss out like where. I think that does to who you are very obviously which is that your that open to allowing these experiences. It's a little bit. Goes to the vibe idea. And a few of the other things that we're going to talk about so i'm gonna jump to just Since we're talking about james we'll actually one of the things i want to talk about is the point of view to jump to Underground railroad and talk a little bit about the point of view in episode one and the point of view of. It's big anthony. I think began. And how you came up with that and what you were trying to say with it is. It is so enormously powerful and those stunning. When you see it. I mean and startling but I think is where i've heard you talk about you. Know how do you still show somebody indignity under the absolute horror of what he has to go through. The part of the came and tommy's referencing is the sequence of you. Know near to wade through the pilot episode where character big. Anthony is the humvees wrist Women burned alive. Which is taken from the book and also in my research is taken from actual history and even from growing up and just seeing images from the jim.

Liz janes james anthony tommy Anthony jim
"barry jenkins" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on 1A

"Thousands of you logged onto watches. I spoke to show runner and director. Barry jenkins and the author of the novel that inspired the show colson whitehead. What are the people joining the event. Louise had a question. She asked the music. Both ambient and composed is haunting. Please talk about that aspect of the series. Here's berry jenkins patel. Our the composer on this Talk in Used a really wonderful job because of the pandemic on nick actually move to la to create the score for the show typically. He's in new york. La and it was great. We have little testing bubble in so we would go from the edit then ten minutes drive. Ibm next radio antenna. Strive be at the mix stage so is really wonderful process where they can be sailed a an ambient sound on the big stage. And i can sense nick. Get in the car. Goes the studio with him. Then be scoring in the key of sound from the environment it was a really very involved in fluid processing the beauty that was in the writer's room for show notion of the writers Jackie gene crowder. Alison davis adrian. Rush bush director labor director. Our bacher we were trying to impact this book. We had his rule. We can't call colson about that'd be can figure out ourselves and so we kept trying to come up with a working Allergy for ourselves. Why wider south carolina looked with us. You know why does north carolina does end. He had gives us an easter egg in the first chapter with the station. Agents says oh two. Trains one's going this way once going that way you won't know which way it's going to get out if she got on the situation. What ended up in south carolina or she ended up south carolina but be different south carolina. Oh who was arrested. You know v stay. She gets north carolina. It's damned. she doesn't want to leave things in south carolina behind it. Because of that. Nick score every time she gets to a new state it's gotta be a manifestation of the world record so yeah it was really cold and it was again this lovely process of what's in the environment because you couldn't record two times area in. How can that become music. You also make this decision at the end of each episode to sort of jolt us back to the present with with a modern song. This song choice. There was a mixture of therapy for the audience because it's very arson journey. Miss important to realize your washing missing. Twenty twenty one not at eighteen five. I thought dropping the continue contemporary needle. Drop only the end. Episodes neverland mental. It would help underscore the point but the way it started was at the end of the first indiana chapter core has just said combined to her greatest love. And caesar she's walking into royals. Cabinet is a heartache pure pure heartache as she was walking out of the door at it i started to hear the phone.

Barry jenkins Louise new york Alison davis adrian north carolina south carolina first ten minutes each episode berry jenkins two times Both Jackie first chapter Nick Rush bush two nick colson La
With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

With ‘The Underground Railroad,’ Barry Jenkins looks squarely at Black trauma

"Underground railroad was a network of abolitionists routes to free slaves. But what if it was an actual railroad with a train chugging toward freedom? That's the premise of Colson Whitehead's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, now adapted by Barry Jenkins into a 10 episode miniseries. This isn't a straightforward, inspirational narrative like Harriet. This combines the brutality of roots with the social commentary of watchman and a hint of magical realism like the Polaroids. Press to some ADO is empathetic as the lead Joe Edger tennis sinister as the villain, slave catcher and child star chased Dillon is his precocious psychic. I still have eight episodes to go. But judging by the first two were in for a powerful train ride by a master conductor. I'm Toby Toby film critic Jason Fraley, giving the underground railroad for five stars. So far, dolphin

Colson Whitehead Barry Jenkins Pulitzer Prize Harriet Dillon Tennis Toby Toby Jason Fraley
‘The Underground Railroad’: Barry Jenkins’ Journey Into American Darkness

Filmspotting

01:22 min | 1 year ago

‘The Underground Railroad’: Barry Jenkins’ Journey Into American Darkness

"Was certainly excited. To see the underground railroad josh least be couple episodes. I was able to fit in this week for this discussion. Because as you know. We're both big barry jenkins fans on the show. Moonlight was in my top five year. It came out of beale street. Could talk was my number one film of its year twenty eighteen but i have to confess i was also reading it a bit just based on the title just based on what i suspected the subject matter would be. There's that element of brutality. That i imagine would be part of this show but i was less worried about that and really more focused on the toil of watching people emotionally suffer and suffering along with them. And that's certainly something we've come to expect from berry jenkins work and then you said something last week on the show josh. I think you'd already caught up with an episode or two. The gave me hope. You said it's not really what you think. It will be or something to that effect and i thought okay. Maybe i'm in for a big surprise here and maybe it will be a relatively pleasurable watch. And then when. I admitted to you today in our slack that i was going to have to binge these two episodes just prior to recording. You said binging may be harmful to mental health. And i knew that. I was in for an experience.

Barry Jenkins Josh Berry Jenkins
'The Underground Railroad’: Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins Returns With Limited Series

The Takeaway

01:19 min | 1 year ago

'The Underground Railroad’: Oscar Winner Barry Jenkins Returns With Limited Series

"Miniseries adaptation of the Colson Whitehead novel, The Underground Railroad premieres on Amazon Prime Both the book and the Serie Center around Cora and enslaved woman who escapes from a plantation in Georgia and travels through a literal underground train system in search of freedom. And while the series does depict the traumatic reality of slavery, early reviews have lauded it for not sensationalizing the violence shown on screen as well as for emphasizing the humanity of the enslaved characters. Much of the project success can be credited to Barry Jenkins Theosophy are winning filmmaker behind Moonlight and If Beale Street could talk here he is on the take away back in 2018 talking about his plans for the underground railroad. Most clearly I can say about it is, you know the hero's journey, and I remember as a kid, you know, hearing about the underground railroad for the first time and really literally imagining to two trains. Running underground. And so I think that reading Coulson's book kind of reactivated the childhood kind of off, you know, around just like the power the ingenuity, you know of black folks to create this path to freedom, and I thought the best way to tell that was to go on the four hero's journey. So I was really happy to partner with Amazon and find a place where we could tell the story on the course of 89 10 hours.

Colson Whitehead Serie Center Barry Jenkins Cora Georgia Coulson Amazon
The Lion King 2 Is Coming And Here's Everything You Need To Know

Direct from Hollywood

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

The Lion King 2 Is Coming And Here's Everything You Need To Know

"Twenty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, a photo realistic remake of the Lion. King is officially getting a sequel and they found the man who will lead the project Oscar winning moonlight director, Barry Jenkins who says in part helping my sister raised two young boys during the nineties I grew up with these characters the opportunity to expand this magnificent tale of friendship. Love and legacy is a dream come true. Particularly interesting about the project is that last year's film was incredibly faithful to the animated classic it was based on, but there's no animated lion king to to follow in the footsteps of so this film will naturally by design and more unique story details are being kept under wraps but according to deadline this movie will flash back into move fosters origin story and possibly other characters origins as well while also moving the story from the first film forward, the project is getting going but expect Disney to put on the front burner as the first film raked in a staggering one point six, billion dollars.

Barry Jenkins King Oscar Director Disney
Barry Jenkins to direct 'Lion King' follow-up

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Barry Jenkins to direct 'Lion King' follow-up

"A live action version of one of Disney's most popular animated movies is getting the sequel treatment you have to take your place as king Disney hopes to get lion king another place among box office giants it is doing a follow up to last year's live action version of the movie at the helm will be Barry Jenkins who directed the Oscar winning movie moonlight Disney says the movie will be kind of a prequel to the photo realistic remake which was popular with movie goers though not a favorite of critics still alive version of lying king which starred beyond say Donald Glover and James Earl Jones raked in one point six billion dollars internationally and it ranks as the seventh highest grossing film ever I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Disney Barry Jenkins Donald Glover James Earl Jones Oscar Oscar Wells Gabriel
In the golden age of streaming, does film history have a place?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:40 min | 3 years ago

In the golden age of streaming, does film history have a place?

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And Bryce Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, Sunpro online software makes it easy to save time and money print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit p dot com slash tech. That's PB dot com slash tech. With all these streaming services films knobs have to be in seventh heaven, right right from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm jed Kim in for. Molly would. It's Oscar season a time when we celebrate the history of film, but what if you want to actually sit down and watch some classics that was the selling point of one streaming service film struck that AT and T recently shuttered fills drug showcased directors like Fellini, Kurosawa Kubrick. It was the darling of Sinophile for the two years it existed given that streaming giants like Netflix and Amazon seemed to be focused on making their own original content. Could the golden age of streaming actually mean that film history falls through the cracks and Hornets is senior film critic for the Washington Post. She has high level thoughts on the death of film strike and the future of classic film. She says film strike never released its subscriber numbers her best educated. Guess is about one hundred thousand compared to about one hundred and forty million Netflix subscribers that's tiny. But Hornets says the fan base for classic or indie films has. Value beyond sheer size. It's a highly engaged audience. It's a very loyal audience. I mean, they have value. So whether the movies themselves, quote, unquote, don't have monetary value. I would maintain that they do have value. You know, in terms of the people who watch them, and what they are willing to pay to watch them, and it's not just everyday viewers, but also filmmakers who care about access to a rich array of film history the day after films struck announced it was closing. I happen to spend time with Barry Jenkins who won the Oscar a few years ago, his movie moonlight won the Oscar for best picture. He's just out this year with an exquisite movie called spiel street could talk he is an ecstatic student of film, he's constantly reaching back into the cannon into the history of the medium to enlarge and elaborate on his own emerging vocabulary and language and so for someone like him he was Crespi. On that it was going away. Because you know, when you talk about people like Barry Jenkins or Paul Thomas Anderson or Guillaume or del Toro, all of whom came out very very vociferously to support the site a resource like film struck helps these emerging artists to find their voice. And then it's also educating all of us viewers in terms of what they're doing. I think it was sighted of Warner Brothers and their corporate overlord AT and T not to kind of see the value in that. As the new streaming giants court the best in the business to make their original content or today says showing support for the canon of great film could be a hook. I think that's what Netflix has proven this year so aggressively going after people like I'll find so Koran and spending so much on the Oscar campaign for his movie for people like Martin scores says he will these are film lovers. And I mean, I think as they're trying to impress these tours and convince them. To come with them because they love art, and they love or tourism, a show of good faith would be to express your support of this archival legacy work. I mean, I think that could really sway somebody. She says despite the demise of film strike. There are other ways to stream vintage movies art house and cult films and other non mainstream cinema. There's a subscription service fan door. Also, canopy with a K available with your public library card and the library of congress L O, C dot gov. I got admit I'm not a major film buff. So I asked Hornets for suggestions on what to watch something. That's not a superhero movie, she suggested not a film, but a TV show on stars. And I kind of freaked out. Can I tell you what I'm obsessed with it's it's it's not even the one. I'm obsessed with speaking of stars is counterpart. I'm totally caught up on her part. We did this last week. I just don't know what I'm gonna do. I'm beside myself. I it's so good. Yeah. There's out. I've pretty good taste. I'm jed Kim. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, San pro online software makes it easy to save time and money, no matter what you ship or mail print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit PBA dot com slash tech. That's PBA dot com slash tech.

Hornets Oscar Pitney Bowes Bryce Sunpro Netflix Jed Kim Barry Jenkins AT Washington Post Warner Brothers PBA Molly Crespi Sinophile Fellini Kurosawa Kubrick Paul Thomas Anderson Martin Amazon Guillaume
"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"We're looking forward to in January twenty nineteen on the eighteenth will be opening if Beale street could talk which is the latest film from Barry Jenkins Oscar winner for moonlights and based on a story by James Baldwin. So we're really excited for that. Lou twenty working on these days continuing project is sort of being Facebook and someone for marks oilfields questions on mocks. Oh, foles do keep coming in. And I'm trying also in that same. Area to get myself ready for all you commentary for the exile, which is showing signs of life. It was screened at Walter Reed theater. One of the best theaters. The on the big screen, which is one of four spectacle, film like that. Yeah. So I'm hoping that'll come it'd be the last one for me to do and they Merican foams and Cam, what's the latest Abusir? I've actually been trusted ended a video for an art installation. That will be coming up in January. But I can't give too many details because I'm not sure of the participants for one thing. I don't know if this is gonna air before after so doesn't really make sense. I'm just laying guys that know that I'm not a good for nothing L. Okay, involved in something you not a gave out again about I try to get about as much as possible. Not totally useless. And I expect I will be on an upcoming episode of the projection. Okay, good. Well, you will be on hair next week for sure. Well, thanks again guys for being on the show. Thanks.

Barry Jenkins Walter Reed theater James Baldwin Facebook Lou Cam
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Amanpour

"Just it all the way. And Barry Jenkins joins me now from new Oakwell come to the program. Thank you. So we just showed a bit of the trailer. But even in the trailer, you can see sort of an exceptional lens on black experience in America. There's so much joy the focus on this love that you focus on. There's a certain naive Ted that you focus on. What was it that made you want to adapt this particular Baldwin novel? For me. I've always been a really big fan and Mirer of James Baldwin's work, Mr. Baldwin had quite a few voices. He wrote in but two of those voices in particular that always stood out to me was one voice that was obsessed with romance romanticism interpersonal relationships and the other boys that was just as obsessed passionate about pointing out his stomach injustice, and I felt like in this book, if they'll streak a talk those voices were perfectly fused, and the story addition Fani, I mean, they really are perfect. If you so tissues, the young go. She's nineteen phony is her boyfriend. They've known each other from when they were little little children, and they grew up into this really deep and sweet and wonderful love. And then he gets framed full a rape that he didn't do that his family is trying to get him out of jail full. But his this moment we wanna play a fairly lengthy clip of tissues family, telling funnies family that she's actually pregnant. Just listen. A child is coming. His cringe. Understand you. It's your grandchild. But differences and make how it gets here to challenge got nothing to do with that. Ain't none of us got nothing to do with that. Take your which you..

James Baldwin Fani Barry Jenkins Ted rape America
"barry jenkins" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on KCRW

"By Barry Jenkins, the filmmaker behind moonlight and based on the novel by James Baldwin a film about trusting love all the way. Now in theaters. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. The partial government shutdown is entering its third week with no signs of a compromise between President Trump and congress over border wall funding, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders, says Trump plans to visit the southern border on Thursday is NPR's Windsor. Johnston tells US House Democrats are planning to step up the pressure on the White House this week with a series of bills aimed at reopening government. House. Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she's planning to pass individual bills to reopen federal agencies in the next several days starting with the treasury department to ensure people received their tax refunds talks between the White House and congressional Democrats resulted in little progress over the weekend with the administration remaining firm in it's five billion dollar demand for a southern border wall and Democrats still refusing to funded White House officials affirmed that request in a letter to Capitol Hill on Sunday the letter. Also formalized President Trump's declaration that the wall would be built from steel rather than concrete Windsor Johnston. NPR news Washington supreme court Justice, Ruth, Bader Ginsburg is missing arguments for the first time in more than twenty five years. She's at home recovering from surgery, she underwent last month to remove to cancerous growth from her left lung, but the eighty-five year old Ginsburg is staying on top of the cases now before the court reading the briefs and reading the transcripts of the oral arguments. NPR's Nina totenberg says Ginsburg hopes to be back on the bench next week. There were no decisions today. But the Justice has participated in making decisions issued by the court on various motions from the Trump administration and other parties in cases, indeed on the day. She was operated on she cast a.

White House Bader Ginsburg President Trump NPR Trump Barry Jenkins Lakshmi Singh Windsor Johnston James Baldwin Ruth Johnston Nancy Pelosi Washington press secretary Windsor Sarah Sanders congress Nina totenberg
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"There are moments of just extreme abject beauty in my memories. And it's why moonlight looks the way it does. And it's why Bill street looks the way it does feels the way those films do, and I think if there's anything about Baldwin's work that I've been able to really really ingest in take with me and apply to my work. It's this idea that despite the bitterness in the the anger of the things Baldwin is talking about how those things make him feel if you ever hurt James Baldwin laugh, then you would know that he also understood that there was such such extreme beauty. Enjoy in living a life this way through the prism of so much suffering. And yet here, we are, you know, you cannot break us and be us when speaking of of black folks myself, and Mr. Bauman and the subjects of our work. So it's been really. Really lovely run with these last two films things I was maybe trying to get away from and now understand that. We're always a part of me when you hear James Baldwin talk. It comes across as though because you referenced the fact that he obviously was quite angry and frustrated in the back of his mind often. And yet when we heard him speak to those young people in San Francisco early, you get this idea that he's he's speaking in a sort of fatherly turn like he sees himself as a mental he understands that because he's in the public eye. He has voiced that a lot of people don't have and he can speak in a way that particular point that a lot of people can't do your in the public eye. Now, how do you deal with that idea that you to have a voice that not everyone has? And maybe there's a responsibility that comes with that too is not something that that you feel that that weighs on you. Sometimes. Yes, something I've had become more aware of and take more notice of especially in the wake of everything that happened with moonlight. It is something that I don't enjoy like to say, you know, voices and well. Work the films, but I also realized too because of the very privileged position. I find myself in that that's not enough, and it's not acceptable. So it is something that I'm very aware of and I'm trying to be more responsible west sitting down in being very open and honest with folks like yourself, you're an Oscar winner, obviously. And you've just adapted James Baldwin, which my understanding is almost laughed. He said, obviously, it has not so obviously, but in the end, obviously you've fulfilled one of your big dreams now. Right. I mean, obviously standing up on stage would be at the Oscars would be a dream for little people. But I think perhaps the bigger dream few adapting James Baldwin into into the film that you releasing now what inspires you now. What comes next full? Barry Jenkins way to you see you'll craft taking you I just like telling stories, you know, I love being said I love collaborating with I'll say my friends, you know, but the friend group is expanding. Now, I've always worked lucidly with my friends case in point. I was up till two AM last night. I. College is if I'm not as fresh with it as I should be in this interview, I'm working on other projects, I just had to get the pages done. And so I think I'll always be someone who just wants to tell stories and wants to tell them in a think a very visceral and for me cinematic challenging way I often want to keep challenging myself. There's a sense of wonder and all that I get from watching movies in. I'm always trying to reflect that feeling that movies. Give me to the people who are watching the work that I create and when the time comes when I don't have that sense of. Aw, I don't have that sense of wonder when I don't derive it either from the work on creating from the work. I'm watching the go sit down, you know, in L teach folks how to create the same sense of wonder an that cinema is given me in you'll films as a feeling of acceptance of forgiveness in coming to grips with wear one is in their life..

James Baldwin Mr. Bauman Oscars Barry Jenkins Aw San Francisco
"barry jenkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"barry jenkins" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Dream of adapting the great James Baldwin, and although the events of the film take place in Harlem in the early nineteen seventies. It's themes of racial prejudice at the hands of law enforcement, deeply resonant today. I'm Ben Ryland. And I'm pleased to say that Barry Jenkins joined me here at Meduri house in London full the beginning of you. Barry, it's been quite a ride from promoting moonlight to an Oscar winner. You must be still pinching yourself is pinching myself. Not quite, but yeah, pretty cool really really wild ride at the end for sure. Well, the journey. I think has been all the more extraordinary few. Because of course, when you were younger, you never wanted to be a filmmaker diedhiou. This is a complete u-turn, I suppose from where you were hitting when you will not younger. Yeah. It was kind of by happenstance. I was already at undergrad for about three years before I realized that there was a film school. And it wasn't something that I decided, oh, I want to become a filmmaker. I just thought oh, I like movies. There happens to be a film school here. Let me try this out. And now here we are. I guess fifteen years later going back to when you not younger. I mean, you were quite poll growing up and the area where you grow is actually the same area seen in moon line. What was your exposure to movies like back, then it was mostly like really big budget commercial films? Like black people in the neighborhood. I grew up in we always went to the movies. So it was like the color purple coming to America things like that the family would all get together. And catch the bus and go see those things, and even then it just didn't occur to me. Even though those were like black films that home. Then there must be black people involved in the making of them. It was just something that I enjoyed but not something I wanted to possess. Did you ever ever consider back then the doing something creative making movies or even even writing something that occurred? You is something that could actually be a career not a career. I always enjoyed writing. I had a teacher in third and fourth grade who encouraged me to write my grandma will take fishing on the weekends. And she said, oh, you're the only kid in this neighborhood in the projects who goes out to nature on the weekend. So you should share that with your classmates? She'd had me write down these weekend trips. I took my grandmother and then read them out loud to the class. This my earliest memory of writing. But even then it was like, oh, this is just something that my teacher forces me to do. And even though I enjoy it. Didn't we I can actually do this for a living some day? And so again, it would in one ear and out the other, and then somehow ten years later, I just kind of slipped back into it. And of course, as we mentioned the area that you grew up with quite Rothen. You'll family background was quite a difficult one. As William mother was dealing with addiction looking back at your childhood back. Then what would the would and Bishen have meant to young Barry Jenkins? What did you see in that mode? I thought going to college at all was something to aspire to and even then I didn't even take that very seriously. I only went to university because there were these public funds of the Florida Lottery that pay for the tuition of high achieving students, and I was a good student n really have much ambition beyond maybe thinking, it might be okay to go to college. Because you know, if you saw moonlight the character Naomie Harris plays is essentially, my mom in the main character in that film was essentially me you don't look at what that kids going to go. Oh, yeah. That kids going to go to Harvard or Yale. You realize now that of course. That's possible. But back then when I was living that life, it just didn't seem attainable..

Barry Jenkins Ben Ryland Naomie Harris Meduri house James Baldwin Oscar Florida Lottery Harlem London America Rothen Bishen William mother Harvard Yale fifteen years three years ten years
Discussing 'If Beale Street Could Talk' with Director Barry Jenkins

The Frame

00:36 sec | 3 years ago

Discussing 'If Beale Street Could Talk' with Director Barry Jenkins