17 Burst results for "Baron Streetwise"

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

01:39 min | 10 months ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Secrets of Wealthy Women

"I'm Jack. How hosted the new Barron Streetwise podcast? I'm business and investing each week we hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Iger about the future of movies and theme parks. CVS is Larry. Merlo about stores providing more health services and Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business subscribe to Baron Streetwise, on Apple Podcast, spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts. Hey on Veronica dagger. This is the Wall Street Journal Secrets of wealthy women where women share how they tackle career money in the world today we're speaking with Arlan Hamilton. The founder and managing partner of venture capital firm backstage capital. It's focused on raising money to invest in companies led by women, people of Color and members of the lgbtq community founders who are under represented an often underestimated inventor capital. Arlen knows what it's like to feel like an outsider and to be underestimated about nine years ago. She was working in the music industry. She wanted more, so she crowdsource took a class and in two thousand fifteen launched her company. It hasn't been easy less than ten percent of venture. Capital goes to underrepresented founders, but Arlen determined to change that and she's here today to tell us how. A..

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:35 min | 10 months ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

"I'm Jack. How hosted the new Barron Streetwise podcast? I'm business and investing each week we hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Eiger about the future of movies and theme Parks Cvs. Is Larry Moloto about stores providing more health services and Ford's Jim. Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business subscribe to Baron. Streetwise on Apple podcasts spotify or wherever you. You listen to podcasts. Here's your morning brief for Friday June. Nineteenth I'm kief Collins for the Wall Street Journal. FACEBOOK says it took down some trump campaign ads posts because they violated its hate speech policy. The ads featured an inverted red triangle. A symbol historically used by the Nazis designate political concentration camp prisoners. The trump campaign said the ads included the symbol. It's used by ANTIFA which was referencing in campaign ads. California is now requiring face coverings in environments at high risk for Corona virus spread these include indoor public spaces and Public Transportation California yesterday reported its highest single-day tally of new confirmed cases. And were exclusively reporting that marathon. Petroleum is in talks with potential buyers of its speedway gas station business, a previous deal to sell. It fell apart during the early stages of the pandemic possible price couldn't be determined, but last fall marathon indicated that speedway could be valued at up to eighteen billion dollars for details. Please head to our website wsj.com, or they'll be US APP..

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

01:30 min | 11 months ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Tech News Briefing

"I'm Jack. How hosted the new Barron Streetwise podcast I'm business and investing each week we hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob. Iger about the future of movies and theme parks. CVs Is Larry Merlo, about stores, providing more health services and Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business subscribe to Baron, streetwise on Apple Podcast, spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. This is your tech news briefing for Monday June Eighth I'm Gary Yoga for the wall. Street Journal if you've been glued to your phone scrolling through endless bad news for the past couple of weeks, you're not the only one it's called. Doom, scrolling our personal tech columnist Nicole Nolan will join us to explain why. We can't seem to look away from our news feeds. That's coming up after these headlines. States begin to reopen. Keeping Track of WHO's been infected with the coronavirus is critical to keeping the outbreak in check and everyone seems to want in on the fight. Many people have released their own APPs to do things like track symptoms and help with contact tracing everyone from state governments to hobbyists, according to a new study of more than one hundred of those apps in the Google APP store, and an analysis by The Wall Street Journal. Not all of these APPs are transparent about how they treat user data, which means they could be selling users information to advertisers or sharing location.

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:48 min | 11 months ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

"I'm jack how hosted the new Barron Streetwise podcast. I'm business and investing each week. We hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Iger about the future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business. Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. I'm Marie for totally for the Wall Street Journal. Here's your mid brief. Her Friday may twenty ninth consumer spending fell record thirteen point six percent in April as many parts of the. Us were on lockdown but personal income grew ten point five percent as the government dispersed federal aid payments wages and salaries. Were down eight percent for the month. The personal saving rate the difference between disposable income and spending soared to thirty three percent. Some economists say April could reflect a rock bottom and that has businesses reopen and more Americans return to work activity across the economy will start picking up. Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Fry is urging calm amid increasingly violent protests in the city over the death of George Floyd. There was extensive burning and looting of buildings in the city overnight protests also spread to other major cities including New York Los Angeles Denver and Chicago and Republicans are proposing safety protocols for the Party's National Convention in Charlotte North Carolina in August. The suggested measures include aggressive sanitizing public areas and health checks that would include taking people's temperatures president. Trump has said he would relocate the convention unless the governor guarantees that the event would take place at full capacity. We have more details on these stories and other news of the day. Wsj.com and on the WSJ APP..

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

08:59 min | 11 months ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple. Podcast spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. President trump is going after social media. Companies in Wall Street is taking notice. A company like twitter or facebook could be in trouble. The European Union prepares to trillion dollar response to the pandemic. We should not forget that we are in a deep crisis and We haven't seen the end of the crisis so far plus the science behind. Why video calls make you feel so tired. It is Thursday may twenty eighth Mark Garrison with the Wall Street Journal. This is what's news. More than a hundred thousand. Americans have died of COVID. Nineteen by far the highest death toll in the world. The numbers do appear to be slowing down in the US but epidemiologist warned that official global numbers likely underestimate the real total because of limited testing the western hemisphere is in special focus with rising infections in Brazil. Peru and Chile. Brazil's Daily death toll. Just past that of the. Us President Trump has asked for the FBI and Justice Department to speed up the investigation into the death of George Floyd Black Man who was in Minneapolis police custody. A number of law enforcement officials have also weighed in criticizing the officer who held his knee on. Floyd's neck as seen in video from bystanders. For officers involved have been fired. An attorney for one of them declined to comment on the incident. China's legislature has just approved a new National Security Law for Hong Kong over riding the territory's partial autonomy expectation of this move has triggered protests in the global financial center and a warning from the US that no longer sees Hong Kong. As a Thomas from China Boeing said it plans to reduce its workforce by more than thirteen thousand including forced layoffs. That's a much deeper. Cut Than Union. Officials had indicated. The company is reducing jetliner production but also expected to cut jobs in its services arm and central corporate offices in just a moment after tangling with twitter. President trump prepares to step up pressure on all social media companies. Reporting the president trump is expected to sign an executive order that could limit legal protection for social media companies. This comes in the wake of his ongoing dispute with twitter which recently put fact checking notices on some of his tweets current law gives social platforms pretty broad immunity from liability for stuff their users post but the president's executive order could affect that and some investors seem concerned markets reporter of Chill Kotei explains so the order is still in the draft stage. But the idea is that these companies could now be held accountable by federal regulators. If they curb uses speech if they do things like suspending an account or deleting that posts a company like twitter or facebook could be in trouble. The idea is that the law currently sees the company's just as attack group. They are just host of speech yesterday. Twitter shares closed down two point eight percent facebook shares also down and some of these social media companies have been the darling of investors for the last few months and years and it just raises a new question about how regulators view them and the role that they play in society. The White House declined to comment. We will get the latest weekly jobless numbers today. They're sure to be high. But the thing to watch for is whether the trend continues of a decline from the recent peak dollar tree dollar general and salesforce are among the companies reporting earnings today after a quick break. Europe prepares a multi trillion dollar effort against the corona virus social distancing slows the spread of corona virus. So if you have a fever dry cough and shortness of breath call your healthcare provider before going in more info at Corona Virus Dot Gov. Let's all do our part because we're all Hashtag alone together. Brought to you by the Ad Council. The European Union has unveiled two trillion dollar recovery in budget plan to counter damage from the coronavirus but getting twenty seven countries with very different views. To agree will not be easy. European Commission President Ursula under lion urged leaders to put aside differences and move ahead. I think it's very important that we now focus on this proposal. We should not forget that we are in a deep crisis and we haven't seen the end of the crisis so far journals Lawrence. Norman is covering this from Brussels. He spoke with our Charlie Turner Lawrence. What goals has the European Union set out in this ambitious plan? It tries to focus not money into projects that are in line with the US priorities. Things like spending on green projects on the digital economy but above tries to do is to provide a pathway out of the economic crisis by boosting spending and allowing governments to invest in their own economies over the next two or three his. Why is it being called historic his story because the first time the EU itself is proposing to borrow hundreds of billions of euros in the financial markets in the post. That's always been done. Something done only by national governments. Never never on any significant style by the Y-y-you and what that means is that the EU is pooling the resources of all of this members to pay for this project instead of saying to Italy. For example you need money to recover from the crisis therefore you need to issue your own debt and increase your debt levels in order to recover so the US going to do this for the whole of the block and that will allow the hardest hit countries like Italy and Spain to raise money without increasing already. Very High. That loads what is the likelihood that the plan will pass. It requires unanimous approval. Yeah and every single one of the ease. Twenty seven member states could block these plans so he only take one of them to DC. I think the likelihood that a plan along these rough lines will pass his quite high. The keywords are along the along these lines. The the real question is how much compromise will be to making. This will end up with a lower figure. Less than seven hundred and fifty billion euro recovery plan and less than the one point one trillion. You budget than they've put on. The table will be forced by more prudent member states to adopt very tough conditions and demand very tough conditions on the money that it hands out and the US proposing that five hundred billion euros of the money that it raises should simply be handed out to the hardest hit countries. One of the questions here will will some of that money. End Up as loans instead of grants so there are real questions about how exactly this program will end up. But a significant stimulus program funded by the issuance of the EU debt. It's pretty likely at this point. How does it compare to other stimulus plans in the US and Japan if it all passes in the way that the wants it will be a significant regional response to the crisis the US's spending a lot of money? The Japanese are have done likewise the even the Chinese and of course national governments in Europe have also put in place their own fiscal stimulus plan. So if you add those national efforts to the kind of money that's being floated today and to the to the measures that the EU has already taken around five hundred billion euros of loans have been offered and Support has been offered. Then you all beginning to talk about a significant economic response to the crisis whether it's enough in Europe which has had economic problems for years and years and up really struggled to even overcome the financial crisis at ten years ago that that is uncertain. That was the journals Lawrence. Norman speaking to our Charlie.

US European Union twitter president President trump facebook Europe Brazil Lawrence Charlie Turner Lawrence spotify Norman Wall Street Journal George Floyd Baron Streetwise salesforce
"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"Facts allow you to make decisions in unpredictable times. Get the facts you need. From The Wall Street Journal from PRE CORONA VIRUS UPDATES to daily deep dives in our podcasts videos. Wsj is a trusted source in uncertain. Times visit wsj.com. Here's your money briefing for Friday May Eighth. I'm JR Waylon for the Wall Street Journal. Here's a statistic. He would not expect to hear in the middle of a pandemic home. Prices are rising the up eight percent in March and a lot of it has to do with potential home sellers. Well staying home. That's probably explain some of the caution. That people are feeling enlisting their homes. They might just. They might just be taking a wait-and-see mentality of let's this too uncertain a time to be listing our homes that's Wall Street Journal reporter Harry Torey coming up. She'll tell us where in the US home. Prices are rising and what impact mortgage forbearance is likely to have on the housing market. I'm Jack how hosted the baron streetwise. Podcast I'm business. And investing each week we hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Eiger about the future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car. Business subscribed baron streetwise on Apple. Podcast spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts..

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"Technology it's in your pocket your car. Your Business and the Wall Street. Journal's Tech news briefing is tracking all of it from consumer tech to cybersecurity from the giants to the startups every weekday. We bring you the latest stories about the companies and advancements that are changing the way we live and work tech is remaking the world will make sure part of it subscribed to the WSJ tech news briefing from the Wall Street Journal. Wherever you get your podcasts. Here's your bunny. Briefing for Wednesday may sixth. I'm JR Waylon for the Wall Street Journal. The wild market swings we've seen during the pandemic or enough to make any investor larger small a bit queasy enter buffer funds. This kind of investment fund has surged in popularity in part because they protect investors against potential losses. What can happen. If over the set period the market drops below the level of buffer investors can be exposed to losses but they should still be buffet against the first set proportion as advertised. That's Wall Street. Journal reporter Media Franken Devil coming up. He'll explain how offer funds work and the trade offs that come with investing in them. I'm Jack how host of the new baron streetwise podcast. I'm business and investing each week. We hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Iger Future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business. Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple. Podcast spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. During the pandemic the S. and P. Five hundred has been down as much as thirty percent in a volatile market like that more investors are turning to a relatively new kind of fund. One that promises to ease the potential losses it's called a buffer funds and Wall Street Journal reporter Media Franken. Divall is here to tell us all about them. So Michelle how do these buffer funds protect investors against losses so effectively? These BUFFA funds Use We have options to track and online index or ETF and they ensure that if they are held to maturity invest is protected against the certain amount of downside. So to what degree are they protected so there are a range of products and they offer different levels of downside protection. Some of nine ten or fifteen percent against initial losses and some offer a greater degree. But what happens if the market suffers dropped beyond? Let's say the ten or fifteen percent. The buffet products do track directly on top of the of the underlying. But what can happen? If over the set period the market drops below the level of buffer investors can be exposed to losses but they should still be buffet against the first set proportion as advertised. Okay so in this case. Investors are protected against the first ten fifteen percent and losses but if the market keeps dropping they could lose substantially more than just the loss limits. It's possible yes other. Also caps on gains absolutely so the trade off. Is that in exchange for this sort of defined outcomes change for this downside buffer you also capital gains at a certain level and typically the higher the level the kind of the more extreme level of buffer the lower. The CAP is well. What other trade offs are there so any change the protection you got you do give up some other. Benefits and most notable is probably the lack of dividends because in the case of some these ETF. Stay follow the. S. and P. Five hundred price index the total time index and the dividends that you would receive if you held other types of tracker funds. Don't apply what are these funds. Typically invest in so these funds typically invest in the majority of all of their assets in options that tracker liquid underlying normally can be the S. and P. Five hundred it can be an S. and P. Five hundred. Etf or it can be the Russell two thousand the Nasdaq that kind of thing. Which of these funds has seen the most investment this year so the easiest that's pulled in the most. This year is one issued by I trust and managed by CBO vast which has pulled in about four hundred twenty five million dollars so far this year since it launched which was in mid to late February. It's down about five percent since then. The S&P is down about ten percents but as time to really judge will be at the end of the outcome period. That's when the buffaloes that attached to the fund will be fully effective another popular buffer fund is one offered by innovator that tracks the S. and P. Five hundred while offering a buffer against nine percent of losses the version of that that was launched. April completed his outcome period in April. Just gone and it performed as is issues would have expected less fees. It was a zero after the outcome period and during that time the S. and P. Five hundred fell about eight point eight percent so within the BUFFA now these funds can offer safety and some stability in a volatile market. How they've been around since before the pandemic they have been they haven't been around very long. The first became available to investors in two thousand. Eighteen similar products have been available institutional investors for longer than that. But they've only become available in these more investor-friendly rappers a little bit more recently. Now while this might give investors some peace of mind when you're playing the long game aren't diversify portfolios still recommended. It really depends on the investors appetite. I would say that both have their merits and it very much depends on your outlook if you're looking to have a known downside or at least a known level of protection than buffet. Etf's might suit your outlook if you're looking to participate fully in gains beyond the L- advertised. They wouldn't do that for you. All right that's Wall Street Journal. Reporter Michel Frankel Divall Michelle. Thanks for coming on the show. Thank you for having me. And that's your money briefing. Im Jr Waylon.

Wall Street Journal reporter Michel Frankel Divall Michelle Etf giants Bob Iger spotify Baron Streetwise Ford Jim Hackett Larry Merlo BUFFA Franken CBO Russell Apple
"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"The Journal is your daily deep dive into the biggest stories and money business empower for a wider look at today's news the Wall Street Journal's got you covered our what's news podcast. It's concise comprehensive with context and analysis twice a day on the go. It's the news that shapes your world so you can take on the world subscribe to what's News From The Wall Street Journal. Wherever you get your podcasts. Here's your money. Briefing for Tuesday May Fifth. I'm JR Waylon for the Wall Street Journal with most people staying at home and all the economic uncertainty from the pandemic. Hardly anyone is buying a car. These days to get sales back on track dealers and lenders have been sweetening. Their offers that could include generous financing deals were delayed payments. The cars in your possession may June July. And you're not required to make any payments during those three months then come August that is when the payment period on the loan. You signed up for back in. May starts but there's a catch in just a Moment Wall Street Journal reporter Anna Maria. Andreatta's will explain why these attractive deals aren't being offered to everyone. I'm Jack how hosted the new baron streetwise podcast. I'm business and investing each week. We hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Eiger future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services and Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car. Business subscribe to Baron streetwise on Apple. Podcast spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Pandemic has car dealer scrambling to make up for lost sales. They're offering big incentives for the right kind of Customer Wall Street Journal Reporter Anna Maria. Andreatta's joins us with details. So Anna Maria. Tell me the kinds of deals auto lenders are putting out. Their lenders are offering loans that allow people to delay making payments for up to four months. They are also providing record amounts of financing at zero percent interest rate so loans with no interest charges essentially for the life of the loan. And we've seen examples of this for as long as seven years seven years. That's a long time for zero percent. Right I mean the really dangling. Some.

The Wall Street Journal Anna Maria Customer Wall Street Journal reporter Andreatta The Journal Bob Eiger Baron Larry Merlo Jim Hackett spotify Ford Apple
"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"I'm jack how hosted the new Barron Streetwise podcast. I'm business and investing each week. We hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Iger about the future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business. Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple. Podcast spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Here's your money briefing. For Thursday April thirtieth I'm JR Waylon for the Wall Street Journal. Not even three months ago Collared Seniors. We're looking forward to entering the strongest labor market in decades than the corona virus changed. Everything potential graduates are now wondering. Can I get a job in a field? I'm interested in versus going to work at Amazon versus sitting at home it used to be. Oh I'll take a year after college if I don't like what the jobs are if the economy's bad and I can go take an odd job to make money and then travel. There is no travel. That's Tom Gamble. The founder and CEO of staffing and recruiting firm. Lasalle network coming up. He'll explain why it's important for college. Seniors to broaden their job search and which industries are actually hiring when the world is at a standstill. Facts can move us. Forward facts help us make decisions and bring us together. Even as we're apart the Wall Street Journal has the facts in these uncertain times. Get the latest on the corona virus outbreak with free coverage of the crisis and its impact on the economy politics culture and daily life. Find the clarity. You need with America's most trusted news source visit wsj.com and stay informed because of social distancing many collared seniors aren't likely to enjoy.

Wall Street Journal Bob Iger Tom Gamble Baron Streetwise Jim Hackett founder and CEO Larry Merlo spotify Ford Amazon Lasalle network America Apple
"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. There's a lot of misinformation out there about the Corona Virus. So we thought it'd be a good idea to talk about what we know about the disease and how to treat it what we don't know. And what scientists and public health officials are doing to find out more joining me now with more details. His Wall Street Journal Medical Reporter. Tom Burton Tom. Let's start with testing the. Us has ramped up testing. But many say we're still not where we need to be to safely reopen the country. Can you explain why? Increasing testing is so important to taking those next steps of beginning to reopen the basic way to think of this as think of the idea of casting a wide net right now. We're testing people who have symptoms or think they have symptoms. And that's about all what we need to be doing is approximately four to five times. More than what we're doing in the way of testing and casting a wide net so that we're catching people who don't necessarily have it but some of whom may the whole idea of this contact tracing concept. Is that once? Somebody tests positive. Then they go out and they find ten or fifteen other people who have been in contact with that first person and they find out how many of them are positive and then they contact the people who have been in contact with those and so the whole idea is by the time that they're done with the testing process they'll have a pretty good handle on all of the corona virus cases that they'll have a pretty darn good idea of how extensive the cases are what about antibody testing. Why is that important? And how can it help here will? It's a very different topic and I don't think it should be confused with the testing for the virus itself right now. I would. That it's useful. When Atop Academic Hospital wants to test people who work there and their families and to find out if they've built up antibodies and maybe had the disease and maybe are safe to get back to work. So that's really the main use for it right now in terms of a wider. Use One of the problems with that with antibody. Testing is that we don't really know what level of antibodies really convey a sense of safety or a reality of safety for the people who are getting those tests so if somebody comes back with a positive antibody testing right now. We don't have the evidence to understand exactly whether that person is Kinda safe. Maybe not so safe or totally fine. We're not at that point yet. Okay let's talk about treatments we've heard too anti malarial drugs hydroxy chloroquine and chloroquine touted by president trump despite warnings from health officials and just today the FDA issued new warnings on using either of these drugs to treat the krona virus. What does the FDA say what the FDA said is that there are some very serious heart conditions principally one called ventricular Tackett Cardia what that is a really fast heartbeat and it can be very very dangerous and the FDA is saying that well these drugs may have some evidence behind them. We also don't know how safe the are for people with corona virus and so as a consequence what we really need to be waiting for as people like Dr Fouled. She said we need to be waiting for the results of randomized controlled clinical studies. Those are studies in which people are randomly assigned either to get the treatment or to be in a group like a placebo group. Get another treatment and the random process. Exact is exactly what makes those results believable. Tom What about a vaccine experts? Say we're months away from that? Still will it be safe to reopen before we have an approved vaccine for the krona virus? Well it's not going to be safe as we would think of safety versus other types of diseases measles or whatnot. There's not really going to be an overall sense of safety until there is a vaccine and until we know that the vaccine is very very effective. As far as I know at this point. We're still talking about more than a year. Possibly as much as a year and a half before vaccines are really an alternative for people. Are there any other treatments under consideration? Right now? There are a lot of treatments that are being tested at various hospitals by various companies. It's in a way it's kind of throwing mud on the wall to see what sticks but it's possible. People are trying really hard because after all this is a pandemic and so these hospitals and those companies are doing everything they can to see if any drugs especially drugs that are already approved for an existing purpose whether they can actually help people who have the krona virus so finally we've talked about some of the things that we still don't know about and I think it's important to acknowledge that there is still a lot we don't know about this disease Tom. Can you tell us about what? Scientists and health experts are still seeking answers on the one that I just. I mentioned a moment ago has to do with the antibody testing. I don't think we have any sense right. Now of what level of antibodies will really convey safety to people? Also the the very fact that now. We're discovering that there were some cases back in early February earlier than we ever thought it was possible for those cases to exist in the United States to be there and so that's pretty huge mystery that we need to find out more about also. We really need to find out. If you've been exposed and again this has to do with. Antibodies if you've been exposed what level of exposure conveys safety to your in the future or are you still at risk of getting the disease. We don't really know whether a person who's been exposed is really safe forever. And that's that's also one of the greater mysteries that's Wall Street Journal Medical Reporter. Tom.

Tom Burton Tom Wall Street Journal Medical Re FDA Us Spotify Tom What Baron Streetwise chloroquine Academic Hospital Dr Fouled Apple Tackett Cardia president
"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"About how the pandemic might change the car business. Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple. Podcast spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Another day another oil price. Plunge and it's fueling a lot of chaos people. Say it's really an oil crisis. Turned upside down. So many Americans remember previous oil price spikes causing inflation road consumer spending now gas prices are cheap but no one can take advantage of it and president trump has been calling for a complete immigration stop during the pandemic. The interesting legal question here is does. The president have the authority take sort of unprecedented steps on immigration. Do you like deny asylum seekers do process do things like turn everyone away with an emergency sort of bolstering his clamped to that sort of authority. It's Tuesday April twenty first. I'm Ameri for totally for the Wall Street Journal. Here's what's news. The economic toll of the corona virus is prompting several southern states to begin reopening in South Carolina. Some retailers were accepting customers today. Georgia says it'll start reopening gyms bowling alleys and barbershops on Friday but in Alabama governor. Kay Ivey said they're waiting to increase testing capacity before reopening anybody to get out. Kinda me back open spinning on all cylinders again but again we have to be careful and cautious. And what we're doing and do it in a smart productive way. Meanwhile Democrats in Washington and Labor groups are pushing for a bill that would require businesses to put worker protection plans in place for employees who are working during the pandemic. The occupational safety and Health Administration has given gardens on how to shield workers from the virus but the steps aren't mandatory and the White House and leaders in Congress have reached a deal on a four hundred eighty billion dollar aid package. For small businesses. The plan would replenish a popular small business loan program that ran out of money amid high demand it would also provide funding for hospitals and expanded testing. Senate minority leader. Chuck Schumer says he expects the Senate to pass the bill later.

president Chuck Schumer Baron Streetwise Kay Ivey spotify Wall Street Journal Senate South Carolina Apple trump Alabama Georgia Health Administration Washington Congress White House
"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

WSJ Minute Briefing

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Minute Briefing

"I'm Jack how how the new Barron Streetwise podcast. I'm business and investing each week. We hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Eiger about the future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business. Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Here's your morning brief for Tuesday April. Twenty first I'm kief Collins for the Wall Street Journal. President trump says he plans to sign an executive order temporarily suspending immigration into the. Us In a tweet last night. He said he wants to protect American jobs. During the corona virus pandemic administration officials say the order. Wooden make major policy changes. New York State has asked the federal government for a four billion dollar. No interest loan to cover. Unemployment payments are analysis. Shows nearly half of states or seeing double digit percentage drops in unemployment trust funds as tens of millions of Americans are laid off because of the pandemic were exclusively reporting the US regulator of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac is considering allowing them to by home loans in forbearance that is when homeowners stop making monthly payments as millions have during the pandemic and coke and Lockheed Martin report earnings before the bell this morning netflixing snap report aftermarkets close for more details please. Head to our website dot com or the WSJ APP..

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"In response. Big retailers are offering spring fashions at deep discounts online. And who wants to buy clothes for a life that you may not be able to resume for who knows how long I mean going to events in social occasions you know you just might not need the kinds of clothes that you need it. In the past that's Wall Street Journal reporter Suzanne Kempner coming up. She'll discuss the lengths to which retailers are going to try and unload their unsold inventory. I'm jack how hosted the new Barron Streetwise podcast. I'm business investing each week. We hear from company chiefs analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Eiger about the future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business. Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple. Podcast spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. With their work from home uniform consisting of blue jeans and a sweatshirt many Americans have stopped by new clothes that has retailers scrambling to unload this year. Spring Apparel Wall Street Journal. Reporter Zan capture is with us to discuss so Suzanne. How are some retailers? Trying TO GET RID OF INVENTORY. They must have a lot stocked. Up was really hard right now because so many stores are closed so they can't do it the normal way which would be holding big sales in their stores. They are you know discounting on their websites but people just are not in the mood to buy apparel or fashion or footwear right now and we've seen sales for those items even online online sales for those items have been down year over year last week. Sachs was offering seventy percent offspring dresses. It was like a one day. Flash SALE BUT SEVENTY PERCENT OFF is a big reduction. That's the kind of sale you see and of season gap. The gap brand was offering sixty percent off of everything last week. J. Crew was offering sixty percents off. Select items so you know. It's pretty deep. Then you know another way is to sell the goods to off price chains like Tj Maxx but those stores are all closed as well so they're not really buying much now either. It's a real problem for them. Normally consumers would rush toward discounts. Like that they would but they've got other things on their mind. When I've talked to shoppers. They say you know if it's not an essential item. They're just not interested in buying it. And and who wants to buy clothes for a life that you may not be able to resume for who knows how long I mean going to events in social occasions you know you just might not need the kinds of clothes that you needed in the past for the next year or so kantha retailers. Just hold onto the clothes until next spring. Well you know it's fashion. It goes out of style so so. That's a big problem. It's like an executive said to not like wine. This kind of inventory does not get better with age and there are some basics things that are in season That are in style year after year. They will try to pack away. But there's a cost to that you have to pay for the warehousing in the storage and and retailers. You know they really need right now. More than anything to raise cash and one way they do that is by selling goods. So you know. They don't want to have to sit on this stuff if they if they can if they can't help it but aside from finding ways to sell the clothes how retailers trying to raise cash. We've seen a lot of the big chains you know Draw DOWN THEIR CREDIT LINES? Refinance dead and try to boost their liquidity in various ways. But you know in normal times. The way retailers make money is to sell their goods in they convert inventory cash. And they're not able to do that right now. How about shipping the unsold clothing overseas? The problem there is you know stores around. The world have been closed due to this virus and know in China. Stores are just starting to reopen. But there's a backlog of goods there as well so so. That's not really. A realistic option to retailers often. Donate on sold close. That's usually a lot of respects. The last stop. Because you know they'll get the least amount of money recovered that way but some nonprofits are saying. They are girding for a record year of donations because retailers. Really have nowhere else to put the stuff I did. Talk to. One Company delivering good which donates clothing and apparel to communities in need and a lot of brands or contacting them about wanting to make donations right now or luxury brands experiencing the same challenges said the luxury brands. They don't Wanna see their items out there being discounted heavily and they'd be more inclined to just take their goods back and sort of sit on them and wait till the market recovers you know. In in the past a lot of these luxury brands destroyed products. They couldn't sell. That's really become a very frowned upon practice now so hopefully we won't be seeing too much of that. Do luxury brands have other outlets at which they can try to sell those even saxes? A department store has saks off. Fifth stores you have some Gucci outlets in select outlet malls. So that's another avenue for them. There's been a big trend and sellers of secondary goods like the real real which sells preowned luxury items. And the real real says. They've had a thirty percent increase in the number of brands who want to consign with them. So that's like another way for some of the luxury players to get rid of some of this excess merchandise or Wall Street Journal reporter Suzanne Capture Suzanne. Thanks for coming on the show. Thanks for having me. And that's your money briefing. Im Jr Waylon for the Wall Street Journal..

Wall Street Journal reporter Suzanne Capture Suzanne Apparel Wall Street Journal Suzanne Kempner Bob Eiger spotify Jim Hackett Ford Baron Streetwise Larry Merlo Tj Maxx Zan capture Sachs J. Crew China executive Apple
"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"I'm Jack how how the new Barron Streetwise podcast. I'm business and investing each week. We hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Eiger about the future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business. Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Picture money briefing from Monday April Twentieth. I'm JR Waylon for the wall. Street Journal the Federal Government is suspending student loan payments for millions of Americans until the end of September but borrowers might WanNa continue making payments. Anyway if they can normally when you pay make a loan payment. A portion of that payment goes to principal and a portion goes to interest but during this six-month suspension period it goes one hundred percent to To principle which enables you to basically pay down your loan faster that's Wall Street Journal reporter and Turkson coming up. She'll answer some common questions about putting your student loan payments on pause. I'm jack how hosted the new Barron Streetwise podcast. I'm business investing each week. We hear from company chiefs and analysts about profound changes facing investors. We've heard from Disney's Bob Eiger about the future of movies and theme parks. Cvs Is Larry Merlo about stores providing more health services. And Ford's Jim Hackett about how the pandemic might change the car business. Subscribe to Baron Streetwise on Apple. Podcast spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts..

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"Social distancing slows the spread of corona virus. So stay a minimum of six feet away from others and stay home if you can more info at Corona Virus Dot Gov. Let's all do our part because we're all Hashtag alone together. Brought to you by the Ad Council your money briefing for Thursday April Sixteenth. I'm Charlie Whelan for the wall. Street Journal the Corona Virus Pandemic has put the squeeze on household budgets leaving many people struggling to pay basic monthly expenses like rent. That's leading many wrench. I turn to credit cards and while it may ease the cash crunch on the first of the month it comes with considerable risk. There's definitely been a trend towards a more people needing to finance their rent and in some way or another at least temporarily and for for those people you know. There's there's a risk that this compounds. The financial hardship at they're experiencing right now due to corona virus that's Wall Street Journal reporter Will Parker coming up? He'll tell us how landlords feel about credit cards and how bureaus will treat missed payments during the pandemic. I'm Jack how host of the new baron streetwise podcast on business in investing. This week I focus on Disney and how the pandemic might change theme parks movies and television. Here's Disney executive chairman. Bob Eiger just lose we. Now have you bag checks for everybody? That goes into our parks. It could be an at some point. We had a component of that takes people's temperatures Disney beyond the pandemic on. This week's Barron streetwise. Subscribe on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts The first of the month traditionally means the rent is due but widespread job losses and furloughs are making it harder for many people to plan their households cash flow as a result. More out of work tenants are using credit cards to pay the Rent Wall Street Journal. Reporter will parker was with us to discuss. So we'll.

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

10:11 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"Are canceling spring and summer travel plans because of the corona virus that often means requesting refunds in the airlines. But actually getting your money back has proven to be a tall order. Even during a health emergency the stimulus. Bill certainly ties into that The government can look at this and say hey wait a minute. We're bailing out. The airline industry They should at least do the right thing for their customers. That's Wall Street. Journal Middle C. Columnists Scott McCartney coming up. He'll tell us what the government is doing to pressure airlines into honoring passengers requests for a refund. I'm Jack how host of the new baron streetwise podcast on business and investing this week I focus on Disney and how the pandemic might change theme parks movies and television. Here's Disney executive chairman. Bob Eiger just as we now do bag checks for everybody that goes into our parks. It could be an at some point. We had a component of that takes people's temperatures Disney beyond the pandemic on. This week's Barron streetwise. Subscribe on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. Us airlines have.

Disney government Scott McCartney Bob Eiger executive chairman Us Spotify Bill Barron Apple
"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

14:13 min | 1 year ago

"baron streetwise" Discussed on WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

"Numbers I mean that money is not gonNa last very long. No and that's why already earlier this week. Treasury Secretary Mnuchin was going to Congress and saying look we need to shore this pergram up a Mesli popular. It's clearly very much needed People are flooding into it and he came back and asked for another two hundred and fifty billion dollars It's not even clear that will be enough to sustain the program but it was the next obvious step The problem is it. Democrats blocked that move. Republicans in the Senate had attempted to a very straightforward manner approved that additional money for the one program the only program we know so far. That doesn't have enough Democrats wanted to tie that up with a whole bunch of different rules about how it could be spent and they wanted additional money for other priorities and they said no until they got those things. So there's a bit of a deadlock to speak just I to the need. The Labor Department reported on Thursday. Another six point. Six million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week. That's on top of six point. Nine million from the week previous the original number there were six point six million and then may revise it upward and then three point three million the week before that meaning bill that almost seventeen million people have lost their jobs in a matter of weeks which is sort of hard to imagine even right and that's why. I mean when I look at the. I'm skeptical about a lot of it. But the one that makes the most sense is to help people that are having a cash crunch through no fault of their own in other words. We're there were healthy businesses going into this and now find themselves crunched for money and we we surely want to keep those businesses going because that's one of the keys to not having everyone fall fall out of work and go onto unemployment so The way the Democrats are holding it up. It's just inconceivable to me and I I frankly I think they should be getting more blowback for well. Let's talk a little bit. So the the bill that Senate Majority Leader Mitch. Mcconnell tried to pass on Thursday by unanimous consent was very short. I looked at it was two pages. It was very straightforward. Mcconnell on the floor Before he did his unanimous consent proposal said he said quote. We're not talking about making any policy. Changes were literally changing the number three hundred fifty two six hundred meaning three hundred fifty billion that was originally allocated and adding two hundred fifty billion to that very important here because you can look at this a couple of ways you can look at this as saying the Senate when it passed. Its two point. Two trillion bill About ten days ago it didn't make enough provision for the importance of this program and it now needs to correct that and this should be a straightforward technical correction instead. Democrats came out and said you have an obligation to negotiate with us And we have to have consensus on what should go into this latest package as if it is a package. It was never designed to be a package and what they are calling for in particular. Is THEY WANNA double the size of that bill they want an additional More than one hundred billion dollars for hospitals They also want a another one hundred fifty billion or maybe I have those numbers backward for state and local governments but combined they create two hundred fifty billion dollars in addition to the two hundred and fifty billion dollars for the P P P program. I think the real problem with this is that as Republicans have pointed out the money. We already approved which was an enormous vast amount of money for state and local governments for hospitals. Hasn't even gone out the door yet. There is no credible evidence at the moment. Hospitals yet need more that state and local governments yet need more and their argument is. Let's let this settle. Let's see what we did already how that goes and then if we need to. We can talk some more about additional funding for other areas and Kim There. There were some set-asides that they wanted to correct me. If I'm wrong for how. Some of the money to small businesses would flow through different entities. What's the issue there? Yes so of that. Two hundred and fifty billion that Republicans are proposing to shore up this Democrats want half of it earmarked for small community banks that primarily serve women minority in veterans businesses. And again. I think the real problem with that argument is that while there have been some complaints out there about who's getting access CETERA. And so on. This is a first-come-first-served Program. Everyone at the moment whether you are a a a larger mid size business Whether you are a small women's own business has equal opportunity to go to a bank and this is also being a managed by a vast network out there of SPA approved lenders as well as any Financially Insured Credit Union or bank so there are hundreds upon hundreds of banks that people can go to now including community banks. So this instead seems to be a bit of a political stunt. It's designed to suggest that Democrats are standing there helping a minority businesses that are otherwise being crowded out. But there's no real evidence that that's actually happening on the ground and this risks tying up the programming amount huge amount of red tape and potentially misallocating a lot of resources Another thing that caught my in the counter proposal Were some changes to the food. Stamp Program and particularly according to a democratic memo explaining the bill would lift work requirements on food stamp recipients for two years and bill. What's what's the objection there From the conservative standpoint. Do you think Jackson is? We've we've already got a tremendous percentage of Americans on food stamps and we're trying to wean them off of this. This looks less like a response to Cova. Nineteen and what people need then A A james clyborn attempt to use the crisis to restructure the economy. In the way they What I mean I think food stamps has been a very troubled program and this is not going to make it better and I think that after this crisis is over if we do this. We're going to have a bigger problem on our hands. Yeah two years was what caught my eye particularly since what we are talking about. Right now is whether this is going to be a v-shaped Recession recovery when it goes down really fast and then goes up really fast or whether it's GonNa be a more typical use shape recovery and Kim I mean two years I think is longer than they are hoping this is GonNa last look. Es obviously as it is the food stamp provisions already extend for four months. I mean meaning the the expansions that we have already provided And let's all hope. I mean. We should be rooting for the idea that we come out of this and we don't need a tremendous number of Americans to remain on food stamps for any longer than that period of time So it's pretty obvious that yes. This is being set up as a way to restructure things overall and now you're already hearing just in the in the time since that vote failed in the Senate yesterday. Democrats pushing for yet new things like new provisions for mail in voting in November Etc So? I think that there's a risk here for Democrats that they look as. Bill said to be just exploiting this crisis for all kinds of policy changes. That aren't in anyway proven yet to be necessary as a response to this and it's kind of disturbing especially because you know they should be made to own the fact that there are. GonNa be very soon here. A number of small businesses that cannot get the cash they need to keep going and all because Democrats are playing politics so bill I mean. What do you see as a possible outcome here? I mean we're stalled for the moment in the Senate but it seems to me that if if this three hundred fifty billion dollar fund for Small Businesses Gets as it gets ever closer to running out. Seems like there would be enormous pressure to refill it and to get something passed you would think. I think the Senate comes back Monday and Tuesday but the house is out. I believe till April twentieth and again there just doesn't seem to be the urgency to me the help that keeps otherwise healthy businesses. Going into that. They can pay their employees and pay their bills. It's a it's a big chain that seems to me. The the the most beneficial part of what we can do to help the economy and it's just staggering to me. That people would delay this because they want some other pet program in there and again. I'm astonished that there isn't the blowback that they're you know. They're going on their break for For Easter and again I think this also speaks to there. A Lotta people who will still get paid like us can work from home but a lot of people can't and they're really facing crunch most people can't do you know about seventy percent of the economy can't reckless games with a very vital aid right now. Is just again beyond belief to me right. We're talking about Corona virus relief. Money Joe Biden's left turn and you're listening to toby. Watch from the Wall Street Journal. I'm Jack how hosted the new baron streetwise podcast on business and investing this week. I focus on Disney and how the pandemic might change theme parks movies and television. Here's Disney executive chairman. Bob Eiger just as we now do bag checks for everybody that goes into our parks could be then at some point. We had a component of that that takes people's temperatures Disney beyond the pandemic on. This week's Barron streetwise. Subscribe on Apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. From the opinion pages of the Wall Street Journal this is Potomac Watch Bernie. Sanders suspended his presidential campaign. This week We talk a little bit about that. All D- last podcast..

Senate Kim There Wall Street Journal Disney Mcconnell Senate Majority Bill Labor Department Spotify Mnuchin Mesli Congress Bob Eiger Joe Biden Insured Credit Union Barron