14 Burst results for "Barbara Hampton"

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Reset

Reset

02:28 min | Last week

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Reset

"Not specifically addressed at all so this is kind of verifying the experts. Fear that this is either done on purpose or was a colossal mistake and a mistake. That walgreens isn't really willing to fix at this point in time. You know. I don't. I don't know i know it's not fixed yet. I know they know about it. I know the time the fix it before we published. But you know maybe after we published things will change. I really hope they do. Okay sarah last question. Like i said i'm not thrilled about going to walgreens for a cova test but let's say i had to. Let's say i was my only option. Now that we know about these vulnerabilities. Is there any way that i can protect my data and still get tested at walgreens. If that's my only option. I mean you can buy over the counter tests from them that you don't have to give them any information at all but if your only option is to get a test like one of their drive through tests that you have to sign up for you you have to give them data and i believe it has to be accurate So with the walgreens vaccine story we kind of had the same thing where it was like you know yes. They take a whole lot of data. If you're not comfortable with that is more important that you just get the vaccine. If that's the way to get it you know yes. And i think i feel that way about test to you. Think you have cloven and walgreens dot com is the only way you can get it as like. Please please get a test sarah. Thanks for joining us. And thanks for your great reporting on this. Thank you and i'll hundred. I'm adam clarke. Estes and this is rico. Daily this episode is produced by taylor making an engineered by melissa poems from hemlock creek productions. Do you have a tip for one of our reporters send us an email. Rico daily at recode dot net. See you tomorrow. Looking for signs that the economy is rebounding from the pandemic then look no further than american manufacturing which recently set a record for new orders but surging demand is also exposed challenges including a record number of open jobs and piling back laws. A new series on the optimistic outlook podcast hosted by siemens usa ceo. Barbara hampton offers a way forward. You'll learn about the technology changing the game and the more than eight hundred thousand opportunities to start a career in manufacturing nationwide. That's the optimistic outlook. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts..

walgreens sarah melissa poems hemlock creek productions Rico daily adam clarke Estes rico taylor siemens usa Barbara hampton
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:41 min | Last month

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Recode Decode

"The american manufacturing recently set a record for new orders but surging demand is also exposed challenges like piling backlogs a new series on the optimistic outlook podcast hosted by siemens usa ceo. Barbara hampton offers away ford details on game changing technology and exciting opportunities for careers in manufacturing nationwide. That's the optimistic outlook. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. Hello vox listeners. might name is aaron lamour and i'm one of the hosts of the long form podcast the newest addition to vox and the vox media podcast network. We've been doing the show for over nine years. We've got to talk to people. Like george. Saunders terry gross tallahassee coats and really tried to explore what it means to be a writer or a journalist today. Twenty twenty one. We're also expanding to feature documentarian podcasters. Whoever we find interesting so you can catch up on long form now at vox dot com slash long form or in the podcast app of your choice to decoder. I'm neil patel editor in chief. Verge and decoder is my show about big ideas and other problems. Today's episode is about trying to solve a very big problem with a very big idea in the trade offs. That come with it. Here's the situation last week apple without very much warning at all announced a new set of tools built into the iphone designed to protect children from abuse. Siri will now.

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:42 min | 5 months ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It from Bloomberg Radio. Our listeners and viewers on YouTube might recall that we recently caught up with the presidency of Seaman's US She is Barbara humped in and Tim. She talked with us about how work is shifting its something you and I talk a lot about because we know whether it's hybrid. Two people come back to the office to people stay at home. I mean, things are changing a lot. She is someone who was talking with leaders about making their workplaces safe making school safe. And planning for the next crisis. Barbara joined us again this week to talk all about President Biden's recent call to arms to address today's problems, including cementing the US his position on many levels in the future. It includes being self sufficient when it comes to semiconductors and other major infrastructure projects, as demons were really deeply engaged with all of the critical elements of infrastructure you're hearing discussed today. Earlier this year, I actually wrote an open letter to government leaders outlining some suggestions that we have a broader vision for America's infrastructure because this is a moment to make those investments and I shared our support in investing in manufacturing, enabling a new era of electric vehicles. Getting cleaner and more of a billion energy systems and transforming America's buildings. And I was pleased to see so much of this aligns with where the federal at the executive office of going and where the federal government is likely to head with the support of our legislators, So you know here we are at this moment of deciding what shall we invest in? And this week I decided it's the right time for me to raise my voice. More clearly on the subject of manufacturing. This idea that manufacturing in and of itself is a key element of our infrastructure and key to developing the workforce of the future. And I'll tell you that cement. We've got this perspective not only as a manufacturer ourselves with 24 manufacturing sites across the U. S and 40,000 people all across the nation, a supply chain with 24,000 U. S suppliers supporting this backbone of the U. S economy. But we're also helping 90% of the fortune 500 industrial companies with our hardware and software that's helping America really adapt to the new digital revolution that's underway. This is our moment. Where do we get it wrong in the United States when it comes to manufacturing as you said 24 manufacturing sites. Nationwide for semen. So what do we do wrong here in the United States when it comes to manufacturing are making it more hospitable to more places. You know, I think our incentives have changed. If you had looked back over the last two decades, you would have seen American businesses making decisions on a global scale. Where can we find the lowest cost location for the bulk production? And the supply side economies of scale that are going to drive costs down. By the way. All of those are very useful goals to have. But what we've seen now, especially due to the Corona virus crisis is the fact that we need not globalization. So much as globalization. The idea that we need to produce things Closer to where they're needed so that we're not dependent on single points of failure in a global supply chain. We have an opportunity to turn that around, and people have been asking me. Are we going to be on shoring or re shoring and what I keep reminding people is? I think what needs to happen for many manufacturers is more than and In an or we do need to serve people around the world close to where they are. But we also need to bring the ability to manufacture right here close to where we need the goods and services ultimately, so I'm gonna play Devil's advocate a little bit, but I can see cos gearing up already to say, But wait a minute. Now you want us attacks more, But you want us to build plants in the United States and provide jobs and The president makes the case that a lot of corporations get off easy when it comes to paying corporate taxes. And if you look at the data, we've certainly reported on it here at Bloomberg. That is often the case where companies through you know various maneuvers and loopholes are able to pay a pretty low rate. What do you say to that? What I say to that is this is a moment when business needs to show that we are responsible. We have to step up and have a mature dialogue about this semen. For our own part. We are responsible taxpayers and we're really Advocating that our tax code represent of regimen that will put us on a level playing field with the rest of the world. So we, of course, are not going to be advocating for off the charts tax rates for corporations when it would actually cause investments of flee the company. But let's say we can work with other nations find tax code levels that are going to be equitable. Provide that kind of level playing field and then also really incentivize investment in the U. S at Siemens. We've invested $40 billion over the last two decades in America, and what we're finding is that If we make these investments, then the growth comes that the health prosperity comes after these are good investments for us to be making, particularly in a time of transformation like this one. So, Barbara we were talking about The president's American jobs plan Manufacturing here in the United States, and I'm thinking after week like we've had so many different earnings and hearing from so many different companies, whether it's apple BMW Ford when it comes to the global chip drought, and you know, we know specifically that companies like Apple and Samsung talking about production cuts and lost revenue. Because of the global chip shortage. Tell us about the situation. The U. S. You guys have a great vantage point. How bad is it? And how quickly or what will it take for us to ramp up production so that we can address some of these shortages significantly? This is a real issue because as you know, semiconductors are used in everything, cars, planes, computers, batteries, I mean the toothbrush that use exactly so we're maybe if you and me I'm not quite sure any given time highly dependent on this technology and back in the nineties, the U. S had about a 27% market share. Of the worldwide market. But now we're down to a mere 12%. So this is one of those areas where this would be a wise investment. It's a matter of national security. And by the way the U. S security is key to global security. So an investment here is critical for all of us. And so one of the things we're promoting at Siemens is support to the chips Act. The idea that there would be incentives for local manufacturing. The Department of Commerce is putting their full weight behind US tow locate key semiconductor manufacturers here. I know there's work already going on in Phoenix. Truly this digital economy rides on this technology that was the president and CEO of Siemens. US. Barbara Hampton. I love what she said. Digital economy rides on this technology. I feel like it's not just the digital economy. It's completely our economy. Some great reporting throughout the week on the Bloomberg Bloomberg dot com Just about why you're seeing the semiconductor shortage what it's going to take To ramp up. I mean, it's a global problem it is, And it's one that might not end any time soon. Exactly Still ahead on Bloomberg Business Week, there was, though some optimism from Barbara there. We just heard it our next guest full of doom and gloom. He certainly is more specifically doom the politics of catastrophe. It's the title of Neil Ferguson's new book. All Right, Everybody, Brace yourself. Do.

Neil Ferguson Apple Samsung Barbara Hampton $40 billion United States BMW Barbara U. S Phoenix apple 90% Tim 40,000 people Siemens 24 manufacturing sites Bloomberg Radio YouTube Bloomberg Two people
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:06 min | 5 months ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Right, Charlie. Thank you so much. Let's get back to our gas for talking to the presidency of Siemens us. Barbara Hampton. She still is with us on the phone in Washington, D. C. So Barbara we were talking about The president's American jobs plan Manufacturing here in the United States, and I'm thinking after week like we've had so many different earnings and hearing from so many different companies, whether it's apple, BMW Ford When it comes to the global chip drought, and, you know, we know specifically that companies like Apple and Samsung talking about production cuts and lost revenue because of the global chip shortage. Tell us about the situation. The U. S. You guys have a great vantage point. How bad is it? And how quickly or what will it take for us to ramp up production so that we can address some of these shortages significantly? Yeah, this This is a real issue, because as you know, semiconductors are used in everything, cars, planes, computers, batteries. I mean, the toothbrush that used exactly. So we're there. Maybe if you and me I'm not quite sure any given time. We are highly dependent on this technology and back in the nineties, the U. S had about a 27% market share. Of the worldwide market. But now we're down to a mere 12%. So this is one of those areas where this would be a wise investment. It's a matter of national security. And by the way the U. S security is a key to global security. So an investment here is critical for all of us. And so one of the things we're promoting at Siemens is support to the chips at the idea that there would be incentives for local manufacturing. The Department of Commerce is putting their full weight behind us. Tol locate key semiconductor manufacturers here. I know there's work already going on in Phoenix. There obviously, are these for projects elsewhere. These are large facility. It cost tens of billions of dollars of investment to stand up the manufacturing but well worth it. When you understand that truly this digital economy rides on this technology. It's interesting that you say that I'm thinking about what you're saying, and we talked about what needs to be done here, you know. We reported I think it might have been on April 28. But in a dizzying 12 hours stretch, Honda said it's going to halt production at three plants in Japan. BMW cutting shifts at factories in Germany and England Ford Motor reducing its full year earnings forecast do the scarcity of chips Caterpillar flagging, It may be unable to meet demand for machinery used by construction and mining industries. Am I reading that because it is a global problem, And I do think about what Japan might do what Germany England might do. China might do what other countries will be doing to address these chip shortages? And I say that because I think it's pretty obvious that President Biden is laying out this plan thinking about How do we keep U. S and U. S companies competitive? That's right. We we have to consider our place in the world. We and we do have a responsibility with all of the innovation that happens here. It's going to be vital that we have a supply and enhance these kinds of investments are going to be critical for us. Um, but but I'll add to this that you know, we had this year have really come to appreciate our supply chain and logistics professionals. I mean, if you weren't hearing about them previously between everything. We've been through it the pandemic and now semiconductors. What you realize is that we have There's a whole segment a whole market segment devoted to the proper disposition of rare supplies and assuring that we prioritize and get things to the right place to keep. Operations running for many of these critical industries. No, it's interesting, right. The financial crisis reminded us how important the chief financial officer was because they had to watch the books. Make sure liquidity was maintained at firms and I Think it's fair to say that the past year has certainly stressed how important the supply chain and those logistical people, you know, are important to kind of keeping things running before you go because when we have a guest like you, you, you know, have a great as I said Vantage point. What's going on in many walks of our life here in the U. S, and certainly vantage point when it comes to manufacturing, but also some of the new terminology that we might be using more in the future Digital twin Just address that remind our tell our audience what that's all about. Yeah, Well, let me ask you this. Did you watch the landing of the Mars Rover Rover? And did you watch the first flight of a helicopter on Mars? Yes, Those. Those milestones were made possible by digital twins. And in this case, Stevens helped Nasha JPL actually model the the actual rover and helicopter as they would perform on Mars and they created in virtual space. A digital twin of each of them and then put them into a digital environment to simulate the conditions on Mars, which we really can't replicate here on the Earth. So on Lee through computer simulations, were we able to know with confidence that those Are those new inventions would succeed the way they did and well what? What an achievement. So it's not just Mars Rovers that need that and could take advantage of this. It's everything from ventilators needed during the Corona virus to the pharmaceuticals to the testing, the FDA will now do as they consider the use of new drugs. Or new medical devices. We have the ability to create digital twins. Justus We've all been playing video games and enjoyed of Rachel World. It's gone big time in engineering, and it's gonna change the way we approach these fields in the future. Well, we will continue talking about I know we'll have you back more in the future to continue. This conversation is well, Barbara. Thank you so much for finding time for us again. Barbara Hampton, She's president and chief executive Officer Simmons, you say on the phone from Washington, D C. We're going to stay in the nation's capital. Checking with fancy lions for well. The National News. Hi, Nancy. Carol Well.

Apple Samsung Charlie Nancy BMW Barbara Hampton United States apple Japan April 28 Mars Germany Phoenix 12 hours Siemens Stevens Earth Washington, D. C. Honda Lee
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:18 min | 5 months ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The Bloomberg Interactive Brokers Studio in New York. Bloomberg 11, 30 to Washington, D. C. Bloomberg 99. 12, Boston, Bloomberg, one of 61 to San Francisco Bloomberg, 9 62, the country, Sirius, XM Channel, 1, 19 and around the Globe, The Bloomberg Business. Hap and Bloomberg radio dot com. This'll is Bloomberg Business Week and coming up? We're gonna get back to our conversation with Barbara Hampton. She's presidency of Seaman's US talking about bringing manufacturing or cultivating it more in the US specifically also wanna ask her about digital twins because I am guessing we're gonna be talking a lot about this. In the future. We'll continue in just a moment right now, though, back to Charlie Palate who's been summing up what a week it was John what a week indeed, down day on Wall Street, though, with the Dow, the S and P. NASDAQ, all declining on the positive side, though, for the month of April 5.2% on this frumpy Today, Those stocks fell from a record as traders were assessing corporate earnings case in point, Twitter plunging 15.2% Amazon after earning spent much of the day higher ended with a loss of 1/10 of 1%. Exxon Mobil reported this morning down today by 2.9% and Edition. Investors were analyzing economic data showing potential inflation pressures and hawkish remarks from Federal Reserve official end of the week. End of the month. Numbers here snt Down 30 ending the month at 41 81 down 7/10 of 1% the Dow Down 1 85 Drop their of 5/10 of 1% as Thank you guessed it down. 119 points dropped their of 9/10 of 1% 10 year. Yield. 1.62% Gold Down 3 60 60 ounce of dropped their of 2/10 of 1%. 17 68 on the precious metal West Texas Intermediate crude down 2.3% 63 50 for a barrel of wt I busy week, though, for tech earnings is behind us. James Check Mark is technology analyst of Clockwise Capital Away. The big companies reporting the tweet, Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Microsoft and I think the bagel Russian take away from those is that These companies are proving to be increasingly essential to the world, and the results certainly proved that And again recapping S and P down 30 a drop today of 7/10 of 1%. I'm Charlie public that there's a Bloomberg business Flash. All.

Barbara Hampton Apple Microsoft Exxon Mobil Facebook 2.9% Amazon 15.2% 2.3% Charlie Palate James Check Mark April New York Clockwise Capital Away John XM Channel Twitter 2/10 1.62% 1/10
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:10 min | 5 months ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"We find the lowest cost location for the bulk production? And the supply side economies of scale that are going to drive costs down. And by the way, all of those are very useful goals to have. But what we've seen now, especially due to the Corona virus crisis is the fact that we need not globalization so much as Localization the idea that we need to produce things closer to where they're needed so that we're not dependent on single points of failure in a global supply chain. We have an opportunity now to To turn that around, and people have been asking me. Are we going to be on shoring or re shoring and what I keep reminding people is? I think what needs to happen for many manufacturers is more of an and In an or we do need to serve people around the world close to where they are. But we also need to bring the ability to manufacture right here close to where we need the goods and services. Ultimately, I'm gonna play Devil's advocate a little bit, but I can see cos gearing up already to say, But wait a minute. Now you want us attacks more, but you want us to build plants in the United States and provide jobs. And The president makes the case that a lot of corporations get off easy when it comes to paying corporate taxes. And if you look at the data, we certainly reported on it here at Bloomberg. That is often the case where companies through you know various maneuvers and loopholes are able to pay a pretty low rate. What do you say to that? What I say to that is this is a moment when business needs to show that we are responsible way have to step up and have a mature dialogue about this seaman's For our For our own part. We are responsible taxpayers and we're really advocating that our tax code Represent a regimen that will put us on a level playing field with the rest of the world. So you know we're we, of course, are not going to be advocating for off the charts tax rates for corporations when it would actually cause investment to flee the company. But let's say we can work with other nations find tax code levels that are going to be equitable. Provide that kind of level playing field and then also really incentivize investment in the U. S at Siemens. We've invested $40 billion over the last two decades. In America, and what we're finding is that if we make these investments, then the growth comes the health prosperity comes after these are good investments for us to be making, particularly in a time of transformation like this one Great stock barber, we're gonna continue in just a moment. I'm going to live in a news, but we'll come back and continue with you. Barbara Hampton is with us. She is president and chief executive officer. It's Seaman's you say on the phone. From Washington, D. C. Quick check, though, and reminder of how we closed on this Friday, of course, wrapping up the trading week, one that was packed with her earnings packed with a Fed meeting and a presidential joy. Our presidential address I should say to a joint session of Congress as a P 500 closing down, 30 points 300.7% here. Dow Jones Industrial Average.

Barbara Hampton United States $40 billion Congress America Siemens Washington, D. C. Fed 30 points 300.7% Bloomberg Seaman this Friday single points P 500 last two decades Corona virus crisis U. S Dow Jones Industrial Average
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That we have enough pp to meet our needs. We go overall, I would tell you. FEMA's gonna end up being an important partner for for communities around the globe and here across the U. S. As we deal potentially with a second way that our goal is to help America stay open. Potentially a second wave. Gotta ask you, though. How likely are you expecting that? Especially with What we're watching over in Europe right now in the UK What we know that everyone everywhere is having to pay a lot of attention to community health, and we've got tools to do that now, right. So expanded testing certainly makes a big difference. And we've also learned how to keep things open with appropriate strategies like physical distancing, etcetera. One of our businesses, smart infrastructure actually have the whole program called comeback with confidence. We're rolling out technology into buildings to help the people who are managing those faces. Keep their resident faith and I were confident that that's going to be a major tool for us as we enter into the Palme. So Barbara. One of the areas that we've been very focused on is what's happening in cities and you alluded to this and I know that you attended. I believe the U. S Conference of mayors and I want to understand what they're saying to you because thie infrastructure that they have to maintain is critical as both the network but also Just for individual human beings. What can you tell us about what's happening on the ground as you talk to these folks who are very much on the front lines. Yeah, we were so interested in what's happening at the city level because this pandemic as hyper local right, it affects communities and and community passage deal with different circumstances. We wanted to survey mayors and we asked Harris poll in concert with the U. S Conference of mayors and we got great feedback from 124 mayors across 34 states across the United States. And it was remarkably consistent feedback, and what Mayor they're saying is they expect to see declines in their budgets were all concerned about that. Understanding the economic impact. But they're also viewing investments in infrastructure as the most the most positive way that they could be working in both the short term and the long term. To support the economy, bring jobs back into their communities and and attend to help simultaneously. You know, I feel like we've been talking about infrastructure for so long, Barbara, Do you feel like finally something will ultimately be done because, you know, it's like one of those things that Actually, both sides of the aisle agree that we should be putting money into infrastructure, you know in Washington, and yet it doesn't seem to happen. You think it's a little bit different? Yours actually see municipality saying, We've got to do stuff. We've got to do Think Carol. And so Here's what I think we're gonna say. First seen both campaigns at the presidential level. Talk about infrastructure is being central to their agenda. But more than that this is going to take far beyond I mean, before the pandemic, we were seeing something like a $2 trillion deficit in the kind of spending an infrastructure It would be required to this data from the American Society of Civil Engineers, So we knew we were working. You know an uphill battle. At that point. What's going to be necessary at this stage of the game is to mobilize capital from every sector. So I truly believe that they not only government action, but private sector actions. He engaged in infrastructure improvement. So Barbara in the few minutes that we have now, I just want to ask you What's this been like as a leader. I mean, you have a massive organization that you're responsible for. And I wonder, you know, now six month in this isn't triage anymore. You know, we're having to make really decisions about how our company's a run. And I wonder how you've handled it in what you've learned. Well, great question. Jason and we discovered early on because we were so essential to so many segments of the market. It was necessary for us to, you know, basically puller boots on and get out there and get working. When we initially got started, about two thirds of our imports were ableto work remotely, But that meant a third had to be out on the front line in harm's way. And that's Barbara Hampton, president and CEO of Seamen's yusei excited to catch up with her, because, as you pointed out, Carol, they have a window into The local governments, the state governments and really this infrastructure issue that we're going to have to tackle to battle this virus. You're listening to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek coming up lots of problems out there for CEOs to solve it When it comes to all that ails the US well, our next guest, there's.

Barbara Hampton U. S Conference of mayors Carol United States president and CEO FEMA Bloomberg Europe partner American Society of Civil Engi Palme America UK Jason BusinessWeek Washington Harris
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"By this afternoon. That's the latest On camera Fairchild and I'm Susanna Palmer in the Bloomberg News Room. Despite citywide rules on large gatherings and repeated warnings by officials of an uptick in Corona virus cases, nearly 200 people were busted at an illegal end or gathering in Queens. NBC reports New York City deputy Sheriffs found 192 people inside the Flushing Building shortly after 12 A.m. this morning, nearly 24 hours after breaking up an illegal wedding of nearly 300 guests in Woods. Died the night before. Once inside, authorities said they witnessed people gathered without facial coverings or social distancing. Officials said the location on Casino Boulevard was also illegally selling alcohol. Worries over a spike in cases in the city may derail plans to allow indoor dining with limited capacity in New York City starting Wednesday. Earlier this weekend, it was reported over 1000 cases were reported in a single day, a number not seen since June. Today, Governor Andrew Cuomo said there were another 866 cases of the virus reported in New York and six more deaths. The 2/10 of 1% rise was equal to the average daily increase of the previous seven days. The percentage of positive test results was over 1% for the second consecutive day. As the finance world tiptoes back into the office. Some of the biggest hedge funds are opting to keep their workers at home into 2021 more from Bloomberg's Charlie Pellet. While Wall Street firms including JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup ramp up attendance of their global headquarters, sources say. Staff of Bridgewater Associates, D E. Shaw and two Sigma Investments are unlikely to be back until next year. Thanks often have their own buildings. But hedge funds usually work in shared locations with less control over how the lobby and elevators are managed. Charlie Pelant Bloomberg Radio Global News 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quick take powered by more than 2700, journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. I'm Susanna Palmer. This is Bloomberg. This's Bloomberg BusinessWeek with Carol Master and Jason Kelly from Bloomberg Radio. This week on our Daily show, we cut up with the president, CEO of Seamen's Yusa. She's Barbara Hampton. As you know, this is a company that has a wide lens at which to look at our world Power generators. High tech, you name it. We talked about a lot of things, including Koven, 19th impact on the company..

Bloomberg New York City Bloomberg Radio Susanna Palmer Governor Andrew Cuomo Queens Barbara Hampton JPMorgan Chase Fairchild NBC Charlie Pellet Flushing Building Bridgewater Associates Charlie Pelant Koven E. Shaw Citigroup Sigma Investments Yusa
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That we have enough pp. Meet our needs. We go open all I would tell you, Seamus is going to end up being an important partner for for communities around the globe and here across the U. S. As we deal potentially with a second way that our goal is to help America stay open. Potentially the second wave. Gotta ask you, though. How likely are you expecting that? Especially with What we're watching over in Europe right now in the UK What we know that everyone everywhere is having to pay a lot of attention to community health, and we've got tools to do that now, right. So expanded testing certainly makes a big difference. And we've also learned how to keep things open with appropriate strategies like physical distancing, etcetera. One of our businesses, smart infrastructure actually have the whole program called comeback with confidence. We're rolling out technology into buildings to help the people who are managing those faces keep their resident safe, and I were confident that that's going to be a major tool for us as we enter into the coma. So Barbara. One of the areas that we've been very focused on is what's happening in cities and you alluded to this and I know that you attended. I believe the U. S Conference of mayors and I want to understand what they're saying to you because thie infrastructure that they have to maintain is critical as both the network but also Just for individual human beings. What can you tell us about what's happening on the ground as you talk to these folks who are very much on the front lines. Yeah, we were so interested in what happening at the city level because this pandemic and hyper local light it affects communities and and community had to deal with different circumstances. We wanted to survey mayors and we asked a Harris poll in concert with the U. S conference of mayors and we got great feedback from 124 mayors across 34 states across the United States. And it was remarkably consistent feedback and what mayors are saying is they expect to see declines in their budgets were all concerned about that. Understanding the economic impact. But they're also viewing investments in infrastructure as the most the most positive way that they could be working in both the short term and the long term. To support the economy, bring jobs back into their communities and and attend to health simultaneously. You know, I feel like we've been talking about infrastructure for so long, Barbara, Do you feel like finally something will ultimately be done because, you know, it's like from those things that Actually, both sides of the aisle agree that we should be putting money into infrastructure, you know in Washington, and yet it doesn't seem to happen. You think it's a little bit different? Yours actually seen municipality saying, We've got to do stuff? We've gotta do think Carol. And so Here's what I think we're gonna say. First, we've seen both campaigns at the presidential level. Talk about infrastructure is being central to their agenda. But more than that this is going to take far beyond I mean, before the pandemic, we were seeing something like a $2 trillion death if it in the kind of spending an infrastructure It would be required. This is data from the American Society of Civil Engineers, so we knew we were working. You know an uphill battle. At that point. What's going to be necessary at this stage of the game is to mobilize capital from every sector. So I truly believe that he not only government action, but private sector actions, the engaged in infrastructure improvement. So Barbara in the few minutes that we have now just want to ask you. What's this been like as a leader. I mean, you have a massive organization that you're responsible for. And I wonder, you know, now six month in this isn't triage anymore. You know, we're having to make really decisions about how our company's a run. And I wonder how you've handled it in what you've learned. Well, great question. Jason and we discovered early on because we were so essential to so many segments of the market. It was necessary for us to, you know, basically polar boots on and get out there and get working. When we initially got started, about two thirds of our employees were ableto work remotely. But that meant a third had to be out on the front line in harm's way. And that's Barbara Hampton, president and CEO of Seamen's yusei excited to catch up with her, because, as you pointed out, Carol, they have a window into The local governments, the state governments and really this infrastructure issue that we're gonna have to tackle to battle this virus. You're listening to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek coming up lots of problems out there for CEOs to solve it When it comes to all that ails the US well, our next guest, there's a.

Barbara Hampton U. S Conference of mayors Carol United States president and CEO Seamus Bloomberg Europe American Society of Civil Engi partner America UK Washington BusinessWeek Harris Jason U. S
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That we have enough pp to meet our needs we get overall, I would tell you. FEMA's gonna end up being an important partner for for communities around the globe and here across the U. S. As we deal potentially with a second way that our goal is to help America stay open. Potentially a second wave. Gotta ask you, though. How likely are you expecting that? Especially with What we're watching over in Europe right now in the UK What we know that everyone everywhere is having to pay a lot of attention to community health, and we've got tools to do that now, right. So expanded testing certainly makes a big difference. And we've also learned how to keep things open with appropriate strategies like physical distancing, etcetera. One of our businesses, smart infrastructure actually have the whole program called comeback with confidence. We're rolling out technology into buildings to help the people who are managing those faces keep their resident safe, and I were confident that that's going to be a major tool for us as we enter into the fall months. So Barbara. One of the areas that we've been very focused on is what's happening in cities and you alluded to this and I know that you attended. I believe the U. S Conference of mayors and I want to understand what they're saying to you, because thie infrastructure that they have to maintain is critical as both the network but also just for individual human beings. What can you tell us about what's happening? On the ground as you talk to these folks who are very much on the front lines. Yeah, we were so interested in what's happening at the city level because this pandemic hyper local right. It affects communities and and community had to deal with different circumstances. We wanted to survey mayors and we asked a Harris poll in concert with the U. S conference of mayors and we got great feedback from 124 mayors across 34 states across the United States. And it was remarkably consistent feedback, and what Mayor they're saying is they expect to see declines in their budgets were all concerned about that. Understanding the economic impact. But they're also viewing investments in infrastructure as the most the most positive way that they could be working in both the short term and the long term. To support the economy, bring jobs back into their communities and and attend to health Final painting. You know, I feel like we've been talking about infrastructure for so long, Barbara, Do you feel like finally something will ultimately be done because, you know, it's like one of those things that Actually, both sides of the aisle agree that we should be putting money into infrastructure, you know in Washington, and yet it doesn't seem to happen. You think it's a little bit different to ours actually see municipalities saying we've got to do stuff? We've gotta do think Carol. And so Here's what I think we're gonna say. First, we've seen both campaigns at the presidential level. Talk about infrastructure is being central to their agenda. But more than that this is going to take far beyond I mean, before the pandemic, we were seeing something like a $2 trillion death if it in the kind of spending an infrastructure It would be required to Mrs Data from the American Society of Civil Engineers, So we knew we were working. You know an uphill battle. At that point. What's going to be necessary at this stage of the game is to mobilize capital from every sector. So I truly believe that they not only government action, but private sector actions, the engaged in infrastructure improvements. So Barbara in the few minutes that we have now, I just want to ask you What's this been like as a leader. I mean, you have a massive organization that you're responsible for. And I wonder, you know, now six month in this isn't triage anymore. You know, we're having to make really decisions about how our company's a run. And I wonder how you've handled it in what you've learned. Well, great question. Jason and we discovered early on because we were so essential to so many segments of the market. It was necessary for us to, you know, basically polar boots on and get out there and get working. When we initially got started, about two thirds of our employees were ableto work remotely. But that meant a third had to be out on the front line in harm's way. And that's Barbara Hampton, president and CEO of Seamen's yusei excited to catch up with her, because, as you pointed out, Carol, they have a window into The local governments, the state governments and really this infrastructure issue that we're going to have to tackle to battle this virus. You're listening to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek coming up lots of problems out there for CEOs to solve it When it comes to all that ails the US well, our next guest, there's a pretty.

Barbara Hampton U. S Conference of mayors Carol United States president and CEO FEMA Bloomberg Europe partner America UK Washington American Society of Civil Engi BusinessWeek Harris Mrs Data Jason U. S
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That there's adequate hospital beds available standing up new facility than record time helping manufacturers keep supply chain flowing. That we have enough pp to meet our needs. We go overall, I would tell you, Seamus is going to end up being an important partner for for communities around the globe and here across the U. S. As we deal potentially with a second way that our goal is to help America stay open. Potentially a second wave. Gotta ask you, though. How likely are you expecting that? Especially with What we're watching over in Europe right now in the U. K. What we know that everyone everywhere is having to pay a lot of attention to community health, and we've got tools to do that now, right. So expanded testing certainly makes a big difference. And we've also learned how to keep things open with appropriate strategies like physical distancing, etcetera. One of our businesses, smart infrastructure actually has the whole program called Comeback with confidence. We're rolling out technology into buildings to help the people who are managing those faces. Keep their resident faith and I were confident that that's going to be a major tool for us as we enter into the Palme. So Barbara. One of the areas that we've been very focused on is what's happening in cities and you alluded to this and I know that you attended. I believe the U. S Conference of mayors and I want to understand what they're saying to you, because thie infrastructure that they have to maintain is critical as both a network but also just for individual human beings. What can you tell us about what's happening? On the ground as you talk to these folks who are very much on the front lines. Yeah, we were so interested in what's happening at the city level because this pandemic hyper local right. It affects communities and and community had to deal with different circumstances. We wanted to survey mayors and we asked the Harris poll in concert with the U. S Conference of mayors and we got great feedback from 124 mayors across 34 states across the United States. And it was remarkably consistent feedback and what mayors they're saying is they expect to see declines in their budgets were all concerned about that. Understanding the economic impact. But they're also viewing investments in infrastructure as the most the most positive way that they could be working in both the short term and the long term. To support the economy, bring jobs back into their communities and and attend health simultaneously. You know, I feel like we've been talking about infrastructure for so long, Barbara, Do you feel like finally something will ultimately be done because, you know, it's like one of those things that Actually, both sides of the aisle agree that we should be putting money into infrastructure, you know in Washington, and yet it doesn't seem to happen. You think it's a little bit different? Yours actually see municipalities saying we've got to do stuff. We've got to do things Carol. And so here's what I think we're gonna say. First, we've seen both campaigns at the presidential level. Talk about infrastructure is being central to their agenda. But more than that this is going to take far beyond I mean, before the pandemic, we were seeing something like a $2 trillion death if it in the kind of spending an infrastructure It would be required to this is data from the American Society of Civil Engineers, So we knew we were working. You know an uphill battle. At that point. What's going to be necessary at this stage of the game is to mobilize capital from every sector. So I truly believe that they not only government action, but private sector actions to be engaged in infrastructure improvement. So Barbara in the few minutes that we have now just wanted to ask you. What's this been like as a leader. I mean, you have a massive organization that you're responsible for. And I wonder, you know, now six month in this isn't triage anymore. You know, we're having to make really decisions about how our company's a run. And I wonder how you've handled it in what you've learned. Well, great question. Jason and we discovered early on because we were so essential to so many segments of the market. It was necessary for us to, you know, basically polar boots on and get out there and get working. When we initially got started, about two thirds of our employees were able to work remotely. But that meant a third had to be out on the front line in harm's way. And that's Barbara Hampton, president and CEO of Seamen's yusei excited to catch up with her, because, as you pointed out, Carol, they have a window into The local governments, the state governments and really this infrastructure issue that we're gonna have to tackle to battle this virus. You're listening to Bloomberg. BusinessWeek coming up lots of problems out there for CEOs to solve it When it comes to all that ails the US well, our next guest, there's a.

Barbara Hampton U. S Conference of mayors United States Carol president and CEO Seamus Bloomberg partner American Society of Civil Engi Palme America Europe BusinessWeek Washington Harris Jason
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Within the S and P 500 on Lee, one of the 11 industry groups were was positive information technology. S and P Today down 1.2% NASDAQ composite coming in with a loss of just 1/10 of 1% got a stronger dollar. Bloomberg dollars spot Index up 6/10 of 1% Lower bond yields. 10 Year Treasury last quoted a field of 66 paces points. I'm Doug Prisoner. That's your Bloomberg business Flash. All right, Doug. Thank you so much. Let's get back to our conversation with Barbara Hampton Presidency of Seamen's Yusa joining us on the phone from D. C. So Barbara in the few minutes that we have now, I just want to ask you. What's this been like as a leader? I mean, you have a massive organization that you're responsible for. And I wonder, you know, now six month in This isn't triage anymore. You know, we're having to make real decisions about how our company's a run. And I wonder how you've handled it in what you've learned. Well, great question. Jason and we discovered early on because we were so essential to so many segments of the market. It was necessary for us to, you know, basically pull our boots on and get out there and get working. When we initially got started. About two thirds of our employees were ableto work remotely, but That meant a third had to be out on the front line in harm's way, and we really didn't know much back then about you know, what would it take to keep people safe? So safety of the business safety of our employees just went hand in hand? And then, of course, as I shared, we were looking for ways that we could help in addressing Corona virus and the subsequent crises and now we're looking at reinvention. The thing about demons is we are a company of engineers of makers, and there's nothing better than you know, digging our teeth into a really hard problem. So the key thing that we needed along the way was to stay focused on water. Our customers top issues we're dealing with and then give away power, empower people at the local level to do what needed to be done in the moment. Turns out that's a really healthy formula for success going forward, and so some things like Remote working. We've announced within the last month. We're going to keep that ball rolling. We're not going back. We're really building forward was for all of your workers are. How does I mean, Obviously Something's probably cannot be done at home. But I mean for those that can work from home. I mean, what percentage of your workers will ultimately stay at home long term? But obviously this does really depend on roles but on average on average, What we're expecting is that employees will only need to come to the office two or three days a week on what we needed to make that time in office, something that's meaningful. You know what needs to be done in person and a We've got teams all across the country, reconfiguring office space. For the new way, We're going to be using that what they're going to ask you, though, and Jason. I've gotten into this with a lot of the CEOs and leaders that we've talked with is about those strategies that maybe they were going to implement in two years from now or three years from now and then all of a sudden because of the pandemic, they're like got to do it right now. What has changed either in your strategy or your business operations because of the pandemic, and it's here to stay, obviously, as you said, working from home, But what else? Well, we actually took a look at all of our markets about the May time frame. We asked ourselves the question We had done a future strategy. Look, we called it the U. S Agenda 2030. What will our markets look like? 10 years from now, Therefore, what do we need to be doing now to be ready for that? So we published this year the covert edition. You know how have things however, you to these markets been impacted and you look across it. Transportation is changing. You know how how do planes and trains need to attend a health and safety In addition To the other traveling safety. They already had his priorities. Businesses everywhere are focused on cybersecurity as ah, hot hot priority for all of them. And so you know, for every single one of these market segments we've now said, Hey, some of these changes are here to stay. Not only that, but some of these changes make us better. Manufacturing is going through a digital revolution and yes, it got accelerated during the pandemic, and that's going to be good for everybody. Because what this is going to allow is more local manufacturing, more tightening of supply change in local regions, diversification. Not all of these changes are scary. And Barbara just last minute or so here. How have you or do you plan to in the short term or in the in the near future, I should say. Sort of reallocate resource is either too, you know, investing in certain areas or investing in certain locales or regions. How how dramatic of those ships. Yeah, well, we've been on a strategy where we think that what's happening now is the same digitalization that came communication and entertainment to our to our personal lives. Is now reaching our built infrastructure in so the whole idea of getting our physical world connected using data than help it performed better. That's the world we've been living in, and that's the that's the nexus of the digital and the physical world. So now we're at a point where we can say to prospective employees. You can live wherever you want to pop experts inside semen. We can reach out to historically black colleges and universities and say, you know, let's devise ways, Teo, you know, build talent pools of the future that I'm excited about what happens next as we move away from big centres. Right, who are more distributed workforce you could hear in your voice so great to catch up with you, Barbara. Thank you so much. And for giving us so much time on this Monday afternoon, Barbara Hampton president and Chief Executive Officer Simmons you say on the phone from Washington D C. Yeah. I mean, write things that you thought you're going to dio maybe longer timeframe and now I'm going to do it. More quickly. I think we'll look back on this. I mean, obviously there so many different things that we will live learn, But I think we will look back at this is sort of the great accelerant in many ways, you know, it's not basically just decide. All right. We got to do this. There you go. All right, Let's get back to Ed Baxter out in San Francisco. He's got World National Headlines, ages and US a place further sanctions on Iran in a presidential executive order not waiting for the U. N to act. Our actions today are warning that should be heard worldwide. No matter who you are, If you violate the U. N.

Barbara Hampton Bloomberg Doug Prisoner Jason Lee U. S Agenda US Yusa San Francisco Ed Baxter Teo executive Iran U. N Washington Chief Executive Officer Simmon president
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"It was a risk off Monday. But if you're going to look for a positive, we did have a rebound in Tech shares today as a matter of fact of the 11 industry groups within the S and P 500. Information. Tech was the only one showing a game today. Other groups like financials, energy materials and industrial shares leading the way lower the S and P 500 down today by nearly 1.2%. 32 81. The Dow, for its part was weaker by 1.8% and in the NASDAQ market. The composite Index was off just 1/10 of 1% AA. Lot of issues for the market to consider, including Possible resurgence in Corona virus cases of British Prime Minister Johnson will convene crisis talks on tackling a resurgent caseload tomorrow in the UK, his top scientific advisor, warning that the UK is on course. For 50,000 new cases a day by mid October without urgent action, and here in the states a key question How is this confirmation process for a new Supreme Court justice going to influence negotiations for another round of fiscal stimulus? And on top of that, given a new justice, what's the potential for the court to declare the Affordable care act? Invalid. We had some dollars strength today with a Bloomberg dollar spot Index Rising 6/10 of 1% flipside, weaker yen Weaker Offshore Chinese yuan and a 10 year treasury yielding 66 basis points. I'm Doug Prisoner. That's your Bloomberg business Flash. So thank you so much dug our earlier interview with Mahendra is deputy managing Director doctor and you shot it really gave us a global look at the world and of many different industries. Well, our next guest also has that wide scope as well. And I actually think we're gonna hear from him later. We are. You did it earlier, but we're gonna get that's why a lot of time we are the wormhole. Our next guest, though, has a very wide scope. When it comes to the world. They make wind turbine turbines, power generators, industrial motor, so many different things. Hi tech digital systems and a lot more June used to talk about where we are in this world is Barbara Hampton, president, CEO of Seamen's Yusa on the phone from Washington. D. C. Forgive me, Barbara. It's been a really long day that started about 4 a.m. this morning. So thank you for your patients. We are delighted to have you here with us, though, because you do have kind of a window into our world. Will you see a lot and I think This is a really important perspective, especially when we have so little visibility. What are you seeing? Well, Yeah, thanks. First. It's great to be with you. Both Carolyn Jason and what demons have been doing through the pandemic is serving the serving society. As we've been built to Dio you mentioned a few of the things were involved in. But the most important things with cement capabilities in health care are colleagues and semen, health and years. Have helped respond with additional testing capability and now, most importantly, with antibody testing so that we can understand public health as the virus continues to spread. But it goes beyond healthcare. We're engaged in helping with facilities, ensuring that there's adequate hospital beds available standing up new facilities in record time helping manufacturers keep supply chain flowing so that we have enough pp to meet our needs as we go. Overall, I would tell you, Seamus is going to end up being an important partner for for communities around the globe and here across the U. S, as we deal potentially with a second wave, and our goal is to help America stay open. Potentially a second whenever I gotta ask you, though. How likely? Are you expecting that? Especially with what we're watching over in Europe right now in the U. K. What we know that everyone everywhere is having to pay a lot of attention to community health, and we've got tools to do that now, right. So expanded testing certainly makes a big difference. And we've also learned how to keep things open with appropriate strategies like physical distancing, etcetera. One of our businesses, smart infrastructure actually has a whole program called Comeback with confidence. We're rolling out technology into buildings to help the people who were managing those faces keep their residents safe, and I were confident that that's going to be a major tool for us as we enter into the fall months. So Barbara, One of the areas that we've been very focused on is what's happening in cities and you alluded to this and I know that you attended. I believe the U. S conference of mayors and I want to understand what they're saying to you because thie infrastructure That they have to maintain is critical as both the network but also just for individual human beings. What can you tell us about what's happening on the ground as you talk to these folks who are very much on the front lines? Yes, we were so interested in what's happening at the city level. Because this pandemic has hyper local right. It affects communities and and community had to deal with different circumstances. We wanted to survey mayors and we asked the Harris poll in concert with the U. S Conference of mayors and we got great feedback from 124 mayors across 34 states across the United States. And it was remarkably consistent feedback, and what Mayor they're saying is they expect to see declines in their budgets were all concerned about that. Understanding the economic impact. But they're also viewing investments in infrastructure as the most the most positive way that they could be working in both the short term and the long term to support the economy bring jobs back into their communities. And and attend health simultaneously. You know, I feel like we've been talking about infrastructure for so long, Barbara, Do you feel like finally something will ultimately be done because, you know, it's like from those things that Actually, both sides of the aisle agree that we should be putting money into infrastructure, you know in Washington, and yet it doesn't seem to happen. You think it's a little bit different? Yours actually seen municipalities saying we've got to do stuff? We've got to do Think Carol. And so Here's what I think we're gonna say. First, we've seen both campaigns at the presidential level. Talk about infrastructure is being central to their attendance. But more than that this is going to take far beyond I mean, before the pandemic, we were seeing something like a $2 trillion death. If it in the kind of spending an infrastructure that would be required to this is Data from the American Society of Civil Engineers, So we knew we were working, You know an uphill battle at that point. What's going to be necessary at this stage of the game is to mobilize capital from every sector. So I truly believe that they not only government action, but private sector actions, he engaged in infrastructure improvements. Well, we know Jason, right. We talk about this a lot..

Barbara Hampton Carolyn Jason Bloomberg Washington Supreme Court Weaker Offshore Chinese UK American Society of Civil Engi Doug Prisoner U. S Conference of mayors deputy managing Director docto Mahendra Prime Minister Seamus
"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"barbara hampton" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"You know, Trump has been such a juggernaut. The campaign hasn't raising money on. Democrats are making some noise that we haven't seen in a long time on the fundraising front, right? It's very telling, you know that people are kind of out there speaking with their donation, so something will track and talk with Josh Wingrove a little bit later on. We've got three companies coming up that look, and the leaders at those companies are senior executives that look at the global economy with a wide lens, and that includes the presidency of Seamen's USA. We're talking about Barbara Hampton. So we'll see what she is saying right now. Yeah, exactly. I'm also going to catch up with Pete Stavros. He runs a private equity at K. K are the role that they're playing with workers? It's a novel thing that they have introduced. They're announcing it today with one of their companies. It involves taking equity much deeper into the company, basically paying frontline workers in stock a different sort of compensation scheme. Interesting. It's a meaningful move when it comes to private equity, and maybe trying to undo some of the things that are largely attributed or often, historically, attributed to private equity. And speaking of moves he owes like watching the moves by Big Global blue Global. Excuse me, conglomerates on I cut up with Thie individual, the gentleman who's going to be taking over the top spot. At the global conglomerate. That's right. That's based in India. We're talking about the Mahindra group. Let's try speaking again. Maybe I'll take a lesson. Doctor knee shot. We're gonna catch up with him well, and a couple of folks at our last hour talking about fixes what I fixed the US well, there's a population fixed to that. Can't wait to catch up with Matthew Iglesias from box amazing and fixing the climate. We got a solution for that, as well. It's the subject of a new Netflix films, so we'll get into all of that in just a moment. First up. Let's get a check on world. The National news Headlines for that. Let's check in with Nancy Lions in.

Pete Stavros Barbara Hampton Josh Wingrove Trump Mahindra Nancy Lions Matthew Iglesias India Netflix US K. K USA.