35 Burst results for "Barrow"

"barrow" Discussed on Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

08:07 min | 8 months ago

"barrow" Discussed on Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

"Thought. We met. Carried away with her enthusiasm for my writing, her promises to make me into a brand name, and her assurance that she had many contacts in the publishing world that would snap her hand off for my novel. I signed on the dotted line. 6 months later, so far, for rejections from publishers. Couched mind you in encouraging remarks, including believable characters, strong and powerful writing, gripping story, Judith has an exciting flair for plot, evocative descriptions. And then came the death knell on my hopes, unfortunately, our lists are full. We just accepted a similar book, we are only a small company. I'm sure you'll find a platform for Judas work, et cetera, et cetera the self doubt the frustration flooded back. Then the call from the agent, I think it's time to reevaluate the comments we've had so far. Parts of the storyline need tweaking. I've negotiated a deal with a commercial editor. When she mentioned this am I had to pay? Yes, I had to pay, and yes, I was that naive, I gasped. It's a realistic charge by today's standards. She said, think about it. In the end, we'll have a book that will take you to the top of your field. I thought about it. Rejected the idea. Listen to advice from my various acquaintances. Thought about it some more. And then I rang the agent. Okay, I said, I'll do it. I felt I had no choice. After all she was the expert. Wasn't she? What did I know? When the manuscript came back from the commercial editor, I didn't recognize the story at all. This isn't what I wrote. It's not my book. I told the agent, it's nothing like it. The plot, the characters, had been completely changed. You know nothing of the publishing world. If you want me to represent you, you have to listen to me, she insisted do as I say. But I said. She replied, take it or leave it. I consulted our daughter. Luckily, she's a lawyer, qualified in intellectual property. She said, you can cancel the contract within the year. After that, you have problems. There will be all manner of complications. I moved quickly. The agent and I parted company. I took a chance and contacted hano, the publisher who'd previously accepted two of my short stories for their anthologies. Would they have a look at the manuscript? They would, they did. Yes, it needed more work, but I'm proud to say I've now been with hano, the longest standing independent women's press in the UK for 14 years, and have had 6 books published by them. I love their motto, great writing, great stories, great women, and I love the friends I've made amongst the other women whose work they publish, and the support amongst us for our writing, and our books. In normal times, we often meet up. I'm hoping those normal times will return before too long. Of course, there has been much editing and discussion with every manuscript. But at least, in the end, the stories are told in my words. With my voice. Judith's writing process. Dell asked me to talk about my process of writing and, to be honest, it's not something I've actually thought about before. But I've realized with each of my books, it's been slightly different. Not the time I write, I'm an early morning writer, always have been. I think waking around 5 in the morning is something I've done since childhood. Then I used to read. Now I use the time to write. Usually until around 8 or 9 o'clock. The pandemic and lockdowns have altered the pattern somewhat. The last few months have seen me at my desk more or less all day, I've managed to write two books. But I still started 5 in the morning. But back to the actual process, the usual question asked of authors are they a plotter or a pantser? In other words, do they plot the whole book from start to finish, or do they just begin to write and hope something happens to make an idea into a story to have a plot in the end? I think I've been both in my novels. My howarth trilogy begins with a place I discovered, Glen mill. It was the inspiration for the first of my trilogy, pattern of shadows. Glen mill was one of the first two pow camps to be opened in Britain. A disuse cotton mill in the north of England, built in 1903, it ceased production in 1938. At a time when all purpose built camps were being used by the armed forces, and there was no money available for pal build, Glen mill was chosen for various reasons, it wasn't near any military installations or seaports, and it was far from the south in an east of Britain it was large, and it was enclosed by a road and two mill reservoirs and soon after it opened by a railway line. My parents worked in the local cotton mill. My mother was a winder, working on a machine that transferred the cotton off large cones on the small reels bobbins in order for the weavers to use to make the cloth. Well before the days of health and safety, I would often go to wait for her to finish work on my way home from school. I remember the muffled boom of noise as I walked across the yard, and the sudden clatter of so many different machines as I stepped through a small door cut into a great wooden door. I remember the women singing and shouting above the noise, the colors of the cotton and cloth, so bright and intricate. But above all I remember the smell of oil, grease, and in the storage area, the lovely smell of the new material stored in bales, and the feel of the cloth against my legs when I sat on them in the warehouse, reading until the siren hooted, announcing the end of the shift. When I was reading about Glen mill, I wondered what kind of signal would have been used to separate parts of the day for all those men imprisoned there during World War II. I realized how different their days must have been from my memories of a mill. I wanted to write a story. In pattern of shadows and the subsequent two books, Glen mill, or grand Ole, as I renamed it, became the focus, the hub, and the memory of the place around which the characters lived. The prequel, a hundred tin threads, which I actually wrote after the series, was an answer to the many questions asked to me by readers, what were the parents of the protagonist, Mary haworth, and the trilogy, like in their youth. With all four of these historical family sagas, I had a fair idea of the endings. Unlike my previous books, the memory is more contemporary and evolved as I wrote. The background stems from a journal I kept at a time when I was care for my aunt, who lived with us. She developed dementia. Her illness haunted me long after she died, and the idea of the book was a slow burner that took me a long time to write, and I had no idea which way it would take me. It's been described as a poignant story threaded with humor. I was thrilled when it was shortlisted for the whale's book of the year 2021. The Reese Davis trust fiction award. My latest book, the heart stone was also a story that, in a way, wandered towards a demon. Written during lockdown, I allowed it to mean under whichever way the characters took me. I was quite surprised by the ending. All this being said, I realized that I do actually have a process of working. It comes automatically for me, so I haven't actually thought it was a method. With every book I write, I research the era, what was happening in the world, what was on the newspapers, what work was there? What were the living and working conditions in the UK? The houses, the contents, the fashions, the music, films, radio, or television, the toys, and books. I always graph a family tree, with birthdays and dates of special occasions for each character. And for each character I write a list, appearance, relationship to other characters, clothes, work, hobbies, habits, personality. Then I pin them to the notice board in front of my desk, so I am able to see everything at a glance. So I say to myself now, I do have a process of sorts. I just don't know if I'm going to plot an ending or let things evolve until I begin writing. But I thanked to alpha giving me the chance.

hano Glen mill Judith Britain Dell Mary haworth UK England Reese Davis trust fiction awar dementia
"barrow" Discussed on Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

07:48 min | 8 months ago

"barrow" Discussed on Happiness Between Tails by da-AL

"In labeling when it comes to banding together for social justice. Here's how I filled in Spotify's contest form. Contest question number one was what is being lauding sliding in the U.S. mean to you. To this I replied. I grew up as a Latin slash Spanish speaking slash outsider in all of 15 homes and schools, the Latin and the examp into one fair skin lotting squirrel who was bullied for the sin of chubbiness, and who couldn't fathom why she and her mom were treated so very differently from the family males. My father was a charismatic Spaniard who doomed me to find a husband from Spain, bare children, stay home, look sexy, and turn a blind eye when my inevitable husband would inevitably stray. Sissy work was off limits for the boys. Dad groomed them for machismo to become bull fighters or flamenco guitarists, or tennis pros. At four years old, already I pondered nature versus nurture versus culture. Males had enough respect to create an Aiken child me, when I was sure I wouldn't have if I were a boy. If I could have regressed clear to before my father's spermatozoon collided with the ovum inside my Argentine mom's womb, I would have switched genders. When it came to speaking Spanish, as a green eyed auburn haired kid, I found it hard to be taken seriously because I didn't fit what adults thought Latinos ought to look like. At the same time, I wondered lines on maps mattered so much. The politicians the grown-ups would discuss argued a lot about lines on sand and dirt and blood and gender, but none actually fought in the wars they made. Contest question number two requested an elevator pitch, which should be a 50 word proposal for the kind of show I wanted to produce. Right before I clip send, I read Spotify's terms and conditions. If I propose to do a show based on my novels, would I sign over control to my books? After a night of having decided to not participate, the next morning I offered them a different proposed show. Here's my revamped elevator pitch. My podcast would fill the crevices where nitty Gritty day to today exists. Stories on with pat answers. Characters who go beyond the archetypical and are more akin to annoying diverse friends who are there when we need them, or maybe they aren't, but are later. For contest question number three, I needed to go into more depth regarding that proposed shell. I answered by saying my serialized fiction podcast intends to bring forth characters as unique and complex as life who help us exist more harmoniously. So much of what we hear, read and watch as populated by the symmetrical and the able bodied, the fertile on the viral. All of them are one dimensional people who are invariably destined for parenthood and partnering. Where are the exes, lodgings included? My shows will chlorine are convoluted humanity. It's fine to not be a heroine or a hero, neither a goddess nor God. It's okay when we misunderstand ourselves. Even mirrors lie and even selfies are no more than sees flashes of light, color, and shadow. Listeners will be enticed to take a second Eiffel at each other. Whereas the self help industry encourages us to change ourselves, this show would spotlight what's uniquely wonderful about us. Fiction nourishes our souls. Fiction is the treasure map X marks the spot of celebrating our nuances. Our veins of gold aren't found by pretending we're smarter than we are. Platinum manifests when we voice our vulnerabilities. Revealing this is me from the inside out, gets everyone closer to this is us. Now, it's time to introduce you to today's guest. Judith barrow has published 8 novels, and she writes much more than books. She blogs from her home in west Wales, England at Judith barrow blog dot com, where you can find out more about her. Now for her experience and thoughts on writing. Judith barrow on how she publishes and writes. I wrote for years before letting anyone read my work. If I was self deluded, if it was rubbish, I didn't want to be told. I enjoyed my little hobby, as it was once described by a family member. But then I began to enter my short stories into competitions. Sometimes I was placed once or twice I even won. Encouraged I moved on to sending the magazines. I had some luck was published once. But I hadn't dared to send out any of the four full length book manuscripts I'd written and actually never did they were awful. That changed after a long battle with breast cancer in my 40s and finally finishing a book that I thought might possibly possibly be good enough for someone else to see, other than me, I took a chance. I grew resigned, well almost to those a four self addressed envelopes plopping through the letter box. Yes, it was that long ago, the weekly wail of, I've been rejected again was a ritual that my long suffering husband also almost ruys to. There were many snorts of exasperation at my gullibility and stubbornness from the writing group I was a member of at the time. They all had an opinion. I was doing it all wrong. Instead of sending my work to publishers, I should have been approaching agents. You'll get nowhere without an agent. One of the members said she was very smug. Of course, she was already signed up with an agent whose list, she informed me, was full. How could you even think of trying to do it on your own? Was another horrified response when told what I'd done, with the sharks that are out there, you'll be eaten alive. Or sink without a trace was the helpful prediction from another so called friend. So, after trolling my way through the writers and artists yearbook and invaluable tome, I bundled up two more copies of my manuscript and sent them out to different agents. 6 months later, I was approached by one of the agents who, on the strength of my writing, agreed to take me. The praise from her assistant was effusive, the promise is gratifying. It was arranged that I meet with the two of them in London to discuss the contract they would send in the post. They said there would be no difficulty in placing my novel with one of the big publishers, and they would make my name into a brand. There was some editing to do, of course. Even though the manuscript was in its 5th draft, I knew there would be. After all, the agent, a big fish in a big pond, knew what she was doing. Okay, she was a little abrasive on hindsight I would say rude, but she was a busy person. I was a first time author. But I was on my way or so I thought. A week before the meeting I received an email, the agent's assistant had left the agency and they no longer thought they could act for me. They had misplaced my manuscript but would try to locate it. In the meantime, would I send a self addressed envelope for its return when or if it turned up? So back to square one. For a month I hibernated, my family and friends called it sulking, but I preferred to think of it as regrouping. I had a brilliant manuscript that no one wanted. At this point, I think it's important to say that as an author, if you don't have self belief, how can you persuade anyone else to believe your work is good? But still, no agent meant no publisher. There were moments well weeks, okay, if I'm honest, months of despair, before I took a deep breath and resolved to try again. I printed out a new copy of the novel. In the meantime, I trolled through my list of possible agents. Again, then, out of the blue, a phone call from the editorial assistant who had resigned from that first agency to tell me she'd set up her own, was still interested in my novel, and could we meet in London in a week's time? Could we? Try and stop me. I.

Judith barrow Sissy Spotify ruys auburn Spain tennis west Wales pat U.S. breast cancer England sharks London
Donna Barrow-Green, Creator and Producer at Illuminus Audio Productions, on Episodic vs Serialized Fiction Podcasts

Podcast Movement 2021

02:17 min | 10 months ago

Donna Barrow-Green, Creator and Producer at Illuminus Audio Productions, on Episodic vs Serialized Fiction Podcasts

"So what makes a fiction. Podcast literary most fiction. Podcasts are somewhere between episodic in syria. You can jump in on any episode and you won't be totally lost. Each episode has a problem a story like a story of the week and that problem is usually solved by the end of the show. Saint characters say world likely of protagonist has a super objective and their subplots plots yet. The story is not usually bound by a larger plot. Structure serialized literally podcasts. On the other hand are sequence and have to be listened to it water as the story builds listeners. Make an investment for the big payoff in reveal at the end. You have a problem with conflict in every episode that engages the listener but these subplots are leading up to a bigger story arc. Consider the tv show matinee. This is a good example of episodic show with evolving plots. Now compare this to handmaid's tale. This story is serialized. Deep investment in the characters theme and most of all the story long form fiction podcasting tells the story that evolves and develops along one narrative structure over the course of a set number of episodes. The most important one of the most important things to understand is that the listener must be invested in toronto in pretty early on for them to stick with the whole show. A plot grain was a good way to look at the difference between episodic in literary serialized stories so literary fiction podcasting here on the bottom is long form meeting the are carries over episodes for one a bigger story. Similarly audiobooks follow long-form but they do not stray from the rhythmic pros the way scripted literary fiction podcasting deaths the literary elements which. I'll be talking about in the context adapting long form. Fiction are addressed through southbound mood and

Syria Handmaid Toronto
What Is Literary Fiction Podcasting? With Donna Barrow-Green, Creator and Producer at Illuminus Audio Productions

Podcast Movement 2021

00:37 sec | 10 months ago

What Is Literary Fiction Podcasting? With Donna Barrow-Green, Creator and Producer at Illuminus Audio Productions

"Literary fiction podcasting breathes life into long-form stories with an arc that stretches across across seasons of episodes escalating dramatic tension. The result is a fully cast immersive audio experience akin to popular benjamin drama series storytelling for the screen. This isn't new emerging audio drama sub-genre and there aren't many examples to draw from think of literary fiction podcasting as audio book meets. Radio play with a splash of limited series trauma.

Benjamin Drama
Thomas & Friends Storytime: Chases and Races

Thomas & Friends Storytime (US)

01:36 min | 11 months ago

Thomas & Friends Storytime: Chases and Races

"This is a story about thomasson. James thomas is cheeky. Little blue steam engine. James is up. Bright red tendering. Both engines can shut freight pull passenger coaches on both engines. Try to be responsible and reliable but they loved her race so now you've met the heroes of our story. Let's begin our janney. All aboard for a big adventure reds versus blues. Thomas is friend. James is a very proud engine. Who loves shopping around showing fish. I need bright red paint but so does soccer team where blue so on matchday. All the soccer fans cheered thomas wherever he goes because he's painted blue but the funds never cheer james because he's painted red early one morning sir. Top hat arrived at timothy sheds with a special job thomasson james. Hello almost good morning. James moriarty sodo united of a big much today against the barrow. Refereeing the game. There will be a lot of extra passengers today so the two of you must work together to take them back and forth to the soccer field dry. Oh yes sir we're together. You can count on us sir.

Thomasson James Thomas James Janney Soccer Thomasson James James Moriarty Thomas Timothy
Psychiatric and Neurological Problems Are Common After COVID-19, Study Finds

Mike Broomhead

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Psychiatric and Neurological Problems Are Common After COVID-19, Study Finds

"And nerve pain. New research shows one and three covet patients are left with neurological issues. As many as six months after being infected. Dr. David Wang, with a Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix, worked on a similar study last year. It found a third of covert patients experience neurological symptoms, which is not a case of smell. When you flog in learned paying muscle pain, he believes the loss of oxygen to the brain because of lung problems caused by the Corona virus could be to blame.

Dr. David Wang Barrow Neurological Institute Neurological Symptoms Phoenix
Walsh’s former economic development chief enters Boston mayor’s race

WBZ Midday News

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Walsh’s former economic development chief enters Boston mayor’s race

"Day for those running for mayor of Boston with NBC's Mike Macklin with more on the latest to throw their hat into the race, a former school committee member who was until last week Mayor Walsh is chief of economic development Today, John Barrows joined an already crowded field of candidates to be Boston's next mayor as me Would work to make sure that we continue to engage our community continue continue to particularly engage our young people continue to engage those who feel left out. In our economy continue to engage those who feel most vulnerable, protect those who fail most gonna revive for by by taking us through this covert pandemic safely. Re opening our society in a more just and equitable way. Bustin born and raised. Barrows is the sort of Cape Verdean immigrants, said one of five minority candidates in the race for mayor

Mike Macklin Mayor Walsh John Barrows Boston NBC Bustin Barrows
Punxsutawney Phil Sees His Shadow, Predicts Six More Weeks Of Winter

AP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Punxsutawney Phil Sees His Shadow, Predicts Six More Weeks Of Winter

"The famous ground Hog and Gobbler's Knob, Pennsylvania said. Winter is hanging on. But not all of the forecasting. Rodents agree. Hoxha Tony Phil came out of his Barrow in Pennsylvania and saw his shadow. According to the ground hot clubs Tom Dunkel. There's a perfect shadow cast of MI six more weeks of winter, there will be because of covert. This year's event took place without an audience. Ohio's Buckeye Chuck So predicts an early spring while Connecticut used a hedgehog named Phoebe, who agree He's with Park's attorney Phil's forecast

Hoxha Tony Phil Ground Hot Clubs Pennsylvania Tom Dunkel Ohio Connecticut Phoebe Park Phil
"barrow" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

On Mic Podcast

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"barrow" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

"With kissinger or am i wrong about that. I did not interview kissing. I sent him a letter indicating. I would like to talk to him and i never heard back. Kensinger plays an interesting role in his last his life. The different stages because in nineteen fifty six. i think it was Elias was told by certain of the greek. Cia and certain other military contacts and that this fellow who was working for the rockefeller foundation was coming to greece. And he's done a lot of work on nuclear arms issues and name was henry kissinger and they said he's not famous now but he could become something Take him to lunch and talk to him. Get to know him. And so i took him out to to launch but kissinger instead of coming along brought his wife and two kids to lunch. And elias. said it wasn't something that let itself to a serious discussion of nuclear arms. And anyway he difficulty understanding is heavy german accent. We all did for a time. I think that's the case before we before we continue Let's talk about the man himself. He was a man of style dressed. Elegantly you mention his apartment would have been a look like a disaster zone with paper everywhere but he was a very slick smooth sophisticat. I guess you'd say very very close with the ladies absolutely He he he. He dated on never asli. He was very much the ladies man from his his childhood To his is middle ages activities in washington he was frequently the desired extra man for washington dinner parties. So all the wild james all the while that he's writing these pieces and getting in trouble whether he knew it or not by cia a. F. b. i. And all kinds of intelligence services in the greek junta this time he's flitting around the world and having fancy lunches and taking beautiful women out Really james bond style lifestyle. It's remarkable And the interesting thing is the the number of women i track down. I the fbi and cia and others Intentionally win after his connection his female connections even going after his ex wife thinking that she might mad at him And that they they could use them as sources for negative information but one after another after another they. All strongly stood by him never betrayed him never betrayed any pillow. Talk that he may have shared his women were loyal to him and they were remarkable group of women. I would say the might take away from. This is as a fan of american history and world history and i love reading deep dives and people. I've never really heard about much. There's something interesting about that. Is that a pursuit of yours. That you find very fulfilling. I would imagine it is absolutely i mean years ago I did a law review article on the origins of the right of privacy Looking at the the law review article was written by warren and brandeis Louis brandeis on laid out the development of the whole tort of privacy And i was fascinated with the history. That point i was working as director of the legislative commission on privacy and what i did in doing a deep dive into that realized how flimsy the historical origins were And how much How thin the thread was on which we base the whole right of privacy And it became a very controversial but interesting law review. Article is still cited today So yes i. I like getting into certain matters. Doing deep dives of things that are not commonly known enjoyed about the book. The greek connection. Jim is the fact that you highlight an intrepid journalist who worked hard for the cause of freedom and took a lot of risks in doing so fierce. Truth sayer me. Part of his problem was was That he would. He was a scooper. He was proud to be a scooper This part of the george polk image of getting stories and others didn't have that he wants to have and he had access. He had a marvelous ability to get people to leak to him and would publish sections or complete government documents whether it be greek documents or american government documents and he made himself persona non grata to both governments. Because of doing that. Well it's a fascinating story A big thick book to read. Take your time with it. A lot of references. I'll tell you what it does do. It makes me want to visit greece thinking of doing a map of athens marking up the elias tour of athens. I think that's love. You could lead that absolutely. That's a great idea and again There are a lot of folks listening to this all over the world Many of whom have greek Background and this is a an opportunity to learn a lot about greek culture. And about the greek government's and how they've evolved. It's called the greek connection the life of elias demetracopoulos and the untold story of watergate. By james barron. Jim really nice to get to know you and really nice to share this amazing store short. Thanks again to james baron. Jim is a fine journalist. Anna terrific writer. With magnificent new book the greek connection the life of elias metropolis and the untold story of watergate. For all kinds of great information visit the website the greek connection book dot com and you can connect with me on my site jordan rich dot com anytime. We certainly invite you to do. So thank you. For subscribing and downloading the podcasts or growing in numbers every single week and i certainly appreciate it. This is jordan until next time saying as always be well so you can do good day care..

james barron james baron washington Kensinger two kids warren Elias brandeis today Jim elias rockefeller cia james cia a. F. greece Anna both governments jordan rich dot com Louis brandeis
"barrow" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

On Mic Podcast

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"barrow" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

"When greece was under dictatorship. Tom pappas was a remarkable person Into some he was from born in greece but grew up in boston. He immigrated to boston with his parents. in nineteen zero three and lived in an apartment in somerville And worked in his father's grocery store And then what was the the gritty north end. He became involved in business and politics was his brother. His brother focused on the democrats. Have tom pappas. Focused on the republicans. A- from night. I think it was nine hundred. Forty four was the first republican convention. You went to in nineteen forty eight. He met a young congressman. Richard nixon At the republican convention and they bond together with sharing stories about their fathers. Both having had grocery stores he became a close friend do fundraising wasn't close friend. for richard nixon over the years Eisenhower question of dropping him from the ticket in nineteen fifty. Six papers took a lead in making sure that eisenhower kept him on the ticket And was a strong backer. Nineteen sixty nine hundred nineteen sixties. The greek economy was booming And he wanted to get involved in expanding. His import export business get involved in an economic development in greece. He had friends the friend who was also a republican party. Stalwarts With esso and o had been blocked out of a lot of the economic development and they thought that pappas because of his connections in greece could help get them into grace and in exchange for pappas making the right payments and making the right connections and getting s a win was the first time that s o ever had a joint venture with the individual so the oil companies development in greece was known. As so pappas that visual received equal billing with that. So but pappas Struck all kinds of deals with the greek government to guess. So in establishes power base and then when the papandreou government came in in the mid sixties they thought it was a colonial contract unfair to grace and they renegotiated the terms that upset pappas and pappas Allied themselves with some of the forces that wanted to you behind the greek winter And was a stalwart for the greek junta in the mid nineteen sixties. Hunter took over in nineteen sixty seven. he was there with a first name basis with the colonel. Colonel were running greece 'til the seventies and elias. Our hero of the story. Our main thrust is constantly trying to seek a freedom for the greek people and so forth through his writing and his connections. Let's get to the The connection to watergate and of course spiro. Agnew was the first ever. Greek american Not only candidate but vice president and he as we all know ended up being a bag man and had some issues in resigned. But there's an earlier connection that You explore that Elias uncovered talk about that. Whatever and sixty seven One of the first people had met agnew through louise's school or at the At the fairfax hotel where elias was living after he escaped And when when elias came to this country after he escaped and sixty seven elias winter. Agnew at the governor's mansion and asked him for support for the resistance. He is the hunter and agnew said that he wouldn't be supportive of the resistance but he would be neutral and later in nineteen sixty eight with active became nixon's vice president. Elias was puzzled Because he was hearing stories about the hunter involved in certain monies coming to the nixon campaign and he was trying to pin things down And agnew confirmed in a meeting with louis score. After he had become the nominee that he would be neutral but then when elias was sitting at the national press club school In september of nineteen. Sixty eight agnew came out with statement for four square behind the greek winter and elias was upset and he tracked down the information and spouted out that the greek cia was providing. What is today. Close to four million dollars sucked into for today's dollars To the nixon campaign and the conduit for that was palm pappas agnew was involved in some aspects of some greek money but the real conduit for the cia the cia. Money's the nixon campaign. Was tom pappas. But it was news. One eighty switch the triggered. Elias to investigate. And then he found. Com pappas being the bag man and sixty eight for that money. And just tell us in very short. Recap how this was uncovered. No you uncovered the details galore. But what the watergate committee learned about. Thanks to ally if anything at the time. The watergate committee did didn't discover this part. The watergate committee in fact one of the problems with the watergate investigation in the book goes into this in some detail. Is that people. Wanted to investigate pappas for what happened. In sixty eight happened successfully got members of the committee and the staff to restrict his activities to fundraising for nixon in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy two related to watergate and they closed out this whole effort and the discussions of nineteen sixty eight so here. You are with this greek connection. You're shedding the light on this story that a long time was buried. Exactly i mean this variety of people that were dealing with the the nineteen sixty eight story That christopher hitchens your friend Wrote extensively about this And several inci hirsch followed up on some of elias is Tips and documented in more detailed some of the material that elias that originally uncovered on the cover of the book. There's a picture of elias with henry kissinger who still with us on the planet I assume you didn't get any interviews.

Tom pappas Richard nixon agnew boston Agnew Six papers Elias tom pappas somerville one thousand Eisenhower september of nineteen richard nixon today christopher nine hundred mid sixties mid nineteen sixties Hunter republican
"barrow" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

On Mic Podcast

08:16 min | 1 year ago

"barrow" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

"During that time covering that and was assassinated And elias far from being dissuaded was fascinated and saw pocus a model as someone who has fiercely independent would go after all sides regard if if he had the facts he then became a fiercely. Independent celebrated and the matic scoop hungry journalist covering primarily american fares in greece in the nineteen fifties and he gained access to powerful figures inside and outside of both governments. Any attracted a lot of enemies exposing truths hidden. It does read like a novel at times. Because you've got the a. You've got other intelligence services snooping around trying to discredit him It's really an incredible story of survival on his part absolutely i mean the i n. f. b. i. Relentlessly spied on him and harassed them and try to destroy his reputation And fact early on When he was married in nineteen fifty one to an american woman. The fbi was not only monitoring his civil. You know marriage in new york city hall but They even had somebody staked out his hotel room. Uppers wedding having a spy in the hotel room during your wedding night. That could be embarrassing. Or maybe thrilling. Maybe a few have really pulled off a miracle Could be the star of the century. One of the things that important mention here is is the greek connection which is the title of the book and the reason he is a key figure and his so much paid attention to is because greece is an important strategic landmark for the united states for the soviets for all kinds of people. Talk a little bit about greek politics because it plays a big part in his early days in terms of the was nineteen. Sixty eight in. Greece was a important part of the whole western alliance It was the bull work against communism the listening posts for communist countries during the early part of the cold war. It was the area. It was the country in which was the early incursion of the conservative early incursion of the russians at the beginning of the cold war and with the development of the truman doctrine to provide the aid after the second war To be a force against their communist men after the second world war. I thought it was really interesting. As you recounted his experiences with american generals and military brass basically we've cover his was covering the american presence which was dramatic in the early nineteen fifties And what happened was As he was closed out by some in the embassy making him persona non grata. He intensified some of his relationship with those in the military who trusted him more and he had talked clearance from the greek military so he developed at times when he was blocked from certain civilians sources. He developed very good relationships with certain members of the american military Those in charge of the sixth fleet and others and one in particular Admiral burke Became a close friend over the years And the story played out even in to the degree connection and the problems with the nine hundred sixty eight election which we will get to by all means the book lays out the connection watergate but i was just thinking about sources and contacts and how masterful. This gentleman was on on the world stage of connecting with people in different countries and different governments. He really had it down to a science. It appears it really did and It was remarkable e compartmentalize. His life and part of this is what he learned as a young boy in the resistance. Where if if you didn't compartmentalize and you new information you might just divulge information somebody else. in an untimely way and risk their lives or your lives and so he fiercely kept the different parts of his life. Discreet and people trusted that he could keep secrets He kept secrets from friends. Who on the right friends. Who were on the left friends who run the middle And if that one of the problems i had in writing the book is that he didn't wanna do sources to me. Free information that i was getting Or information was telling me because he promised confidentiality. He was gonna take the back that he was not going to divulge their names. Still the it was great. When did you actually get a chance to speak with him. I know he passed away a few years ago. Tell us about your connection to him. But like i can t shirt with you The the backstory to the book. Sure how. I even came to write the book. Which is fascinating series of serendipity. He's the many of the greek connection really began and a suburban boston. Emergency room in two thousand seven. I've been rushed there by ambulance and doctors and nurses were struggling to control my symptoms. I was sure this is my hand to quell my fear. I saw a place of calm. A sensual oasis far from the commotion about me So i picture myself on an idyllic summer morning in nineteen sixty six at a small bear on the island of mykonos eating succulent figs freshly baked bread and honey listening to the bells of donkeys. Emily down the hillside in feeling the warmth of the glorious greek sun on my back yard stabilized me discharge me after discovering. It was just a terrible reaction to some medication but for months afterwards i tried to understand why if that perilous time my mind took me there of all the places in ever been and i traveled all the world I falling in love with greece. When i spent much of that summer. There live with a local family and that people who introduced me to the complexities of greek politics. I was fascinated by stories about the mysterious. Tom pappas the greek. American tycoon from boston was later described as the bag. Man for illegal. France for a foreign funds in the nineteen sixty eight nixon campaign ad identified on the watergate tapes as the infamous greek bearing gifts. When i wasn't working. I told her writing a novel set in greece and embarked on the background research. My brother a successful writer producer. In the bbc encouraged me to learn plot development by reading mystery set in foreign locations and i did and they even tracked down a girlfriend from that time. Who's now a psychotherapist in geneva. She was games. Help fictionalized our experiences including stories. I learned about pappas for whom her father had worked at the time. But it didn't take me long to figure out that i'm much more comfortable writing nonfiction. So i set about preparing a serious article on pappas in the nineteen sixty eight election parent dip it asli in mid two thousand nine a dinner following a fundraiser for the new england center for investigative reporting which was a founding board member. I told our guest speaker legendary investigator reporter. Cy hirsch about my project he said don't spend your time doing pappas he recommended instead. I focused on greek journalist. Elias democrat propolis. The person who had tried unsuccessfully to expose the pappas money laundering plot. I flew to washington in later in nineteen in two thousand nine and then elias quickly realize this watergate related bombshell was just a small part of his larger even more compelling life story i love thank you for reading that because it's it's fascinating I love the idea that it came to you on a in a meditative state but that's where great creativity often stems from now. You mentioned oscar. You mentioned. Tom pappas i was going to get to him. He is a major player when we get to the subtitle the untold story watergate. I am not heard of him before this and learned a lot. He was a boston based fellow. Obviously greek and obviously well-connected and what was his role in the in the junta days in greece.

new york washington Tom pappas boston Tom Emily two thousand Cy hirsch early nineteen fifties second world war nineteen geneva Sixty eight One both governments oscar cold war American second war nineteen fifties
"barrow" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

On Mic Podcast

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"barrow" Discussed on On Mic Podcast

"Twelve year old In occupied athens. Elias became a resistance fighter. He was captured by the nazis tortured and imprisoned sentenced to death in his life was miraculously spared by moving him to a horrible mental hospital for the last year of world war. Two years world war two he survived and then during the greek civil war was shot while friday..

Spring Mountain Center To Open Manufacturing, Distribution Headquarters In Barrow County; $45 Million Investment To Create 205 Jobs

Mornings on Maine Street

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Spring Mountain Center To Open Manufacturing, Distribution Headquarters In Barrow County; $45 Million Investment To Create 205 Jobs

"Company officials say they're building a new manufacturing plant in Barrow County, and they want to hire 200 plus people in the near future. Governor Brian Kemp's office releasing a statement on Friday, saying Spring Mountain Center is setting up a $45 million manufacturing plant near wind, er, Company supplies businesses like Home Depot and

Governor Brian Kemp Barrow County Spring Mountain Center Home Depot
North Georgia man arrested, accused of kidnapping woman at gunpoint

Morning Talk with Martha Zoller

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

North Georgia man arrested, accused of kidnapping woman at gunpoint

"Kidnapped at gunpoint from her whole county home Wednesday was able to escape and call for help. Eric Booth with the whole county Sheriff's office says it was around 1 20 in the afternoon when Whole County deputies arrived at the home on Highland Terrace, just off Atlanta Highway had arrived home that they defined the suspect. 33 year old voices David Peguero in her driveway and the victim and Quiero were previously in a relationship. He says Paraguay row forced the woman into his current gunpoint, drove her around for a time and then ended up back. Residents where she was able to escape and call for help. Investigators found that Peguero lived in Barrow County, so authorities there were able to track him down and arrest him. He's been charged with aggravated assault and kidnapping.

Eric Booth Whole County Sheriff's Office Whole County Highland Terrace David Peguero Atlanta Paraguay Peguero Barrow County
Atlanta - Barrow County Commission To Vote On Changes To Dog Ordinance

Clark Howard

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Atlanta - Barrow County Commission To Vote On Changes To Dog Ordinance

"To vote on changes to its Dog ordinance after a teenager was critically injured in an attack by two pit bulls this summer, backing away from the the initial initial proposal proposal abandoned abandoned certain certain breeds breeds The The ordinance ordinance now now banned. banned. Gathering Gathering of of dogs dogs as as a a way way to to keep keep them them from from becoming becoming aggressive, aggressive, county county manager manager Mike Mike Crenshaw Crenshaw says. says. Instead, Instead, all all outdoor outdoor dogs dogs must must be contained in a pin or kennel of at least 144 square feet per dog. Even if you have a fenced yard, you're so required to have a dog and his dogs like those involved in the attack on Johnson, Stinchcomb would have to be deemed dangerous by the probate court and in the owner would be required to obtain additional liability insurance. Sandra Parish 95.5 double USB, the US has hit a

Mike Mike Crenshaw Crenshaw Stinchcomb Johnson Sandra Parish United States
"barrow" Discussed on Bolton Fan TV

Bolton Fan TV

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"barrow" Discussed on Bolton Fan TV

"It's like it's leading to you. Know i mean not. As to leak like bought wonders do not deserve to be lead to they. Do not deserve old. Did start when you know. The devil took all the dots went off all happened. Issue after issue after issue after issue. We quite frankly swaggering leaks. Because i mean yeah you can disagree with me or not. But i believe we get your determination against barrow. Obviously to combat. We showed ha phi grab to get bought the defense the defense as woeful is horrendous. I mean we still. Don't get me wrong. The defenders is individual. Players are very very talented. Tuft is very good at defending at times. And then you know about teast with the experience top to probably has gone experience as well to befall we. We shouldn't be leaving ourselves open now. People will probably say to kind of combat. not is probably that we should realistically. I'll be honest. I forgot the point about what was going on but The long story shovel. We need to win games. I know you know this. I know this inevitable this. The players know this but yeah i mean. I'm allowed to say over the saturday. We need to turn up at least the point of it but obviously i would rather take three points so yeah going back to the whole thing. Look if you believe the end of it should be. She older opinion but I said this from the start. And a very i bought in philly back him. I trust him. I obviously say the right things. Which is what ki- tilted as you know similar things we are. I'm hoping that when tyler gets on the podcast. I'm hoping that we are going to do a whole episode on whether it should be in on. I'm yeah it is. It's tough because i can understand why people at said that the book it's just a tiny bit where too soon. We're not even halfway through season. Because i do believe ever will turn around. And she'll like he like he's made it no secret seems he came in he was. I want to be attacking. I need to atop won't attackers and he won't go goal. Which has been helpful to the past few seasons. We haven't goals hunker eh challenges and we haven't been clinical Which is why you brought in sock bitch dole of not like kept crawford realistically as well as you know tuft from the buck and stop the atop teach as well And obviously bringing the you can join the top. You know a chiasso honestly he. He blew my mind. He is lead. Looks like i'm sorry talented player. Barry town's a yes. I think now. Is it going to be for this episode. I think i've covered everything. Yeah i've covered everything. I wanted to.

Tuft barrow tyler philly Barry town crawford
"barrow" Discussed on Bolton Fan TV

Bolton Fan TV

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"barrow" Discussed on Bolton Fan TV

"Yeah. I mean regardless toughened is. It's and one. Play this for me to now obviously the new side independent but he isn't too clued up if you're not was on to a star. Jesus on his debut he looked madison. Il more scored a times eastern. He's trying to create chances and yet he was abandoned. And i think he's going to be a very key player for us. This season for. She'll obviously he did get a goal yesterday on for me personally. He was one of the one of the very. He plays the putting a good performance against auto and also grimsby and literally. He is all like he just is goat so he's going to be a key part of our season in my opinion. Yeah i mean there's also been expect on social media by well in other because obviously we have been very lackluster. We've been underwhelming and we're just not being good enough. Yes we've been looking at certain games like them. Because i understand there was light on the a couple minutes. How they don't. We ended up in the ninety six ninety-six but you know. I know it's very very odd to be honest. I just don't understand that. We've got very talented players and we ought winning games. I don't get it. I do not get an appointment funds. If you're listening to this is very very difficult situation because we got all. We have all this hype star of the season when i started the season on saturday. Twenty but if if we winning games. I mean being no doubt on this late but they might play with the matt equality. We've got in this team. We should be taught the top of the table. Now you can disagree with or agree with me. That is what i believe. I believe that we are going to be at the top of our. We should be at the top of the table rather. I don't think we're going to be a top of the table anytime soon. But then yeah. It's a struggle. I mean barrow haven't won a league game apart lefty before yesterday which is still technically so. I suppose there's a positive but the no doubt behind this Israel israel because of the beatable fundings died the seems to be a lot more towns reason less than you know we still this won't loop and yeah we. We just looked this football club and we're not going to stop supporting so we would just going to have to deal with that. But i do believe that they seize them way will at least get playoffs. Not going to say that. We're going to win playoffs. Because i'm not sure but it is what it is now. Giving her just discussed or mentioned.

Jesus madison Il Israel football barrow
Filmmaker Finds An Unlikely Underwater Friend In 'My Octopus Teacher'

Fresh Air

08:33 min | 1 year ago

Filmmaker Finds An Unlikely Underwater Friend In 'My Octopus Teacher'

"Craig Foster about his new movie, My Octopus teacher. Well, Foster was diving in the kelp forest off the coast of South Africa. He gained the trust of a wild octopus. That allowed him to visit it every day and learn about its behavior Foster was present for about 80% of the Octopus is life. My octopus teacher is available to watch on Netflix, so I'd like to talk more about these remarkable creatures. You know what really amazes me is their skin. They have this almost instantaneous ability to change their color. A cz camouflage. Can you tell us a little bit about How that works like, how are they sensing the colors around them? Because I think I read that octopus are color blind. I see you've done your research. That's the strange thing is how on earth Can an animal that's colorblind. Match its color so perfectly and camouflage with its background. I mean, it's just like you know what on earth is going on there? And a CE faras. I can understand. We don't fully understand how that's possible. But there are some interesting kids. And I think cuttlefish providers cattle. Fisher, closely related to octopus. Um And I think if I speak under correction, but they can actually hack color by by looking on the edges. About having this dramatic shift in their eyes. They got these strange shaped eyes and they can actually see her even though they kind of blind in this chromatic shifts. And they also options in this skin. That can detect some form of light or color. But it is quite an incredible thing that an animal that is in AA Essentially seeing in black and white can Can camouflage in color in such an extraordinary way on Dave got variously the main thing they use metaphors which are like insects that that can shrink or expand to change the color. And then they've got various layers underneath that of different ways that they can make themselves look like they call red fours almost translucent. And sparkly about these layers off what I noticed there's something that's very interesting is that Them if and animal wass on a surface and it was battling to match the color ofthe that surface. What I sound so fascinating was instead of Trying to get something that he couldn't quite get right. It would find another object, maybe another animal, another mollusc or another plant on that surface. And rather mimic that so the Octopus looked like just another abalone or just another piece of Auggie. On the on the sub stepped he with me. So you can. That's extraordinary intelligence. I'm backing. I'm backing. I'm struggling T match my surface. OK, There's an object over there. I'm gonna match that and pretend that I'm a piece of algae. Or an Impenetrable abalone and then the potato and see me. I mean, that's incredible intelligence. And these are the kind of things I noticed over the Have the time with her. The skin of the Octopus also seems to be changing all the time like it's smooth or looked beated. They can span their arms or contract them. There sometimes will make little horns on on the top of its head. Do we understand what that's all about? Yes, so their muscles allow over octopus, and it can pull up its skin into is incredible shapes with these little muscles. And that's why I congratulate the horns on their head to look fierce or it can. If it's on a surface that is that is very ragged. It can pull its skin up into Looking very pretty to match that surface. That's gonna make its its skin completely smooth. It's got tremendous and it can As you say, Telescope. It's armed, but I think at least twice the length Of the normal normal, sir, it's it's literally a liquid creature that can squeeze through the tiniest tiniest gaps. And you can imagine in Ah as when you being chased like witnessed. Ah, a crab hunt. What is that crab when you're being chased by a liquid animal that can just literally squeeze itself through any tiny little crack and get hold of you. It's a very It's. It's it's frightening. You clearly felt very close to the Octopus. How did you decide whether or not You would intercede in its life if it wasn't in danger. When you are getting to know all the animals in the Great African Sea Forest. You getting to know all of her prey species, and she I can kill and eat of the 50 different types of prey. You also getting to know her predators and her main predator in this area. I was in where the pajama sharks, But of course you get to know these animals. Very well. You watch the adults. Lay the eggs. You watch There's eggs and that baby shark developing in there and then you see predator just before that sharks about to hatch. Eat that tiny shark out of the egg. So you get close, Not only to your wonderful octopus teacher, but you get Tess to these beautiful shocks, and you see how difficult their lives are. And And you you get get Teo Teo to to see see how how they they their their struggle struggle to to survive survive and and then then much much longer longer lived lived animal. animal. It's It's harder harder for for them. them. So So you you develop. This empathy for the whole living ecosystem. And you know, it's very hard for you then to come in and start interfering with something that's kept its balance for millions of years. It just doesn't seem right. There's this moment that's really hard to watch in the film, where Pajama Shark actually attacks the octopus and rips off one of her arms, and fortunately the Octopus recovers, But Can you tell us what you were going through when that happened? Kill. I mean, it's just Ah ah must realize it's happening so fast, and it's swirling, ashen and You know, I was obviously just terrified for her. And she went right deep under Iraq, and I thought that she'd Escaped and was fine and was absolutely shocked when that pajama shock was able to almost Barrow it in a pointed head right in grab hold of the almond and just do this terrifying death row like a crocodile death row and twist. And take her arm off. And it was, Yeah. A shock and ah, pleasant experience. Doesn't expend a lot of energy for an octopus to regrow an arm like that. It's a fair amount of energy to regrow. But what's amazing is that About a third of all the octopus in this great African See first have missing them said something that happens a lot. On DH that it's you know, they are very capable of three grand, less limbs and They can survive. Actually, I think quite easily. It's if they get hit in the head. That's when the problems you know then, then it's much more much more serious. Let's take another short

Octopus Craig Foster Netflix Teo Teo Great African Sea Forest South Africa Auggie Fisher Dave Iraq Tess Barrow
Taiwan's leader hopes for reduced tensions with China

WBZ Afternoon News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Taiwan's leader hopes for reduced tensions with China

"The leader of Taiwan is appealing to China's president to de escalate military tensions more from the BBC's Chris Barrow, the president of Taiwan, sighing. One, has said she wants to have a meaningful dialogue with China. Provided Beijing is willing to resolve antagonisms. Speaking on Taiwan's National Day, she promised to maintain stability across the Taiwan Strait, but insisted that responsibility should also be shouldered by China. Beijing considers thes self governing island

Taiwan Taiwan Strait Beijing President Trump Chris Barrow BBC
Taiwan's leader hopes for reduced tensions with China

WBZ Afternoon News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Taiwan's leader hopes for reduced tensions with China

"Jinping to de escalate military tensions more from the BBC's Chris Barrow, the president of Taiwan, sighing. One has said she wants to have a meaningful dialogue with China. Provided Beijing is willing to resolve antagonisms. Speaking on Taiwan's National Day, she promised to maintain stability across the Taiwan Strait, but insisted that responsibility should also be shouldered by China. Beijing considers thes self governing island part of its own territory. And a rift between

Taiwan Taiwan Strait Beijing Chris Barrow BBC President Trump Jinping
"barrow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"barrow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lonely than happy with somebody. You might find the nighttime. The right time begins. And then nighttime is my time. Just diminish in regretting instead of forgetting with somebody else, it will be no one. Unless that someone is you. I intend to be in that, Let alone want you don't want a Barrow have today back tomorrow. Your love is my love. There's no love for nobody..

Barrow
"barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"R W and this is Josh Barrow. We're socially distanced right now. But that doesn't mean we need emotional distance from our friends and loved ones Reach out and touch someone not physically fight loneliness. Make that phone call be well and stay tuned to case here. That is 3 29 here at K C. R. W Thanks for being with us on this Wednesday afternoon. Here's what's coming up on all things considered hospitality workers on the spot is government make masks mandatory in public places. A restaurant industry groups started teaching employees in ways to de escalate situations involving people who refuse to wear them. We'll check in with restaurants and some customers. In Michigan, also ahead as protests over racial injustice in the US continue Major League baseball is honoring the Negro leagues that showcased black baseball players at a time when the sport was segregated. Got state and local news coming up at 3 32 Why? Another unwelcome milestone has hit L. A county that more after this from NPR Life from NPR News in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston. The U. S. Has surpassed 150,000 deaths from the Corona virus, another unwelcome milestone and made a record spikes in the number of new infections. The U. S remains the world epicenter with nearly 4.4 million confirmed cases. The executives of the nation's most powerful tech companies testified on Capitol Hill today as NPR's Bobby Allen reports. The CEOs of Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Google are facing mounting scrutiny from lawmakers who accused them of using their power to favor their own products, with Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, making his much anticipated first appearance before Congress. Democrat from Ilithyia. Paul had this question is Amazon harvesting data from sellers to make its own products? Bezos replied. We have a policy against using seller specific data to aid our private label business. But I can't guarantee you that that policy has never been violated. At the heart of this hearing is whether these U. S. Tech giants abused dominant market power toe box out rivals. Amazon has been accused of scooping up data from independent sellers toe launch competing products, but until now, Amazon executives have categorically denied it was happening. Bobby Allen. NPR NEWS SAN Francisco The Pentagon says it's planning to remove nearly 12,000 U. S troops from Germany. Defense Secretary Mark Casper says the withdrawal is expected to begin within the next few weeks. This is something we want to do. We feel very good about we think it meets All the principles and objectives I outlined, so we want to get there as quickly as possible because of the importance it has to the alliance and to deterring Russia. The move has been met with bipartisan opposition amid concerns that it will weaken the U. S military's position with Russia. At the close on Wall Street, Adela 160 points. This is NPR. And on a Wednesday, July 29th. This is Casey AR W. On Larry Carol. Here's what's happening at 3 32 L. A County has announced a daily record high of 91 Corona virus death today, along with more than 4800 new cases. The 91 deaths included Six fatalities, announced yesterday by health officials in Pasadena and Long Beach County Public Health director Barbara for Rare said the elevated number of new cases was in part the result of a backlog in reporting, she said About 2000 of the new cases are results from the States Laboratory reporting system that happened between last Thursday and Sunday. The new numbers pushed the county's overall Corona virus death toll to more than 4500. A number of positive cases in the county has risen to over 183,000 California is up to an average of 9400 new covert 19 cases per day. That's led Governor Newsome to re close certain indoor business operations and delay. In person school instruction. But California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr Mark Galley says if 80% of Californians wore their masks, the spread of Corona virus could be cut in half. Which is tremendous. Exactly what we need to see those case numbers start to come down, not only protect Our families and communities but help us move on the road of economic recovery. Polls show 70% of Americans say they wear their masks. Newsome has required that masks be worn in public places state why but has faced pushed back by some local officials, who said they won't enforce the order and by residents protesting the mandate, like in Orange County. Some local jurisdictions like Santa Monica and West Hollywood have begun sighting and finding or finding residents who don't comply will most if not all, school kids in Southern California are going to be attending their classes virtually this fall due to the virus, But S K. C. R. W's Terry Glacier reports. Health care officials say students still need to be up to date on their shots. California has saw the strictest immunization requirements in the country in an effort to increase vaccination rates among school kids. In 2015 state lawmakers passed a bill eliminating personal belief, says the reason parents could opt out of vaccinating their Children. Last year. The Legislature crackdown again this time increasing scrutiny of doctors who give five or more medical exemptions for vaccinations in a year. The Sacramento Bee reports, The number of vaccines being administered to kids in California dropped more than 40% between April of 2019 in April of this year. Perhaps parents are reluctant to take their kids to the doctor during the pandemic. However, the state Public Health Department says the requirements are the same, and that kid's must have their shots to be enrolled in school. That.

Amazon NPR NPR News California Bobby Allen Governor Newsome Jeff Bezos C. R. W U. S R W Josh Barrow Long Beach County Public Healt Russia baseball Public Health Department Windsor Johnston Michigan California Health and Human Se Orange County
Retired Holyoke Soldiers’ Home leader Paul Barabani testifies before Congress, calling for more federal aid to support vets’ homes amid pandemic

WBZ Midday News

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Retired Holyoke Soldiers’ Home leader Paul Barabani testifies before Congress, calling for more federal aid to support vets’ homes amid pandemic

"Of the soldiers home in Holyoke, calling for greater federal oversight of state veterans homes. At least 76 veterans died. And Holyoke from Covert. 19 retired Massachusetts Army National Guard Colonel Paul Barrow. Bonnie telling a House Veterans affairs subcommittee that a lack of state support at the Holyoke home has long been an issue for veterans in Western Mass. When asked what he would have liked to have done differently regarding the soldiers, So, Massachusetts governor Baker said. The Pearlstein report made it clear that his administration's department of veteran services did not properly oversee the superintendent. For the long term care facility, it responded. That one's on us, The independent report found an ousted superintendent Bennett Walls, was not qualified to run a long term care facility. Rabbani represents the Holy Oak Soldiers Home Coalition, which is pushing for more funding and staffing there and construction off a new home in New Hampshire.

Holyoke Holy Oak Soldiers Home Coaliti House Veterans Affairs Superintendent Massachusetts Army National Gu Colonel Paul Barrow Massachusetts Governor Baker Bennett Walls New Hampshire Bonnie Western Mass Rabbani
Record Numbers of Americans Try to Buy Guns

The Erick Erickson Show

04:25 min | 2 years ago

Record Numbers of Americans Try to Buy Guns

"Right I'm going to do something and those who are listening on radio, which is like ninety nine percent of you. You're going to be mad at me because you're not going to be able to see this. I have in my hand a case and it says Glock on it. It is Mike concealed carry weapon. It is a glock forty three X. And it is from true precision. And those of you who are yes. Let's see. Make sure I you this infocus. This gun is a work of art is from true precision It is a glock. Forty three x They have a barrel and slide. I gotta get the trigger upgrade. They put incites for me. The thing is a work of art I. It is a remarkably gorgeous gun The slide has a cammo pattern on it. I got to pick out the colors. I got to pick out the color of the barrel. Is is gray steel in black. There's also a better grip on it. It is, it's fantastic. They were able to upgrade this glock. Forty three x four conceal carry that now I. Love My concealed carry permit laps. I'm a huge fan of theirs. And I was a customer of theirs I. got this Gosh. Last summer I think and now they're an advertiser on the show, which is really cool. I know so when I was a kid, I listen to Paul Harvey My Dad Love Paul Harvey. There was the one time of day you get a spanking in my house. If you made noise while Paul Harvey was talking and and my dad loved him and. Paul Harvey you believed at least whether it was true or not that we actually used all of the things he advertised for and and I thought you know that's Legit, and so I like to advertise for companies that I'm actually customer of Omaha. steaks on my evening radio show or identity guard which I use for. For credit protection and and stuff and true position. I, I am an actual customer. This is my. True Precision Glock forty three ex that you could see if you were on. The camera and it's an awesome gun. You can go to true precision, and you can upgrade the parts for your guns the the. Do that other guns as well and what you do, is you go to true? Dash? Precision, DOT com. TRUE DASH PRECISION DOT com. If you use Eric Your I C. K at checkout you'll get ten percent off. Your debt. You'll get a discount You can upgrade slides. Barrels triggers it y'all they are they. They do such good work. I cannot recommend them enough the accuracy of this gun. The style of this gun when I go to the gun range, people ask where I got it it is true dash precision dot com. You will be very happy with your upgrades If you want to upgrade Y-, you got a handgun. You went. Upgrade it. TRUE DASH PRECISION DOT COM hands down They are so awesome to work with a you know interestingly enough as an aside so the gun store that I probably go to most often is incurable, and it's called shots but I love Barrow. Down in in Butler, but my in laws are over in Carrollton I'm trying to get on the radio station over there and I go to shots by it is. I mean not a mile from their house. It is down the street from them. And I saw on their instagram page yesterday that they're so overwhelmed with people picking up guns. They've ordered from elsewhere. That come in to the store that they're back ordered in their delayed, and you gotTa give them at least twenty four hours, preferably forty-eight hours to put everything into inventory and end licensing and the like to be able to give you your gun. And this is a nationwide trend. Sales of guns have gone through the roof. In this country. It is crazy. How many people are buying guns in this country, every thus far has been a high watermark for guns. March broke the record for gun sales. April broke marches. Record may broke April's record. June broke as record in July is now on track to break June's record and you know. What gun owners are you know? The the other name for gun owners. Republicans. The more this happens, the more it solidifies, sick amendment voters for the GOP The crime wave is going to be real problem for the Democrats.

Paul Harvey Glock Mike GOP Eric Butler Carrollton Omaha.
Matt Dillahunty, Jim Barrows, and the Monty Hall problem

The Atheist Experience

05:21 min | 2 years ago

Matt Dillahunty, Jim Barrows, and the Monty Hall problem

"Imminent Ohio. Who wants to tell us how? The monty hall problem proves there's almost certainly no god how you doing. I'm good, thank you for taking my call man Jim Hello so! Could you start with explaining what the Money High Hall problem is for those people who don't know. Maybe if I sent the hypotheses, though this might go a little bit better, but I'll do it if that's what you think stupidest so I'll do it that way. so the the Monty Hall problem is the game show from the past, and the host would show you three doors ABC and he would ask you to There'd be a prized behind one of them, and then I think the goats behind the other two, and he would ask you to pick a door. And, so you'd say well I. Don't know. I gotta one in three shots here. all go with door. A I've always liked the letter A. and my wife's middle initials as so let's go with day. And those who say Oh really a well. Let me show you. What's behind door be so he'd open door. Be and you'd find out that there's a go there and so then you're going. Oh cool. So then the host would ask you a question and he would ask you. Do you want to change your vote now? You WANNA switch from door to door see. And you're thinking will no. I don't want to switch my vote. I had a one in three shot before. And now it's fifty fifty, so my my chances are. Ev improved. You know and I've always loved the letter. A. And my wife is never wrong, so I'll stick with A. And this is intuitively what you should be doing. Is You feel it feels like your chances of their increased? But the truth of the matter is is that your chances have not increased at all and what you're. You're what you're seeing. Here is a false choice between it's either. A or at, sea. But really it is a or is it. And so the chance you're correct, remained a one third chance and the chance that you're wrong. Is two-thirds see so? You really should absolutely switching your vote at this point, right? Sure and this is. This is a problem that they've gotten wrong a lot so I go. Well I mean anybody can go. You can go to wikipedia. Look this up. You can find youtube videos described this I. Remember hearing about it, you know when I was much much younger Maryland, Voss savant, or whatever had had written an article about it and people couldn't believe that you know you're that you should switch and all of a sudden. There's a number of ways when I want to know is what the hell does this have to do with God belief as a great question so I. Think this comes up a lot when people come in and call in and ask you about like Pascal Wager, or and I'm going to talk specifically about a call that happened with you guys back and say September, but P. People consider it to be and I'm just because I want to be crystal clear I'm going to say did God create the universe right, so people think it's either God created the universe, or it's not God created converts. And like literally. Caller. That's true God created. The Universe or God didn't create univer. That's true. That's just a straight dichotomy. That is true, and but but people like they see it as fifty fifty, but not fifty fifty. Is it I mean you obviously knew this you? You talked about this and that phone. Call that I'm referencing from a long time ago. it's more into. Is it yellow or is it not yellow, right? There's yellow things, and then there's red and orange things, and then there's all the other things that like you know. Doesn't even make sense and still nothing like the Monty Hall Problem Okay so I'm sorry. At least you threw me off by having me do that. Part I, so let me try to get there, so I'd like to. Explore what is the chance that God created the universe and what I'm going to do is assume a high chance. That God created the universe and a very low chance that not God created the inverse. Okay, so just because we're talking on a phone call here. I'M GONNA. Keep the numbers simple, but they're obviously more complex than this, but out of one out of one hundred chance. Let's give one out of one. Hundred is not God side I, assuming a very low chance. Something not God created the universe. This is where you'd find your universe, creating Pixel. And let's assume a very high chance. A God created the universe. The ninety nine chance out of one hundred eight guide, craving numbers, and just to be fair, because obviously you and I don't have a horse in this race. We'll give one chance to every God. We can think of God of the Bible that got around the God of the tour. You know north guys native American Gods Tom. No pause, you just completely screwed this to where it's completely untenable, you cannot have ninety nine options that God created the universe, and then assign one to each individual. God because only one of those can actually be correct, so you only have a one ninety eight now giving your example, you've already screwed up the math and options on this.

Monty Hall Money High Hall Jim Hello Ohio ABC Youtube Maryland
"barrow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"barrow" Discussed on KCRW

"C R W And this is Josh Barrow on left, Right and Centre. We talk About being civilized. That means being thoughtful in your words and actions, especially at the grocery store. It means being kind to one another. Looking out for the common good and fighting this virus together. Be well. Stay tuned to K C. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly for ex Minneapolis police officers charged in the killing of George Floyd are expected to appear in court this afternoon for a pretrial hearing. Matt Sepik with Minnesota public radio reports Derrick Show. Vin, who pressed his knee into Floyd's neck for nearly eight minutes, is charged with second degree murder. J. Alexander King Thomas Layne and to Tao are charged with aiding and abetting murder. Last week, the City Council took the first steps toward replacing the Minneapolis police Department with a new public safety department. They hope to put the plan before voters this November. In Mississippi. A new state flag design is expected to go before voters in November. Lawmakers voted yesterday to remove the Confederate battle emblem. New Corona virus Infections air rising in more than 30 states in the U. S. In Florida. Many beaches will be closed during the upcoming July 4th holiday weekend and includes ones in Miami and Fort Lauderdale. California's governor is rolling back the reopening of bars in seven counties, including Los Angeles, NPR's Alison Aubrey has more. We've had about 2.5 million documented cases, though experts think that at least 20 million people in the US have had the virus for every one case documented at least 10 more probably what went undiagnosed. And we're approaching about 130,000 deaths. This is NPR news from Washington. But it's 6 31 This is K C R. W News. I'm Matt Dillon. The city of Beverly Hills faced criticism this weekend for how it handled peaceful protests, including the arrest and lengthy detention of two dozen demonstrators. The affluent city has imposed an ordinance for weeks now banning nighttime gatherings of more than 10 people in an attempt to prevent noisy protests. On Friday night, a small but organized group filled the streets, played music and blocked traffic before police declared an unlawful assembly will not be arrested. Beverly Hills Police Department then used a long range acoustic device, sometimes called a Sonic cannon cook.

Minneapolis police Department Beverly Hills Police Departmen George Floyd NPR second degree murder Josh Barrow Beverly Hills Matt Sepik Dave Mattingly Minneapolis J. Alexander King Thomas Layne Matt Dillon City Council Washington Mississippi US Derrick Show Florida Vin
Are There Zombie Viruses  Like The 1918 Flu  Thawing In The Permafrost?

Environment: NPR

06:48 min | 2 years ago

Are There Zombie Viruses Like The 1918 Flu Thawing In The Permafrost?

"Now we take you to the top of the world to the Northern Coast of Alaska where a cliff is crumbling and exposing ancient hunting site. There's another head back there. GonNa head right here head right their main body right here. Across the Arctic these prehistoric settlements are being unearthed. And the reason why is climate change as NPR's Mike Lean do cliff reports? Scientists are worried about something that could be lurking inside. These settlements Zombie pathogens up on top of an ocean. Bluff team of archaeologists is trying to pull off an emergency excavation. Here we have ribs and vertebrae other long bones. That's Dominique Tulu. Student helping to dig out hunting cabin. He's found a stash of animal bones at the other end of the house. Glenis on shows me where someone was storing fresh. Kills so this. Is this skin right here? At my feet are mummified seal. These seals are incredibly well preserved. You can see their skin their whiskers and this odsal paw. Oh Paul everywhere they dig. There's another surprise owing us. This is ridiculous. That's an Jensen the archaeologist leading the team they're out of coastal site near Ukiah that the town wants known as Barrow. They're rushing to save a piece of history before it falls into the ocean the cliff where the cabin is buried is going breaking apart because of climate change bird bird after bird after bird stack up in their skin. There there is the whole boy. Things are getting super stinky. The birds are thawing in rotting. That's right when students hands covered in black king bird flesh. Oh yeah hands. Oh my gosh. Oh now Johnson starts worrying about something. We can't see even flu virus. Oh norovirus yes. The team realizes there could be bird-flu hidden in these carcasses. You he all across the. Arctic climate change is causing the ground to warm soften like butter and there are a lot of things buried this ground. Not just animals but also their diseases tinkering take a rank colleen. You're GONNA drive yourself seriously. You need a break cooling. The major as a student she puts on gloves. Yeah you should probably do that hand. Because I mean a lot. Dunkin you at this point. In the excavation something even crappier happens. A human molar appears really human tooth. Now the site rat isn't a burial ground. There shouldn't be bodies right here but the two does make them pause because it reminds them that there aren't just animal diseases buried in the Arctic but also possibly human diseases. There are tens of thousands of bodies hidden in the Arctic permafrost. Jensen knows this better than anyone. I've gone a lot of burials. Yeah I've probably Doug as many variables was anybody. Some of the people buried up here. They died of smallpox others from the nineteen eighteen flu. Have you ever seen human remains like as well preserved as this seal? Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah well the little the little frozen girl from rookie. Avic ARE NYACK. Yes she was. She was actually much better preserved than the seal. The little girl was just six years old. She was carefully wrapped in duct skin. Parka WITH A FUR-TRIMMED. She had this little sled with her. She died about eight hundred years ago. Water in around her burial I think and she was socialist. Basically encased in ice. We're able to take her out in a block of ice. Her body was so well preserved that Jensen shipped her to anchorage so doctors could do a full autopsy. One of those doctors was Michael's Zimmerman a paleobiologist at the University of Pennsylvania. I've done the number studies on frozen bodies in Alaska and when you open them up the organs role there and they're easily identified. It's not at all like Egyptian mummies where everything is shrunken and dried up. So it's easy to see what a person died up for the little frozen girl. It was starvation. But Zimmerman has seen infections embodies excavated from permafrost in one case a mummy from the Aleutian Islands. Looked like it had died of pneumonia and when he looked for the bacteria inside the body there they were frozen in time. We can see them microscopically in the in the lungs. There's this fear out there that once human bodies are exposed by melting permafrost. The pathogens in them could come back to life like Zombie pathogens. It's not unheard of anthrax. Can do it. It happened just a few years ago. In Russia a massive reindeer burial ground thought in the anthrax that killed. The reindeer woke up and started an outbreak. Were these new moon. You bacteria still alive. Zimmerman tested it. He took a smidge tissue from the lungs warmed it up fed it and tried to revive it. Nothing grew not one single cell though. I was happy because I didn't have to worry about catching anything. Zimmerman says he wasn't surprised. Bacteria were dead. Anthrax is a special case. In general bacteria that make people can't survive deep-freeze we're dealing with the organisms. That are hundreds of years old at least of the stuff. I work out of their frozen for hundreds of years and I really don't think they're ready to come back to life. I asked him if the same is true for viruses. I think it's extremely unlikely we've never been able to Culture any living organisms out of these bodies in nineteen fifty one a pathologist from San Francisco. Johan Halton decided to test this out. He went up to a tiny town near nome Alaska in dug up the bodies of five people who had died of the nineteen eighteen flu a virus that killed at least fifty million people Holton told. Npr Two thousand four that he cut out tiny pieces of the people's lungs and try to grow the virus in the lab. I hope that I would be able to isolate living virus. And they couldn't they ours is dead. And in retrospect of course maybe that was a good thing a good thing. But here's the crazy part. Holton tried to capture the virus twice. He went back to Alaska when he was seventy two. In Russian. Scientists like Holton have intentionally tried to revive smallpox from bodies in their permafrost. They recovered pieces of the virus but couldn't get that to grow either so maybe when it comes to Zombie Diseases. It's not melting permafrost. Me Need to worry about but what scientists are doing in the lab mike do cluff NPR news.

Zimmerman Alaska Anthrax Arctic Jensen Holton Mike Lean FLU Dominique Tulu NPR Nyack Smallpox Ukiah Aleutian Islands Paul Colleen
"barrow" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"barrow" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"The barrow neurological institute and its work on stroke prevention and treatment one year ago our very own detour Dan had a life changing moment right here at the KTAR studios he had a stroke I'm one lucky guy and now Dan is sharing his story I woke up feeling a little bit off Monday morning the day after mother's day twenty nineteen I wasn't moving right I I was sluggish I didn't have the the muscle control and when Dan arrived at work that wider stairs was like mount Kilimanjaro man I I struggled to get up that flight of stairs I was sweating profusely I was winded I I went in to my my boots and I I still kept telling myself it's just a bad morning until you realized my lips are numb that's when he approached our news director and told her something was wrong she dialed nine one one and that's when my whole world changed Jamie when paramedics arrived dance normally good blood pressure had gone through the roof they called in the barrel mobile stroke unit I was looking at a computer a laptop and a face of a neurologist who is asking me lifesaving questions they got me to the barrow neurological stroke center and took care of me and within minutes I was in a cat scan and I got a a lifesaving blood thinner medication he credits barrow neurological institute with saving his life I didn't really realize until later how serious it was thank god I was in their hands and danced as if there's one thing you take away from his story it's one word fast it's for face arms speech and time that's the short of it all of those are recognition symbols for you may be having a stroke with your face may droop your lips may droop your tongue may not work the way it's supposed to your arms may not be moving the way they're supposed to your speech may be slurred and T. for time that means you need to call nine one one right now every second may make a difference in what the rest of your life looks like Jamie west KTAR news so you're we're pretty thankful to vero to read and hear more of Dan's story at KTAR dot com yeah and I'm really grateful to Dan for a you know make in this is not just about him but you know try to get the word out and we really appreciate that but we appreciate the most is that you're still around to yell it's Friday American authorized purpose in life I have is taken from the valley Chevy dealers traffic.

barrow neurological institute Dan director barrow neurological stroke cen T. KTAR mount Kilimanjaro Jamie west vero KTAR dot Chevy
"barrow" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"barrow" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"A light on the barrow neurological institute and its work on stroke prevention and treatment it was one year ago our very own detour Dan had a life changing moment right here at the K. T. A. R. studios he had a stroke I'm one lucky guy well now Dan is sharing his story I woke up feeling a little bit off Monday morning the day after mother's day twenty nineteen I wasn't moving right I I was sluggish I didn't have the the muscle control and when Dan arrived at work that flight of stairs was like mount Kilimanjaro mascot hi I struggled to get up that flight of stairs I was sweating profusely I was winded I I went in to my my boots and I I still kept telling myself it's just a bad morning until you realized my lips are numb that's when he approached our news director and told her something was wrong she dialed nine one one and that's when my whole world changed Jamie when paramedics arrived dance normally good blood pressure had gone through the roof they called in the barrel mobile stroke unit I was looking at a computer a laptop at a face of a neurologist who is asking me lifesaving questions they got me to the barrow neurological stroke center and took care of me and within minutes I was in a cat scan and I got a a lifesaving blood thinner medication he credits barrow neurological institute with saving his life I didn't really realize until later how serious it was thank god I was in their hands and danced as if there's one thing you take away from his story it's one word fast it's for face arms speech and time that's the short of it all of those are recognition symbols for you may be having a stroke with your face may droop your lips may droop your tongue it may not work the way it's supposed to your arms may not be moving the way they're supposed to your speech may be slurred and T. for time that means you need to call nine one one right now every second may make a difference in what the rest of your life looks like Jamie west KTAR news read and hear more of Dan's story at KTAR dot com wow men can I get to it can I get to this I don't I can't emotionally give me a Kleenex you know what you and Jamie I have known each other for a long time yes we have and we're really brought yeah I'm really glad you're still around to be part of errors on the morning news of course but I appreciate it because I did need to get paid this week we're also glad that it you know and happy that we'll be able to join with you at your at your next daughter's wedding yeah and you know I I I did this interview with Jamie there's one thing that I really feel remiss about and that's to thank so many people that reached out to me I don't think I ever even mention it but that was probably the most challenging thing of all there were so many people was so emotionally overwhelming there's so many people reached out to me and made me feel loved and cared about and while it was a life changing my friend and I I know I know Hey all right enough of the emotional stuff do let's get to the traffic.

barrow neurological institute Dan
Firefighters Battle Massive Fire At Norton Mill in Boston

Jay Talking

00:46 sec | 2 years ago

Firefighters Battle Massive Fire At Norton Mill in Boston

"The Norton a massive fire hits an old factory building on barrow street WBZ TV news Katie brace for about a couple of water supply issues along the way there are no sprinklers in the old complex the hydrants at the back of the building near the fire are disconnected many firefighters had to run long water lines tell you what's burning is just the the floor in the structural contents of the thing there's not a lot of material actually in the building crews were able to keep the fire to the one corner the parents have noticed broken glass and doors over the past couple years people go in there every now and then fire crews say no one was inside the mill and the patent say this is the first time there has been any large activity there fortunately they other other neighbors live far enough away as to not worry about their

Katie Brace
"barrow" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

05:22 min | 2 years ago

"barrow" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Special thank you to Isabel barrow my colleague here at element financial engines who substituted for me on the air here these past couple of weeks while I was in Australia everything was fine when I left a month ago I came back to this mayhem somebody better clean this up I cannot believe how much the world has changed in the past thirty days I'm sure you feel the very same way well we know what the impact is already from a personal finance perspective and we have seen major measures being announced by the federal reserve by the White House and by Congress we're seeing announcements by the IRS that we're not going to have to pay taxes by April fifteenth up to a million dollars per taxpayer the White House is going to be releasing more than a trillion dollars in economic support but here's the thing all of the stimulus is designed to improve the economy to help the economy avoid getting worse there's a huge difference between economic recovery and stock market recovery and this difference makes all the difference because the economy is not right now in a recession that's to come why then if the economy is not in a recession is the stock market plummeting like this it's because the stock market acts in advance of the economy the stock market looks out into the future several months ahead so if the stock market feels that corporations are going to suffer financially they cut the stock prices right now and that's what we see happening the first quarter really wasn't a problem for corporate America because Kobe didn't really happen until the last part of the first quarter so when they announced their quarterly results at the end of this month it's not gonna be that big a deal but when they're asked how will the second quarter B. that's when they're going to lower the boom and the stock market anticipating that is causing stock prices to go down right now knowing that corporate profits are going to evaporate over the next several months so the recession hasn't yet started but the stock market decline has begun so the stock market moves in advance of the economy therefore when the economy is still in a recession the stock market seeing the end of the recession coming we'll begin to raise stock prices the stock market goes into a demise first and comes out of it first as well and that's why we need to recognize there's a big difference between the economy and the stock market and there is therefore a big difference between economic recovery which is what the White House and Congress and the federal focused on and stock market recovery this reinforces why diversification is so important if you have a sixty forty portfolio sixty percent your money in stocks forty percent in bonds then you're not down twenty eight percent you're only down fifteen no notice I say only as if only down fifteen percent in a month is exciting but it all demonstrates the importance of diversification it's also important to recognize the folly of trying to maneuver your portfolio on a daily basis back on March second the stock market the Dow Jones industrial average jumped thirteen hundred points the next day fell eight hundred the day after that was up eleven hundred the day after that down a thousand this is crazy and it's been going on all last week as well on March ninth down two thousand the next date of eleven hundred and then down fifteen hundred and then down twenty three hundred and then up two thousand and then down three thousand and then up one thousand this is ridiculous this demonstrates when you see massive volatility of the sort with the stock market rises thousands of points and then falls thousands of points one day after the next and does this every other day in a row it demonstrates that nobody knows what's going on nobody knows what direction this is taking and some investors are desperately trying to capture the short term opportunities that they perceived in the market place they're trying to catch the wave unfortunately when people try to catch a wave they often get wiped out so is it any surprise second Sumer confidence is down in the United States since the beginning of the year consumer confidence is down eight percent it's down twelve percent in Japan six percent in Germany ten percent in the United Kingdom and five percent in France everybody everywhere is less confident in the economy than we were at the beginning of the year and it is incredibly obvious why I know by the way if you weren't shaken enough by all of this along comes the American property casualty insurance association they've just released a report saying that.

Isabel barrow
Sometimes a Planet Can Manifest It's Energy Through a Person

Learn Astrology with Mary English

06:26 min | 2 years ago

Sometimes a Planet Can Manifest It's Energy Through a Person

"Because I want to demonstrate how sometimes a planet can manifest it's energy a person fixed extinction bellion he's an activist organisation based in the U. K. and the funding to do some details Kim Co founded a Jar Hallam hermit ladies the other person that but we need to back in time base so I think probably the best I'll make sure provide linkin so if the putting into the New Statesman 'cause that's covers who All the information about the Organization and what an up to digital output thinks to Mr Hallam's website itself and his treaty his book Coletta which is now called publishing deal for so we bite so this could watch Tom was born in Manchester and in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine he moved to Wales and started up nice organic farm and thought he do edgy book season and for at least two years running that was an inorder inordinate amount of rain and his crops ruined he wondered what it was about and the ads often a pig Baena bouncer but something wherever ended up at university and did degree in Activism canoes into the existed I think it's a king's quality number one in his first year university he we second year or something I don't know how many days doesn't investment that's happened he decided to go on hunger strike doc because the university themselves what contributing towards foresaw summit rather and he didn't Kareem event now so the man himself Mr Hallam is a tourist and Send Me Speaking Tureians aunt rebellious type people wanted to some studies on philosophy and this muscle memory skips minute he was a tourist but generally speaking as a general rule tours is didn't entrusted Passe in activism rocking the boat changing the world or any of these things that's note will tours is about so how did someone with sudden tours get that stage case it is wary now he's been in prison until ten he's just come out where we still at work with Scripts Quality Twenty Six folks are he's being released not too sure combine it was in court on the fourteenth Barrow Mavis Imprison for bribes imprisoning book deal for them book though for let's do some background this why would anybody want to be an activist what is about what's inner child that might suggest that as something that is possible so let's just go through the don't have both Tommy ages to find out where he was born but he's stepney-born in Manchester Anti Stat was Sabbatical Warehouse Purse and so he doesn't come from an upper caste poche family from and he's so we know what state your birth place fantasy details companies house and companies view after obesity in fact just start researching squad eweek Scott I'm so we've got said it's get this chance home so let's displayed what he's talking about the son is in chorus and regardless of the day malls is also tourists and the two very talked more dump them in the lesson degree appall so mas is the god of war this is who you are so that would accentuate his venditti to be manipulated in some way avid downs Loyd to Mars conjuncture the sun is that you could be angry to daily do all the time could skip cross about stuff the positive side to Moscow junked the sun is that you might be physically quite active now he birds suffer system would he does have his mercury in the sign of aries so even though he's a tourist he's got his nano contain how many toys it's on with my Korean areas it's not and when you met treason ABC's and aristotle forgets will buy mouse you're going to be things mentally quite swiftly as a fossil now if he had she doesn't but if you had his mother in tours we wouldn't be having anything batsman toll be an activist any shake phobos is but the tweet is not quite so she has met Kunda totally different sign from his sons

Two Years
"barrow" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

16:31 min | 3 years ago

"barrow" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"I'm your host Josh barrow on the right is rich Lowry editor of national review on left lane. Olen columnists the Washington Post and Baz lawn. The New York Times magazine is our special guest. If you listen to left, right and center, sister show all the president's lawyers, and you should be listening to it. You know, I host with Ken white, who's a criminal defense attorney, and one theme on that show is the huge power prosecutors. Hold over how criminal defendants get punished the prosecutors decide what crimes to charge and that decision can put a judge in a position where he, or she has little or no choice about how to sentence a defendant. So if we want to make changes about who we incarcerate and for how long we either need to change the degree of discretion, prosecutors have or need to elect prosecutors who will exercise discretion differently. This is the subject of Emily Baz lawns. New book, charged which looks at reform efforts in prosecutorial offices around the country, Emily, can we start by talking about illegal gun possession, because it's a tension, you raise right at the start of the book, liberals are eager for. More restrictive and better enforced gun laws. But on the ground gun enforcement often means long prison terms for young black men who often haven't even fired the guns. They're arrested for possessing. Yeah. I was focusing on mandatory minimum prison sentences for people who have guns without a permit in New York. It turns out that this kind of is the flip side of liberal gun control, this really punitive approach to people who have firearms without a license in usually in dick cities. And what I found in following people who are facing these charges was that they were being called the most dangerous evildoers in the city by mayor Bill to bless yo. But in fact, these were not the shooters. There was no evidence that they had actually heard anyone with their guns. And when I asked a lot of them, this is mostly young men. Mostly poor people, lots of young black men, when you ask them why they have guns. They say they have them for. Protection. There is a kind of defense quality to why they're carrying the guns. It may be totally misguided. I mean I talked to people who are carrying guns who, who had gotten shot while they were carrying. So it wasn't that this was an effective strategy for staying safe. And in fact, it made the streets more dangerous. But watching this play out in court day after day in Brooklyn, I felt like I was watching another incarnation of the war on drugs, where you have this deep social problem that has to do with poverty, and other aspects of just like social dysfunction, and there is a small group of, like scary people who are shooting people, but then the city and states reaction to this is to scoop up, many hundreds of other people, and then fennel them all off to prison. It started feeling like a kind of zero tolerance blanket, one size fits all punitive approach to a much more complicated problem. What do you say to people who say, I don't want guns in my neighborhood. Especially guns possessed by people without permits or with criminal records, and that we need prison sentences to get dangerous people off the street, and perhaps as importantly to deter illegal gun ownership. So if somebody's out say dealing drugs, at least he's not carrying a gun around, because, as you note, you know, this is a very risky strategy for self defense in, you know, in individual case, a person may not have fired their gun. But if more of these people are out there with guns, they may in a mistaken belief that it is a good way to protect themselves end up committing an act of violence isn't the justification for this enforcement, basically to get guns and people with guns off the street before they shoot someone. Yeah. Sure. And then you want to look at the evidence that supports that justification because it's what the cops and what the New York City mayor were saying, and it turns out that researchers have studied this all over the country, and that there's just no evidence that mandatory minimum sentences for gun possession, reduce violence. Right. And if that sounds counterintuitive will think about what we know generally about zero Toller. Silence approaches like they sound reassuring. But then when you get into the nitty gritty of it, you're treating a big group of people in the same way and you end up sending lots of people to prison when they are all going to come out on the other end. Right. These are not life sentences, and then you've made them even less equipped to be productive citizens and really contribute to their neighborhoods. And so there are alternative approaches for making the streets safer in poor urban neighborhoods. There is some really good sociology about improving. What's called social cohesion? How much people look out for each other in the neighborhood and, you know, even findings about increasing the number of nonprofits in a community that do a whole range of work. Not just like direct violence prevention that can have a good effect on reducing the homicide rate rich. What do you make of that? I mean, a talking point, you hear a lot from Republicans saying, we don't need new gun laws to enforce the existing laws. We have here Emily's saying that actually overzealous enforcement to the. Laws may be maybe counterproductive, I do think an Emily knows much about this area than I do that straw purchases are generally something that are Nord by prosecutors and feed. The legal gun trade take Emily's point. If I can maybe extended out some I think zero tolerance should be a phrase. It's just sort of excised from our vocabulary because Neville, never leads to arbitrary decisions in overreach and irrational things because you're, you're substituting a very standard rule for accounting for circumstances in motives in things that happen in, in real life. And I would have been much more dismissive of what I take to be Emily, general argument in this book, you know, two or three years ago. I'm not so much anymore. And I just look at the Julian Assange and dight -ment latest one listeners program, I have zero use fruit Julian Assange, but just seems so arbitrary. So is at one count with exposure of five years or seventeen counts with exposure one hundred fifty. Years. And the prosecutor just gets to decide that, that seems like a really huge question. And just that's a massive amount of prosecutorial discretion. I'm not sure what the alternative is. But it's a concern. Yeah. Emily could you talk about that broadly, sort of, you know, people think of judges as handing down sentences, but really it's prosecutors who make the charging decision that are heavily controlling how much time people spend in prison. Yeah. So what happened in the eighties in this country? Was that we increase sentences? It was a time when crime was rising, and people were scared unfor- understandable reasons. What we did the most was to have lots of these mandatory minimum sentences. I agree with rich about the problem with zero tolerance, but that was the tactic. We took the idea was to eliminate discretion from the criminal Justice system. But that's just not possible. And so what ended up happening even though we didn't talk about it this way was that we took discretion away from judges at sentencing. And we gave it to prosecutors because they're the ones who make the kinds of decisions about charging that rich was just outlining, and they also are the ones who make plea bargaining offers. There are no limits on how much prosecutors can charge or how high, they can go in terms of the kind of sentence there threatening if someone refuses to plead guilty. And so, in this limitless system, what you see are prosecutors using their power to hike up charges and threatened big sentences. If you go to trial, they use that power to coerce, I would argue or certainly encourage many, many people to plea bargain. And so you see the child virtually disappear from our system in a lot of state courts right now, something like ninety five percent or more of convictions are obtained through plea bargains, and that's the kind of grand sweeping changes that are behind the dynamic in the Julian Assange, case in this is something that's come up with fair amount in the presidential campaign, especially surrounding, comma, Harris, who was the district. Rainy in San Francisco, and was attorney general of California, and some policies she used that basically used this prosecutorial threat explicitly to try to coerce people into certain behavior. And she's she said that, there are something she did that she regrets. But she's also made a case that this stuff can be progressive that, you know, she was trying to get parents to make sure that their children, go to school in certain things like that she's made a case of, of, of prosecution as a as a as a as a as an avenue for progressiveness. Do you think that case washes at this point, I think what, what the Harris if she shows and actually think points to why she's not picked up as much traction as everybody thought she would is that Harris is a bit more of a follower that a leader when we moved towards, you know, being more vague dictate on crime on being more punishing of crime. She was really with that, and she and she followed along, and for instance, the truancy thing at ended up, where mothers of in very troubled families were being prosecuted. This is really not a good thing on the other hand. You know, she didn't really come out for marijuana legalization till two thousand eighteen which is you know kind of late in the game. If you are really going to crack down on this sort of stuff do grew with that assessment, w I think Harris did some things as DA in San Francisco years ago that at the time were like in the vanguard she had a diversion program for first time drug offenders. For example, that now doesn't seem at all exciting radical. But at the time, not very, many cities were even doing that. The problem is that the progressive prosecutor movement has moved so far beyond where she was then that for her to defend or whole record into claim to be a progressive prosecutor. You know, people within that movement who have worked very hard to elect district attorneys who are doing far more than did. Then they don't want that label water down, and they're pushing back and they're looking at things like those truancy prosecutions lane was talking about with, like deep skepticism. So that's the kind of. Of challenge for Harris in trying to straddle this divide. Finally on through show. Why, why don't we talk a little bit about the supreme court. Justice cavenaugh has been on the court for several months. Now, just as Gorsuch has been there about two years, and they've ended up on the opposite sides of a number of significant cases. Emily are they performing differently than you would have expected them to at the time that they were confirmed? I mean, not really. I just don't see anything all that significant that is putting daylight between them. And in the biggest cases that we're looking at this term, I expect them to vote the same way. And we don't have those decisions yet, I'm talking about whether the Trump administration can add a question about citizenship to the next census, and then whether courts have any ability at all to address partisan gerrymandering, we're probably going to get those decisions next week. I expect Gorsuch, and Cavanaugh to be on the side of the Trump administration in the census case and against leading courts intervene to stop political gerrymandering, no matter how extreme. It is rich. What if you made it that, I mean, we've seen some cases, for example, where Gorsuch has aligned with the liberals on some issues related to criminal defendants just as cavenaugh sided with the liberals on an antitrust case, basically saying that, that apple can be sued by, by consumers who are maybe a harmed by anti competitive practices in the app store. Are they are they less down the line conservatives than you expect it?.

Emily prosecutor Harris Julian Assange Emily Baz New York rich Lowry Josh barrow Washington Post attorney The New York Times magazine Baz lawn president Ken white San Francisco mayor Bill supreme court Gorsuch editor
"barrow" Discussed on WTRH

WTRH

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"barrow" Discussed on WTRH

"Barrow site just same guy came. A friend with with with him. He says something similar subway to my brain. He said that I have this same picture of her on my mental at my house. Like, why would he have a pitcher on a meadow of his house? Did it my mind thinking, and I remember her telling me a story about some guy the head of painted on his wall. Oh, but they got me was about the money was because. Paid her daughter's rent for the month of may. It'll say a what man would pay. Daughters. Writ that called me. Start thinking about. Stuff because as we was shredded papers and stuff way she passed away. She always had money at all sudden, daughter, step-daughter say what he always. Out him at other men helped her mom out and we talk in bars. Amounts of money. It don't think back stuff that she did make no sense to me financially. She'd be it, because it had to be because it wasn't her money 'cause she didn't make them much money. Okay. Yeah. So do you think, do you even suspicion that? The daughter was actually his. The daughter was she adopted daughter. The daughter was the. Actually she was two daughters. Great niece, her sister had a daughter, who's she adopted okay because I guess, drove.

Barrow
"barrow" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"barrow" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Barrow county since two suspects to the hospital three men in a pickup tried to outrun deputies after they were spotted weaving in and out of traffic on Georgia three sixteen GB guy special agent. Mike air says the suspects were stopped by a pit maneuver. But immediately opened fire on deputies. This was a potentially very hazardous situation. Very Bala situation. Barrow county sheriff John Smith, what was her motivation Iran and why they put the publican in in danger. And while the at our deputies suspects are being treated for non-life threatening injuries. No, deputies were hurt. Breaking news. I I this is W SP twenty four hour continuing news. The FBI is touting the number of arrests made during the Super Bowl for sex trafficking. Dozens of alleged traffickers and buyers were nabbed in the local state federal operation across the metro, but juvenile victims were rescued, including a fourteen year old hearing the rescue of the young people that were involved that is amazing. Jennifer, Swain leads youth spark which helps young victims. She tells me other cities need to follow Atlanta's bigger event blueprint it attacking the epidemic. Challenge them to say. What more can we do how this can we respond and prepare Edgar Treiguts WSB. Thanks to a tag reader in Duluth and accused hit and run driver in this country illegally is behind bars. The pedestrian victim was killed. Late Monday night on Peachtree industrial boulevard near Howell ferry road. Officer Ted Sadowski tells channel two action news investigators use the tag reader do identify and locate Damian Burgos that is home in Buford. He found out that the.

Barrow county Damian Burgos Ted Sadowski Swain Jennifer Mike air FBI Bala Buford Georgia Iran Officer John Smith Duluth Atlanta three sixteen GB twenty four hour fourteen year