2 Burst results for "Barbara Ray Venter"

"barbara ray venter" Discussed on Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"barbara ray venter" Discussed on Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

"Episode who embraced genetic genealogy to help solve the 1987 murders of Tanya van kuhnen Borg in Jay cook. In Jed match was a major part of that breakthrough. Jed match was the hub that first made genetic genealogy a widely accessible tool. By allowing users to upload their DNA profile from different ancestry sites into one common database. People could make far more connections than ever before. Paul holes, the investigator who spearheaded the capture of the Golden State killer, and it was also my partner on Jensen and holes, the murder squad, was always impressed with how easy the process is. Jet match is at the Tower of Babel for genealogy. You have these different genealogy testing companies like ancestry dot com, 23andMe, my heritage, family tree DNA. And they have their own proprietary DNA testing that they do. That can't be searched. If I get tested and ancestry dot com, I can not directly search 23andMe. What jet match allows a search across multiple genealogy testing laboratories. Walk me through the process of uploading a sample. Like how long does it take and how expensive was it? This profile, even though it's huge, is a simple text file. So the process of uploading this DNA profile is the same as if you were to upload a photograph into a social media account. It's that easy. To upload into jet match, it was free. You know, and that's one of the amazing things about the website is it was a free service to anybody who wanted to use it. Even better, the testing itself was superior to traditional forensic DNA databases that could only identify very close kin. Like a parent or sibling. Genetic genealogy is based on a completely different type of DNA testing than what we have done traditionally within crime laboratories. They generate a DNA profile that looks at single points. Hundreds of thousands of single points across all the chromosomes within a person's DNA sample. And the more points that an individual shares with another person within a database, the more closely related they are. Initially, genetic genealogy was used to help adoptees connect with their biological parents. But that application soon presented a chance to help law enforcement solve a decades old mystery. What were the uses of genetic genealogy for law enforcement prior to using it to catch killers? The first case that I'm aware of was related to identifying a little girl by the name that we knew as Lisa Jensen. And this was a girl that was abandoned in 1986 down in Santa Cruz, California by an individual who professed to be Larry vanner. Larry vanner, who would later be connected to multiple other aliases, had been raising Lisa Jensen as a single dad when he abandoned her with a couple in a trailer park, and fled when she was just 5 years old. 17 years later, in 2003, he would be convicted of murdering his girlfriend on soon June. It was later confirmed that he wasn't Lisa's biological father. So who then was Lisa Jensen? And where did she come from? Vanner never revealed the truth, and he died in prison in 2010. It would not be until the rise of ancestry technology in the early 2010s that authorities would find an answer with the help of Jed match. Doctor Barbara Rae Venter ended up doing this triangulation method. To identify Lisa Jensen as Don boden, who was a missing girl out of New Hampshire. And that ultimately kind of spiraled into a huge case and huge connections with the bear brook murders, as well as who Larry van or was. Larry vanner was identified eventually as Terry Rasmussen. And he was connected to multiple murders of women and children. It was also confirmed that he had disappeared with Lisa and her mom when Lisa was only 5 months old. To date, her mom has not yet been found. That part of the mystery is yet to be solved. But genetic technology had proven its usefulness in connection with criminal cases. It had rebuilt the biological history of a child who had been abducted and abandoned by a serial killer. Paul holes wanted to know if doctor Barbara ray Venter could use it to find a serial killer who was still on the loose. I reached out and asked, could this tool be used to identify an unknown offender? And she basically said, I see no reason why I couldn't. So Golden State killer was the first time to identify an unknown offender. And the dam broke for law enforcement to utilize the genetic genealogy tool in these unsolved cases. It was like dominoes. Some of the most horrific cases out there start getting solved, utilizing this tool. The identification of Joseph Deangelo as the Golden State killer. Set off a gold rush of investigators hoping to solve other cold cases with this new technique. And it paid immediate dividends. Starting in the spring of 2018 and using Jed match, authorities closed more than 40 cases in the first year alone. And they were barely scratching the surface. Can you walk us through why there were so many solved right at the beginning? They were going after the low hanging fruit. They just focused on those cases that had close enough matches that they could work very quickly. Parabon ended up being in a prime position. To be able to utilize this tool because pair bond had generated this special type of DNA profile in order to do the phenotyping. You know, predict eye color predict hair color. So they reached out to agencies and said, we can do this. You don't even have to send us any more sample. We've already got the profile. We can just convert it and get it uploaded into Jed match. And so that's what they did as they just rapidly started working case after case, tons of cases got solved very, very quickly. Police expected to find the bulk of these crimes, connected to serial offenders that had yet to be identified. The reality was very different. How often was a serial killer presumed responsible for a case that had gone cold that was of a sexual homicide nature. You have a cluster of cases and the assumption is one person's committing all these cases. So when that person's caught and he's convicted of, let's say, one out of the 5 cases. Investigation into the other cases stops because they just assume that person was responsible. And it turns out, well, no. You don't DNA testing has shown. Actually, there is multiple predators at work in this particular area at that moment.

Lisa Jensen Larry vanner Jed Tanya van kuhnen Borg Jay cook Paul holes Vanner Lisa Barbara Rae Venter Don boden Larry van Terry Rasmussen Jensen Barbara ray Venter Joseph Deangelo Santa Cruz New Hampshire Parabon California Paul
"barbara ray venter" Discussed on Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"barbara ray venter" Discussed on Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

"As the days ticked by after Tanya and Jay's murder, with no leads panning out. Tangy his brother John despaired of ever finding an answer. It was a pretty, pretty dark time. I stayed home for a number of weeks, didn't go back to university for a while, tried to spend some more time at home with my parents and try to try to get through it, but it was very dark days. Despite a robust search for tips or witnesses by authorities, the days became months, and the months became years. There were 230 different people named as possible suspects in this case because it was profiled on unsolved mysteries back in 1980 9 or 88, so people from all over the country had been calling in tips on this. Every year that you don't get a hit, you know, it's like, are we ever going to get one? I was always hopeful that it would be solved. I never gave up hope knowing that a DNA evidence that was there. The DNA was the one thing investigators had going for them. But even as the national database known as codis expanded, they couldn't find an answer. I don't think they did any DNA work until like 1991 on this case. The DNA was put into codis and a year later it was put into the equivalent of codis in Canada. And there were no matches. I think a lot of people were surprised that it that there wasn't a match based on the profile of what the killer was expected to be like. Had the killer refined his approach to avoid leaving DNA again? Had he died? Had he left the country? It would take more than 30 years for law enforcement to find the answer. And it would come through genetic genealogy. This is the most powerful tool that's ever came along since DNA came along itself. Because it's a way that you can solve any crime if you have DNA evidence. Not just one where you've got a person that's encoded. In 2018, 31 years after tangy and Jay were murdered, detective Jim scharf received a message that would finally bring him closer to solving this cold case. I went to my office and I had an email from Barbara Rae Venter. And the email said, today they caught the Golden State killer and I don't want anybody to know it, but I was behind that. He was responsible for like 52 rapes and 13 murders in California over all this time period. And I thought, wow, this is great. Barbara ray Venter was a noted genealogist. She told me that she thought at that point she could help me. Identify the killer of Jay and Tanya. She says we need to get a DNA sample and upload it to Jed match, and we can work on identifying him through his relatives. And at that point, what was your understanding of jud match? It was a public database. If you get your DNA from ancestry dot com and I get my DNA profile from 23andMe and if you upload it to Jed match and I upload it to Jed match, we can match if we're related. So it's a way to match to more relatives. Jed match spelled GED match is a publicly open resource, which made it a potential boon for law enforcement trying to identify unknown DNA. As it turns out, Jim's team had already given a DNA sample of Tanya and Jay's killer to pair a bond nano labs. The company that was used in genetics to create composite sketches of suspects, like Raymond roe. Paraben agreed to do the Jed matched search for this case to see if they could identify the suspect that way. I'm thinking maybe we'll match to 40 relatives. Because I had put my DNA in to a couple of different companies, and I matched to like a thousand people. Most of them you're matching to fourth cousins. So you might have hundreds of fourth cousins out there that you have no idea who they could even be. Four days later, a pair of rep called him with an answer. He says, I've narrowed it down to one name. And I'm like, I don't believe this. What's the guy's name? And he says, William Earl Talbot the second. And I'm like, I have never heard of this person. Iran is criminal history. And it was pretty insignificant, I think he had a simple assault charge year or two before the murder. Nothing since then. Did that surprise you? Yeah. William talbott the second was a lifelong Washington resident who lived a nearby wooden ville and worked for a trucking company. He seemed unremarkable in every way. And he had never been on police's radar. Jim and his team now needed to verify Talbot's DNA. Detectives followed him down to a little cafe in Buckley. And he went inside and ate a lunch. We contacted the waitress and asked her not to throw his stuff away when she bust his table. So after he ate, they gathered the items that she had set aside in the kitchen. They packaged that and brought it to me. The results from the lab were definitive. Talbott was their guy. They were able to verify that it was him and the chance of it being anybody else is one in a 180 quadrillion. Were you excited were you nervous? Were you thrilled? I was like, I can't believe this. I feared up, like I am now. And then I said, we got him. And it was, it was just wonderful feeling. After all these years to solve such a horrendous crime like that. Officers cornered Talbot at his workplace, and Jim himself snapped the cuffs on him. I said, listen, you're under arrest and he says, what for? And I said, first degree murder. Now we're going to take you up to the sheriff's office and Everett. And we'll be able to talk. And he said, not after what you told me, I wanted to. I got on the phone and I called John kylan Borg. And I told him that he was in custody. He's sitting in the back seat of this car. And he's like, he's sitting in the back seat of the car you're in right now, and I'm like, yeah, he's all under control. You don't have to worry about it anymore. I've been a police officer for 44 years. And that day was probably the highlight of that whole career. Michael Lewis here host of against the rules..

Jed Jay Tanya Jim scharf Barbara Rae Venter Barbara ray Venter Raymond roe William Earl Talbot William talbott Jim Paraben John Canada Talbot California Iran Buckley Talbott Washington John kylan Borg