22 Burst results for "Barnes And Noble"

"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

The Drill Down

06:55 min | Last month

"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

"Learn about that those transactions. So we're still early. They're better the way i think about it is. We've got scale of data at this point. This soffer is working really while in. We're unique in the sense that like as you do the zinger comparison while gaming companies have to monetize their audience with in-app purchases or ads. They can only monetize the audience. The game we're monetize in the game and monitoring the date on our audience that work not dissimilar to obviously the social network. We all know laugh ran. So the reality is the ability to monetize. Data gives us a huge advantage in the content marketplace and so the way we operate as different we look at the incremental data is high value in. So we're still we announced another acquisition this past quarter of a company that had a poker game and a casual casino game in categories that we just didn't exist it and so we see that as a opportunity about to build great content with a team. That's very strong and and season but more importantly to get data that we didn't have visibility into into the platform and monetize that data. It really gives us an opportunity with the games and with the software platform which is most important. Does our business of the privacy Changes will come full on restrictions. But at least the pullback and privacy issues toward with apple last so with facebook google of those changes affected your ability to gather data runs through the whole ecosystem. But the reality is gonna gaming. His third parties weren't sharing data with us the same as they shared other places and that for us it was a requirement if we wanted to execute on our long term vision and then our data the most valuable part of our data became our own data first party. Data is not restricted by any sort of privacy law. Whether cpr or apple's changes it becomes down to one of the third party sharing with you. And how are you using that data to track customer across site but if you provide the customer we provide million around forty million users a day free content to play and engage with. They give us their data back. They do it knowingly and and we're able to now use that as a core part of our machine learning so we're in a pretty good spot given the changes in the market and given the unique position. We're in with with such a good amount of first party firsthand hand data on our customers uneven training now and that was good that was impressive. Just such a neat business. I just think it's so fascinating how you guys have seen around the corners that are coming up I wonder also our which no one could have seen. I think was was covert and the movement towards into the changes that had in people's lives. Yes they were more digital. Yes they were online more but they weren't mobile more. Where did you see. What have you seen coming out of this inasmuch as we're coming out of it with delta and so on it's interesting because we're we're we're in such a transitional point our business with ads solution changing dramatically and games really ramping over the last couple of years. We don't have a frame of reference like other people do go. Here's a stable business. How was it before. How is a post been qualitatively. What one as you said. There's more time on people's hands during covert lockdowns and people started engaging with different forms of entertainment gaming being a leading format of that. The people weren't engaging with that mobile app. That's a casual game on the go. They're playing games. That are much more. Intensive the console games the p. c. aims to take three hours a day of investment. The didn't have the time for before. Now i think some of those patterns changes we all return back to the real world that we know love and existed in before kobe. But i think what doesn't change is the fact that more people realized how fun playing games are and so the new normal regardless of the access point whether it's mobile console p. c. The new normal is going to be more gameplay because people just understood that games are quite fun and a great way to relax and also very accessible and affordable. They're free for the most part Interesting stuff and so in the coming out of the. You're still you're showing up in your numbers to it very unclear. How shows up in our numbers because we've been more stable are focused more on that mobile casual game so we didn't see like some huge spike nelson see some big decay in consumption and you're also seeing covert role in and out in now. Unfortunately we're seeing it go the other way and so it's been volatile but for our business we think the only impact is long term that is going to be more engagement with games which is not positive press interesting coming up love and ceo. Adam froggy thank you very much. We appreciate your time. We'll coming up next to drill down by that number. That tells us a whole lot. We talked about this revenue growth in this company and while this company's been at since two thousand twelve It is really just continuing continuing to grow the to talk about the compound. Annual growth rate of this company from two thousand. Sixteen to two thousand twenty. The numbers are are really jaw-dropping. We'll have that number when the the drill down is brought to you by era with era. Give yourself an information advantage. Directly to earnings calls and other investor events with live transcription and event intelligence. That's era a. R. a. dot com. We're gonna try this. Some one breath is drill. Dumps available on spotify apple podcasts. Pandora's stitcher audible amazon tune. In news iheartradio listen notes and bombini but button if you click the subscribe button and listen to us on any of those platforms and make sure you get every show by following us and let us know what companies you think. We should be drilling down on. Talk to us on twitter instagram. My following admiral down pie and connect with us directly at our website. Biz dot net her back with drill down the down that one number that tells us a whole lot about the compound annual growth rate for app lovin or the name for that company apple of competent new growth rate from two thousand sixteen. Two thousand twenty every year. Seventy six percent in average is seventy six percent last year. Forty six percent alone. But isaac terrific growth top line for this company terrific cashflow generation really kind of under the radar businesses. Doing really well. Yeah that is substantial growth. That's great if i grew it seventy six percent a year you would be two thousand feet tall. I believe the jolly green giant or some. Let's let's not encourage that although all the roads in the world wouldn't do that all right. Thank you for listening to. We do appreciate roy. People don't do royds unless prescribed by a medical professional or a veterinarian or a veterinarian hydroxy clark. Also therefore you brought to you visit guesswork. I'm cory johnson. Isaac webster's our executive producer then wilson editor extraordinarily.

soffer apple Adam froggy facebook google nelson Pandora amazon twitter isaac royds hydroxy clark roy cory johnson Isaac webster wilson
"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

The Drill Down

07:45 min | Last month

"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

"Subsequently we we acquired that studio but they needed growth and they needed to do it through marketing and as an app standalone in an app store millions of apps. No one was finding this app so they started running marketing campaigns across view different channels but on our platform found the most success and we focus on two things. One is working with the developer to give them a full suite of tools to as giving them capacity the to show a consumer their ad through video advertisement. So you can get a really good sense for what you're gonna go. Download and engage with before the consumer does and then in the middle are software matches up the two sides to make sure the advertisement shows up to someone who's actually going to engage with that and then it all works first. Half of this year we drove almost two billion app installs through our salt for on behalf of all these customers that we have so. It's just an immense amount of scale creating more consumption on the consumer side because we're matching up relevant content with consumers daily wise would never find and for the companies that are using apple lovin to promote their games or their apps for that matter. And i want to get into that separately villages madge. You've got gamemaker. They come up with a good game. They've got their up. They hire they contract with you to promote their upright. How do they pay you. How do you guys get paid. We drive them a transaction and they pay for the transaction. We show our ad space in other applications so we pay some portion of what we got for the transaction to the developer. Who let us show the advertisement. Developer makes money. The advertiser gets a good user. We make a spread in the mill. That's what we reported software rapid and it's a piece of transact a piece of the transaction. It's not a flat fee to to get into the service. No it's not flat for your fix is variable in. This really comes down to value for the advertiser that they may get one user. That's worth one hundred bucks and they're willing to pay fifty for that user. It's all dynamic and known by technology. They may get another user. That's worth a dollar. And they'll pay us fifty cents for that user and again. It's all dynamically price done. In real time were. Our system is predicting the value of the customer for the advertiser and each one of those will price differently. And we'll make different. That's really interesting and so it would seem for. The app developed over the game maker. In the case of games of that that would be very attractive. Because there's no sort of what are they got to lose. They're not losing that they're not taking exposure. There's no risk in a performance model like this. They know they're going to generate a thousand dollars in the lifetime of a user and they get an easier. They're willing to pay up two thousand dollars for that knee easier now. Today's world they're paying a lot less than that so the margins are on there and then we do the matchmaking and take our cut and the better we get at driving them value and predicting how good that users. There's going to be for them in real time the more were able to make his well and you really end up as a partner. Not just a software vendor just an advertising marketplace for them. Yeah we call ourselves growth partner. That's actually one hundred percent right even the studios that that we've acquired we call them partners studios because we think of the creators as really inspirational creative minds building great content and in the middle there were providing them a solution to help consumers get their content discovered and so we ended up. End up partnering with them on the task at hand after you develop that great content to display that content to the consumer. So obviously you're looking at things beyond games. You're helping other kinds of apps. How do you decide. Let me ask you two ways. What is different of how gamers and then. How do you decide what market to go into beyond gaming the so the reality is gamers human beings right so they do everything. The question is as a platform like ours. Do we have data. Available to understand is gamer. A going to be into adored ashoura a health and wellness subscription app. Or whatever else may be an ecommerce apted cetera. And when i can assure you is that of the two billion people playing games on mobile every month. They're doing a lot more than just playing games. just too much of the population. So they're doing everything and where we are as a platform as when we started. We didn't have first party data so we didn't have an intimate set of data on what consumers were doing in in content that we owned so that we can decipher what else. They're interested in beyond gaming three years ago. We got into gaming ourselves and built up a roster of a bunch of studios. I referenced that we've acquired partnered with to get our own content and our own data and so now we've got two hundred million users a month playing our games. We're getting a lot of engagement. Data and purchase data from those users and our software can better understand on our audience and other audiences like ours. What else are they gonna do. And if we can figure out that question with a good strong answer. Our solution can work for any development. We're seeing a ton of success there at starting in our platform now success such as what was though in the first quarter to second quarter the software business groups sequentially over forty percent organically in terms of this overall growth but then the non gaming category apps outside health and wellness social ecommerce fintech. That category grew over one hundred percent in advertisers success in spend in revenue we reported on our platform just from q. On youtube so we're starting to see success across a number of different advertisers outside the category gaming. 'cause we do now understand what our customers are interested in this games. Which one of the really. I mean i don't care about wall street and certainly care less about people on wall street. Sorry for those people wall street listening. No but i think. I think there's way too herbie rant about this but there's way too much focus on stock and stock prices anonima focus and business which is why we do the our broadcast until the business stories on the stocks. Move but i think that your story. The story of your company has confused wall street a little bit. i. I've watched for example trade in tandem with zinc has had some of some big struggles lately. And then all of a sudden you're stock takes head because you're seen as a gamemaker. It's confusing that. You are a platform for advertising. But also a gamemaker with the games into your platform. And i and i. It would also seem that that would cause some channel conflict where your customers might say. Why would we use marketing. If you're just going to use the data or information who claimed to have your own games and compete against us. When we got into gaming we did it to get data to make the software more personalized to really better understand that consumers so we do a lot more on the advertising side both for the game customers non at believing couple of things one. We never misuse data and we never used a benefit. James that we make i. I don't think you can make a replica game. Have success in this market. You've got to be innovative to that. What we've seen is just as we executed on. The strategy scaled the success of these companies on our platform more and more companies. Get past that really quick if you give them a good business opportunity. They really understand that. You're benefiting them not harming them in any sort of way and so we've seen a lot of growth we had. I think it was around. Two hundred and seventy five percent net dollar attention that we reported in the core that's companies spending dollar same quarter last year. Almost triple that amount in this quarter. And so you're seeing just this success within the ecosystem where they're benefiting and we're we're excited about that because we took a gamble and we dealt with some difficult conversations Reacted above board on everything. We've given our customers a much better solution. Because of it and given ourselves and our shareholders better business opportunity long term because of it is. Is it something where you'd want to acquire even more games or build even more. You said you've got a studio so you're clearly buildings from games as well and then would you. Could you imagine a world where you're acquiring other kinds of businesses to.

app store anonima apple youtube James
"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

The Drill Down

07:45 min | Last month

"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

"Coalition next down. Let's farida for regia. Trades at a p hr shares fell nine percent today but there is an eighty nine percent in a year. Tell me about frisia software. As a service. We talked about asana earlier in the show software. The service here in the world of healthcare in particular regia is healthcare. It software to streamline patient processing and communications with their patients for healthcare organizations of all sizes. now what they found during covert is. We've heard this before. It's a people put off any kind of procedure that they could. They just didn't want to be in hospital. They didn't want to be in doctor's offices. Doctors offices worn opened sometimes for elective things and the result was they weren't rolling a lot of new software last year but they're back somewhat revenues for the quarter just announced or forty six percent your year to fifty one million dollars now the sounded like it should be a good thing but they had some weird suggestions that things are slowing down. Their guidance wasn't as exciting as some people might have wanted. But it was interesting to me. They talked about how there had been kind of a rush back to the doctor to get procedures done. That were elective. Or you know. The people put off with that rush might have slowed down a little bit and the way that insurance companies a dole out The patient responsibility portion of a doctor's bill as an effect on their business. The company is pretty proud of the quarter. They put up she. Financial randy rasmussen was pretty stoked that he got to over fifty million dollar quarter for the first time ever but did hint. That things might not be so strong in the second. Half of the year asmussen dr first quarter of our fifty million which we're really proud of as a company We did really well You know we grew forty six percent or raw thirty five percent and provided revenue. We're really strong and in mice finances at ninety five percent. I think as we look at the second half of this year You know we had mentioned this in the q. On call is that you know. Coded affect us quite a bit last year from the patient. Volume and Payments spending level. And you know in our payments business. It's driven by the patient responsibility. He's an so. That's typically higher at the beginning of the year when the duck deductibles roll over and it declines during the year. And i think as we look forward this year. A lot of that payment revenue You know subject some of the dynamic nature of code and pandemic and you know what that impact will be on payment levels and and patients as so again. The suggestion is that there will be less patient visits unless optional things going on. I don't know if that's going to bear with other what other companies have to say but at least for this company for frisia at suggests that they're not going to see the kind of growth in the in the second half of this on the first half coming up next our guest the app love and ceo adam ferruzzi fascinating company here. The misunderstood company. It's company that promotes schemes. It's that also own some games but a really interesting approach to getting things to be popular online. But i the drill down is brought to you. By braintrust of global talent network the matches highly skilled technical freelancers with the world's most reputable brands brain trust has helped clients like bank of america. Goldman sachs porsche. Under armor and more built agile teams fast at a fraction of the cost visit. Braintrust dot com. That's b. r. a. n. t-r-u-s-t t. Dot com to learn more and remember to join the drill down on twitter. Nisa graham at drill down pod and check out our website biz pod dot net. Let us know what stocks we should be drilling down on. Welcome back to the drill down as promised adam for joined us right now. The ceo of app lovin a fascinating. I'll call it an under the radar of the fast growing company in listener note. I'm completely possibly biased here. Because i've done some work with them in the past Coaching him up for other interviews as a media trainer and normally like to coach gus up anyway just in this case. I did it for it to somebody else's interview months ago adam. Good to see you and good to hear your voice What is apple oven. What problem do you guys. What business problem dissolve. Thanks for having me here corey. Let's see how good your coaching skills go on this interview. The so how soft i am on you. We'll see we'll see. We started a decade ago building apps. And then we had a problem getting the apps discovered by customers. No-one downloaded it and we pivoted to build a platform for mobile app developers to get their content discovered. And at the time we felt like the whole space was really gonna grow This whole mobile evolution was just starting the mobile devices so intimate usage is so high and this developer ecosystem was really cool back then and we were right on believing that it was going to get even more fragmented and bigger over time and so we spent a decade building out software solution tools data content all built around solving this problem of helping a mobile app developer get their content discovered and you and just for context for our listeners. You know twenty twenty. You guys did about one billion dollars in revenues. So it's it's it is a big business And you've been affairs. He'd been very concentrated on games and out and mobile gaming. Interestingly we never we built an advertising platform never invested in a salesforce until more recently in game developers are very technical very organic in viral amongst their own community and they wanna work with any solution that helps them improve their business whereas other categories of advertisers and enterprises required sales in long longer cycles to get going on a platform like ours so we really ended up just naturally and organically falling into that games category so game so game companies game. There are such a plethora of game apps. I feel like it's not like a lot of other industries that we've seen in our networked world are online world where the power really concentrates are on very few franchises. We've seen that in certainly in search right was seen that in social. We've seen that in in other enterprise software products. We haven't seen that so much. In mobile gaming media and entertainment right television shows movies you see huge amounts of fragmentation based on interests gaming is no different than mobile gaming. The interesting change there is. It turned a game around two billion people whereas what we think about sometimes as a traditional game whereas the sixteen year old sitting in a basement drinking diet coke all day playing fifteen hours a day. That's not what mobile gaming really is. It's two billion people pulling out their phone playing for thirty minutes a day to relax and it's completely different. Dynamic contract that really just evolved over. The last decade has become a reality for most of us human beings. I'm thinking about my my ex-girlfriend's sitting at a bar in manhattan a fancy whatever high heels and all that playing a game pretending the so what are you doing. she says. Oh my son really stinks this game. I'm just trying to get them caught up when in fact that she just played the game and she wasn't what you would think of when you think of a gamer but getting those people to see those app so what's the secret sauce. What's how does your software do this. While i gotta have a great game. So we've got a bunch. Advertisers we ever own studio is one of our most popular games. Game called words gapes. So let's say like bad developer. They develop words gapes. How do they go and grow it. They ended up partnering with us an.

randy rasmussen adam ferruzzi Goldman sachs porsche Nisa graham adam bank of america corey twitter apple manhattan gapes
"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

The Drill Down

09:17 min | Last month

"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

"Of its workers. The pay raise will total at least one dollar an hour and we'll take effect. September twenty fifth the company companies average wage will rise to sixteen four. Sixteen dollars and forty cents. But it's minimum wage of eleven thousand hour still lags that of other large retailers like target amazon. Yeah and there is no single conference. Call i listened to as as we all know. Listen to all conference calls every day and it's it's really amazing that they're all having to deal with these wage issues across different levels of companies and responding in different ways. I'm trying not to make the show boring pull soundbites only about wages or only about supply chain but there isn't a conference call where those two things aren't mentioned in any industry and finally. Let's move onto apple. Apple is going to allow media apps to link their own websites for payment options. Spotify other tech companies have for years of said that apple's restrictions were unfair and anti-competitive. These changes will go into effect early next year. Talk she drilling down on today. Well why don't we start with asana. Asana trades at our asean shares rose sixty percent today. They've risen to hundred percent this year. Tell me what's going on with the sauna superperson customer a company and i am a customer. We are customers here at the business. Podcast network And this is a software that really changes the way organizations. Work asana is essentially. It's kind of a shared to do list so companies will use it as agendas for meetings when they get together though kind of a published the to-do list. Everyone walks out of a meeting with for everyone to see and it really changes the way organizations work by creating one version of the truth. There's no walking out of a meeting. Saying oh i thought you were going to do you want me to. What did i say that this week. I was going to do it next week. That doesn't happen when you use asana right Company based here in san francisco. They've got one hundred seven thousand paying customers but they're free product has got millions of customers across one hundred ninety countries. They reported earnings today than ninety million dollars of earnings. That's up seventy two percent year-over-year and customers you know mentioned the free customers or small companies such as ours using it but company has been more than five thousand dollars or more a growing ninety seven percent and the cousin companies are spending fifty thousand or more They've got five hundred ninety eight companies fifty grand a year. That's one hundred eleven percent so the fastest growing part of their business is the biggest paying customers again. This whole idea will the founder Dustin moskovitz helped start a company called facebook. you've heard of this facebook thing. I believe so. Yeah we talked about that years ago. Right it's a it's a social media thing and the facebook thing is built on this notion of the social graph and look at the ways you can graph. The connections between people moskovitz is built this business asana on the notion of work graph and again with a big idea of trying to create one single shared source of truth. And they're seeing this adopted not just by little companies by by some big fifty thousand seat deployments fortune fifty companies yours dustin moskovitz to really excited about the between five thousand seat deployment and that's on top of those What we announced last quarter with a fifty thousand deployment. Both of those are fortune. Fifty companies We also have a number of examples of other customers in the you know many thousands And we're starting to see an when they're at that scale we do tendency it's an entire division or maybe a parts of multiple multiple divisions and then additionally with customers that are more in the thousands of c. trained. We're starting to see more. Sort of wall wall deployments to really seeing customers adopt asana for work management across all of their employees. So really excited about bad tom. And that's when you really start to see the magic of the unique work graph data model where they're able to engage in cross functional workflows And leveraged the flexibility to have everyone aligned around the shared source of truth. I'll tell you our friends brain. Trust who you just read the advertisement for brain trust. They turned me onto asana about two years ago. And it's really fascinating tool. That really does change the way places and people work. I like that phrase shared source of truth. Wouldn't it be nice to stitch that on a pillow senator moynihan's dump the late and great saying saying that you're entitled to your own opinions but not your own facts. A solid does that for corporate meetings. And don't we love it. That sounds like we just read an ad for asana cat. Let's get the sponsors to be clear. The product short this dog or god. But i happen to love it. My gosh all right coriander device. That was a joke joke. Everybody we were joking around because we were love on on so much of course. What is your next drill them. Look a barnes and noble education barnes and noble education different from barnes and noble correct correct. It trades under b. n. e. d. shares rose thirteen percent today and they've gained three hundred and five percent over the past twelve months. So what is barnes and noble education. Doing obviously correct well. First of all if you sell textbooks and and run campus bookstores which they do in fact. They are one of the largest contract. Operators of physical and virtual bookstores really colleges and across the country. Yep oh i didn't realize that. So yeah you you walk in a bookstore. A major college might be run by contractor and indeed might be run by barnes and noble education. Well people weren't walking into schools last year and they weren't buying their books and they weren't. They were deferring a lot and a lot of schools. Weren't open so that really hurt their business now. Even while they're selling digital copies of books the students they weren't selling sweatshirts and caps and logos. And all the you know the the stuff that comes along with being a college student in the festooned logos on sweatshirts and landlords and so on well They're coming back These guys also we're one of the largest textbook wholesalers In in the world. So they've got about fourteen hundred physical virtual custom bookstores serving more than six million students airport with their fiscal q. One results and they were good. They were really good up there. Two hundred forty million dollars in revenue. Eighteen percent lost money but Lost a lot of money lost about forty four million dollars but this first quarter is usually not terribly important to them at summer school and so on but what they had to say in their conference call was super positive about the return to school and and the reopening of college campuses in elsa tenure partnership with the university of notre dame where they're going to manage all the course materials retail and online operations at the the retail stores for notre dame And so they've got these people coming back one of the things they say that's really helping. They talked with. This conference call was a sports coming back. 'cause when there's a big game at the big game of course it's cal stanford november being stanford. The garum go bears but Cal football lamont's football starting this weekend And that sells a lotta stuff at campus bookstores. They're excited about that. But to the most interesting thing to me was the effect of the cares act. The corona virus aid relief an economic security act enacted in march. We all recall of of last year. Well two point two trillion dollars were put into the economy at fourteen billion of that was given to the office of post secondary education and the higher education emergency relief fund which meant that. A handful of colleges took that money and said okay students. We're gonna pay for all your text books and he can't opt out. Barnes and noble education loves that because it means that y'all of the students come to campus are going to roll out and get all our books purchased whether they would've walked into the store or borrowed from a friend or not. That's not happening now. Listen to ceo. Mike huckabee we have situations with large community college state systems where they decided to go ahead and completely fun boston course where they're cares act. Funding which needs one hundred percent of the students will be getting their books for free with with no opt-out in some cases they're doing this for two years It's an interesting thing that we're analyzing on a very specific basis. Make sure we help those schools at need help. Spend that money that they've received from the government. There's a lot of money that's flowed into certain schools and they have to spend it you know within a certain timeframe and of course where one of the allowed expenditures for them. So that's that's working out really well for many of the schools and every see the government. Funding is to use that at funding ahead and pay for the cost of coursework for all their students and And those situations there's there's no out so super positive for them. You saw the stock react today..

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"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

The Drill Down

01:33 min | Last month

"barnes noble" Discussed on The Drill Down

"barnes noble" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

Discovered Wordsmiths

02:58 min | 2 months ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on Discovered Wordsmiths

"By the name of Christina Henry. And she wrote what is called The Chronicles of Alice. I actually bought this at a, it was a Barnes Noble. Maybe I was killing time in Columbus. And so I just went into like this Barnes & Noble around Dublin or so around that area and found this book. And the designer in me really appreciated how the book looked and felt And it dealt with Alice in Wonderland, which is one of my favorite stories. And so I bought it and then much to my delight found out that it was one of a Trilogy Thursday. So I have definitely enjoyed reading, Christina, Henry's, Alice Chronicles. Great. And when you get a book club book and author, you don't know a book. You don't know that. You aren't enjoying that you don't like do you still finish it? You put it down, move on. What do you do? That's really funny cuz it just happened months. I've gotten so many of these books and I've read through them and the majority of the time. If I if I crease that binding I'm going to finish it just because I have Bubble, I have an obligation to. But recently I have to admit I bought a book that came in and I started to read it and found out. It was one in a long time. Series of like 20 horror slash romance books and they would get to the romance section and I was just like I just can't do this and I actually stopped reading it and gave the book Away. Wow. Yeah. Who you gave it to you today, like it and appreciate it. I don't know. They enjoyed romance novels. And so I was like, hey, I'm try this. Maybe you like it and I haven't heard back. Well, I'd love to hear find out if they did like it, if you're having read it. So your kids have you passed that on to them. The love of reading. They read a lot, know, I would like to say they do but in the modern era with so many distractions, they love a good told story. They just don't want to take the time to read it themselves. So they'll have other people read to them or act. It out there big into watching movies or YouTube app. Or Netflix playing role playing games but for them actually reading a book is always been more of a school assignment than something that would sit down to do on their own for pleasure. Hm, that's interesting. I know my kids when they were younger, read a lot more often than they do now. That's true. Yes, when they were.

Christina Henry Barnes Noble Alice Chronicles Alice Barnes & Noble Wonderland Columbus Dublin Christina Henry Netflix YouTube
Ramit Sethi's 10 Money Rules

The Frug Life

07:15 min | 7 months ago

Ramit Sethi's 10 Money Rules

"I got an email from ra meet sethi with ten money rules and i thought it was interesting enough that i wanted to share it with you my audience. If you don't know where meat sethi is the author of. I will teach you to be rich and i'm pretty sure. I shared a review of his book on this podcast f. So they'll be lincoln the show notes to that episode so let's dive right into it. Rule one always have one year of emergency fund. Cash or meet goes onto explain. He used to say six months but after covid nineteen. He's up to twelve months. And you know. I agree with this idea now. You personally don't necessarily need to have twelve months but if you do want to have twelve months i support you in that one of the purposes of having money at least in my mind is peace of mind and of having twelve months of expenses. Saved up in cash gives you that gives you peace of mind. I say it's money while used some people might say it's too much money that you should have less of an emergency fund an icee in the way that benefits you the most his next role role to is save ten percent invest twenty percent of gross annual income. I think this also is a pretty good roll. My heart isn't set on the percentages in particular f. You know me. I save and invest everything i can. I don't even know the number offhand. I should try to calculate it. I suppose but in a chapter of my life where. I am living pretty much as frugally as i can where i am investing as much as i can and saving as much as i can. I think for most people this ten percent saving and twenty percent investing is a good number. So i say you can go higher. But you probably shouldn't go. Lower now also uses this point to say that he can spend money on small things and not worry about it like spending money. On appetizers next is rule three be able to pay in full for large expenses before spending for important purchases. Save enough. that cost is not the primary factor in my decision and that is also one hundred percent. True you don't want to finance your wedding on debt. I guess the only exception for that is a house. He says a house. But if you live in california like me buying a house in cash is simply not possible unless you are so well to do. But in general. I agree with this principle as well. I say never get into consumer debt. Always pay off your credit card. Don't borrow for things that aren't a house is role for never questioned spending money on books appetizers health or donating to a friend's charity fundraiser. Into this i say question spending money on whatever you want. As far as books are concerned go to the library and check out a book for free. If fact that's how. I read remains book. I went to the library. Checked it out and read it for free and so books are invaluable sources of knowledge. But you actually don't necessarily need to buy them you can borrow them and you get all the knowledge. So if you are spending tons of money at barnes noble buying paper books maybe you should question that. And as far as appetizers go just eating an entree without an appetizer might be effective dieting for you so again you could with good reason questioned spending money on an appetizer. Now as a treat. Definitely treat yourself so. That's okay when you spend money on your health. You have to be aware of what you're spending your money on. There is a whole industry of health supplements that do little to nothing for you and so also you should question what you spend on health. Because some things don't do anything and they cost a lot of buddy and as for the last point he was making your friends charity fundraiser. While maybe my new nickname is going to have to be mister scrooge. Instead of mr frugh. But you're under no obligation to donate to your friends. Charity fundraiser f. You don't want to if you do go for it but if you don't you have no obligation. His next rule rule five is business class on flights over four hours and to this rule. I say that's nonsense. You can fly coach like everybody else. Actually i ve very rarely been on a four hour flight. So maybe i'm not the best one to a pine on this but personally i'm definitely not an a place to fly business class everywhere. Roll number six by the best. Keep it as long as possible and this rule is potentially pretty good if you buy good and they last longtime you're probably going to be better off than you bought very cheap stuff and let it wear out real quick especially with tools and equipment. I think a good pair of boots will last you a long time. A cheap pair of boots will not last you a long time and you'll be miserable every step of the way rule. Seven no limit on spending for health or education and also to this. I say oh yes. There should be a limit true. Investing in your health can be a good idea. He specifically mentions a personal trainer. And if that is helpful to you you may have health benefits that the financial costs. But that's not a free ticket for anything you want. Likewise when he says education he specifically mentioned courses events etc. but also. I think that is a bad idea. There are no blank checks for example if you wanted to go to an expensive private school and would put you like a million dollars in debt. I say no no way. Don't go a million dollars in debt for anything now. Maybe a million dollars is kind of an exaggeration but at the same time he said no limit. So what's stopping me. Rule eight earn enough to work. Only with people i respect and like i think this is a great goal. I'm not sure about how good it is. As a rule in fact it may be kind of difficult to live by that rule number nine mary. The right person which also is a great rule. Shout out to mrs frugh okay. Roll number ten prioritize time outside the spreadsheet a rich life is lived outside the spreadsheet running in another monte. Carlo analysis won't change things at a certain point. You won the game. Now get out of your chair and turn the page to the next chapter. And i guess i should specify these are ra meets rules for himself and he says your rules may be different. In fact i'd go on to say your rules should be different. You can set your own financial rules for

Sethi Barnes Noble Buying Paper Mr Frugh Lincoln California Mrs Frugh Carlo
How To Self Publish Your Book Online With XinXii Publishing

Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

05:23 min | 1 year ago

How To Self Publish Your Book Online With XinXii Publishing

"What's happening? I am just absolutely tickled to death that you take a little bit of time out today to spend a little bit of time with me to talk about one of my favorite things in self-publishing books. And you know how long we've been talking about it. They're going on sixteen weeks straight of discussing all the different Avenues it rest assured. We're not quite done but this is probably going to be one of the last month or this type of publishing they're going to talk about we're going to switch over into aggregate publishing and audiobook publishing more importantly in the coming weeks. So let's focus on this long last option. Now, this is not to say that I've exhausted every Avenue. I've just hit all the major Avenues some of the areas that people have asked me about the thing with self-publishing a book on off online is it can be overwhelming it can seem like oh my gosh, there's Amazon. There's Apple there's Barnes & Noble. There's Kobo. There's racket since rackets in scope. Oh, I said it twice just coughing. Twice is nice. There's smashwords. There's draft the Jewelers published. Oh my gosh. Well, I thought what better way to break it all down then just do an entire podcast series about this off. So in any event, we're going to be discussing an aggregate publisher an aggregate publisher works like this you upload your content to their platform and they feed it out to numerous Avenues on your behalf. Typically, typically an aggregate publisher takes a percentage of the net profits that come in from the different areas. Okay. Now too bad, there's other ones like published drive that charge a fee a subscription fee to do it since she's not so much like that, but I'm going to put a little bit of an asterisk next to this. So we're going to be talking about Shinji full disclosure song. I'm just curating information here. I've never used them. In fact today. I actually started breaking ground and started uploading an audiobook cuz I'm really curious. They have some Avenues. I don't see a page or through other areas like a CX or find a way voices or published drives. So I said, let's go and give this a shot. There's a little bit of an ambiguity about it though, and I'm going to discuss it here. Get too far ahead of myself. So Shen she's the name of the company. It's spelled x i n x i i and look it up. Yes. It is pronounced Shen. She actually found a video of someone saying it that actually is from the companies and she so european-based company and I always try to cross check to see if they're legit. If any aggregate Publishers good the alliance of Indian authors is one of the best organizations to cross-check any kind of services for self-publishers. You have something that's called the Watchdog service and on that Watch Dog service, they fully vet competition and they don't mince words if there's something a little bit of skew a little bit off. They're not going to recommend it. They'll probably put a caution rating or even avoid it altogether. With Shadow, it gets a recommended rating. Now that is like the top award, you know, there is excellent partner. But since she's not a partner, they're just recommending. So it's without that partner relationship that they have the recommendation. So that speaks volumes ahead of time. Keep in mind Ally the alliance of independent. Authors is run by any authors for any others. Isn't that somebody getting their you know Palms greased saying well, you know, if you give us good words, well, we'll go ahead and pay a little extra. Something doesn't work that way. So in any event, they distribute ebooks and audiobooks but no print books. And so if you're looking for another print-on-demand Avenue Shane, she's not it off. I try to do some digging to see if that was something I was coming any time soon, but I didn't find anything about it. Let's learn. With the books. They accept files. Oh my gosh, like I think thirty different file types. I will mention these ones real briefly here doc ePub PDF. Text PowerPoint. What? Yeah, they accept PowerPoint Excel. Yeah, they accept Excel spreadsheets what PostScript and so many more years. There's no minimum requirement or maximum threshold. Now, I'm going to have a little bit of an asterisk here because I saw they said there's no minimum requirement off. No, ma'am ran out of pages. Technically there is there is and and looks like it too far ahead ourselves here distribution goes out to Amazon the example Bookstore Barnes & Noble Google Kobo Scribd. They have 27 Avenues in total Plus. the shaanxi author page now Shinji author page is essentially a way that you can distribute through the senshi platform and because it's an aggregate publisher. You'll be going to the various Avenues. Let's say you're Distributing ebook over to Amazon. Everybody knows that if you have your book price between 299 and 99 at 70% through Amazon KDP. Well,

Partner Amazon Publisher Shinji Shaanxi Author Jewelers Apple KDP Shane Google Bookstore Barnes
"barnes noble" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"When it comes to investments, you need more than hope. So pay attention. Don't be a dope. Here it comes. The Bloomberg Market Minutes on 700. W well, we finally got to Friday. Jeff, how you doing? Oh, doing okay. Steve here happy Friday to you. Boingboing getting some much needed good news from overseas. Yeah, the top aviation regulator in Europe satisfied now, with the changes Boeing made to the 7 37 MAXjet, The head of the European Union Aviation Safety Agency says Boeing has made the plane safe enough to return to passenger service in Europe before the end of the year. The agency conducted test flights last month that expects to issue an airworthiness directive next month. Here in the U. S. The F A A says a number of key milestones remain before the 3 37 37 Max is re certified. Alright. I was like walking through Barnes and Noble Looks like they got hacked. Yeah, they did. The bookstore chain is notified customers that a data breach has exposed some of their personal information. The bad guys could see customers transaction histories and email address is the good news is, though Barnes Noble says credit card numbers and financial information remains secure. All right. The covert economy kind of changing the way we buy cars. Yeah, Carbonneau and the online rival services shift and room have seen much stronger growth and their founders ever expected. The CEO of shift says things he thought would take five years to happen, have taken place in five months, carve on a shift and room sold more than 125,000 vehicles of retail in the first half of the year. That's a 36% increase from the same six month period last year. All right. What's the markets look like? Looking a little better. The futures higher across the board now the S and P futures up six. NASDAQ futures up 29 of the Dow Futures are up 61 from Bloomberg. I'm Jeff Hullinger on news radio 700 wlw Check. You got a minute here. Sure. See what finish airlines air doing thin air is what it's called. They're going to start selling their airplane food. In shopping stores. Oh, yeah. Airplane food. It's going in supermarkets. It's a move to keep their catering staff employed. I'm glad they're trying to do that. But do we really need airplane food at the store? They've got this already. It's ah Reindeer meat balls. Would you eat that Arctic char not a clue What that is Japanese style teriyaki beef 12 bucks. Would you pay for airline food? Airplane food in your grocery store? How biggest portion. Oh, like that little peanut bag. They gave me three bites. And you're going. It's just got a strange I'm glad they're trying to keep people employed. But somebody should have talked to these people. First. It's been a slow morning. Alright, Traffic.

Bloomberg Jeff Hullinger European Union Aviation Safety Boeing Europe Carbonneau Barnes Noble Barnes CEO Steve wlw
Using Tablo Publishing for your online book

Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Using Tablo Publishing for your online book

"Hey there, this is Dale and I'm just tickled to death that you took a little bit of time out your day to spend a little bit of time with me to talk about our favorite things and self-publishing books. And you know, I don't say this enough, but I appreciate each and every single one of you that it's taking a little bit of time out your day. So with that being said we're episode 76 of this freaking podcast. I mean we've been going seventy six weeks straight. So that's freaking awesome. But without any further bloviating cuz we got a lot of ground to cover today when it comes to self publish books online. It can be so stinking overwhelming. There's so many options. We're not really sure which ones to go with what's the pertinent information that we need to dive into to get started, you know, is this going to be okay for you or is this going to be okay for me? Well, that's why I'm kind of demystifying this process and this is why we're working on a 15th straight episode has self publishing a book online. The solution when it comes to publishing to various platforms can be found through what's called aggregate publishing how to aggregate publish your works like this you upload your content to a given platform. That's an aggregate publisher. Then they send it out to various Avenues to say places like Amazon Apple Barnes & Noble Kobo Google Play books. So on and so forth rather than having to go to each and every single one of those Dash boards and uploading each one of them individually. You can just do it through one and I guess what your CPA is going to love you to the end of the year because you'll have 50 different w-9s to file with them and it's only just one that you can have to worry about. We're going to be talking about aggregate publisher today known as tab Volvo. I'd heard about Tableau a few years ago. When the MacMillan publishing company known as pronoun went out of business pronoun was an aggregate publisher and it was great. I really loved It actually brought me at a fair chunk of change and was distributing some of my stuff over to places like Google Play books when I couldn't do that. So I was looking for some solutions wage in Tableau was one of them but had a little bit of a hang up and you going to find out why a little bit of a hang up in just a second here. That's not to say that tableaus bat. Don't tune me out because that's actually pretty good news full disclosure. I'm just curating information here. So don't shoot the messenger have never used any of this stuff. So anything I say is an opinion when I say well that's good or that's bad. It's just from the outside looking in that I'm saying this I can say for sure I can say for certain that the alliance of em, an author's very reputable company that it's a non-profit organization run by Indie authors for Indie authors. They fully vet different services and part of those Services is off. Watchdog service and they have actually given Tableau in excellent rating and they're even an ally partner. So that speaks volumes to what they you have and what they bring to the table just to kind of summarize before we jump into things if you listen to my episode about published Drive Tableau functions much in the same way, but there's some deviations there's some differences than what they have with published drive. So before we jump in with all that, let's break down each one of the things they do what they do not do is they do not distribute audiobooks. Just going to get that off the table get that out the way they don't deal with audio books whatsoever. They distribute e-books and print books. Now. I'm going to save some of the stuff for last for instance. We're going to talk about royalties and how it's all paid out a little bit later because wage They're all the same royalties. So for ebook distribution and it appears for ebook and print book that they have 35 online bookstores and they also feed out to scores of other bookstores online. But part of those bookstores include Amazon Apple Books Barnes & Noble booktopia never heard of them before wage Scribd Microsoft. I thought that was pretty interesting. I had never seen anybody should be two Microsoft before overdrive and another one called readings and then they just say home and More in quotations. I tried to track down there and more to find out what these other 35 different platforms were but I couldn't find a job information literally couldn't find it anywhere. You're going to find out why there was some issues that I had

Partner Publisher Dale Google Apple Macmillan Volvo Microsoft
"barnes noble" Discussed on Parenting Roundabout

Parenting Roundabout

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on Parenting Roundabout

"You don't know what's going on outside of the house or what is happening in them internally and the struggles that their life inside and if you're sending a message of I have done all the right things. Therefore, you will be a perfect child. You're pretty much assuring they're not going to come home and tell you they're having a problem. Yeah, you know, I know it's it's pressure on them to and this idea that kids are like a like a smartphone game where if you do all the things right you go on to the next level and everything, you know, it's like a it's not that they're not just something that if you push all the right buttons a predictable outcome happens. Yeah, right. That's what I was drives me crazy about parenting advice. Yeah spring. Say x and the result is why like? Okay, you got me try it. It's like if you go to Barnes & Noble, there are like to isleworth of parenting books. If there was one easy answer we would just you just get the book at the Maternity Ward and say here and she'll be all all children are exactly the same have a good time off and goes wrong. It's horrible. I think you could take away from the conversation as if your child is acting out stop and ask them why rather than immediately, you know kind of assume they're doing it on purpose to yeah. All righty, right. Yeah. Yeah just kind of stopped and asked by and get the background story first, right? There's Yeah in our head we're checking off the list and they should be performing accordingly. Yeah, but but also to you know to take some of the pressure off of everybody. I mean teachers are going to assume that if there's a bath Album it's cuz the kid is having is not being treated right at home not being disciplined right or being traumatized at home parents are going to assume it's the teachers, you know, it could be something completely different. It could be kids and being traumatic traumatizing to other kids. You could be an undiagnosed medical exactly to it could be all sorts of different things. And once you put up the walls and say well I've done everything so they need it's somebody else's fault. You're never going to find out what the thing is. Well remember, I don't know if you don't know where this is another quick little aside to that kind.

Barnes & Noble
"barnes noble" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Learning learning how to fix your car. I think it's really fun, and I grew up on a farm. So you'll be proud of me. Bradley I know how Tio actually build a Web site and also hand shear a sheep. Great. So you are rare. No unicorn. I'm a unicorn. But a lot of people nowadays don't have that privilege of grow, and I called a privilege It was. It was a lot of blood, sweat and tears and our live shoveling stalls when I was little, but I know how to do a lot of weird stuff that other people don't necessarily know how reduced but I imagine it's fun to go learn that if you've grown up in the suburbs if you've grown up in the city, it's fun to reconnect and see how people do stuff with the land. You know what you can learn so much just by going hiking this go backpacking for three days in the wilderness. If you've never done it, we just took our knees for the first time. And have her, you know, put up a tent and build the fire. And we had to build a fire without a lighter, you know, And and she had such a great time on. We had a great time. You know, stopping already do all this stuff and you know, potentially these air skills that you'll never need. But I think you know one of the things that I kept getting back to you as I interviewed thes preppers around the world. Is that the preparations that they were undertaking? We're giving them a sense of salt assistance of peace right in the present, so it wasn't necessarily about the future. It was about them feeling. More confident about their abilities and giving them a senses as you have that they have. Varied skill set and that they're able to, you know, tackle practical problems as they come if you never need to tackle those problems, that's fantastic. But you know, it might. It might give everyone a sense of kind of, you know, existential piece to actually have the skills to be able Teo to do those things if necessary, Bradley I could seriously probably talked to you all day, and I actually really do want to have you back on. So is it cool if we keep your number and bring you back on sometime? Absolutely anytime. Awesome. Know your book is coming out in, like, two weeks. Right about Teo. Except for the dog show. Awesome. How can people get copy of it? Can they pre order it? Yeah, You can order it online. You confined on Amazon Barnes Noble, you know, regular places and hopefully where people are. They can get into a bookshop by the Fourth of August. But.

Teo Bradley Amazon Barnes Noble
"barnes noble" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

03:51 min | 1 year ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"You know, how do we get to the bunker at the time? We didn't know where they're going to close state lines. What's going to happen, right? You mean just the logistics of Kind of breaking away and making that very self decision to save yourself and your your immediate family. It's hard to do you know, so What we did instead is we bought a remote cabin that's about on our and 1/2 from all of our family members, and we're using it as a vacation home in the moment, But if we do need to retreat to the cabin, we could just, you know, call everyone up and say, OK, it's time to come to the cabin and we're gonna wait this thing out. So if if you were talking to somebody like me, who's you know, right here in Cincinnati? A Kentucky is not that far. There's a lot of wilderness. Still in Kentucky, I buy a remote cabin in Kentucky. Okay? Yeah, In theory. Well, I think that's the beginning. But I also think that you know, 150 years ago, right? We have totally different skill set. We knew how to grow food. We knew how to raise animals. We knew. I mean, we have We have a very practical skill base. You know, people repaired things instead of just replacing them going out and buying new things. So this skill set that we've now built our lives around most of us, you know, which is based around computers and sitting in front of screens, You know skills that don't necessarily translate into a kind of Survival instinct. I think it's worth building those up again on DH again. It doesn't have to be. This isn't doom and gloom and it's not pessimistic, but a lot of people and they just really enjoyed You know, learning how to build a shelter, learning learning how to learning how to fix your car. I think it's really fun, and I grew up on a farm. So you'll be proud of me. Bradley I know how Tio actually build a Web site and also hand shear a sheep. Great. You are rare. No unicorn have a unicorn. But a lot of people nowadays don't have that privilege of grow and I called a privilege It was. It was a lot of blood, sweat and tears and our live shoveling stalls when I was little, but I know how to do a lot of weird stuff that other people don't necessarily know how reduced but I imagine it's fine to go learn that if you've grown up in the suburbs if you've grown up in the city, it's fun to reconnect and see how people do stuff with the land. You know what you can learn so much just by going hiking this go backpacking for three days in the wilderness. If you've never done it, we just took our needs for the first time. And had her, you know, put up a tent and build the fire. And we had to build a fire without a lighter, you know? And and she had such a great time on. We had a great time. You know, stopping already do all this stuff and you know, potentially these air skills that you'll never need. I think you know one of the things that I kept getting back to you as I interviewed thes preppers around the world. Is that the preparations that they were undertaking? We're giving them a sense of salt assistance of peace right in the present, so it wasn't necessarily about the future. It was about them feeling. More confident about their abilities and giving them a senses as you have that they have. Varied skill set and that they're able to, you know, tackle practical problems as they come if you never need to tackle those problems, that's fantastic, But you know, it might. It might give everyone a sense. It's kind of, you know, existential piece to actually have the skills to be able Teo do those things if necessary, Bradley I could seriously probably talked to you all day, and I actually really do want to have you back on. So is it cool if we keep your number and bring you back on sometime? Absolutely anytime. Awesome. Know your book is coming out in, like, two weeks, right about Teo before its August show. Awesome. How can people get copy of it? Can they pre order it? Yeah, You can order it online. You confined on Amazon Barnes Noble, you know, regular places and hopefully where people are. They can get into a bookshop by the Fourth of August. But.

Kentucky Bradley Teo Cincinnati Amazon Barnes Noble
Downtown Seattle Barnes & Noble closes down

Own It

01:10 min | 1 year ago

Downtown Seattle Barnes & Noble closes down

"It's it's been been twenty twenty two two years years Barnes Barnes and and noble noble closed closed its its doors doors Saturday Saturday at at Seattle Seattle Pacific Pacific place place is is the the sign sign of of the the times times well well maybe maybe maybe maybe not not corporate corporate PR PR is is telling telling me me the the stores stores closing closing because because the the landlord landlord redevelopment redevelopment of of the the center center and and the the company company is is looking looking at at other other places places he he did did not not say say where where will Pacific place is redeveloping the center and with has some stores expanding their footprint we asked people coming out of the Barnes and noble what they thought about the closure seems like it was just out of no where almost you cut I heard that it was going to happen and others have been expertise that they were also the guys a lot of the small the players out of business then Amazon tendency care of them kind of a reflection of the times it with a big business can't even staying downtown that's kind of telling you have big businesses like Macy's the Third Avenue Bartels drugs grocery outlet for this to the south now Barnes and noble they're all closing we ask the downtown Seattle association at the track these kind of closing they don't track how many stores come and go downtown but they do track taxable retail sales they see is increased fifty six percent this call was not market vegetable chain has closed nearly four hundred stores since nineteen ninety

Barnes Barnes Macy Seattle The Times Amazon
"barnes noble" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"What's happening in libraries today well they're more about doing then borrowing more about connecting then simply plugging in whether you want to get involved in your community find a job start a business or simply get ahead your library card is the key to opportunity libraries are transforming visit your library this September during library card sign up month and find out how or visit I love libraries dot org have you written a book and want to get it published then we suggest you call page publishing at one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two immediately that's one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two page publishing is looking for authors of all types of books and unlike most publishers page publishing will take the time to review each and every book submitted to us and we will give your feedback and if we like what we read we'll get your book into bookstores and for sale online at Amazon the apple iTunes store Barnes noble and other outlets we handle everything editing cover design copyright protection printing the publicity and distribution so if you read the novel children's book cookbook inspirational work poetry or biography and want to get it published then you need to call page publishing and do it immediately call one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two now for your free author submission kit numerically that's one eight hundred six five eight eight two zero two again for your free auto submission kit call one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two that's one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two your road to fame and fortune could very well start with a simple phone call call page publishing at one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two for your free author submission kit..

Amazon apple Barnes noble
"barnes noble" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Dot com what's happening in libraries today well they're more about doing in borrowing more about connecting then simply plugging in whether you want to get involved in your community find a job start a business or simply get ahead your library card is the key to opportunity libraries are transforming visit your library this September during library card sign up month and find out how or visit I love libraries dot org have you written a book and want to get it published then we suggest you call page publishing at one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two immediately that's one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two page publishing is looking for authors of all types of books and unlike most publishers page publishing will take the time to review each and every book submitted to us and we will give your feedback and if we like what we read we'll get your book into bookstores and for sale online at Amazon the apple iTunes store Barnes noble and other outlets we handle everything editing cover design copyright protection printing publicity and distribution so if you were in the novel children's book cookbook inspirational work poetry or biography and want to get it published then you need to call page publishing and do it immediately call one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two now for your free author submission kit numerically that's one eight hundred six five eight eight two zero two again for your free auto submission kit call one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two that's one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two your road to fame and fortune could very well start with a simple phone call call page publishing at one eight hundred six five eight eighty two oh two for your free author submission kit. you should.

Amazon apple Barnes noble
"barnes noble" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Barnes noble and Amazon and all over the place coming soon hopefully when the next six to twelve months here called psychological analysis salts tell you more about that as it comes out and it's basically dives into the subject you know you know fundamental analysis you know technical analysis but there's something else there and that's what I've spent my career focusing on I called psychological and Elsa basically price is a function of perception I can go on and on but it's outside the scope of the showing of just take up way too much time but again if you have interest get in touch if not that's fine too but here's what I've learned over the years and the way that I came up with psychological analysis how many times have you seen a stock that is great fundamentals great technical go straight down or the opposite crummy fundamentals crummy technicals go straight up so after years and years and years of banging my head against the wall into whenever we also don't I feel like something else is missing and that's how I came up with this whole concept of psychological analysis but I digress let me get back to the appointed hand here so there's many reasons why people can't beat the market one of the reasons I'm going slow here on purpose because I wanna make sure I choose my words carefully is that people look backwards they have a tendency always look what just happened why did that happen and the market's looking for work what that means is all of us are programs innately to want to know why the market went up down or sideways or why something happened enter any reason you anything at all nothing to do with markets just we will always want to know why we're naturally curious as human beings and that's a good thing sometimes as a bad things other times so what's happening is you're in a situation now where people but traders investors are too busy asking why that just happened and they're looking backwards instead of focusing on what just happened or what more importantly is happening and equally if not more important what is going to happen and looking forward present looking at the present moment obviously looking forward to this two sides and every chart you know you look at that any chart one day one minute one year one week it doesn't make a difference there's a left side of the last take and then there's the right side the only place to make money get on the right side but we spend all our time looking at the left because the right side by definition hasn't happened yet people again they're looking backwards not forwards to them when you have news you know a lot of times especially over the next few weeks as we hand enter into the bulk of earning season you will see many many times where the market well you see individual stocks on the market sells off on cortical bullish news and or vice versa you see a stock rally on clinical bearish earnings the only question always becomes why not the what they're not focusing on what is happening they want to know why again it's it's subtle differences but it's very very powerful we can re wire your brain and train it to focus on what actually matters what moves the needle and it just realigning your sites to make sure you're looking in the right direction so when you look at news or earnings or any data point for that matter literally anything it doesn't matter what it is earnings news happens to be the two biggest ones but you can look at monetary policy you can look at fiscal policy it doesn't make a difference it tells us what already happened jobs report last month housing claims housing starts doesn't matter enter anything you want consumer conference always a rear view mirror phenomenon now if you pull out your driveway in a car you're looking in the rear view mirror most people park forward facing the pointer driving home at the end I they wake up in the morning they'd look back and they'd pull out of the driveway nice and slow I looked everywhere but if you want to get to work you've got a look forward eventually at.

Amazon Barnes noble twelve months one minute one week one year one day
In a Real-Life Page-Turner, Buyers Fight to Buy Barnes & Noble

Business Wars Daily

04:19 min | 2 years ago

In a Real-Life Page-Turner, Buyers Fight to Buy Barnes & Noble

"The business wars daily is brought to you by Staples work is changing, but Staples is changing right along with it. The new Staples delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday, June thirteenth, it's a question. We've been asking for years. What does it take for a bookseller to survive in the age of Amazon, and we may soon have an answer Barnes and noble? The beleaguered bookstore chain is up for sale last Friday at announced that it had struck a deal to be acquired by the owner of the UK bookstore chain Waterstones for about six hundred eighty three million dollars more than two hundred million dollars of that value is the assumption of Barnes and noble debt. It turns out, though, that the brick and mortar book business may be more desirable than most investors assumed on Tuesday. The Wall Street Journal reported that Barnes, and noble may have another suitor a book distributor called reader link, the journal reported that reader link may bid higher than its rival Waterstones owner, Elliott management corporation, a hedge fund, reader link could. That bid as early as today or tomorrow because Barnes and noble would face a penalty for ditching its deal with Elliot, it would have to pay the hedge fund four million dollars. If it pulls out by Friday after June thirteenth, however, that break-up penalty would climb to more than seventeen million dollars though, not a household name almost every book lover in the country has been touched by Chicago based reader link. It is the nation's biggest distributor of books to mass market change like target, WalMart and Costco, since its beginning with a single bookstore in New York in nineteen seventy-one Barnes and noble grew by offering a high volume of books and undercutting the prices independent stores could offer Amazon's growth made that strategy, largely obsolete and the company faced many management challenges as well today, it is squeezed on one side by Amazon, which reportedly sells fifty percent of all new books and independent bookstores which are growing after closing many stores. Recent years at now has just six hundred twenty seven locations nationwide publishers, and literary agents which still rely heavily on the existence of Barnes and noble appeared to breathe a sigh of relief. At the news of the Elliott sale last year. The hedge fund bought Waterstones the UK's biggest bookseller Waterstones had been losing money for years under new ownership. It's now turning a profit if the Elliott deal goes through Waterstone's, CEO, James daunt would also run Barnes and noble. The hedge fund announced the Daunte would plan to turn the American chain around by allowing individual bookstores more autonomy to serve their communities. Making Barnes and noble run more like a large collection of independent bookstores, no word on what reader links strategy would be yet. But already this story's turning into a real page Turner. I'm wondering this business daily. Hey, listen, if you like our show shirt with a friend. Would you send a tweet in Email, posting Instagram? And hey, thanks much. I'm David Brown back with you tomorrow. Business wars. Daily is brought to you by Staples. The world of work is changing faster than ever before a week ago open floor plans were in. Now, they're out the pace of our evolving work lives can feel overwhelming. But Staples can help not the old stables, but a new Staples that delivers solutions to help your team be more connected productive, and inspired work may be constantly changing. But Staples is changing right along with it to support you. Learn more at Staples dot com slash change.

Barnes Staples Staples Dot Amazon David Brown UK Elliott Elliott Management Corporation Walmart New York Chicago Elliot The Wall Street Journal Turner James Daunt CEO Costco Waterstone Six Hundred Eighty Three Milli
"barnes noble" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

11:30 min | 3 years ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"And they knew it wasn't working years ago years ago and lost money for a long time. So and then the spun out the educational bookstore part, right? Which also wasn't been doing well, and so it's really tough. I think it's tough to do those big stores when people are not driving to the mall or to the strip mall for books anymore. In the newer kind of urban areas where people are buying books, they wanna walk past it in that means a small bookstore. Maybe there's room for a national chain, opening small bookstores who could probably do a better job of it, and maybe they should buy this Starbucks right there already have a relationship them and their what if they sold what Starbucks that we're going to open a chain of the small bookstores. Maybe they could do a better job because they've got their in these places in small. Okay. Nations they are, although as a Starbucks shareholder, I, you don't want them doing I I don't think I want them do in that. I feel risky there better ways for them to invest their money. I think there are, but I'm just pointing out that. I think that's the only strategy that's going to work, and I don't know if it works at the twenty percent premium price that Barnes and noble as commanding today, right? That's really the thing that's amazing to me is looking at Barnes and nobles market cap. This morning's like four hundred million yesterday or yesterday, four hundred million today. It's closing in on five hundred million and one hundred and there's for what is I guess? Amazon like burps one hundred million dollars market cap difference every five minutes, probably right. I think that's right. But I looked at this and I thought, gosh, if if the stock wasn't taking off, I could see there is a price at which Barnes and noble makes sense as an acquisition for some company. The fact that it's twenty percent higher, I think reduces the likelihood that they find a buyer. Yeah, it stuff to figure out. What's that name really worth? Do people really care? What is the expertise worth? Because there aren't a lot of hard assets underlying this, at least as far as I can see if somebody else knows what those hard assets are, please let me know. 'cause they sure didn't jump off the balance sheet at me. So drop us an Email market full, read full dot com. Title at Seth is an idiot. We'll go in the Ben with all the other side of the male. Exactly. How are we separated constellation brands up about five percent today? This is the parent company of a bunch of wine brands, liquor brands, probably best known as the parent of corona. You know, who likes drinking seems like everybody does a lot of people myself included second quarter results came in higher than expected. That's boosting the stock today. I'm curious what you think of this quarter because one of the things that's getting the headlines for constellation brands is they made that recent investment in canopy growth is looking into candidates and they went out of their way to highlight pot stock. One of the pot stocks extraordinaire which doesn't actually have much business yet because they're waiting, you know, for for the recreational market open up in Canada and then hoping in the US. Right? They have some medical marijuana sales right now, but I think it's canopies like eleven billion dollar company with sixty million sales or something. I mean, it's that was the thing that constellation highlighted, they said, oh, and by the way we have over one billion dollars in unrealized, James xactly from our investment in Bonn, some stock and they need to market up. So there's a billion dollars a fake earnings here unless you know they were selling into this, but they're not selling into this mania. Are they? They're gonna put four billion dollars more into the business right by four billion more. So as I understand canopy and I am a newcomer to canopy their idea, I think that the story they're selling and I say they're selling a story because I think that's what their main product is right now is that they want to be like constellation. Of of pot rate. So there if you look, they were issuing their issuing a press release every couple of days for a long time now, and you look at some of these companies, they were buying, don't do much in any look at the people behind some of these companies, and they look kind of suspicious. So I'm sorta on is that a little pot company you bought down there and Chile or this one up here in Canada, really such a great business, but everybody seems to go, you know, it's going to be so this is going to be the constellation of pot. We're going to have all these different pop brands and constellation wants in on that crazy thing to me is that you would take like four billion dollars if your constellation and put that in here. You've already got a pretty good stake in this company. If it by some chance turns out to be big and important. You own a pretty big chunk already. I mean, constellation, you look at their margins, they can sell anything to anybody, right? They have people drinking corona for crying out loud. Not a fan of God, so it's what it's the cores of Mexico or or is it the natty Boh? I'm not sure what it is, not sure, but people drink it so that obviously they can sell anything to anybody if it's as blue as they do a good job at they get great cash flow out of this by your own shares for crying out loud, you do a great job. I don't know why you need something is is as speculative as marijuana, especially with an investment that is to attempt to your current market cap or something like that. So that was the thing that makes the canopy investment all the more puzzling. When you look at this latest quarter from constellation brands. Beer sales on the rise shipments on the rise, same for wine and spirits. It's they're selling higher margin stuff. You'll Coronas expensive. I mean, it's basically water and it's expensive. I don't know why they're not sticking to their knitting on this one because they're doing a good job and it's not exciting. I well, I mean to your point, they already had the investment in canopy grow there. I'm not sure why they felt so confident in it that they felt the need to increase it to the degree that they did win. You know, some borrowed money. Sure. It'll all work out. I'm sure if it works out fine. Everyone will say, see you idiots. There didn't know anything. And if it doesn't work out fine, nobody will remember that we lightly pooh-poohed it constellation just sell the booze. Everybody likes everyone likes drinking. Well, there's certainly enough of it, but you know, here's here's a good thing as investors because like you. I'm not. I'm not an investor in cannabis. I. I am however, very curious to see how all of this plays out. And I think that's going to be one of the more interesting things to watch over the next twelve months as we're now what two weeks away from the legalisation kicking in in Canada. We have four more still trying call Canada for four more states in here in the US have various levels of legalization on the ballot in the midterm elections. And so now we're going to say it's like, okay, everyone. It's not just canopy growth. All of these companies have been pushing the story, pushing it a trend, and it is largely worked out for them and now it's to to use a tired glee shea, it's this is where the rubber meets the road. And we're going to see who who speeds ahead and who ends up as roadkill thing is with with with booze and with drinking. I, I used to brew beer beer is actually, you know, kind of tough to make, especially in the quantities. You might wanna drink it. Same thing spirits. You can't. Potus really easy to grow. It's a weed, and I don't say that because I'm growing pot. I say that because I, I ride my bike through Iowa quite often and on the small roads, you're still seeing ditch weed from the forties. You're seeing him from the forties. It is impossible not to grow pot, and so I don't understand why the marijuana industry doesn't just become a really fragmented. Everyone likes small brands now. Right? So if there's brands, why would it be big? Wouldn't it be a bunch of small, artisanal? Nobody can see my finger quilts in the podcast, artisanal brands and then and then the underlying product is just an agricultural commodity. I mean, if you're growing pot, you want to grow it in Iowa, you will have no problem getting the costs down a long way. Quick shot to slack for supporting today's episode of market fully. Slack is a collaboration for work, whatever work you do and with slack, the right people in your team are kept in the loop and the information they need is always at their fingertips. Teamwork on. Slack happens in channels and it lets you organize conversations and information around projects offices and teams. Because everything you need is in one place, it's faster and easier to get things done. And with slack, your team is better connected when Seth and I were working on stories today, we're doing on slack when south wanted to know what time we're going to start taping. She hit me up on slack and I stepped away from my computer and and didn't see that message, which is why I had to interrupt your lunch. You horrible. I look, I'm horrible for reasons far beyond anything. Reheated bounty. Slack makes it easy to share files whether it's documents, links to articles and it works with Google Drive and Salesforce, and you can tailor it to work with over one thousand APs slack where work happens, find out why at slack dot com. As I said before, our Email address is market full, read fool dot com question from Lance price, who as I always enjoy market, fluorine motley fool money. Will there be any podcast listener meet ups in Denver? Yes, there will be, but everyone's going to be so stoned that you won't get any questions answered. I guess. We'll see. It's going to be Tuesday, October twenty third. So if you are in the Denver area, Email us market fully at full dot com, and we will send you all of the details for our listener meet up. That's Tuesday, October twenty. Third in Denver, that really is one really is. I don't think those guys'll be stoned. Actually. I'm just my experience. My last experience in Colorado. I was out there to run pikes peak marathon. The hotel room is across the parking lot from a marijuana store, and the parking lot was so full all day that it really scared me. Did you partake to to help yourself with the run either before or after now? That is not something I'm interested in. I don't. I don't. Yeah, I bet someone did. I bet at least one runner was like, I'm in pain and I'm going to reduce the pain. There were plenty of people partaking downtown. I'll tell you that much earning season begins next week with as is the case the the big banks kicking off. And I'm curious as we head into the final earning season of twenty eighteen what if anything you're watching, whether it's a company or an industry or anything. I'm interested to see how much making America. Great again is going to. Have an effect on a lot of the companies out there. They're paying a lot more for steel manufacturers more for aluminum, they've got tariffs, and so I'm interested to see when that finally starts to hit home. I mean, you read a lot of stories now in the the various newspapers of smaller businesses that are struggling. And so I wanna see how that's going to flow through companies. Like, you know, titan international that tiremaker while rubbers expensive steals expensive agriculture is getting pummeled because of tariffs and trade wars. Steel and aluminum, you think there is an attractor and

marijuana constellation brands Slack Canada corona Barnes Starbucks Denver US Seth Iowa Amazon Chile pikes peak Lance price Bonn America James xactly
"barnes noble" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Way and who knows how long it'll last but but right now they're the proving that you actually can survive if you make it exciting if you make it different if you give people good reason to go there right yeah i think barnes and noble the the biggest thing is is that the money in what they back in the past eight to ten years were all the wrong bats and what is going to take is a ton of money and i just don't see anybody having the pallet to allow them to do that going forward because if you look at sort of the same story with toys r us they got a situation where they really couldn't take the money to truly innovate what they were providing people along with their debt and all that other stuff that there was really kind of know scape for them so unless somebody steps forward and i i don't think it's gonna happen to truly change and actually understand a way to connect with that customer it's just not gonna happen let's go to the phones right now joanne is in los angeles california joanne welcome to the show all right good morning still mourning for us here in philadelphia that's all right go ahead yes i like to see noble go smaller and have more author's coming in any sense because that is one of the things that was unique and nice about them as well as you know other things and that would be an event bad you know could is different from amazon well i mean we talked about the space issue to adapt all these stores but the the book events with authors and maybe doing more book clubs and stuff those are ways to kind of connect with consumers and they've tried a little bit of that but it's it's just it's real it's not in their dna anymore they're they're big box they're the kind of onesizefitsall on i think it's the these these small local places that just can can do that kind of thing better it's better space for they do it with more genuine authenticity rather than the kind of the fakey vanilla kind that that barnes and noble with layer on one of the other things i wanted to touch on before we.

barnes los angeles philadelphia amazon joanne california ten years
"barnes noble" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"I think we all agree is just a matter of time i think the way in which it goes in the reaction to it it's going to be different than let's say toys r us in that case it was like whoa it was quickly what happened what's going to happen here is people going to say i mean that didn't happen all ready that they're still around now and again it's it's really sad but but there's nobody who's going to say you know well they put up a good fight those say you know that this this was their fate years ago and and it's been kind of painful to watch again the to join in with your comments eight four four nine four two seven eight six six or if you'd like on twitter at biz radio one eleven or my twitter account which is at dan looney twenty one i and again i mean this is a bigger issue just in general with a lot of these legacy brands he's legacy stores beater that just in they're not able to make that adjustment they're not able to make that adaptation to what we're seeing now as the one of the consumer here in the year twenty eighteen ambience and seemingly this has been a bigger shift i think and you would and the rest of the guest would knows this feels like a bigger shift in this sector in the last five ten years that maybe we'd seen in in this type of sector in the prior fifty years to that part of it of course is because of the closeness to amazon yeah that just makes it particularly acute that that it's it's real easy to say it is amazon that drove barnes and noble out of business i don't think that's true i think it's parts noble that drove itself out of business by not adapting to the to the times and kind of moving with its customers it's a it's just real easy to jump to that conclusion probably not warranted i think they'll be a other big box is going away but on the other hand let's give shout out to a best buy that that seemed to be on this very same trajectory and man oh man if they turn things around and just a really dramatic way.

twitter dan looney barnes amazon five ten years fifty years
"barnes noble" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"barnes noble" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Public library that serves starbucks coffee and a lot of people just go in and browse get their cup of coffee and maybe that's the only purchase they have and walk away what what i think they're really missing and it could be because their size and everything is in retail in general it seems like customers want a personalized experience and it goes to why independence are so successful in that that you have a small john ryan you have people that work in the store that no romance or no mystery or no sifi or what have you inside and out and make personalized recommendations and have a conversation with a person that's a really unique experience i can't remember the last time i had a conversation with someone like that in barnes and noble my previous life fifteen sixteen years ago was working as executive at borders and i remember in the nineties we did try to have booksellers and we actually trained when we hired on people to see did they have an interest in a certain jonah books so they could hold a conversation with the customer make personalized recommendations to customer based on on their experience and background and barnes and noble there really is not that kind of unique experience anymore giving people reason why to go in and shop other than taking you to the book that you're looking for right and there's really no discussion and seemingly that feels right like that is one of the biggest issues in in retail today we've mentioned with mark in the past amputee is the fact that that experience the people are looking for just in many cases not all but in many cases is just not there anymore.

barnes executive starbucks fifteen sixteen years