27 Burst results for "Baroness K"

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:34 min | 2 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And the attacks against you are because you're an investigative journalist. It's because you're a Muslim. It's because you're a woman. So phrases like prostitute and the horrific death threats and rape threats. Is it true that you wrote a letter to be published in case of your death? I did. I did. I left a letter with my brother and a friend of mine, just in case something would happen to me. I wanted the letter to be published across newspapers, because that's a legit fear that I have and that that's a legit view that I had a couple of days ago. And what have you written in a letter? Sorry, what did you write in the letter? It's painful. It's extremely painful. It's a letter of dejection. It's a letter of hopelessness where I have lost faith and not just the not just the government of the day, but the people in my country and my fellow journalists and that's to sum up the letter. In case something was to happen to me. And rona, I also read that your 75 year old father suggested that you will leave the country. Would you? Would you consider leaving if you're under so much threat? No, I would never yes. My 75 year old father who's also been made a co accused in my cases and suffers from dementia when does not he does. He's extremely proud of my work and he has suggested that I leave the country, but the point is there are a lot of people in the country who plays great trust in me and me leaving the country at this point of time. It would be a betrayal of their faith in me and my journalism. So that is not an option that I would like to consider. We've run out of time subtly, but thank you very much for joining me on women's hour this morning. Thank you so much. 8 four 8 four four is the number to text. Now this week, a misogyny act for Scotland created exclusively for women has been recommended to the Scottish government by baroness Helena Kennedy QC following a year of chairing the misogyny and criminal justice in Scotland working group..

rona dementia baroness Helena Kennedy QC Scotland Scottish government
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:34 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"One <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> woman <Speech_Female> part of that team that <Speech_Female> bagged the gong for <Speech_Female> speed growing coral <Speech_Female> in The Bahamas, <Speech_Female> Alana, <Speech_Female> coral <Speech_Female> Vita's <Speech_Female> coral restoration <Speech_Female> specialist. <Speech_Female> Welcome to <SpeakerChange> the program. <Silence> Congratulations. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Thank you so much. <Speech_Female> Good morning. <Speech_Female> Really, <Speech_Female> really sweet to pee <Speech_Female> on this radio show right <Speech_Female> now. <Silence> How early <SpeakerChange> is it with you? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> It's currently <Speech_Female> about 6 a.m., <Speech_Female> but I've been up since <Speech_Female> four to be <Speech_Female> ready to speak you. <Speech_Female> Yeah. But you live <Speech_Female> in The Bahamas, as I've <Speech_Male> said. So we have limited <Speech_Female> sympathy because <Speech_Female> we wish we were there too. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Tell us <Speech_Female> how are you regrowing <Speech_Female> the <SpeakerChange> coral? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Well, <Speech_Female> I guess <Speech_Music_Female> first of all, oceans <Speech_Music_Female> are <Speech_Female> coral reefs are one of the <Speech_Female> most beautiful ecosystems <Speech_Female> on the planet <Speech_Female> and also one of the <Speech_Female> most important <Speech_Female> coral <Speech_Female> reefs sustain <Speech_Female> a quarter of all marine <Speech_Female> life and support <Speech_Female> livelihoods of <Speech_Female> up to 1 billion <Speech_Female> people in over <Speech_Female> 100 <Speech_Female> countries and territories <Speech_Female> around the <Speech_Female> world. <Speech_Female> But unfortunately, <Speech_Female> coral reefs are <Speech_Female> dying around the <Speech_Female> world with half of the <Speech_Female> reefs already <Speech_Female> dead. <Speech_Female> And if we <Speech_Female> don't figure it out soon, <Speech_Female> we're on track to lose <Speech_Female> 90% <Speech_Female> by 2050. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> this is detrimental <Speech_Female> not only to <Speech_Female> our oceans and everything <Speech_Female> that lives in <SpeakerChange> it, <Speech_Female> but to humanity <Silence> as we know it. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> we use a <Speech_Female> special method <Speech_Female> that's been pioneered <Speech_Female> by <Speech_Female> lead scientists and <Speech_Female> top choral practitioners <Speech_Female> who we <Speech_Female> collaborate with. <Speech_Female> And it's called <Speech_Female> micro fragmentation <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> where we're able <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> cut <Speech_Female> a larger piece of <Speech_Female> coral <Speech_Female> saying maybe, I <Silence> don't know that the size of <Speech_Female> a <Speech_Female> dinner <Speech_Female> plate. I guess <Speech_Female> we would cut <Speech_Female> it up into smaller <Speech_Female> pieces. And <Speech_Female> this triggers a <Speech_Female> rapid healing <Speech_Female> response <Speech_Female> in this creature because <Speech_Female> corals are animals. If <Speech_Female> you didn't know, they're not <Speech_Female> rocks or plants. They're <Speech_Female> actually animals. <Speech_Female> It triggers <Speech_Female> its rapid healing <Speech_Female> response in the same <Speech_Female> way that <Speech_Female> your skin would react <Speech_Female> if you were to <Speech_Female> cut it off to have <Speech_Female> an abrasion. <Speech_Female> Your body would send <Speech_Female> oxygen and nutrients <Speech_Female> and everything <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> would need to heal <Speech_Female> faster. <Speech_Female> Corals do <Speech_Music_Female> the same thing. <Speech_Female> And so if <Speech_Female> you take a <Speech_Female> we'll say a coral the <Speech_Female> size of a fist. That's a little bit <Speech_Female> better than it is in a place. <Speech_Female> And you cut that <Speech_Female> into <Speech_Female> smaller pieces. It triggers <Speech_Female> this rapid healing <Speech_Female> response. But then <Speech_Female> if you plant them <Speech_Female> close to each other, <Speech_Female> replace them close <Speech_Music_Female> to each other. <Speech_Female> As they grow, <Speech_Female> they're able <Speech_Female> to fuse together <Speech_Female> and recognize <Speech_Female> themselves and become <Speech_Female> a much larger <Speech_Female> piece than <Speech_Female> you started with, especially <Speech_Female> if you planted <Speech_Female> across the <Speech_Female> size of something like <Speech_Female> a big textbook <Speech_Female> or a dinner plate. <Speech_Female> So growing corals <Speech_Female> up to 50 times <Speech_Female> faster <SpeakerChange> than they <Speech_Female> normally would in the wild. <Speech_Female> That's amazing. <Speech_Female> And then you <Speech_Female> join those fragments <Speech_Female> you've grown <SpeakerChange> onto <Silence> the reef itself. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Yeah, exactly. <Speech_Female> So <SpeakerChange> we would <Speech_Female> have one colony <Speech_Female> of coral corals <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Female> very, very <SpeakerChange> weird, but <Speech_Female> also super <Speech_Female> interesting and beautiful. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> that if you have a <Speech_Female> piece of coral and <Speech_Female> you cut it up into <Speech_Female> several pieces, <Speech_Female> all of those <Speech_Female> pieces are <Speech_Female> still the <Speech_Female> same <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> individual. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Music_Female> my name is Alana <Speech_Female> sounds

The Bahamas
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:33 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And that went on for over a year and a half throughout the students kept target to me at every single event that I would go to. And what I mean by that is a transaction students were encouraging people to physically assault me to punch me to throw X at me when I was due to give evidence that were encouraging people to yell that I was going to come. So obviously in the university name that behavior, bullying harassment and unacceptable behavior. At that point, the universities and the transaction is bullies got legal representation. And I was cross examined by my bullish virus. There was also a question by the university's lawyers. Keep in mind, all I did was decide to share a family meeting. And I'm the only person who has had to answer questions about God. And then at one point, the university decided to drop the disciplinary process side to security concerns by their own balaclava clad students who would protest every single hearing and every single meeting that I attended. So what I'm saying is, that is not acceptable. That is a climate of intimidation. Purification that has been fomented in university. I want to go back to that in just a moment, but what was the upshot of those investigations, the universities investigations? Nothing happened. Nothing happened at all against anyone. Nothing. No. The only thing that happened is that I was cross examined and I was asked questions about my feminist views, but the people who were actually targeting me and encouraging people to physically assault me never had to answer questions. A spokesperson for the university of Bristol says this all concerns about harassment and bullying or bullying are taken seriously and where appropriate action is taken in accordance with university policies, miss Sanchez has chosen to take legal action against the university given this we are unable to comment further. When you talk about trans activists, can you give us a sense? Because again, each person's life or each person's campus, it seems, there are different things going on, and people would like to understand I'm sure the experience of that. Are you talking about whenever you did an event or are you talking about day to day? And how many people are you talking about? Well, when the bullen and harassment started back in January 2018, it was hundreds of people. And I didn't know anyone. I had just gotten to the UK. And then at every single event, it would be, I don't know. It would depend on the event, but it was significant. Like, in the doses of people. Yeah. I know their students. Yeah. Okay. Because university acknowledged that there were students too. And I just wanted to say, you know, there are some reason why institutions have policies against bullying harassment and the intimidation of people. And that is because that has an impact on people. And what has the negative impact on people? So it's not just it's not good enough to just say what we uphold free speech. We have these policies in place. If the policy are useless or if they refuse to use them, because they're scared of their own transactive students. What would you say the impact has been on you? It's been significant, you know? It's been significant to the point that one of the claims in my litigation against the university of Bristol is negligence..

miss Sanchez university of Bristol bullen UK
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:39 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Support in that way. But you haven't been able to meet since last year. Yeah. And to clarify that point is that because you've been the sanctioned, as you say, or because of lockdown? Because we've been sanctioned. Your understanding of how those sanctions would be lifted is what? Well, we would have to comply with the demands of the Bristol students union which is that we stop being female only. And so now, you're in a situation where you're taking this to court. I've got a statement here from the union saying, we appreciate this is a serious and important matter. We've received a letter before action from Raquel's lawyers on the 11th of October. We're in the process of replying to that letter and expect to continue a dialog over the coming months. That's from Noel rumble, the co chair of Bristol's student union trustee board. Why is it so important to you to take this action? This isn't something that happened suddenly. We have spent the past four years trying to bring that dialog with the Bristol students union to let them know why it is so important for our attendees and for us to center the lives and be experienced as a women and at every single stage we have faced rejection and we have faced disapproval. So it's not something that we decided to take lightly. We are taking this litigation because we know that the law is crystal clear on this. Women are allowed to have single sex spaces and services. But what's happening around the country is that women are frightened to use the law because we think that if we use the law then we will be labeled transphobic. But then when we do use the law then we're sanctioned. And that's not acceptable. Women shouldn't have to resort to raising thousands of pounds just to have the rights that they already hold being upheld. There's a difference, of course, though between being sanctioned, which is what you just described, and then you said, before this incident last march, there was already issues, disapproval. What do you mean by that? Well, every time we tried to have a meeting, public meeting with feminist speakers, for example, Julie bendel or pregnant Patel from black sister. The rest of students union would make us pay for security because they admit that there was a risk that all of our meetings were going to be targeted by trans activists. Now, the answer to that is it is the Bristol students union or the university of Bristol that should create policies to contain their trans activities students instead they made all responsible for their behavior. And we were the ones being targeted because we should also say, I should also say at this point that you're taking your own case against the university. So this is not the union, and you first made a complaint back in 2018. What is that case about? The case is about a contain of billion and intimidation that I have NGO or since I became a student, a PhD student at the university of Bristol. Your PhD is in gender and violence. So when I came to the United Kingdom, I was already a feminist writer and I was invited to an event by the feminist organization, women's place UK. And the second that that event was announced for us actually students at the university of Bristol protest that was unacceptable. So they became enraged by the fact that as a PhD student I was participating in feminism that they didn't agree and they started, identification and intimidation campaign. That went on for almost two years. The fire doesn't play because the university policys are very clear that that is not acceptable. The university selected some students and started a disciplinary process against some of them..

Bristol students union Noel rumble Raquel Julie bendel university of Bristol Bristol Patel United Kingdom NGO
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:04 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And it was an angry clash, did it get violent? Could just so we again we can imagine the scene? Well, it was a 45 minute standoff in which I expressed it and then some of the other women in the group had to repeat the law over and over again. Just to stress the point that there's a reason why. We're not doing we're not being female only to be hateful. We're doing it because we want to prioritize the experiences and the needs of our attendees. And also, I just want to point out, we're welcome the fact that our other society sometimes all of the other societies and open to everyone. So we encourage the fact that there is an LGBT student society there is another feminist society that is open to everyone. It just so happens setting hours we sent their women. And you then say, they went, both of them, to complain to the union. And you were sanctioned. What does that mean? Have you been able to meet as a group since? No. We were sanctioned and we were told that we had to undergo mandatory diversity and inclusion training, essentially, to teach all of us that we had to be inclusive of the male sex. You know, human only society. We were told that I couldn't run as president or any leadership position for the next two years. And we had to modify our constitution in our constitution. We started explicitly be equality act 2010 and they said that we couldn't do that. So we had to change the nature of our students society. Your group lets in as you say women, but not just student women. So women from outside the university. Yeah, because we want to make the point that consciousness racing, what we do is that we gather together as women and we talk about all of these little experiences that we're taught are isolated incidents. And when we discuss them together, we realize that they're part of a larger pattern in society. And that's what that's what consciousness tracing is. So for us, it's important that women who have never received an education who can not afford to be students at the university of Bristol, that they feel welcome to. But the reason I also asked that is, some people listening to this might be thinking, well, if it's such an important group, obviously lockdown happened and other things happened last year, but if it's such an important group, and you want to be able to meet and you include women who are not part of the university, why not take it away from the university? Why not have the meeting elsewhere in I don't know a church hall or somewhere else? There are some parts to be in a feminist student society that is affiliated with the British as soon as you know, for example, we had a space at the multiface Chapman scene. And that's where we held our meetings every Sunday. If we wanted to have large events, it means that we didn't have to pay venue costs if we're not affiliated. You will have to pay and then you cost. But by being affiliated, we didn't have to pay those hundreds of pounds. And we got some sort of.

human only society university of Bristol Chapman
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:42 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Unless anyone tells you otherwise. And I'm sure they won't mess. Thank you very much to both of you. Now, in the last couple of weeks, you may have read about the campaign to have professor Kathleen stock removed from Sussex university because of her views on gender identity and biological sex, all the fact that professor Joe Phoenix, the chair of criminology studies, open university, is planning on taking her university to tribunal, saying she's been made to feel like she's a pariah for her gender critical views by her colleagues and has faced she says a two year campaign of harassment. Well, today, women talk back a feminist society at Bristol university is filing a legal case at county court against Bristol students union. After they say they were sanctioned by the university union for running a woman only meeting and women only meetings generally, an issue that came to a head last march when they refused entry at one of their events to a trans woman. Raquel Rosario Sanchez is a PhD student at Bristol university, also a feminist writer and campaigner from the Dominican Republic and his president of the group, and I spoke to her just before coming on air this morning and asked her what the case is about. We're zooming the Bristol students union because we were sanctioning for running a women only feminine society. And we decided the law at the resource students union for a week as a reason why we needed to be women only our attendees said that they felt uncomfortable discussing very personal issues relating to the fact that their female in the presence of people who were of the male sex. And we're talking about issues like menstruation, male violence against women, talking about disability issues, all of these things that women go through as females. And they wanted this space to be just for women so we can talk about it. And the Bristol issue said that that was unacceptable in sunshine also. So the president of this group women talk back and it's been affiliated to the union to do with the university since 2018? Yes. And we're talking about things coming to her head last year, aren't we? There was a particular meeting. Could you take us back to that and for the listeners of women's? Tell us what happened. So we had a meeting on the 1st of March 2020. And the meeting was called boundaries and feminism. During that meeting, we had an incident in which trans activist students at the university of Bristol attempted to infiltrate that meeting. Now, because of our society being female, we told the male trans.

Bristol students union Kathleen stock Joe Phoenix chair of criminology studies, university of Bristol Raquel Rosario Sanchez Sussex university resource students union university union Dominican Republic Bristol
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:47 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Well, I think it's a, and I'm not the only person to do this with knitting. I saw another woman. I think she was in England, actually, where she knitted the train delays into her shawls. Like every time her commuter train was late, she would sit there and knit. And that showed different times of the train. I've also seen it done for climate change of different temperatures, so they use different colors for the hotter temperatures of our planet. So I mean, I think it's a fantastic way to show data and it's very visual and, you know, quite accurate. Well, as I say, I'm in awe and whatever people create around me whenever I see it, I wonder how. Hazel, welcome to the program. Thank you. I believe you've held the title of the world's fastest knitter. Is that right? Well, as far as I know it, I still hold it, but nobody talked me otherwise. You keep it then. I'm definitely not taking it away from you. How did your love and fascination with knitting and creating patterns begin? Well, I started probably as soon as I could focus on movement, I would have been watching the ladies in the family netting. So probably watching from the I don't know three months old..

England Hazel
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:40 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"But maybe events in recent weeks just remind people again that whatever color of ribbon they wear, most fork are in it for the right reasons. And your view on Boris Johnson, how is that going? You said in 2019 you had personal concerns about what kind of prime minister he would be, where you've had some time to appraise that now. Have you talked about changing your mind? Have you changed your mind on Boris Johnson? Well, I tell you what, if he committed only three years away from the next general election, if he committed to having government time to a large open debate on assisted dying and giving everybody a fever and encourage other parties to do the same, he would absolutely copy my estimation. So he's down at the moment, but for other reasons too. Well, I didn't see what the beast was. But look, people know that he was I'm interested in what I'm interested. I'm interested in what you're not saying. Not just what you are saying Ruth Davidson. I mean, where I agree with them where I think he's done good things on stuff like support during for furlough in terms of the vaccination program, I praise him on things like British national overseas passports for Hong Kong, coming to the United Kingdom, a praise of where I disagree with them on things like taking the 20 pound uplift from universal credit. We have been honest about that too. And you know, I'm afforded a platform because I've beaten holy reason because I know in the second chamber at Westminster. There are thousands of people across the United Kingdom that don't have the platform that I have. I think if we have a bigger wider debate and conversation about end of life issues, should be allowed to have their voices heard. People who have terrible illnesses, people who are affected by this. People who've seen their loved ones die. You know, they don't have the privilege of the platform that you have or that I have. And their voices need to be able to, and I hope that we can have that conversation in a bigger way. Barres Ruth Davidson. Thank you very much for your time and talking about that platform that I have and you have. We've just had a message from Sarah, who says, my father died on the 30th of July. I was by his side 24 7 at home for his final 5 days..

Boris Johnson Ruth Davidson United Kingdom fever Hong Kong Westminster Barres Ruth Davidson Sarah
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:12 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"In uneven, they're not compelled to go to a particular clinic. They make choices, whether they become an initiative or a general practitioner or an oncologist or a pediatrician. You know, they make all sorts of choices. And they choose to apply for a number in a certain hospital or in a certain clinic or in a certain GP surgery. So there is no compulsion. And under the actual wean, which has been drafted this year, outlined at the start of the program. It's not actually the doctor that is administering this door to you either. It is the person themselves. So I think one we've got over 20 years worth of examples of good practice around the world. We're protections can be built in. To I would never discount those people who don't want to have this who have an object into a particularly those in the medical profession. But I would ask them not to just take those who do want it. And a big imbalance that I see in the arguments must be is that those who want this, who desperately desperately wanted are not compelling those who don't for it to happen to them. But those who don't want it are denying those who do. Do you think that is a genuine involvement? Do you think when we've got some issues to put it mildly with some people, you know, losing their jobs in care right now because they won't get jabbed. And one of the reasons they won't get jobs is they don't trust doctors that don't trust science. They don't want a job for whatever paraphrasing people's reasons. That issue around trust in physicians and trust in authority that these doctors are citing could be undermined by this. Are you concerned by that when we've seen what's happened with vaccine hesitancy and even anti vaxxers? Well, I think we should all be concerned by people that don't want to accept or absorb the health messages they're being given. But again, I would point to 20 years worth of examples that we have around the world and countries like how it's English speaking countries like Australia and America and New Zealand and Canada. It's European countries like speed and Switzerland and Belgium and the Netherlands. You know, they've not seen a crisis of confidence in their medical professions following changes to this law. While this debate is incredibly important and matters so much to those people that this effect. And that you have been hearing from very compellingly. It does not seem to be something politicians while they are in office, wish to commit to en masse as you already alluded to. This telegraph report, for instance, today says that it's understood the prime minister and the health secretary are not pro, a change in the law. Now, I mean, that's just how it's been attributed. What are your understanding of the reality of this actually changing politically? Well, between the two of us, Emma, you and I have got several decades of being political watcher of in my previous job before politics of interviewing politicians, not as tenaciously as you do know. And then becoming. See how this goes by the end of it, you're going. Well, I'm becoming one. And both of you and I know that a private members bill. I'm a huge societal change like this in the House of lords. That's a vanishingly small chance of ever becoming more. In its currency. So I'm in this for the long haul..

Belgium the Netherlands Switzerland New Zealand Australia Canada America Emma House of lords
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:51 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And it did make me Luke at situations and the imbalance between the choices you have to start a life and the choices you have in terms of agency, even at the end of your own life. And I think, well, I was going to say, it's a funny thing. I also have been through IVF. And there is a terrible thing when you have heard people debate it, which is if I may put it like this, that you are meddling. Right, that you are interfering. It's a terrible thing that can come into your own mind about it, whether it's not that it's right or wrong, but you just think I personally felt as so many I'm sure do, I don't want to speak for anyone else. What a time to be alive that there are these options, right? But it's funny how it can change other views that you had or views that you have about other things. It does. Well, I think having children does change your perceptions of lots of things generally. But I think the process, particularly is particularly blue link. Even when it's successful and lots of times it's not and a lot of people who ultimately have a been successful have had time for us not being first. But I don't want to dwell too much of that because I think there's so much in the issue that at stake in terms of end of life. And one of the people that was speaking to a group of MPs and peers yesterday was a 37 year old woman who has stage four born cancer and she knows exactly what's coming. And she talks about the imbalance. That she felt. How unfair it was, and we did a lot of things because I thought it was super fun. It feels unfair that those who don't have a terminal illness are making decisions on behalf of those who do. And we know that there's a vast majority of support in the public for this. You know, it's 70s, 80s percent of people that want to see a change here. But only about 35% of MPs want. And urging colleagues in both houses to allow us to talk about this law and perhaps get to a stage where each of the parties will have in their manifesto. A commitment that government can be given to this issue that we can have a discussion about. But a lot of Donald Trump, a lot of doctors, not least the nearly 1700, you have written, feel uncomfortable..

Luke cancer Donald Trump
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:59 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Scottish conservative leader the recently ennobled baroness Ruth Davidson will be giving her maiden speech as part of this debate. She formerly was against changing the law on assisted dying, but has had a change of heart last year. We don't often hear about changes of hearts, lady Davidson. Good morning. Good morning. We really don't in politics. It's quite a rare thing. And I thought we'd start there because you had a change of heart around some specific circumstances. Tell us more. Well, I think we had this come up in a private members bill and holy mood about 6 years ago. And I stood down from the Scottish parliament and me. And I think after a decade in there, you kind of look back over what your decisions have been. And you kind of smile at the winds and you mourn the losses and you fret over the ones that you think are we. And this is one there's an agent at me for years. Because the way in which the law was written in the private members bill, it was badly drafted. And it would never have made it into law. And I think even though it was a free vote, so people could go anybody they wanted two to one, we struck it down at the first issue. And I think it was because it was easier to deal with the text than it was to deal with the complicated situation. And in my head and I'd listen to testimony from people, I understood why people wanted this. And there was something in my gut. Possibly to do with my face to do the position of my church to do with the fact that my sister is a doctor that made me, you know, kind of push against it. And I think the changes for me I've actually been something that I've been tangential to that. So part of it has been having a tail by IVF and how medicalized the start of life can be and 50,000 people in Britain use IVF and you can use donor material that you scream for eye color and family medical history and some of the invasive procedures are so medicalized at the start of life. It makes a bit of a mockery of the idea that you can have medical intervention at the end. But also a lot of people close to me have been our suffering from cognitive issues like dementia, like Alzheimer's, like vascular dementia. These wouldn't be covered by the bill. Nobody with a cognitive impairment would be allowed to or specifically the prohibited by this..

baroness Ruth Davidson lady Davidson Scottish parliament Britain Alzheimer's vascular dementia dementia
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:48 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"It's just absolutely outrageous. And again, in terms of the injections, as I say, no matter whether the directly feel that this is happening local to them or not. The consequences mean that no matter where they are, they're limiting their own personal freedom. They are making themselves smaller. They're putting themselves into laws of clothing. They're not going to places. They want to go to their freedoms being constrained in a way that it should never have to be a precisely the time when they should be at their freest and most able to go and enjoy themselves. What was that like? Reading that message of which I quoted part of from your daughter as a parent. Well, I consider myself. I'm not the sort of parent that sort of normally worries frantically about my children. I have two daughters in a son, two of my daughters, the two daughters are both at university. And I regard the idea of a girl going off to university, young women are something extraordinary. It's an opportunity to go and study and to become yourself and to do something wonderful. And it should be, as I say, the freest time you could have. And so I'm not someone that sits at home and thinks I want to show they're not there anymore, or even worries on Julie that they're out and about. But, you know, this has made me think again, it made me have yet another conversation with her where I say to her, how do you feel what sort of steps do you take? And, you know, I am really so reluctant and so furious at the idea that I should or any other mother or parent should have to say to their children, their daughters, you know, maybe don't do that. Maybe stay not so late. Maybe don't go out at all. Maybe wear something different. Why should we do this? Why endlessly should we have to make protection the responsibility of the victim?.

Julie
"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:23 min | 7 months ago

"baroness k" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Good morning, welcome to today's program, and a packed one is it when is it not? I want to ask you something you may find difficult to admit. I want to ask you about changing your mind. What is the biggest thing you have changed your mind about, perhaps you are absolutely resolute. And then something happened, or you met someone. Or perhaps it was getting a bit older, and you suddenly saw something in a different light. I was speaking to one of my producers before coming on air this morning. She says simply her family don't change their mind. Maybe you're in that camp. But what if I first guests today, the former leader of the Scottish conservatives, now baroness Ruth Davidson, has changed her mind over something significant, assisted dying. She now supports a change in the law, having previously been against it. We're going to those details shortly. Yours may be far less serious, and I still want to hear about it, or it may be incredibly consequential. Another question though with that, if I can. Have you admitted it? Maybe you had a big row about it, maybe you had a big discussion with somebody. Have you actually told the other people in your life who have known you for that view, perhaps, that you have come to a different one? Changing your mind hard to do, sometimes even harder to admit, tell me what you've changed your mind over 8 four 8 four four is the number you need to text me here at woman's hour, text, of course, will be charged at your standard message, right? You can get in touch with me on social media. It's at BBC women's hour or email me through our website. Also on today's program, the feminist taking Bristol students union and Bristol university to court. And a scientist who's got up very early indeed to talk to us about speed growing coral. But don't feel too sorry for her. She's in The Bahamas. But first, the Home Secretary, pretty Patel has requested an urgent update from police following a space of recent cases of women's drinks being spiked with police in Devon and Cornwall warning of women having their drinks spiked at house parties to multiple reports of women being spiked by injection in clubs in Glasgow are Nottingham. Last night, a journalist and author Lucy ward shared a text message from her daughter on Twitter, which went viral..

Scottish conservatives baroness Ruth Davidson Bristol students union Bristol university BBC The Bahamas Patel Devon Cornwall Lucy ward Glasgow Nottingham Twitter
What is the Atvidaberg Sun Cannon?

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:25 min | 9 months ago

What is the Atvidaberg Sun Cannon?

"Some cannons have been around since the sixteen hundreds some of them were used on ships. The position of the sun triggered them to fire at almost exactly twelve. Pm so everyone on board would know what time it was in the seventeen hundreds. You might also have heard a son cannon in fancy park in england or france or even on a large estate where they were used to signal lunchtime in fact when son cannons were in style throughout the seventeen eighteen hundreds most of them were owned by european nobility and that how a son canon ended up in a small town in rural sweden the sun cannon in all to the body has its own tower. It's up on top of a hill and it looks like a fifteen foot tall version of a rook. That chess piece. that looks like a little castle. it's round made out of brick and there's a long narrow slot carved into the south facing side. It's been here since eighteen fifty three and it was built by the local barron and his family. The all those fats. These days it's cared for by a team of volunteers who call themselves the sun cannon club there a delightful gang of retired people who've taken responsibility for preserving the town's history but the whole organization is totally unpretentious and they're a little loosey-goosey when it comes to the foggy lor surrounding basan cannon but at least three different people including my grandmother told me this story back in the mid eighteen hundreds the barron and his wife took a trip to paris. Supposedly the baroness who was born. A commoner was terrified of boats so instead of making the relatively short trip across the baltic to mainland europe. They'd spent somewhere between two and three years. Travelling to france in a horse and carriage by finland latvia with wayne lia poland. You get the idea. I was able to verify almost none of the story. But i'm told somewhere between one and two kids were born on the way from sweden to france and when the family finally made it there and saw the sun cannon in a garden they thought would be kind of fun to have one of those to fire off parties back at home.

Fancy Park Sun Cannon Club Barron Basan Cannon France Sweden Chess England Wayne Lia Baltic Paris Latvia Finland Europe Poland
The Blood Countess Elizabeth Bathory: Serial Killer or Victim of a Patriarchal Society?

We Saw the Devil

02:28 min | 9 months ago

The Blood Countess Elizabeth Bathory: Serial Killer or Victim of a Patriarchal Society?

"So that brings us to bet battery or elizabeth bathroom for us english-speakers which i will be referring her to for the remainder of the episode after a literally limitless number of films plays poems and books have been written about her. She is also known. As the blood countess lady dracula and the blood lady of qatif ish. She's been given countless nicknames. Just based on what she was suspected of doing and i use the word suspected in h. One and bold formatting but what she actually a victim of the patriarchal culture of her time or was she just really one of the most vicious and bloodthirsty female serial killers with ever lived. I mean that's kind of polar opposites there right. Elizabeth bathroom was born on august. Seventh fifteen sixty on her family's estate in hungary now they were a very powerful protestant family. Calvin est actually and they were one of the most prominent families in the entirety of eastern europe. Her father and mother. Baron george the six by three and baroness on bathroom respectively. More or less controlled its own miniature kingdom within hungary which consisted of modern. Day transylvania in romania. Her uncle. stephen bathroom was the king of poland. So they were. In fact the most well-connected as was the custom at the time royalty sometimes married within their own families. I mean everyone knows the inbreeding jokes. Right so generational inbreeding elizabeth's mother and father were actually first cousins. Both from the bathroom side of the family. This could actually potentially explain why she was plagued with health problems throughout her life but especially during her childhood and fun fact. Elizabeth bathroom is actually remotely related. To vlad the third via marriage whom many of you know as dracula himself vlad the impaler but as a child elizabeth would have epileptic seizures. She was frequently ill and she would reportedly go into fits of white hot rage on a dime. Very little is actually known about her childhood but the urban legend and myth has seemingly just multiplied taken on a life of its own throughout the years. I it was reported that her uncle taught her satanism and witchcraft. Then it was a satanic doctor who attempted to treat her epilepsy with healthy blood. Taken from the peasants apply to elizabeth's forehead via a piece of their own

Elizabeth Bathroom Calvin Est Elizabeth Baron George Hungary Stephen Bathroom Baroness Transylvania Romania Poland Europe Dracula Seizures
"baroness k" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

The Vance Crowe Podcast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"baroness k" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

"Is locked down completely now right and there is a big. I know nothing about where you guys are out with lately locked down. Everything's closed site Locked in lockdown there is a huge an economic cost gutter mentioned that that's also mental. Health costs the fact that that counseling operations for people with cancer. You know all of these things going on now. I mean that's that's that's simplifying. What the arguments against lockdowns might be the arguments for lockdown. All that they stop transmission. It's the only thing that could really fast at fastly contagious. Numeiri it and it's spreading throughout the uk. There's arguments about whether you should do that. No were they should be arguments these discussions because it's huge prior whose i'm calling to both sides however if you challenge the lockdown your sense of be an anti science you know. Kobe deny the would deny purposely deployed united to and put you in the credits fascist later take anti-science of is because you know that means that you're irrational and on scientific y- people together people like me in quite critical of the government lockdown strategic. Because they do a balance you know. They went to a kind of balancing homes balancing risks assessment. They won't be honest on the apron. I did not out you know. You're just fueling cuban in on conspiracy theories. Well you know i could. They can demonize you putting you in the camp in the sand comes on that of course that means that there's no nuance and you are asking about inter the bachelor. This is one of the things that's been great regret in the last. I mean actually quite toxic times around brexit in the uk. But also i think in the us pretty toxic divide divisive discussions around trump. Even around black lives matter some of these contentious issues where nuance just bound nuance water. Bow if can we discuss the complexities of initiating or completely ruled out of order. Because you say you had you hesitantly say could this be. The shape got immediately. Covert deny that kind of forces pretty winter camps they. I feel by cosby toll dangerous because they do speak. Although they go elsewhere called seething may only speak with people that already agree with them..

trump uk united both sides Kobe cuban things one of Numeiri
"baroness k" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

The Vance Crowe Podcast

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"baroness k" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

"Which was they wouldn't give consent lizards sense important. I'd mean they should have been no challenge new term. What does that mean. Leases consent is a key part of democracy. Which is you accept that you've lost. You accept the election you lose you accept it otherwise you have chaos that you don't have to change your mind. You just have to say i expect. That's what a peaceful transition as you say i give loses called seven. You walk hot. You might bitterly resenting you might be furious you might think anything but you have to accept that if like in the uk what brexit happened. The establishment refused to give old g separately. Substrate refused to give allegiance consent to brexit happening. That was what caused the kale and donald trump did the simul..

donald trump uk kale seven
"baroness k" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

The Vance Crowe Podcast

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"baroness k" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

"Don't know this but in the us the senate used to not be elected it used to be appointed by the house of the of the state and so the state was sending you and then later they turned it into an election and so it just became really a house of representatives members that Had a longer term or maybe a little bit more power so it's interesting that the uk is kept your Your appointment system. That's right i mean. I think the problem is that if you had elections for the house of lords which some people would argue would-be a progressive before the difficulty is is it would just simply endo replicating house of commons is kind of weird the purpose of it and so in some ways i just think abolish it you even though i at least job because i thought in the end you know it doesn't. He doesn't able to be representative. It can scrutinize but it takes its role too far and in eight say they pull all paid attendance allowance with going in then paying the salary but dependent. Attendance allowance didn't have to in and it just seems to me show up each day and then you get paid for it. Or what does that mean. S you got paid if you show and obviously joining carbon crisis does not very many people setting up and there's a kind of hof payment system if you if you turn vising to join in the guy tried to. I've tried to avoid being cynical about it. I mean i. I tried to show no because of the money. I tried to become work environment. Is she kind of started. I think in october. And i still run the company days and what i consider layers of time at the house of lords timing and i thought you were just a spectator. There actually didn't understand when i would see you talking. I thought wow. They wanted clear to speak again. That's crazy so i wondered what you're doing. You're doing this and all of the academy idea. Yeah so when you said that. The house of lords has the ability to throw a bunch of roadblocks in for brexit. And that's kind of what you have navigating through. What did they throw up. And how are you now through it. So i think for a period of time. I think maybe for your audience to understand when the referendum happening twenty sixteen. It was not expected that the vote would go to leaving the european union in the build up to that referendum massive the establishment all of the main political parties very practically everybody respectable as it were all that we should stay in the european union previously been quite critical of the european union. Ended up arguing to stay and this included the holy university vice-chancellor as science open as i can also has i really felt as the the there was hardly anyone in respectable society as it were set in amongst the ruling elites and the media elites he would for it so as a real shock to the system when leave warn in two thousand sixteen and for the vast period of time. I think it was pretty obvious where it's those who leave just because we were asked to constitution question. We decided that we wanted to leave. We just thought it would be an active soon. Became clear that there was a pretty determined efforts to stop always leaving the european union. Komo may i than sit down. Our relationship or rule to leave would make that factum factory stayed connected to the european union absolutely in a variety wise not caused huge amounts of bitten. Somebody would just arguing. To overturn the votes. Were every time anything that would occur. The house of lords would vitality and show that you couldn't just leave that you know they would just constantly saying no..

october european union eight two thousand sixteen each day carbon crisis brexit of lords twenty sixteen Komo uk factum factory senate
"baroness k" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

The Vance Crowe Podcast

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"baroness k" Discussed on The Vance Crowe Podcast

"People are not allowed to have an opinion and then all lights be had allowed to read things that they would read to bath than this one feels conspiracy theories people start to say what is it. They want us to know what what is today. We'll find out. Say the tim. Ways of communicating the number paper leaking contents of meal tyler grabble nicholas bartlett co owner of the world's first popcorn board game cafe living in both in missouri. And you're listening to the vance crow. Podcasts welcome back to the podcast. I'm glad you're here today. We are going to be re interviewing claire. Fox only now. She's no longer claire. Fox you will discover that she is. Baroness claire fox. Because she has been invited to join the house of lords so we get to talk to somebody that was once a very counter cultural figure throughout the uk and the eu that joined the house of lords after she and a small group of people help guide the uk to actually achieving brexit. Claire is one of my favorite people to talk with. She runs a thing called the battle of ideas where people get together from all over the world and have fantastic debates in great conversations. So when you start talking with clare you know she's gonna hold her own have her own perspectives and everything. She says is super nuanced. We were lucky to get her time. Because she's on the bbc all the time she got her work with the house of lords. And also you know. He's running the academy of ideas so this was a really good chance. We're going to get to that interview. But i wanna talk about a few things that articulate ventures is offering. Which is the company that i run so many of you know that i don't like running ads on here so far. I've done it without having to do any and so what i wanna do is instead of doing ads. Talk about some of the things that i'm working on and see if any of them are of interest to you. The first one is for people that are interested in in depth conversations. You've liked to be you. Like encountering people that are going to say things that you don't necessarily agree with but also know how to have a reasonable conversation. Then you might want to consider joining the articulate ventures network there we have all different kinds of classes and programs that people can get involved in where they're encountering other people there talking about ideas. They're talking about their businesses that they're trying to get started and it's really a forward moving place so if you're the type of person that loves this podcast and you want other meet other people that do as well join the articulate ventures network by going to network dot articulate dot ventures. Another thing that we've been working on is a vr program so my business partner. Ben who is the executive producer on this show. He and i have done a few events in vr. And if your company is thinking about what we think the vr world is gonna look like in the next couple of years we are offering an introductory presentation and then we will also actually if you have headsets. Walk you through a few experiences to get you started in virtual reality. This is something that we put together for one of my clients in realized this is actually a really valuable thing for everyone..

Claire Ben claire uk today Fox clare first one vance crow one missouri claire fox both tyler grabble first popcorn next couple of years tim one of favorite people clients
UK cuts overseas aid amid worst recession in over 300 years

The Briefing

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

UK cuts overseas aid amid worst recession in over 300 years

"Warned the economic emergency caused by corona viruses. Only just begun as he set out his spending review in the commons. It comes as official forecasts showed. The uk economy is expected to shrink by eleven point three percent this year that puts the nation in the worst recession for more than three hundred years. We've got six graphs showing the bumper levels of borrowing plant and drastic plunge in gdp. The most controversial part of mr kinnock statement was his decision to cut the government's overseas aid budget foreign office. Minister baroness has resigned. In protest at the cut branding it. Fundamentally wrong and gallant has details of the backlash

Mr Kinnock UK Minister Baroness
UK abandons contact-tracing app for Apple and Google model

Mac OS Ken

02:22 min | 2 years ago

UK abandons contact-tracing app for Apple and Google model

"Got Surprising message on twitter on Thursday. Dez said he had just listened to Thursday's Moco West Ken, the one that had me talking about the tiny number of smallest countries that had gone with the Apple Google Api for contact, tracing APPs as well as the problems. Australia had had going a different way. Dez had just listened to that show when he saw this headline from the BBC. UK virus tracing APP switches to Apple Google model. Again maybe not. I? Mean that is what the headline says. But for lines in the article says the government now intends to launch a nap in the autumn. However, it says the product may not involve contact tracing at that point instead, the software may be limited to enabling users to report their symptoms and order a-tast. Baroness Daito harding who heads up the wider test and tracing program will only give the green light to actually deploying the Apple Google technology if she judges it to be fit for purpose, which he does not believe is the case at present. It is possible. This may never happen. The report says tests run with iphone could not tell the difference between contacts who are three feet away versus contacts who are nine feet away. It also says that the at the U K had been testing was good at that distance thing, but battered iphone since apple won't let them under the hood. and. They're still kind of cross about that. Quoting the beep at a downing, street briefing Health Secretary Matt Hancock suggested the original plan might have worked. Had it not been for Apple's restrictions on Third Party APPS use a bluetooth. Apple? Software prevents iphones being used effectively for contact tracing unless you're using apple's own technology. He said our APP won't work. Because Apple won't change that system and their APP can't measure distance well enough to a standard that we are satisfied with. What matters is what works? What works will save lives? So the UK will use the Apple Google API or it won't. And thanks again. For the head top on that report.

Apple DEZ Google Twitter Baroness Daito Harding UK Australia BBC Secretary Matt Hancock
Who Was Karl Marx, and What Were His Philosophies?

BrainStuff

08:55 min | 2 years ago

Who Was Karl Marx, and What Were His Philosophies?

"With glance at Karl. Marx's curriculum vitae says a lot economist philosopher journalist sociologist political theorist historian. Add to that socialist communist in the original meaning of the word and revolutionary and. That's just a start. Karl Heinrich Marx was one of the most respected minds of the nineteenth century. His meditations on how societies work and how they should work have informed and challenged humans for more than one hundred and fifty years. Yet to the uninitiated marks may be only a bushy mugged symbol of revolution the father of communism the hater of capitalism. He's considered by many especially in the West as the man whose ideas spurred authoritarian communist regimes in Russia China and beyond that again is selling the man short. Because it's not entirely right in his book Karl Marx. A nineteenth century life author. Jonathan Sperber wrote viewed positively. Marks is a far seeing profit social and economic developments an advocate of the emancipatory transformation of state and society from a negative point. Marks is one of those most responsible for the pernicious and features of the modern world. If nothing else marks was a keen observer of the human condition he was deep finger with bold ideas about how to make life better we spoke with Lawrence Talmon who teaches a course on marks and philosophy at the University of Chicago and is the CO author of a chapter on Marx and Marxism in the rootlets. Handbook of philosophy and Relativism domine said Marx himself was first and foremost kind of scientist. He was a student of reality but he himself struggled throughout the course of his career. How exactly to put his ideas to politics. It's important to note that despite his one time lofty standing in what was then the Soviet Union marks was born in tier in the Kingdom of Prussia in eighteen eighteen. That's what's now known. As the Rheinland area of western Germany. After the failed German Revolution of Eighteen. Forty eight marks fled to London where he eventually died in eighteen eighty three. He's buried beneath a large tomb in London's highgate cemetery. Inscribed with the words workers of all lands unite but marks grew up privileged the son of well off and liberal parents in an ancient town that had been racked for decades before his birth by Warren Revolution that upheaval cultural religious and political shaped his parents and was a big part of young. Marx's upbringing later marks attended universities studying law and philosophy where he became engaged to and later married a Prussian baroness it was well studied philosophy and law that marks introduced the works of German Philosopher Yard Ville Helm Friedrich. Hegel whose ideas he used to later. Form his take on Communism Marx began a career. As journalists early twenties writing for radical newspapers in Cologne and Paris the route he consorted with other liberal minded philosophers and by his mid twenties met and collaborated with one of the major influences in his life. Friedrich Engels it was angles who convinced marks that societies working class would be the instrument to fuel revolutions and bring about a more fair and just society in eighteen forty eight the to published a pamphlet. That would be the basis for a new political movement. The communist manifesto in eighteen eighty three after Marx's death engels summed up the main idea in the communist manifesto like this quote that economic production and the structure of society of every stoorikhel epoch necessarily arising therefrom constitute the foundation for the political and intellectual history of that epoch the consequently ever since the dissolution of the primeval communal ownership of land. All history has been a history of class struggles of struggles between exploited and exploiting between dominated and dominating classes at various stages of social evolution. That this struggle however has now reached a stage where the exploited and oppressed class. The proletariat can no longer emancipate itself from the class which exploits and oppresses it. The bourgeoisie without at the same time forever. Freeing the whole of society exploitation oppression and class struggles domine explained marks was always concerned to understand the real underlying causes of social phenomenon the events and institutions that kind of shape the social world marks wanted to kind of dig down beneath the appearances and see what was really going on early on in his career. He thought that the best arena to do that in was philosophy and then as time went on he transitioned more into the social sciences. What's most important about marks is that he very much had a kind of engineering mentality about society he wanted to know. What makes it work? And how if we want to change it do we change it. What are the levers that we have to pull? Marx's eighteen forty seven economics work capital a critique of political economy a takedown of capitalism that decried the exploitation of the working class crystallized debate one that continues today between the West's ruling social and economic theory capitalism and Marx's idea of communism too many. It's a fight that hits rich versus poor bourgeoisie versus proletariate ruling class versus workers. And it's even more than that to those who debate it. It's right versus wrong. An argument about the best path to a perfect society. But that of course is very simplistic and doesn't get Marx's thinking right the Allman said above all else the association the people have with marks is that he some Utopian Pie in the sky dreaming a perfect world that is free of all the nastiness we live in now really that couldn't be further from the truth. Marks had a kind of engineering mindset. He was probably of all the major figures in the history of political thought the most practical the most realistic he was the most concerned with what is really possible. In the real world what marks to find as communism boiled down society that produces goods only for human need not for profit and in which there is no master slave royalty peasants owner worker relationship and therefore no need to overthrow. Anybody certainly clashes with the materialism of capitalism. But it's a long way from what many today see is communism to after the Russian revolution of nineteen seventeen and later under Joseph Stalin's reign some of Marx's ideas along with those of Ladimir Lennon were used to build a new empire. Millions were killed along the way similarly millions died in China under the rule of Mao. Zedong's Communist Party domine acknowledged. It's hard to even talk about what marks out of communism without dragging in all the weight from Soviet Russia and Communist China and obviously a lot of people hold marks responsible for that or -tarian rules like Stalin's and malls were not what Marx had in. Mind it's important to note too. That Marx did not hate capitalism. He actually saw some virtue in the system. He saw it as a necessary precursor to communism and he envisioned some of the technological challenges automation unseating workers for example. That are true today. Domine explained marks was very impressed with the kind of progressive character of capitalism by forcing people from all different walks of life into the same workplaces capitalism. Kind of breaks down. The old divides between communities and so things like race and gender religion. Divide people less. The more people are forced to see each other as equals in the workplace. Marks recognized marveled at the economical and technical growth the capitalism begets and saw it as an improvement from previous societies. Later in life. Domin says mark suggested that a growth capitalism might be a way to move toward communism instead of all out revolution but he still saw communism with no master slave dynamic as the end goal in that way and in others. Marx's idea of communism was far from the atrocities that have been committed in the name of communism elsewhere and his ideas are still perhaps strangely many a beacon and a search for a better way of life in that this practical and deep thinker of the nineteenth century still has relevance in today's world. Dahlman said marks was so committed to giving a kind of rational criticism of everything not just the enemy but to himself in everything he was willing to criticize the old modes of life and show how capitalism kind of improved on them but he was also willing to criticize capitalism and show how we could foresee improvement coming in the future. That is still hopeful vision.

Karl Heinrich Marx Marks West London Soviet Union Friedrich Engels Jonathan Sperber Warren Revolution Germany University Of Chicago Cologne Russia Rheinland Lawrence Talmon Scientist Hegel Joseph Stalin Domine China Highgate Cemetery
Save the Children scandal 'let down all charities in UK due to mishandling of sex claims'

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:26 min | 2 years ago

Save the Children scandal 'let down all charities in UK due to mishandling of sex claims'

"GONNA start with the Daily Telegraph. Now this is all about save the children which is alleged to have downplayed some sex scandals. Yes that's right. If you cost you mind not to fall back. There were some very serious allegations made against a number of international agent humanitarian outfits or humanitarian development outfits and save. The children was one of them so they were allegations about him. A culture of bullying inside the organizations themselves and indeed for some of these organizations inappropriate behavior actually extended to some of the very people. They were meant to help. And you've had this investigation which is carried out by the Charity Commission. And they've shown the spotlight on. Save the children and basically they said the term when these scandals about him bullying a first surface bullying within the organization the response of the charity was to effectively behaved like an ostrich and others. You Bury your head in the sand and you downplay the significance and is only as it really gained traction that they started shaking the tree that things started happening so for example you had accusations made by several women against two former senior members of staff. Now this is quite important because the two senior staffer gentlemen who joyful side. I'm Brenton Cox and Brenton Cox was the husband is the husband of Joe. Cox and Joe Cox Tragically murdered during the UK referendum on independence. She was Labor impe and out of her death came this organization. Hope not hate and so this this inquiry by the commission. It's been pretty extensive. It's made some very serious accusations but some visible the stinging sentencing here by the person who led this baroness stole of Beeston. And she said that no one gets a pulse because they all doing important work or are motivated by the desire to help some of the most vulnerable people around the world and this is a really stinging indictment of what actually went on and the whole point about it. Is that when you downplay scandals like this when these these terrible things happening in your own backyard? It's detract to not detract. It deters people who've actually very talented to want to get involved but more importantly it deters people from giving about is so so essential said they had had this open purge and to actually look at what was going on why this happened because clearly. They don't want it to repeat itself again but it's very disturbing but the truth has to come out. It's often very unpleasant but better to a face it now rather than to ignore it

Brenton Cox Joe Cox Charity Commission Daily Telegraph Beeston UK
David Rabe Reads John Updike

The New Yorker: Fiction

07:04 min | 2 years ago

David Rabe Reads John Updike

"High David so I know some other ideas came up but updike was pretty much the first writer you thought of Reading for the PODCAST. Why was that He's been he's sort of been in my mind for. Since I started writing or thought about writings he he was always meaningful to me. And then there's a period of time where I stopped reading him. I just willfully stop because I felt like it was the only way to right the way he just doing it and so I just stopped I can remember talking to friends and I would kind of even develop some harsh opinions of of him that were really authentic on some level right based on just the need to Kinda separate. What for you is at the heart of his appeal Yeah I mean it's funny way. We we have you know. There's kind of a cross of backgrounds in a way. I think I just trip. I remember like he wasn't that much older than me. When I was in college? He was being published regularly New Yorker and everybody Where I was living at the time? I'm in college. You know who was interested in writing was very attuned to the New Yorker and he was published very young. I'm not sure what he started in the New Yorker in his early twenties. Yeah so you felt well. It's possible he's done it so that's sort of. It's been part of my brain for a long time. I think his these inhabited part of it for a long time and at that point in college. Were you thinking of writing fiction and not place. Yeah Yeah I started the whole creative. Things started wanting to be an actor. I thought then the college I went to didn't have a theater department but but we had a a professor teacher priests teacher who is really very good and you is a published poet which was significant to us but he had a class so I was in for like three years and it was all prose or poetry and the first story. You thought of reading was Updike's the sandstone farmhouse which was too long to read on on the podcast. What made you pick the other side of the street? I heard that similar in a way in in terms of the territory and It's it's a smaller version of similar work. I think but that hallway. He can mash the present with the past and keep it very alive and not seem forced to. It's just something that I admire and do you. I think the other side of the street is is very characteristic of updike or is it more off the beaten path for him I think it's characteristic in a way but it's kind kind of off the beaten path in its small us in its But he does that very well. So that's the that was why I picked it really right. Well we'll talk some more after the story free and now here's David Rabe reading the other side of the street by John. Updike the other side of the street for that. His lawyer told Faucet you need a notary public in this state. They're the ones who handle car title. Changes Faucet hadn't lived in his home state for forty years and only his mother's death had brought him back. He was taking possession of his meager inheritance inheritance cleaning out her sad cramped apartment. He lived far to the west and the climate and vegetation and even the quality of light light here in. Pennsylvania seemed strange. The afternoon light was dying in the windows. The Leaf is trees in the courtyard below. Where sinking into a well of darkness s with a silvery November glitter as if after an ice storm Leeming on their upper twigs? He looked in the phone book under Notary Republics and one listed at two six two Chestnut Street Hayes. Ville leap to his I a woman. Georgina are Mueller. She answered the phone and sounded excessively cheerful and helpful but perhaps that was just the regional manner which he had slowly lost. He suggested that ladies it was their the transaction must wait until tomorrow but she told him going that extra mile with him the way people in Pennsylvania did no. I'm open here until L. A.. Lot of people you know can't get to you except in the evenings you'll need the car title the Insurance Card Your own driver's license and what we call the short certificate it'll say short certificate letters testamentary across the top. Yes I they have those. My lawyer gave me plenty. Now let me tell you how to find my house. You come out the afraid Pike. I Know Faucet Taller I used to live across the street at two sixty one did you though. What did you say your name was? He told her but it rang. Nobel was a longtime ago. He apologized just after the war. I was a child. We moved away when I was twelve. Is that a fact. Well it's still a house to be proud of Brubaker. Sold it you know. This name meant nothing to him. A younger couple has bought it and sold off the back. Half of the lot really. It wasn't that big a lot in the first place. The Vegetable Garden had been down there. and his mother's Rove peonies and the ESPECIA- This shingle chicken house which is grandfather had had built and the little fenced in yard where his grandmother used to be had chicken with a hatchet on the stained old stump within the chicken house there was a liquid clucking and musty stench of chicken. Dong and there were fascinating. Glass egg scattered about in the Straw. OUGHTA give the stupid hands. The idea of laying. Well I know George in Mueller side. But that's how they do things. These days the crowd the houses in in this is considered a desirable neighborhood. It always was also told her. That's why grandfather bought the place back in the twenties. I'll be there around seven. I got to get a bite to eat. I've been lugging junk all day. There was no need to tell her about all this but perhaps he was gaining back. garl- is local manner faucet new the way but was slightly confused by the traffic lights which had multiplied to play in Hayes valley since he was last there a mall spread itself where there had been field. A new high school flat and low reminded need him of an airport. Along the low side of Chestnut street trees have been cut down on the curb pushed back without the trees his his old street had a baroness that made the houses some frame. Some brick appear exposed and

Updike David Rabe Pennsylvania Changes Faucet Faucet Hayes Valley Writer Professor Ville Mueller Side Brubaker Rove Pike Nobel Dong Georgina John George
Stand-up, sketch and satire: The rise of Indigenous comedy

Unreserved

08:57 min | 2 years ago

Stand-up, sketch and satire: The rise of Indigenous comedy

"Tim Fontaine Initiative and a member of the sagging first nation and he joins me from Toronto. Intel Hallo Tim Moon who I need so tell me. Do you still remember the first story that prompted you to start walking eagle. There was a would watch. Watch the news when I was a reporter. You're watching the news. And I was watching a story about pipelines like pipelines has been in the news for for decades and it always seemed to me that they were always going through indigenous land. No matter what it just seems like they're you know you never hear of it. Like it's going to go through brandon or something like that. It's always like our. We're GONNA go through this list. And so I had made this joke over the years that they're fighting and make a pipeline that goes through every single indigenous community in the country first nations and you admitted meaty that was probably the sort of like the Genesis of Walking Eagle News was I wrote it exactly like a new story. This joke and it was. And that's basically that's the headline is new. New proposed new pipeline will cross through every single indigenous community in the country and Yeah so that was. That was probably the first one that I wrote. It wasn't the first one that that I published but that was the one that made me think I could probably do something with these. Yeah yeah now at the top of the show you did recite some of your headlines but looking back over for the last two years even posting these esoteric articles. What's been your most popular? The most popular is the one about the the Queen US can trudeau. How how her Indians are doing? And it's one that's like a lot of them are strangely plausible like as ridiculous they sound or there's there's something in there that makes people think think that she actually say that or they actually say oh. I can't believe she said that. Even like believing that chef she said it so that one is probably the most popular one of all of the stars that Everton. It's one that's that gets shared the most still what about the most controversial story Any of the ones that do with racism. I mean there was one then. There's some that that I hate saying this. 'cause new real news as says this all the time. Sparks debate is is one about all white panel. Discusses says whether something is racist and that one gets a lot of people. Well you know whatever like people taking both sides on that one Any of the ones about racism usually. Yeah Yeah I get a lot of people sort of riled up either some topics that That you won't cover yeah. I don't do a lot of my. WG and that was one where very very early on in the site. published a story about At inquiry being called into the inquiry which maybe now might fly. I don't know but at the time There were so many families that that were struggling with what was going on. They weren't feeling like they were getting information. And then the story comes out. That's written just like a new news story and I think some of the families believed what people told me and so I just I just put it in apologize because and so. That's that's one where it's sort of. It's really tough to cover without feeling like you're making fun of the issue itself right like a lot of these stories. You'll have to trump fine line between laughing at the issue and laughing at the ridiculousness of the response to it which is usually what I do But that one. I didn't want anybody with that issue. I absolutely don't want anybody getting even the impression that we're feeling that I might be making fun of. Where do you think that line is? What were you gone too far? You've got not gone far enough. I don't know I mean there's sometimes when I published a story and I can't think of one off the top of my head right now but there's a couple of times where I've published a story and I thought I could have been stronger on this. You know what I mean like in calling out racism or in calling the ridiculousness of how the media talks about indigenous communities. There's a couple of times where I've were published it because I published them really fast. It's usually just it pops into my head. I sit down and five five minutes I have a story and publish it and I find that the longer I dwell on it the more I second guessed myself and so and that works a lot of times and then other times it it. It comes out later that I think like maybe I probably could have said something stronger about that. I don't know where the line is yet. I don't think I've crossed although it's funny like people people think satire is the same as comedy and I don't think it always is satire. Doesn't always have to be funny like it doesn't always have to make you laugh. I think sometimes it can make you groan grown and and a lot of my stars do that and a lot of my stories make you feel uncomfortable and I think that's fine as well and so You know the the gauges ages different. It's not like it's not like every single one is getting a laugh. I think a lot of them are just sort of like woo. You know so. Sometimes it's not ha ha funny. It's like ha ha. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. There's a lot of that and I think that's that's that's sort of becoming my brand new headline says this is Kennedy. Which is true? I mean and that's that's there's a lot of that right like because I mean the thing about walking you'll news I've been thinking more and more about uh-huh roots and where it came from where that sense of humor came from and I think a lot of it is like sitting around with my brothers and my sisters watching the news when we were kids and parodying as it's happening right like sitting there and putting voices on the reporters or you know doing bad voiceovers or are imagining scenarios where the news would go right. I mean I remember my my old one of my brothers. He could just he could parrot a reporter like crazy and he's just as big MSCI guy he would be like you know Monte Fontaine. CBC He News Duckie. He would just do it. So perfectly but yet just exaggerated enough that it's really really funny right and so that that was always in me. Yeah I think as as the news is funny it can be very funny but it can also be you can say things with that voice. That's strangely make people listening. Yeah so For a long time indigenous issues as you know were largely ignored or misinterpreted by the media. Let alone featured in mainstream comedy Until we have this clip recently. I'm GONNA play this clip from the Baroness von Sketch show. Here's what happened when that sketch show decided to take on land acknowledgments before we begin this evening's performance. We'd like to acknowledge that this theater stands on territory of the initial Bay schone here on and Wendy first nation also mindful of broken covenants and the need to make right with all our relations. Now please enjoy the show. Sorry excuse me should we. Should we go on someone else's it lands shouldn't we should we leave only the theaters here. Now we just like to acknowledge WHO's landed in. I'm sorry I'm so confused. So if we're on someone else's land shouldn't shouldn't we do something about that or Hopefully enjoy the performance. Okay so some of the money from ticket sales of the show or going to the indigenous. No the ticket sales go to theater. So is the money from the bottled water. Sold here here going to the first nations for clean drinking water or that money goes to sleep. Sorry I'm so who's minded. What are we doing? Gosh that's a good laugh. That's a bit of the sketch from the Baroness von schedule. And Land acknowledgements all shared on our facebook page. You want to check it out but tim. How did you react when I saw that sketch I thought it was great? Thought it was like it's finally I don't know who wrote it. I mean but they did a pretty good job of sort of like cutting through the ridiculousness of of these things that we're starting to take for granted now. Are these things that we're starting to expect. Do you feel like comedy generally is starting to get it. I think to a certain extent I mean you know there's pushback against that rate now I find you. They are working. Nobody can be funny anymore. But that's all like angry white comedy. Nobody sounds to me. Oh I don't understand anything anymore. I think makes sense. It's like that's that's basically what. The world is changing comedies changing. And everything's changing people. When that happens people tend to hold on tight sometimes right in that? That's where a lot of the detention comes in but there are still people out there that are that are funny. I mean I think a tall boys on on. CBC knowing mean that doesn't rely on on anything other than other than up. You know these these funny guys and so I think Yeah you can still be funny. But I think there's there's absolutely a brand of comedy out there that that now especially indigenous comedy. That's that's also there to sort of make you think all right then. I think I'm I'm sort of in that cap because I don't I don't consider myself a comedian yet or comic yet but it's definitely definitely cousins so yeah

Reporter CBC Tim Fontaine Intel Toronto Tim Moon Queen Us Sparks Facebook Trudeau Kennedy Monte Fontaine Wendy
Cowboys' Jerry Jones opens up about Jason Garrett

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:40 min | 2 years ago

Cowboys' Jerry Jones opens up about Jason Garrett

"I'd like to. I prefer to talk about Jason Garrett and Jerry Jones and what's happening there because I really do believe twenty three years after the fairly flabbergasting development of Jerry Jones running off championship coach. Jimmy Johnson he continues to behave in a way where he doesn't even bother. He doesn't even wait for the film to be viewed before going into his coaching. Press conference which no other owner in a league is giving thing after every game is also the GM no at all but what I find funny about the criticism. Even though he was saying something that a whole lot of people were saying on television yesterday yesterday that Jason Garrett his coaching was terrible. But what Jerry Jones doesn't allow for is Jason Garrett is in that job only because he's compliant because because he takes these emasculating. Beatings after a victory after a loss rather were Jerry Jones is perfectly fine publicly. Criticizing an employee. Who doesn't doesn't have a contract that extends very far and Jason's perfectly fine with it? So that's what I'm saying the king he doesn't object or he doesn't publicly cle- object to any of it but one of the things that I find funny about it. Is that for him to blame anyone. Other than Jason Garrett it is to blame himself and even blaming Jason Baroness's fault like there. There is nothing on that organization. That's not imprinted by Hi Jerry Jones. They've behaved in trades and in payments like they're a piece away an every team they played this year they've lost to them Yeah pretty much and it. It is funny anyway. He's being critical. He is being critical of himself. You're the reason that but that's not what is that's amazing. What what he is doing by blaming his coach is not looking looking in the Mirror on two fronts? One you pick those players right to you. Pick that coach. After many people there is no coach in the league. Who's been fired more times by the media than that Guy Right? He's been on double secret probation for like five years but yet he continues to lose key games and and Jerry Jones continues to imply that he's maybe going to make a coaching change and then doesn't do it. It's all on Jerry Jones every bit of it. There is not a good win. I didn't realize that I thought they had a good victory somewhere. We're on that schedule. I know they blew out the eagles. But that's not a good win. And they lost to the saints. They lost to Minnesota they lost to the Patriots. Lost to Green Bay. Yeah they did had And and Dak Prescott has played well in one of those games. which was Minnesota but when they play great defenses Dak Prescott Revert back to being the Dak Prescott from before this season when they played good

Jerry Jones Jason Garrett Dak Prescott Jimmy Johnson Jason Jason Baroness GM Patriots Minnesota Green Bay Eagles Saints Twenty Three Years Five Years
Top jockey Eurico Rosa da Silva to retire

In The Gate

06:17 min | 2 years ago

Top jockey Eurico Rosa da Silva to retire

"Very few successful athletes get to win their illustrious career here's by going out on top a handful come to mind John elway one super bowls in his last two years with the Denver Broncos Peyton manning went out with a super bowl win I'm for that same team Ray Bork left the NHL team with which he'll forever be associated the Boston Bruins to win a Stanley Cup with Colorado and then jet off into the sunset it could be the same kind of fairy tale ending to the career of one of the most successful jockeys North America Eurico Rosa Dasilva who was written primarily at Woodbine race course in Toronto for the past fifteen years the forty four year old rider will call it a career sometime in mid December he's one six sovereign awards for best writer the sovereigns are the eclipse awards of Canada he's been the leading writer at Woodbine five times and won back to back queen's plates the Kentucky Derby of Canada in September he took down for what will be the only time one of the tracks signature races and by so doing wing now has a chance to cap his career with the Breeders Cup win they come to the home stretch the Rica Woodbine Mile Lou collina's Kliot down the outside of mass up the rails all across the track and L. Tournament coming through God's stormies in front to Second L. Tormenta Luke Collina's they're raging bull starting to build a run late in the latest what stormy that Philip Dodd Manta up the inside strides astrid L. dollars Meta on the inside and L. A. has one Rico with by L. Tormenta was forty four to one that day and now he's being pointed to the Breeders Cup Mile he'll no doubt be a long shot Swell facing the likes of got stormy Higher Power Uni and possibly circus maximus but hey a win for L. Tormenta over that group would be a real story book ending the career of our next guest Jockey Eurico Rosa Silva who joins us for a few minutes here on in the gate you've been around logging enough to know that forty four to one shots don't come in every day especially in grade one races so what was going through your head as you powered down the lane to win the Woodbine Mile Tormenta when when I was on the race what's compete under moment I was not thinking winning or or lose us me and him we both doing the weekend through two hundred race right and was completed on their moment or so folks all we want it could wire I you had not much experience with that horse before the Woodbine Mile I think but he had been a turf sprinter last year at age three free so what do you think made trainer Gail Cox decide to stretch this gelding out a little yes I think falling these horse he used to go to the elite before and he was a sprinter and you know they start taking him back and he learned how to relax and then they stretch him out and I think that was the key for him you know to learn how to relax and today he is I can say that they did very good job because he's he's not a horse to ride you know he relaxed that easy for you as we talked about an are open you're retiring basically at the top of your game made now the right time the right time for me is that I'm young to start a new business and my kids I really really want to focus on my family you've said that you grew up without family and you don't want that to happen to your three young children including a nine month old daughter congratulations what do you mean that you grew up without family when Noah's keeping my mom was always working I completed grew up Foodie much without my father and that's almost could create a black hole inside yourself you know as much I want to win before the races and I used to have a Lotta anger and I know in fewest I work on myself and that came from being a kid that most of the time King or in the street you know trying to make a leave and when I started understanding more that and I see how important for the keeps to have their baroness supporting them when they're growing up you know and because they didn't have that and also I want to enjoy seen my son my daughter having that with me you know he's not been better for myself I can say that when I'm not tired and I can take my keep to the park and play with them is very subtly fight for me because I raised for the time here and take a lot of promo body and he's very high from to do that well two things first of all I hate to break this to you but eventually those kids are going to become teenagers I have one and it's not really going very well so yes enjoy it all now while you can the other thing is you said you're racing here and you know as a top okay you'd have less trouble than less successful jockeys would booking mounts if you follow the money during colder months let's say to Florida to Kentucky but you've not real he done that it seems I believe once turned down a Breeders Cup ride to raise woodbine instead that day so what is your thought process for how you have set your skin Joel in the wintertime people think oh he's home he's that but you know I really work in myself I have entertained that work inside myself to come through to the recall you showing up on the track you know and he's the kind of really Really set the myself down and work on the brain I I really I never stopped working on the tire year I'll take two weeks like I am free as I'm not going to do anything and just deal with the family other time I use the time that I have time to work with myself inside myself oh jockey Eurico Rosa Dasilva joining us here on in the

Peyton Manning John Elway Denver Broncos Forty Four Year Fifteen Years Nine Month Two Weeks Two Years