17 Burst results for "Barbara Tuchman"

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

08:35 min | 3 months ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Another mother with the kid with autism were scared to death by this and and bought into it. You can understand why some people would would react that way. There's a There's a lot of science on autism and the causes of it remain to some extent of mystery. But to the discredit of the autism vaccination length theory. Several studies have now identified symptoms of autism and Children well before they receive the measles vaccine, and even more recent research provides evidence that autism develops in the in the womb well before a baby is born or receives. Vaccines. Let's check in with the Dallas and Lakewood. What's on your mind? Alice? Oh, Mike, I'm reading a distant mirror by Barbara Tuchman. If you read that I'm familiar with it. Yes, she talks about the 14th century also They're so it's a deep history of that entire Um, era and I'm just gonna offer. I take notes when I read books as I'm sure you probably I do. Yes, I was just gonna offer a few quotes from that book about me. Sure. Uh, There's one from Page one of six for the plague was not the kind of calamity that inspired mutual help it slowed awesomeness and deadliness did not hurt people together in mutual distress. But only prompted their desire to escape each other. Mm hmm. And another one. You know, the Papacy had been moved the avenue in France at that time. This is you know, 13 46, Grant noted. Another correspondent, said The mystery of the contagion was quote the most terrible of all the terrors as an anonymous Flemish cleric in Avignon Road to a correspondent in Bruges. And people. You know if you read stuff like this It gives you It gives you hope for the future because people back then really suffered. And medical science, of course, was in its infancy compared to where it is today. Oh, it's horrible to read. You know, they thought that four humors that coursed through the body of determined your relative health and it was all connected. To the position of the planets Well, but I mean people with serious diseases were bloodletting was used to treat them. Uh, the leeches. Leeches were commonly used, uh, treatment for for other things. Yep, it's kind of like watching some old Star Trek episodes were Your bones is transported back to the 20th century and quaking in fear when he thinks about the way doctors in the 20th century worked on people, But it was. It's really stunning to read how bad How badly people suffered because of the ignorance because of the lack of science. Good point. Very good. Yes, right. Okay, hurry. My thanks. Here's Here's another vaccine myth. That infant immune systems can't handle so many vaccines. I think they're think, like 14 vaccines that are given to very young kids to cover a whole range of things. You know, I remember when I was in the army and in basic training when you get all these vaccines It's not as if they're doing so many people one right after another. They didn't use an individual syringe. They had this syringe that And, uh oh, I don't know, six or seven holes in it, which they put up against your your arm. And then the gun that propelled it put all these in at the same time, and the last thing you wanted to do was flinch because that would tear the skin right off your arm in any event. Infant immune systems are stronger than you might think. Based on the number of antibodies present in the blood of baby would theoretically have the ability to respond to around 10,000 vaccines at one time. Even if all 14 scheduled valve. There's that number 14. Even if all 14 scheduled vaccines were given it once it would only use up slightly more than 1/10 of 1% of a baby's immune capacity. And scientists believe this capacity is purely theoretical. The immune system could never truly be overwhelmed because the cells in the system are constantly being replenished. In reality, babies are exposed to countless bacteria and viruses every day, and immunizations are negligible in comparison. So there are more vaccines than ever before. Today's vaccines are far more efficient. Small Children were actually exposed to fewer immunological opponents overall, then Children and past decades. Another myth. Natural immunity is better than vaccine acquired immunity well, in some cases, natural immunity, meaning actually catching a disease and getting sick results in a stronger immunity to the disease. In a vaccination, however, The dangers of this approach far outweigh the roads of benefits. If you wanted to gain immunity to measles, for example, by contracting the disease, you would face a one in 500 chance of death from your symptoms and contrast The number of people who have had severe allergic reactions from an MMR. That's a measles vaccine is less than one in one million. Go to chat in Denver. Hello, Ted. What do you think? Yes, yes. Get well. I was calling to ask if you had You know, you went through a lot of wonderful statistics regarding this whole thing about the big picture, and I was winning Is all statistics available somehow guided their available all over the place. Where do you think I got a call from scores Go, You go to the Senate to go to the Center for Disease control. Uh or or just go on your browser and put in general question about the trade offs, and the statistics uncovered 19 and then You'll have a countless number of sources. But make sure you're going to a credible source not to some loony in the side and you can recognize credible sources. Yes. Oh, no, I didn't. I didn't question I'm Of course I'm sure you probably went to one. I mean, is there one of you might recommend? Yes. Centers for disease control, But okay, But look at look at all of them. Don't just look at the ones that the media tend to sensationalize on when they talk about when they talk about the number of new infections. You've got to look at the number of new infections compared to the much larger number of new testing that's been done since this thing first started. And that's what I did I I changed the numerator on compared to the denominator. Which is how we calculate percentages, But okay, well, yeah. So you shouldn't have any any trouble by the way Ah caller recommended. A recent paper that was put out by him. Promise that's a publication of his little college. Go to Hill. Stale heels. They'll that e d you because I I had seen that one as well. Uh, And it's Hillsdale that Edie you, uh, head. The title of it is a sensible and compassionate anti cove in strategy. And professor of medicine is Stanford University who's got not only an MD but a PhD in economics, which is why he's qualified to look at the big picture. His name is J. But Shariah you can you can find that online at Hillsdale that you either you just look for in primacy that serve their publication. Right, Right. Okay. Yeah. I don't know why those things these things are not quoted more. I mean this I mean, I don't know. Like you said, there's such a political storm Brown this and their people trying to go in the blame game. But if people would just use the statistics specific statistics, and they could see the big picture of it all. They would kind of understand, you know, and get a good perspective of it. Instead of this You know Mathis craziness. It's you know, blaming, blaming everybody and government officials and all that kind of stuff and You know the whole bit that you You were just gonna.

Hillsdale Barbara Tuchman measles Alice Mike Bruges Center for Disease control Dallas France Avignon Road Grant Lakewood Mathis Brown Ted Denver Senate professor of medicine
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"It continues to quite ostentatiously attempt to build a case for military action against Iran without congressional approval. Joining me now, Senator, Chris, Murphy, democratic Connecticut, co-sponsor that amendment today to block funding for unauthorized military operations against Iran. Is that your fear? Is that what you, you brought up the amendment today? But we brought up the amendment for a number of reasons. First, of course, we're concerned about this blind esscalation with no endgame with no strategy overlying, the tactics that the administration is engaged in with respect to Iran, but we also can't get a straight answer out of this administration as to whether they think they have existing authority to engage in a preemptive war against Iran. There are many of us that worry that they could try to contorts, one of the old war authorizations from two thousand and one or two thousand and three such that they could launch a strike against Iran and never come to congress. We thought this was kind of a no brainer today. All our resolution said, was that if the president is engaging in a strike, that is preemptive, if it's not in defensive our troops or in retaliation to an attack against our troops that he should have to come to congress. And I was really disappointed in that we only got one Republican I thought this was something we could get consensus on the message. It sends the administration is that, you know, as serious as they are about consulting with congress. It doesn't appear that at least for. Publican's are willing to stand up for our constitutional responsibilities as well. You were you were speaking in tweeting about the briefing that happened on Capitol Hill yesterday. And I'm curious what your read on? It is, it's very hard to parse any outside. I personally have deep skepticism because some of the players involved because of the agendas, but it's very hard. We don't get to see the actual intelligence. What is your read on what you heard yesterday? So I think there is intelligence suggesting that there's a heightened threat level inside Iraq today and I don't second. Guess the administration for deciding to pull some of our personnel out of harm's way. But it's also perfectly clear that the Iranians are reacting to us that it's the pulling out of the Iran deal. That it's the naming of the Iranian army is a terrorist group that has made the Iranians feel as if they have to put themselves in combination of defensive offensive position. And everybody should go back and read the guns of August. The famous Barbara Tuchman book about World War, One in which each side thought the other side's defensive. Actions were offensive..

Iran congress Barbara Tuchman congressional Senator Iranian army Connecticut Chris president Murphy Iraq
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on The Takeout

The Takeout

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on The Takeout

"What kind of music artists are John gonna are you most likely to listen to? Okay. I is is what's the favorite book. Right. Well, I think the most influential book for me when I was in college. I read Barbara Tuchman guns of August, which is the most splendidly written beautiful history of World War One. And for me to see a woman historian a woman writing about war. It was incredible. I mean, fiction wise, it would be Tolstoy. I just love storytelling. And I love what he's written. But the book itself. And I finally met Barbara Tuchman years later, they will say you were my mentor, even though I never knew you. She wrote so many portent massively important books on history that is a seminal work of hers, but she has many many others, and what she understood she wrote an essay once about how you right now at of history. She said you have to imagine to yourself if you're not writing if you're writing about a war rather that you don't know how that war ended. So you can carry a reader with you every step along the way from beginning to Middleton knowing only what the people at the time. No. Because I think when I was in academia, you injected yourself in the middle of every story because you'd be saying, I know this and some other Mike competitor on know that and you're not telling the story the way the people at the time who only knew their lives at that time so learning that narrative history from her I think was really important tastic a movie. Movie. You know what I suspect? It was because it was when I was young was gone with the wind. I mean, I now look back on it. And I think oh my God. It's so biased toward the south etcetera etcetera. But all I knew was that I fell in love, you know, with with with Clark. And I thought that I'd like to be Scarlett O'Hara, and I wanted Rhett Butler in my life. And I think it influenced I'm husband was kind of a rake, you know, with dark hair, and I fell in love with that colorful character that he was it just somehow it's crazy that a movie can make you think about what romance is supposed to be live. And we used to debate who wanted to be Melanie, the good girl who wanted to be short Scarlett O'Hara, and I always wanted to be Scarlett O'Hara, it's a great epic movie their parts of it that don't hold up well that feel completely out of touch with our sensibilities of these of these days, and that's okay, because it's a cultural artifacts in that sense. I. And one of the things I try to emphasize on the show is cultural artifacts do matter. And they shouldn't be expunged simply because their level of sensibility doesn't match ours now. Absolutely. And and I may look back on it. And wish that it'd be more mature and understood what it was doing. But I just saw it as a story. And that's okay. When you're young it's fine. And there's also aspects just from a technical point of view of that movie that are revolutionary there things shot of that moving the way that was shot brought images and emotion through the camera that people had never seen before. And it was a smash sensation of it's time. Not only the underlying novel itself, but the movie so you'll always be in good company with gone with the wind music. What kinda music do you like nineteen fifties? I guess because high school was the time when romance was really beginning knowing the platters was the moment when at a party at midnight, and they play the platters. That's when you could kiss your boyfriend, so all that rock and roll Elvis Presley the platters, did it feel. Evolutionary to you at the time that if feel like it was breaking some important barrier or just a berry that you were aware of her. You felt like your parents weren't comfortable with. I think that's why you knew some Barrio was being broken because you know, that your parents didn't like you watching the gyrations of Elvis Presley. But I'm not sure I felt it as much except. That's right..

Scarlett O'Hara Barbara Tuchman Tolstoy John Elvis Presley Middleton Rhett Butler Mike Clark Melanie
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"The inspiration and the right book come along the right book, certainly came along. The Yanks are coming in military history of the United States, enrolled war one H W Crocker is the author bestselling author and rightfully so. And he has his moral compass functioning, which to me is a very big deal. The book is up at Dennis Prager dot com, we've discussed how it is that the US entered the war that it is the general consensus, and certainly his that the United States turned the tide of World War One. And how many ultimately how many Americans died in World War One? Well, all these estimates are are subject to debate. But it was about four million Americans were activated for the war and the two million served in France casualty ratio, and then you have to remember. There was also the the flu swept through. Yeah. The the forces probably a hundred thousand I think it'd be a fair, which is a huge huge number given the American population at that time huge number in any event. So I let me ask you what they drafted. Yes. Yeah. The american. Yes. Yeah. The draft was instituted fairly early on. Okay. How did was there as there was in the between the wars later was there a large? We have no business going their movement in the US. There was a huge one before the war. Once we got in. No a lot of the the opposition to the war completely fell away. Because because it was. The Germans had painted themselves in this corner where it became very hard to defend them. The there were those who actually said during the thinking of Lusitania that look the Germans told us they're going to sink this ship, and we had no right now putting American civilians at risk there. But for most Americans certainly after nineteen seventeen after the decorations unrestricted submarine warfare. It just seemed this is intolerable you can't wage war on American shipping on American women and children, and you certainly can't invite our neighbor to the south Mexico to invade us. I mean, what are well-selling had no choice, but to declare war because war had defective in declared on us by the Germans and most most all the American people that point agreed with him. Is there a book on the Zimmermann telegram Barbara Tuchman road or? Okay. There is one. Yes. How did how did that strike? The American people was like a bombshell. Absolutely. It was it was the smoking gun that started us off onto the race to get enter World War One. Right. So again for for again for my listeners telegram, sent by the Germans to the Mexican government that if we end up with the war with the US, we will happily if you join us give you land back that you think you you should have. Did the Mexicans react? I'm just curious. As they they kind of ignore it. As is practicable. Mom yanna. We'll deal with it tomorrow. But you know, right now, I'd rather have dinner. Okay. So amazing story was the last major military campaign, but say it's actually been in Mexico. John Pershing, general general Pershing who commanded the American expeditionary force to France. His last major engagement I've been fighting Pancho villa on the border. So, and that's what the Germans view the American. Notre is good for was patrolling the border. It wasn't going to be this modern army that could compete with these massive armies of Europe. But in fact, it did as I said it went from this type of Portugal to four million men being activated two million going to France. And who or what is responsible for having America prepared in such numbers to fight? Well. It's interesting because whatever Wilson had zero interest in military affairs. All right answer this question when we come back because I don't want. I don't want to interrupt that answer. I am very curious. How do we go from fighting punch via.

United States south Mexico Crocker America France American expeditionary force Dennis Prager flu Pancho villa John Pershing Barbara Tuchman Wilson Europe Portugal Zimmermann
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

11:11 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Show. World War One November eleven nine thousand nine hundred eighteen begins the mystery of what happened in one. And why one hundred years later, those lessons are critical to our understanding of the future. Michael Vallejo's, Mike collie for these many years is here with five reasons why we must remember World War One. Why forgetting is dangerous and why now over these next weeks as we prepare to talk about for Cy the Versailles treaty of nineteen nineteen. We must review we must review how we can avoid a clash of arms at that scale again, Michael a very good evening to your five reasons. I wanted to go very quickly here the narrative, we all know. But the fact that it was terrible. What did that tell us? Why must we remember that good? Good evening to you. Michael. John the. The narrative of of the great war took hold right after the great war, and the idea that it was a horrible, and especially in this is important and somewhat ironic even to the victors, and especially the victors Britain, France Italy, as well, the war was seen as just a calamity and not so much in Germany, which is also important and look at to that. But the fact is that the war is great lesson as you, and I and and many of us know, what's that? It must never happen. Again. It was the war to end all wars. That was the Oxford pledge that students took in Britain swearing never to take up arms for king and country. All of this would have told history that oh here is civilization prepared. Never to do it again. But it did so World War One kind of merged into World War Two. And it's really interesting because I remember the the fiftieth anniversary of World War One in nineteen sixty four. And that was the time when Barbara Tuchman great book, the guns of August appeared, and I how well I remember my parents and everyone around make going oh World War One. We hardly knew. Ye you know, it was almost as though World War One had been forgotten in the sense that it had been completely eclipsed by World War Two. It was almost as though World War. One were was the silent era in Hollywood. And and you know that once talkies appeared at the end of the twenty s a silent movies and the entire. Experience of movies before nineteen twenty eight was completely forgotten and only slowly rediscovered. Well, it was the same way with World War One suddenly in nineteen sixty four. It was like, oh, there was this earlier war before World War Two before the war that we all were veterans of like, my father and your father and everyone else who was a mature man in the nineteen sixties. Our president John F Kennedy, Richard Nixon, et cetera et cetera. They were all veterans of World War Two and suddenly World War One was discovered. And when it was rediscovered it was rediscovered in the context of the nuclear doomsday, the impending sort of Damocles that would destroy humanity. In fact, it was all one everything merges together, then and the war never stopped at the first Cy was a a dividing up of the next car. Flicked someone said we're still living with the break-up of the empire. And the the the the abusing of the of the sub tribes and tribes of the Middle East and Michael the nation between Moscow and European capitals in Washington, it's all right there in one thousand nine hundred and and what what what happened in World War One that people rediscovered in the nineteen sixties was that you didn't need nuclear weapons destroy civilization. And suddenly it became quite clear that it wasn't just the power of nukes that mattered. It was the capability. All right. Let's go to the second lesson then in nineteen fourteen Michael they were so ready that two weeks before the actual mobilization which begins the end of July into early August nineteen fourteen two weeks before there was a false notice. And a little Parisian town. I read about it in the newspapers and everybody thought this is war. So they rushed to get their uniforms on and. To the assembly point, the whole country was ready to fight. It's peculiar, Michael. It was as if they were all it was a collective madness. It was kind of madness. But it was a madness that had been building for century. You know, the essence of modernity was that war became after the French revolution. And in the wars of Napoleon war became the way in which the nation was fused together became one. And and achieved a kind of what I call an ecstatic realization through battle in other words, the nation transcended in battle, and and and became a kind of eternal vision. And we can see this also in the American civil war in the eighteen sixties and read it in the Gettysburg address. We can certainly see it in World War Two. And and the problem going into World War One was that all the nations of Europe assumed that the wars that had had preceded in maternity would be. Attained in a new war, and and all the wars like the rest of Japanese word of the Turkish war, the Crimean war. The Australian French war, the Franco, Prussian, war, etc. Etc. All of those wars since eighteen fifteen had been modest and controlled wars that had a chief d-, sometimes great and glorious achievements of Italy, the unification of Germany, and what was so wrong about going to work in. And so you had this convergence of a belief that war was the way in which a nation could realize itself and transcend on one hand and also a kind of complacency that war would fit all of the preceding pattern of wars for the last century. So there was no real danger. So obviously people flocked to the standard. And embrace the idea of going to war men and women as well. And that really set up such a gigantic fall. I mean such a great letdown within months within months because the massacre started right before the before the end of August. But it wasn't until the trench warfare. Started at the end of the year as the weather worsened that it settled into the standoff that we knew went on for four years and the bleeding that went on for four years third lesson that we must never forget, the leadership delete the elites as you say the aristocrats allowed this thing to be handed off to the superior forces of the general staff, Michael what nonsense the only person who learned the lesson. Here's Winston Churchill. He never trusted the generals in the second war. He replaced them willy nilly because he saw what those generals did to the population in the first war. You know, who the other guy? Was who didn't trust them. It was adult Hitler. And with the same. Good reason. I mean, the fact is that World War One was a war in which the elites essentially betrayed the people by handing off all responsibility to military machine. General general Haig general Kitchener, Michael all of them criminals for their conduct on and on. And these these men didn't care about human life. And they didn't really understand that war had to be successful at a very deep, emotional and spiritual level for the war to be seen ultimately as having been worthwhile. They just saw immediate tactical needs, and they they just literally Jaffer French. I mean, Michael Lisa appalling characters as long as they went to lunch. It really was. That kind of farce for them. The the great achievement on this score, of course, which everyone should watch at least five times in their life is Stanley Kubrick's passive glory. I watched it the other night anticipating this Michael it is still is still upsetting. I can't finish it again showing. And you know, it's it's not only true. It doesn't tell that half of it. And so it's really important understand today that what we have done in the United States is the same thing that was done before nineteen fourteen we've offloaded war into a special monastic of privileged and separate class in the military that conducts war owns war conducts war as they please. And this is a dangerous if we were to ever get into a general war. This is the one thing. That I fear would would ruin not we need another Churchill. That's the only thing that would stop it. I'm talking to Michael playoffs. We're talking about five reasons. Not to forget the first war which actually was the war of the twentieth century it just blended in rights at the Cold War right to the new Cold War was still living with the fragmenting of Eurasia and the conflict between North America, and the central Asian the central Asian continent that would be China and Russia Brazil living with and the deep wounds in Russia continue they still resent the AFC deploying soldiers to archangel and Murmansk. You bet they do as we tried to interfere in the Soviet army Soviet era. So there resentments and all if you scratch anyone in Europe, you'll find resentments towards another country. These are not forgotten lessons, though, the our grandfathers and great grandfathers have long since left us when we come back to more reasons. Not to forget the first war. Michael blair. Joe Johns Hopkins. I'm John bachelor..

Michael Michael Vallejo Winston Churchill Europe Germany Michael blair Barbara Tuchman Michael Lisa Joe Johns Hopkins John bachelor Britain Middle East John Stanley Kubrick Soviet army president Hollywood
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

11:27 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on KGO 810

"State law. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor show. World War, November eleven nineteen hundred eighteen begins. The mystery of what happened in one? And why one hundred years later, those lessons are critical to our understanding of the future. Michael Vallejo's, my collie for these many years is here with five reasons why we must remember one. Why forgetting is dangerous and why now over these next weeks as we prepare to talk about for Cy the Versailles treaty of nineteen nineteen. We must review we must review how we can avoid a clash of arms at that scale again, Michael a very good evening to your five reasons. I wanted to go very quickly here. The narrative, we all know. But the fact that it was terrible. What did that tell us? Why must we remember that good evening to you? Michael good evening. John the. The narrative of of the great war. Co- cold right after the great war, and the idea that it was horrible. And especially in this is important and somewhat ironic even to the victors, and especially to the victors Britain, France Italy, as well, the war was seen as just a calamity and not so much in Germany, which is also important, and we'll get to that. But the fact is that the is great lesson as you, and I and and many of us know, what's that? It must never happen. Again. It was the war to end all wars. That was the Oxford pledge that students took in Britain swearing never to take up arms for king and country. All of this would have told history that oh here is civilization prepared never to do it again. But it did so World War One. Kind of merged into World War Two. And it's really interesting because I remember the the fiftieth anniversary of World War One in nineteen sixty four. And that was the time when Barbara Tuchman great book, the guns of August appeared, and I how well I remember my parents and everyone around make going oh World War One. We hardly knew. Ye you know, it was almost as though World War One had been forgotten in the sense that it had been completely clips by World War Two. It was almost as though World War. One were was the silent era in Hollywood. And and you know that once talkies appeared at the end of the twenty s silent movies and the entire experience of movies before nineteen twenty eight was completely. Forgotten and only slowly rediscovered. Well, it was the same way with World War One suddenly in nineteen sixty four it was like, oh this earlier war before World War Two before the war that we all were veterans of like, my father and your father and everyone else who was a mature man in the nineteen sixties. Our president John F Kennedy, Richard Nixon, et cetera et cetera. They were all veterans of World War Two and suddenly World War. One was rediscovered. And when it was rediscovered. It was rediscovered in the context of the nuclear doomsday, the impending sort of Damocles that would destroy humanity was all one everything merges together, then and the war never stopped it. And the verse I was a a dividing up of the next conflict zone said we're still living with the breakup of the Ottoman empire. And the. The the abusing of the of the sub tribes and tribes of the Middle East and Michael the alien nation between Moscow and European capitals in Washington, it's all right there in one thousand nine hundred and and and what what happened in World War One that people rediscovered in the nineteen sixties was that you didn't need nuclear weapons. Now to destroy civilization. And suddenly it became quite clear that it wasn't just the power of nukes that mattered. It was the capability. All right. Let's go to the second lesson then in nineteen fourteen Michael they were so ready that two weeks before the actual mobilization which begins the end of July into early August. Nineteen fourteen two weeks before there was a false notice. And a little Parisian town. I read about it in the newspapers and everybody thought this is war. So they rushed to get their uniforms on and rust the assembly point, the whole country was ready to fight. It's peculiar, Michael. It was as if they were all it was a collective madness. It was kind of madness. But it was a madness that had been building for century. You know, the essence of modernity was that war became after the French revolution. And in the wars of Napoleon war became the way in which the nation was fused together. It became one. And and achieved a kind of what I call an ecstatic realization through battle in other words, the nation transcended in battle, and and and became a kind of eternal vision. And we can see this also in the American civil war in the eighteen sixties and read it in the Gettysburg address. We can certainly see it in World War Two. And and the problem going into World War One was that all the nations if Europe assumed that the wars that had had preceded in modernity would be attained in a new war and all the wars like the rest of the Japanese or the Turkish war the Crimean war. The Australian French war, the Franco, Prussian, war, etc. Etc. All of those wars since. Eighteen fifteen had been modest and controlled wars that had achieved sometimes great and glorious life teen of of Italy, the unification of Germany, and what was so wrong about going to work in. And so you had this convergence of a belief that war was the way in which a nation could realize it self and transcend on one hand and also a kind of complacency that war would fit all of the preceding pattern of wars for the last century. So there was no real danger. So obviously people flocked to the standard and embrace the idea of going to war men and women as well. And that really set up such a gigantic. Fall. I mean such a great letdown within months within months because the massacre started right before the before the end of August. But it wasn't until the trench warfare. Started at the end of the year as the weather worsened that it settled into the standoff that we knew went on for four years and the bleeding that went on for four years third lesson that we must never forget, the leadership delete the elites as you say the aristocrats allowed this thing to be handed off to the superior forces of the general staff, Michael what nonsense the only person who learned the lesson. Here's Winston Churchill. He never trusted the generals in the second war. He replaced them willy nilly because he saw what those generals did to the population in the first war. You know, who the other guy was who didn't trust them. It was Adolf Hitler. And with the same. Good reason. I mean, the fact is that World War One was a war. In which the elites essentially betrayed the people by handing off all responsibility to military machine. General friends general Haig, general Kitchener, Michael all of them criminals from conduct on and on. And these these men didn't care about human life. And they didn't really understand that war had to be successful at a very deep, emotional and spiritual level for the war to be seen ultimately as having been worthwhile. They just saw immediate tactical needs. And they they just literally. French. I mean, Mike Eliezer appalling characters as long as they went to lunch. It really was that kind of forest for them. The the great achievement on this score, of course, which everyone should watch at least five times in their life is Stanley Kubrick's paths of glory. I watched it the other night anticipating this Michael it is still is still upsetting. I can't finish it again showing. And you know, it's it's not only true. It doesn't tell that half of it. And so it's really important to understand today that what we have done in the United States is the same thing that was done before nineteen fourteen we've offloaded war into a special monastic of privilege and separate class in the military that conducts war owns war conducts war as they please. And this is a dangerous if we would ever get into a general war. This is the one thing. I fear would would ruin we need another Churchill. That's the only thing that would stop it. I'm talking to Michael playoffs. We're talking about five reasons. Not to forget the first war which actually was the war of the twentieth century it just blended in rights at the Cold War right to the new Cold War was still living with the fragmenting of Eurasia and the conflict between North America, and the central Asian the central Asian continent that would be China and Russia living with and the deep wounds in Russia continue they still resent the af deploying soldiers to Arkhangelsk and Murmansk. You bet they do as we tried to interfere in the Soviet army Soviet era. So there resentments and all if you scratch anyone in Europe, you'll find resentments towards another country. These are not forgotten lessons, though, the our grandfathers and great grandfathers have long since left us when we come back to more reasons. Not to forget, the first war, Michael Flynn. Hosts of Johns Hopkins. I'm John Batchelor..

Michael John Batchelor Michael Vallejo Winston Churchill Europe Britain Germany Michael Flynn Barbara Tuchman Johns Hopkins John Soviet army Middle East Adolf Hitler Stanley Kubrick John F Kennedy
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on WJR 760

"Seven sixty WJR. With the gold, Richard. Did I hear you right? That Mary Barra has said that GM was going to be all electric. Yes. I listened to the entire third quarter earnings statement, which was at the end of October. And right in the middle of the statement, as they're dealing with all kinds of gray matter pretty boring statistics. Miss Berra said that General Motors would be all electric in the future. She didn't say by win them. No, she didn't say buy one. And it was only one statement one-sentence. No question. And there were no questions. It was almost like everybody missed that. Yeah. Well, the immediate question would be you know, with the lack of strong sales by the current crop of electrical vehicles out there. Why would you wanna do that? Right. That's one question. That's not what selling what's what selling is bigger vehicles. And I don't know. I just that struck me when you said that well, as you know to make up when you make plans plans are for the future not for what you're doing right now. And and General Motors, obviously, envisions a future where people will be buying those electric cars. All right. We shall see. We appreciate it. Always Richard Charlene in Troy, we appreciate your calls. Always welcome back. How are you? Hi. Good morning. Frank. Well, I don't have any hope of wall ever being built and people continued to vote for Democrats. And and some of these Republicans. You know, the the democrat party used to be the party of slavery, secession sedition and flavor. And now, they're the party of amnesty anarchy abortion, in slander. And people think they're really do so much for all these people in the comb county and other people around the state who have been indicted for misconduct. They're all Democrats, except for that one gal who said she lived in when she really didn't. And you'll get the unions. They just I was just reading this guy because he was Dennis Wilson. I former head of the union absconding with money to build a home for himself up and up north. I mean, what does it take to realize that they're not going to do anything for you? I mean is it dad harder concept to understand? I mean, and this is not new this goes back years. I remember back in. But isn't isn't the general feeling that the Democrats will do something for you that they want to spend more money and and redistributed in in the United States? That's true. But look at it. They've spent all this money, but the kind of money they have spent why are there any poor people in this country where is all the money going. It's certainly not going to the poor and the people that they say, they're helping you make it a pittance a little crummy cell phone works. Maybe ten percent of the time. Well, what are you getting for your money? Really nothing is it that hard to understand with the billions and billions maybe trillions of dollars that we've spent why are there any poor people in this country. See this is a this is the point that I try to make or try to discuss with educators. All the time is there is really no excuse for the for the poor scores of of our kids in the schools because of the money. That we're already spending and we will talk about cuts in education funding, but we spent a ton of money on education, and it goes off to the teachers that doesn't go to eighty five percent goes for for salaries. You're right. Whether it be teachers, janitors, you know, the principals administrators you name it. That's that's where it goes. But the the key is to get these kids at a young age to understand what their future might be to show them. The opportunities out there for them that meet the interests that they have that. They don't need to skip out of school and hang out on the street, and you know, try to emulate that guy selling feno on the corner that that's that's the message. We gotta get the kids, especially in cities inner cities like Detroit and. The message that they want to send in that's not what they want. They use Bloom's taxonomy. And if you read oh, gosh, it was named. Tuchman Barbara Tuchman wrote an article notes on China, and she talks they use. They use Bruce boom lose taxonomy is over there. And she talks about the stultifying affected has on the human mind. You'll people should get a copy that read it Bloom's taxonomy says that what you said. Yep. Bloom's taxonomy. T A X T E C H S T A X taxonomy. Okay. Takes on me. All right. And I just wanted to make one small correction last week. You were talking about the Zimmermann telegram, and you completed World War One World War Two when you said that Zimmerman was a student Hitler's regime when actually he wasn't is there. Interesting. I read Barbara tukwila's book is article the Zimmermann telegram Zimmermann was her grandfather. He was also the the diplomat here the United States, and they sent a telegram to him that they ended up reading, and what's in Germany was trying to do was to fund Mexico with money and arms to invade us. And when Wilson found out about it. That's what made him want to get into World War One. He was so incensed that exactly and that, and that's the point I made. But here's here's here's the other part of it is we don't know whether that that telegram that was sent was was real or whether it was composed by the by the British government to. Get the US into World War One because they needed help in the in the seas, and you know in protecting themselves. So that that may have been a one of those false flag operations that was that was intended to get us involved in World War One. If that's the case it worked if it wasn't. Well, we got in anyways. And we're we're glad it was over. And wish we wouldn't have any other wars. It was supposed to be the war that ended all wars. But it wasn't. Hey, I appreciate the call. Always charlene. Thank you so much. We have more of your calls Paul W here every day and especially every Christmas. I like to remind myself, and you that every day is a gift my good friends today..

United States General Motors Richard Charlene Dennis Wilson Tuchman Barbara Tuchman Bloom Zimmermann Miss Berra Mary Barra GM democrat party Detroit Paul W Frank Troy Barbara tukwila China
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on Amanpour

"I think what we were trying to do with the series is is to borrow phrase from Barbara Tuchman hold up a distant mirror to the past to reflect on what's going on right now. And what do you think will happen? You know, Monica has always said that you know, it would be good to get an apology a personal apology that hasn't happened. And she also wrote again in this before the series came out. She wrote if you want to know what power looks like watch a man safety even smugly do interviews for decades. Without ever worrying, whether he will be asked the questions that he doesn't want to onset clearly shifting because people are beginning to us, President Clinton directly about this. And they still ask Hillary Clinton about it because they didn't cooperate with your film. But what do you think might happen? What do you hope might be the result of yo series? One. I'm hoping that we might learn from it, and maybe try and put some of these some of these things past us. I think there's a great line from one of the journalists in the series who talks about President Clinton being a moral in his personal life, but moral in his public life. It would be nice for us to like politicians who were pub moral and both personal and public life. I don't know if that's too much to ask for these days. But I'm hoping it will maybe reignite some conversations or fuel some current conversations and allow us to move past some of this. So just a quick question. Then because you know, obviously, you beginning to put this together prepared to have it during the Cavanaugh hearings serious accusations against him. He's now sitting on the supreme court, and he had some kind of role in this impeachment process. Right. Exactly. We'll Brookhaven I'll was a part of the independent counsel. He was one of the prosecute. Here's who is working with judge star. And and in fact, you you see him in footage sitting behind judge star when he testifies before the House Judiciary committee, and he recently a memo came out where he was helping to write questions for the questioning of President Clinton, it Clinton and his grand jury deposition, which were very detailed and graphic in sexual nature of the questions for which which surfaced during the the hearings. Bled foster. We have to leave it that. Thank you so much indeed for joining us tonight. So highlighting the political tribalism affecting the United States from Charlottesville to Charleston to Pittsburgh. The FBI confirms that racism and antisemitism are on the rise. The latest numbers show that hate crimes were up seventeen percent in two thousand seventeen from the previous year the investigative site propublica and frontline have just released a new investigation into white supremacist groups in the United States in particular, a Neo Nazi group that has actively recruited inside the US military AC Thompson reports for propublica and contributes to frontline he spoke to Harry swing of us in about this. AC? This is the second in a series of films at frontline is publishing documenting. Hey, tell us a little bit about the scope of this project. Now, basically back at the end of two thousand sixteen we started building a coalition of newsrooms that we're going to report on hate crimes acts of bias and bigotry and track the resurgent white power movement. So that's what we've been doing since then with newsrooms across the country about one hundred sixty different organizations. The documentaries are sort of one of the most high profile products that we've put out in that series. But they're part of a broader series last year took a look at Charlottesville, and what happened there. Let's take a listen and look to a clip from that documentary..

President Clinton Hillary Clinton Monica Barbara Tuchman United States President Charlottesville propublica FBI Cavanaugh House Judiciary committee Thompson Pittsburgh Charleston Harry seventeen percent
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Only famous in the subtitle was. From Nebuchadnezzar to Sarah Bernhardt, so you can see predate covered wide swath of human history, that's a broad range broad range. And I don't think he he often thought about Nebuchadnezzar or Sarah Bernhardt, but he used to say when I was trying to think about what to do with the atom bomb or what to do in Korea. I would think about what had read particularly in that book about ABRAHAM LINCOLN or Andrew Jackson. It was never an exact parallel. But there were some areas of what they had to deal with that gave me some comfort and some insight. So that I could go ahead. Fact, can I mention one other JFK and the Cuban missile crisis nineteen sixty two fortunately for all of us, just before then he read a book that I'm sure you've read read Barbara Tuchman 's guns of August, it's assigned reading in most colleges if you were a political science major I'm glad to hear it. And I was a political science major was assigned to us to Williams College. The lesson of that as you. Well know is basically World War One happened because there were a lot of miss communications between the sides that were about to go to war. So Kennedy had just read that before he's going to the Cuban missile crisis. And what better lesson would you want his head than exactly that because during the missile crisis? You know, he he keeps on saying. I want to make sure that some lower level person. The defense department doesn't put out some statement that's going to convince the Soviets Khrushchev that we're about to do a first strike attack mistakenly, and we get into a nuclear war accidentally that could kill hundred million people incinerate much of the northern hemisphere. That's the way history really can guide the president at an absolutely paramount time this maybe not a Willer ticketed question. Anything's may not be distinguishable and the overlap, but if you had to pick which of the following qualities as most important to a president to do the job. Properly at one is a good grasp of history. Another is good judgment. And the third is is good character. Which is the most important because they are a little bit different yet. They are different. But I think I would say that's a three way tie. I have never seen a great president. That does not have those things. And also, I would add to that. This is a part of character empathy Lincoln in the middle of the civil war. There were so many soldiers being killed because of the decisions that he was he was making his people said we need a new national cemetery. Where do you want it and Lincoln said build at next to my summer house because it's going to be intensely painful to me, but I want to see the union graves being dug I want to see the grieving widows. I want to see the crying. I want to always be reminded of the real life results and death results of the decisions I'm making. That's what empathy is that's what you. Really want to see in a president you need balance. Right because you can be paralyzed, by empathy because you don't want to cause harm in the short term. Even though it might cause longer term good and peace and Lincoln. Obviously, you know, even if you haven't read a lot of history, if you've watched any movies, you know, that he spoke very movingly not only in public. But also in the letters that he wrote to the families of fallen soldiers, which is a great distinction between him and the current president who today has not even visited any troops. Not been dec- troops not been to a base not been to Iraq or Afghanistan and also has sent troops to the border in a reality show that doesn't have too much connection to read it real life reality. I mean, it is something that we have rarely if ever seen in presidential history, which presidents, do you think in recent times have had the best grasp of history. I think Kennedy did Kennedy wrote history Truman as I've mentioned. Roosevelt tried. I mean, he was not as much of a history reader, but member I was saying about Kennedy. It's a good thing. He read guns of August. Right. Well, FDR as it happens. Sometimes God looks over the United States in one thousand nine hundred forty the year before we got into World War Two..

ABRAHAM LINCOLN president Kennedy Nebuchadnezzar Sarah Bernhardt Williams College Barbara Tuchman Khrushchev Korea Roosevelt Andrew Jackson United States Iraq Afghanistan Truman
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on Skullduggery

"I mean, I I read that book, and I've read it probably seven or eight times my proof reading, and I don't remember blaming Bannon for Trump's announcement speech in June. Well, you're saying that you're saying blaming we'll go back and look at that. But, but but then also evidence that in my book that I'm blaming go back and look at that. But also joined the campaign year and two months after that speech. Yeah. All right. All right. You may be right about that. We'll look we'll look at it and get back to you in a sack, but and then the framing of globalism, or you know, the globalist versus nationalists, obviously that was something that Panin was dead. But just the other day in Houston at that at that, Texas rally Trump was out there proudly saying, you know, Armagh, nationalist, so. I mean, that's Trump Trump's not a nationalist. He can say these nationalist four hundred times. But if you know the historical definition of nationalism, you're welling definition. The Barbara Tuchman definition, tough Trump is in tag. But he's not he's not a nationalist. There's again, there's no evidence that supports the national what he likes doing. And what I tried to present it CNN yesterday that ended up with the headline scour moods. He calls. Trump a liar. What he likes doing? He likes seeing very provocative things. And in the case of lighting up the media. He likes very inaccurate things because he knows the media will jump on him like a hall monitor in the middle school and reprimand him. And he knows that his base loves it. When the media reprimands, it galvanizes them, it gets them angry it brings to the fore, and he's doing that to try to get them to participate in the vote on November six so you can you can you can hate him for that. You can hate me. For explaining it. But in my mind, he's intentionally lying as opposed to just lying line as relates to a nationalist. He saying the word nationalist because he's hoping that somebody that really understands that word that hates him. We'll get up on the television and say, this SOB is a militant nationalist and his base. They enjoy it. They don't they don't they don't mind it could be upset about that. But that's what that's what it is. And so just the I'm really trying to be observational less political about the analysis just to buttonhole the whole question of what you wrote in the book about Bannon, and the and the speech referring to Mexicans as as rapists and murderers, you write in the book on page one hundred sixty nine that, you thought the speech was narrow minded, and you thought his words were too rough..

Trump Trump Trump Bannon Barbara Tuchman Panin CNN middle school Armagh Houston two months
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"The reason is not as scary as it might sound is that I always sort of happened outline of knowing what I want to do before I start it sort of the lay persons. I don't know that much about the person. So I wanna know what do people want to know about them? I'm not that much of an expert. On the person when I start, and then I start building the book usually pronto. Logically, if not from their childhood, wherever I'm starting. So chapters get done. So it's not like I spent five years researching and then start writing again, Barbara Tuchman my heroine said, you've gotta start writing soon as you can because otherwise you'll really feel this massive materialists is unable to be worked on. So yes, sure there were times. But on the other hand, it meant that I could have my own hours. My husband's was writer. We both wrote at home, didn't have to travel anywhere to go and do what I was doing at enough faculty meetings at night. I could be with the kids to go to the league games and I really appreciated that I was now in a profession that allowed me to balance as much as I could even if it meant I wouldn't produce forty books. I sometimes saying what if I, you know, had been a man living in another time and I wasn't involved with the kids. I mean, it's a sad thing to think about. Maybe I would produce more books, but I would never. Raided I think I think you're doing spectacularly. I have. I've. Has mentioning earlier such an incredible level of respect for the work you've done. It's it's very intimidating on some level. I'm not sure it's intimidating, but it's fat. Now it's. Teasing me who read the bully pulpit in which was very long book, actually, nine hundred pages that she was reading at night in bed, and she fell asleep and broke her nose. A new book is shorter than any of those. Those is going to be broken. Well, let's let's talk about some of your guys and perhaps we could. We're going to bounce around quite a bit and we can take this and just about any direction. But. I'd love to perhaps start with a question about Lincoln, and I've read that. You've said, what's most striking about Lincoln? Was his emotional intelligence temperament? Can you can you? Can you explain what you mean by that. Absolutely. I mean, I think when we look at the quality of empathy which I think is critical quality for any leader. I think for some people, it's inborn. Others can develop it over time, but for Lincoln, even as child when his friends would be putting hot coals on turtles to watch them wriggle he would stop them and say, this isn't right. We can't do this or there are times when he found somebody drunk in a pit hole and everybody was walking by the person. He ended up going back and picking that person up and bringing him carrying him to a home, and you can see that in him as a child. But it's more than that, I just felt living in his presence that I could become a better person. I don't always think that I have great respect for the people that I've written about, but there was something about Lincoln's and even forgetting how it made him a great leader, which did he just refused to let resentments fester. He refused to let himself get jealous of people. It wasn't that he didn't have the normal human emotions of jealousy or envy or anger. But he said, if you allow those to fester, they will poison you. So there would be times when I might be jealous of something or envious of something and just remember, Lincoln would tell me this isn't doing any good. You have to stop..

Lincoln writer Barbara Tuchman five years
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"So sad what I'm saying. But my childhood bizarrely was not sad, and I think it had a lot to do with him. You also mentioned and part of the reason for people listening asking these questions, and I'm so interested in you as a person is that you are such a keen observer and that's reflected in you're writing, certainly reflected in your speaking as well. And I'm interested in the formation of your character and strength, and so on. Baseball. You mentioned baseball. I don't know much about your background of baseball, but is it true? And I can't believe everything I read on the internet. So I certainly stand to be corrected anytime that you were the first woman to be invited into the Red Sox. Locker room is that true is apps, but I don't know about the first woman to be invited in, but I was the first journalist journalist, I happen to be at spring training on the day that the order came down from the court saying that women journalists had to be allowed into the locker room to be able to do their job. So the owners of the Red Sox said, go in. So it happened that I was the first person to go in, and it actually is trivial pursuit question in New England trivial. So it's a, it's a great pride to have done. It wasn't that exciting to be honest. See lots of guys in matters of undress because they but they were. I was there. I didn't even have to interview them. I just had to say I was there. I'm okay. Have you always been a as long as you can remember a an aficionado of baseball? How did that develop? I think in so many ways on my love of history came from my love of baseball. My father had grown up in Brooklyn when the move to Long Island just before I was born but still love the Brooklyn Dodgers. So when I was only five, six years old, he taught me that mysterious art of keeping score while listening to baseball games so that I could record for him like on a summer afternoon, the history of that afternoon's Brooklyn dodger game. And then he would come home from work on the Long Island train night. And I would recount for him with all my miniaturize symbols k for strikeout, getting the guy around the bases. I could tell him every play of every inning of the game that had taken place, and he made me feel I was telling him a fabulous story. So it makes you think, even as a little girl is something magic about history to keep your father's attention for so long. In fact, I'm convinced I learned the narrative art from those nightly. Sessions with my dad because at first I be so excited before I went to run dishes. I would say the dodgers water, the dodgers lost, which took the drama of this two hour telling away. So I finally learned you had to tell a story from beginning to middle to end the humidity even more special for me when I was six. He never told me then that all of this was actually described in great detail in the sports pages of the newspapers. The next. So I feel without me when even know what happened to the Brooklyn Dodgers. So it really did. I think teach me the importance of telling a story in fact, much later. I read an essay by my heroine Barbara Tuchman and she said, even if you're writing about a war as narrative historian, you have to imagine to yourself, do not know how that war ended. So you can carry a Rita with you every step along the way from beginning middle and not being all knowing person that says, oh, they won this war, what's the drama? If you will ready know that. So I learned that just trying to keep my father's attention in telling him the story step by step of what happened to the dodgers that debt. For those who don't know who is Barbara Tuchman Advocaat win is female historian, and I only mentioned female store in question is very important. Early theme will Pulitzer prize winning historian, and I read a book that she wrote guns of August when I was in college and it was so beautifully written..

Brooklyn Dodgers Baseball Long Island Red Sox Barbara Tuchman Barbara Tuchman Advocaat Brooklyn Pulitzer prize Rita New England six years two hour
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Beltway next week one more week out here. In sunny California where it feels like, California following this. Morning the Turkish crisis is the lira, plummeted eleven percent earlier in. The day it's off its, lows but look for it to drop further in the day is there to one. Made another, crazy, speech over the. Weekend someone is finally going to quote before the end of the day someone who's. Going to bring up, Barbara Tuchman is. Wonderful essay purdah Carris alive or dead TR's confrontation with the the madman Rizzoli a few years few hundred years ago I'm joined this morning by Philip Rucker the Washington Post he's the White House bureau chief daily but he's a good guy I love Philip on morning Joe because he, always, looks the way. I feel at six AM in the morning, good morning Philip good morning here you're always looking for the copy and they. Never have, it for you on. Morning Joe I guess they need to get that they need to ask their. Game Gotta get you some some help I've got a Cup I've got a, whole pot when I show up here at three o'clock in the, morning Philip you're going to be the. Representative of the mainstream media today because. I got a question for it There are three hundred eighty four thousand churches roughly in America each one of. Which probably had more. People in it yesterday then did the racist right wing nutters in Washington DC so why, did we spend billions of airtime on forty crazy people who are, not Representative of anything in this country Great question Hugh I mean. Part of it is we were we all remember what happened a year ago Charlottesville and so I think there was Some fear Rightfully that there could have been some sort of interaction between the white nationalist and the counter protesters that Neo Nazi white supremacist rally was expected to have about four hundred people which is a fairly. Sizable, group clearly a fraction of those people even showed up many of them who did, show up wouldn't even reveal their, faces publicly but. It it it ended up being much ado, about nothing but there's nothing wrong with. The media, you know being prepared for for the bigger event as it. Was built the, distortion effect I think is, significant win and I'll use Rick Warren saddleback valley community church got sixteen thousand people on. A weekend forty thousand people on. Its roles the average American spends Sunday golfing watching, Tiger Woods try to win the PGA watching the Indians when a baseball game going to, the beach paying praying for pastor Brunson, in Turkey doing things, like that but yet The television business is built around the prospect of violence, and I think it has a terribly, distorted perfect on our, nation's politics Yeah well. Look that's a fair point I guess I I don't, know what to say about that I don't I I don't make these About how television networks ever news but you know there, were there they were anticipating I think. Of big altercation I'm the path and I think had there been something like that in Los. Angeles right in front of the White, House it would, have been important for the country, is that the media be there to, record it undocumented show what was happening right now the next story. Which is not very, well, developed which will be. Right up your alley. Jim Jordan announced on Twitter. Over the weekend that Bruce. Or formerly he's not number four, Lindsey Graham gets it wrong everyone gets it wrong he was not number four, in the. Department of Justice he was associate deputy. Attorney journal which is an aide to the second ranking official in the department of Justice Sally Yates he has been called to testify August I believe the eighteenth that is potentially very significant because appears to be a go between between Christopher. Steele and the FBI after the bureau had fired. Mr.. Steele, and, he and his wife. Nellie or have, known still for a long time my question. I'm gonna. Ask, Steve Scalise this later The our can the Republicans not screw this up are. They capable. Of not screwing up a hearing Philip That's a good question..

Philip Rucker Philip Joe Jim Jordan California Washington Philip That Barbara Tuchman Department of Justice Steele Steve Scalise Representative saddleback valley community ch Rick Warren Bruce Tiger Woods Rizzoli Nellie America
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"Trump's word Jim combs, word today versus Giuliani's version of Donald Trump's reality today you have Jim combs. Contemporaneous notes from the time. You have contemporaries notes of other people that Jim Komi reported the conversation to at the time you have people, they'll all every account of this that's been given by everyone, including many people who are allies of the president. Suggests that that conversation take place. There's lots of dispute around the details around what had Trump intend around what to be mean around what we know about the state of the Flynn investigation at that moment. Many of those things are in dispute. What has never been in dispute until this weekend was the notion that the question of Mike Flynn came up in the room with Jim Komi and all that is now happening Giuliani as pushing sustained campaign of gas, leading the country and blatant fabrication with a political and to its logical. And obviously what I mean by logical, I mean insane extreme to the point where he's getting tripped up on words of his own from just a fortnight ago. Again, we John meets him. He go through Jim co means contemporaneous notes and his friends contemporaneous notes. So you can just take Rudy Giuliani's word for it. Giuliani himself said the president was saying gift Flynn, right? This is again, this is you could say, this is the death of truth. I just I think this is just the renaissance of just stupid out and. No public Spiner is here Joe, those could both be. No, I'm serious. A third grader, and I've had four third graders full third grader would be able to keep his or her story more consistent than what Rudy Giuliani's doing out on the Sunday shows every morning. If Barbara Tuchman were alive, we would now have the title for her book about the age of Trump the renaissance of stupid. I think one of the thing, the thing that struck me with his Giuliani bid of the weekend was, you know, so far we had that wonderfully rich vernacular from Watergate twisting slowly, slow in the wind. Third way, third-rate Burg yearly expletive deleted. One of the great entries in the Trump version of that is Lord.'. I hope there are tapes and so partly on this one, it's. Are you going to believe James Komi who's kind of the Samuel peeps, right? He's a obsessive diarist or you're going to believe Donald Trump who's already admitted to obstruction to Lester hold without being subpoenaed. So we believe that aside for versa. Seems to me as John was just saying that this is setting up a kind of political Armageddon. Almost a cultural Armageddon. And I don't mean to be wildly hyperbolic. This hour on a Monday plays is there is this question. Did you use renaissance Armageddon? I seems to me that what the goal here has to be a wounding every possible vehicle that would bring any contrary fact to the table. And so at this point, if you ops Fugate if you have eighty three percent of of Republicans thinking that the way Donald Trump handles race in America, even on tonal basis leave aside the substance. I, if you have eighty three percent of those Republicans thinking that you're going to have an equal or higher number, I seems to me willing to believe what Trump or his lawyers say about the FBI. Or the deep state or whatever. So we have this moment where we're really are going to have to decide are facts, stubborn things as John Adams said, are, do we actually care about what genuinely happened as opposed to what a president that somebody likes says happened, and that's a really important inflection point in the life of the Republic, Nixon, baggy for a willing at the very end to turn on Nixon. Now, they had him on tape. They had him on tape so they could hear it. So maybe that's a difference I, I don't know, but it's it's a fascinating moment at why does this always happen in August. Why does it always happen in August, but it always does Casey. Hi. It is becoming more and more obvious, of course, Donald Trump. Again, you all you have to listen to what he said to Lester Holt and the Russian Foreign Minister and the the Russian ambassador to the United States to figure out that he fired Comey to in the Russian investigation, even White House, press admitted as much. He wanted to end the Russian investigation. But even on the.

Donald Trump Rudy Giuliani John Adams Jim Komi Trump president Mike Flynn Jim combs Nixon Lester Holt James Komi Barbara Tuchman Comey Jim co Burg Casey Watergate United States FBI Joe
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"And definitely they don't want to take any direct military action against israel it's because they know what the consequences would be there isn't a lot of reporting on what happened on sunday night and military airport outside of aleppo and two basis outside of hama one for the forty seventh brigade were struck by missiles that seemed to strike ammunition dumps particularly where a number of missiles exploded and apparently was pretty extraordinary amount of explosions towns had to be evacuated etc no claim of authorship if you will of the strikes but everybody seems to think it is israel but some of the iranian and syrian authorities said the missiles came from a british base in jordan so would that be a way to disguise the origin said that they didn't have to disguising the origin has the political purpose definitely for iran in the sense that if they see it was israel and they really suffered the the casualties then based on their put a gun and say they should retaliate and they absolutely do not want to take military action so they blame someone else or another source you know today but attention from what actually happened otherwise international reports and also the nature of that tax shows that this is the area that based on the reports booking with the syrian army and it concerns israel that iran is going to have any kind of military base the threat may not be immediate but given the history of israel and people think about their security given the suffering of the jewish people for centuries and centuries when someone threatens them to destroy them it influences people are the three d it iran is the enemy apiece movement in israel well you know we've seen we haven't seen it for a while but there was of course the famous barbara tuchman book.

israel aleppo hama syrian army iran barbara tuchman
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on What It Takes

"Not only to our enemies that our word was not worth much but it also set a bad message to our allies as to whether or not our work could be depended upon and that i think we can it weaken the united states and i think as a result of that i wouldn't be surprised to putin read that message to become a lot more aggressive in going into the ukraine and going into syria and doing things that putin did so i think i think it is very important that when the united states and particularly in the press the united states establishes any kind of red line and you could argue whether this was right red line to establish but once you do that you've got to back it up you ran the pentagon he ran the cia here we are in 2017 what are you most worried about when it comes national security now look i i think we were living at a time when there are there are more flashpoints in the world of 2017 21st century more flash points i think then probably since the end of world war two uh i think if there's if you could comparative anything it's probably that period in in 1914 i mean i think people to reread the guns of august barbara tuchman spoke about how a world leadership failed to really come to grips with all the crises that were going on that ultimately led to world war one.

united states ukraine syria red line pentagon cia world war barbara tuchman putin
"barbara tuchman" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"barbara tuchman" Discussed on KQED Radio

"International security studies program at the woodrow wilson center thanks so much for being with us this morning how do you read this rhetorical back and forth between kim jong luna and president trump what barbara tuchman famously wrote the guns of all go scoop out the drift warren 1914 of the hyperbolic statements rhetoric from both sides coupled with the risk of miscalculation and inadvertent a military escalation or or quite worrisome um the the administration appears to be sending a couple of different messages when it comes to north korea on the one hand you have the president talking about fire and fury but on the other hand you have a secretary of state rex tillerson talking about the need to keep a door open for dialogue and to use military force worse only as a last resort is there some value in a good cop bad cop approach to this well perhaps but i think it also raises the risk of miscalculation of there have been mixed messages from both washington and pyongyang about the possibility of launching a diplomatic track yesterday's report from the defense intelligence agency uh determined concluded gut north korea of man mastered the technology of miniaturization of warheads it at all it is already demonstrated it longrange ballistic missile capability the only component that's really left for them to demonstrates route test is the reentry of every warhead i will take time to digital testing and what i've argued a my new publication preventing north korea's nuclear breakout is that this creates space for diplomacy a through that would focus on constraining our freezing north korea's nuclear capability not rolling it dr zero so what does that look like because as as you know this effort to to curb north korea's nuclear program has been going on for decades so what needs to happen now that hasn't happened in the past well i think he new component is the possibility of marshall inkind support to put meaningful pressure on pyongyang to accept a freeze in zeros not an option they're not going to roll back the program currently estimated a twenty warheads two zero of a twenty is better than a hundred which is what the trajectory there all right now and within several years they could master the longrange capability us homeland the really talking about making.

kim jong luna president barbara tuchman north korea washington nuclear program pyongyang us woodrow wilson center secretary of state marshall inkind one hand