35 Burst results for "Barn"

A highlight from How Scuba Works

Stuff You Should Know

10:45 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from How Scuba Works

"Get ready to dive into the future with Technically Speaking, an Intel podcast, the groundbreaking podcast from iHeartMedia's Ruby Studios in partnership with Intel. Each episode unveils the incredible ways AI technology is transforming our world for the better. Join host Graham Klass as he speaks with the experts behind the technological advancements that are powering a brighter and more accessible future for everyone. Listen to Technically Speaking, an Intel podcast, on the iHeartRadio app, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Following in your parents' footsteps is never easy, especially when mom or dad happen to be superstar athletes. What kind of lessons do hall -of -famers like, oh, I don't know, NBA legend Tim Hardaway and NFL icon Kurt Warner impart on their kids as they chase professional sports stardom? How do they teach them the importance of prioritizing health and how to overcome adversity? Well, you can join Heart of the Game as they explore these questions and more with some of the greatest families in sports. Listen to Heart of the Game on the iHeartRadio app, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to Stuff You Should Know, a production of iHeartRadio. Hey, and welcome to the podcast. I'm Josh, and there's Chuck, and Jerry's here, too, and it's a good old -fashioned barn burner whiz banger of an episode. I ran out of weird colloquialisms. Oh, yeah? Yeah, just now. Didn't you hear? Yeah, but I just figured you were still doing them in your head. No, I was frantically grasping for another one in my head, and it was just dust and a tumbleweed. So this is sort of continuing our underwater series, we'll call it. Yeah, this is so Stuff You Should Know. We've done stuff that's much more specific about the general category that we're talking about, and now we're finally doing the general category. Yeah, we did the diving bell. We did the butterfly. We did cave diving. In fact, cave diving was released as a select just this year. Yes, such a good one. And do I need to remind you about the other related episode? I forgot about that. I'll give you a hint. I remember the scuba cat episode. Didn't you interview scuba cat? Oh, yeah, I mean, for those of you who don't know, the short version is many, many years ago in the very early days of the podcast, occasionally we were sort of told to do certain things as episodes. Unspeakable things. And two of them really stand out to me. One of them was scuba cat. I know what you're going to say for the other one. I know you do. Which was this guy who trained his cat to scuba dive, and it's literally like a blurb or maybe a little fluffy news piece at the end of a news program. And they're like, do a Stuff You Should Know episode on this cat and this guy. Why, though? Do you remember? Did they just want page views or something? I guess, or else that guy happened to be friends with whoever owned the company at the time. All right. So I think there was an article on the website we worked for, and they were probably just trying to drive people to that. So we did one on scuba cat. I would really love that just to be scrubbed from the archive. Well, way to go bringing it up, then. What was I going to say, Chuck? Oh, wasn't this thing in like a little submarine kind of? Isn't that what the scuba diving was? I don't think so. I think he built him a little outfit. Oh, OK. Wow, I don't remember that. A little thing with like a big bubble mask. OK, that's worth an episode. We should redo it. We should do a scuba cat redux. What's the other one? I know we're going to say it. We could say at the same time, I think it's going to be... Three, two, one. Tenovators. Tenovators. Yes. What can you do with an Altoids tin? Yeah, for real. Like, I don't know how that one came up either, but we were instructed to do an episode on tenovators, and they were interesting, but not episode length interesting. Even when they were six minutes long. Yeah, and an attenovator, just for those of you who don't know, they take Altoid tins and they do things with them, like turn them into radios. Maybe they hold coins instead of Altoids. It's just repurposing. Yeah, exactly. It's repurposing an Altoid. Tenovation. Very well. And we always talk about jackhammers in the sun. That's because we're literally too ashamed to even mention those other two, but here they are. Go listen to them. Just quickly wanted to say I got back from Mexico, and I did not scuba dive. I snorkeled. Oh, yeah, it's fun. And I didn't... I mean, I love the experience, but I learned that I, and especially my daughter, are free divers. Oh, yeah? She couldn't do it, man. We got her... I mean, she loves to swim more than anything, and we got her in all the gear, put her in the water, and she was pitched a fit, quite frankly. Oh, like she couldn't breathe through the tube? She does it in pools. It just... When you're eight, things happen, and you can't explain why a kid will dig in, but she wasn't into it. We were very frustrated, did not handle it well. She asked to get back on the boat. She got back on the boat and cried while we snorkeled. We're like, we're out of here. We're going to do it. You know, you'll be okay. And then once we were done, she asked the scuba guys or the snorkel guys, can I just get in with my mask and free dive? And it was in Mexico. And they were like, sure. Right? And she did, and she turned into a dolphin. And I recounted this on Instagram. I took some great pictures of her just swimming like no kid has ever loved swimming before. And it was just a big lesson for everybody. I know what happened, though. I think, unless I'm misreading it, she got claustrophobic from having to breathe through that tube. No, she does it all the time in pools. What it was, I think, was wearing the life vest keeping her up on the surface. Oh, okay. Well, you left that little detail out. Well, I mean, that's part of snorkeling is you got a vest on so it keeps you up top. And she was like, no, no, no. I belong down there. My home is the sea. I see. I got you. Okay. Well, that makes a lot more sense. I guess I was just projecting onto her because I used to get claustrophobic trying to breathe through a snorkel. Well, a lot of people on Instagram supported that and said, you know, I have a hard time with this equipment, too, and I love to swim. But it was really that life vest, I think. Okay. All right. Well, we finally established the root cause then. Yeah. But here we go with scuba. Oh, okay. I guess. Okay. So what does scuba stand for, Chuck? Self -contained underwater breathing situation. Appomattox. Appomattox. Apparatus. That's right. Scuba. It's actually like an acronym, but it's so used, so widely used now. It's a lowercase word. I'm not sure. Oh, really? Yeah. I mean, like, it's not. Nobody does it with capitals and periods or anything like that. It's just lower. It's a word. It's its own word now. It's almost lost its meaning as far as, like, the acronym goes. And yet, it's gained so much meaning over the years because as scuba has been around for over the decades, more and more people have found the joy of going underwater, and I heard you laugh at me, by the way, and breathe. If you breathe fully underwater, no snorkel, like, your head is nowhere near the surface of the water. And it doesn't need to be, like, significantly distant from the water. It can just be, like, a foot below the water. But you're breathing underwater. It's an amazing feeling for sure. And a lot of people have discovered that over the years and said, scuba's the life for me. Well, as of December 2019, you had scuba dived once. Yep. Have you done it since? No. And I'm actually a little troubled because I read that you're supposed to go, like, three or four open water dives, and I only went on one. So I've been under the impression that I've been certified to scuba dive all this time, and I'm like, is that true? Like, I can't remember where my card is or anything. So I wonder if I actually wasn't fully certified. Hmm. Or satisfied. I would find it very dissatisfying if that were true. Well, do you want to do it again? Because I didn't get a good read on you in 2019. I didn't know you then like I know you now. Maybe, because before the reason I didn't like it is because it made me seasick. Like, the air mixture did not sit well with me. And then getting on the boat in between dives made it even worse. Mm -hmm. So I was like, I don't feel like doing this ever again. But I think enough times past that it's possible I would try it again. Well, I want to get certified now for sure. I did anyway before, and we thought we'd wet our beaks with snorkeling. Mm -hmm. The big problem I had, man, was the fins. I mean, there were a lot of currents, and I just felt like I couldn't go and get anywhere. Yeah. And then at the end, when Ruby was free diving, I did the same thing. I took off all my stuff except for my mask. Mm -hmm. And I went down there, and I was like, all right, well, I feel like I can swim again. Yeah. It takes a lot of getting used to, because it's meant to help you, and it does if you are familiar with it and comfortable with it. But if not, it's all encumbrance. It makes everything difficult. And, like, yes, you just want to take it all off and just free dive, like you're saying. Yeah. Emily was cruising around. But, you know, we saw a little, my first, like, coral that I've ever seen, like live coral. Uh -huh. And it was beautiful. And, you know, the little stripy, bright fish, and I was in there with those guys for the first time. And it was remarkable and amazing. Was it a Dory or a Nemo that you saw? Oh, I don't know. It had, I think, yellow stripes. I don't think it was technically a clownfish, although maybe they're all types of clownfish. I'm not sure. What's a clownfish? I think, like, a Dory or a Nemo. I saw this one big thing that was, like, the size of a dinner plate, another big, flat guy. Oh, wow. He was cool. And then Emily saw a sea turtle, which I did not see. Oh, neat. And then we also saw their efforts to, you know, with artificial reefs, with, like, these PVC sort of pyramids that they were building down there.

TWO December 2019 Graham Klass Kurt Warner Josh Mexico Emily Tim Hardaway Chuck ONE 2019 Six Minutes Three Jerry Each Episode Ruby First This Year First Time Iheartmedia
A highlight from 419// Telling The Difference Between Weeds and Wheat: A Devotional Bible Study on Matthew 13:24-30

Hearing Jesus: Daily Bible Study

09:08 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from 419// Telling The Difference Between Weeds and Wheat: A Devotional Bible Study on Matthew 13:24-30

"Do you sometimes doubt if you're truly hearing God's voice or if it's really your own? Or have you been in a season where it feels like He's completely silent? Have you been praying for a way to learn how to hear His voice more clearly? Hey friends, I'm Rachel, host of the Hearing Jesus Podcast. If you are ready to grow in your faith and to confidently step into your identity in Christ, then join me as we dig deep into God's Word so you can learn to live out your faith in your everyday life. You may be familiar with The Salvation Army by the Bells We Ring at Christmas, but did you know that we also produce a network of Christian shows you can listen to on your favorite podcast store? One of those shows, Words of Life, is currently in a series on parenting. We'll be joined by families at all stages of parenting to hear their testimony and what they've learned along the way. We've realized that we are her first experience with faith, you know, and what she sees in us, and we're really mindful of how we react to things and how we speak. I've always thought, like, I'm not raising this kid to just grow up, right? I'm raising them to be a fully grown adult who is functional in society. As a father, as a parent, I feel my goal in life is to share the very best parts of me. Those values that you guys instilled in us certainly is something that we give to ours. Find Words of Life wherever you get your podcasts, or visit WordsOfLifePodcast .org to start listening. This holiday, the Home Depot is helping you get gifts that keep on giving by making sure they keep on going. Right now, when you buy a select battery kit from Ryobi, Milwaukee, RIDGID, DeWalt, or Makita, you get an eligible tool for free. Just pick a brand, pick a battery kit, and get a tool free. Give the gift of more doing this holiday with the Home Depot. How doers get more done. Valued at participating stores and online, one per transaction. Discount taken at checkout. Full, eligible tool list in store and online. Valued October 23rd, 2023 through January 28th, 2024. Hey friends, welcome back to the Hearing Jesus Podcast. I'm your host, Rachel Grohl. Today we are continuing our discussion of Matthew Chapter 13. So if you're just joining us and this is your first time listening to the podcast, welcome. We're glad you're here. What we're doing is we're in a series of an introduction to the Gospels where I'm walking through the Gospel of Matthew and chapter by chapter, verse by verse, we're talking about some of the things that we easily overlook because we are in a different time and space than the original audience was. And the reason why we do that is because there are things that the original audience, Jewish living people in a farming community would have understood that is sometimes lost on us. And so I want to point some of those things out to help you understand how this message of the Gospel is relevant to you in your life today. If you would like to dive a little bit deeper, we have resources available for you every day. There are journal prompts that go along with each episode as well as a family discussion guide, and you can get the links for that in the show notes. And then we also offer spiritual direction and one on one life coaching to help you dive That's what you're interested in. You can go to shears .org for that as well. So we are in Matthew chapter 13, and we're picking back up at verse 24. It says, Jesus told them another parable. The Kingdom of Heaven is like a man who sowed good seed in his field. But while everyone was sleeping, his enemy came and sowed seeds among the wheat and went away. When the wheat sprouted and formed heads, then the weeds also appeared. The owner servants came to him and said, Sir, didn't you sow good seed in your field? Where did the weeds come from? An enemy did this, he replied. The servants asked him, Do you want us to go and pull them up? No, he said, because while you were pulling the weeds, you may uproot the wheat with them. Let both grow together until the harvest. At that time, I will tell the harvesters first collect the weeds and tie them in bundles to be burned, then gather wheat and bring it to my barn. So at first glance, this may feel very similar to what we studied yesterday, which was the parable of the soils. And I would encourage you to go back and listen to yesterday's episode if you haven't done that so far. But it's the same theme, but it means something a little bit different. And you have to remember who this audience was that Jesus was speaking to. This original audience was a group of people that likely were farmers. And in that time frame, there was a lot of wealthy landowners that controlled most of that rural land throughout the I mean, that was throughout the Roman Empire, not just in this location. But their estates were worked either by free peasants or by slaves. And honestly, essentially, most of their situations were very, very similar. The only difference would be the fact that the slaves could be beaten or sold. But as far as their stature and their status in life, they live very similar lives. And so many of the hearers of Jesus that were in this crowd would have been rural farmers on these larger estates. And they would have really identified with this situation that he's describing. So they would have identified with the soil story from yesterday. And then this story about the weeds, they would have understood what the struggle was about. And before we get into that, I just want to make note about a couple things. First, the crop that's going to be produced in the life of the person who is good soil. So this is going back to what we talked about yesterday, this idea of good soil. The crop is for the kingdom of heaven to operate. And many think that that crop is referring to converts, people that are one to Christ through the believer. And yes, that is partially true. But in this context, it goes a little bit deeper to this more fundamental idea of transformation of the person who has encountered this kingdom of heaven experience. And so in the forest soil yesterday, we were talking about the four kinds of soil in the forest soil. That crop represents the working of the Holy Spirit inside the life of that seed or you and I, that person, that seed falls on good soil. And so there's a reference there to this production of good fruit. And later in Galatians, we'll study this. If you don't know what I'm talking about, you can go there and read in Galatians chapter five about the fruit of the Spirit and what that is. It is the gifts of the Spirit within the believer's life. And that results in these characteristics that are produced by the Spirit of God working through the life of the believer. And so this external creation of this kind of Spirit produced righteousness and these good works that are done, they're now coming up through these new converts where it's not just about them praying a prayer or them making the decision to follow Jesus, but it's about them producing good fruit, a good crop, a good harvest, the fruit of their lives. And so that's what we want to look for when we're talking about good soil is not just the fact that somebody receives that word, but that they internalize it and they develop this relationship with Christ. So as we're going through a couple of things in verse 25, it says about while everyone was sleeping, his enemy came and sowed seeds among the wheat and went away. Now, in that culture, they often would sleep after lunch, but most of the time, the greatest length of time that they would be sleeping would be at night. And either way, it could have happened at either time at lunchtime or even at nighttime. But this was something that was very common in that timeframe. Ancient farmers sometimes fought. Sometimes it would be over land. Sometimes it would be over relationships. Lots of different things, money. And a Roman law had to actually forbid this practice of sowing poisonous seeds into a neighbor's field. And so do you have to think about what was their diet? The most basic staple of their diet in the entire ancient world was what? So wheat was critical. And most of the time we're talking about seed, we're talking about wheat. And so what the enemy or the neighbor that wanted to get back at his neighbor would do is he would also plant a poisonous weed, which is a kind of a rye grass known as Darnell. And it looks like wheat, especially in the early stages. And you can really only tell the difference once the ear appears, once the fruit appears. See, Satan operates in this world, both as the swooping bird that we saw yesterday that swooped down and stole the seed and also as that enemy farmer. And so what this parable is doing is emphasizing the fact that the enemy will plant things just alongside of where God is planting. And what does that look like? Well, it's evil intentions. It's lies. His influence is right alongside those who are spreading God's word. And the interesting thing about this, and you will hear a lot about this if you are operating within the church, within the body of Christ or serving God, is there's a lot of times a demonic oppression or attack against God's people, especially when they are called to share God's word. It's predictable. We call it predictable resistance. And quite often what will happen is the moment that you are getting ready to stand out and stand up in obedience to what God has called you to do, the enemy will attack.

Rachel Grohl October 23Rd, 2023 Rachel January 28Th, 2024 Ryobi Home Depot ONE Jesus First Dewalt Each Episode Makita Today Shears .Org Yesterday Wordsoflifepodcast .Org First Time Christ Christmas Ridgid
A highlight from S3 E52: Time for the Earth to Quake

Six Minutes

08:52 min | Last month

A highlight from S3 E52: Time for the Earth to Quake

"Hey, it's Jess here. Have you ever found yourself sinking into a story like this? Pirate ship. Mysterious island through the fog in the distance. And then, ad break. Well now, there's the GZM Family subscription. Listen ad -free and get early access to new episodes, plus bonus content only available to subscribers. Join the GZM Family now. Head to GZMShows .com and you can find out all about it. There are kids in this world who are different. Special. They go to school in a place you can't find on a map. And they're about to get a new classmate. Casey! It's Penn! Remy! Over here! Casey! What's happening? It's Penn! He opened a portal? He didn't mean to. We need to stop him. Hey! Wake up! No, Remy! Stay back! Why is this happening? Best guess? My power combined with his equals something really bad. How do we stop it? I can feel him pulling power from me. The gloves! The ones the headmaster put on me to control my powers. They're here, right? I think so. We had them on the beach. Quick! Find them! Hurry! The portal's getting bigger! I'm trying! It's starting to suck things in! Come! Get them on me! Oh no, Casey! It's got me! Penn, listen to me. You can do this. Close the portal. Casey? Penn, fight it! Bassinet! Cut it loose! The bassinet? Yes, of course. That's part of it. Hurry! I got it! I'm going through! Guys, what was that? Guys? Brinley? Casey? Cyrus? Brinley? Where are you? Here. I can barely hear you. Are you okay? I think so. Casey is here too. The rocks that came down, I... I don't think I can get to you. Is Jude with you? Is anyone there? Hello? I need a hand. Jude, it's Cyrus. Where are you? Down here! Down? Down where... Whoa. What happened? Looks like the ground opened up. I can barely see him down there. Stay where you are, Brinley. I'm gonna try and help him. Jude? Watch your step, mate. Thanks, but I'm a little more worried about you. This thing is deep. Here, I'm gonna try and reach down. If you can, grab my hand. I don't think I can let go of this rock. Listen, Jude, we need to get you out of here. And what about Brinley and Casey? I think they're okay. Once you're back up here, we'll try and reach them. Sounds like an excellent plan. Good. Now, whatever you do, don't look down. Too late. Why are there all those sparks down there? Don't know, but this isn't going to work if you don't follow my directions, because if you fall even a foot, I have a feeling the electric shock will do you in before you hit the ground. This little island, it's man -made too, just like Elixir Key. Apparently. Are you certain Brinley is all right? She's alive, but that's all I know. Jude, I need you to focus on getting off that rock and grabbing onto me. Cyrus, listen. You have to save Brinley, no matter what. Oh, trust me. We've been saving each other long before you came into the picture. The rock is giving way. I got you, Jude. Good catch. Yeah, I know. I'm taller, but unfortunately, the gaining muscle mass wasn't proportional. Cyrus, I got you. I got you. Hang on. Cyrus, Jude, can you hear me? Jude? Cyrus? Still can't decide, huh, Laska? Cyrus? Jude? Cyrus? You be quiet. Just saying. Well, don't just say. Sorry about you with me. I'm here, Brinley. Got any ideas? We appear to be trapped behind the wall of rocks. I could have told you that. Maybe if we both push at the same time. Brinley, how about a little help for your roommate? My roommate? It can't be real. What would be unreal is if I ended up dying in this cave with you. So can you please start digging or pulling or pushing or something? How did we end up here? Who cares? Come on, Laska. This can't be new for you. Don't you, like, live in a cave or an igloo or something? Stop. Stop what? Being brutally honest? Kind of my trademark. First of all? That's my trademark. And we need to talk. Is this where you break up with me as a roommate? Because that horse already left the barn. Look, sorry, not sorry. You got busted cheating on your boyfriend. I was not cheating. But I would like to get out of here instead of dealing with your petty garbage until my last breath. This isn't petty. It's boring is what it is. So either help me help us get out or get out of my way. Hey! Are you trying to start a fight? Because I've had enough. Oh, you've had enough? No, I've had enough. So come on, Katie. Is it true? Is what true? That we need to dig ourselves out and find Cyrus and Jude and the others? You know what I'm talking about, Katie. Why do you keep saying my name like that? Why did you never tell me that was your name? This? This is seriously what you're upset about right now? We have got to reorder your priorities. Stop it. Stop trying to gaslight me. I spent the last few months looking for the truth and it was in front of me the entire time. You were my roommate. I don't know what you're talking about. And frankly, I don't give a flying hoot. Your initials are KZ. Yeah, so? And your name is Katie with a K. Did you hit your head during the quake, you quack? Seriously not the time to compare weird spellings of names. Brinley with an E -I -G -H. Is... Is Katie short for anything? I'm so over this. What does the C stand for? Look around, Brinley. Our friends, they're disappearing or being kidnapped or being experimented on. We are stuck in a cave. What does the C stand for? Cavendish, okay? Cavendish, happy? I got to the island. They told me my name was Cadence Cavendish, but that I should only ever go by Casey. Now, can we please move on? How... How is this possible? It's you. This entire time, it's been you. Hey, now that you've listened to this week's episodes, head on over to the GZM Rewind feed to hear me and the creators talk about the latest episodes with special guests, including cast members and superfans. Shh, it's starting. GZM shows. Imagination amplified.

Katie Brinley Cyrus Jude Laska Casey Remy Jess Penn Cadence Cavendish Elixir Key This Week Cavendish First KZ Both GZM Gzmshows .Com Last Few Months Gzm Family
A highlight from Vibrant Living: Brain Health Strategies Matter Even in Memory Care

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

28:40 min | Last month

A highlight from Vibrant Living: Brain Health Strategies Matter Even in Memory Care

"Are you struggling on navigating the complexities of specific dementia behaviors? Well, join me and my guest, Krista Montague, the brain behind Dementia's Success Path, as we unravel this tangled issue. Krista, with her riches of experience in dementia care, shines a light on the intricacies of caring for dementia patients. From handling physically active patients to dealing with violence in caregiving, we delve into the importance of balancing physical and emotional needs, and how fostering one -on -one relationships with recreation therapists or activity directors can revolutionize patient care. Welcome to Fading Memories, the podcast for caregivers of loved ones with dementia. I'm your host, Jennifer Fink. My mom had Alzheimer's for 20 years, and when I went looking for answers, I had the start a podcast to find them. Join me as we navigate the challenges of dementia caregiving together. This podcast is your beacon of support and empowerment. Let's share our experiences, find solace, and discover the strength within us. Get ready to embark on a transformative caregiving journey with Fading Memories. If you're looking for additional advice, be sure to sign up for our weekly email newsletter. It's brief, gives you great advice, you can read it in less than five minutes, and you know where to find the link in the website, on the show notes. We're working on subscriber -only information and specials, so you're not going to want to miss out. When I learned that despite eating as healthy as possible, we can still have undernourished brains, I was frustrated. Learning about neuro -reserves, Relev8, and how it's formulated to fix this problem convinced me to give them a try. Now I know many of you are skeptical, as was I, however, I know it's working because of one simple change, my sweet tooth is gone. I didn't expect that, and it's not something other users have commented on, but here's some truth. My brain always wanted something sweet. Now fruit usually did the trick, but not always. One bad night's sleep would fire up my sugar cravings so much they were almost impossible to ignore. You ever have your brain screaming for a donut? Well, for me, those days are gone. I believe in my results so much that I'm passing on my 15 % discount to you. Try it for two or three months and see if you have a miraculous sweet tooth cure, or maybe just better focus and clarity. It's worth definitely a try. Now on with our show. Welcome back, everybody. Thank you so much for joining us. I know you're going to love today's episode. With me is Krista Montague. We are talking about challenging dementia behaviors. And for those of you who know, who have listened long enough, you know, I had a few of those with my mom, so we'll be talking about those and others. So thanks for joining me, Krista. Oh, thanks for having me. So why don't you introduce yourself, tell us about your company, maybe your background with caring for somebody with dementia, and then we'll dive right into the topic. Yeah, absolutely. So I run a platform and a business called Dementia Success Path. The reason I started it is when I was very first getting started with my career, I ended up working in Jerry Psych. And that's where you run into the most challenging of dementia behaviors. That's why they're there at the hospital and my job there as an activity therapist was to provide natural intervention. So what to say and what to do to get them to come to a certain baseline in order for the doctors that work there to really be able to correctly prescribe medication. So anyways, that is how I got into the space. And over the course of many, many years, I cared for thousands of dementia patients with challenging behaviors. Thus, now I help caregivers on the Internet with said challenging behaviors now. So that's that's a little bit about me and my background. Awesome. While you were talking, I remembered a different scenario, so I hope I'm not going to throw this out of left field because this was a really challenging behavior. And I want to keep it as anonymized as possible. So a resident who was very tall, who had been a what do they call like a endurance athlete, did those like endurance marathons for people who are not watching the YouTube video. This is a very I don't want to do that kind of face. And he got very agitated if he couldn't get a hold of his wife on the phone and she was out of cell reception and he got so agitated, he pushed over another resident who broke a hip. We all know what happens when older people break hips. And this was an issue she had with him. It's just like he had obviously greater than average. What is the word? Oh, it's Monday and my brain's not going to work. He just had a ton of energy and he needed people to like take him running or he needed a way of getting rid of the energy. But he was out of stage of his dementia that taking him out wasn't necessarily safe for himself or others. So just off the top of your head, what do you think you would do with that? Just we're going to start off with the hard question first. Yeah, well, so I guess I'd be curious to figure out some of some of the why behind that, because ultimately behavior is just communication. The main thing with most of the dementias, whether it be Alzheimer's or from a temporal or blue body or whatever, is that it takes away language if you stick with the disease process long enough. So over time, those behaviors become a way for them to say, hey, something emotionally or physically with me isn't right. And I can't tell you any other way than maybe to shove this over or something like that. So it sounds like a couple of things are there, which is he has a physical need of moving around if that's been a part of his life and that's not being that that could definitely be part of it. The other part is maybe an emotional need that's not being met, which is he's wanting to get a hold of his safe person, the person who he feels gets him and can help orient him. And it's not happening. And I can just feel so overwhelming when you've lost control of everything else in your life with dementia. So as far as tackling those issues, I usually like to start with the physical issue first before I tackle the emotional one. So I understand it could definitely be challenging to get them to maybe run around the block, but I know where I happen to work, we had a pretty substantial backyard area, a garden area that people could walk around or even like a little mini trampoline event. That'd actually be a great idea if you can't move anywhere and he's like, there's nothing physically wrong. He has no mobility issues going on. Just have him bounce on that trampoline and just count it out, like almost treat it like a workout he's having like he might have had in sports or something like that, or maybe run laps a around few times or make it like some type of competition, like he's beating himself with it. So there's all kinds of ways that you can help productively put that energy towards something where it's safer. That was a lot of my job is figuring out how I could safely get these folks needs met so that if things continue to be an issue that then the doctor would come in with, say, like your Ativan or your Seroquel or, you know, whatever, things like that, it's a delicate balance trying if you're a psychiatrist that specializes in geriatrics to really get that right. And he really depended on us trying everything before he gets the medications. We're like, OK, so roughly we probably need this amount. But I was so I'll go there first with getting this physical needs. If he has a lot of energy and he just needs it met, there's there's always a safe way to get it done. It just takes a little bit of creativity and knowing a little bit about his life and his background and what would make the most sense for him. So all that's very important. And then beyond that, the emotional need could be maybe he feels like there isn't anybody else that just sits and talks to him. And I know it's challenging facilities. I get it. I worked in a facility, but at the same point in time, that's really where your let's just say your recreation therapist, your activity director can really be helpful with that. Chances are maybe he could like wall that person's activity planning or something like that could be sitting next to to her him or whatever and help him with these ideas and really building that one on one relationship so that it's not such a desperate bid for that person. You know, ultimately, there's always there's always something you can do. But I hear you. There's always going to be challenges when you're looking at an institutional place with staffing, training, all that type of stuff. But, you know, every single person's different. And it was it was rare when there was ever a person where I'm just like, no, we can't we can't help them. But it was it was very, very, very rare that that would ever be a situation that we find ourselves in. I'm wondering if they actually had gone to a geriatric psychiatrist. I'm thinking no, but I didn't know everything about their situation, obviously. Sure. That probably would have been a really good solution because he'd been in one memory care community and they just I'm not sure they tried very hard. That one used to be a mile down the hill from my home and there was a reason my mom wasn't there. And the one my mom was at, he had been moved there. So the whole incident with the shoving was in the person who got shoved was the parent of a client of my husband. So it was like, it was all the dramas. Yeah, it resolved. It resolved pretty well. I mean, there wasn't lawsuits or everybody was level headed and came to some some agreements that were positive. So that was good because I was like, oh, God, we don't. We're like, do we really need to get lawyers involved? Because, you know, this is just a really ugly situation. But I question whether whether they had a psychiatrist because that might have helped because they did have a really beautiful outside courtyard. I don't know that it would have been enough space. I mean, it was basically the size of an Olympic pool, so he could have run down and back and around. But I'm wondering if he would have felt like like a hamster on a wheel, just kind of going in a circle. But I like the trampoline idea. It depends on the context you're putting it in. It really does. If you're really treating it like, hey, this is, you know, a workout that we're doing together, like a training workout, if he was a big sports guy, then it could make sense for him. It just depends. As far as, I'd say it's unlikely the facility had one. And the reason being is in the place that I worked at, it's a hospital, so it was meant to be short term and that's usually how it goes. Oftentimes we see, rightly so, medication being a very last resort because it could take someone like him who is nothing's physically wrong with him. He's extremely physically active and it could mess with his balance and make it so he becomes a fall risk. So it's almost like you're borrowing from Peter to pay Paul when you're introducing medications. Oftentimes the folks that come to our hospital, they were violent, like they were spitting, they were fighting, hitting people, danger to themselves or others. Like it was very, very extreme situations where they'd be like, OK, like the drugs are like the very last resort to managing this. And I can understand in, you know, memory care or skilled nursing or something like that, it's challenging to have somebody so physically strong around with a bunch of frail people around, for sure. He certainly had quite a few of those. Yeah, he's really tall and then none of the caregivers, most of them, like 99 % of them were women and they weren't, none of them were more than average height. Most of us were pretty, yeah, we're talking like five foot two to five, six or seven at best. So it's not like they had like big, tall, you know, burly women to control him, which, you know, physically controlling him isn't really in the options either. But yeah, it was just, it was one of those situations where it's like, you know, his care partner was just at her wit's end and she was out of cell range because she was doing something for herself and their religious community. And so the fact that she freaked out that he couldn't get ahold of her was really unfortunate. But, you know, and I'm hoping that they learned something, you know, like all of this happened in like 2019 and then we had the pandemic and my mom passed away. It was like, oh, like, it was just, it was like a whole lot happened in a couple of years. But you were talking about violence. And so now we're going to shift back to mom, my mom. And the more we, so we talked a little bit about this, the more help she physically needed. Now, my mom walked fine with no AIDS. She had nothing physically wrong with her either. She had just had Alzheimer's for nearly 20 years. The more help she needed, the nastier she got. She didn't want people to help her. She didn't think she needed help. And if you pressed the wrong way, she literally scratched people and drew blood. So a little bit violent. They were always so surprised because like, oh, she's so easy going. I'm like, you're not talking about my mother. My mother was never easy going. She was, she was a very lovely, nice lady. Did lots of things for the community, loved her family and all that. But don't piss her off because that was a bad idea. And it did not help after Alzheimer's if you pissed her off. So I know we're kind of going back to lack of training, lack of time, lack of staff, which, you know, is actually has gotten worse since my mom passed away. But they never seem to be very good at diffusing the anger that came up kind of quickly. And it was always, it always made me feel so bad when she's, when she drew blood on the gal that took care of her. Because that gal put up with way too much garbage. So it's, go ahead. I was going to say, when you've got somebody who doesn't think they need help, that was the worst with my mom. It's like, you know, and I actually experienced it. We'd come back from, I always took her out. We went and watched kids in the park or whatever. This was what gave her the most joy. And we came back, she needed to use the restroom and she was, you know, she was still fairly continent, but she needed depends, just in case kind of thing. And as we all have happened, you know, her toe gets caught in the elastic and she's grunting and groaning and pissing and moaning, trying to pull the, first off, she crossed her legs and then tried to pull up the, you know, the incontinence underwear. And I'm like, I know exactly what's going to happen if I help her because she's going to get angry at me. And so I let her fuss and fume for a few minutes and I thought, this is ridiculous. And I went in and I said, oh, you just have your toe caught. That happens to me all the time. And I like grimaced and I bent over and I unhooked her toe and I literally backed up and stood up as quick as I could. Thankfully, I did not get smacked. That was what I was expecting. And I left the bathroom. I left her to do the rest of her stuff. She had her clothes back on. She comes back in her room, absolutely spitting mad. And I'm like, you know, this is ridiculous. It's not like I, I didn't even touch her. All I did was unhook the elastic from her toe, which, you know, if she didn't have Alzheimer's, she would have understood that that was the problem. But she was so mad. She was like, right, right, right, people come here. And she stomped out of her room and I thought, okay, well, I guess I'm going to go home now. And she made a circle around. The residents came back in her room. She goes, oh, hi, what are you doing here? I was like, oh, crap. Now we can start the visit all over again. Like, should have left a minute and a half ago. Oh, no. Oh, man. Yeah. So, you know, it's funny. I was actually having this discussion recently. I don't know if you've heard of Dan Salinger. He's pretty big on TikTok, like a really big caregiver on TikTok. I was just interviewing him on my Instagram. And we were talking a little bit about really how memories aren't quite as straightforward as a lot of people initially think. Something I really noticed with a lot of people with dementia, like all kinds of dementia, is that while the dementia stole the information aspect of their memories, and memories are really both comprised of both emotions and information. So you notice that a lot of the emotions behind their experiences would really linger. So, for example, if I'm sure if mom like so my thought when you're talking about mom is it's possible, maybe somebody else pissed her off earlier in the day, and she didn't necessarily hang on to the information of what made her mad earlier, but she was maybe hanging on to the emotion from it. And it's possible that maybe the her toe getting stuck in you helping her. She's like, no one respects me like this is just like the fifth thing that someone's disrespecting me with. And now my daughter's doing it to me like gosh darn it. For emotionally, her it feels like this is I'm just so tired of not having any control over my life, or I'm just so tired of like people telling me what to do all the time, talking to me like I'm a little kid, like just all those are very valid feelings of anger. But since the information gets like poof out of their brains, all it looks like is, wow, they're really overreacting to that being stuck in their pant leg. So sometimes it's not always the easiest to try to discern like, was I the fifth thing that pissed her off? Because she probably won't be able to tell you. But anyways, how I guess Dan and I came through that is he noticed that like maybe when after he got his dad to shower and his dad is mad, the anger would just kind of linger for a few hours afterwards, even when he completely forgotten he even had a shower. So it's just so, yeah, it's so interesting how all that works. It could be both helpful and unhelpful simultaneously as far as them forgetting things or the emotions lingering. So anyways, those are the thoughts I've had. The lack of control, something that she had. So she was the oldest of four kids. And so, you know, she was always responsible for the younger siblings. And I mean, I'm the oldest of two, so I can relate to that. My dad wasn't the easiest person. He, you know, he worked. My mom took care of my sister and I, and he kind of kept control of things. And whenever she wanted to do something, like if she wanted to repaint a room in the house, she'd think about it. She wouldn't talk to anybody, but she'd think about it. And then she would announce, tada, I'm going to do this. It sounded like, literally like it came out of the blue and I knew that it didn't because I think about things and then say, I think we should do X, Y, Z. Like our closet door, it's irritating. And it's like, we're going to put a barn door on here. So I talk about it, then I research it, then I share the research. So I'm not like, bam, we're going to do this. And it sounds coming out of the blue. So I don't think she felt like she had a lot of control, like her whole life since she was a teenager, probably, or maybe younger. Um, you know, like both my grandparents worked. So my, you know, both my uncles were kind of rowdy. She had the rowdy cousin that wound up. So yeah, I don't think she felt like she had a lot of control. So even if it wasn't the fifth thing that pissed her off, even if it was only the second or the third thing that day, yeah, I can totally see where that would have. That would have been an issue. So I've learned so much since she's passed away. It's like, dang, I really wish I'd known this five years ago. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, it's, it's interesting. I find that anytime, regardless if they have dementia or not, if there's like a huge reaction that feels disproportionate to the situation you're in, chances are, it's probably not about you. It's probably about a bunch of other stuff. And it's very much the same with our folks with dementia. And that's usually the fastest way I can get them calmed down from anger is I would say it sounds like there's just a lot of things that are frustrating you here. Let's just go outside and you can just tell me what's on your heart. And usually I was right. There's usually like six different things that were all pretty valid sounding that was pissing them off. And it was really relieving for a lot of them to have someone actually really sit down and listen to them. And it was a very unique position to be in as far as the facility goes. To actually be the person who had a little bit more time to spend with, with my folks to really understand where they were coming from a little bit more. I was really special. And it's really unfortunate because COVID, many of the other things COVID has taken out has also taken out this particular facility as well, which it stinks. But, you know, COVID did a number on all of it and everything on everybody on all the things. I guess I want to circle back real quick when we were talking about the staff and the training and things like that. Something I notice oftentimes just because of maybe because it's just severely underpaid they're asking their folks to do is you and oftentimes you'll find culturally people who maybe came from more of like an authoritarian type parenting background and they see these adults who are acting like children in their eyes. So they almost instinctively go back to like this authoritarian style parenting to these adults. And it just doesn't work. It just it just doesn't work. And that's why, you know, the training is so, so important. But now it's just rough when you live in a country where everything is all about the dollar. Yeah, my so where my mom lived, my husband's a real estate broker and we were talking about this exact topic because the people that did the hands -on carrying on my mom did not get paid worth beans because some of them worked at Starbucks for eight hours and then went and dealt with these, you know, these people with dementias. And like I could barely deal with my mom for two or three hours at a time much. And that was on top of what all the other stuff I did, but I didn't work at Starbucks for eight hours and then come deal with my mom for eight hours. Like, nope, that was outside my abilities. So I always, you know, tried really hard to, like, make their life easier. But the gal that my mom was always drawing blood on, she just worked at the community and she was freaking poor at it, you know. And I had a really good relationship with the executive director. If he was making big bucks, he wasn't spending it. He had an older model Honda Accord. You know, he wore polo shirts and khaki pants, you know, not dissing pennies. I shopped there, but that's kind of where he looked like he shopped. You know, he wasn't wearing suits. And I always, I thought, I don't know how you do this job because you've got the staff to deal with. You've got the residents to deal with. You've got the residents' families to deal with. Like, there are too many people to try to make happy. There's not enough money for you, but somebody's making money. And so I had my husband, like, pull up the property taxes and when the building was built and we, like, kind of assessed, like, their expenses. And it was like, God, I don't know how anybody's making money doing this. And it was expensive. We paid $5 ,600 a month for my mom. And then she moved in March 2017. So every March she was reassessed. The memory care director was very kind. Always, you know, when you kind of got somebody who's in a range of needs, always kind of scaled it to the lower end. And my mom fell, broke her leg, was bed -bound, wheelchair -bound, and she still skewed everything, like, as minimal as she could. And the fee was going from $5 ,600 to $7 ,200. And I've said this a lot. I think my mom had a moment of clarity where she realized there was this COVID thing going on. You know, people were not allowed to come in to the community. We weren't allowed to take them out to go watch kids in the park. She was going to need this wheelchair. The fee was going to, oh, forget it. I'm out. I really seriously think she had that moment because she died March 31st. The new fee was supposed to take place April 1st. So she saved us some money. Yeah. I was like, man, you've done that just right, honey. I mean, and it just, yeah, it just seemed like there just had to have been a moment of clarity. So yeah, it was crazy times. We were very blessed. They let us come in. I saw her the day before she passed away. They called me on the 31st and said, come now. She passed away before we got there. But literally, so this is March 31st, 2020. We're still in the initial stages of quarantine, you know, two weeks to flatten the curve. All that, if you guys remember back then, it's like, I almost forgot that was the beginning of the year, basically sitting at home. No, we were so innocent back then. Yeah, we thought we were doing really good sitting at home, baking sourdough bread. Oh, I was most certainly not doing that at that time. I was working with the ventilation staff. Oh, wow. Oh, so yeah, nope. I was doing my same stuff, but there was 10 of us. So there was my husband and I, my daughter, son -in -law, my sister, her kids and husband, and one, my mom's sister and one brother. And my aunt wore a mask. So this was a little bit before masking because my aunt took care of my grandmother, who had vascular dementia, lived on grandma's social security. So when my grandmother passed away, I don't understand why my family made this choice. Still don't. Well, obviously when my grandmother passed away, my aunt didn't have a career or money. So my aunt lives in subsidized senior housing and she has her own mental health struggles. She obviously knew that maybe wearing a mask was a good idea. And again, great relationship with the executive director, but that man looked like he was about to have a complete stroke because literally there's 10 of us standing outside my mom's room, including two kids. My niece was a teenager and my nephew was almost a teenager. And he never basically said, get the hell out. But it was very obvious on his face. That's what he wanted to say. But a lot of people didn't get to see their loved ones at all. So I felt really blessed and that must've been really, really hard for them.

Krista Jennifer Fink Krista Montague March 2017 April 1St Two Kids Dan Salinger March 31St $5 ,600 15 % 10 DAN Eight Hours $7 ,200 Four Kids 20 Years TWO Paul 99 % Two Weeks
A highlight from Vibrant Living: Brain Health Strategies Matter Even in Memory Care

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

21:16 min | Last month

A highlight from Vibrant Living: Brain Health Strategies Matter Even in Memory Care

"Are you struggling on navigating the complexities of specific dementia behaviors? Well, join me and my guest, Krista Montague, the brain behind Dementia's Success Path, as we unravel this tangled issue. Krista, with her riches of experience in dementia care, shines a light on the intricacies of caring for dementia patients. From handling physically active patients to dealing with violence in caregiving, we delve into the importance of balancing physical and emotional needs, and how fostering one -on -one relationships with recreation therapists or activity directors can revolutionize patient care. Welcome to Fading Memories, the podcast for caregivers of loved ones with dementia. I'm your host, Jennifer Fink. My mom had Alzheimer's for 20 years, and when I went looking for answers, I had the start a podcast to find them. Join me as we navigate the challenges of dementia caregiving together. This podcast is your beacon of support and empowerment. Let's share our experiences, find solace, and discover the strength within us. Get ready to embark on a transformative caregiving journey with Fading Memories. If you're looking for additional advice, be sure to sign up for our weekly email newsletter. It's brief, gives you great advice, you can read it in less than five minutes, and you know where to find the link in the website, on the show notes. We're working on subscriber -only information and specials, so you're not going to want to miss out. When I learned that despite eating as healthy as possible, we can still have undernourished brains, I was frustrated. Learning about neuro -reserves, Relev8, and how it's formulated to fix this problem convinced me to give them a try. Now I know many of you are skeptical, as was I, however, I know it's working because of one simple change, my sweet tooth is gone. I didn't expect that, and it's not something other users have commented on, but here's some truth. My brain always wanted something sweet. Now fruit usually did the trick, but not always. One bad night's sleep would fire up my sugar cravings so much they were almost impossible to ignore. You ever have your brain screaming for a donut? Well, for me, those days are gone. I believe in my results so much that I'm passing on my 15 % discount to you. Try it for two or three months and see if you have a miraculous sweet tooth cure, or maybe just better focus and clarity. It's worth definitely a try. Now on with our show. Welcome back, everybody. Thank you so much for joining us. I know you're going to love today's episode. With me is Krista Montague. We are talking about challenging dementia behaviors. And for those of you who know, who have listened long enough, you know, I had a few of those with my mom, so we'll be talking about those and others. So thanks for joining me, Krista. Oh, thanks for having me. So why don't you introduce yourself, tell us about your company, maybe your background with caring for somebody with dementia, and then we'll dive right into the topic. Yeah, absolutely. So I run a platform and a business called Dementia Success Path. The reason I started it is when I was very first getting started with my career, I ended up working in Jerry Psych. And that's where you run into the most challenging of dementia behaviors. That's why they're there at the hospital and my job there as an activity therapist was to provide natural intervention. So what to say and what to do to get them to come to a certain baseline in order for the doctors that work there to really be able to correctly prescribe medication. So anyways, that is how I got into the space. And over the course of many, many years, I cared for thousands of dementia patients with challenging behaviors. Thus, now I help caregivers on the Internet with said challenging behaviors now. So that's that's a little bit about me and my background. Awesome. While you were talking, I remembered a different scenario, so I hope I'm not going to throw this out of left field because this was a really challenging behavior. And I want to keep it as anonymized as possible. So a resident who was very tall, who had been a what do they call like a endurance athlete, did those like endurance marathons for people who are not watching the YouTube video. This is a very I don't want to do that kind of face. And he got very agitated if he couldn't get a hold of his wife on the phone and she was out of cell reception and he got so agitated, he pushed over another resident who broke a hip. We all know what happens when older people break hips. And this was an issue she had with him. It's just like he had obviously greater than average. What is the word? Oh, it's Monday and my brain's not going to work. He just had a ton of energy and he needed people to like take him running or he needed a way of getting rid of the energy. But he was out of stage of his dementia that taking him out wasn't necessarily safe for himself or others. So just off the top of your head, what do you think you would do with that? Just we're going to start off with the hard question first. Yeah, well, so I guess I'd be curious to figure out some of some of the why behind that, because ultimately behavior is just communication. The main thing with most of the dementias, whether it be Alzheimer's or from a temporal or blue body or whatever, is that it takes away language if you stick with the disease process long enough. So over time, those behaviors become a way for them to say, hey, something emotionally or physically with me isn't right. And I can't tell you any other way than maybe to shove this over or something like that. So it sounds like a couple of things are there, which is he has a physical need of moving around if that's been a part of his life and that's not being that that could definitely be part of it. The other part is maybe an emotional need that's not being met, which is he's wanting to get a hold of his safe person, the person who he feels gets him and can help orient him. And it's not happening. And I can just feel so overwhelming when you've lost control of everything else in your life with dementia. So as far as tackling those issues, I usually like to start with the physical issue first before I tackle the emotional one. So I understand it could definitely be challenging to get them to maybe run around the block, but I know where I happen to work, we had a pretty substantial backyard area, a garden area that people could walk around or even like a little mini trampoline event. That'd actually be a great idea if you can't move anywhere and he's like, there's nothing physically wrong. He has no mobility issues going on. Just have him bounce on that trampoline and just count it out, like almost treat it like a workout he's having like he might have had in sports or something like that, or maybe run laps a around few times or make it like some type of competition, like he's beating himself with it. So there's all kinds of ways that you can help productively put that energy towards something where it's safer. That was a lot of my job is figuring out how I could safely get these folks needs met so that if things continue to be an issue that then the doctor would come in with, say, like your Ativan or your Seroquel or, you know, whatever, things like that, it's a delicate balance trying if you're a psychiatrist that specializes in geriatrics to really get that right. And he really depended on us trying everything before he gets the medications. We're like, OK, so roughly we probably need this amount. But I was so I'll go there first with getting this physical needs. If he has a lot of energy and he just needs it met, there's there's always a safe way to get it done. It just takes a little bit of creativity and knowing a little bit about his life and his background and what would make the most sense for him. So all that's very important. And then beyond that, the emotional need could be maybe he feels like there isn't anybody else that just sits and talks to him. And I know it's challenging facilities. I get it. I worked in a facility, but at the same point in time, that's really where your let's just say your recreation therapist, your activity director can really be helpful with that. Chances are maybe he could like wall that person's activity planning or something like that could be sitting next to to her him or whatever and help him with these ideas and really building that one on one relationship so that it's not such a desperate bid for that person. You know, ultimately, there's always there's always something you can do. But I hear you. There's always going to be challenges when you're looking at an institutional place with staffing, training, all that type of stuff. But, you know, every single person's different. And it was it was rare when there was ever a person where I'm just like, no, we can't we can't help them. But it was it was very, very, very rare that that would ever be a situation that we find ourselves in. I'm wondering if they actually had gone to a geriatric psychiatrist. I'm thinking no, but I didn't know everything about their situation, obviously. Sure. That probably would have been a really good solution because he'd been in one memory care community and they just I'm not sure they tried very hard. That one used to be a mile down the hill from my home and there was a reason my mom wasn't there. And the one my mom was at, he had been moved there. So the whole incident with the shoving was in the person who got shoved was the parent of a client of my husband. So it was like, it was all the dramas. Yeah, it resolved. It resolved pretty well. I mean, there wasn't lawsuits or everybody was level headed and came to some some agreements that were positive. So that was good because I was like, oh, God, we don't. We're like, do we really need to get lawyers involved? Because, you know, this is just a really ugly situation. But I question whether whether they had a psychiatrist because that might have helped because they did have a really beautiful outside courtyard. I don't know that it would have been enough space. I mean, it was basically the size of an Olympic pool, so he could have run down and back and around. But I'm wondering if he would have felt like like a hamster on a wheel, just kind of going in a circle. But I like the trampoline idea. It depends on the context you're putting it in. It really does. If you're really treating it like, hey, this is, you know, a workout that we're doing together, like a training workout, if he was a big sports guy, then it could make sense for him. It just depends. As far as, I'd say it's unlikely the facility had one. And the reason being is in the place that I worked at, it's a hospital, so it was meant to be short term and that's usually how it goes. Oftentimes we see, rightly so, medication being a very last resort because it could take someone like him who is nothing's physically wrong with him. He's extremely physically active and it could mess with his balance and make it so he becomes a fall risk. So it's almost like you're borrowing from Peter to pay Paul when you're introducing medications. Oftentimes the folks that come to our hospital, they were violent, like they were spitting, they were fighting, hitting people, danger to themselves or others. Like it was very, very extreme situations where they'd be like, OK, like the drugs are like the very last resort to managing this. And I can understand in, you know, memory care or skilled nursing or something like that, it's challenging to have somebody so physically strong around with a bunch of frail people around, for sure. He certainly had quite a few of those. Yeah, he's really tall and then none of the caregivers, most of them, like 99 % of them were women and they weren't, none of them were more than average height. Most of us were pretty, yeah, we're talking like five foot two to five, six or seven at best. So it's not like they had like big, tall, you know, burly women to control him, which, you know, physically controlling him isn't really in the options either. But yeah, it was just, it was one of those situations where it's like, you know, his care partner was just at her wit's end and she was out of cell range because she was doing something for herself and their religious community. And so the fact that she freaked out that he couldn't get ahold of her was really unfortunate. But, you know, and I'm hoping that they learned something, you know, like all of this happened in like 2019 and then we had the pandemic and my mom passed away. It was like, oh, like, it was just, it was like a whole lot happened in a couple of years. But you were talking about violence. And so now we're going to shift back to mom, my mom. And the more we, so we talked a little bit about this, the more help she physically needed. Now, my mom walked fine with no AIDS. She had nothing physically wrong with her either. She had just had Alzheimer's for nearly 20 years. The more help she needed, the nastier she got. She didn't want people to help her. She didn't think she needed help. And if you pressed the wrong way, she literally scratched people and drew blood. So a little bit violent. They were always so surprised because like, oh, she's so easy going. I'm like, you're not talking about my mother. My mother was never easy going. She was, she was a very lovely, nice lady. Did lots of things for the community, loved her family and all that. But don't piss her off because that was a bad idea. And it did not help after Alzheimer's if you pissed her off. So I know we're kind of going back to lack of training, lack of time, lack of staff, which, you know, is actually has gotten worse since my mom passed away. But they never seem to be very good at diffusing the anger that came up kind of quickly. And it was always, it always made me feel so bad when she's, when she drew blood on the gal that took care of her. Because that gal put up with way too much garbage. So it's, go ahead. I was going to say, when you've got somebody who doesn't think they need help, that was the worst with my mom. It's like, you know, and I actually experienced it. We'd come back from, I always took her out. We went and watched kids in the park or whatever. This was what gave her the most joy. And we came back, she needed to use the restroom and she was, you know, she was still fairly continent, but she needed depends, just in case kind of thing. And as we all have happened, you know, her toe gets caught in the elastic and she's grunting and groaning and pissing and moaning, trying to pull the, first off, she crossed her legs and then tried to pull up the, you know, the incontinence underwear. And I'm like, I know exactly what's going to happen if I help her because she's going to get angry at me. And so I let her fuss and fume for a few minutes and I thought, this is ridiculous. And I went in and I said, oh, you just have your toe caught. That happens to me all the time. And I like grimaced and I bent over and I unhooked her toe and I literally backed up and stood up as quick as I could. Thankfully, I did not get smacked. That was what I was expecting. And I left the bathroom. I left her to do the rest of her stuff. She had her clothes back on. She comes back in her room, absolutely spitting mad. And I'm like, you know, this is ridiculous. It's not like I, I didn't even touch her. All I did was unhook the elastic from her toe, which, you know, if she didn't have Alzheimer's, she would have understood that that was the problem. But she was so mad. She was like, right, right, right, people come here. And she stomped out of her room and I thought, okay, well, I guess I'm going to go home now. And she made a circle around. The residents came back in her room. She goes, oh, hi, what are you doing here? I was like, oh, crap. Now we can start the visit all over again. Like, should have left a minute and a half ago. Oh, no. Oh, man. Yeah. So, you know, it's funny. I was actually having this discussion recently. I don't know if you've heard of Dan Salinger. He's pretty big on TikTok, like a really big caregiver on TikTok. I was just interviewing him on my Instagram. And we were talking a little bit about really how memories aren't quite as straightforward as a lot of people initially think. Something I really noticed with a lot of people with dementia, like all kinds of dementia, is that while the dementia stole the information aspect of their memories, and memories are really both comprised of both emotions and information. So you notice that a lot of the emotions behind their experiences would really linger. So, for example, if I'm sure if mom like so my thought when you're talking about mom is it's possible, maybe somebody else pissed her off earlier in the day, and she didn't necessarily hang on to the information of what made her mad earlier, but she was maybe hanging on to the emotion from it. And it's possible that maybe the her toe getting stuck in you helping her. She's like, no one respects me like this is just like the fifth thing that someone's disrespecting me with. And now my daughter's doing it to me like gosh darn it. For emotionally, her it feels like this is I'm just so tired of not having any control over my life, or I'm just so tired of like people telling me what to do all the time, talking to me like I'm a little kid, like just all those are very valid feelings of anger. But since the information gets like poof out of their brains, all it looks like is, wow, they're really overreacting to that being stuck in their pant leg. So sometimes it's not always the easiest to try to discern like, was I the fifth thing that pissed her off? Because she probably won't be able to tell you. But anyways, how I guess Dan and I came through that is he noticed that like maybe when after he got his dad to shower and his dad is mad, the anger would just kind of linger for a few hours afterwards, even when he completely forgotten he even had a shower. So it's just so, yeah, it's so interesting how all that works. It could be both helpful and unhelpful simultaneously as far as them forgetting things or the emotions lingering. So anyways, those are the thoughts I've had. The lack of control, something that she had. So she was the oldest of four kids. And so, you know, she was always responsible for the younger siblings. And I mean, I'm the oldest of two, so I can relate to that. My dad wasn't the easiest person. He, you know, he worked. My mom took care of my sister and I, and he kind of kept control of things. And whenever she wanted to do something, like if she wanted to repaint a room in the house, she'd think about it. She wouldn't talk to anybody, but she'd think about it. And then she would announce, tada, I'm going to do this. It sounded like, literally like it came out of the blue and I knew that it didn't because I think about things and then say, I think we should do X, Y, Z. Like our closet door, it's irritating. And it's like, we're going to put a barn door on here. So I talk about it, then I research it, then I share the research. So I'm not like, bam, we're going to do this. And it sounds coming out of the blue. So I don't think she felt like she had a lot of control, like her whole life since she was a teenager, probably, or maybe younger. Um, you know, like both my grandparents worked. So my, you know, both my uncles were kind of rowdy.

Krista Jennifer Fink Krista Montague Dan Salinger 15 % DAN Four Kids 20 Years TWO Paul 99 % Monday Less Than Five Minutes Three Months Peter Thousands Today SIX Seven Five
A highlight from The Mike and Mark Davis Daily Chat - 10/03/23

Mike Gallagher Podcast

13:59 min | 2 months ago

A highlight from The Mike and Mark Davis Daily Chat - 10/03/23

"Not just any Fleetwood Mac record, little secondhand news, first track when you put the needle down, when that little Rumors album was released, you heard this, you heard the great Lindsey Buckingham, who is 74 today. Mike, you've caught, you've caught the Mac a few times, have you not? Oh, sure, sure. Love Fleetwood Mac. What a sad, what a sad story because he's so, he's a genius. He's a total genius. And they fired him like four or five years ago. The chemistry was just terrible. He does solo tours now and does some, some Fleetwood Mac stuff, but I just hope he's just not... These stories, these stories about these guys all breaking up and fights and all that. The Eagles, of course, had an epic, epic battle. You know, who they fired, they fired, I guess, the, I mean, they had a big, the two of them, the two founders, I guess, of the Eagles. They broke up and then they came back and, you know, it's like, hey, life is short, you know? That's it. You know what it makes you think about? It makes you think about Aerosmith. Same five guys, 50 years. There you go. You got to get Steven Tyler well again because he like blasted a vocal cord. But anyway, speaking of people who've been together for a long time, here's my buddy. How are you doing? Well, I'm good. I'm just trying to make sense out of the, the rage that the establishment Republicans and the Rhinos and the squishes are exhibiting towards Matt Gaetz. Now, I, I think there's a lot of merit towards the frustration over what Gaetz is trying to do in, in ousting Kevin McCarthy personally. I think Kevin McCarthy has done a great job. I think he's, he's fine. You know, it's a tough conference. It's a tough coalition. You got to hold it together. McCarthy did a great job in helping to identify strong candidates in California and New York, in New York. And without those victories, Marc, we don't have, we don't have a Republican majority in the House. Now, we have a slim majority in the House, slim, four, four people. That's it. All right. So I want to present, and I get it, you know, this is probably giving the Democrats a lifeline. It's ceasing our momentum. This is probably not the most productive thing to happen right now to try to have this crisis over the Speaker of the House. But what the establishment types are saying in their rage, and man, are they mad. I mean, Marc, they're not agitated. They're not, they're livid. I mean, I, I heard this morning, I, I never knew Switzerland could be so angry. Man, for Switzerland, Switzerland's got the knives out in the show before yours. Geneva is on fire. Oh, my gosh, Switzerland is burning. This is a reference, of course, to the always even -handed, neutral, and presidential matters, et cetera, our buddy Hugh Hewitt, who has decided to take a couple of sides, take one side on this. Not so neutral on this issue, is he? I mean, it's just like full -blown, Gates is a clown, he's a fraud, he's a traitor, he's a this, he's a that. I saw a tweet last night that got me thinking, and this is, I think, a reasonable thing to have as part of this conversation. Has Kevin McCarthy fulfilled the promises he made in order to get elected speaker in the first place, or hasn't he? It's a reasonable thing to talk about. It was, you know, Gates and Lauren Boebert and Eli Crane and all these real, you know, sharp -elbowed Republicans got concessions from McCarthy in his bid to become speaker. Remember, I'm old enough to remember that wasn't so easy. That was not long ago. Exactly. And it wasn't that long ago. It wasn't that easy, right? Well, he promised they would pass 12 appropriations bills for a budget, in other words, fiscal responsibility in the budget. He'd give members at least 72 hours to read legislation. Now those are not, that's not onerous and that isn't crazy. So those two promises, well, both of those promises were broken this past weekend. And Gates is saying, you broke your promises and we're going to hold you accountable. Now, does he have a plan? It doesn't really sound like it to me. I don't know who you replace him with. Thank you. And it does hurt the Republican momentum we have. There are over 200 Republicans who are solidly in McCarthy's corner. But Mark, we expect some accountability. We do expect disruption. We do expect people who are warriors and fighting for what we believe in. So it just seems to me that to turn on Matt Gaetz all of a sudden and, P .S., insult the millions and millions of Americans who are rooting for him isn't very productive. Are they rooting for, first of all, your sound, sound logic throughout. Are they rooting for him in this particular tactic or they admiring the lofty standard that he has? And it may not even be all that lofty is like, hey, you made us promises to become speaker. How about keeping those promises? There's an old adage that it's possible for multiple things to be true at the same time. Here are the two things that are true at the same time. Kevin McCarthy has been a very successful, very impactful speaker and deserves a lot of conservative praise for the things he has been able to do. There's thing number one thing. Number two is he might have fudged on some of these things, seems to have fudged on some of these procedural things, and I don't say that to be dismissive of them. Some of these things that he promised the Gang of 10 or whatever they were that were that were holding him up. So in what form is this the only accountability? Is this the only way to call him out? Because all I would ask, and I'll give this back to you in the following way, is if Gaetz tactics are so great and if they are to be admired, what is the end game? What is the plan? Trump's have disruptions a plan, and it's a wonderful plan. Various other people who are disruptors, there's a place they're trying to get you to. Here's what I want to do that is specific. Here's the goal I'm trying to get to. What exactly is the Matt Gaetz end game? I don't know, and I don't know that he knows. I'm not sure he does. I would suggest, I would respectfully submit that the way to deal with these differences is behind closed doors, not to burn it all down. I mean, again, make no mistake. I don't agree with the Gaetz tactic right now. I don't want anybody to be lost on that, but I also strongly disagree with disparaging the spirit with which he's doing it. And again, savage millions and millions of Americans in the process. So listen, I guess Cal's out of the barn. He's called for the vote. The vote's going to come today or tomorrow if they oust McCarthy, which is possible because Democrats are quite capable of adding to this misery right now. Right now, Gaetz needs some Democrats. And if he gets Democrats to support him because they like to sit back and see this kind of dumpster fire, well, McCarthy's out, Mark. Is there an irony there in that Matt Gaetz needs Democrat help to oust a speaker whose worst sin is doing something with Democrat help? Yes. That's a great irony with a capital I. Great way to put it. It really is. And I heard a congressman, you know, a RINO New York congressman on Hewitt this morning and they are again, they are on fire. As you said, Geneva is burning. But this guy pointed out, well, I don't think any of the Democrats are going to want to be associated with this guy, Matt Gaetz. Don't be so sure. Strange bedfellows sometimes. Well, AOC of all people said this week, hey, we're not going to it's not up to us to bail the Republicans out of the mess they're in. Believe me, they're enjoying this. I do agree that this benefits the Democrats. I'm sorry for that. And I hate it. But I also don't like seeing, you know, somebody called a nihilist. I mean, nihilist. You know, it's like and he's anti -American and he's got his daddy's boy and daddy was the Florida. I mean, they're just attacking him personally. I mean, it's it's kind of wild. To see it. There are bigger fish to fry. I want to share with you. You mentioned earlier I was listening to you talk about the plight of the big cities. Horrible story out of Philadelphia. There was a young journalist, an LGBT journalist who was very prolific on X and social media mocking conservatives for being concerned about crime in big cities like his city of Philadelphia. And this guy was even mocking the idea of having a gun to defend yourself in your home. He was mocking and taunting Republicans for criticizing cities like Philadelphia. He loves this Jim Kenney, this sanctuary city mayor. Markie was shot and killed in his home this week. He was murdered seven times, seven bullets put in his body. And of course, the ghouls on social media are dancing on his grave and they're mocking him. Can't do that. But but you must understand that this is life or death, that things are happening in these cities. And I hate it. I hate it for his for obvious for him and for his family, his loved ones. And again, a well -known journalist in Philly, apparently in the LGBT community. But the bottom line is a day before he was murdered, he was literally, you know, poo pooing the idea that we got a crime problem in Philly, mocking the people who are trying to draw attention to the issue to make it better. And it's funny. So did you hear the two things when I was talking about the conversion of Dallas mayor Eric Johnson? He said, listen, we need Republican mayors in our big cities, so I'm going to become one. We also need to elect more of them. And that seems like a ridiculous long shot. How do you get a Republican elected in most of America's big cities? And I don't know the answer to that except to try. A lot of people don't even want to try. We have given up. We have ceded the cities to Democrats. Is that helpful? 70, 80 percent of Americans live in these big cities. Is that helpful to just give up or should we try to it's a marathon, not a sprint. It's an uphill steep climb to try to get some sensible Republican mayors who can save our cities. You spend so much time in New York. I grew up in the suburbs of D .C. I'm in Dallas and Fort Worth all the time. You're in Tampa all the time. Big cities are beautiful. There's no more beautiful city in America than San Francisco. It breaks my heart what happens out there. Should we try to save American cities or say, screw them, get buried under your own bad policies? I'm inclined to say you own it. You live with it. You've got to you inherited this. There's a great column by Douglas Murray of the New York Post called The Fall of Lululemon. How stores have surrendered to looters. He tells the story of how Lululemon fires employees who try to stop shoplifters from walking out with the high end material and merchandise from Lululemon. And a lot of stores are doing this. They're firing any of the employees. They're saying, let them go. Let them walk out. And guess what? When you when that happens, when you encourage it. I mean, it's not a sane society anymore. I mean, call us old fashioned. Law and order is an important thing. It's one thing that people want to steal, but for businesses not to mind being stolen from. Well, but I'm intrigued by the employees thing. And for those that don't know, Lululemon is high end athletic wear, mostly for for women, but not exclusively. And so there's some some an arm load is some serious cash if you're going out the front door. Thousands and thousands of dollars. What do we expect? I mean, if I'm an employee, I'd love to say, well, I'm not going to let this happen, blah, blah, blah. But sometimes these people might be armed. I mean, what these what these stores need is armed guards to prevent this, not employees trying to try and try to go vigilante. Two female Lululemon employees in Atlanta confronted three masked men who pillaged the store. All they did was call the police. Right. I mean, one of the systematically said, you know, what do we want them to do? What do we want? They did call them. They were fired. They were fired for for for OK. Pardon me. Confused host for for calling the police or for not doing more for calling the police. No, they did too much by calling the police. One of the fired employee told the Atlanta Journal Constitution, we are not supposed to get in the way. You're supposed to clear the path for whatever they're going to do. And then it's over. You scan a QR code. We're not supposed to call the police. We're not supposed to talk about it. And Douglas Murray says Lululemon isn't the only company in America that has taken this completely lax approach to its own stock. Well, guess what? Lululemon's on the verge of bankruptcy. They're going out of business. And Douglas Murray writes, you know what? I'm sorry. Count me as one who's not real sympathetic. We're in post consequences America. And this is how Congressman Henry Cuellar gets carjacked. Or it's not the specific because of this, then that because crime is going to happen. But we're going to get more of it in cities where people know they'll get away with it and know that punishment does not await them. And there is a choice that Americans get to make. Republicans are law and order. The Democrats are certainly not, no matter how mad Switzerland gets. Look at that. Look at that call back. Happy Tuesday. And the Mike Gallagher Show lies ahead. Everyone knows that putting money aside and savings is really important. But then what? Should you keep your savings locked in a CD for a higher rate or keep them liquid in a money market? Can your checking account help you save, too? Or is it about creating the right combination? We believe real banking is a conversation. Let's talk about the savings options that are right for you. Learn more at SandySpringBank .com. Member FDIC.

Jim Kenney Marc Douglas Murray Lindsey Buckingham Kevin Mccarthy Hugh Hewitt Henry Cuellar Matt Gaetz Mccarthy Steven Tyler Donald Trump Mark Seven Times California Atlanta San Francisco Eli Crane Markie Gates Lauren Boebert
A highlight from LST3  Zlie Martin and the Gift of Self  The Letters of St. Therese of Lisieux with Fr. Timothy Gallagher Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

04:36 min | 2 months ago

A highlight from LST3 Zlie Martin and the Gift of Self The Letters of St. Therese of Lisieux with Fr. Timothy Gallagher Podcast

"Of the Virgin Mary presents The Letters of Saint Therese of Lisieux with Father Timothy Gallagher. Father Gallagher is a member of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary, a religious community dedicated to retreats and spiritual direction according to the spiritual exercises of Saint Ignatius of Loyola. He is featured on several series found on the Eternal Word Television Network. He is also author of numerous books on the spiritual teachings of Saint Ignatius of Loyola and the venerable Bruno Lanteri, founder of the Oblates of the Virgin Mary, as well as other works focused on aspects of the spiritual life. The Letters of Saint Therese of Lisieux with Father Timothy Gallagher. I'm your host, Chris McGregor. All right, let's move to another letter. So this is a year later, Sayli is 44 now, and Pauline is 15. And she has started a letter, and this often would happen to her. She'd start writing a letter and then her children or her workers or something would interrupt and then she would return to it later on. So she said, it's been a long time earlier in the day or the preceding day since my letter was interrupted. Since then I've been to high mass and we went on a long walk in the fields, which they would do as a family. Louis loved to fish. He was a great fisherman and that was part, Therese would accompany him on some of those fishing trips when she was a young girl. But they loved the outdoors, which was not too far from them because these cities were so small at the time. And we were very happy with this outing. On our way back, we met a poor old man who had a good face. I sent Therese to bring him a few alms. Therese is three years old at this time. He seemed so touched by this and thanked us so much that I saw he was very unfortunate. I told him to follow us. All right, so she's now getting involved. And that I was going to give him some shoes. He came and we served him a good dinner. He was dying of hunger. I couldn't tell you how many troubles he was suffering from in his old age. This winter he had frostbitten feet. He sleeps in an abandoned hovel and has nothing. He's going to huddle outside the barracks. There were army barracks in Alençon to be given a little soup. Finally, I told him to come whenever he wants and I'll give him bread. I would like your father to arrange for him to enter the hospice, so a refuge for the elderly and ill. He wants to go there so much. We're going to negotiate the matter. So they're going to look into it. So to get him, in our terms, the social help that's available for him. I'm very sad over this encounter and I do nothing but think about this fellow who nevertheless was delighted by the few pennies I gave him. With this he said, I'll eat soup tomorrow. I'll go to the soup kitchen and then I'll have some tobacco and get a shave. In a word, he was as cheerful as a child. While he was eating, he would pick up his shoes, look at them happily and smile at them. Then he recited a beautiful prayer for us that he always says at pass. And then later in what is a very lengthy letter, I have to tell you about two events that happened this week. I already spoke to you about a poor man whom we've known since spring. He was in the most extreme poverty since he didn't have any shelter and slept in a barn with an open work door, which caused him to get frostbite in his fingers. No one took care of him and he asked for nothing and only went to the door of the barracks to have a little soup. He was starving. Your father had noticed him in the doorway of the Hotel de France in such a miserable state and with such a gentle expression that he took an interest in him. So it's months later after what we read just a minute ago and Louis sees him now, obviously in great need, standing at the door of a hotel and approaches him. As for me, I wanted to know more about him and while on a walk, I approached the fellow. I brought him home and questioned him. I then discovered that he was childlike, so mentally probably some kind of disability and languishing without any help, so he's a straight person unable to take care of himself.

Chris Mcgregor Bruno Lanteri Pauline Sayli Alençon Eternal Word Television Networ 15 Tomorrow This Week A Year Later Therese 44 Louis A Minute Ago Gallagher Timothy Gallagher Saint Ignatius Of Loyola Months Later Three Years Old Spring
Katbrat Meets Eugene, A Camera-Shy Bard Owl

Katnip & Coffee

04:56 min | 2 months ago

Katbrat Meets Eugene, A Camera-Shy Bard Owl

"So where are you from you're from the yes we're done in largo George C Macau Park okay we have like so many names the park is George C Macau are called Friends of Largo Turtle Park and the narrows okay there narrows are going to be going away but we're down on off of waltzingham I think it's called which is the bridge right before going to Indian Rocks Beach okay our park is right there we've got we're nonprofit we have Eagles Hawks Falcons different owls we have the great horned owl we have her the barred owl and a bunch of the little screech owls I don't know if you've seen the smaller one right but they're all unreleasable they either have an injury or their imprints to human okay can you tell us a little bit about her story her name is Eugene so she came to us we thought it was a male turned out to be a female we kept her name Eugene she came to us with an injury to the eye we don't know what caused it we think it could have been a branch or a fight they tend to be very territorial birds so they get into fights over nests all the time especially when they have their their young so she's been with us since then the eye ended up getting infected so we had to get it removed and she's been with us since we have another barred owl there at the park but yeah she's a sweetheart a sweetheart what is can you explain what a barred owl yeah so you might have heard barn owls yes and this is a barred owl and you can tell because she's got the bars okay she weighs about two pounds because you think she'd be about ten pounds but she's only two pounds they're pretty hollow no we don't reason wise we've got oils on our hands okay and their feathers are waterproof or cages outside so we you know she may get wet and we just want to make sure that her feathers stay what is their normal lifespan so in the wild they may last anywhere between eight to ten years but in captivity or cared for as we have her and they can go into the yeah 20s yeah they last pretty long time just not in the wild right what so let me ask you this as far as taking care of them are what is the percentage of being able to get to go back into the wild afterwards and being on their own on the injury she also has tendonitis okay I'm so when I guess it depends on the injury right I don't know the percentage but a lot of them that come to us and abstain okay yeah and probably the age as well right yeah it depends on and a lot of them we don't even have the money to get them tested okay you know DNA tested to find out if they're male or female how we can tell if it's male or female is by weight so they get weighed in every Monday and the males always tend to be less in weight than the females okay so the females are heavier so that's why at first we thought it was a boy because of he weighed less but then when we got her tested when the whole eye thing and then turns out it's a female where can we go online to donate so George C McGowan Park okay you can find that on on Google okay and I'm not a hundred percent sure if you can donate there okay but there's definitely contact where you can contact the park someone can swing by and donate but yeah they would love to oh yeah so nice they they eat and you know from all the donations we have birthday parties there as well to raise money for them and on field trips and that sort of thing that's right you're a star look at that thank you so much for your time I appreciate it. Oh, you're welcome. Thank you. I appreciate

Indian Rocks Beach Eugene Waltzingham Eight Two Pounds Ten Years About Ten Pounds About Two Pounds Largo George C Macau Park Hundred Percent Eagles 20S Monday Largo Turtle Park Lot Of Them George C Mcgowan Park George C First Every Falcons
A highlight from ActCon 2023 vs The Federal Government

The Charlie Kirk Show

09:03 min | 4 months ago

A highlight from ActCon 2023 vs The Federal Government

"Hey everybody, it's the end of the Charlie Kirk Show. Reflections and some breaking news from our Turning Point Action Conference, how the Secret Service threw us a curve ball. Same Secret Service that can't find the cocaine in the White House, or whose cocaine it is. Whose cocaine is it anyway? And we also talk about the straw poll results and more. Email me freedom at charliekirk .com. Get involved with Turning Point USA. Make sure you listen to the end of this episode for a giveaway opportunity and get involved with Turning Point USA, tpusa .com. That is tpusa .com. Buckle up everybody. Here we go. Charlie, what you've done is incredible here. Maybe Charlie Kirk is on the college campus. I want you to know we are lucky to have Charlie Kirk. Charlie Kirk's running the White House, folks. I want to thank Charlie. He's an incredible guy. His spirit, his love of this country. He's done an amazing job building one of the most powerful youth organizations ever created, Turning Point USA. We will not embrace the ideas that have destroyed countries, destroyed lives, and we are going to fight for freedom on campuses across the country. That's why we are here. Brought to you by the loan experts I trust, Andrew and Todd at Sierra Pacific Mortgage at andrewandtodd .com. I want to say thank you, thank you, thank you to our amazing Turning Point action staff. We had our chapter leadership summit brought to Turning Point USA in the days before it. No other team could have pulled off what we pulled off and what we had to overcome, and I'm going to share that in great detail. For those of you that watched at home, I hope you enjoyed it. It was the largest event of the summer and honestly one of the largest of the year. We had over 6 ,000 people, actually had 7 ,000 people try to attend when you had, you know, here's a little lesson. When you do events, usually you'll have, and we have an algorithm for this, or the formula we've developed, algorithm's not the right word, the formula, you'll have 80 to 85 percent people show up, and depending on the speaker, 70, 75 percent people show up. When you have Megyn Kelly, you have Tucker, and you have Donald Trump, all one after the other. We had something like 96 and a half percent of people show up, and all at once. It was absolutely, it was unheard of. It was the highest turnout we've ever had as far as ticketing in there, and the Turning Point staff handled it amazingly. There was definitely some frustration with getting into the event. I'm going to tell you all about it because some people were definitely upset, and they should be. It was a three -hour wait to get in, and it involved the Secret Service. Interestingly, you know, there was no wait on Sunday when the Secret Service wasn't around. I mean, the same Secret Service, by the way, that can't tell you who's cocaine, it is in the White House. But first, I want to talk about all the good news, and I wanted to say thank you for you guys that had the patience, that supported the event, that prayed for the event. We were really, really blown away by the people that stopped us in the hall, people that said thank you. Charlie, listen to the show. I watch you on Real America's Voice. Charlie, I listen to you on the Salem Radio Network. Charlie, I listen to the podcast. It really touched us, and you guys were patient, and you guys were amazing, and it was an amazingly successful event. So let's get to the recap here. President Donald Trump gave a 110 -minute speech. I got to tell you, President Trump, he goes all in. So he arrives there, and he does like 50 pictures with every police officer that he could find. You want a picture of you? It was like Oprah. Do you want a picture, and you want a picture, and you want a picture, and you want a picture? And then Tucker's there. He talks to Tucker for 20 minutes. Megyn Kelly's there backstage, talks to Megyn Kelly for 20, 30 minutes. The guy's a machine. Then he goes up and gives a 110 -minute speech. He's 77 years old. We receive thousands of emails criticizing Trump. The energy level of this guy is incredible. Incredible. And then he goes on and has a three -hour dinner afterwards. It's just something else. Biden's State of the Union was 72 minutes, and it felt like a marathon. You're kind of like, is this guy going to make it? Is he going to make it? Is he going to make it? And Trump, I at the Turning Point Action Conference, standing room only. We had just people all over the place. It was incredible. Fire Marshal had to close us down and say, enough. And we can't fight the Fire Marshal. It is what it is. And so we had great attendance. It was incredible. Vivek Ramaswamy spoke earlier in the evening. Now, for those that remember, Chris Christie declined our invitation. Nikki Haley declined our invitation. Mike Pence declined our invitation. And Ron DeSantis declined our invitation. Ron DeSantis is a terrific governor of Florida. I don't like people that are rewriting the history. He has been and remains a great governor of Florida. He's done some amazing things, banning critical race theory, what he's done with the new college, what he did with Disney I fully support. He's not been running a good presidential campaign, and he made a major mistake to not show up at this event. We'll dive into that in great detail. Vivek Ramaswamy gave a barn burner speech. And so we had a question of, who do you want to be president of the United States? Donald Trump with 85 percent. The more interesting question, though, is, OK, who is your second choice? Vivek Ramaswamy won with 51 percent as the second choice. And the obvious lesson is, if you show up, you're going to win. Vivek showed up. He did press. He did media. He was on like no sleep. He did an after party. He did an influencer meetup. And Ron DeSantis, I think, received four percent in his home state. If Ron DeSantis would have showed up, he would have done very well. Ron DeSantis could have won over a lot of our audience. He would have been treated very respectfully, obviously. In fact, I said this privately. I'll say it again. We're going to play a piece of paper. I said this. Ron DeSantis should have showed up and he should have done an open mike and say, if you disagree with me, go to the front of the line. If you don't like what I'm doing, go to the front of the line. That's what I do on college campuses. Governor DeSantis would have earned people's respect by doing that. Dodging voters you need to win over is not a path to victory. Just a little taste here. You know that they love Donald Trump, but I think it's more interesting, at least in this sense, is how Vivek Ramaswamy is ascendant. In fact, I believe Vivek is going to overtake Ron DeSantis very soon as second place in the Republican primary. I see it. We know the base very well. Almost every prediction we've made. I'll tell you, I think Vivek's turning point in his campaign was when Vivek took our public advice, which was to go down to Miami and to say it's outrageous that Donald Trump was being charged federally. I was mocked by Ron DeSantis consultants and influencers. I was mocked by people in many presidential campaigns because that tweet went totally viral. Vivek Ramaswamy went from sixth place to now second place. No one heard of it. That's not totally true. Some people had six months ago, but only if you watch Fox News and especially Tucker, but he was not a household name. Vivek Ramaswamy went down to Miami, Florida, and he benefited from the 600 different media outlets that were there. So you have President Trump, obviously he wins 85%. That was my prediction. And by the way, the poll was done by Trafalgar. We had no access to the poll. We had no inside information about the poll. We had no updates about the poll. It was literally we got a report at the end and that was it. It was that simple. I swear to you, people say, Oh, Charlie, you manipulated. Okay. If you think we manipulated, you should have just walked in the room. Do you support Trump? You don't need to manipulate what you can see with your own eyes. And so we get, we get the results. And I said, boy, I think Vivek is going to do very well. And I do want to, I do want to ruminate on this because Vivek Ramaswamy is running the campaign that Ron DeSantis should have run, which is he refuses to attack Donald Trump. He refuses to attack his voters. He's reading the room and he's making principled, clear, wise statements. And it goes to show that, yeah, you can actually ascend in the Republican primary if you understand the Republican base. So 85 .7 % selected Donald Trump for president, 51 .2 % as second, second choice for president. Carrie Lake won our vice presidential straw poll with 30 .8%. And there were some other top line, um, really important takeaways here. And I just want to make sure I'm making this clear. Had Ron DeSantis attended, people would have been way more positive on him. Ron DeSantis could have worked media row. He could have done an influencer reception. He could have gone and taken selfies and pictures. He could have put his hand around people. In fact, you know, because of just, let's say less than desirable, uh, the waiting lines that we had to come into turning point made Maricopa County look like, uh, an expedited thing. You know, people, I think appreciate when you go and you look at them in the eyes and you shake their hands and you take pictures. I did it for an hour and a half. And I think Ron DeSantis would have really benefited from doing that. It's a missed opportunity, but it seems as if those missed opportunities are, are building.

Mike Pence Vivek Ramaswamy Chris Christie Vivek Megyn Kelly Nikki Haley Ron Desantis Disney Donald Trump 51 .2 % 20 Andrew 50 Pictures 80 85 .7 % 30 .8% 110 -Minute Tpusa .Com. Sunday
Dr. James Lindsay and Charlie Unpack Corporate Liberalism

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:16 min | 5 months ago

Dr. James Lindsay and Charlie Unpack Corporate Liberalism

"James Lindsay is with us. He's the author of several books. He is prolific. I don't say that lightly. I read almost everything he publishes from new discourses to marksification of education, race, Marxism and cynical theories. Is that the whole canon? That's the whole canon. Yeah. For right now. Make sure you just get the mic up there, James. So happy Juneteenth, James. Is that what today is? Yes, that's true. Yeah, it is. I forgot. It's not important to me, so I forgot. And I think that this is an attitude, right? I feel like these kind of fake holidays, I mean, Juneteenth is a real holiday in Texas. Yes, but I mean, we know what this is. We know what this is. And so having forgotten that it exists, I think is kind of a is a key mentality that I think a lot of Americans should have. You know, speaking of forgetting that things exist, I'm sad. I'm sad to admit to our audience that as a family, we use Amazon more than we should. When you have a young kid, it's almost unavoidable. However, it was it's interesting. You know, I had to go pick something up at pottery barn kids and I had to leave, you know, gay stuff everywhere, pride, all that. By the way, Trevor Project, go donate. Oh, you have the A is for activist book. Have you seen that little baby book? I actually have a copy that one of your thoughts on totally out of control. And then I was just interested. I said, OK, went to Amazon .com and then Whole Foods. If you walked into Whole Foods, which I hate to say they do a good job. They really do. Their produce is excellent and all that. Even though it's run by an oligarchy. Not one thing, James. Is there something to this? Not a employee with a pride badge, not a flag, not a mention, not a you could donate to the chemical castration of a poor kid in Mississippi poster. What's going on here? Well, that's interesting. That's a really interesting feature of reality today, Charlie, because it seems like, you know. It's everywhere, but then there's certain places it's not which we see what it happens where it's everywhere, right? Like Bud Light's getting crushed. Target's getting crushed. Target is a competitor to places like these targets getting crushed. Amazon's not getting crushed. Amazon's not doing this. So you can kind of see that there's this game being played that may be pushing people towards certain vendors.

Amazon Americans Bud Light Charlie James James Lindsay Juneteenth Mississippi Target Texas Trevor Project Whole Foods Today
Did Your Parents Crush Your Santa Dreams at a Young Age?

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:10 min | 7 months ago

Did Your Parents Crush Your Santa Dreams at a Young Age?

"What age did you learn Santa Claus might not exist? I think 7 or 8. And I was devastated. I was there with my man. Devastated. How about you learn it from a kid at school? No, this is going to make my dad look so bad. He is my dad is the best. He did the most to try to make me believe in Santa Claus. I heard him say it to my older sister. I heard him say something like when are we going to tell Julie that the Easter Bunny in Santa aren't real and I was so sad. And then he went, no, no, no, I was just kidding. I was just kidding. Whatever back of the barn. That's interesting. I would think that parents would just allow it to evolve. Why did they have to sit down your child and say, listen, I just want you to know there's really no Santa. Really, what is the answer to that? I don't know. I think I agree. I mean, I guess if you're 13 and still believe in Santa, it's a little odd. But yeah, just let it just let it evolve. I agree. But I am as fascinated with this mythology idea as you are with one's nature. Well,

Julie Santa Claus 8 13 7 Santa Easter
Larry Elder Announces 2024 White House Bid

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:13 min | 8 months ago

Larry Elder Announces 2024 White House Bid

"It is April of the year before the election. And there is something there's a part of human nature that involves obsessing about the now. Obsessing about this week today this month. Look at this poll number that happened yesterday, surely that'll never change. When the only thing that's guaranteed in life is change. Now, does that mean that there's enough room, enough latitude for desantis to catch Trump? I don't know. That's a formidable lead that Trump has right now. It's the kind of lead that tends not to vanish, but are there so many moving parts in so many variables, and then one that's interesting right here in the Salem family did everybody catch Larry elder, announcing for president last night on Tucker Carlson's show. I did. Larry is a longtime friend of mine. Obviously, was a colleague of mine. I've been in the Salem barn here for about 12 years. And about ten years, excuse me. And Larry, of course, is just legendary in the talk show world. And ram this magnificent campaign for governor of California. Now it's California, so Larry was not going to win. Dare I say. But it was so noble and so great an attracted so many people and did so much better than a lot of people thought and so much better than a whole lot of other Republicans could have done. And it's because Larry is a fighter. And the Republican Party, the Trump Republican Party, requires fighters, absolutely requires them. This is why I wonder why in the world Mike Pence is even thinking of running in God bless Mike Pence. A good man. Vice president Pence is a wonderful American, a strong Christian, a good conservative on so many things. We can talk about whether he was up to the task on January 6th, so we can do that if you want to do that for the 500th time. But I got nothing against Mike Pence, but there is precisely zero constituencies, a massive constituency, a mav, a mass broad desire to have Mike Pence be president of the United States. And I

Mike Pence January 6Th Donald Trump Yesterday Larry Trump Republican Party 500Th Time About Ten Years Republican Party Last Night About 12 Years April This Week Salem Today This Month Zero Constituencies Pence Vice President American United States
Harden, Embiid lead 76ers to 117-110 win over Raptors

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 8 months ago

Harden, Embiid lead 76ers to 117-110 win over Raptors

"Joel embiid and James Harden had double doubles in the 76ers one 17 one ten win over the raptors. And beat had 25 points in 12 rebounds as he continues to take aim at an MVP award. He's playing through a nagging calf injury, Hardin had 23 points and 11 assists for the sixers who shot a blistering 77% in the first half and led by as many as 24. Toronto got within one O three one O one before a 7 O run put Philly back in control. Scotty barns dropped in 29 points and OG Anna and obie had 19 for the raptors. I'm Dave ferry.

Hardin James Harden 25 Points Joel Embiid 11 Assists 29 Points 12 Rebounds 23 Points 19 Obie 77% 24 Dave Ferry Toronto First Half 17 Philly ONE 7 O Ten Win
Ramadan begins for the world's Muslims, a pioneer of gospel music is rediscovered

AP News Radio

02:08 min | 9 months ago

Ramadan begins for the world's Muslims, a pioneer of gospel music is rediscovered

"On this week's AP religion roundup, Ramadan begins for the world's Muslims and a pioneer of gospel music is rediscovered. Hundreds of millions of Muslims began the daily facts of Ramadan this week during Ramadan observant Muslims abstain from food and water from dawn to dusk and gather with family and friends for nighttime meals. Enjoy within the bandages now. Imad Hamad of Dearborn, Michigan, says it's like opening a new page with God each year. This is the way that is required to face the month. This is the way it's required to again guts rewards and gain the forgiveness and open a new chapter. That's why we quote Ramadan is a month of renewable. Islam follows a lunar calendar, so Ramadan starts about a week and a half earlier each year. For more than two decades, the work of gospel music composer, Charles Henry pace, sat silent and 14 unorganized crates. I knew we had this gospel collection, but nobody had ever really looked into it or really even figured out what it was. Christopher lynch is a musicologist at the center for American music at the university of Pittsburgh. We had about 140 pieces of music that didn't exist in any other library in the world. And might be completely lost. Lynch and his team discovered that pace was an early pioneer of gospel music. His independently owned publishing company helped elevate and expand the genre. I remember working in our music store. If my late teens. Francis pace barns. She was surprised at her father's impact. I think what I learned as an adult, I recognized, God, he was smart. Just a little ahead of his time, maybe. One, two, go. Average Herbert Jones, the founder of the heritage gospel corral, says bases archives help secure Pittsburgh special place in music history. Pittsburgh was a stop over point for jazz musicians and blues musicians back in the 20s, 30s, 40s and 50s. So this is another niche in the history of Pittsburgh and the music field. This week, the community showcased paces work at a free concert in Pittsburgh's hill district. Hi, Walter radliff.

Lynch Charles Henry Walter Radliff Christopher Lynch Imad Hamad This Week 14 Unorganized Crates Pittsburgh Islam About 140 Pieces Each Year More Than Two Decades AP Hundreds Of Millions TWO 20S ONE 50S Pace
America Is a Country of Christian Plurality

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | 11 months ago

America Is a Country of Christian Plurality

"That listen to our podcast with regularity, you know that I have been bashing against gnosticism and we don't have to go too far too deep down that route. However, it does tie into our conversation, Chris, you wanted to pick this up about glory be to God to do big things in the physical world that glorify God. Yeah, I think this is actually super important. Just to sort of recap, you know, one of the things that you always and every place united civilizations is some common religion. Now, probably not with your listeners, but for some people, when they hear that it makes a Mitchell a little bit because they think it means intolerance or grams or something like that. Obviously that's happened in the past, but you think about places like in a Rome. Like the Roman Empire or something, your room was actually pretty tolerant. But particularly by ancient standards. Correct. Yes, were the intolerant of Christians. Sometimes is the answer. It depends on who the emperor depended on who the emperor was, but Christianity within the Roman world was kind of unique because Rome's typical standpoint with barn gods was just incorporate them. The problem with Christianity for Rome was like Christ can't be incorporated into the Pantheon. Yes. He did wind up as a turns out taking over. Constantine, I think, eventually allowed to take over everything. Right. But you think about what has motivated people to do these big projects and hold these civilizations together. We talked about Egypt, and we talked about the sumerians, and we talked about obviously Christians. Any place in the planet, like there's these massive buddhas built all over Asia, which are these big projects. Mind-blowing. Mind-blowing. Yeah. But the point I think that you were driving it is really important is that America is a country that has a Christian heritage. It has a Christian if you sort of take all Christians regardless of denomination as a single block as a country that has a Christian plurality.

Rome Chris Mitchell Constantine Egypt Asia America
Mike Rowe: A Real Value for Handmade Versus Automated Objects

The Dan Bongino Show

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Mike Rowe: A Real Value for Handmade Versus Automated Objects

"And I'd love to get your take on that going forward You're seeing that now No one wants automated crap When you see handmade now you're going to see more of that in the future I think there's going to be a real value on the creativity that craftsmen puts into his work in the future It's a pendulum Dan And it has to swing by definition too far the other way before we realize what we've lost My take on it starts with Scott glass We took shot class out of high school back in the early mid 70s and through the 80s By the time we got to the 90s it was gone And we didn't just we didn't just take shop class out overnight It was a process And the process started with the language And you're old enough to remember back in the day It wasn't called shop It was called the vocational arts And the first thing we did was we took the art out of the vocation Then we abbreviated it to vote tech And whenever you abbreviate something you're one step away And then we change the name of the shop And then we walk it out behind the barn and we shot it in the head And that's how we got shot glass on a high school Well you know any time you take the art out of a thing you diminish it in ways that aren't necessarily readily apparent and ways that don't necessarily reflect in the transaction of the thing In other words we traded in the artistry for the mass produced reality of the deals we made as a result of getting in the global economy And bit by bit like a frog in the boiling water we woke up one day and realized all our stuff was crap I didn't have to go to Batman standing with Tim Allen once and we were standing backstage having the same conversation and he got so incensed He got so angry because he wanted to take his broken blender apart and show his grandkid how to put it back together

Scott Glass Tim Allen Batman
Mark Levin, Tucker Carlson, Others Return to Twitter

Mark Levin

01:15 min | 1 year ago

Mark Levin, Tucker Carlson, Others Return to Twitter

"One as you know We returned to Twitter what was the exact time mister just for the fun of it Four 52 today Four 52 Eastern Time after I learned that Elon Musk had in fact succeeded in purchasing Twitter And he is argument that he is going to promote free speech very important And now you can see the gate is opened The barn door is open and income the others Our outgo the others But I want you all to join me over there at Twitter now Let's muscle up the platform If they turn on us we'll reverse course but I think for now I don't think a guy would put $45 billion on the line of his messing around I see our friend Tucker Carlson returned to Twitter what time is it About 7 p.m. Eastern Time So I think you'll see others join as well And they should

Twitter Elon Musk Tucker Carlson
America's Problems Predate Putin

Mark Levin

01:54 min | 1 year ago

America's Problems Predate Putin

"Just as I predicted we actually have people regurgitating Joe Biden's line That the sanctions against Russia are what's creating Or will create food shortages That's not what has created or will create shortages of any kind We've had freighters sitting out at the West Coast for months Not at a time but months backed up for months We've had empty shelves for months We were talking about it For months food prices skyrocketing We've talked about that For months you go into a drive-through Long before Putin committed his atrocities In Ukraine Food shortages Meet shortages That's why Biden was attacking big meat Before that big oil and now it's big wheat Agriculturally we've been a self sufficient country But when you destroy our fossil fuel system what are tractors supposed to run on I'm quite serious Electricity So what is it You're going to keep running your tractor back to the barn and keep plugging it in and plugging it in and plugging it in over and over and over again Is that it We have fertilizer shortages and the price of fertilizers through the roof Why Because it involves oil Oil The cost of oil inflation supply chain gas prices all skyrocketing before Putin's war machine invaded

Joe Biden Russia West Coast Putin Biden Ukraine
"barn" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

06:57 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"Catherine O'Leary. The fire had started in her barn. Successful. Dairy owner O. Leary claimed she was asleep when the blaze erupted. I was in bed. Myself and my husband and five Children. When this fire commenced, I guess it was my husband got outside the door and he ran back to the bedroom and said Kate, the barn is a fire by the way Proper attribution that tape Kurt shape of Mrs O'Leary, courtesy of our colleague, Bill Cameron and his audio archives. I told you he worked here a long time. Professor Carl Smith, professor emeritus of English and History of Northwestern Joins us Now, Professor. Welcome to Double Deal, Sir. How are you? Fine. Thanks. Thanks for having me. I'm a fan of your work. I've yet to read this, but I'm going to Chicago's great fire, The destruction and resurrection of Anna Konik American City. Well, is Mrs O'Leary to blame? First question. No, Mrs Hillary is not to blame it all The evidence indicates that she was in fact in that, uh, when the fire started around nine o'clock that Sunday night, uh Which was she negligent, leaving the lantern lit, and then the cow kicked it over. Oh, no, I don't think there's you know, there was cute Blast milk the cow around 4 30 in daylight. I don't think there was any lantern or anything like that. The point is, is that Chicago was extremely fire prone. There were Who doesn't fires in the city in the week before and and hundreds over the summer. Point is any of them fires happen? The question is why this one did so much damage, And the main reason is because Chicago was so fire prone and then a combination of Circumstances that made for a of perfect storm that burn the city down. I go through those if you like the main one being the fire department arriving late and the wind blowing from where she lived towards the downtown. Professor. I framed this question delicately, but Every time I go to Manhattan, I look at how they put their garbage out in front of their There's you know, in front of the on the street and it just irritates me and I think to myself Perhaps the great fires of 18 71 here in Chicago was maybe a net gain as opposed to a net loss. What do you think? Well, it's very hard for me to accept that you can only learn in the school of pain that was tremendously high price to pay. Uh, having said that Chicago. It's uh, was barely Up for a moment in terms of its growth. And there, you can make an argument that it helped career out bad buildings and helped accelerate the growth on the path that was already on. But I I hate to think that you have to have a third of the city burned down in order for things to be a positive. Is it true that most of Michigan and Wisconsin was clear cut to rebuild Chicago? No, uh there's a lot of wood and Michigan and Wisconsin. It was that were a lot of trees were cut down in order to build a whole lot of places. The Chicago that was built in the first place is built from watching from wood from those two places after the fire did the political environment in Chicago did it. Aid or hinder the rebuilding of the city. Well. It's And as you can imagine a complicated question. Uh, the city was rebuilt with remarkably rapid speed. Uh, within two years, it was basically rebuild. The political leadership was very conflicted, though. Uh, the mayor was Joseph Medill was wanted the whole city to have no would next year buildings anywhere but that she was thwarted in this by the common Council. Marshall is supported by a lot of people who couldn't build with With bricks. So, uh, it's basically what rebuilt the city is that they kind of, say entrepreneurial zeal of a lot of builders and the need of the rest of the country and the world to have Chicago where it was as it was and investors from outside funding this whole effort, my understanding you're going to join Rick Kogan at the, uh, the printers role lit fest coming up in September. Do you have the specific date? Yes, it's four o'clock this Sunday. And and and was at the printer's row fair. So this Sunday four o'clock printers role lit fast. Uh, right down there on Printers row that is that Dearborn. I can't remember that South Dearborn, South Dearborn. Gosh, that's that. That's I used to go to that every year. It was one of my favorite things to when I lived in the city, and I guess last year it didn't happen because of Covid. I'm glad it's open this year. Yes, and most of the venues are outside. So it's it isn't problematic. Like a lot of other things, Professor I noticed that Rick Kogan rated your book in the Chicago fire higher than his father's. When I first came to ship was very kind of him. When I first came to Chicago, I might say that his his father, I went to see because I wanted to write about Chicago and people so I mean he was extraordinarily gracious. Help get me going. This is a good book minds of different kind of book. It also talks about the recovery, for example, and that has, uh, maps and things like that. So the book Rick Stad, Herman Kogan. He partnered quite often with Um, gosh, the actor from Cheers. What's his name? And his father was another journalist here in town, Kogan and Oh, gosh, I just had it now. I've lost it. Um, I'm sorry. Yes, Um, Norm Norm, who sat on the bar stool went? Yes. Yes, George One's father was Rick Kogan's father's partner in a lot of books. I didn't know they were. George went and went and went and Kogan were related. Yes, I believe son. They wrote many books, give the customer what she wants. That's the Biography of Marshall Field. They write down a number of of those books. Yes, yes, I cite that book in, uh In my book in terms of what field in terms of we're getting going again. Congratulations on the book. It's obviously a well reviewed Rick Hogan loves and I know I like it and we'll have you back to talk more I would imagine next month regarding Chicago's great fire. I hope so. Thank you so much. In the meantime. Thank you, Professor Carl Smith, professor emeritus, English and history at Northwestern. Yet, even before.

Bill Cameron Herman Kogan Rick Hogan Rick Kogan George Rick Stad Joseph Medill Kogan Catherine O'Leary Manhattan last year September Hillary Michigan Chicago Wisconsin Norm Norm Carl Smith two places Kate
"barn" Discussed on Konfus

Konfus

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Konfus

"But I invited writing for some failure. He's fantastic. Simple hint ensues. And it could mean more to care about. And so, hey, what's been fast? Yeah. Exon specifically. Well then, whose taste? All right. So do armor did. It did. I saw a little. Okay. By the cinnamon for about 8 minutes and every squall liked about any. Diva. No. Okay. My bang farm. A bit of MTS apparently meets me. You think yeah, so this is something you start with. Do you exon a piece somewhere on Giga tink, oh, hey. I mean, it's really small to put down. Yeah. I'm invited. I don't know, son. Diva. And so think about it. I'll show them, dear. Objects tend to be. I got no. I did it, how do you stay linked? Elsa decrease. Mayor. Or do you want more women? I'm also going to knock you. I said, do I react in only 18? Do I ask in the mid Q&A pestle me or my son? Is it always? The dividend squeak as C do I sawn at an ignite society is run on the scale doses of Google Nestlé talks are still tens of. Or something like this was probably. In. It marked it minsky, mini. Yeah? Yeah, I am for you as a. To the K Mike. All right, we'll kick us on my discharge for you. It's still a mile or more snug about somebody. A lot of us. Yeah. And by still, the white nose Elsa. Did you like Norwegian message? The equipment. Bipod, it was 400 and 40 one. I mean, at a certain rate, it made you okay? We were so stay tuned. What are my so heavy? Yeah. Oh. Yeah. So do I figure, for example, go online? I know the TSC. Unity for Caitlin..

Exon Elsa Nestlé Google Mike TSC Caitlin
"barn" Discussed on Konfus

Konfus

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Konfus

"Have two little mosquitos, little African men in the security and pass on behind the bill at a pain level. This can be seen. More, there are still some. What do you have in day long? So demo that a little bit more. You know? I know how I like to go. So it has to give you a snack on you. It's not that I'm going to compete. It's not going to be one at the idea of tea. I mean it's. For teddy. Lit on button. For D at that organ up on some via lit or ask it. In a community botfield. Or to the but not in the UK. Feedback far too. Yeah, up to Denmark. Okay. L is something like. Net Lili for Vienna, it was an honorable and I came to data. Yeah, double us sent for what was he? Meant by all models. In the list, it was shown. It was gate, we do something. Many of our friends saw more contact me to the bottle or more utero in my top. Most am I? Are you feeling a bit filling up? Yeah. Or blue sacked for the perineum of viva Po epique skittles. Okay. If you were in a trailing orthogonal TSN and talk menus bigger talk will also come in and say you saw at the time bigger talk. I asked Devine. It might push. Yeah? Did I shorten it to the bot filled by? Some works are excellent here. You can of excavator. It is good for stories. I didn't know. So, it really scared up short night was technique for heat tillet. Don't want more. Yeah. Okay, I know. Yeah. Well, extinct deep blue graft full discourse, I don't like them. Some of them. At a certain score they are not absorbed by piano. Odorant CT I've had never roots for at uncle Komodo again. Okay. At the same body quickness according to bloat 6 on. Now, sort of by middle. One minute I did Italian. Of us some oxen, daily, every till. See it? It's very invalid. Yeah? Or excellent. Apparently. You don't say it. So if you procure at all, merit demand.

Lili Denmark Vienna tillet UK Devine
"barn" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

08:35 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Stroke R W. J barn of his health, let's be healthy together. New Jersey one a 1.5 instant whether it will be very warm this afternoon with a mix of clouds and sunshine. Parts of the area will see a thunderstorm developed the high 89 a shower or thunderstorm can linger early tonight, otherwise turning out partly cloudy and warm the low 65 Bobs and sunshine tomorrow another hot afternoon the high 90. Then it turns much cooler on Monday clouds some sunshine. The high 69 I'm meteorologist Dan Perranoski. Right now in Somerville. It's 88 Winslow 91 old breads, 88. As traffic instant weather every 15 minutes on the jersey One on 1.5, New Jersey, one on 1.5 Our own radio station, New York, Not Philadelphia. Proud to be New Jersey's speech. Oh, Henry, you cherish the one over. Get up here. You got nothing to say. Come on, man. In the morning, I go to bed, feeling the same way nothing but time. God, I'm bored with myself. Hey, there. Use just a little. You can start by. You can't start a fire without a spark this behind Just answer the door, Mrs. Just getting clear videos all man. I'm moving around the place that you're my looking nearer. Wanna shake my clothes. My race. I still don't have any song way. Maybe just by eye. You can't start a fire without a spark this stunt behind her. I was just passing I don't know. This job. Just one second one shoulder left state industries stuff. Moving. Probably were both say they gotta stay hungry, baby. I'm just a fast ship. I'm trying to write this book. Give me just one. Look, you just start by sitting around find the river card. This comes the higher Understand Ross a word about shock response behind her. I just don't even understand. The girl in school. Big Joe Henry. Lovely accent. You have New Jersey. Together. Be okay at my door. Don't come around here. No more that you see that It's later night. Very tired feeling right? All I wish to be alone. Still waiting. Don't you invade my home? That's up. If you hang outside, don't come in. I'll only run and I okay. Okay now. Good. You know, you get it now. You gonna be okay? My daughter. Make yourselves Therefore, if he hears he'll not go there, I'll be. In fact, I'm here. I'll have just I don't know. Harm AKI myself. He's never wrong with state of mental health. I like it here with my childhood friend. Here they come. Wow. Okay, now. Decent man. Come to take me away. Why do they follow me? It's not the future that I can see. It's just my fantasy. Oh, Jay Z, one of one boy, you're just in time. Time to to 18. Have a buddy It's big Joe Henry weekdays. We talk weekends. We ride love playing the hits. Thanks for listening to the big show. We certainly do Appreciate.

Dan Perranoski Somerville Monday New York Jay Z New Jersey Henry tomorrow AKI Philadelphia Ross high 69 88 high 90 1.5 low 65 Bobs both 91 old breads R W. J Joe Henry
"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

Drunk Unks Podcast

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

"Silverado in this nuggets achieve. Your though movies are good rope and things or sixty. I always enjoy everything like our your wallet thought process you seen a post on ten dollars could sell up lab dark because because the fact of the matter is this like when you work in distribution center for post office was pretty much tent. Would you still big at ten dollars now. Taught every every hour buying odors. Oh my closet. Us crazy waters. Maybe i'd like. I like to eagles players. I every with guy every jersey abbey's fall do alert got so you will update when he story move which one hundred seventy years old disease. Jarding gas was i remember. I remember vividly eighty nine ninety nine one now river mom of one. I was intrigued. Koby dollar an hour. Listen all like just download right now by a office for we need t- back with never never know like that. Thanks for only four of the venues died own obama's watch big bags biggest back. No word awkward. That i should this. I took a big big turkey. Your back in good kodak you back. Who the little bird about out. So why waste in there several years the real treasure. Now be bullshit deal. He was charged but she just charge cruel charges. This out out that wait to do like the secret member devil records funded that you better than go anyway. Teagle good i ever so city shot is your birthday. Y'all enjoy now live over y'all worse tesla. My sister opening monster coach governors said. She's said hundred and we want to go. Well you'll notice this again. Michael young shit. They love the high. Not first of all texas. Be losing ship okay. This week hang on award next week. Up man word net. Don't take the best off already. Their respect this talked up. You never lose bass off was gotta sit back. What gasoline do so. We're state in that day. Well thanks for talking off. Radio dot com content. Man we will keep riding. We'll go for what we got. Podcast at us. They got some gossip on location rates. Coming up real soon because everywhere. Create facts is living. We we might go into our podcast. You should with that shit. That being said i wa- cube with that we outlet titties in the summertime. Cr next week as word..

ten dollars This week Silverado next week four Michael one hundred seventy years old eighty nine ninety nine one texas an hour one Jarding gas dollar sixty tesla obama abbey
"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

Drunk Unks Podcast

05:57 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

"The athletes won't out again they don't know how many people that about we still thirty forty. Four jobs are a simple shit. That's why each level with freeze you're go wish was awesome. How the building of busted up our some he has. Our capsules burned off as war. Was that pack five. Pack light like that so you got the more expensive one he's describing. These show auditing diaz about rules..

Four jobs thirty forty each level five
"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

Drunk Unks Podcast

08:29 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

"Going on anyway. This names like he's we're gonna live my word i'll new i read. Is i know it it. It was solid solid at that moment. Birth all your rubio. So salute right out. There by talking in a cat was record. No he's done. This is this is funny because we realize the cows record us to. We all got a hand on this. We all pardoned car. We liked this. I think i might bounce out soon. Car come upside entire ten so low so like i'm sales love like this. He said all three. Hey supporting this now that we could get we govern off. What do ya and let look. I think all the ways when john jaw is asking the words. It's like three o'clock in the morning. So little right away but i just dot exonerated so thinks oh go. You wouldn't always adult responsible. I'll tell you it was bobby wrong. i'll be. He's the wants score at least about new bought that until do we've been talking about clothes. I will unlikely the jackson. That's followed New goldeneye water way. That report first of all jammed up volunteer services pro bono back breed. I came up about. I'll say to rebel. Had the i really. I really block look right. Obviously rivers bart stories during this whole different. Deal smarts coming up on cars. That's somebody's birthday. Outgoing to out. It was your brother out. What fighting but a born. Your man's jonas dot com inside the most voted. Not so we are we sliding adapters. Right as i check my all your own way that macgyver short he got fighting here. We've got a big so now what we've close to the spot. We go all right. We go over a bump may be with sabre. that'd be. it's all said become ethical last couple also passwords coppola's over. He's yup only because we went over. That bump i saw sparks is now looking at the car. I understand why sports out to this allowed. Y'all ain't adjunct licensed. He said good fortunes. Bobby and the global england hollis terminal so you know what was fifteen even were used clubs of it same word just on storing pulled over to go down going down going down to Going to see quite slide down old. Many car for deep express led to front to back the et four. Listen minds right party. Especially where two lanes back. Three four route right weddings which is soon as enjoy. Open up a doing a hundred third what what aren't followed polluted all in the front seat leagues al. I'll just are alive. The course of the day right. I'll we like. We like ten minutes away from where we go. I'm going so fast right on. The cop came out the gas station that sits in the middle. You get right behind soon. As i seen i was like oh shit cops to see of nameless and said he said bro got eat that we eat. That should eats we. We've been a little bit about. The cop is oh shit. Is the area judicia. Tom burns listen. Kabul's mule right. He's like is i. I knew he was doing over one hundred. Because i had to catch up to like when he came up to your car right after. What happened to george floyd when he came in car racing for big house like we goal. Damn ain't no way around right back. Which i never got a ticket as my out behind.

george floyd john jaw three o'clock Tom fifteen Kabul two lanes over one hundred Bobby Three rubio three jonas dot com ten minutes ten jackson england four route third
"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

Drunk Unks Podcast

07:48 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

"Down on the black. I will hold you those word coming around the corner. A merging lane. This lane is into getting ahead and curb question in the bali jason. Do they wait. Whoa broke don't honey tulsi about so locked in so do cup you I'm all in now. Editorial of carbon short will pay be covered. I look over there shaking talking anymore. Might say you had this shaky legged shakiest little league gore sleep eight years. I was scared. But i had one of his on but anytime over. I suppose that i always jail. We can so listen. Let you remorse ward. I lesson firstly married. John wrote okay. So in a barrel rate your day's best say drugstores up okay or you. And that's true. So in the payroll barbie babe so tell me mesa dragging know who to move by the way. Okay thanks so but you gotta who wawa he wants even was well. We'll an see where that i was. So that's going building laura who write a mind. We're so we're all allowed him to drop into who's out we always say. She's got nightingale devoting a cashier off those here. We own car rival dan. This thirteen thousand zero five series. They'll listen right but the whole was doing ninety. You guys is alan So look right. Is this a bad dramatic art. Lisera i love you with so we don't know me dice. Fags myself is all number of So lead clubhouse on. Right i leave. I am going home. Were trying be responsible own top. Commodore barry bridge also not here carbo. Tired of at the top of the british lorry story. So look like soon as i get to the bible hulu you go ahead. Report look great. When i wanted wooded bridge right boom on. I take my jacket. House trump kotli rights got argue. Knock it out. Boom minded car drove johnny. I've not loosening looks don't she. I read saw trump shari's allow you to bench is like patience is virtue but invalid boom. I wanted when i when i go to the trump eileen go get my mouth a four-way and the fucking call comes off. The jack shrugs. Not you listen. Deports wound up on am focused. Now i got this cop cops here looking ab everybody still because sound like i'm school called me. I called you go back to jack. jack jack. Santi is a jack but he is jelly jacket. Said you have like all diesel diesel city. You give me jat real quick last. Call for me jack. On day when we got first thing you get the result over banks in his in a moment of pals this look lobby evident wisdom comes up with the idea. He said course on all this year to get cool. Lifted up for clinton regular will. He's like now.

John Lisera eight years trump Santi johnny bible ninety first thing one thirteen four-way laura alan clinton dan thousand zero five series firstly trump kotli jack
"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

Drunk Unks Podcast

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

"People like your own. June runaround bulls you by way talk. We so was in very over. He's not ready. I said listen instead. He said he said oh. So now we say age said it said is this even over here and you said about the routes in each student as live. I never going to be or no. He was well actually shows right now. Over gung i think the fact was really took her great here anchor for not doing plus these phone. A free did a bar to this okay. Fair job when she added more but he said what would your time finding shot this week when you ready. They wait times a day. You wonder currently auto comes lease what good. It sounds. Very good man. You look good for your game. Look good to a say the best face bowman said you gotta be bad guy on your show knob is not for. Yeah rates also batman Grill the down. Last roads beggars stretch. Zoom i got this and that's not just talk about forest how long we live that people that drabness too much go. Yeah shop on lobby comment from eisner. Thanks also requires not. You should that guerrilla-style young plant. This is in refining off. I leave as like always innocent. Saudis used to we have blue direction in vain. I naked running down south running from his job for charges. That warrant there weren't dropping. Dead is the to the listening audience added. But i'll mow the night at the holyoke regarding building social media survive. We got nicer building. You get drunk enough for your joy At the end of the evidence just the facts you know. We got the shot a shot view of this. The your kid bear game. That will go five dollars at a. It's so good. Bye bye gut. Yeah this this'll be outside gas night. Plus all right then like we in the backyard. Man no we doing. This shouldn't be back. He will get chance. Never lead cigars. Let's get a popular fired. Says you got to stay cigars. You your body off all the good to he that he offered buddy superstar cigar. We'll talk do vendors garden shape or wii this. Don't do that. But joe this lebron's as audience but it is michael dickinson. We stupi since there's laurent reruns is as easy. A definite. he allying aggressive like always not new growth. That you already bishop facts. We wanna talk every y'all torch everybody's gonna think i'll go. I'll let got you always. He's startled campbell. People do this in the backyard back door now before i call is out there. Lack charlie said about his.

michael dickinson charlie five dollars this week June eisner each student bowman batman laurent Saudis lebron
"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

Drunk Unks Podcast

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Drunk Unks Podcast

"If you haven't heard by anchors easiest way to make a podcast let me explain. First and foremost is free. There's creation tools that allow you to record. And edit your podcast right from your phone or your computer anchor will distribute your podcast for you. So it can be heard on spotify apple podcasts. And many more you can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one convenient place. Download the free anchor app or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started. We did drunk ons podcasts. We love anchor. Spent everything to us and we encourage you guys get on board with it and we can't wait to hear your podcast but more importantly make sure you go listen to ours. Wouldn't should boy rich dallas from loving hip hop man. You know i'm out here. I'm working hard on promoting this new app. I got a new app called on me drinks. You know what i'm saying. Shut up to the guys over at the drunk angst podcast. This drink this drink at goes right along. Which all doing homey drunk podcast goes right along with the free drinks from on the drinks. China to the homie rico. Shutout oracle night night shot up facts and you'll peak gonna reach out the pd guns man. Tell them stop playing with john. He need to get on a podcast. You need to get on talk that talk. You know what i'm saying. My god guns is going to be on the podcast. I'm gonna make it happen. I'm shouting out the drunk arc's saying that's family right there on me. Drink tab richie dallas new venture go kochta hell.

"barn" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

Maureen From Quarantine

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

"It was the saint. Louis six We only ended up with Five of them because one of them was injured in couldn't make it. How is he injured. We know you know. We tried to review the video footage. We do see in the video footage that he has this moment where he drops Momentarily when he was slaughterhouse Something happened to his leg when that happened. The please car is rammed into them to back this autre house. I mean he to the violence. Yeah but you know i There was also a lot of internal sickness that he was dealing with but but long story short. I'll just share with that. Because of his injuries he allowed me in and where the other cows were taking time to come around he softened and was willing to let go of the fear at the end of his life and it was a moment for me watching his process of letting go and of forgiving and going through those kind of stages that meant so much to me. It's something that all take to my grave. He became so sweet and so connected and it helped me heal and it helped bring some truth and some clarity. In some comfort to the whole situation. Where i'm having to put on his face of dealing with the slaughterhouse owner and hauling them out and just barely making it and being exhausted. And you know all those things and you did a beautiful job. J just that connection with him though. was healing to me so you know and how interesting is named spirit and the spirit indeed lives on it is eternal love in talking about spirit now. The spirit is is with us. And it's it's real. It's an energy field. Iowa's lift my arms up in in doing it now. Too and bringing in kind of bring my palms in like i'm waving bring all the beautiful light and levin the world and i look at a picture of a of a lighthouse and just all about shine in the light and bring it in good energy and with the animals and the kids and the people in the world. That are filled with the unconditional. Love like yourself and you are so important and so you know long. May you run. Ellie and j. and the gentle barn you guys rock and if i may may i ask one more question before and maybe you'll.

Ellie j. Five one Iowa one more question Louis six them gentle barn
"barn" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

Maureen From Quarantine

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

"You know bad fortune you know you have to remember that. Because it wasn't just some wonderful thing he did. It's it's that he did it and at a total loss to himself. But but or was it right. I mean we. We all agree that the energy of it is is valuable. But you know i'm just saying. In that moment. he had a choice von. You know it's interesting. You say that thing about the individual you know because you know no matter what you wanna say about it. You get back to the beginning of the gentle barn and it was a dream that e. had since she was seven you know and i think that's one of my things i love about. Her book was just reading about and being a part of learning about how she got started in her mind. And how it developed into this incredible thing. You know. I you know i i take part in it and i helped grill. It and i helped a lot of different ways but ultimately when you get down to it it's it's it's the manifestation of a dream that you know a seven year old child ad isn't that the and the book we find the book. Where can we find the book on the at the barn dot org. It's called my gentle barn in my right. Yeah work or in our store. Lots of wonderful things to find in the east store but yeah just amazing a story and i mean people who wanna learn about how to start a sanctuary and things like got aside from connecting with program. Elliot's book is is an incredible way to learn. Not did you. Did you turn to. What what was your. Did you have a favorite animal. You turn to when you were going through your own scenario as a child where it was so healing with animals. Was there like a dog or a cat or a horse or when you were seven and you realized you had this special rapport with the now.

seven Elliot one seven year old barn dot org things
"barn" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

Maureen From Quarantine

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Maureen From Quarantine

"They see trees red roses too the well. Hello hello hello world. This is maureen from quarantine and today. I'm shining the light. On to special guests from the gentle barn in santa clarita california and that is ellie legs and jay whiner and together what they do at the gentle barn is just so much that will will will cover Some of it here on the podcast but There's going to be more to be discovered. But they are most definitely a part of the solution in the world as we talk about here and maureen from quarantine and so what they're doing is teaching people kindness to animals each other and our planet isn't that nice doesn't it just sounds so simple and yet it's so profound what they're doing. Isn't it nice to know that there really is goodness in the world. And and great energy and and kindness is Really ever present and moving forward unconditional love and they stand up. I love this. They stand up for the innocent. Don't you just love that. And they help. Animals and children alike..

"barn" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:42 min | 3 years ago

"barn" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"My dad is Honey Mead on Welcome back. It is cannabis talk agency and educational Odyssey. I'm Frankie boy, and so glad you're with us today. And joining us now is Marlena Fishman. She is Thecolonialplayers with Noah Fishman of Zen Barn. Farms in Waterbury, Vermont, and You guys tell us the story of What Zen barn is because there we were just talking about our last segment with Charlie. How important Hamp is in this world on so many fronts, but especially on the front of Bringing young people back to farming. And getting young people excited again about the land and that this world of hemp has so many possibilities. So I love to hear, um, your story how you and Noah started out in and a little bit about the farms. Of course, Thanks for having me on Frankie. You cannot first and nobody grew up in Vermont. And and he and I moved back here together 13 years ago. And we started, um, our brand pretty much, which has been born farms on his family's land, Um Jim Barnes Farms where a missing driven cannabis lifestyle brand And our model's pretty much is the feel good. Do good, because we know you're gonna feel great after using our products, and when you do we donate 1% of ourselves to causes that we care about. First everything that we do is filtered through the limbs through this plans from our suppliers, packaging, farming practices and retail operations. We have some great ones. Some of my favorite things in the store is our art that we have from local artists around the area, including a young girl was just nine years old, and we In addition to those things we have from top pickles to bath bombs, which I love. I spent two hours soaking in the tub yesterday as the sum of the events unfold it and we have flour. And teachers that we made using sustainably grown family farm temp. And what to me was really special about the canvas that has been farmed on our smaller scales. Farm is how it feels like it has a little more soul soul to it. Kind of like when, uh, it's going mad like when your grandmother makes you something, and it always takes a little bit better, because there's that extra love that's put into it. Yeah, part of the quality of our hips. And it evolved from it started out with our restaurants in Barnes and our family farms on our farm. We were growing veggies and some hemp, too. And we thought it would be fun to add some hemp infused tive. Food and cocktails on our menu at the restaurant. Um what once CBD had became federally legal can leave referred. We were the first to do that in our state, which is Vermont. And we got such a great response from our customers that we decided we wanted to create a cannabis lifestyle brand and number on farms was born in 2020 mist of a pandemic. So, um I think that this is such an important story because It's about I love what you say. Ah, your motto is to, um feel good and do good. And I think that for many people having CBD in their lives and having Choices is really critical. And one of the great pieces about your story. Is that No. Uh, apparently what? He traveled all over. He was involved in sustainability and went all over the world. Yeah, I know His background is and international sustainability, and he lived in a tanz, India and Molly and did some micro finance work with this group. Other times kinka out there and he, um Came back to you. We met in D C and then came to Vermont together, and he worked for some nonprofit organizations continuing to focus on community development. And went to school for his master's at Marble College, which has a great sustainable community development program and business and he's just been applying that Hear cries his passion. So where you guys right now? At with Cove, it did covert having a nim packed on the business. That it definitely It definitely did. It's been tough, but it push us to be innovative and creative as well. And there's been the bright spots like getting to know our customers in here. Why they're passionate about Can't envision what brings him to our location. But lots of people have been coming in with elevated stress levels and seeking out CBD products as a way to cope and get through the difficult time. And it is one of the great parts of this feels really good to be able to know that you're helping them so better and find what works for them. And, um Rico that we had this vision to do. Ah cannabis, do some cannabis events and have a grand opening. Would covet. That hasn't been in the cards just yet, are so as I say, not on the table because we have it in our deck of cards. But we used to host that 4 20 parties at our sister business in barns. Right down the road and Waterbury. And we were hoping we could host another one soon at a body shop Once once it's safe, and maybe hopefully drink, you'll be able to join us. You're not too far. Not too far. No, no, no, not at all. And and Vermont is so gorgeous. It's such a beautiful part of the world. And pristine and still one of those you can't you know, you just kind of look around and you say this is really New England. It really is. It's just so special. And was it hard for you adjusting? Moving back from D C to Vermont. Marlena. Um It wasn't really a hard adjustment for me and I grew up in in jersey. Um and I always wanted to have just like the space to do what I want spirit and to cure it. This vision that we have been. I think that one of the When the highest adjustment of anything was Being one of few people of color in Waterbury and in Vermont and heaven CBD in Canada has really helped Philip this social anxiety believe that comes with walking out the door and being one of one of the few And it's pretty much fine, passionate. Some of the reasons why I'm passionate about our cannabis brands. And tell us about the line, So you have a lot of wonderful things in the CBD line. Yes, we do. Um, So we have our our tank years. We have three different flavors of a mocha mint and apple cinnamon that people have really been enjoying and We also have fast bombs, which I love. And along with our different flowers..

Vermont cannabis Waterbury Marlena Fishman Zen Barn Honey Mead Hamp Noah Jim Barnes Barnes Charlie New England Philip Marble College Canada India Molly
"barn" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"barn" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Ed r W. J barn of his health, Let's be healthy. Together. New Jersey 11.5 Instant whether a sees me cold start to the work week, then a gradual warm up as the week progresses. You see clouds on the increase for tonight low step down the load in the twenties. Trending. Mostly cloudy for you. Monday sees the cold highs Little bit forty's upper thirties for North Jersey mostly sunny sky Tuesday. A touch warmer highs low to mid forties from the Edison. He didn't call it Weather desk. I'm dressed top work. Right now. In Toms River. It's 31 in Belleville. It's 34 Pennington. 29 fast traffic and instant whether every 15 minutes Right here on New Jersey one a 1.5. Jersey, one on 1.5 our own radio station. New York, Not Philadelphia, Proud to be New Jersey. Yeah. I'm gonna enjoy life with him. I understand. Great. Yeah..

New Jersey North Jersey Toms River Edison New York Belleville Philadelphia
"barn" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"barn" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Put out a house for the for the Barnell that now is the time to put it out because they are looking for a nest site at this time in order to just start laying eggs in February. I was surprised to learn that barn owls do have predators coming after them. And one of their major enemies are other species of owls. Yeah, like the great horned owl that that I was talking to a guy just the other day, and he was telling me that he was just watching a bar now. And a great horned out just came out of nowhere and just and just and just basically just just came down and just snared it. It was, she said, it was. It was really just kind of a little distressing is he is he loves his barn else, But yeah, that that can happen. And And so the one of the main predators of force in the barn Ellis is the great horned Owl. How about some barn Owl house? Basics of what size should it be? And how do you How do you clean the thing? Oh, that's a really good question. So you think you said there's wonderful aren't Barnell Box our house plant and one of our University of California booklets called songbird Bat and al boxes that can can be found. Online and, uh, and then also, there's a lot of plans also, that are that are found online. But, you know, basically, it's just like a large a large box. That's you know, at least maybe No 2 ft by white, um by 1 FT, by, you know, by maybe another 15 inches high and with it with the whole In it so that the barn else can go in and out. And then what you have is in the back, you'll have a little hinged door that you can open up because the Barnell box Will fill up with pellets and such. And so so you at the end of the nesting season, usually in the fall early winter, So you're talking, you know, maybe October, November December then then you can open up the back and try to sweep that out. Of course. You don't want to breathe any of that dust, you know, because the basically, you know, just could be could be a little bit. Unhealthy to breathe that dust going back to the construction of the barn. Allah house. How big should that opening be to allow them to get in and get out? You know, it's gotta be At least I would say about maybe six inches high, and they 4 to 5 inches wide. And, you know, they say those plans can be conveyed found on the on the website and it used to be, you know that we'd recommend having a perch there. But we don't anymore because I think when you have a perch that the Hawks can actually land on the little perch, you know, outside the whole and then they can reach in with their talents and the m pluck out a little baby Barnell so So actually, we recommend now really? Not even having that perch again. Now is the time that barn owls are hunting for nesting sites. And if you want more information about building barn owl houses go to that booklet that Rachel was talking about called songbird bat and al boxes, and you can find it at the UC egg and natural resource is catalog. They're amazing hunting creatures that can help you control the rodent population on your farm or rural area. Rachel Long you see, cooperative extension, farm adviser and Woodland. Thanks for telling us more about Barn owls. Well, you're welcome. Thank you for having me more of the pre recorded kfbk garden show on the way here at news 93.1.

Rachel Long Hawks University of California songbird Ellis Woodland
"barn" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:01 min | 3 years ago

"barn" Discussed on True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

"Today that seventy five thousand dollars would have been split between all present who helped capture booth more than a dozen soldiers and several civilians were present evidence that it was booth didn't add up booth had jet black hair body pulled from the barn. had red. Hair lieutenant william. C allen worked for the united states secret service in eighteen sixty five in august nineteen thirty seven. His widow mrs helen. Allen told a journalist that her husband had told her that he saw the man at garrett's farm who had been killed and that man had red hair and that the government that that man was not booth but they were determined to foist this man on the nation as booth booth had a scar on the side of his face from surgery. The body pulled out when examined had burn mark in a exact same place. The body pulled from the barn didn't have injured a broken leg. Chains kenzi was a quartermaster in the union army and was free to go wherever he wanted basically within the military alliance at is and so he went with a companion to garrett's born because he had an interest in what was going to happen to booth in nineteen twenty two when he was seventy seven years. Old kenzi detail. What he saw gareth's farm in a sworn affidavit. As i wrote up he heard someone call out to say john wilkes booth at all. I could see the color of his hair. I knew at once it wasn't he. His body was exposed and he had no injured leg. The face had freckles now later under examination. The tattoo booth was notorious as having on his hand had appeared on his arm for the next few years washington. Dc was a buzz with the question of what really happened to. John wilkes booth in eighteen sixty nine booth. Mother was escorted down into the arsenal penitentiary. Morgue to identify her shun once and for all but she couldn't identify 'em because it wasn't him over the next seventy years witnesses to the assassination and those that had been present at the barn. He was allegedly dragged from passed away. But the question of what actually happened to booth persistent in one thousand nine hundred three in enid oklahoma. A young reporter took a confession of adine man who claimed to be john wilkes booth shortly after the body of the man claiming to be booth was mummified later in nineteen thirty one six chicago. Physicians examined the body of a man called. John saint harrison. Who was the man in enid who claimed to be booth and recorded their findings in an affidavit. They specifically noted a scarred right eyebrow. A crushed right thumb and a broken left leg john wilkes booth is known to have had all three of these unusual characteristics. Could he have escaped the barn and live for thirty eight years only to die..

mrs helen booth booth john wilkes booth kenzi garrett united states secret service union army arsenal penitentiary allen Allen william gareth enid John saint harrison washington oklahoma booth chicago john wilkes