35 Burst results for "Barnes"

"barnes" Discussed on Overthrowing Education

Overthrowing Education

02:29 min | 2 weeks ago

"barnes" Discussed on Overthrowing Education

"I am restructuring your learning path to meet your new goal of becoming a game developer. I'm sold. Thank you. Get the learning GPS today. Welcome to overthrowing education. I'm about 7, and I'm so glad you are listening because my guest Matt Barnes has so many great takeaways for parents and educators. I hope this episode is heard by more parents because Matt's message about them should be heard by everyone. It could literally, and I actually mean that in the literal sense, not the hyperbolic overused way, it could literally change education in amazing ways. So please share this episode with every parent you know. I guess speaking of amazing, as I was editing this episode, I realized that I said, amazing, way too many times. So, if you were the first person to tweet out with the correct number of times, I said, amazing. On this episode and make sure to tag me at overthrowing Ed, I will send you an overthrowing education mug. Anyway, Matt also has discussed help for teachers who want to see real changes in education. And speaking of making great changes in education, you'll hear us talk about gem, the global education movement. At the time of our interview, I hadn't been able to attend a Thursday meeting, but since that time, I become a bit of a regular and I've gotten to know Matt even better. And I have to say the more I know him, the more impressed I am. And now, my conversation with.

Matt Barnes Matt
What Can We Expect Next From the Durham Investigation?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:42 min | 3 weeks ago

What Can We Expect Next From the Durham Investigation?

"What can we expect from this point forward? So is Durham wrapping up his investigation? There's still some skeptics out there, cash. There's still some cynics. Hey look, there'll be a couple process crimes, but don't hold your breath. You're not going to get a Comey. You're not going to get a struck. You're not going to get a page. You're not going to get him a cave. You're not going to get anyone from the senior level of the Clinton campaign. What do you think? Look, I've run these massive conspiracy, massive national security cases, and they take two. I spent two three four years on some cases. John Barnes in his second year. And he's working against literally everyone in government because Merrick Garland's Department of Justice doesn't want to prosecute this. And the Chris ray and the FBI don't want to. So I don't think you issue 40 page indictments for process crimes and tell the world what you're working on if you're just going to stop. That's my opinion. And remember to your audience, an indictment is the only way a prosecutor can tell the world what they're doing because they're not allowed to disclose their evidence. So John Durham has taken the time to methodically issue indictments totaling over a 101 hundred pages now for three people. That's it. And he's identified 15 individuals like the Clinton operative in the matter like Fiona hill like Michael sussman and the like, and I think that's why he's building a larger conspiracy. Now, look, I'm not married to this pipe dream that we're going to get Comey. I wish we could, but I unfortunately just don't think we have the Jews to do it. I do think we have a shot at Andy mccabe and that's probably why the likes of Peter strzok are out in the media now, parading around. Just like Christopher Steele did, parading around his false credibility, now Peter strzok's turn. And that should tell you something that may be something else that's coming down the

Comey Merrick Garland John Barnes Durham Chris Ray John Durham Clinton Department Of Justice Fiona Hill Michael Sussman FBI Peter Strzok Andy Mccabe Christopher Steele
Keep the Movement Going: Buy and Share 'American Marxism'

Mark Levin

01:44 min | Last month

Keep the Movement Going: Buy and Share 'American Marxism'

"One I want to keep this movement going ladies and gentlemen The movement that you and I know exists under the radar they were now and then we show some ankle Even our Friends on TV and on radio they don't acknowledge it but that's okay They react to it And I'll react We're in this baby We're on the front lines where the point of the spear you and me all of us Those of you who have not acquired your copies of American Marxism please do As soon as possible or get the audio or however doesn't matter whatever platform will ever form I was in Costco today for my regular hot dog and I want to salute kashka This book's been out now over three and a half months and Costco still has it on its table In Costco rarely ever does that Rarely And I want to salute yes Amazon Amazon is kept stocked up Barnes and noble Walmart has done a fantastic job Sam's And BJ's and all of them They've been absolutely superb So the books are there for now Then about the supply chain stuff I told you about paper It's no joke It's no head fake There really is a paper issue Let's toilet paper paper towels or paper for books So I want to encourage you to act I want to keep this movement going This is our way of trying to defend the country internally Most of us are not in the military overseas Most of us are not police officers or in law enforcement And we're not even talking about that kind of defense We're talking about defense in a republic As civilians

Costco Amazon Walmart Barnes SAM
Chapter 4 of 'American Marxism' Is a Frequent Favorite

Mark Levin

01:27 min | Last month

Chapter 4 of 'American Marxism' Is a Frequent Favorite

"I went into a Barnes and no copies audiobook and I also got the breaking the news and four copies of that in an audiobook and I have to listen to it twice because I'm just a high school educated truck driver and it's got a lot of stuff that I have to research and find out what it means But my favorite chapter so towards chapter four and I'm actually on the second going through a second time on there But Alex Carlos book will answer some of your questions about who's at the media and stuff like that He's got a lot of stuff But Jonathan I've always said about this book Take your time and you may have to go through it once or twice There are twice And chapter four is on the CRT and gender ism and Marxism how they all relate and that seems to be among the favorite of a lot of folks too And you know I had a dirty Joe just FYI you know and to do my part to speak out and everything I had a dirty trailer I just went up to Boston and on the back of the trailer you know I wrote my glove and I wrote CRT equals segregation And on the other side I wrote read American Marxism by Mark Levin With Tennessee And nobody saw that yet Well thank you for that I

Alex Carlos Barnes Jonathan JOE Boston Mark Levin Tennessee
"barnes" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

05:10 min | 2 months ago

"barnes" Discussed on Conversations

"There was a bit of a hippie. Which which would have made him a target somebody but he came straight up to me for some reason the other boys because it would killed him and he knew my brother john. John had a bit of a reputation as being in band since he was twelve. And this guy came up where getting the band together and we want. We're looking for a singer. Your be okay. You might be your brother. So i looked seemed surreal. Hippie is looked like he's is long hair and boxes and they look like he didn't fit my gang. I thought well this is sort of guys in here but Gave me a piece of paper and said come to this address on saturday. If you're interested in any quickly got. I wish awhi- sanctity and i just shoved at mytalk. I wasn't going to go and am signing the united sort of one of these moments where you get a bit of clara eight. I'm standing there. And i looked at myself. And i'm you know sixteen years old and i spend every night that week hanging around outside and snoop whole whiten to fight with somebody. Don't even and i just thought to myself. What am i do it. No one what am i was so i thought i'm gonna go. I'm gonna go up to an ed. Gave me an address. It was in the city train up in turn very nervous. Leading batsman only bands started and kids and never really audition. So i was really nervous when i didn't take rejection will on the edge. I've had a big night and found a place and it was a women's liberation home in adelaide. Which i i thought immediately to take the piss out of you know. I had no idea that coaches will started in the women's liberation adler for a long long time. This really great. I mean the women ran this home. Empathic and we really re- respect for them and with having the space to rehearse. But i got they're gonna come on and anyway i walked upstairs and sure enough. There was abandoned. They're waiting to rehearse they were nothing. Like my mates. Don was looked like a unique shoot. He was he was a physics student. Ian was a country boy from mossy marshmallow springs and laser. The guy who started coaches or less cosmic was told good looking polish bass player with big flavors and really shiny gear and none of my band said any equipment we can afford it and i remember going in and it was really nervous. Anything the someone's at all. Do you know any songs by free. On of my favorite in the world i knew every solves. I said yeah so. We sang a few songs and immediately they let me join the band like sixteen and a half of that point and that changed my life. It was sort of my ticket out standing in that corner. Think waiting to find. People didn't make any sense to me and hadn't ever made sense to me you know. It's like fate just okay. I'm a and if coaches on. Come along i think i would have just jumped on a train or hitchhiked out and god knows what i would like. My mates are probably would have been dead. I hadn't joined coaches on the first album. The band's fest album came out in early nineteen seventy-nine. Hey did you meet in november of that year. Your boss..

whiten clara john John adelaide united Ian Don
"barnes" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:14 min | 2 months ago

"barnes" Discussed on Conversations

"Built the city. Just to give holden's put a factory there and and i think this strain government did a deal with holden's that they bought this big package of language was absolutely horrible. And you know like nothing rose and they and they said yeah you can buy cheap and the factory up. And they said and we'll give you a workforce and they built this city for migrants there and and basically elizabeth. Was you know when i moved. There was all neat new like the new suburbs in and out of sydney and also stuff and within by the time we left a ten years later it was know just horrible it was at all but but initially idea paper they put. They're all there and they had had. Everybody worked at holden's so there was the role the and there was a pumpkin in every sort of district. So the there was plenty of places for the main get drunk before it'd be wives and also to stop so what happened. Was all the problems. They had in britain and most of the immigrants from northern britain. Because it was a big big push in northern britain and and they just throw all the problems that they probably ran up like. I know my parents so we can move to australia and leave at problems behind. you know. my dad's violence and alcoholism and you know whatever. My mom was running from those all sorts of things and they could come here that fresh and it doesn't work like that unless you address the issues like. That's what i find it as well so it was quite a violent place where you tell a story. I think in working class boy of visiting a family friend's house and their fight breaks out between two brothers. Awesome some cigarettes. What happened a miami christmas. I'm gonna feel. It was christmas and we were there friends of my my dad's and it was. I was eight or nine but this couple had two sons one was about seventeen was eighteen and they were arguing about a pack of cigarettes when we the it was getting quite heated. And we're just gonna sit down for dinner. Wanted storm dos and in the bedroom and the door slammed and we're all sitting at the table and and the other brother was sitting across the table for may and june before the meal were served on the The the brother came out in the bedroom.

holden northern britain britain elizabeth sydney australia miami
"barnes" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:28 min | 2 months ago

"barnes" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an abc podcast. When jimmy bonds was a teenager he and some mates kicked in the back door of the apollo stadium in adelaide to see tina and arc turn. Jimmy made his way to the very front and he was transfixed by tina's power her energy legs. He was also mesmerized by the driving. Power of the band unto ike turner's direction the magic combination. Jimmy encountered that not of saul and force and precision is what he's aimed for with his own music. They've been many times with cold chisel and as a solo performer. That he's got there. They have also been times when other things got in the way booze and drugs and the demons of his troubled childhood over the last few years. Jimmy barnes has been bringing those demons out into the lot by riding the story of his life. I in working class boy then working class man and now in his new book killing time and a warning. Jimmy is very candid about his life story and there are elements that some of you might find upsetting. Haji me how well do you remember that. Tina turner gig very well. I mean just from that was just it was inspiring me and my mates by the way we didn't particularly go. See tina turner. We'd just go to any concerts. The apollo stadium which was the big. That was the only international acts played in adelaide. And we were just hoodlums and so basically we'd go there and we had the system we knew there was about tena twenty of us. Oh would kick the back door and there was only two or three bounces so they can only catch a few of us. So you'd sacrifice one or two of your best friends and then you know the rest of his little get in and we used to do this almost every week and not seen all sorts of wonderful things. of course i'd heard river deep mountain high end. It was a fan of that song. But i didn't really know what to expect when a guardian there of course tina don't just looking fabulous in the front of the cats so i did. Everybody does around on the front got fund and it wasn't just you know i was in literally. Just the oh. These legs in front of me was amazing but more than that was just the intensity that the woman sang within the power and the commitment to what she was doing was just and i was standing. There was what. I was like mesmerized by this as a young fellow fourteen or something i know. Stop beating up inside of my own. We were in the garish man. I was watching of just this secret and and it just happened for sake and to gaze pasta these incredible women that were performing and are seen this guy in the back and i noticed everybody in the band was watching him and and he was the one was bang everytime he moved these legged abandoned. The next sent it was intense and he was really tasks and it was. I turn and so. I know and as everybody else knows i turned out to be really bad cat but he knew how to run a band. I think that drive in that power that he was demanding from us band the push tina hotter and hotter every every show an obviously because she did so much after she left. She hadn't even hit full speech..

apollo stadium jimmy bonds Jimmy tina tina turner adelaide ike turner Jimmy barnes river deep mountain saul Haji abc tena
"barnes" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

03:28 min | 2 months ago

"barnes" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an abc podcast. When jimmy bonds was a teenager he and some mates kicked in the back door of the apollo stadium in adelaide to see tina and arc turn. Jimmy made his way to the very front and he was transfixed by tina's power her energy legs. He was also mesmerized by the driving. Power of the band unto ike turner's direction the magic combination. Jimmy encountered that not of saul and force and precision is what he's aimed for with his own music. They've been many times with cold chisel and as a solo performer. That he's got there. They have also been times when other things got in the way booze and drugs and the demons of his troubled childhood over the last few years. Jimmy barnes has been bringing those demons out into the lot by riding the story of his life. I in working class boy then working class man and now in his new book killing time and a warning. Jimmy is very candid about his life story and there are elements that some of you might find upsetting. Haji me how well do you remember that. Tina turner gig very well. I mean just from that was just it was inspiring me and my mates by the way we didn't particularly go. See tina turner. We'd just go to any concerts. The apollo stadium which was the big. That was the only international acts played in adelaide. And we were just hoodlums and so basically we'd go there and we had the system we knew there was about tena twenty of us. Oh would kick the back door and there was only two or three bounces so they can only catch a few of us. So you'd sacrifice one or two of your best friends and then you know the rest of his little get in and we used to do this almost every week and not seen all sorts of wonderful things. of course i'd heard river deep mountain high end. It was a fan of that song. But i didn't really know what to expect when a guardian there of course tina don't just looking fabulous in the front of the cats so i did. Everybody does around on the front got fund and it wasn't just you know i was in literally. Just the oh. These legs in front of me was amazing but more than that was just the intensity that the woman sang within the power and the commitment to what she was doing was just and i was standing. There was what. I was like mesmerized by this as a young fellow fourteen or something i know. Stop beating up the side of my own. We were in the garish man. I was watching of just this secret and and it just happened for sake and to gaze pasta these incredible women that were performing and are seen this guy in the back and i noticed everybody in the band was watching him and and he was the was bang everytime he moved these legged abandoned. The next sent it was intense and he was really tasks and it was. I turn and so. I know and as everybody else does knows i turned out to be really bad cat but he knew how to run a band that drive in that power that he was demanding from us band the push tina hotter and hotter every every show an obviously because she did so much after she left. She hadn't even hit full speech..

apollo stadium jimmy bonds Jimmy tina tina turner adelaide ike turner Jimmy barnes river deep mountain saul abc Haji tena tina hotter
Why Is It Important to Potty Train Cows?

Science Magazine Podcast

01:28 min | 2 months ago

Why Is It Important to Potty Train Cows?

"Now we have online news editor david. Graham he's here to talk about potty training cows. Hi dave hey sir all right. We're already laughing but it's not silly. It's serious why would we need to tell cows where to go. Well house as you may have seen or heard make a lot of waste appeal lot. They poop watch and not so much of a problem if they're out in the field and actually it's not always the problem when they're in a bar setting because the way barnes have operated until recently scousers confined in these stalls through tied up and so they can only sort of excrete in one area. The problem which is kind of a bit of conundrum is that as barnes have tried to become more. The cows have more free roam in the barn and so maybe you sometimes have hundred or more cows roaming around a bar and on these concrete floors their pooping and peeing everywhere. And that's not only sort of a health issue for the cows and actually for people to but when urine feces knicks. It actually creates a monja which is a very toxic chemical both cows in for people Ammonia can become nitrous oxide which is a very potent greenhouse gas and so ironically by trying to improve cow welfare were also sort of hurting the environment and so the question is can we get cows. We get cows to sort of excrete in just one location. It would be a lot easier to clean it up or store to use it like as fertilizer or other types of things

Dave Hey Barnes Graham David Knicks
Brianna Parmentier: Do Cows Get Exploited for Their Milk?

Real Food Real People

01:46 min | 2 months ago

Brianna Parmentier: Do Cows Get Exploited for Their Milk?

"So some people are really concerned that animals are like being exploited to produce milk for us to drink all dairy products for farms to profit. Or whatever what's your take on that you manage the cows on this farm your the the herds woman are these cows happy are they okay so we wouldn't be able to get quality of milk or volume of milk out of the cows at all if there were any sort of stress so it is not any. I'm gonna say farming in general their best interests to have stressed animals so by providing twenty four hours of feed and misters in the parlor. When it's hot and fans and most of these cal- pens have cow brushes in them just enrichment and that sort of thing. It provides them the most stable environment constant today today for them to go about their life thermal or an eat get milked of the pressure and consistent so by that consistency we get the most out of product. Cows don't really like change for one. I've been told no they dislike the same thing every day. I wouldn't want to eat the same thing every day but they seem to do pretty dang. Well yup no they. The heat is one thing the l. weather's out of everyone's control but it's in our best interest to try to keep it somewhat the same every single day so the barnes provide a nice stable temperature that we can kind of control with fans to keep the air flowing because air quality makes a really big difference in the animal. Health is their their pooping. They're coughing. They're doing all normal animal statham

Statham
Why States Are Sending Transgender Athletes to the Sidelines

ESPN Daily

02:08 min | 2 months ago

Why States Are Sending Transgender Athletes to the Sidelines

"Katie barnes can you tell me a little bit about becky pepper jackson. Becky is an eleven year old girl. Who loves to run with her family. Favorite sport cross country. And the reason why i love it so much is because my whole family have always done it most nights especially in the summer they go out and run a mile together in through the rolling hills of the west virginia countryside. You remember the first time you ever ran for a long time Running with my mom when she was on the stroller. When i was in the stroller now troy and becky's just like every other kid except she's transgender heading into sixth grades. The first time she'd be able to run cross country for her school. She really wanted to join the team. But west virginia passed a law. That would have made it impossible for her to do so. A bill moving through the west virginia house would place new restrictions on transgender student. Athletes kabila supporters believe transgender athletes. Have an unfair advantage over non transgender athletes and so her mom and becky sued in order to get the right for her to run cross country with her peers. This is all stemming from a transgender student here in harrison county that wanted to run on her middle school cross country team. The american civil liberties union filed a lawsuit on her behalf. Mbeki's the only young transgender person who is faced with this issue. It's a sippy is poised to ban transgender athletes from competing in women's sports in schools and universities florida. Girls are gonna play girls sports in boys. You're going to play voice sports. That's what we're doing at least twenty four states at least twenty five states at least twenty-six states have now introduced similar. Bill's over sixty bills targeting trans youth. Specifically

Katie Barnes Becky Pepper Jackson West Virginia Becky Troy Kabila Harrison County American Civil Liberties Union Mbeki Florida Bill
New Zealand Company to Trial a Four-Day Week

The Pulse

02:07 min | 3 months ago

New Zealand Company to Trial a Four-Day Week

"Right now. A lot of employers are having a hard time finding staff. I'm seeing signs and ads. Promise bonuses for new employees all kinds of perks. Some economists argue that better working conditions could change the game higher wages good benefit packages and how about a shorter workweek for the same pay jets. Lehman has this profile of a new zealand company. That's trying that approach. Few months i've been giving whole question of of how we work quantities. Andrew barnes stood before an assembly of his employees and told them that starting in about a month everyone would work only four days a week instead of five and he'd keep paying everyone their full salary they'd keep all their benefits. You forte's week and you will be five q the balloon drop and confetti cannons right. You know the initial response from the company was not rapturous applause. It was shock and followed by nervous laughter. Because what was the catch. The had to be a catch. This was in two thousand eighteen. Before the pandemic ended the meaning of work for millions and andrews company perpetual guardian wasn't some plucky new startup out to disrupt and shake things up the two principal. Units of my business have been around since the eighties so we are very much old school and trust companies. Aw very stayed dull boring. Dependable businesses estate planning basically synonymous with stability continuity. Doing things the way they'd always been done andrews colleagues were skeptical of his plans to say the least girl italy every single person on my board every single member of the leadership team all four. It was not gonna work. And i was mad but andrew very conveniently owned a good chunk of the company.

Andrew Barnes Lehman Perpetual Guardian Forte New Zealand Andrews Italy Andrew
Tampa Rays Beat Boston Red Sox 6-1

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Tampa Rays Beat Boston Red Sox 6-1

"The tampa bay rays the defending champions the american league unequivocally the league's best team they faced the red sox last night and louise patino a key. Piece acquired in the deal with the padres was outstanding tremendous stuff in the raise dismantle boston. Nick better first brandon lau is rocketed the right sterner betty the budweiser ports pets up. And that's where it landed. I swing here. The i just wanted to bud light. It's one nothing race. They will six twenty. Da the raise win that game six to one before the game. The red sox announced that. Closer matt barnes was played placed on the kobe. Nineteen injured list on monday. Joining several teammates will miss time during the critical stretch of the season. Also at kika dez christian arroyo in pitcher martine

Louise Patino Brandon Lau Tampa Bay Rays Red Sox American League Padres Nick Boston Matt Barnes Arroyo Martine
Scherzer Shuts Down Padres, Dodgers Win 4-0 for 3-Game Sweep

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Scherzer Shuts Down Padres, Dodgers Win 4-0 for 3-Game Sweep

"Max Scherzer threw seven two thirds shutout innings leading the Los Angeles Dodgers to afford nothing win over the San Diego Padres shares are dominated the hapless San Diego offense allowing just two hits while striking out ten improving to foreign as a Dodger twelve and four overall on the season Austin Barnes two run Homer was all the offense only needed behind Scherzer at the Dodgers won for the twelfth time in their last thirteen games you Darvish returned from the I. L. for San Diego allowing four runs on five hits taking a loss and falling to seven and eight the Dodgers remain two and a half games behind the giants in the National League west Phillip Gaunce San Diego

Dodgers Max Scherzer Austin Barnes San Diego Padres San Diego Scherzer Homer Darvish National League West Phillip Giants
Biden Admin Wants Left-Media Validation With Americans Stranded in Afghanistan

Mark Levin

01:18 min | 3 months ago

Biden Admin Wants Left-Media Validation With Americans Stranded in Afghanistan

"The school. Children. Their parents in Afghanistan. And if you listen to this clown whose secretary state you listen to this clown this This this communications director Admiral over at defense and you listen to this clown. In the Oval Office. I think they call them, uh, Joe Biden. Everything's going hunky Doory. Ladies and gentlemen, it's the greatest event military. Civilian farm we've ever seen, and they're very upset with the kind of press they're getting. Very, very upset. White House to media politico. We want our props on Afghan. We want our props. What's going on? Come on. We're Jim Acosta when we need and where's D lemon? A. Fredo Cuomo. Where's uh, What's the rest of them? Where's that schmuck from the Washington Pull out. Jeremy Jeremy Jeremy Barnes. Where's Jeremy? Bar? We're going to have a whole book written about how fantastic this is by Professor Tom Nichols. Mr Producer. The only problem is nobody will read it because nobody knows who he is. The people who know who he is thinks he's a putt, so nobody's gonna read Tom Nichols. Who exactly?

Jim Acosta Oval Office A. Fredo Cuomo Joe Biden Afghanistan Jeremy Jeremy Jeremy Barnes White House Schmuck Professor Tom Nichols Mr Producer Jeremy Washington Tom Nichols
'American Marxism' Continues to Fly off the Shelves

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 3 months ago

'American Marxism' Continues to Fly off the Shelves

"It was in a Costco today. My local Costco, Leesburg, Virginia. Told you I go there about once a week to get a hot dog. And I was walk through there, You know, Keep my hat down. The other things I get from time to time I went through the book table there. And I want to thank them. Because there were a couple of stacks in my book, but it looks like you folks are very busy. Because there were a lot of new books, including from some of our friends, and there were a couple of stacks there and it didn't look like anybody was buying many of them. But when it came to American Marxism There were two stacks and they were half gone. And whether it's Costco or Barnes and Noble. Or WalMart. Target. Sam's Club. BJ's So many of you out there. And even most of all, Amazon I feel like we're making a lot of progress. I really do. I really do. I think will be at 900,000 and a couple of weeks. And maybe a month or so after that. I think we'll be at the At the Million mark. As I've told you, I think when we're at the million mark, that's where we're going to be. That is Then we've reached the pinnacle, hopefully more, But then we've reached the pinnacle. That means a million of you. A million of you have jumped in

Costco Leesburg Sam's Club Virginia BJ Barnes Walmart Amazon
"barnes" Discussed on theblerdgurl

theblerdgurl

03:31 min | 4 months ago

"barnes" Discussed on theblerdgurl

"Because those doors are not gonna stay wide open but enough of us can push them open or like able to rene said once when i invited her to spend we can build their own doors. Hey folks carol horn aka the blur girl and welcome back to the blur girl. Podcast now if you are a writer or an aspiring writer or fan of horror this is the episode for you now. This is another episode to the blur girl. Live in fact. It was recorded last july. But it's actually pretty timely. Because this week it was announced that my guests to redo and her husband steven. Barnes are going to be executive producers on a new show coming to shudder..

carol horn rene steven Barnes
Detroit Pistons Grab Cade Cunningham at No. 1 in NBA Draft

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 4 months ago

Detroit Pistons Grab Cade Cunningham at No. 1 in NBA Draft

"The Detroit Pistons made Oklahoma state point guard Cade Cunningham the first pick of the NBA draft the six day coming in with the big twelve player of the year as a freshman averaging twenty points a game the Houston Rockets followed by selecting guard Jaelyn Greene became the first player drafted that high street out of the G. league U. S. C. big man Evan bubbly then went third to the Cleveland Cavaliers fall by Florida's the fourth Scottie Barnes in the surprise of the Toronto raptors Gonzaga point guard Jalen Suggs was then scooped up number five by Orlando who also took Michigan's Franz Wagner eighth I'm Tom Mariam

Cade Cunningham Jaelyn Greene Detroit Pistons G. League Evan Bubbly Houston Rockets Oklahoma NBA Scottie Barnes Cleveland Cavaliers Jalen Suggs Toronto Raptors Florida Franz Wagner Orlando Michigan Tom Mariam
Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

Data Skeptic

02:10 min | 4 months ago

Opportunities for Skillful Weather Prediction

"My name is elizabeth. Barnes i go by libby an associate professor in the department about miss science here at colorado state university. You told me a little bit. Broadly speaking about your interest research wise and things like that. I guess in broad terms. I'm a climate scientists. I've been studying. Climate dynamics that includes climate change but also the earth's climate as it is today as it wasn't in the past and really probably on this podcast but also might broad interest are in the data science side. So how do we use. Data and analysis tools be at statistics mathematics modeling to understand the system and all of the interacting pieces. Could you go into little depth about the data. You're interested in even what's available as most listeners. Do some data science. Maybe they're used to working on the internet where it's as easy as just tracking something but the earth has been leaving us clues for a while. What do you have access to to study specifically the part of atmospheric science i study. I'd like to say we actually really have data coming out our ears. We have so much data. That's not all good data but one of the reasons. I'm so excited about eight science machine. Learning techniques is how can we utilize the data that we have even when some of it. Maybe isn't perfect. For example we have in science in climate science. We have paleo record so ice cores that tell us what the climate looked like hundreds of thousands of years ago today satellites that are constantly there orbiting the earth or sitting still and staring at one place over and over again and they're pouring data in all of the time sometimes it's hard to just get data and process it once we have it than you know so we can do fun stuff just getting it into a processed form is a lot of work. We have climate model data so we have these big climate models that are being run on supercomputers all over the world to try to help us understand the climate system and they are out putting a lot of data in people need to look at it to try to answer and ask interesting questions about the our system and we have people here my department. I don't do this. Atmospheric scientists say with a weather balloon or radar and actually measuring thinking about the weather and the climate state. Right where you are.

Colorado State University Libby Barnes Elizabeth
Thank You to Bookstores Holding 'American Marxism'

Mark Levin

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

Thank You to Bookstores Holding 'American Marxism'

"Way, I want to thank all the great retailers out there. All the great retailers that sell books. As far as I know. Have been very generous with their shelf space. And have a significant inventory. Whether it's Barnes and over books, a million or Costco or all the others. Independent bookstores, too. So it's available. We can't accuse anybody of Of hiding them or not providing them. Hundreds of thousands of copies of the book. Now have you noticed something? Ladies and gentlemen? There's almost no reporting on this. So We were huddling here and talking. What will the response to the left will be the response to the left will be either to try and ignore them. Just stop saying Doctor touch some anything. Or let's trash the hell out of it. So far, it's the former

Costco Barnes
Young Caller Testifies on the Realities of Critical Race Theory in Schools

Mark Levin

01:25 min | 4 months ago

Young Caller Testifies on the Realities of Critical Race Theory in Schools

"You. Thank you for taking my call. Like I said, I'm 20 years old, actually. And my my father introduced me to your show Introduced me to you, Mr Rush Limbaugh and all the greats. Um, so I just want to say I appreciate everything you have to say. And I definitely learned a great deal every single day listening to you. Well, thank you also want to say I have preordered a couple of your books from Barnes and Noble. So I have those to look forward to picking those up very soon and a topic you haven't touched on today. I don't believe maybe you have earlier, however critical race there. I mean, this is a topic that a lot of people just want to dismiss. Obviously, you've touched on it many times, but it's real. 100% Israel As a 20 year old. I've lived through it. I see it all the time in my classes in college. I've seen it in high school. I've CNN junior high, and it's just hate filled. You know they talk about in the media critical race theory. If we don't have it, we don't talk about slavery. That's completely false. 100% false. We talk about those tough subjects, but the whole ideal surrounding it is that white people are bad black people are always at first. Bringing down people and telling people that they have absolutely no starting found and that they cannot their way up, especially kids and college students. My age. People just don't do their own research, so they just buy into it, and it's very

Mr Rush Limbaugh Barnes Noble CNN Israel
Caller Describes 'American Marxism' Flying off the Shelves in San Francisco

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 4 months ago

Caller Describes 'American Marxism' Flying off the Shelves in San Francisco

"I'm tremendous mark on the thank you for this book. I have to tell you two quick stories. One, uh, when I was in Barnes and noble this morning, and I went down to get it. That was my mission, And I asked the guy behind the counter where it was, and he'd be grudgingly pointed across the room. You know, it's right there, not really giving me much much service, and as I walked over, this was the best part. The guy, another worker at Barnes and Noble how to stack of him and he had to be. He was putting them on the shelf as the line I waited on in four or five people pull them off the shelf. The book I have in front of He was not on the shelf 30 seconds. And just I think it drives them crazy at Barnes and Noble. I'm in the belly of the beast. You know where I am. Santa Rosa County or Healdsburg, North San Francisco. Um And it was literally literally flying off the shelf. I mean, people were there to buy that book. So, uh, I was only up to about page 166, where you talk about Thomas Soul in the quest for cosmic justice, and I had to jump ahead when we When you talked about Chapter seven, I read a lot of political science books. It's what my education is in particularly interested in progressivism and the destructive nature. It has toward our founding principles, and I can't recommend this enough for people. That, um, are interested in this thing interested in saving our country because I have never, ever read a, uh, a chapter like we just went over. You just went over and the way you lay the groundwork for the war we're in And I'm I had never thought of these things that you mentioned the back of this book or Chapter seven. The one you just went over and I read with you. You You read it on the air. Um, brilliant things that the things that I have never seen that I've read thousands of political science books. Well, maybe not

Barnes North San Francisco Thomas Soul Santa Rosa County Healdsburg
'American Marxism' Is the #1 Book Across All Sites

Mark Levin

01:12 min | 4 months ago

'American Marxism' Is the #1 Book Across All Sites

"The number to book is our pal Jesse Waters book How I Saved the World. The next three out of four books are Trump trashing books. This full Michael Wolff book called Landslide Is Number three. Frankly, we did win this election. The inside story of how how Trump lost by Michael Bender. And then the number six is I alone can fix it. Now two out of three of these hate trump trash trump traps, Trump supporter books. Written by reporters. They're written by reporters. One for the Wall Street Journal and then two at the Washington Post. And Michael Wolff is the reprobate. We all know him to be. But American Marxism has blocked them from going to the top of the list. That's because of you. And these are the kinds of books that publishers have made a fortune off of over the years since the announcement of Donald Trump running for office. Now it's our turn, folks. It's pushback time. An American Marxism is number one on Amazon. It's number one on Barnes and Noble. It's number one on every single books

Donald Trump Jesse Waters Michael Wolff Michael Bender Wall Street Journal Washington Post Amazon Barnes Noble
'American Marxism' Will Be Available Wherever You Get Your Books

Mark Levin

01:08 min | 4 months ago

'American Marxism' Will Be Available Wherever You Get Your Books

"So I want to encourage you. Have this book show up at your house tomorrow or your place of business tomorrow or your workplace tomorrow. This order it online. And after tomorrow that is Excuse me. After today and starting tomorrow, the book will be available in Costco. Barnes and Noble. Wal Mart. Supposed to be the airport outlets, but typically, it's not I don't know what they do hide them in the back. All the warehouse stores. Books, a million all the independent bookstores. Wherever you shop. That's where this book is supposed to be available. They're going to be 800,000 copies of this book out there, Mr Producer. Not all of them will be first edition. You want first edition. You've got to get in there. Now. Get in there tonight and order it online. Some point, it won't matter. Some point, it won't matter. And here's the thing. Once you're done with this book, you're going to feel really good about

Wal Mart Costco Mr Producer Barnes Noble
"barnes" Discussed on Team Never Quit

Team Never Quit

04:30 min | 5 months ago

"barnes" Discussed on Team Never Quit

"She older younger older by fourteen months. Oh gosh they're only planning on having to so. Technically i could have been you know the mistake. The wuxi i'd do. They already have a name for the boy. Yes we spend an extra day or two in the hospital because they wouldn't release us until my parents had names. Yeah early four-term i work. My momma can hold up two months early free free pounds. Four pounds when we came in one of the sports signing now became. Believe that. but that's the way she was smaller clamped down on that umbilical by establishing dominance already often. So i know y'all obviously from the she never quit event which is one of my favorite things that we are able to do so bump last year we couldn't do it But i want to hear y'all's story like your parents pretty much live like the real true american dream and from you know you've shared some on instagram and If you could just tell that story when go there well. I think we were very fortunate because we had incredible role models are our parents. They they worked hard at everything they did and they They taught instill bad us to think they. My mom was a school teacher and she. She was one of those teachers that you either feared her. You loved her. She would teach she taught for first off middle school science and then she did Biology in high in high school and And then like a science and stuff like that and she was. We had her first semester and she was the hardest teacher. We had a really yeah. I didn't know whether to call her. Mom or mrs barnes and it just weird is the hardest a ever had to earn because she she wouldn't you know help us out with their homework or anything. She's like the other kids. Don't get my helps own. You're on your own dry. Try to gauge the way. Because y'all how she would teach like if you guys could pick that up and the rest of the class that was probably the scale definitely but yeah. I mean she. She was a phenomenal teacher. She she really pushed her students and stuff. And then my dad he He started out as a shop teacher and then started his own construction company and and just worked really hard. You know he He started out in a little tiny wiki trailer in during and then just kind of built their way up. You know working especially my dad working nights and all sorts of weekend projects and things like that just to try and make it especially with three kids and diapers and trying to start a new business and all that sort of stuff so yeah. They're incredible role models. And and i mean we just grown up we. We did anything and everything. We could especially outdoors and and You know living in the outdoors you you learn a lot of things about how to take care of yourself and and you know if you if all you have to get yourself back up and and It was it was great having My twin sister and our older sister. 'cause we you know we. We pushed each other and everything we did. It was one big competition after another. It's your third have the same interests she she does like. We grew up doing a lot of sports together. And we're all three of us are best friends and we will say that. She went the academic route and we went the sports route. Good looks in the brain the all get along pretty good though. Yeah yeah yeah. She became a ear-nose-and-throat surgeon. So yeah she's awesome nexus right there. Yeah yeah so. Then we went the the jock route..

mrs barnes
"barnes" Discussed on Poets and Muses: We chat with poets about their inspirations

Poets and Muses: We chat with poets about their inspirations

04:04 min | 6 months ago

"barnes" Discussed on Poets and Muses: We chat with poets about their inspirations

"And now let us turn to our poa. Guess of the week deny barnes. Hey thank you very much for coming onto poets muses. I'm really to thank you for help. You have you so. Please tell us a little bit about yourself by would consider myself a writer. Artist activist in phoenix for two years. Before that i was in the bay before that i was in. Dc place law. Yeah i like to think of myself as kind of closeted radical activist. Who's currently playing the capitalist game but good roadmap out. Yeah it will need to exit plan. Sure entrance into something else. Yes might let us know what activism into sure. When i was reborn involved in direct activism it was in dc. This was right around the time of the wto. Protest the mass prentice when that was really starting to pick up and these mass protests came back around in i was part of dc media and couple of groups didn't really have a website or web presence during those kinds of things when it was still possible to get close to the buildings so before the militarization of the police before you had the sort of special forces teams snipers on the top of the roof that would come in the infiltration of all these other things. We were getting up in people's faces were blocking off streets. We were blocking off doors. And i got really involved with a direct action really of this creating community organizing in a time when those big organizations still felt as if they were the neo. Liberal agenda was helping at it hadn't been clear to mainstream. Of course it was clear all communities all over the world effected by those policies. It was becoming more clear to people who were funding it. The average american taxpayer the average western citizen as it were that these works were were nefarious. And pretty pretty sketchy. Just call them sketchy. And so what i was doing was just standing on the street and shouting am organizing. Those protests and organizing things that were definitely not permited But then the solution that was to recognize that there was a lot of it was an extension of competition was okay. Well i'm going to stand in front of this cop. I'm gonna shout. Because i'm very angry. And i'm going to be bigger than that person in. That's how i know that my ideas better. And so i watch this kind of. It's a critique that's shown up a lot about who's at the protest how they protest their intent their strategies their tactics and i really saw that when i got started in radical activism that it was a lot of anger against anger without really a plan for next without a community clan building of destruction not building and at some point you recognize. How false studies just the same tools..

two years phoenix deny barnes american couple groups Dc
"barnes" Discussed on The Impact of Leadership

The Impact of Leadership

08:04 min | 6 months ago

"barnes" Discussed on The Impact of Leadership

"Important enough to me. that i would get out there. A risk getting in and the answer was absolutely yes to answer this with the excellent leadership. And what does it look like practically think a a big part of it is experienced. And i don't necessarily mean five to ten years on the job not that sort of experience experience especially in government. I think it should be about what a person actually understands about the world. Because for the most part you have upper-class you have business class in people who pretty much had figured out in regardless of what situations may arise. We'll be okay in. You have a very volatile middle class. We lost a lot of a lot of middle class. Go lowly last year already. Increased the question because what we do to make communities holy in. There are a lot of people who are serving in office who never had experienced any sort of harsh it. A think about a twenty. I mentioned a little bit of announce have. That's the waqian. I remember twenty nine. I was working for the walk. Eerie workforce investment board and their right of in hours released from forty to twenty. Nine was no longer eligible for health insurance or other parts. They came along with a full employment. And this is no fault amount. It wasn't because i was a bad employees or anything is that's just the way things happen in. After having to manage a budget that was significantly smaller than it was before I ended up getting laid off in my was people. Jobs were forced work which is a wild of irony Getting laid off the nets parole. But it helped me. Learn first hand i talked about the middle income also was not frivolous by any means but did experience a bit of frimley relatives to round recognize that and i think is important for leaders to recognize privileged that they do have in being in the household media. Worry out you know table out Next month i was fortunate in that regard op within this economic uncertainty for the first of all life as an adult now fortunately out in early twenties so able to that it helped me think about things especially affordable in public office helped me understand the struggles that so many people in the stains so many people across the country Rapport with in during this pandemic. I think that it is in highlighted. But there's still many folks who are making decisions for people who are down a hard times without ever having had that experience without knowing what is actually liked to have to go out front employment to have to for energy assistance to have to apply for food stamps or whatever other assistance just to be able to make it to the next day to try to improve your own life right in what i think about excellence leadership. It is being able to resonate with the people who need your help. The most how when it comes to leadership in government. I imagine there's that you've had experience with diverse communities because the same people continue to get ahead in our society insane people at negative rules the same equal in charge in the same people know the same people in uae holiest. Small percentage of our population continues to see so Benefit of government so we had the shift that paradigm i. We have to include. People in the conversation had traditionally in conversation especially hovers asians that impact their lies. I attract practice reaches much as humanly possible. We have conversations about incarceration or justice reform. Wanna make sure that we have a formerly of heart rate urban. Join the conversation at about poverty on. Ask somebody who's harvey in recent years. The our conversation is well because this is how we truly get to the root get to the core of what we're trying to deal with in f- i think that excellent leadership recognizes that is also recognizing that as an individual. I don't have all the answers. But it's important how he gets that answer so the extracting from that An empathetic position. That's fueled by the experiences that you've had as you move into positions of influence and remembering that staying tied to that not that your financial situation estate exactly the same as it did back in your early twenties but that you're not it's not lost on you as you keep increasing influence which is which is great which is what people want in their political leaders. the people in office aren't making decisions based on their current state but that the state of the people that they represent so is good. It makes sense it's reassuring and It's exciting to say that So based on the where we've gone so far who or what has influenced your view on leadership the most and and two parter. Why are they are. Is that thing so impactful to you. I guess the easy answer for me to take this back to roma someone loses completely unknown in two thousand four in four years later becoming the party's nominee president of the president elect. A wild ride only comes to leadership. I think that barack obama probably one of the most thoughtful leaders awful to a fault whereas thousand feel like. I even got frustrated at the pace that things were going out. The could ever say that he is a person that didn't take the time to truly examine what was going on in the face of a lot of hardship in also believing in the best about people in. It's difficult to do that in this field. It's not easy at all especially me get let down by so many people so many times the same people so many times In the way that he was able to incorporate is background as an organizer to get him elected in also to help govern something that i think that we can all take a lesson from was a perfect by any means no but i certainly think that he created a certain foundation that will be look into for for generations he. He totally rewrote replaceable. And also gay people not to be cliche about it. But he he legitimately gay people hope that they belong. There was an opportunity for them if they want to pursue a career in politics a path in politics that they could do it regardless of where they were from regardless of their families background or family situation s.

five last year ten years Nine two thousand forty Next month one two parter roma obama day asians four years later twenty nine four twenty folks so many people elect
"barnes" Discussed on The Impact of Leadership

The Impact of Leadership

06:32 min | 6 months ago

"barnes" Discussed on The Impact of Leadership

"No one drifts into excellence. I'm your host. Steve sheer and today's episode is showcasing. What many believe to be impossible. Effective leadership in politics. Lieutenant governor mandela barnes. Is my guest today. And the current lieutenant governor for the great state of wisconsin. I'm so excited for you to hear this conversation but a word of advice before we jump in. Now you're going to need to do some work. Set your political alignment aside for forty three minutes or so. It's not easy for some of us. Here's a practical tip. If you find yourself saying yeah but don't finish that sense now. If you're willing to do that and listen with focus. I promise you'll not only respect the man you'll also gain several practical pieces of application by the end of this episode. And i'm betting that you'll agree with the tiny difference that i lay out in the altro. Okay so what does a lieutenant governor. Do very glad you asked so. Let's jump into. Lieutenant governor barnes reading down what his role in office entails is one of those sort of in some ways obscure roles where last not the position that always in the public is not what people immediately think about when they associate different issues of were different areas of concern higher to the pandemic being in office. Lieutenant governor was inexperienced. Like i never had for now when we're campaign and we had a chance to get all across state and talk to so many people and it felt like we were just always in overdrive and after we took off his. We took over tribe further. It was it was amazing. The things that we've been able to do places you've been able to visit in the we've been able to have conversations with and so i am very proud honor to serve in this role. Being lieutenant. governor has been an incredibly unique opportunity out served in the legislature a previously. But i ran for lieutenant governor because i felt that there was a need for us to expand opportunity across the state of wisconsin and we needed to lead on really critical issues. I think about model personal experiences. And i think about the experience of people that are close to me. The help inform my decision making but things changed around this time last year. Things change drastically went from a taken a hands on approach to governing to take a very virtual approach to because things still. We're going to be able to adapt dangerous circumstances if you could help us with a few foundational things because he touched on a little bit with with the position that you're in and and i think that average day what that looks like might help paint a picture for people. So what does the average day look like You can go pre our current situation you know pre covid or whatever What does it look like for the lieutenant governor and ultimately what are some of the goals of the position. Yeah thanks for that. If i were to hang a picture it will be an abstract painting first of all. That sounds good. That's fair that's fair. But like i said before. We took a very hands on approach. Showing up places. Much speed is much able to Prior to the pandemic in the role of lieutenant governor. I liken it to the role of vice president to the president very similar in motion. You serve as spokesperson at times of or the administration. Basically they're just to assist the governor. In what your roles and responsibilities into becoming a depend on your relationship with the governor. And i'm fortunate to have a very solid personal and professional relationship with governor. We know each other off prior to us become a running mates in. I'll say here. There's a different way that lieutenant are elected across the country Wisconsin we don't wanna six as that system so you'll have about half the space you automatically are. Older ticket are right. Away governor or the candidate for governor will pay their running mate right out of the gate in some states though. Governor lieutenant governor running completely independent of each other and you essentially have scenarios where heavy immigrant serving as governor and they were looking in wisconsin. You run completely independently independent of each other in the primary on the general. You are a ticket. You can't have one without the other in so think about the responsibilities of that brings because it is a different way to have completely different personalities. Serving together complement each other. I think we both bring different experiences in life. We share values in that helps us in. The governor came to me ask. What issues were important. I'm want to work on as lieutenant governor as opposed to issuing some sort of eat it saying this is what you must focal and i chose issues at center around equity and sustainability in the able to service chair. The governor's task force on climate change. while sitting. on a number of other councils in task forces the criminal justice coordinating council the missing in murdered indigenous women task force the health equity council in the an inequity council that was established as well in with envious. It is no average day home every day was completely different especially in our first time. I told people was almost like getting to go on a field trip every week. Because we are so many different places. We hit all seventy two counties in our first year which was very important to us than six counties every month on average in. We did that intentionally. Because we want to be seventy two county administration. We do not want to leave people behind. Everyone feel like they are represented by this administration so every day's different Now days are still different. But i'm usually sitting in the same exact place all day. What about after work is there in after work for you will. Not as much now. That's must've after work for anybody. He's yeah the last year So.

Steve sheer last year forty three minutes Wisconsin today six counties first time first year mandela barnes seventy two county both seventy two counties six wisconsin one half Lieutenant governor criminal justice coordinating Lieutenant lieutenant
"barnes" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"barnes" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"Podcasters? It's the one and only. From the bottom show, that's why to saw produced by. Lee All. In Entertainment News, bother male, common, creeping celebrity, guests, hosts, and more the big box on the baller. Marsha podcast by Ferrari Sims. Follow and me OTC Saka Thou- on the bother large-scale podcast today. On iheartradio APP on Apple podcast or wherever you get your podcast this day in history, class is a production of I heart radio. A quick content warning before we start the show today, this episode contains mention of Sexual Abuse. K. All I'm eaves and welcome to this day in history class, a podcast that brings a little bit of the past and the present every day. Today Is June twelve twenty twenty. The Day was June twelfth ninety two. Writer and illustrator Juno. Barnes was born in Cornwall on Hudson. NEW YORK? Barnes is best known for writing the modernist novel night would. Barnes's grandmother Zongol had a big influence on her Zodda was also a writer, and she advocated causes like spiritualism and the philosophy of free love. There is some indication. Barnes may have faced sexual abuse and incest through her family relationships, and these themes show up in her work, but June never confirmed this. However her family did encourage her to marry Percy faulkner a fifty two year old when she was around eighteen. They only stay together for a few months. Barnes began writing and at early age to support her mother and brothers, she studied at Pratt Institute and the Students League of New York for a while, and she worked as a freelancer writing for magazines and newspapers like the Brooklyn. Daily Eagle the. New. York Press New York World Magazine in New York Morning Telegraph. A lot of her work was so-called stunt journalism that was subjective for instance in nineteen fourteen. She opted to be force fed to experience. What suffrage is on Hunger? Strikes were going through. In addition to her journalism, Barnes was also writing poems, short stories and one act plays as well as creating drawings that were being published in small press magazines. In Nineteen fifteen. Her chat book called the Book of Repulsive Women Eight Rhythms and five drawings was published. The chat book contained Lesbian. Imagery at a time when writing was being censored for sexual content, but the collection avoided censorship as sensors in some readers did not always understand the references in the work. Barnes got some recognition. For three one act plays. That were produced by a collective called the province town players in nineteen, nineteen and nineteen twenty. Barnes moved to periods in the nineteen twenties. Joining Artists and writers are goals in the city's left bank. In Nineteen, twenty two, she interviewed writer James Joyce for Vanity Fair and in nineteen twenty, three, she published a collection of poetry plays in stories called a book. Writer Barnes's first novel was published in Nineteen, twenty eight. The chapters in the book are written in different styles and is believed to be somewhat autobiographical. It contained the of sexuality and polygamy, and it was censored when it was published when Barnes and our editor were told to get rid of some of the text and drawings in the book Barnes called for astronauts to replace the sensor parts, so that there was quote matter for no speculation were since continuity and beauty have been damaged as she put it in the forward to the book. Her second novel night would was published in nineteen, thirty six. It's considered one of the most influential novels of the modernist period, if follows the love, affairs of a woman named Robin Vote in Paris, and it was noted for explicitly portraying lesbian relationships. It contained moments of humor and moments of tragedy, and it to had to be edited because of concerns about censorship. The book got good reviews, but it didn't sell that well. After night, it was published. Barnes dealt with depression, alcoholism and illness. She stopped writing an returned to New York, city. For the rest of her life, she lived in an apartment in Greenwich village during these years. Barnes became somewhat reclusive. Her birth play. The Anti was first published in nineteen, fifty eight, and drew on her own family relationships, and her collection of poetry. Creatures in an alphabet was published in nineteen, eighty-two. Barnes wrote mostly poetry in the last two decades of her life, but she didn't publish as much as you previously. died in nineteen, eighty two. Some early works were reprinted after her death and her writing has received renewed interest. I'm each jeffcoat and hopefully you know a little more of our history today than you did yesterday. And you can hit us up on social media where at t? H C.

Writer Barnes NEW YORK writer Ferrari Sims Lee New York World Magazine York Apple Daily Eagle Brooklyn Pratt Institute Students League of New York James Joyce Paris Robin Vote Zodda Zongol Cornwall Percy faulkner
"barnes" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

Dead Celebrity

12:44 min | 1 year ago

"barnes" Discussed on Dead Celebrity

"With complex issues of gift estate entrusted taxation. Jackie also has a strong background in international state planning factor compliance and pre immigration tax. Planning thanks for joining us. Jackie Dave Bahir subjective. Today's episode is Albert C. Barnes Barnes was an American businessman best known for his massively valuable collection that he devoted most of his life to curate the nine hundred piece collection which was worth some twenty five billion dollars featured one hundred eighty-one in-laws sixty nine says on sixty matisses. Forty four Picassos and fourteen Medaglia Ottis to just give a few highlights. Barnes intensely disliked the elite Air quotes of the art world and negated his life to providing education to less fortunate. You defied convention by grouping is our peace based on aesthetics philosophical reasons instead of artists are period Andrea. Matisse said the foundation is the only place to see Harken America Dr Barnes never had children but he took great care to plan for his legacy in one thousand nine hundred eighty two created a title. Trust agreement call the trust indenture. This trust established the Barnes Foundation a charitable organization to manage his art gallery as an educational institution in Lower Merion Pennsylvania. And if that name sounds familiar. That's because it's where Kobe Bryant is cool his lengthen. These documents that was not be sold moved placed on tour or even rearranged within the gallery itself. He wanted used primarily for education but open for the public on a very limited basis. He restricted how it could be viewed when only one day a week usually and how much could be charged to see the restrictions also made it very difficult for the board of to keep the foundation profitable or at least that's what they climbed so little by little a filed corpse-eating asking for permission to change the trust. Provisions Trustees engaged in expensive litigation in court arguing that the terms of Dr Barnes's trust impossible because of the great costs needed to maintain the collection and the final blow. Came in two thousand four when a judge ruled that the Barnes Foundation which now supported by three wealthy and elite Charles Foundations and the Pennsylvania attorney general can move the entire collection to the museum district or Downtime Philadelphia right next door to the Philadelphia Museum of art for context of House offices. Barnes had once said the Philadelphia Museum of art is a house of artistic and intellectual prostitution so safe to say probably not what he wanted. So how could he wishes have been so blatantly disregarded or because of a doctrine of deviation which is a legal principle that allows court effectively rewrite a charitable trust if the purpose becomes impossible to maintain without changes. The trustees argued that there was no financially viable way to keep the art of the building. Dr Bars created for the collection could only be maintained. You'd by permitting the move and I'm sure. The allure of creating a huge tourist attraction by relocating at twenty five billion dollar Philadelphia certainly offered no motivation at all. Now there's more twisters to this story which inspired the excellent documentary the auto steel. And we're not gonNA cover them here. Our focus was just how surprisingly easy. It is to have estate planning documents and wills in particular modified overturned. So Jackie how worried should clients be about how close to the letter? Their estate putting documents will be enforced after they're gone if someone just leaves a will and everything's going outright to their beneficiaries. I think that clients can essentially rest assured as long as they've picked a a trustworthy executor that their wishes are going to be carried out. Same thing with a shorter term trust for beneficiaries. For example. You might leave your child or a younger person Entrust to a certain age. I think that you can probably guarantee who the trustee is going to be or who the trustee and potential successor will be so that you can have pretty good control over these dispositions link where clients do have to worry is especially in this area with long-term charitable dispositions. You have certain people that you're going to put in charge right after your death. Almost a hundred years later you might have an entirely different board running the organization. Different Trustees of a trust and then your vision can start to go awry if you haven't done some really careful planning. What's the difference in this situation between the will and trust and what those different instruments are supposed to do and of what they can do? They can be quite similar documents depending on the type of woman type of trust here we. In the case of Barnes we would have a a well with which essentially disposes of your estate at your death and then we have this trust which established his foundation ultimately to hold this art and carry on this educational mission. This charitable mission rather than necessarily run art museum so that's very different and also obviously Your estate isn't going to last forever. The idea is to administer an estate and have it wrapped up within a year or a few years. This other plan in which the arch foundation was held was mental last. Ideally in perpetuity are as long as possible. And I think that we should talk a little bit more about the doctrine of deviation to and how that's brought us to where we are today in terms of how have you made your wishes known to your fiduciaries how major wishes known your executor if you have a will and how have you made your wishes known to trustees if you have a trust or how we made wishes known to Charitable Corporation. That's going to continue beyond your debt. Obviously some methods making your wishes known or not going to be ultimately legally enforceable when they applied the doctrine of deviation to barnes they essentially were trying to anticipate how could most closely meet. Barnes is desired end. When circumstances changed so I think that something. That's it's important to talk to clients about is what's your ultimate goal and get that in writing. Even if it's not legally enforceable I think if Barnes have been consulted on this and someone had said well it's down to this re they're gonNA move your entire collection right next door to the Philadelphia. Museum are moving out of the suburban setting that you chose change. The way to the artwork is presented from what you designed to something that's perhaps and more accommodating to the General Public. Would you rather have moved? And your vision changed in that way or would you rather sell. Certain pieces certainly arguable. That might have said sell certain pieces or we might have come up with a different way to raise funds to keep the off foundation operating as it was one of the difficulties. When you're dealing with these plans that are intended to last in perpetuity. Right is that that's impossible along the way and you have to anticipate not just through the various scenarios that could occur over the ensuing rest of time but also the legal changes that are and all that stuff is just impossible for an estate plan to like completely for. See it in any way how good you are all. That's kind of why it's best to sort of building at certain points. Some safe spots here where where things can transfer or where where things can change a little bit in some flexibility. Because you know the only fact that you know is that things will change. You have no idea what the changes are going to be necessarily. Yeah in hindsight is twenty twenty but I think that if I were assisting with creating this plan I might ask those questions. If you're endowment runs low in years what changes would you be most okay with if changes had to be made because we never know even if someone gets a hundred million dollar endowment today the market crash could be invested in something that seems really safe at suddenly becomes unsafe or sometimes organizations are even victim of produce aries? Obviously we don't see that very often but it does happen. So how are we going to necessarily plan for all contingencies? That can happen there including running out of money to keep the operation going until depicted the night honestly in this situation despite what I just said. It's kind of the most obvious question right pure album. Barnes's stay planner and he's putting all these rules saying people can come in once a week and it can only be X. People at once and you can only charge this or it's just simple math. Look at and be like well. Rent costs this much to say like a house. It's going to work out. And would Albert Barnes of preferred to allow more people in at a time or preferred to have partnered perhaps with the city of Philadelphia or even with Philadelphia Museum of art to transport people easily from Philadelphia to Marion in that suburb where he was located rather than have the artwork moved. I think people describe Albert Barnes being someone who got what he wanted and who might not have been particularly open to hearing different perspectives. But I think that this is the kind of thing where if someone brought in this concept for an estate plan. You'd have to push back if the individual wasn't willing to sort of look at the different contingencies and plan for them and I think that you know now we have the example of Albert Barnes if someone doesn't WanNa plan for different contingencies. We can say okay but if these unforeseen things happen we want to know. We most like your opinion on what should happen because that can be instructive for how changes should be made. And if you don't provide it you're leaving it up to the court and you're leaving it up to whoever might be in charge of these assets or your plan to one hundred years after death. And that's probably someone who has no personal connection with you concede the Barnes case the smallest possible genuine to the most closely adhering to your wishes can be nowhere near what his wishes clearly would have been right out in. My last possible thing you to do was hurt. His Art to go to this autumn quote elites in the Philadelphia Museum. It's also possible. That was the best way to do it now. You know it's sort of a a weird situation. Where even sometimes the closest possible best solution can be the last thing that person would want if they haven't specified right exactly. I mean he might have wanted everything to be sold and wound down if it got to this point. But we'll never know because obviously it wasn't anticipated the endowment would deplete to the point that they were in grave financial trouble but these are the kind of questions that we need to think of as a state planners. And that's why we why we study things that's why we read case law. People might not have been as aware of these problems back in nineteen twenty two or back. No one this estate plan was initially created but we have the benefit of an extra hundred or so years of history to guide us in making a state clowns. Obviously don't think that most of our listeners have clients with twenty five billion dollars collections. That they're gonNA have to worry about this about unless you do. In which case awesome. Why the Hell you listening to me? You know. I think this concept of what porn was doing this idea of dead hand control and sort of the risks inherent in that and the natural idea that sort of the natural tendency toward of powerful people to want to do that is something that can be instructive for all advisors regardless whether working on estate planning on vacuum. I'm just talking about the dead hand a little bit with that. Mean a good way to phrase it. It's essentially trying to control beyond your death. What happens to your assets as we discussed at the beginning of this podcast? It works best for a shorter amount of time in the longer. It's been since your death the harder it can be. For example sometimes clients will want a particular financial firm or financial advisor to be working on their assets. That usually works fine. If it's just going to be your estate but if you have perhaps a lengthy trust and you might not even think you have a lengthy trust. You mentioned that most listeners probably don't have huge art collections to dispose of. But if you have younger people in your life either. Children Nieces and nephews. Whoever even the children of family friends? Who might be inheriting from you? You have to anticipate that if these kids are three years old today you might be putting something in your estate plan that has assets in them for trust until they're thirty five forty so that's going to be a fairly lengthy amount of time and if you're restricting to certain financial advisers. We don't know what could happen with that. For example people retire financial firms emerge and go under and it might not be clear what to do in those situations so I do try to draft with a certain amount of flexibility to.

Albert C. Barnes Barnes Philadelphia Barnes Foundation Philadelphia Museum Albert Barnes Barnes trustee Jackie Dave Bahir Medaglia Ottis Kobe Bryant Andrea run art museum Picassos Matisse Lower Merion Pennsylvania arch foundation General Public Pennsylvania Dr Bars
"barnes" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

12:40 min | 1 year ago

"barnes" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Hey listen who doesn't love to make a buck and who doesn't love to have fun I winter. I got a Lotta air air air miles of because of that single that hit and I learned a lot about the business about myself. What it's like under pressure when you're chasing a record up the charts and anytime that I've been successful In terms of a hit record I've looked around and it has always been a team around the earn. I've always had the smartest people in my career around me. When I've had the biggest success in terms of my recording so that that was no different I had a great manager great producers and really fantastic support You know that's not the kind of thing that happens on your own. You really need a team to make that happen but you went back to jazz. Oh yeah man. I took that money. You Know I. I called up my buddy. He was like you know these rock'n'roll songs that were doing they're better at the channel. I said I know jazz artists. I said the record so I threw the money at my own record and I brought that home to Canada and Molly Johnson heard instead. Okay coming on tour with me Nice. That was one of those lovely moments and and and so. We'll we'll see more photos of you like I got to go back to Ellie. Shave your head tight leather. Well you know I'm expressing my rock and roll side a little differently these days. Actually go ahead. No no no sorry. Finish that honest swagger and what I do is in Crawley smell from the conversation. I'm I am I'M A. I'm a big personnel. I look I'm the lead singer you know. You know what the drummer is going to be. Like you know what the Bass player's going to be like. I'm a lead singer. I walk in the room. I I WANNA be friends with everybody. I want you all to notice me. But I'm I also WanNa give you something that's the thing. I'm interested in communication right. So there's a lot of rock and roll swagger and what I do today and that's very much in In the music that I make now there's a kind of a lot. It's all about making sure that the music fits my personality in that. That's how I think that's how you come up with the winning combination In a career that successful you have to really know who you are so so I I got a question for you and now we're GonNa sort of going in a different direction. But you've mentioned this person a couple of times talking about the swagger. Are you talking about the attitudes talk about sort of the Chameleon? What did you think of? Bowie's block star. Oh my God. What a record okay. Well first of all right so first of all we did not listen to it without the context of understanding that it was his lungs right now so we can't really difficult for me to say you know but didn't wasn't it wasn't it. I thought I thought it was a day or two before. No it was. It was the time I got here. I gotcha yeah right. Yeah and the NFC FOR MOST PEOPLE BECAUSE MOSAIC FM RIGHT. But but but by five. Doesn't it tell you that as an artist? He wanted to be remembered. Not only as men who gave you a wonderful song but the man of kept pushing the boundaries searching for ways to make music all that all those jazz artists working with like cool it. A million years with a predicted that end at the record would be so good. I mean that is the guy who did take care of his reputation in the sense that wait to the end right to the end. And I'll get you gotta love it. I find that inspirational Irene up. It's just enough that you go about knowing. He's a legend but also just enough creativity as an artist to dig in and make sure that his legend is his artistry. Yeah Yeah it was a did to me as a huge fans saw bowie. Numerous times to me. It was a gift it was a gift it was just it was as if to to meet us to everybody that he he has pointed the way before so many of us and Yeah I I'm an accolade. That's for sure How did you get into into coaching career site and vocal coaching the well? You'RE GONNA laugh. I was just trying to make the rent when I was a kid. Really Okay you know I mean you know there I was. I was basically you know. Live on Spina near the market in Chinatown and I was acting in plays making music for plays and like actors that needed to sing. My songs would come by the apartment and I would teach them maybe teach them a good warm up or something you know. I mean I work with coaches you know but I was twenty twenty one when I was in these shows right so you're twenty two years old and like I'm not really going to try to be a coach but the actress started getting Landa musical or slander musical role in a film and I'd be like Oh. Jeez I seem to have a map for this like okay look I. I need the rent for next month. Let me just you know. Let me just start paint asking people to pay me? It wasn't really. It was never a career choice. It's just a Collie I love other artists. Like you know you walk in. Maybe because my parents were ernest. I've had the opportunity to see where they were confident. And where they were in need of support and You know being a little kid watching them in their careers. I think I had an insider's view of how artists grow and what we need in terms of support in terms of what we need to function. Well so I think. That's probably in a nate thing for me when I'm seeing somebody as a voice as the voice client. We're really talking about the health of their career. The health of their spiritual emotional and physical self. Because what you have to give your audience it's not just your voice you know and So I think kind of holistically that way. And that's a. That's a really different thing than being a technique teacher around the block. You know it's a little bit bigger deeper. And so that's why I end up mentoring. People who go on to have according deals and careers in the industry about the you know it. It is something that I love so much. If you gave me trillions of dollars I would still be coaching. I love it and I. I'm happy every day that I can see that. My calendar is full with people that I get to work with. That's nice. I'm very blessed in some of the videos that that I've watched You you seem to really enjoy playing to the camera and and it sort of makes sense. You talked earlier about wanting Have Thoughts of being a dancer? An actor is that. Do you ever think that you know there's been a lot of you know. Bowie did did did a few movies. There's there's there's a lot of the you know these these front men. The you know that love the camera. Yeah Yeah I'm curious about you in your relationship with the camera and your relationship with maybe wanting to be on the small screen big screen in the future. It's interesting that you know. Look I I am happy to entertain it and I absolutely did my time acting. Tv Little Film. Lots of theater and I love it. I'm most comfortable being myself I've spent an awful lot of time being Nico Barnes and finding what what makes Nico Barnes Tick? So that I can develop the music and the stagecraft and the delivery and So I have a lot more confidence in in in being lines than I would You know sort of taking on an acting role however I will say never say never. It's one those things That if the universe sends it my way I would die in head first because our learn grow and bring all that back to the music and it'd be good for me so it's lovely of you to think of it. I do have a relationship with the camera. I know. That's the tool that gets me to my audience. And so you know. Never say never. That's what I'd say. Never say never. Yeah what would you be doing so you know you talked about if somebody gave you a trillion dollars huge? Still be coaching. What we would you be doing if you know if your parents if the family was not in entertainment right what would meek a barnes be doing. Would you be an accountant? Live my dreams a well. I know I'd be doing music in some way shape or form. Yeah I made of that You probably be doing no. I probably have because the money will help support it. I would probably be doing larger productions as tour. You know like I. I love the idea of touring larger shows with sets lights and costumes and stuff. That's fun to me and you know I've done a little bit of that in my career and I've really enjoyed it and of course the nylons essentially trained before that sure You know it's like So like occasionally I. I've I've put like in the water of developing show and You know musicals and I'll say that yeah right musicals and musical theatrical musical evenings concerts that are also like you know like a theatrical experience takes a lot of finance to get that kind of thing off the ground so I would probably be losing money by spending money on that right and then I go home to Hawaii and there you go is is you spent time in. La You've heard all over the world. Why WHY IS TORONTO? Your Home Oscar so okay so when I came back to Canada from Los Angeles I came back with two things on my mind one is. I'm a grown up now and I WANNA live of grown up life Los Angeles is fantastic. But it's a very adolescent culture there. It's all about the new idea who's got the exciting new thing in town and You know after you've done a couple of seasons twelve twelve years. I have had a sense of what was there for me but what I did not know is what it would be like to come back to go to Toronto Canada and be the big fish in a small path. Honda game and it was great. Molly Johnson put me onto her right away and the and the team members that I have now are the very top of the industry. And it's it. I'm not saying that I didn't have fantastic to work with in Los Angeles but the people who have the top of the industry there. Are you know the superstars? You know a little bit. It's rarified air her you know and this is different this this allows me to have a much richer experience of life and of course I get to tour Canada as a Canadian artist. Make my records here and then bring them back to the world. So it's the perfect place to jump off out of as well of the Canadian culture in terms of supporting our own music is very very strong. Jazz culture here is awesome and because I can pop to New York or La and you know. We have released plans for Europe and the next with the next album..

Bowie Nico Barnes Canada Molly Johnson Los Angeles La Ellie Toronto Canada Europe Irene Oscar TORONTO New York Honda Spina accountant Hawaii Chinatown
"barnes" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

Welcome To The Music

12:42 min | 1 year ago

"barnes" Discussed on Welcome To The Music

"Well let me try. That again shall on. What city my in that is. Why thanks for joining us. Mika also we were in a knocking perfect honest to God. That'll be perfect. Go My god you guys are crazy. All right your I am sorry you you caught us off guard when you said playboy so we're Where did you not read my bio? Yeah I think your your publicist forgot to put that party. Pay Just a little bit more. Just Mika thank you again for joining us. Really appreciate it I'm going to use the word that has been used a thousand times. I think a drinking game. We'll get started once. This is all over and we're all Hanging out in bars and clubs again but We are living in unprecedented times you know you you're obviously a You send it off in the intro. Former member of the NYLONS Jazz singer. I know that you are also coaching. Vocal coaches well With all of this in mind how obviously Cove nineteen must have impacted you in a number of ways. I'm wondering if you can sort of talk to us about the some of these Disruptions to your life well I will tell you I was about to draw a full length record. We were in release mode and the momentum was building we were onto. We've done two singles which had been beautifully received in the momentum. Online with videos was global as opposed to national and And hit so. We ended up having to move the CD launch concerts the fall and the third single and video. We had just cut the video for the third single and we were literally like I had to take it down from all the digital distribution. I mean like it was. It's hard to describe how giant our momentum woolas and then suddenly to screech to a you know it is nothing in comparison with people who are working on the front lines losing their lives to this pandemic globally. Whether you release your record now in the fall is literally the least important thing on earth but it meant that. I had a whole spring tour set up with soft seat theaters across Ontario. That you know we had to fold up and go home. And I know I'm I'm I'm pretty chill but there was about a week ner where I was trying to reorganize everything and you know I'm self managed so I had about sinks people that I was in constant communication with on my team. Managing the team managing. How are we going to do this? What are we GONNA do? How do we deal and So I was in a bit of an emergency for a while and then so the last two weeks where here in Toronto we'd been unofficial lockdown is been fantastic. I mean I'm busy as hell but I'm quite at home. I had stillness in my heart. I have no love for everybody. Who's like there? Are PEOPLE OUT THERE? Who Lost everything and are really wondering if they can pay the rents and I am not in that situation because my clients continue to book. In fact they're double booking with me twice a week instead of once. 'cause they're home with nothing to do. This is your vocal coach business. Yeah I also career strategy to right so I've got clients in La and New York and across Canada. And what happens is they've been. Outta towners have been doing the online with me from time immemorial now. It's just happened to be a guy who was also unclean streets going online with the you know for good. I mean honestly is heart-wrenching when you see the incredible amount of people whose lives are not only distrupt disrupt it but ended because of this virus but In terms of my little bubble of the world. I'm going to pick up a book and read it. Goddamn book for once in my life. You talked about stillness in your heart. I'm wondering if you can sort of Elaborate on that. And what would that manifests itself as well as interesting I was I was in full. Full managed the situation mode both in release while we were gearing for the release clever European team both North American team on that which means constant communication and coordination and management Of people and expectations. And and then and then when you when whenever they fell apart I wish sort of in an emergency mode myself trying to figure out How how what we were GonNa do to re-lane everything for the fall however all of that all of that. All that is dependent on Mika Barnes as an artist as a person having a sense of PD's at the center of the storm. If I don't then everybody on my team they all feel it. The audience feels it. You know my socials reflect like if I don't have stillness in my heart and like I e confidence that I'm in the right place at the right time doing exactly what the universe has intended this week. Our Guide to do on the planet. If I'm good with all that I can be peaceful in the midst of a hurricane I can be still in the in the midst of a pandemic one one of the things that I noticed on. I think you shared the other day. your trainer moving his right. Adrian a from a mental health and physical health perspective. It's really interesting to see how these times of change US or how we've changed with the times and how quickly we james like for example my wife and all her friends get together because one of their friends is a yoga instructor and they get the every day at noon. They jump on Google hangouts. So Meek it's interesting You know when I had my cousin in town I think it was about two weeks ago. Can Losing Track of time with the days here but You know she was asking. You know what's going to be on the other side of this and I thought you know we're GonNa see a lot of really creative stopped. We're going to see artists getting creative and not just artists fans you know doing mashups and getting really creative around their favorite artists and and I think we're seeing that with some of the you know impromptu concerts and even some of the people you know doing meam like or mixing up music and it's just it's very interesting. I don't know if any thoughts and not you seen. Yeah well of course we. We've taken the the music performance out of the amphitheater and the local club and we put it in the living room. So it's it's it's living room the living room which is which is a much more human scale and I. I have to say like you know the music that I make jazz Even when I was with the NYLONS and doing bigger theaters around the world. It has been. It's been beautiful to see how direct and in intimate the music communication has the calm. Now that we're live streaming from the living room as opposed to you know all the other ways that we've delivered music. I love it You know the intimacy that we're getting with our big star right now is unparalleled and You know people a lot of talk about like needing to dig in and spread love during this time and I am seeing an awful lot of positive results of people having to be locked down and digging for themselves and their loved ones. There's a lot more caring and sharing online that you know this is where we're coming out of an extremely divided period politically in. North America and Suddenly the world a smaller. Suddenly everybody's your brother your sister And I'm I'm always happy to see that the feel that after all you know. Why do I make music? It's about communication and You know it doesn't matter to me whether I'm in a big hall or coming through to your living room it's all good. I'm back gentlemen high. We barely moved. We kept talking. I don't know if it we'll figure it out and post. Yeah Yeah we'll figure that out Appreciate your patients Really really appreciate you sharing your thoughts meek on on sort of you know how you're dealing with this and your thoughts Around the the current pandemic Out as I was researching you one of the first things. I'm always curious about is how someone get started in this business this then. It almost seems you were born to be in entertainment. Your Dad was a drummer composer. Both of your brothers were your mom wrote from Mr Dress it up. It would have been strange if you were not in the entertainment industry. The shock would have been. Hey Mom. I've decided that mom dad sit down. I have something big tell you. I'm going to be an investment banker. Now we were. We were very blessed. Cvc Brad I grew up in the studio watching my mom handle all these stupid executives who were trying to push her around on Mr dress-up show I watch down my father as as a serious composer dealing with the you know the classical world and you know my brothers and I all went into the business. One of the things that we believed we. Could you know we? We never thought that you couldn't make a living in the music industry and Boy were we wrong joking but you know it's true you can. Actually you can see the kids that have the leg up and it means that while I was still in in high school I was already performing under my own name and making a name for myself and business when I was still really a kid. And that's thanks very much to the family I grew up in. My grandmother was a concert candidates in Europe. So we really didn't have any. There's no way we were going to do anything else were you. Did you feel pushed into? It isn't something you wanted to pursue. What did your parents think of this? I was interested in becoming a dancer or an actor when I was on a training and continued to train as an actor through my teams into my twenties I did a bunch of theater productions But you know when I about twelve thirteen. The music grabbed me and didn't let go. I mean really grab me like I mean I. I was in a rock and roll band with my friends in the garage. Heard a Billie holiday record. My mom gave my stepfather and I I. It was such a profound experience. I wait in an I quit the band and only quit the band. I told them I'm crew hitting rock and roll and I'm going home to become a jazz and blues artist could buy. Wow so it took. It took my decisions very seriously CONC- and it won't be the last time you changed music genre. 'cause I know we'll we'll get to it later but I know you moved to l a you sort of took a left turn or right turn. I don't know how to explain it but Do you remember the first time you went on stage and performed publicly? Was Lincoln the school thing or was that in a jazz club. Watch so young man. I mean okay. I was thirteen. I went and played..

Mika Barnes playboy Toronto US Google Ontario North America towners Canada Billie Europe Adrian Brad I Lincoln Mr Dress investment banker La New York instructor
"barnes" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"barnes" Discussed on Code Story

"Don't tolerate assholes was a happy accident for the most part. I just try try enough to win sometimes. And that's kind of the playbook this is coterie bringing you in depth interviews tech visionaries digging into critical moment so what a tastes change in industry and build an lead the team. That has your back. I'm Nola Mark nonce day episode. How two thousand six rally barnes earns made a wage Barca's your phone and accidentally changed shop all the uncoached story? Uh for some builders. There's a moment where creativity is Cadillac for others. It starts much earlier Roland. Barnes has been working with technologies since childhood starting out by simply programming. His Lagos to move in all the way through college building in early marketplaces for college. Students to trade textbooks and Building Automated Chessboard. So the invisible robots could play chess against each other when he started creating solution for Mobile Phone Barcode scanning he had no idea the doors would open in eventually lead to the formation of his most most successful product venture and exit cult shop savvy so I think everyone wants to know how you started shop. Saturday was a happy accident for the most part so at the time this was two thousand an eight I was really into graphics processing and the the mobile space and the mobile space back in in early. Two thousand eight was still your flip phone but I really like building whatever you could build foot phones back then and so I had an the idea kind of birth out of textbook traitor and the price comparison stuff I did. I thought it would be great location of price. Comparison would be kicking kicking that off with scanning barcodes. So I would I try to do get Barker scanning working on flip phone back in two thousand five actually turns turns out. That was bad. Timing wasn't timing is everything it really is. And the first time I try to get market scanning off the ground it failed miserably but when two thousand eight came around that's when smartphones were actually the thing you couldn't you couldn't actually build stuff four smartphones yet but the Android Beta Sek was just announced and so And in apple wasn't really done. There's it so I grabbed the grab Android Beta and tried to get an APP built. That could do barker scanning and price comparison and that is that's how it was kicked off so that the with the android Betas decay. CK That's not something that was available to the world right. That was something available to a smaller. Group of developers was available to the world. Actually is he's just no one cared no one no one really. Gosh it would be fun to show screen shots of will look like back offend remember. It was It was well I if you look at the origins of Android two. It's super interesting. What was originally intended for like the very early origins of Android I believe was meant to be used on other devices like digital cameras and so the the interface was very very primitive? You depend navigation and maybe there was a keyboard and there. It was not very very smartphone esque android has done a wonderful job of evolving into a very rich smartphone throwing. Ui these days but that was that was a long journey. They came from very humble place. Actually the way the end was initially set up was meant to be able to run on anything anything. I used to joke. That android was built to run on anything you can imagine including your toaster it kind of stumbled into smartphones Frans from what I gather ham but so yeah it was available to everybody Most people didn't care because they just didn't know what smartphones could do yet so by doing that you entered into a certain challenge right some sort of a competition for who could to build. The the most awesome thing is right. Yeah so Google always trying to promote android so google. I'm not to have a successful platform. They're going to need developers on it so they actually created this competition that were to see who could actually build the best APP for for Android. I figured I tried that same idea from two thousand five. Took it off the shelf it off and try to begin on this new UTECH in it. It worked fantastic. What what I did was I? I was actually at the time working at another startup. That was in the event ticketing space in my brother and I actually both worked there together. which was awesome and I took a week off of work so that I could actually learn the ANDROID android estimate Read everything that were all the documentation that was published at the time covered cover so I knew it well and then I spent the next six months. That's moonlighting to build the at the time it was called go-cart not that that was a good name or anything. Awesome me certain. Certainly too clever by half was supposed to be your shopping cart on the go but the what what that was was. It was an extension of the old tech spectator stuff where I so i. I had experienced building price comparison search engine and if could actually use the camera in the smartphone to Barcode that it'd be a great way to kick off that process. You wouldn't have to spend time fumbling around typing on your keyboard. Brian is that so So entered it in. I entered it into the competition and ended up winning first prize which was excellent winning. That competition ended up getting the application. A whole lot of attention because now suddenly OEM's started getting interested in looking showcase their shirt and carriers started getting interested and what can help them cell phones..

Building Automated Chessboard barnes Nola Mark Lagos Google Barker Cadillac Roland apple OEM Brian
"barnes" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

07:23 min | 2 years ago

"barnes" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"According to the criminal complaint the impact of the vehicle that the tree was soul bad the vehicle literally split into two pieces according to the criminal complaint when burnt Barnes was interviewed by the authorities he said they were coming back my basketball game he ended up pleading guilty in twenty seventeen to a number of charges including homicide by negligent operation of a vehicle remember now in this instance two people died we have had any number of other incidents sense this have been similar where people were driving at an unbelievably high rate of speed causing in some cases if a Talib many of these are hit and runs where the people who died were at a different vehicle are pedestrian is so what in this instance the people who died with the vehicle in the car itself it was a one vehicle accident slam to the tree before he could slam and anyone else and we have heard any number of people call for a cracked out of this kind of driving this is got to stop it's got to stop it's got to stop it's got to stop let me tell you why it doesn't stop in this instance Dante Barnes was driving at an extremely high level of recklessness again we don't know for certain but the authorities are estimating based on reconstruction sixteen eighty miles an hour what's the speed this was a thirty five zone lost control slammed into a tree and two people are dead factory again I guess his age and whatever else Milwaukee county circuit judge Jeffrey coated sentenced Barnes to probation he actually sent him to a sentence that called for many years in prison but then stayed the whole thing when you quote stay a sentence it means that the punishment is hanging out there and can be re imposed upon a judge's order if you violate a term of the condition of your release he was placed instead on probation and extended supervision probation and extended supervision are among the alternatives to incarceration that so many people on the left and unfortunately many on the right fall for it public opinion polls people keep saying over and over and over again they support these kinds of things for non violent criminals well this crime falls into the category of a non violent crime the crash may have been violent but it is not considered a violent crime Barnes they'd have to do a few months out of the house of correction but did no time in prison and as long sense band back on the streets free two people dead he drives like a bat out of hell we all talk goal this is got to stop is for now many of you are wondering mark why are you telling us about a story from twenty six states well as I say there's some more information to share on Dante bards Dante Barnes was pulled over and cited by Walker cooked white Waukesha county sheriff's deputy Saturday night I have not been able to determine the exact stretch but it was on I ninety four and he's accused of driving eighty miles an hour in a fifty five zone so my guess is what this means is probably to the east of more let that's my guess on the stretch but I can't tell you for certain that I know the location because I've not been able to get that part from the authorities what I do know is that he has been cited he was driving eighty miles per hour in a fifty five zone he has no driver's license he's also charged with driving while revoked the terms of his probation of course called for him not to drive at all unless he had a valid driver's license he in fact is a replication but he was driving at that rate of speed the term of his probation was of course to follow all traffic laws he was driving eighty it is on described as fifty five he was also cited for not having any insurance on the vehicle which is a chronic condition of people who don't have a driver's license get out of a driver's license they never have insurance either and I've gone through and tried to explain ninety seven million times why we have so many people driving without insurance your driving without licenses in Milwaukee it's because nothing happens to them all they get is a fine which they don't pay they don't pay it because they know they're not going to be thrown in prison for driving without a license even one revoked it virtually never happens so many people just why get a driver's license why worry about tickets and they often speed because they don't pay their tickets some are suggesting we need to start looking at confiscation of vehicles I support that I support anything act out of this problem but as I say until we lock people up they're not going to stop and the word is out that you can drive anywhere you want in Milwaukee and you will not go to jail in the case sub Dante Barnes he even got to have his passengers killed and he didn't have to go to prison the story is not over I was describing some of the criminal charges some of the citations he received over the weekend as I said one of them was for driving fifty eighty in the fifty fives on another was for driving while revoked another was for driving without having insurance but even through an I love this one thank you was wearing a seat belt actually that's an open question you were driving eighty miles an hour on the freeway would you put your seat belt that I you know I probably actually what I mean I am and I'm gonna get out there on the toll wait a little and see if I can hit a hundred because I will put a cop is that around I probably could have the CD but he didn't have the seat belt that either it it it should do that this is where the story gets really interesting he was cited for inattentive driving now you might be wondering why they would.

Barnes
"barnes" Discussed on Before the Millions

Before the Millions

02:58 min | 3 years ago

"barnes" Discussed on Before the Millions

"Episode picture this the American dream. So whatever your American dream is whatever you think of whatever you think somebody who doesn't live here with my. It was not from here. Somebody who's never been here. Thanks of when I think of the American dream what it means to be a thriving American family. Our guest today. Mrs Kendra Barnes. She was living that dream that was her life. What you've just imagined that was her life. So the big house the great job, the international travel, multiple times a year, everything you name it. The custom closet the fancy cars all. All that stuff. Right. And then one day get this one day, she heads over to a family member's house to play a board game a board game, you know, like chess checkers shoots and ladders monopoly. All that good stuff. Right. This board game that she plays completely uproots her lifestyle per American dream lifestyle that she's built in that she's created completely turns it on its axis and she heads in a completely different direction because of this board game, and she was able to figure out the she was not living the life that she wanted. Not yet. Not quite she felt like she was there. But she felt like there was something missing in this board game expose that thing for what it was. And she realized she was not building wealth. So if you wanna learn about Kendra Barnes and her next actions than stay tuned after this tip of the week to raise of the week. This week. It is short and sweet I'm doing shoutouts item. Child's people who are leaving reviews were telling me that they love the podcast they loved inspiration. They love the guests that we have on the show and their insight. If you wanna go ahead and do that for us. If you want to get us out there and show items and show Citron show Spotify and Google play that this podcast to be reckoned with this a podcast that more people need to listen to this is a podcast that they need to put on their charts as recommended than just leave a five star review and telephoned if you leave a five star review and Tele friend, you have made enormous efforts, and allowing us to be more people's ears, and allowing us have more of an impact. So the two reviews this week that I am going to give a shout out. To are the first one is by Kip bolts and Kim bolt says I love this podcast. It keeps me learning. And it keeps me positive on my future plans. Thanks to Ray. Thank you the second. Review is by not happy anymore. Twenty three while the hope this podcast makes you happy because you said that this is your favorite podcasts. And it goes on to say I stumbled on this podcast in December of twenty seventeen. And I have been hooked your guys hooked at been hooked ever since. I love the knowledge that is presented each week. And it's only motivating me to grind more. I also appreciate everything you do man. I'm assuming that that man is me. So I thank you for that. Also, thank you for your guidance giving during our breakthrough call it didn't go on deaf ears. Awesome. So guys if you don't know what this person.

Mrs Kendra Barnes Kim bolt Kendra Barnes Ray Tele friend Citron Spotify Google one day