9 Burst results for "Barbados Trinidad"

"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:59 min | 7 months ago

"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"I study in the late entry. Yeah in. So hair is obviously a big part of of your story and both of your books actually it's really central. To like you said, this identity politics politics with the big P. something I've really love about your book is how you just mentioned the fashion ecosystems that these communities are creating. You really talk about the importance of the beauty salon as kind of this unrecognized important space in the civil rights movement because he's women are really gathering here. This is a place where these women in these communities are gathering. Could you talk a little bit more about the Beauty Salon culture? Beauty Salon Culture is essential to black lie. And I'm really thankful to the scholarship of people like Noliwe rooks and Tiffany Gill who right berry eloquently and powerfully about. The Salon as a political space tiffany Gills, beauty shop politics in particular goals in great detail about this and what it helped me to see was that not only was it this important homeless social space where black women would meet to talk about all sorts of women's issues you know from where I? Latest Dress shoes that everybody wants to have to you know my husband is cheating on me right? You thought the range of experiences. But it also became clear to me after meeting the Gill Book that these women were entrepreneurs who could use their beauty shop spaces to advance in support whatever political causes they saw fish. So as a Black Freedom Movement is coalescing in ratcheting up to another level in the nineteen fifties allow these beauty salon owners would have small rallies in their salons or they would run voter registration drives from their salons in the U. K. context. an influx of Afro, Caribbean women migrating from places like Barbados Trinidad, Jamaica, to London, and other cities across the U K. They need a place as they get their hair done you know, and so one of the ways that black women a become their own business owners by setting up beauty salon and those beauty salons than become community hubs for new migrants. So oftentimes it the shops were sub segregated by national identity. So here's salon the Jamaican women went to here's a thaw. All the Trinidadian when women went to. So you could read establish a reconnect with community in the beauty salon. So I wanted to really honor that long tradition of the beauty salon being this very important space for black women but I also wanted to talk about the politics of that salon in terms of how these became gathering places in hubs for Black Women, and then also how they became opportunities or economic advancement. For Black Women in so it was fun to. Write in dressed in dreams about the beauty salon and my own experiences being a black girl getting my hair Preston curled in Mama cokie Salon. That was the name of mine my hairstylist when I was a kid in as early as five or six like a right of passage or at least it was becton for black girls get I. President Girl you know I can remember feeling like such a big girl going into the salon and you know sitting in the chair being so small Mama cokie had to put a pillow on the chair so. I could sit on the pillow and she would pump pump pump the hydraulic tear up so that I could see myself in the mirror and then go through what for me was very pain process of getting my hair, Chris our email, and of course, there's view with piping hot pressing comb in the oil. Oh. Gosh things we know about here now that we didn't know then you should never put oil on your hair and then put a hot comb on it. It's like what happens when you put a piece of Bacon into a hot skillet Fries right. But we would you know you put the the pressing comb through your hair. You'd hear all this crackle and pop in. You know how they burn you ear you'd Joe. Terrify like harrowing experience but it was also this brighter patterns. It makes you feel so proud when she saw the finished result. So I wanted to rink all those things across the books so that when you be the to in conversation with one another, you can see just how important the beauty salon was for. Black, women. And again across both of your books, as you said, there's so many interweaving themes between both of these books and especially when you read liberated threads I, mean we're GonNa talk about your mom in a minute but just seeing all of these interconnecting threads is really really special about those two publications that I wanted to talk a little bit more about. This. Embodied activism because part of it was racially driven and politically driven, but it also has a lot to do with class gender and sexuality politics as well. How did women also transgressed these societal coats through their clothing? We'll. Definitely embodied activism I want to explain a little bit about how got there and It's because as you mentioned earlier, liberated threads. Could've bridges, fashion theory and fashion studies scholarship with civil rights black. Freedom Movement scholarship because what I realized there was this gap. In between right and so in that gap, we lost so many stories because of the wave we have framed history. So in fashion theory oftentimes about the garments is the history of textile histories of the designers but this, not necessarily about the bodies in the garments. In the civil rights movement history, we were thinking about bodies, but we were thinking about bodies as blockade. Here are the bodies who are crossing the color line to sit at lunch counter he or other people who are trying to integrate US terminals. Here are the people who are being dragged and beaten as they're trying to cross the Edmund pettus bridge. So we were thinking about bodies in and that way and how you know black the black flesh enduring all sorts of physical punishment trying to break down and push against this regime of Jim Crow Segregation. So I thought like well, what happens though when we think about? Why these particular people went out to participate in these Berry arrowing public protests why they war-within-a-war why they go dressed in that way? What happens if we take all this that we know about garden and then put the garments on bodies input garments on bodies, a folks who were actively participating in this movement, and so I then started to play around with language and embodied activism was something that seemed to make sense or capture what I was trying to explain about you know what we see when we put these two different bodies scholarship together. So to me what that meant was looking at the ways that Black Women Non Binary FIMS a masculine of center black women like how were they making certain choices about the dress body so I looked at everything from the women of the student nonviolent coordinating,.

Black Women Mama cokie Salon Freedom Movement Edmund pettus bridge Tiffany Gill Berry arrowing Jim Crow Segregation Mama cokie President Jamaica US London Preston Chris Joe Barbados Trinidad berry
"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

08:00 min | 8 months ago

"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"An African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah. And to add further complexity to the community in Belize we did a show earlier this year on Latinos identity as it pertains to Belize and guess at the time we. Have a belief in of Chinese descent. So there is an Asian. Community on top of all the other communities that you just mentioned as well. So. Will among other things that you mentioned is that? According you here is that erasure is a violent process of exclusion, and this is something that you mentioned as it pertains to to blackness and central Americanism one if you elaborate on this a little bit further. So. Nick Harnessing Rasiah like violent process of exclusion. Just kinda speaking to like every day. kind of Muendane ways, but the eraser takes place especially in the daily lived experience. I. Think you can eat find. Anybody within the Belizean Diaspora who can always speak to this and always have stories about being excluded both in like. In a rare case like Caribbean circles and then also heavily in central Americans their full. Some. Also thinking about this in terms of like at a national level speaking about Central America as a whole right there the call constituting central Americans by Maritza Kardinia. And she kind of explained what I've always felt for whatever always thought in terms of like questions about you know why is believed always excluded from you know histories and literature about Central America and just speaking about. You know Central America as an identity that's kind of already borne out of as you're. Thinking about like the lack of indigenous representation, the lack of blackness representation kind of like some of the things. That, you have to sacrifice in order to create this kind of homogenous identity. So thinking about that in terms of like the you know the macro level, but also thinking about it in terms of absence in literature for me as a first generation. Who always wanted to see myself represented in? Central. American texts. Growing up I tell the story all the time. But like growing up I was always aware of other Central American countries because. growing up in Los Angeles. There's actually substantial population of blacks and show Americans like my mom. had. Friends that were from Costa Rica from Nicaragua and Guatemala Honduras. Who are black so I never kind of thought about. That particular type of a razor before 'cause I'm just like, Oh, I have this experience. And.

America Central America Belize Black Group Caribbean Latin America Europe US. Gutty Funez Duras Los Angeles Jamaica Barbados Trinidad Belizean Diaspora Gutty Fuda Nick Harnessing Rasiah A. Father Haiti Ghana
"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 8 months ago

"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Once again, , this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, , and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. . American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. . Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. . Thank you for having me. . Excited to be here is good to have you with us. . I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. . Once again, , the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. . So, with , that in mind, let , me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. . Yeah for sure. . So what envisioning <hes> what I was in? ? When I came up with the article title <hes> you know those with everything that's going on. . There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US <hes> I find a lot of conversations especially. . I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. . I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly <hes> an African American movement <hes>, , which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. . particularly in the US. . <hes> but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. . Caribbean. . <hes> Europe other places. . Outside <hes> saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. . <hes>. . So. . In the case, of , Central, , America <hes> you know black lives have always mattered. . There's always been struggles of <hes>. . On, the , ground with black people fighting again, , know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially <hes> what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? ? America. . <hes>. . So that's what I was thinking about. . That's what I had in mind when I, , came up with this article <hes> and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long <hes> history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. . Even. Delve . into <hes> what You, , know black lives. . Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. . Black Communities and black histories in the region I. . so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. . Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. . Belize as well. . So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. . But with that said, , there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, , there's some other groups that need to be recognized. . So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, , their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. . Correct. . Yes for sure. . And that's even including myself <hes>. . I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. . So depending on. . The vantage point, , but you look at central. . America play believes etc. . Gua. . Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. . Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. . <hes>. . So thinking about that identity <hes> in believes to historic. . Black Group <HES> are black creoles. . And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. . It's <hes> common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, , who visually looks why to also call themselves. . And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. . So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion <hes>. . So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. . And of course. . When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. . <hes> black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. . <hes> migration and group within believe. . So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. . You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. . So that's also present there. . <hes>, , and then recently you have a lot of immigrants <hes> from. . The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. . Think someone someone from Ghana, , and then of course, , <hes> from Haiti as well. . <hes> considering migration Haitians to central. . So there's like different levels of that. . But in terms of like historic, , it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. . Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. . It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. . Father vice versa <hes>. . So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct <hes> and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. . Experience within the country <hes>. . which kind of <hes> work to conceptualize <hes> how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important <hes> to also considering language racial formations. . So yeah. .

America Central America Belize Black Group Caribbean Latin America Europe US. Gutty Funez Duras Los Angeles Jamaica Barbados Trinidad Belizean Diaspora Gutty Fuda Nick Harnessing Rasiah A. Father Haiti Ghana
Black Lives Matter In Belize

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 8 months ago

Black Lives Matter In Belize

"Once again, this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here is good to have you with us. I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. Once again, the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. So, with that in mind, let me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. Yeah for sure. So what envisioning what I was in? When I came up with the article title you know those with everything that's going on. There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US I find a lot of conversations especially. I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly an African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah.

America Central America Belize Belize Central America Black Group Nicole Ramsey Latin America United States Uc Berkeley Department Of African Oscar Fernandez Caribbean Europe Gutty Funez Duras A. Father Haiti Ghana Jamaica
"barbados trinidad" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

05:31 min | 8 months ago

"barbados trinidad" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"And informative talk radio 77 w A. B. C. Well, calm unfolded on the restaurant into a dining. We're going to talk about God. And remember when he said. Not only will I not raise the taxes on the rich, I will chase them wherever they are trying when I heard him and come back and look for them well now, under the threat that they may not be the federal bailout dollars, said Cuomo needs He has said. If I don't get those federal bailout dollars on raising taxes on the rich Well, here we go. The exodus and where do you think they're being enticed now, while they're going Teo, the Caribbean because Caribbean certain Caribbean islands are basically welcoming them, giving them citizenship. Not just rich Americans, either just people who apply and who get jobs down there. They're they're offering jobs in citizenship. Like being an adviser for citizenship. Realestate development government agencies. You could go down there and live the life Riley and running tax shelters for others. Perhaps that too, and offshore gambling operations. I'm sure that Brian Manga Lucci's dabbled in the Cayman Islands. Yeah, I mean, with all the money that he likes to move around, I know you just see him in there. Counting. Let me Let me just preface this by saying, I know that a lot of the boards of tourism and trading will be reaching out to some of our listeners from the West Indies and Caribbean. You do not want to go to Jamaica. Too much high crime. You do not want to go to ST Kitts and Nevis cry Crawl. What about Barbados? Trinidad above training ahead? No Barbados. Ah! You don't want to go to Puerto Rico. You don't want to go to deal. Tell you where you want to go. You want to go to Europe or Antigua? Some of the other store island? Yeah. Beautiful places. Those don't have the history that no other European countries. Boy, you talk about quality life till about laying out on the beach. Not my thing, though. I don't think my thing is sipping whiner Aperol spritz is and you know speaking Italian, But there is some good news. Remember, we've talked about this airbridge concept. It looks like it's going to become more of a reality today. Actually, the US announced that they're going to stop requiring flights that are coming in from overseas. The ones that were actually letting in. They're going to stop them Having to be routed through these 15 approved US airports, you know so like right now, my My sister in law, who's in Israel with my niece on the way back to Miami. They have to stop in Newark because that's one of the 15 approved. Airport's well that stops today, so that's really cool. But you know, the reason that they're doing this is because they're realizing Look, you can come into this country and not be presenting any symptoms You can be. You know, you can get your little Ah, your little Ah, fever check and you might not have it, but you still might actually be infected so They're saying, you know, we're just trying to look at the places that have loco vid rates and we're going to potentially be working with them. Which is amazing news. So that means there is the potential jetshead Juliet at you and your heavy metal rock star husband, Johnny Boy, Yes, may soon be on a flight. They're somewhere in Europe. The second this is approved. I told my husband and if you're not going to be on the plane, I will. All right now I know your preferences Italy. But give me let's just say Italy may be off the radar screen because they're so up and down. So up and down there with the cove it Yes, yes. Would Croatia? Yes, Absolutely. Well, they're already letting people in there letting American Montenegro Montenegro I like very much. Yes, Couture Montana. Beautiful, beautiful place, But in the winter, you know the fall months or Are very nice. I would say I'd go more of Ah, probably parents in London, but I know if what one Siri, What are those devices that you say Elections? Kerry. Hey, go all of a sudden Because of this conversation, you start getting bombarded with e mails from the Tourism board in Croatia in Montenegro already do or you can be. I mean, this is all I do all my my train ride home, constantly looking, who's letting us in Who's letting us in? But how can my scam my way over there? What about England? Yes, 100%. That's with us The but they were up and down in England like Italy there up and down. One minute. They're doing well next minute. They're not doing so well well, it's certain areas. Of the United Kingdom that they're letting you come in. So if if it's your having a spike, but they're doing pretty well there. They're all doing pretty well. You may have to. Ah, land in Manchester probably would be flying to Heathrow and we were staying in London for a few days, perhaps driving out to the castle, as Barack Obama said during his campaign. Keep hope alive, right? That's right, baby. It's gonna happen by the end of this month. By my birthday. I'm telling you, I feel it up next. I looked at the video of coma last night having to capitulate on indoor dining, and it was like it was the most painful experience that I've ever seen a politician have to endure. It's almost like he was passing kidney stones when he was announcing the Yes, he would allow 25% indoor dining by September 30th and you'll have to break it down to it What that means for and everyone within the five boroughs 77 degrees cloudy. I'm Sara Lee Kessler and now what's trending on 77 W A. B, C and w.

West Indies Barbados Europe Croatia London England Italy US Cuomo Sara Lee Kessler Teo Jamaica Trinidad Brian Manga Lucci Cayman Islands Nevis cry Crawl Barack Obama Puerto Rico Riley
"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Stance

Stance

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Stance

"So that doesn't matter so Lynette co-directed with me. I did the of the script I cost a lot of mates because the few people that were spared together, I got so everybody is a woman of color, but composer, the musician for fight director, the voice coach the stage management costume designer the lighting designer the costume supervisor everybody even. One of my aunts made one of the costumes so Bolingbrook costumes made by my auntie. So props to anti-death in gospel oak. I was going to say I love the costumes as you said different women's women color, and sometimes people think women of colleges think black women for some reason. So actually there were lots Brown men. They're women he can tell you know, different kind of Heritage's and the love how the outfits represent that. And they're so beautiful. Yep. So so the proposition is women of color why women of color because I wanted women of the empire in the play. There are no aboriginal women from Australia on you see land of which is a failing on my part, actually, but apart from that. I think we've covered all the continents where empire laid it's big greasy hand from China to Iraq to Iran to Israel Palestine to garner to Uganda to Guyana Barbados Trinidad mean, Pakistan. India say already. So we covered Jamaica covered territory because I wanted to say people say that we have no right to claim the flag of Saint George, but somebody came from this island to where our ancestors were and something happened and we've ended up here. And so as you will have seen from the set all the you know, if you went to Buckingham Palace you'd see Lord blundering of who to her on the ball..

Lynette Buckingham Palace supervisor director India Jamaica Brown Saint George Australia China Guyana Uganda Pakistan Barbados Trinidad Iran Palestine Iraq Israel
"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Hysteria 51

Hysteria 51

12:15 min | 2 years ago

"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Hysteria 51

"Pack. His name is pecker back sit near waiting for re-gather. I turn the light on here. Yeah. I didn't. Well, we got other bumper to play. Chris. His competition for space in your hearts here again and Lavan, Chris I'm just here for the socialist paradise. And last, but not least back in the lower forthr- only the second time, but likely already more respected than either of the other two. Oh, I believe it to Mr. Christopher Markham. Thank you very much. And I'm here for the Monkees if you have any for sale. Yeah. Heard the monkeys for sale. Hey, you know, you only have to pay me. Just let me tell you will story thing, I'm running you keep this going. You're gonna you're gonna get another BJ and the bear reference. So last week, we told you about Jim Jones, the monce responsible for this horrific tragedy. We're getting the meat of it. The actual Jonestown the murders the massacre, whatever you wanna call it. We're going to break down. Just what happened how it happened and it's legacies. But first let's start off. I think the best places started some cold hard facts and stats, you know, what kind of tragedy were actually dealing with in case. You're not familiar, and even if you've heard of it, you might not know exactly what went down. So on November eighteenth of nineteen seventy eight the mass murder suicide of members of the California people still call took place at the urging of their leader Jim Jones in that's play spoiler here. But that's what this is all leading to and it happened in the Jonestown agricultural commune in Jonah and the death toll exceeded nine hundred including in this is disgusting. Three hundred people aged seventeen and under many of which were infants or toddlers, and this is the largest mass death suicide in American history. Like, we said in the intro to last week's episode. Before nine eleven was the largest civilian casualty of event, and then after nine eleven second largest, we're going to talk about this these hindsight's twenty twenty but how does averse church group who sit out to build as they said. And they thought they were really doing paradise on earth, a utopian society free of racism and hatred in unleashing fro intents and purposes hell on earth that culminated in one of the greatest crimes that are mind time, we're going to try to answer that I don't know how well we're going to do, but we're going to try, and it is it's a disgusting story. So how does one man I think let's start by going John? How does one man steer so many so far stray I think we need to start with just a cult. And so let's define what a cult. Right. Cult noun a system of religious veneration and devotion directed toward a particular figure or object. Schick we actually went over this in our Heaven's Gate episode. But it's a good refresher. Or? Relatively small group of people having religious beliefs or practices, regarded by others as strange or sinister finally a misplaced or excessive admiration for a particular person or thing. Sweet. And you know, it's funny. I think the key word there is excessive and you know, of course, that's a that's an objective word. Right. But it is certainly the keyword third. One is the one that fits the most in this whole Jim Jones, and the Jonestown story one that fits in most colts. Exactly, exactly. So I tried to say this last time. I don't know how if I got my point across how eloquent you're no one sits out to join a cult. I hope you might start out to try to build one. But no one sits join one. But some of us do have plans to build them with so many find themselves in one and Jonestown of the people simply will it was no different. These people found themselves in a Colt. Do you think they knew it at least towards the end, or do you think the reply I think some of them, of course, knew it? And I think they. They fell for this guy for his quote authenticity. And and saying what's on his mind. But also the 'cause that's that the 'cause I think there's so many of them that knew what Jim was doing was wrong knew that Jim is probably bad person yet the cause was what they really cared about. And they saw Jim as person that was going to make that happen or they were truly just frightened. You know, mama. Don't like tattle. He got out people along that line stitches, right alum at one of questioning, I I'm always curious to hear you guys feedback on this of like one of the things that strikes me as unusual with the Jim Jones story is typically when you think of some sort of whether it's an old religious group, a, quote, unquote, Kalt, whatever or even just a bad person doing bad things, you think of recently, you know, like something like the Jerry Sandusky situation in recent years or even on a larger scale in older skill. You think? Of Scientology most people don't look at that and say, Jerry Sandusky acted alone. And there was no one involved could enable him we all know like lots of people are in prison because of that or you look at Scientology like no one says, everyone is following the deceased leader L Ron Hubbard. There's this group of people that sort of run things I never hear or read or see anything about that. With Jim Jones. It's sort of like there's him, and there's the followers. Do you guys know of any evidence was there sort of an ill? Yes. Greer was absolutely Ebeling the called the planning commission and at first planet commission was a small number. But a group about one hundred at one point, and it became if you were part of the planning commission, you are part of the chosen group, it became a kind of a higher class a caste system within the temple and those planet commission members were able to mete out punishments and do gyms benefit especially when he got really bad with drugs. Then most some of those people really came. Before and later on when we're at Jonestown, we can talk more about Rick Sarasin and Carolyn Layton and more. Now, I don't know if this is true of every member of the planning commission, but certainly a lot of them being the planning commission was kind of like being chief of staff at the White House. You're not going to be there. The whole time the leaders there like e burn out and a lot of the planet commission did a lot of them eventually left and turned and turned on Jones. And we're one of the reasons that eventually the congressman congressman Ryan win to Jonestown because of some of the information that the former plan commission members and relatives, right? So so is the thought that some of them ended up becoming so ensconced in it that they are equally culpable to him. Or is the thought that no they were the blind Lou. Well, I think that if I may sorry, I think the thought is they got a taste of the same. Same sort of power. And they saw through Jim as his faculties are diminishing because of the drugs they could start to step up and take the place of some of that power. Right. The thing about it is we're looking at these people. How do you follow a Munster? How do these people that are these planning commission? How do you follow? These people will the temple was very active in humanitarian causes in its community in a time of prejudice. And hate it was a welcome escape a very, welcome escape and escape was the actual plan of intially. And when I mean that is for over three years Jones and all the people worked with the iana government to create Jonestown. And so in the fall of seventy three after this critical newspaper articles by Lester consulting, and the defection of eight timbale members Jones and the temple attorney, Tim stone prepared an immediate action content. Agency plan for responding to a police are media crackdown. He knew it was coming at one point. They were going to have something put down. So the plan listed varies options. We we talked about, you know, they were they were looking at places in Brazil included, maybe fleeing the candidate or the Caribbean. Missionary post they looked at Barbados Trinidad places like that. They actually quickly chose Ganda a lot of it had to do with his extradition treaties with the US. So he knew it was a place that he was going to be able to stay meaning the US could not demand him back. Right. It was also one of the few countries in South America. That was all ready socialist. Yes. Yeah. They embraced it in Georgetown, the capital Russia had their own consulate there. It was very much. It was a very pro communist in socialist place. So by October Seventy-three, the directors of the temple Jones in his in his cronies pass a resolution to establish an agricultural mission there. Why guillano well? We kind of said that because its own soul spouted, whose they were moving further left during the selection process, but former temple member Tim Carter who plays into a lot of these stories about Tim Carter was a key figure in some people questioned a lot of the things he says, but you know, he comes forward with a lot say that reasons for choosing the temple views of perceived dominance of racism and multinational corporations in the US government. They wanna get away Carter said the temple concluded the Jonah, an English speaking socialist country with a predominantly indigenous population and with a government, including prominent black leaders would afford black tipple members, a peaceful place to live a paper. That's great English. Viki is is key as well. Let's be honest, not a very powerful government. So you you have to know that they perceived that and knew that they could kind of get away with what they wanted as long as there is some money degree some poems. When you see that when you are. A person who likes to take advantage of situations as Jim Jones has proven to be obviously Gannon's gonna look attractive. So he kept injecting himself into politics everywhere. He wasn't a politician, but he got behind these politicians with and also there were times when he would send temple members to forge relationships like romantic relationships with the government. I didn't know that was the name for they they had a name women that provide like literally were there to provide these services Ma what's the? The children got the same thing. And they were floor flirty. Fishers was children of God. Yes. Yeah. He uses. Yes. He looked Yana. He saw it as small poor in independent enough for him to easily obtain influence and official protection, which he got from the prime minister because they aligned in their views. And it's something he in their pocket books. Usage is typically the prime minister that one of the women like was specifically assigned to him. And this is what kind of differentiates him from a lot of other cult leaders is he enjoyed public support, and he had contact with some of the highest level politicians the United States, especially when he's in San Francisco, we talked about he was with Rosalyn Carter in the mayor's in on nail government. Since you know, he was probably the most powerful person in the history of America. Walter mondale. Yeah. So in seventy four Jones and the temple negotiated lease of over thirty eight hundred acres of land in the jungle it's about fifty miles west of the capital of Georgia house also northwest really bringing down the dumb choice. It was such a it's isolated it had terrible soil. So it couldn't really grow much the nearest body of water was seven fuck and miles or eleven kilometers away on mud roads and keep things. Interesting. Jonestown location wasn't too far from the Guineas disputed border with Venezuela. And the actual one of the reasons prime minister was yet take this is thought if he put an American presence in American citizens there, it might deter military incursion that they thought was coming at anytime Joe crossed on that. What year was it that we is collective humanity decided that it might be smarter to build our encampments are our cities. Are living quarters close to water. I can tell you

Jim Jones Jim US temple Jones prime minister Monkees Chris I Tim Carter Scientology Jerry Sandusky Mr. Christopher Markham Jones Lavan Walter mondale temple Rosalyn Carter murder Schick California
"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"barbados trinidad" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"Extend yourself to him. Then. If I wanted to do this as she was dead dressed in the fucking tuxedo. So she's I'm looking to dress the other women on going to be unwilling to feed into the patriarchal view of how women should dress. Good be something don't be fucking complaining. This basketball player who's used to women throw themselves is not going to go for the dump people aren't good in the tuxedo. The amount of liberties. That are given to. Why people when they say outlandish shit is also crazy to me didn't she write a book about finger and her little sister some shit like that when he was kids or digging in the diaper, whatever. So. Wisit grand jury or Nash it. This the system why we don't talk about this. When you got somebody like Tina Turner who shared a clip last week. Of the tunnel on Larry King and Larry King said. Do you think she said, yes, she said, you know, what I'm I'm they love me over there. They respect me as an artist over there and to them. I'm just as big as Madonna. He was like, oh, you don't get that here. She says, no. Tina fucking Turner is not as big as Madonna. In america. Go to go where your appreciation. Where's your place? You're going to go to get. Appreciate it. Finally since I've left England and dumb. Well in America. I'm more. Appreciate it. Now back home in England. That's just how it is. For me. Of is how a lot of British artists. It was appreciated in England. Citizen came to America and blew up. Now, the British a throwing stuff at him for full. He couldn't. Okay, arrested in England. That's how it is for artists. Why you have to go elsewhere to get appreciate it. And then more pre back home. But why I'd never hear about this sort of is it racism there. Yes. The Brits of the best racism de LA notice subtle. I hear you don't even supplement Barrett. Slavery do a routine about this. There were better. Slavery Americans brought people to from Africa and put them to work in plantations in America, that's like stealing ship and keeping in your own house, the British did it smarter and that they stole black people. But they put them in colonie mcabe. And that's why you got black people who are from Jamaica Barbados Trinidad Haiti because why people put them there European specifically put them there that a lot of black people winning. We haven't gone African Americans been in America for hundreds of years. You know that was the same in England. We haven't got that. Our African Americans adverse African Americans a Caribbean. People. Do you have hope? Because you want to have a baby one day. Maybe. Do you have you have to have some semblance of hope to bring a challenge to this world? Okay. I have. No, hope you have not have. No hope. Listen. But you know, I'm kind of glad this whole Trump thing happened. I'm glad because we've been talking about racism for years, and because of a bomber and kept going resumes over we're post reaches society. It's overlooking the blood prisoner. It's amazing. There's no more racism, stop moaning, black people. So. It was the tide was in. The targets in and only black people could see what was underneath the water, but Trump is coming and the tide is pulled out and everybody could see what was bubbling the hatred that was public underneath. I'm kinda glad this whole Trump thing happened because now people cannot deny will you know, what you know, what we've been seeing forever moving trying to help him. They I I stand with this. They've always known the racism was just trying to convince us it wasn't. But I think with Trump has exposed is. He's exposed but Trump kickabout openly. Sure that was tumbling his drive you causing to cross we went to about this shit. But they always had the power. So they didn't give a fuck, right? They didn't have to be. They didn't have to be a malignant tumor because they already had the control. They didn't give a fuck. Now, they feel like there's a switch in control..

america England Trump Tina Turner Larry King basketball Jamaica Barbados Trinidad Hait colonie mcabe Africa Caribbean Wisit Barrett one day Nash
"barbados trinidad" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"barbados trinidad" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The atlantic it's a journey the experts of fourth was a possible and means the locusts were flying continuously for five days how they did it is still a mystery i believe it was the morning of october seventeen nineteen ec it that's i got to work and then we heard reports that lewis of lucas and grasshoppers were landing on the east coast and it's believed that the associated at the time we've psalm call tropical storm jonas central america is on red alert this afternoon as the latest hurricane to hit the car then rages out at sea harken john has already caused on sinisa most people had never seen like us the full methenolone in such series which numbers flew adjusts soil many insects slain all over the police and land in on buildings on cars from people guy methyl rain was the island's only insect acts that he worked as an end to mullah gist and plant protection officer at the ministry of agriculture some people lula scana skate of there because the two have big manned the bulls which they use such to eat grass and plans material with so some people were fridge see made get bitten the locus looks just like a grasshopper the difference is in its behavior both eat voraciously but let us as sociable creatures and when crowded together they swarm as immature adults they health along in unison but once strong enough they develop wings and really take off eating their own waiting feed every day and then flying on mass to the next meal we didn't know how he would react whether they would each all the bananas whether they eat all the mongol trees the coconut cheese and in all the but the main concern for us at the time was would be meeks and lucia their home and would be become a troublesome piston each everything green insights millions of others had landed across the caribbean the bright white sandy beaches of barbados trinidad and to make care was said to be lifted with them some dead some dying while others made their way in land firm and very soon the will fly in all over the island they want in a big swarm which would talk to them the sky blitz the will fly all over the place but on some each chef after a few days dime.

lewis lucas john bulls meeks barbados trinidad america officer ministry of agriculture five days