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Young woman with COVID-19 gets double lung transplant in Chicago

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:25 sec | 3 weeks ago

Young woman with COVID-19 gets double lung transplant in Chicago

"A woman who contracted covert nineteen is expected to make a full recovery after receiving a double lung transplant at northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago Dr hand keep Barak says surgeons performed a life saving procedure a week ago on a Hispanic woman the woman in her twenties this important milestone indicates that while the transplant procedure in these patients is in these patients is quite challenging technically it can be done

Northwestern Memorial Hospital Barak
Biden says he would pick Michelle Obama as running mate 'in a heartbeat'

KCBS Radio Overnight News

01:30 min | 2 months ago

Biden says he would pick Michelle Obama as running mate 'in a heartbeat'

"Democratic candidates a Joe Biden is forming a committee to look for a running mate meanwhile the party is looking for the best person to bring their message to the the people people and and there's there's talk talk about about having having former former First First Lady Lady Michelle Michelle Obama Obama take take on on that that role role for for more more on on the the campaign campaign key key case case CBS CBS news news anchors anchors Jeff Jeff Ellen Ellen Patti Patti rising rising spoke spoke with Bruce Cain Stanford University political science professor and director of Stanford's center for the American west professor a great headline obviously to put Michelle Obama out there is a potential running mate Ailey validity to that are from all indications the people that know Michelle Obama and I work with no I think it's probably more in that category you know putting performer you know we have somebody that would be very intriguing but hasn't actually run for office and usually when people haven't run for office after they passed the age of forty there it's because they really don't want to run for office it's not a pleasant thing to do so it's an intriguing possibility in never say the things are impossible but until the person really wants to do it it doesn't seem like it's very likely about using her more just to actively in the campaign rallies bring people together raising money do you see are taking an active role I think that she might justice I think Barak might if they're polling indicates that it could be very

Joe Biden CBS Stanford Professor Michelle Obama Barak Lady Michelle Michelle Obama O Jeff Jeff Ellen Ellen Patti Pa Bruce Cain Stanford University Professor And Director American West Ailey
Consoles: The Dreamcast's Life After Death

Command Line Heroes

07:44 min | 2 months ago

Consoles: The Dreamcast's Life After Death

"It's Timber Ninth. Nineteen Ninety nine nine nine ninety nine and somewhere in Japan. A spy has made her way. Deep into a mainframe. Computer she hacks. In and disables. A security guard investigates she knocks him out with a well-placed kick with the computer system. It comes to life. Everything goes a strange swirling pattern. Pops up on the monitors. It's obvious that the system is thinking the spy folks. The thicky computers out to stop her. It tries to lock her inside the building. The spy smashes through a window but not before she grabs a case and lungs off with inside that case a prototype for a new kind of machine that could change. Everything describing was a television commercial called apocalypse. It was promoting the newest video game console from Game Company. Sega and no ordinary console either. This revolutionary device was called the dreamcast in that apocalypse ad. What's inside the case? This is stealing. Is that very consul? Well then the dreamcast Box it sort of spins off of the back of the thief and lands in the street and the the the lid of this magic case kept the box plug. In the whole time POPs open camera's zooms into the dreamcast and into the window and goes down to the bottom where it appears that all the characters from all the Games are all gathered and there we have sonic down there and he he triumphantly says we got in the whole place rupp's and everybody's screaming. That's Brian and Pacino. The creative director of the apocalypse ad campaign and the Sauna keys referring to is sonic the Hedgehog Sega's famous game character in the nineties. Seca was one of the most recognized video game companies in the world. The by the end of that decade the competition was proving to be fierce so up at the House on dreamcast. It would be the company's Savior. The apocalypse ad was described as the most epic video game commercial ever created. But how else to show off the most advanced game console ever made so smart. You could almost say it really was thinking. Alas the dreamcast did not change world. It barely made a dent. It's considered by some to be the greatest console that never stood a chance. It was the last console Sega would build and had very nearly broke the company in our penultimate episode of the season a season all about hardware. That changed the course of development. We look at the short lived history of the Sega dreamcast yet. Despite the short shelf-life dreamcast is still considered by many to be one of if not the finest gaming consoles of all time and twenty years after its death it manages to live on in a very real way. I'm throwing at Barak and this command line. Heroes and the littoral podcast from hat like thinking computer in the apocalypse ad that whisper thanking became the company's new tagline for their new console. So the thought of having our our veal always whisper. It's thinking we thought that would be a really neat way to to sort of evolve that icon sake scream. Here was a console that got smarter as he played. At least. That was the marketing Pinch Console. That brought something new something big something live. Aleutian aries to the home video game market. A system built to serve the hardcore Gamer and inside the company. The thinking was that this console would make Sega. The biggest name in video gaming fish was going to change gaming. This was going to change the world so what happened to figure that out. We need to go back all the way back to level one throughout the early nineties. Sega had a reputation for making gains. There were super cool and more mature than what the competition offered particularly intendo. And it's princess saving plumbers. They built this reputation with a very successful console Sega Genesis. Sega decided they were going to be really cutting edge. And these kids who had had the Nintendo's that will now they're teenagers and they want they want real sports games with real teams. They want bloody fighting games like mortal Kombat which came later on and they wanted a more mature it. Your face sort of system. Alex Handy is the founder and director of the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment in Oakland. California he also works for Red Hat if you go back and look at ads from video game magazines in this period. They're kind of shocking their ads. Where there's like a bloody severed arm with gristle coming off of it and it says this is your best weapon against the Bad Guy Light. So Sega does really really well with this extreme in your face. Sort of successive genesis will sonic the hedgehog sort of impertinence as opposed to Mario's oshkosh b`Gosh overalls kind of happy theme. More than thirty million. People bought the SEGA GENESIS. A sixteen bit console that played games from cartridges. Gamers around the world loved it but over time sake struggles to grow as user base after Genesis. They introduced a thirty two bit. Sega Saturn more powerful than genesis. It display both two D and Basic Three D. Graphics but the Saturn Platform never really took off sales struggled. They managed to sell nine point. Two million consoles only a third of what the genesis sold another sticking point developers found a challenging to program games for Saturn's proprietary in house designed hardware. This was an issue. Sega made note of for the future. Add to that the launch of nintendo sixty four and then Sony's first entry into the market with the playstation and gaming was suddenly getting crowded and very competitive in one thousand nine hundred eight. Sega posted a loss of two hundred seventy million dollars. North American headquarters video game. Boss Bernie store announces that quote. The Saturn is not our future. He kills the console with that. Sega turns its focus to building the next generation of council level to building the dream. The Sega Saturn had hurt the company's brand and bottom line if sega was going to reclaim its market share and reputation. This next console needed to be powerful easy to co for and unlike anything else

Sega Nintendo Timber Ninth Game Company Japan Rupp Seca Director Red Hat Bernie Store Sony Barak Brian
eCommerce Logistics in USA & China with Burak Yolga of Forceget

Amazing FBA

09:09 min | 3 months ago

eCommerce Logistics in USA & China with Burak Yolga of Forceget

"Ladies and gentlemen welcome to amazing. Fda Post Today on with Barak Yoga of full gets freight-forwarding expertise seventy eight China in Shenzhen. He's established his own insult freight forwarding company from scratch which is not present in China. Usd by many of the country's sake breaks now living in Miami so getting quite an insect perspectives. Today and I thought he was important. Person to speak to one of the biggest challenges. Right now is supply. Sidon district Scifis set-aside really once oric on the show so Bartram welcome. Thank you so much. So how's life in Miami? We're just chatting about the fact that there's people carrying on like life is no more environments right now It's what is it today like end of March. Almost the you know things are in China going back to normal but now unfortunately they're more and more cases in the United States in it. Looks like you know. We have a pretty slow month in April and in May of businesses shut down right now. People are trying to stay in south currency and nothing official really As except near Simon the soft porn in Florida. A little bit luckier. Because we all look nicer wetter like a little warmer but Rest of the contracting is going to be a little bit more struggling with the winter cold weather so we'll see how it will go. Yes indeed. So let's talk about China for this episode. Then obviously he spent a lot of time in China Seven years in Shenzhen sounds like a novel or something East ICU WAYS. About how to do business in. China was potential for farmers and sellers while they super China particularly in the current situations. Let's get started with random questions I mean. First of all Is China reopening for business? Now when do you think that will be yes So eight hundred. Ninety percent of businesses are back to work but at the moment Most of the factories they don't have full capacity for production right now One of the reason is Roma chill suppliers are also having issues with sublime the enough raw material to the factories and another thing is the Roma tre prices like reading. Because they're really high right now for most of the product China and then one of the worst thing actually when this wire is China was doing. Tiny is some people now. China's largest Public Co. Lane China's most important almost eight hundred nine hundred million people traveling in mainland China. And maybe almost a hundred under fifty million people traveling at Bro. So that's where the wires hit so already. Most of the manufacturers were closed so that was what we were. What we were expecting is actually Those factories will come back to work End of January but things have changed like really badly China. They had to stay close until middle of March so during this time. Chinese factories are having serious issues with the cash flows. You know not receiving any orders. Because they're in the public lays but once they started coming back to work now the rest of the world They have the concern about their health. Most of the country's the government shutdown the countries like Italy France Germany all those countries. They're not doing a business right now. Which means China's factories don't get any orders from the rest of the world so so we're looking at the period of almost ninety days Not Having full capacity working so it's it's really massive cries for China's economy And you know this is going to have a big effect for the girls of the country for this year People back to work They everybody's wearing masks in China. My Office is back to work. We worked for bump for sometime in China. But now everybody's back to work It's difficult to find that domestic truck because prices really increased and another problem is You don't we don't have enough availability. Because most of the main ports in China like Seaports in a airport. Actually most of them they. They're closing in eighteen. Ninety nine percent of the Airplanes cancelled So it directly have the impact of freight as well because almost fifty percent of the air freight actually commercial wise were made by the passenger flights in the cargo. So now what we're looking at is the majority of Weiser cancelled so the airports are not working for the function. So everything is really connected. You know when we're talking about on the we talk about on the supply chain because it has also connection on the freight forwarding the custom the shipping times The pricing so everything is really connected to each other so Chinese doing better than a month ago Definitely about right now. They are having problems of receiving orders from overseas. So I think this is going to have a big impact in an economy and the most of the suppliers are going to have some serious problem with the cash flow. Okay so what is so to try and summarize there's a lot of stuff is sort of half working a rule. Materials prices are up and Sounds like a lot of air freight by being constrained as wet sea freight so What's the biggest constraint them would you say is it still labor or do they have most labor back in place now always rule materials or is it logistics or is it just a combination of all of them a combination of all of them right now for the majority of the people come back to work? accepted where on where the wires started who bay province which is one of the largest state in China so they they start actually Now removing the people from printing some people are going back to their daily life. The best stuff so there are almost to the Portland million. People were a crunchy in and been Wuhan. Them include a province which was like almost two months long so those people are also going back to work in the different cities. Like you know. They're going back to their Factories again in Shanghai and Ningbo in Gone Doll and chat always like big CD. So they're going back to our so right now. The the issue is not really a about people who go back to work. Most of the people are back to work. So they're factors are okay to produce. They have enough human source now. Old Employees back to management is back toward but the the issues right now is mostly with the roll roll mattress players. It used to be maybe some of our friends. Our customers are used to produce in twenty to twenty five days now the supply chain Timing increased almost out say like church the fifty percent so now some of the facts are they used to produce thirty days now. It's like almost four to five days and one of the issue made him also. The people wouldn't think of it as the product box. The cartoon mocks so there is a big shortage of the cartoon box in the market. Like you know the shipping supplies And user manuals would like pay per prices increase a lot in China so this is editor problem some of the factories and they finish production but they don't have enough packing material so everything comes together so it. It's a really complex station. Like everything comes together and right now as I get logistics. We are having our shipments shipping on time. We have good relationship with our Contractors we everything in advance but we're asking our customers to not let us their shipment time the same day. The ship is ready. We're asking people to give us some time like heads up like seven to ten days so that we know what discounting because if you let safe you send us the breaking the law stay. It's difficult to find track of the crisis increase because they know that you're Khanna desperate so I think the most important thing for Amazon sellers now to be following up the station. Very closely their freight forwarders. Their factories is very very important to be on top of everything. Every day. I mean China's people are okay with that right now because you know it's difficult time reading for Sellers Abbott also for two suppliers because they don't have enough orders. They don't have good cash flow right now at most importantly they don't know when things go back to normal so they're trying to keep everything but it's very very important for settlers to be on top of everything the production time the pricing at payment terms One of the most important thing is the logistics Right now when FBI? Amazon USA is not allowing people to create shipments. Except the you know. The the baby products are essentials. Like cleaning stuff so most of the people even if they have product ready China they cannot create labels ask the factory put the labels on the carpet so they cannot really do the ship

China Lane China Miami Shenzhen United States Sidon District Scifis USD Barak Yoga Bartram FBI Amazon Sellers Abbott Italy France Germany Khanna Public Co Florida Official
Trillion-Dollar Optimism

MarketFoolery

05:37 min | 3 months ago

Trillion-Dollar Optimism

"Dan Klein Dan. How are we doing? I'm doing well given the circumstances going a little crazy but working a lot and you know by all accounts do it. By how are you? I'm good Dan Strange Times. And let's get right to it because we're taping this around noon on Tuesday noon Eastern and at the time of our taping. I want you to to brace yourself at. The stock market is up and it is up big now. We have a lot of optimism. Tan Congress may be closing in on a two trillion dollar stimulus stimulus that would include direct payments as well as loan assistant programs for business. Now we don't know all the specifics. Dan Do right now. The market really seems to like the potential. The Dow up around seven percent investors feeling optimistic. Are you feeling optimistic? Yeah it's not even so much about the details. It's about kind of putting a floor on this. If we know that Boeing and southwest jetblue and other major industries aren't going to be driven out of business by this that that suggests that normalcy could eventually return. Obviously there's a lot of devil in the details but right now. This is just kind of creating some belief for people that eventually there will be a way out of this that there's a government backstop beat loans be a direct payments. That's going to help. People PAY THEIR BILLS. But also keep these companies open because these are all major major employers. I mean a lot of people will frame. This sort of government giveaway. But what are you supposed to do? The goal is to keep people at work and bat is leading to a ton of optimism. It Dan. Let's talk more about that. You just mentioned some of the Big Airlines and I'm wondering when it comes to the bailout piece of this. To what extent do you think the government will essentially be in the business of having to pick winners and losers having to decide? Who gets what how much. Yeah so. We've seen none of the details of exactly how this is GonNa work. But let's assume these are loans and that they're at least somewhat secured against the asset of the company. So the reality is I don't WANNA see failing companies get loans that keep them in business for another year or two when they would have died. Even if corona virus had not been issue. But I don't see so far a lot of mechanisms to stop that from happening. Obviously there has to be some sort of means. Testing looking at balance sheets looking at what company was doing but most of the names we've talked about. I mean obviously Boeing is headed struggles. But it was a fairly solid business before this. All of the the airlines. We've mentioned jetblue. Southwest those were on firm financial footing. So it's GonNa be the company's on in in some of the more struggling industries. We talked about retailers last week. Some of those were going away anyway. That's probably true of some of the hotel brands that have had their struggles Maybe some overbuilt casinos. So yeah we need to see the rest of this and some of this money might go to things that don't deserve when you work this fast. That almost has to happen. Okay Dan now. You're in Florida and I know from our recent conversation that you love a good cruise so I wanna you want to get your thoughts on how this might shake out for the cruise industry and specifically the big pureplays. Now we have carnival which owns Prentice and Holland America among others. We have Royal Caribbean. We have Norwegian are the cruise company is going to get some relief from the stimulus. And if not can they stay in business so I don't think they are because they're largely dot? Us companies some of their subcontractors. Might maybe some of their workers will be covered in different aspects of this. Obviously a lot of their workers are not American though. Of course their office personnel largely our citizens so but I can only speak to royal and Carnival I. I haven't looked into Norwegians finances but both royal and Carnival do have significant Barak Capability They do have a lot of money on hand. They have capital projects. They could push off in a time where it's GonNa take a while for demand to recover. They probably don't need to build as many new ships so assuming this ends in four to eight weeks or and people can get back out on the Ocean. They will probably make it through. I looked at all the numbers yesterday and it looks encouraging the challenge for them is will people come back. And as I've mentioned to you I have cruises book I fully intend to cruise this summer Unless the situation remains this dire of but this is an industry that's very very vulnerable to public perception and people. It's hard to know if they will think this is safe. Even when the rest of the world has returned to normal and Dan I wanna hit it from the public sector and the potential bail out here to the private sector were really starting to see some interesting partnerships in the private sector. We had an announcement today. That Ford will be partnering with Three M. and GE healthcare to begin producing facemask and ventilators. What do you make of news like that that answer some questions for me because when Ford and other automakers were talking about making ventilators and as someone who used to run a factory I thought wait a minute like how do you of the Tulane? How'd you have it on even like the blueprint for how to bake a ventilator? Is it that easy and clearly? It's not that hard. But they're going to get assistance from three M on how to make it. Some of the supply chain repurpose things like fans they use in certain ventilated seats To work in ventilator so this is industry sort of the best of the best coming together to make something that needs to happen happen and it's very encouraging

Dan Klein Dan Dan Strange Boeing Dan Do Ford Tan Congress Tulane Royal Caribbean United States Holland America Florida Barak Prentice GE Jetblue
Smarter Phones: Journey to the Palm-Sized Computer

Command Line Heroes

04:22 min | 3 months ago

Smarter Phones: Journey to the Palm-Sized Computer

"In the early nineties a Hammy Software. Developer took a stack of wood and carved into small blocks of various sizes. He carefully compared the weight of each walk. And when he found one that felt pocket-sized he takes a printout of a tiny monitor onto it then. He topped the block in his shirt pocket and walked around with it to see how it feel to be attached to a device. He was imagining a not so distant. Future where we'd all be doing the same thing if you think that guy's name was Steve Jobs you're wrong. His name was Jeff Hawkins and he co created the palm pilot when the iphone hit the market in two thousand seven critics and competitors questioned whether smartphone with a decade later. The question is how can a person succeed without one? Smartphones are ubiquitous. They're APPs allow us to do pretty much anything and the hardware running them says a lot about who we are. But as sexual as the IPHONE has been to the RISE OF OUR MOBILE LIVES. It wasn't the catalyst. This is the epic story of how earlier? Hand-held device pave the way for the smartphone. And it's the story of a developed team that stuck with that device for its entire journey. I'm surrounded Barak and this is command line heroes on ritual podcast from red hat. The smartphone concept has been around since star. Trek's try quarter in real life though the concept I translated into cell phones in Nineteen eighty-four bulky things that looked like bricks during the nineties. They got a bit smaller small enough for more to carry on saved by the bell but they were still just used for phone calls. Remember phone calls. Nothing smart was happening on mobile phones. But there was another piece of technology gaining traction. It was called a PD a a personal digital assistant a mobile device that acted as your personal information manager. We'll get to that moment. But at the time the tech industry was way more focused on the personal computer which we learned about an episode. Three when we looked at the al-Tair Eighty eight hundred. Everyone was so caught up in. What a personal computer was. Was this huge big beige box sitting under your desk. They couldn't imagine that you carry this thing around in your pocket Ed Colligan was VP of marketing at a nascent mobile software company called Palm in the early nineties palm was founded by Jeff. Hawkins the guy who walked around with a block of wood in his pocket. It was a big vision. It was that the future of computing personal computing is handheld computing and that there would be more transactions done on handheld computers in the future than on desktop computers. That's dawn to Pinski Palm CEO. At the time I know today when I say that it sounds like whatever that's logical but believe me. It was not logical at the time. We didn't understand why other people didn't understand it. Because you know we're had computing gone. Right it'd gone from. Computers are filled room to mainframe computers too many computers which were kind of misnamed to personal computers desktop computers we saw the inevitable march of. Moore's law and more and more power and smaller smaller packages palm started out developing information management software for PD. Casio was making called the Zimmer. They also made some synchronization. Software for Hewlett Packard's devices but those first GEN PD as weren't taking off and then the whole personal digital assistant dream looked like a lost cause after the high profile failure of apples effort the Newton. They were all too big too heavy and the software was too slow but the palm team wondered whether a new approach could change the

Jeff Hawkins Pinski Palm Palm Steve Jobs Developer Casio Hewlett Packard Zimmer Ed Colligan Barak Trek
Floppies: The Disks that Changed the World

Command Line Heroes

10:56 min | 4 months ago

Floppies: The Disks that Changed the World

"Jordan Montana is a pack rat. He's the creator of games like karate and the Prince of Persia and he meticulously saved everything along the way journals sketches and storyboards all of it so it came as a bit of a shock to him when he couldn't find something he'd saved and that something was a pretty big deal back in two thousand two magner was working on Prince of Persia the sands of time. The programmers wanted to add the classic version of the game to their playstation two update as an Easter Egg. So they asked him for the original source code but when magner looked in his archives he couldn't find it. He searched everywhere the source code that he'd written on his old apple to the cody was positive. He saved had vanished fast forward. Ten years mechanisms. Dad is cleaning house and buried at the back of a closet is a ratty looking shoebox holding a bunch of dusty old three and half inch floppy disks one is labeled Prince of Persia Source Code Copyright Nineteen eighty-nine and in brackets in all caps. The word original the long lost code found at last it had sat in that box for a quarter century before being unearthed like some archaeological discovery. But this was two thousand twelve. How would he be able to get it off? Those old discs and with the data still be intact. Was it in fact too late to save his work saving our work these days? It often happens. Automatically with programs regularly pushing stuff into the cloud. We don't worry about manually savings anymore. In fact a whole new generation doesn't even know what that save icon represents side note. It is not a vending machine but for many decades saving storing and transferring. Our data had to be done using some physical media when the personal computing revolution took off which we heard about in our last episode on the Altar Eight hundred. There was one piece of technology that became synonymous with saving the floppy disk. It seems so simple. Now but floppies change the course of our history because they helped turn microcomputers into personal computers. I'm surrounded Barak and this is command. Line Heroes Unoriginal podcast from that HAP. Let's put a pin in Jordan Lechner's floppy disk discovery for a moment. Welcome back to it first. Though I want to learn how the floppy disk was born in the first place and how it became such a crucial part of the TECH WORLD FOR ALMOST FORTY YEARS. Our first stop eighteen ninety. Before electronic computers existed there were electrical mechanical computing devices and the method forgetting data in and out of them was through punchcards the size of a dollar bill when electrons computers came along in the fifties. Ibm standardized those punch cards with eighty and twelve roads. A punched hole would form one type of character. No whole meant another for a long while. Those Punch cards were the main method for data input but handling hundreds of cards for bigger. More complex programs was hugely cumbersome. There had to be a better way to save and transfer information next up paper tape which came along in the nineteen fifties to hear how paper tape played a central role in the origin of personal computing. Listen to our last episode. Paper tape had the same punched hole method of reading data as punch cards. Because it's all one tape. No one had to worry about getting cards mixed up it could carry more. Data was much faster to us but as many computers grew in capacity they needed more and more tape to store programs like punch cards. Paper tape eventually met its limit. Enter MAGNETIC TAPE. The key ingredient was mylar a tough flexible material coated with magnetic oxide to make the tape recordable nine tracks could store up to one hundred seventy five megabytes per tape. That was a big deal in fifties and sixties magnetic tape drives of ten and a half inch. Wheels became standard issue for businesses. But the problem take is that it's great for moving large chunks date of one place to another. It's really hard to search on them to find anything in particular when we would install software on our mini computers in mainframes using tate. But it really wasn't that good for anything small and portable or if we wanted to do anything interactive on our with our data that Stephen Vaughan Nichols contributing editor at CBS interactive sure. Magnetic tape could store a lot more data. He was too big and swallow. It was only practical for the mainframe world really again. There had to be a better way and that better way came along in Nineteen fifty-six when launched its very first decide drive the IBM three fifty disk storage unit. It was a component of the three or five ramic mainframe computer a machine that filled an entire room. Here's Dave Bennett. A former IBM disk and storage product engineer. There was storage in core memory. In fact the disk storage device of which ramic was the first was a storage device that permitted random access to give on record as opposed to a tape. Drive interesting thing. That disk drive. Almost didn't see the light of day because it threatened. Ibm's punch-card business but the project was eventually approved. Problem was the drive contained. Discs made of solid metal ramic literally. Wait a ton it had to be moved with forklifts and transport it by large cargo. Not the most convenient storage method but out of that came a better solution of a floppy disk was originally developed for new need and the reason was that there was an intermediate kind of storage originally. There was a computer code and then there was the computer memory. The working memory but with system three sixty there was a new class of memory in between which they called firmware and in system three sixty there was unique technology for the firmware in various forms it was either a special kind of punched card or there was a thing called. Transformer read only storage but the new need was the desire to go from these technologies two semi conductor technology in the days when semiconductor technology was volatile. That means that the memory in semiconductors went away when the power was removed so there had to be a way of recharging bringing the program back into that memory when the power was restored for loading what was called a micro program or that intermediate memory and the need for such a device is what caused the development of the floppy disk dryer so in nineteen sixty seven. A small team of engineers led by David. Noble started developing an inexpensive system for loading those micro-programmes into mainframe computers. The code name for their project was Minna. Noble personally went through all the things that he could think of including various forms of punched cards including use of tape cassettes. And I don't know what else he went through but he hit on the idea of using an inexpensive form of this based on a flexible disc very inexpensive read only mechanism. The Minnow team wanted to be able to mail their micro-programme to various locations. That needed to load it. So the product for sending that program around had to be durable enough to fly through the mail without having its data damaged some kind of casing now what they actually had to do. In order to make it maleable was they decided to put it in a plastic container that was fairly rigid and they would actually read and write the disk while. I was inside of this plastic container like an envelope of plastic envelope. And when you have a coating on a disk and a rigid head you're going to have where and when you have where you have where particles and the problem they had was that as the were particles built up it's kind of caused an avalanche effect. The particles would act as additional abrasive. And then pretty soon with the particles being loose in there. You're where the recording track out and didn't work anymore. So a really smart guy that was on that program men name. Her Thomson came up with a plan that was based on a household dusting fabric that three m soul to housewives for dusting their furniture and he put a sheet of that in there between the envelope and the disk and that material picked up the were particles and they embedded themselves in that fabric and prevented the avalanche effect and really saved the

IBM Persia Persia Source Noble Jordan Montana Magner Cody Jordan Lechner Barak Cbs Interactive Thomson Tate Stephen Vaughan Nichols Dave Bennett
Creating Value Creation in Healthcare by Innovating Thoughtfully with Ashim Roy, Co-Founder & CEO, Cardiotrack

Outcomes Rocket

12:11 min | 4 months ago

Creating Value Creation in Healthcare by Innovating Thoughtfully with Ashim Roy, Co-Founder & CEO, Cardiotrack

"Ashim. Welcome thank you. Thank you for the great introduction. I really appreciate absolutely as she now. Did I leave anything out of your introduction that you wanNA share with listeners? Oh sure actually what happened? Is that a sense. Mike Graduation Undergrad studies in India. I had left the country. I did my PhD in Australia. And then I stayed overseas. I've mostly had to Canada. Us and I came back to India about thirty years later. It was a different country. Fortunately I had the opportunity of that time to travel to some of the relates from where I live. I live in Bangalore India at the moment and within hundred kilometers. You see a larger rural territory. And what I realize a to my journeys in these areas is that affordable healthcare education financials visits Viennese significant barrier Afar many of the people living in those communities and I wanted to do something about that and I just wanted to grab back in and as part of my section now that's a really important factor. Ashim and so kind of gets us to the first question that I wanted to ask is. What got you into the medical sector to begin with right. You've highlighted why you're focused on what you're focused on today. The around the globe journey. That's brought you back home. But what got you into healthcare to begin looking at some of the challenges that are faced people living in rural communities in India and I'm sure similar conditions exist in many of the developing economies. What I saw was something interesting. I come from telecom background as you told your listeners and I have seen the effect of Moore's law being obliged into telecom industry and the computer industry where the you know the cost comes down every two years and the performance goes up every two years. I don't see that I didn't see that in the healthcare sector and I felt intrigued by the fact that healthcare solutions would be provided in silos. There there was no opportunity to bring innovation into healthcare industry particularly in a country like India and that was a challenge and I felt that if the light some of the principles of information technology and communication et CETERA. You would be able to bring down. The cost of the air be able to deliver better care to communities in the rural areas because people in Abia the journey taken care of that of infrastructure available expertise available etc. If you take a look at a simple problem not so simple for people living in the religious cardiovascular divisive which is very common in India and yet a cardiologist Available only in the top twenty five cities so. I felt that something had to be done and that brought me into the medical sector. That's awesome Ashim and you know what it's great that you identified. This need like you pointed out even developing countries. We do have that care gap and it's important that we start looking to different ideas and technology to bridge that gap and so I'd love to hear your thoughts Ashim on an example of something that you and your team have done to create results to address this really what it is. It's access right access to healthcare so love to hear your thoughts in any stories you have to share in that room. Some of the things that I T- I feel that healthcare the fundamental right of every citizen every every country healthcare leaders need to shift their attention from primarily from two more into primary. Care if you look at many countries today particularly where loved healthcare solution designed larger importance to primary care. I'll give two examples either the energies in UK our health services in Singapore. They probably among the best and dumps of health care being provided to the citizens of the country and there is a adequate not only liquid is really established network of from regulations etc and services available. And I don't see that in You know countries like India developing countries like India where there's a huge amount of infrastructure available in the urban centers in all from the place that I bear in Bangalore kilometer radius two mile radius. Then six major so I'm really lucky. In case something happens to me. I really love that. I will get good services wherever I go out. Not even fifty miles. Maybe thirty miles outside of the city and that situation changes drastically. Finding a cardiologist is a rare finding a specialist of any kind finding simple diagnostic capabilities which are taken for granted in developing countries like USA of will not be available and we address that yes so about very good question so let me kind of come to the main point that I'm trying to bring here. Is that to provide quality healthcare beneath you technology's innovation in healthcare designed or developing economies like India. V cannot use the technology that are available in. Us are many of the developing countries because they would be too expensive for deployment in a country like India. Just affordability what it would not be possible however deaths lots of things that can be done little things that can be done. A take a simple case of vascular disease. It's a chronic illness. It gets worse and worse over Peter. Time if a simple. Ekg capability exists at the primary care level in these rural communities. What happens is that all of a sudden diagnosed people early enough and early diagnosis always saves life. And it's always less expensive by no means struck at science is very simple solution and yet we don't have those kinds of solutions today and that's exactly what we are trying to bring to the non urban areas communities that are underserved. We want to provide those kinds of solutions. I think that's Great Ashim and and you know we recently had guest His name is Ronny Schiff. Ron He's over in Israel and his his organization. Global health is very much focused on the impact. That you're working to effect and one of the examples that he provided Much like your example is the technologies that exist in developed countries. Really have a ton of bells and whistles that aren't necessary for basic like an Ekg for example and. So what can we do? If we want to address the needs of the broader global population. This is a conversation really kind of at the government level hiring an address it right and so two ashamed point we gotta take a look at small shifts small things that could be done in order to make that type of impact and Ekg for example is one of those things that could be done. Have you guys? Ashim started any programs. Anything that's yielded results spar. Okay so I can. Thanks for pointing out that audience. That looked better. They looked in the western countries and to fit the budget of the blubbing communities and just to illustrate that in another way winning them. All I would like to give is everyone. Most of your listeners will be Miller Microsoft Excel. Did the street. I'm apologies of Microsoft and high tech. I use only maybe two percent of the capabilities. The Bells and whistles. That are there that I don't really use. Yep so that's either actually thing that can be done in health care and what we have done the EKG. There are expensive solution that are available which are suitable for. I see us. That's not the market that we want to go because for us. The diagnosis must happen at the primary level. Yes soup or hormone actually will reach the ICU. So we can provide bitty simple solution handheld solution robust solution that would work in the Are the other environmental condition that exists at the primary care level with. There's no air conditioning. In the impetus can go up to maybe Hainan. Vendetta night. The device has to work the condition but began take advantage off certain things that are actually coming on rice so fast that is amazing. Take for example. The smartphone be don't really need a printed paper to give the outward because it's basically going to do with it instead if that is available through an APP on android fallen which cost less than one hundred dollars. All of a sudden beheaded capability of displaying mation. That information is available. Honestly that can be sent to a cardiologist sitting hundred miles away or maybe the word and all of a sudden we have created the solution based on existing technologies around us and yet the solution as many low cost. Yep So taking. This example is a great way of doing things and so tell us a little bit about time when you tried one of these things and maybe you ran into some obstacles. Ashim. What did you learn from those obstacles the into lots of obstacles and I'm glad that we did because become from myself and my other CO founder. Both our technologies become from non medical background and as a result of that may fence that for not necessarily league correct. So I'll give you three or four examples of those are maybe towards suspending on Hammerstein. But simple one was that during the early testing of the Barak behead given the product to driver and he was driving around the whole day with the device and India's lady heart most of the year and His mom would get ready getting device at all and it could slip out of his hands on down so by the time he finished his trial two weeks later he was video blood ridiculous like sad phase and I spoke with him through a translator because I didn't understand his language and figured out that excelled on multiple times and has maybe ladies Saudi awarded and yet it's a simple feedback that actually change the way the product is now the actually have silicone rubber grip around. It is easy to hold very very comfortable. It doesn't slip out of the hand and more or less moreover if it falls down nothing happens to realize another one. I will tell you is. We made it incorrectly at all. Maybe we were due naive. At those days that taught that if the allow our device and the information from our device to travel from the primary care physician to cardiologists. Our job is pretty much done. The largest come on line provide guidance to the primary care physician. They will talk to each other. Everything's date and Beijing sticking. What he didn't realise is the whole imbalanced. The situation is in country like India. There are about sixty million people with cardiovascular illnesses less than ten thousand cardiologists so guess what every time the Tradition wanted to get in touch with the cardiology. They will be busy somewhere else. And so they won't get any response on the grady. The primary air from the relatives for maybe maybe never in some cases because the cardiologists is really the busiest person under the Senate. So what we had to we had to rethink our solution and desks spend meteorologist that interpretation if they want to deliver a solution that would work under all the circumstances than the solution has to be on the basis of a Machine Lynn. Either machine learning or AI. This interpretation that we can deliver to the primary care physician on time every time the dog area. And that's exactly what we ended up many so these are the market feedbacks that regard as Donald mistakes but in the end is actually overall with a solution.

India Ashim Bangalore India Australia Canada Mike Beijing USA UK Microsoft Bangalore Machine Lynn Ronny Schiff Singapore Moore Israel Senate
Los Angeles: Artist Says His Portraits Of Day Laborers Are Paintings — Not Statements

Morning Edition

04:13 min | 5 months ago

Los Angeles: Artist Says His Portraits Of Day Laborers Are Paintings — Not Statements

"A Los Angeles art show called cowboy stories has no horse or any towels the campus is show Latino men in worn out jeans boots and cowboy hats staring at viewers and here's Susan Stamberg went to meet the artist and a few of his models you think this looks like you say yes I don't nine I got a I got a menu to ease my eyes his many famous Isola clearly that the Honduran model is Francisco Milka the interpreter another model is Gabrielle Barak has from Mexico your cheeks are bigger and softer you look older there then you look in real life well as I guess he is a may we the LA times says the artist Johnson sini from New York quote may be the greatest portrait painter in the country but sensing he says he's not making portraits he's out to capture the presence of the person he's painting I find that the presence of the sitter frees me up in a mysterious sort of way it loosens his brush strokes in confidence dashes of oil paint the men come alive on his canvases years ago since any found inspiration in LA's Koreatown day laborers hoping for work sun sini thought to paint a few of them and felt he had found his subject here's what we look for in a man he approach someone who's got a dynamic physical presence doesn't mean the person's necessarily attractive or not although I think my attitude is I've never painted anyone I didn't think was beautiful they look uneasy though in the pictures is if they're not used to posing for photographs let alone paintings some of the workers were puzzled when sensing the ask them to model for him this professorial looking Italian American with the salt and pepper beard wanting to paint them Gabrielle Berossus who started as a model and became the artist's long time partner says a few of the men didn't quite understand they always feeling that they are going to paint a house nope different kind of painting and the money was good John told them he would pay thirty dollars an hour five hours a day five days a week and they had to commit to five weeks of work beats putting up drywall or holding tranche Barak has was on scene he's only model for five years he loved it very excited and so but I sent into me ease was made the team the little something into it arts in their twenty four years together over I has has introduced sense any to many models some have become friends like Francisco Melgar sensing his painted him some twenty five times he is the one with the ram face in real life slimmer on the campus Melgaard considers posing a job but it does take its toll he was complaining that he feels he Attica pains heal one sciatica in his legs from standing in one position for so long on the other hand he's been immortalized hung on the walls of collectors and museums that doesn't seem so important to Mel car I asked about how his friends react to his modeling they feel very happy by the mall seeing that he's making with money painter John sensing he's not doing badly either at the veil matter gallery in LA his large canvases costs seventy five thousand dollars ten thousand for the smaller ones in the current climate people sometimes see themes of immigration migration in his work man leaving home toiling for money to send back to their families separation for sustenance sun seeming denies it his art he says is not political I definitely am not trying to make statements how do you see it then what are you doing making paintings making paintings in Los Angeles I'm Susan Stamberg

Los Angeles
Sanders and Buttigieg aren't competing for the same voters Tuesday. But they are competing, and fiercely.

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

05:46 min | 5 months ago

Sanders and Buttigieg aren't competing for the same voters Tuesday. But they are competing, and fiercely.

"Good morning from Manchester the final days of this New Hampshire primary are always frenetic candidates criss crossing the state add saturating the airwaves new attacks on the stump and across the internet as we come on the air this morning the latest tracking poll show Bernie Sanders and lead people to judge right behind with moment in out of Iowa Elizabeth Warren Joe Biden Amy called which are stuck in a second tier was survival on the line our debate Friday night was the feisty is this campaign the attacks continued all through Saturday and I sat down with former vice president Biden right after emotional speech where he took on his opponents and the president I lost a lot my much like many of you have correction took away my wife and daughter lost my son beau like many of you don't but I'll be do if I'm going to stand by and lose my country to we began the interview with those first lines from Friday's debate were biting seem resigned to a loss here in New Hampshire now let's be realistic I think it's always coming up to fight when you're running against two people who are neighboring senators you know the deal for anyone here and every senator by twenty points last time so I I think it is an uphill fight but I think it's a fight will do moment but then you're gonna be looking history because you know that you know the history here no one is coming hello second in Iowa New Hampshire has ever won the nomination well no one is ever won the nomination without being able to get rumors force now African American communities and so far no one's been due to that but me look the thing that changes a selection is everybody in the Democratic Party June on one thing you have to be Donald Trump in order to do that everybody knows you've got to bring out the black vote and the brown wrote he got to be able to do it I've been able to do that so far so I don't think it's viewed the same way as it has been in the past even taking the right to to mayor Pete and I basically been organ he's not ready to be president I did it with the back in two thousand seven reset another candidate was when the president was Brock upon your **** you ready he said I think he can be ready but right now I don't believe he is the presidency is not something that lends itself to on the job training I think that I stand by the statement let's get some straight here I did the tech Pete Peterson attacking me he's been saying the reason we're in the problem right now is because of the recent past that's eight years will bomb in may I don't get the I don't understand and I think he is completely misunderstood or misrepresent my record I'm doing a great deal I've gotten off line don't both as a senator as vice president and he talks about him be ready well I managed at nine hundred billion dollar recovery back with no waste or fraud it would build out his city I led the fight the president turned music get to try it out of this mess I know how to handle a city I was able to get to try it back on his feet that's why the merited toward indoors I've been I've been able to get the chemical weapons treaty passed I was responsible in large part for the what happened in Paris with John Kerry and so on so I don't understand how those things don't matter and I don't understand when they talk about the past why Barak was such a lousy president there's a pretty damned good president is locating people to judge a risk because people ages is been nothing more and he's a good guy I like him he's a smart guy but he's been the mayor of the city smaller in the city right now is what has he done what is who is he pulled together does he knowing the foreign leaders has been able to I mean Barak Obama was a different story Barack Obama came from a large stadiums United States Senate run before he'd been involved in international he had a clear vision of what he thought the world should look like and so on so but it is very different situation your campaign put out a pretty tough video on the mayor earlier today they also reference the fact that he had fired an African American police chief in an ad and forced out in African American fire chief are you basically saying that the mayor but a judge has a race problem no no I'm saying he had been able to unify the black community that's what I'm saying the the most senior members of city council African American momentum doors me I never met the rest for the doors and so I think look in order to win George you're gonna have to be able to win states like Pennsylvania you do have to be able to win Florida remember even when a lot of places in fact I'm very diverse populations and so the assertion that he's ready across the board I don't see it I haven't seen that yet he's fired back today the campaign said that the fact he put out the video says a lot more about where you're where you are in this race and his record as mayor hello he's the one's been attacking me George I never said a word about him please talking from the beginning about how I don't have a record to run that by and all the problems from the past it was used to be Barack and me now I found out how probably Brockes so it's not just me as if I were named part of history and so I was responding to I haven't done this I responded to his attacks on me he also talked about the risk of taking it Democrats taken the label democratic socialism international election we surprise last night when only senator club chart join you in that concern no I was surprised but I think it's just a reality I mean look I have put in the late one Bernie Bernie calls himself a democratic socialist how you been around George as much as anybody you could win with that label your help somebody in Florida went with a label democratic socialist is every was going to go all the way down the line that's just gonna happen when North Carolina can win Pennsylvania you gonna win in those states in the Midwest it's not I'm not I didn't put a label Bernie calls himself a democratic socialist

Manchester New Hampshire Bernie Sanders
Irish voters frustrated by economy choose next leader

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:36 min | 5 months ago

Irish voters frustrated by economy choose next leader

"Thank you Ireland holds parliamentary elections day prime minister Leo Varadkar hopes to win more seats for his ruling finna gala party the poll this week shows that his party's in third place the Irish nationalists in feigned surging into the lead we're joined now from Dublin by Jennifer brave political reporter for The Irish Times thanks so much for being with us thanks so much for having me on lot of people the thought it would be a victory lap for their prime minister Barak care the economy is doing well in negotiated a brexit deal with the U. K. that avoided a hard border why would he be trailing in the polls so I think what we saw that at the start of the campaign I think most commentators knew that something was a force here so you know for decades in art and we have had this source of do Walkley basically fearful or fifty gal when the voters did not want to power they thought the other one and and I think what happened after the recession things started changing in our political landscape for years the last system in Ireland left parties have been quite fragmented while the economy is strong we have a number of social crisis so we have housing crisis we have health care crisis and we have a crisis with the cost of living in terms of housing look we we now know that rents Norrland are an all time high we know that they're around just under around ten thousand people homeless elderly people L. people are left can't get access to beds in hospitals and left wishing on trolleys for most families the cost childcare is basically a second mortgage I think people they find it a call and I think to hear this talk of the fantastic economy and you know how we turned it around but then see homeless people on the streets see addict their children moving back home because they can't afford to Roger to get on the property market and I think now there is an appetite for change and I think shin Fane are coming in on that wave Jennifer shin Fane is still associated in many American mind's eye I think with into its ties to the Irish Republican Army how should become a contender in in recent years after Gerry Adams well to be honest with you I think that after Gerry Adams stepped down as leader I married a McDonald's took over that's when a shift started in the party and I think she presents a different face to vouchers so when Gerry Adams used to go on and do and the TV debates that we have he would of course rightly always be asked about those links to the Iraqi which you always tonight and to kind of historical legacy issues in the past not to some of its not historical some of us quite present I I think when merry looked all took over she has made the campaign that those things that I've talked about housing and held on to that third they've got new faces as well they have spokespeople who are very effective and have been viewed as big standard performers in those debates I talk about and it just the shift is there what should then be able to form a government if it wins the most seats no the trend is undeniable torching thing even if they continue on they basically in our parliament our goal which we should explain that the dollars the Irish parliament yeah indeed in the art department now at to get a majority in the next all at UT eighty seats you need that majority of AC seats should it have only one forty two candidates so even if they returned every single one of those candidates which is not going to happen they cannot form a government that's where the focus will move next week focus today's people out costing cussing they're both party turned out is quite high it's our first Saturday election in century on stand by one day the focus will turn completely to how do you form a government on these

Ireland Leo Varadkar Prime Minister
"barak" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:39 min | 7 months ago

"barak" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"The past so well what what if you haven't done that number please five aw hello Barak to have you in the club with the engine may now you know I was so proud when I got my and now I'm not so sure sure here and there's one reaches out and they cannot but we'll be here for what you did you get the Nobel Peace Prize that the thing is you know when you say well what if you don't know what you did get back with I just got a note from somebody who recently received one of the Christmas ornaments cement rush this thing is heavy okay your tree can support if you have a decent three we wanted something substantive they also said that picture doesn't do it justice I understand that it's a pictures of me for example do not do me justice but you have to live with and the ornament is classy and it is always a collector's item because there's a new one every year anyway backing down will be back in twenty one hours fox wrapped and ready to go with whatever happens between now and then thanks for being with us.

Barak fox
Automated Machine Learning with Erez Barak

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

08:22 min | 7 months ago

Automated Machine Learning with Erez Barak

"All right everyone I am here in Orlando at Microsoft ignite. And I've got the pleasure of sitting with Ariza Barack Ariza's group manager for as you're as welcome to the uh-huh podcast. Thank you thank you great to be here. Great to be with you. Sound super excited about this conversation. We will be diving into a topic that is generating raining a lot of excitement in the industry. And that is Auto Amal and the automation of the data science process But before we dig into to that. I'd love to hear how you got started working in Melanie. I it's a great question because I've been working with data for quite a while and I think roughly about five to ten years ago. It became apparent that the next chapter for anyone working with data has to we've itself so the AI world and the world of opportunity with AI is really really only limited by the amount of data. You have the the uniqueness of the day you have and access you have data And once you're able to connect those two worlds and a lot of things like predictions new insights new directions sort of come out of the woodwork. So seeing that opportunity imagining that potential has naturally led me to work with the. I was lucky. Enough to join the AZURE. Ai Group and does really three focus areas within that group. One of them is machine learning. How do we enable data scientists of those skills to operate through the machine learning life cycle starting from the data to the training registering the mouse to put them in productions in managing them a process? We call Emma Lops so just looking at that end to end and understanding understanding how we enable others to really go through that process in a responsible trusted in known way. There's been a super exciting journey so far and so did you. Do you come at this primarily from a data science perspective or research perspective engineering perspective. I I think one of the above or all of the above. You know I'm actually going to go with all of the above. I think it'd be remiss to think that if you're gonna hit it from a data science perspective live and you're trying to build a product. Yeah really looking to build the right set of products for people to use as they go through their journey. You'd you'd probably miss out on an aspect of it if you think about. The engineering perspective will probably end up with great. Infrared doesn't align with any of the data science. So you really you gotta think between the two worlds and how one empowers the other. You really gotta figure out where most data scientists ovo skills need to help. WanNa help are looking for tools and products and services on Azure to help them out. And I think that's the part I find and most compelling sort of figuring that out and then really going deep where you land right because if we end up a billing sticky. We're going to spend a whole lot of time with our the data signs customers data science internal teams and figure out. Well how should I look like but if you're building something like ultra mel that that's targeted not only at the deeper data scientists but also the deeper rooted data professionals. You WanNA spend some time with them and understand not only what they need but Kahad that applies to the world of data science. And what were you working on before Azzura. So before as R- a Microsoft I worked for a team in culture data retreated created the set of data platforms for our internal teams and prior to joining Microsoft. I worked in the marketing automation. Space Company called op Fai and again the unique assets. We were able to bring to the table as part of op. Find the world of marketing automation were always data-based. We're always sort of looking at the data assets marketers had instead. What else can we get out of it? Machine learning wasn't as prevalent at the time. But you could track back to a lot of what we did at that time. And how machine learning would have helped if it was used on such a general basis. Yeah one of the first Machine learning being use cases that I worked with were With folks that were doing trying to do like lead scoring and likelihood likelihood to buy propensity to buy types of use cases. I mean that's been going on for a really long time. So we're on a podcast so you can see me smiling but we did a lot out of a worker on building glow lead scoring okay and you ristic's and manual realistic sense of general us. Ticks and you're is that the customer could customize and today today you've seen that to really evolved to a place where there's a lot of machine learning behind I mean it's perfect for machine learning right you've got all data it's fresh it's coming. You know does insights sites. That are really hard to find out once you start slicing and dicing it by regions or by size of customers. It gets even more interesting. So the whole the makings for you're adding machine learning really make. You are getting pretty excited about various Nice Nice. You want to dive into talking about auto. I Mel this is probably for the level of excitement that and demand for Ah Auto Amal and enthusiasm That folks have for the topic not to mention the amount of confusion that there is for the topic. I probably not covered it nearly enough on the podcast. You know certainly when I think of when I think of Auto Amal there's a long kind of academic history behind the technical approaches that That drive it it. But it was really popularized For many You know with Google's cloud autumn L. Twenty eighteen and like before that they had this New York Times. Sometimes you know they had this PR win. That was like a New York Times article talking about how you know I was GonNa create itself and I think that contributed a lot to for lack of a better term in the space but then we see it. You know all over the place. There are other approaches. More focused on kind of citizen data data science. I love to just start with how you define Auto Amal and you know is is is your take on it as a space and you know it's role and importance that kind of thing I think I can. I really relate to many of the things things you touched on. So maybe I'll start and this is true for many things. We do Adra but definitely for Auto Mail on your point around academic roots Microsoft Microsoft. Has this division gold. Sr Microsoft Research. And it's really a set of researchers who look into leading edge topics and drive the world of research in different areas and that is when we first got in our team introduced to Oto Mel. So so they've been doing. Research of a subset of that team has been doing research around the ultimate meal area for quite a few years. They've been looking looking at it. There have been thinking. Well you know it started yes. I've heard centers AI. Making A. I don't know when he started getting into it. Like what does it me. And then it means to be honest. It means a lot of things to many people. It's quite normal. Used will be quite frank. There is no one standard industry the standard definition. That says. Here's what I can tell you what it is for us to continue what it is for our customers. I can tell you where we're seeing. It make a ton of impact and it comes to using machine learning capabilities in order to help you being the data scientists create machine capabilities in a more efficient in a more accurate in a more structured fashion.

Auto Amal Microsoft AI Barack Ariza New York Times Microsoft Research Ai Group Melanie Orlando Group Manager Oto Mel Emma Lops MEL Space Company Google Azzura Ten Years
"barak" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

02:11 min | 7 months ago

"barak" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"Welcome to the PODCAST. I'm your host Sam Charrington. Hey what's up. Everyone Visit Sam a quick reminder that we've got a.

Talking to Machines: LISP and the Origins of A.I.

Command Line Heroes

09:12 min | 10 months ago

Talking to Machines: LISP and the Origins of A.I.

"Garry Kasparov lost a match to the computer program program deep blue. It was a pivotal moment in machine intelligence for some it was an existential crisis a challenge to the supremacy of human intellect but for the technologists of the world this was a milestone of another kind a leap forward in the arena of artificial intelligence a sign that their dream of truly intelligent machine might not be so crazy after all a machine that can think remains the Dream News and quite a few startling breakthroughs away. How do we get to that point though what breakthroughs led up to Casper Roth's famous defeat and where did we go from there throwing it Barak and this this is command line heroes unoriginal podcast from red hat all season long. We're exploring the mysteries of programming languages uncovering uncovering their history and their potential this episode we zoom in on artificial intelligence. What language do you use news. When you're tech has a mind of its own how are programming languages help us get to that deep blue moment and way beyond the question of what language can work best with a thinking machine is something we've been tackling for more than half a century and so our story begins way back back in the nineteen forties when the term. Ai Hadn't even been coined. We think back act the end of World War Two. There's this sense that technology was how allies won the war there was this optimism that technology could accomplish anything a whole generation believed in the power of computing and out of that generation comes the godfather of artificial intelligence John McCarthy. He's brilliant mathematician who radically shook up the way we talk to our machines. I wanted to know about the origins of his his ideas and how that paradigm shift came about. I mean for starters when McCarthy and his peers were imagining the future of intelligent machines uh-huh. What exactly did they imagine wow. That's a good question. I got talking with Colin Garvey. He's a historian in the Science Games and Technology Studies Department at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute here. Some of our chat so McCarthy is remarkably keble kind of reticent about proposing exactly what it's going to look like for example. He has probably his most famous program that was actually never implemented but it's kind of thought piece was the advice taker and so the advice taker was written written up in one thousand nine hundred sixty. McCarthy in a paper called programs with common sense and it starts off you think the advice taker is probably a robot that will learn and that's his intention right. It's kind of a domestic robot. It could take advice you say no. You're doing doing that wrong. You know do it this way and it'll understand what you mean helpful. It'd be helpful. The whole goal of the advice taker is to drive from his desk to the airport port basically formalized his notion of what the advice taker robot should do which is apparently drive him to the airport He formalized it in to a series of logical statements that it would need to infer about what needs to to happen in the current situation to turn the current situation into the desired situation right so he formalizes is this kind of a pseudo code we'd call it now and so this is actually where lisp originates as well and and then in the next few years lisp comes out as his implementation her his language for implementing it. McCarthy's he's Lisp language was a game changer. It would help a machine understand not only commands but a common sense logic. What McCarthy discovered was that he could write conditional expressions code that embodied rules rather than just blunt commands in fact there were a bunch of major programming breakthroughs with Lisp conditionals garbage collection recur. Shen and lots more lisp used lists for both code and data a simple change with profound effects. All this opened the gateway for an entire field that McCarthy himself dubbed artificial intelligence chills. It was a language paradigm shift imagine speaking to a machine without giving it every particular of information imagine inviting that machine to infer and reason through his list language McCarthy hope to give a kind of intelligence to the machine okay back to to my chat with Collin Garvey refined earlier attempts at writing a high level computer language interesting because that was going to be my next question was about the relationship relationship between Lisp and is so it's almost like that. I idea of what I could do that. Advice machine was the beginning winning. It sounds like off. Tell me more about that relationship between Lisbon. Ai Sure so one of the things that these early AI folks were up against against was that they're doing programming with punch cards and probably these early guys knew how to program at the level full of machine code and that's very time consuming and difficult and so you needed higher level languages that you could instruct in ways that were closer informed to human language so something like Lisp gives instructions in literally a list of and that's where the name comes from list based processing in a list of instructions that are much closer to I mean the human language in the sense that they are basically logical propositions so if you could read formal logic you can basically look ed a lisp program or any of the logic based programming languages and have a much better sense of what's happening in the code so this really helped yeah. I mean it helped us take our ideas of artificial intelligence and actually were toward them. Make them happen which makes me wonder what intelligence even means during that time periods of we go back to the fifties at that point what was intelligence how did that. How did people even define that back then because Lewis was first developed for the IBM seven four which does really just one thing at a time so it doesn't really sound very intelligent yeah. How do people think about intelligence at that time so this is of course incredibly controversial right they have very narrow concepts as far as I'm concerned from a social perspective but yeah at the time for instance the ability to perform form of behavior that would be described as intelligent is kind of the catch all definition but these guys are really mathematicians mathematicians and logisticians and computer programmers. I mean to be crass. The ability to play chess was considered indefinite sign of intelligence and of this early this early generation of people was much more willing to sidestep. This is question and say well. The philosophers have not agreed on what intelligence is but if we make a computer that complete chess. I think we can all agree. That's intelligent college. It was starting blaze anyway. Baby Steps McCarthy had a dream that machines could be intelligence people on have common common sense and essentially you could talk to them and he set about creating a program language to make that that dream a reality that became lisp and it captured certain aspects of human thought and especially logical Michael Thought and made it possible to use computers to amplify or extend those features cheers of thought so from a mathematician perspective. He was well on his way to realizing intelligent machinery

John Mccarthy Garry Kasparov Dream News Casper Roth AI Colin Garvey Lisbon Barak Michael Thought Rensselaer Polytechnic Institu IBM Collin Garvey Shen Technology Studies Department Lewis
Israelis vote in repeat election centered on PM Netanyahu

Ben Shapiro

08:23 min | 10 months ago

Israelis vote in repeat election centered on PM Netanyahu

"Get but let's talk for a second that Israel's election self coming up in the next forty eight hours is Israel's second election within like six months or eight months. according to Reuters Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu stepped up a bit for far right votes two days before a closely contested election convening his cabinet in the occupied west bank and having it approved legal status for an unauthorized outpost okay first of all there's nothing under international law that says that Israel is barred from building in the so called west bank intraday and Samaria those are at best a disputed territories Netanyahu's caretaker government met on Sunday in the Jordan Valley a largely agricultural area which announced on Tuesday he tends to annex if he wins a fifth term Israeli cabinet verily held sessions in the west bank now in reality so is that a bit of an election gambit of course it is but is it illegal now I not only is it not illegal his opponents in the same exact rates are celebrating the fact that Netanyahu is talking about doing something with regard to the Jordan Valley the Jordan Valley easy strategically important area for Israel and always has been and this bizarre notion that Netanyahu is annexing the territory as opposed to applying Israeli sovereignty annexation and applying Israeli sovereignty are not the same thing. is gonna Mitchell bard who writes about the sort of stuff just Netanyahu statement was widely misreported as calling for annexation of the territory but he chose words carefully. he said applying sovereignty which Ariel David ten of the federalist nodes has a different meaning a nation cannot annex land over which already has sovereign claims meaning that it's not that this land is owned by the Palestinians and never was owned by the Palestinians this land is owned by the Jordanians was lost in a war and then Israel to get over. as with other issues related to the status of the disputed territories is as much a part the wisdom of such a move may be debated however it is important to know some of the facts about the Jordan Valley that there were settlements in the Jordan Valley dating all the way back to nineteen sixty seven then any prospective peace deal those areas would end up in Jewish territory it's talk a being who is the sponsor of the Oslo Accords also wanted those areas to be under Israeli control because the Jordan Valley has to be under Israeli control or the Jordan River could be cut off from Israel's population. it is also true as I say that the blue and white party Netanyahu's chief opponent in this election actually support him. according to the according to an interview in The New York Times the blue and white party supports his basic idea here early in the Jerusalem post they say the blue white party said was pleased to see he was adopting and would like to plan for recognizing the Jordan Valley so the international media trying to turn the Israeli election into a referendum on Netanyahu Netanyahu is the obstacle to peace of only we got rid of Netanyahu everything would be all better and they've had it out for Netanyahu since Brock about the headed out for Netanyahu and Barak Obama headed out for anything because you want to see a widely reshape Middle East in which Israel's influence was diminished in which runs influence was maximized. no one was not he was not lying about this is pretty obvious he kept talking about Ron being a well respected regional power and how he saw the Israel Palestinian issue as one of the key wheels to turn in order to achieve some sort of balance of power in the Middle East now as we've seen that alternate out the dental turned out to be a bunch of nonsense the fact is that Israel and Palestinians have nothing to do with the broader Middle East Israel has made no concessions to the Palestinian authority over the last several years nor should day and yet war has not really broken out there specifically because the Saudis are not interested in backing the Palestinians neither are the Jordanians neither are the Egyptians the only people who are interested in pushing Palestinian terrorist aspirations are exactly the sorts of groups the back terrace in the first place for talking of the Turkish government we talk about the Iranian government. in any case. writer suggest at this new meeting the government announced it had approved Netanyahu's proposal to turn the outpost above all get a call into a formal settlements twenty years after he was stabilised as a farming community in the Jordan Valley without state sanction. then require state sanctioned by the way in public remarks of the session Netanyahu said it would be up to the government formed after Tuesday's election to grant final approval. now according to the according to Reuters this is all about how brutal Netanyahu is appealing to far right voters in the cruise on supporters to turn out in large numbers meeting Yahoo has been portraying himself as being in lockstep with ultra nationalist of retaining west bank land through annexation. well no that was always we could plan from the good platform was that Israel would retain an enormous amount of the Jewish settlement activity in any peace deal but what it is also the perspective a blue and white. it's amazing to watch as the media got an attempt to turn it in Yahoo into the villain here as opposed to the reality the peace deal died a long time ago it died because the Palestinians refused no less than four or five times any effort at peace. refuse the original Oslo Accords and they refused a deal tried to cut by Bill Clinton in two thousand between Ehud Barak and Yasser Arafat Arafat walked away from the table and started intifada there's an attempt at peace deal by Arial Sharon that was bought out by the Palestinians who own their tried one that was blocked out by the Palestinians. Netanyahu himself in his first go round in the nineties signed over eighty percent of your day and Samaria. in the in the wye river accords but always the problem for the media is that Israel is two intransigent not that its opponents are terrorists. which is the real problem here. opinion polls right now so that we could and its main challenger the centrist blue and white party are running neck and neck. there is no real division on on these issues now blue and white may approach this more slowly and maybe this is an election gambit again the this bizarre idea that your going to be able to cut a different foreign policy of blue and white is not for now the election polls are showing this thing very very close the latest election polls the way that it works in Israel is there are a variety of parties they get elected to Knesset you have to have at least four seats to sit in the Knesset which is a hundred twenty seats I need to form a majority by putting together a coalition now last time Netanyahu did have enough for a majority the problem was a big door Lieberman who leads one of the parties the S. Robitaille party. refused to join the coalition without burning some concessions from it you know how to knit in Yahoo simply call the new election it looks like the results are gonna be pretty similar right now blue and white are neck and neck with we could but the other parties that would side with Netanyahu in the elections are winning more seats so you mean which is the the sort of right wing alternative to Likud is supposed to win anywhere between seven and ten seats in the in the various polls labor has turned into a non party which is unbelievable I labor used to be the the other major party in Israel all the way up until about nineteen eighty with the election not Megan labor had every prime minister of Israel and now they are winning forty six seats in the selection which is truly incredible. so we will see how this ends up. if you had to lay odds right now you would suggest an attorney who probably retains the prime ministership and that again is not because the people of Israel have fallen for Tierney or anything like that that's because everyone in Israel agrees on security and they know at this point that regardless of whether they nominate Netanyahu to lead the government or whether they nominate any guns to lead the government that security is only going to be assured by taking a strong stance against terrorism and by refusing to make deals with the Palestinian authority nonetheless there is this bizarre notion in the media that whenever there's an impasse in the Middle East the only liberal democracy in the area is involved in a long piece in The Washington Post today by Robert Kagan it's a truly egregious these. Israel and the decline of the liberal order. did it really it's it's quite disgusting piece. and the idea is that BB Netanyahu siding with the nationalists as opposed to liberal internationalist and it really it would be in Israel's best interest if they would just side with a liberal internationalist like France and Germany there's only one problem those are precisely the states that had some of the worst anti semitism problems in Europe Jews are fleeing their on mass those are also the governments that are. trying to make concessions to the Iranians as the Iranians open the call for the extermination of every Jew in the region is unbelievable but this have media going to cover this thing anything yeah who's the bad guy by the way as I say there a lot of people I know on the right who don't want to Yahoo to be prime minister anymore they want any guns suggested that the media will recognize that this is not anything Yahoo problem this is the rest of the world just like in Israel and that's the

Israel Netanyahu Yahoo Prime Minister Europe Germany France Forty Eight Hours Eighty Percent Eight Months Twenty Years Six Months Two Days
 Israelis vote in repeat election centered on PM Netanyahu

The Savage Nation

07:58 min | 10 months ago

Israelis vote in repeat election centered on PM Netanyahu

"To get but let's talk for a second Israel's election self coming up in next forty eight hours is Israel's second election within like six months or eight months according to Reuters Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu stepped up a bit for far right votes two days before a closely contested election convening his cabinet in the occupied west bank and having it approved legal status for an unauthorized outpost okay first of all there's nothing under international law that says that Israel is barred from building in the so called west bank injured and Samaria those are at best a disputed territories into his caretaker government met on Sunday in the Jordan Valley a largely agricultural area which announced on Tuesday he tends to annex if he wins a fifth term Israeli cabinet and barely held sessions in the west bank now in reality so is that election gambit of course it is but is it illegal now I not only is it not illegal his opponents in the same exact race are celebrating the fact that Netanyahu is talking about doing something with regard to the Jordan Valley the Jordan Valley strategically important area for Israel and always has been and this bizarre notion that Netanyahu is annexing the territory as opposed to applying Israeli sovereignty annexation and applying Israeli sovereignty are not the same thing. is gonna Mitchell bard right about the sort of stuff just need to know the statement was widely misreported as calling for annexation of the territory but he chose words carefully. he said applying sovereignty which Ariel Davidson of the federalist nodes has a different meaning a nation cannot an excellent over which already has sovereign claims meeting that is not that this land is owned by the Palestinians and never was owned by the Palestinians this land is owned by the Jordanians was lost in a war and then Israel to get over. as with other issues related to the status of the disputed territories is as much a part the wisdom of such a move may be debated however it is important to know some of the facts about the Jordan Valley that there were settlements in the Jordan Valley dating all the way back to nineteen sixty seven then any prospective peace deal those areas would end up in Jewish territory you talk about being who is the sponsor of the Oslo Accords also wanted those areas to be under Israeli control because the Jordan Valley has to be under Israeli control or the Jordan River could be cut off from Israel's population. it is also true they say that the blue and white party missing out his chief opponents in this election actually support him. according to the according to an interview in The New York Times the blue and white party supports his basic idea here early in the Jerusalem post they say the blue white party said was pleased to see he was adopting and would like to plan for recognizing the Jordan Valley so the international media trying to turn the Israeli election into a referendum on Netanyahu Netanyahu is the obstacle to peace of only got rid of Netanyahu everything would be all better and they headed out for Netanyahu's and broke a bone headed out for Netanyahu and Barak Obama headed out from Seattle because you want to see a widely reshipment least in which Israel's influence was diminished Mysterons influence was maximized. no one was not he's not lying about this is pretty obvious he kept talking about Ron being a well respected regional power and how he saw the Israel Palestinian issue as one of the key wheels to turn in order to achieve some sort of balance of power in the Middle East now as we've seen that alternate out then that all turned out to be a bunch of nonsense the fact is that Israel and Palestinians have nothing to do with the broader Middle East Israel has made no concessions to the Palestinian authority over the last several years now should day and yet war has not really broken out there specifically because the Saudis are not interested in backing the Palestinians neither are the Jordanians neither are the Egyptians the only people who are interested in pushing a Palestinian terrorist aspirations are exactly the sorts of groups the back terrace in first place for talking of the Turkish government we talk about the Iranian government. in any case writer suggest at this new meeting the government announced it had approved missing out his proposal to turn the outpost above all get a call into a formal settlement twenty years after he was stabilised as a farming community in the Jordan Valley without state sanction. it requires a tension meddling in public remarks of the session Netanyahu said it would be up to the government formed after Tuesday's election to grant final approval. now according to the according to Reuters this is all about how brutal Netanyahu is appealing to far right voters in the cruise supporters deterrent large numbers Netanyahu has been portraying himself as being in lockstep with ultra nationalists of retaining west bank land through annexation. well no that was always we could plan from the could platform was that Israel would retain an enormous amount of the Jewish settlement activity in any peace deal well it is also the perspective a blue and white. it's amazing to watch as the media get an attempt to turn it in Yahoo into the villain here as opposed to the reality the peace deal died a long time ago it died because the Palestinians refused no less than four or five times any effort at peace their views the original Oslo Accords any refused a deal tried to cut by Bill Clinton in two thousand between Ehud Barak and Yasser Arafat Arafat walked away from the table and started intifada there's a ten two piece of our Sharon that was bought out by the Palestinians and would only tried one that was blocked out by Palestinians. Yahoo himself in his first go round in the nineties signed over eighty percent of your day and Samaria in the in the wye river accords but always the problem for the media is that Israelis to intransigent not that its opponents are terrorists. which is the real problem here. opinion polls right now so that we could and its main challenger the centrist blue and white party are running neck and neck. there is no real division on on these issues now blue and white may approach this more slowly and maybe this is an election gambit again the this bizarre idea that your going to be able to cut a different foreign policy of blue and white is not for now the election polls are showing this thing very very close the latest election because the way that works in Israel is there are a variety of parties they get elected to Knesset you have to have at least four seats to sit in the Knesset which is a hundred twenty seats I need to form a majority by putting together a coalition now last time Netanyahu did have enough for a majority the problem was a big door Lieberman who leads one of the parties the Israeli Tina party. refused to join the coalition without earning some concessions from it you know who sent it to ya who simply called an election it looks like the results are gonna be pretty similar right now blue and white are neck and neck with we could but the other parties that would side with Netanyahu in the elections are winning more seats so you mean which is the the sort of right wing alternative to Likud is supposed to win anywhere between seven and ten seats in the in the various polls labor has turned into a non party which is unbelievable a labor used to be the the other major party in Israel all the way up until about nineteen eighty with the election Megan labor had every prime minister of Israel and now they are winning forty six seats in the selection which is truly incredible. so we'll see how this ends up. if you had to lay odds right now you would suggest an anti who probably retains the prime ministership and that again is not because of the people of Israel have fallen for Tierney or anything like that that's because everyone in Israel agrees on security and a no at this point that regardless of whether they nominate Matignon who to leave the government or whether they nominate any guns to lead the government that security is only going to be a shirt by taking a strong stand against terrorism and by refusing to make deals with the Palestinian authority nonetheless there is this bizarre notion in the media that whenever there's an impasse in the Middle East the only liberal democracy in the area is involved in a long piece in The Washington Post about Robert Kagan it's a truly egregious please. Israel and the decline of the liberal order into it really quite disgusting piece and the idea is that BB Netanyahu siding with the nationalists as opposed to liberal internationalists and it really it would be in Israel's best interest if they would just side with a liberal internationalist like France and Germany there's only one problem those are precisely the states that had some of the worst anti semitism problems in Europe Jews are fleeing their on mass there's also the governments that are. trying to make concessions to the Iranians as the Iranians open the call for the extermination of every Jew in the region is unbelievable but this tell me you're going to cover this thing anything yeah who's the bad guy by the way as I say there a lot of people I know on the right who don't want to Yahoo to be prime minister anymore they want any guns suggested that the media will recognize that this is not anything Yahoo problem this is the rest of the world just like in Israel and that's the

Israel Yahoo Netanyahu Prime Minister Europe Germany France Forty Eight Hours Eighty Percent Eight Months Twenty Years Six Months Two Days
"barak" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"barak" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"But Barak you told us when you were nominated for the democratic ticket in two thousand eight that this would be the beginning of the the Klein in the sea level and what did he make this what do we make this dire observation grace but two thousand fifteen but happy yes I believe you are right I yes two thousand fifteen the other thing is now that we look back at the time that seems like such an outrageous promised to make people but now when you look at the promises the Democrats are making that really doesn't seem like a lot the sea level I mean they're promising to cure cancer to stop the world from ending Medicare for all Medicare for all they had a lot bigger goals down about rebel bomber said he didn't have a magic wand all these candidates now every candidate that's gonna be on that stage of that debate is good it's got a magic wand I I mean it may be a character Tinker Bell maybe an invisible winds but they're all claiming they have the invisible wide so some people are going to give at the you wave the wand to give reparations for black people other people are going to while wave the wand to open the borders or Medicare for all others are going to ban cow flatulence air travel actually I total combustion vehicles at what point Bernie said that people shouldn't be dying in America when they're sick so I think we're gonna live forever until the world ends now it now that's a that's when you need a big magic wand for eternal life the Turkish tuck everlasting how what how how many year was a court has Hernandez the soda so who's who searched for the fountain of youth they they searched for decades in Florida for the spawn of you nobody ever found they found Zephyr hills springs and they bottled water out of it but they never found the fountain of youth but now the Democrat candidates of found that at least Bernie has eight four four five hundred forty two forty two I'm how a car swallow.

Barak Klein Democrats Medicare Tinker Bell Bernie America Hernandez Florida Zephyr hills springs
Iran says U.S. drone was shot down over Iranian territory

Dave Ramsey

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Iran says U.S. drone was shot down over Iranian territory

"The paramilitary guard which answers only to the supreme leader. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said that it shot down the drone at four AM Thursday, when it entered around in airspace near the Kuma. Barak district in southern Iran's Hormuz gin province. This is about seven hundred fifty miles southeast of Tehran. The drone took off from the southern Persian Gulf, and collect data from Iranian territory, including the southern port of Chabahar near Iran's border with Pakistan. The us military has not commented on the mission because why

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Iran Hormuz Gin Persian Gulf Pakistan Tehran Barak Chabahar
How and Why Do Dogs Bark?

Your Brain on Facts

06:47 min | 1 year ago

How and Why Do Dogs Bark?

"Episode is all about how and why dogs bark. In the throats of dogs and humans and many other animals is a structure called the larynx and stretched across the inside of the larynx are two very thin bands of muscle called vocal cords. When we breathe in the vocal cords, open to let air pass through the larynx into the trachea and down to the lungs. The local flown 's are open when we breathing closed one, we want to speak when we breathe out and want to talk to vocal chords, close air from the lungs trying to go through the close vocal cords causes them to vibrate. Which makes sound dogs have fairly plastic vocal cords or a modifiable vocal tract as scientists call it. This means that dogs can alter their voices to produce a wide variety of different sounds that could have different. Meanings. That's how they produce. Big angry barks little curious. Barks growls whimpers and everything in between. Some of the changes are subtle humans can't hear it, but other dogs can when scientists took special images called spectra grams of dogs barking, they notice, not all barks are the same, even from the same dog spectra graphic images show differences, in timing pitch and amplitude all of which change with what the dog seems to be saying dogs bark for lots of different reasons so they can have different barks. That's not just something we're guessing at either in one experiment. Researchers recorded a dog growling over their food and a dog growling at a stranger. The researchers played these different. Sales to a dog who was approaching a juicy ban. Those dogs were more hesitant to approach the bone. If they heard the food growl, rather than if they heard the stranger growl in another experiment. Researchers recorded stranger barks and the barks of dogs when they were alone when researchers played three alone barks, two different dogs, the dogs acted board. But when they played the stranger bark, the dog's jumped to attention, people can tell dog barks apart to researchers played different dog barks to a group of people, and whether they owned a dog or not most people could tell the alone bark from the stranger bark dogs evolved from wolves but wolves don't usually bark barking is only three percent of the way they communicate. So it's possible that early dog learn to bark. When they began touring now with ancient humans cats are the same way they don't yell at each other, only at humans. Some people think they were trying to sound like babies to get sympathy from the woman who were in charge of the food. The conventional wisdom used to be that cats domesticated themselves. But people intentionally domesticated dogs when people stopped being nomadic hunters and started farming. They had stores of food, the food attracted rodents, the Wildcats in the area, noticed this and started living closer to the humans, eventually someone got close enough to one of these wild things from the wildwoods to try to pet it. And the rest is history. We know from studying their DNA that wolves were domesticated separately in Europe. And in Asia, people used think that humans. Trying wolves to hunt with a Semper tuchus this at night. But now we're starting to realize that, that doesn't make autism. The process of dog domestication was probably the same as with cats, it would have started with the wolves approaching hunter gatherer camps in search of food, the more chill, the wolf was the more likely they were to be able to reach or even be given food early domesticated dogs didn't belong to any one family, but roamed freely through the community in Russia, people are estimating FOX's in these FOX's balk one day. See people, but Fawzi's in the wild don't now it's time for the fact fire. The animal with the most complex. Verbal language is the prairie dog. The Guinness world record for the parrot with the largest vocabulary was eight hundred words that's more than the average human three year old and parrots are showing signs of intentionally using the words, they know not just mindlessly repeating them, some kind of fish. You look trinity not only to stun prey, but for a communication, the plot pastas to there are different words around the world to imitate a dog barking in China. They say one, one in Finland they say, how, and in Nigeria, they say, why, why a two thousand twelve study found that dogs who follow human communication about as well as six month old babies, you might know that bees communicate through dance to describe where the good flowers are. But they also. Communicate through smell when a B is killed. It gives off a smell that tells the bees around it that they need to defend themselves. A frog called the hole in the head frog. Makes it sound that's too high in frequency for us to hear we can't hear anything above twenty kilohertz in the frog average thirty eight kilohertz. Bancer today's quiz. Question. The loudest recorded dog bark belong to a golden retriever named Charlie who barked at one hundred thirteen decibels, which is as loud as a snow blower. So savannah. What kinds of things do we teach people today that wolves only Barak three percent of the time. And even people who don't own dogs can kind of tell what a dog is trying to say when it barks

Barks FOX Savannah Asia Europe Wildcats Barak Bancer China Russia Finland Fawzi Charlie Nigeria Three Percent One Hundred Thirteen Decibels Thirty Eight Kilohertz Twenty Kilohertz Three Year
Trump Touts Economic Improvements In Pennsylvania at Rally

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Trump Touts Economic Improvements In Pennsylvania at Rally

"President Trump. Speaking in Montoursville, Pennsylvania's huge crowd at the hangar wearing red Maga. Hats. Shouts four more years, Pennsylvania state. President Trump won and twenty sixteen by only one percent. The economy improving in Pennsylvania, in the past two years with manufacturing jobs, back and unemployment down. Here's the president. United States edit two hundred sixty three thousand jobs just last month. Barak seething expectation. Students. Created dealy six million new jobs. Now I would've ever said that to the fake news media look at how many back then. A lot of

President Trump Pennsylvania Montoursville Red Maga Barak United States One Percent Two Years
"barak" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"barak" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Attack remain semantically for them assuming this over there. Suzanne. An the routine, but at the local Paseo was mere those. Geology for. They seem cool this group soon as fussy. Listen. Have you know, he calls? Santos. Gene for Barak portal associate. Things like your pensions IRA or Roth IRA's dividends from any stock portfolios or stockholdings money from the sale of real estate. So if you're going to downsize, you and your spouse or thinking about downsizing, and you know, you may be going into a less expensive home, which means you may have some excess equity from the sale of your original home that you could use and also included in that you may have rental properties as well, then etc. Okay. We could the list could go on. But those are some major areas, but rental property is another big one in Zona because properties don't disintegrate like they do in other parts of the country because you don't have the sleet, the ice and snow and yada, yada. So really it son and more sun, and he more heat that we've got to worry about. But but usually homes up a little better out here in the south west. And so because of that there are some people that are building their retirement plans around acquiring rental properties. And that's valid. That's the place to go. So again, it's important to meet with someone like me of financial professional, but but more than that, not just a financial professional one that specializes in retirement income planning, okay to discuss all your options, del you and your family determine which option would best suit your needs. So bow. Wow. Wow. So obviously, there are a lot of different types of income. Then that we can, you know, pensions, IRA's, etc. You've talked about, but what are some reasons we absolutely need an income plan for retirement. Well, I would say a heavy an income plan will help you get a better picture of what your retirement is really going to look like, so it's where the rubber really meets the road. Okay..

Suzanne Zona Santos Barak Gene
"barak" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're you're training gas fasting and training and it was amazing and it was just a great race we would encourage each other throughout the month we meet up around the city to run together and so yeah so it's nice to have a supportive network of other people who are fasting and training so what what advice do you have for people who have muslim colleagues who are observing but aren't muslim themselves and i'm assuming don't ask them to watch you eat lunch would be one of them let's definitely at the top of my list but i think just generally approaching people out of curiosity and empathy can go a really long way i've had people ask me questions that were based in that were based in assumptions of why i was doing what i was doing that almost seemed to pity me for what they felt like i was forced to be doing and that really is not something that makes me feel super welcome in an office environment but when people were really curious and open and wanna stand more about my experiences and why this is meaningful for me then that's a great place to start yeah i would say that ramadan like anyone can engage in this month right if we're thinking beyond just like not eating and drinking so one time when i was working in a workspace i explained to my co worker like my call how i didn't want his how bad about anyone and she was like that's actually a really good pass all year round all year round and so just reminding people that ramadan is beyond just eating or drinking barak having us.

barak
"barak" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on WTMA

"Radio and tomorrow don't miss ehud barak on the savage nation what's interesting about ehud barak remember the movie munich many years ago was a fabulous movie way way on their respective for it was the writer of it i think it was mr chet wynne i'm not a hundred percent ehud barak was in that mission and now because he's a liberal all of a sudden those who control the keyboards in their mother's basement are saying i shouldn't have him on the show he's a miserable liberal he doesn't believe in the bible he destroyed israel this is what i'm dealing with every day if you go off the party line now you're a communist you work for russia your this your that this is what happened during the soviet union is that you had told the party line this is what happened in nazi germany you ought to be a loyal soldier of the nazi party and my friends i'm very sad to tell you it's exactly what's happening now amongst the impostors who have suddenly found great ratings by pretending that they will for trump all along they alike apparatchiks in the communist party usa only in reverse but what the hell is the difference if they're acting the same way as the mini fascist that they are what you can't go off the line the party line now all of a sudden you have to like lick the boots of everything that comes out of the white house i won't do that i'm never going to do that what do you want me to talk about michael this is michael from long island new york you're an inspiration and i just wanted to say that after listening to your opening about the ratings i actually found myself tuning into other stations without even realizing i was doing it because i want to know more about what's going on now i'm not saying that you should change anything that you're doing i just wanted to point out how i felt and what i've been doing again without even realizing it.

ehud barak writer russia soviet union michael munich mr chet wynne israel germany communist party hundred percent
"barak" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Okay okay 'cause i'm just throwing a bunch of interested in both aspects i did just throw a lot of seed out on one side of my lawn like underneath my big liquid amber nothing grows so i just said barak along half of it and then we're in the shade i've at some more seed to the grassroots hasn't been growing very well and kind of wondered if there was something for that second could help with the receding that was my secondary question but my first question really back to the person who called before when you mentioned he's dropping and trying to stop something from growing and you mentioned a liquid amber tree and i know every year i guess those little yellow things that come and then i guess the leaves all come and then the the bombs come with all the little pokey things on it and i was surprised to hear that you said that maybe possible to stop some of that from growing now my tree is very tall it's gotta be lumo thirty five i know they're very tall yeah the way you distribute this it's called god david you gave me that thing already floral it's called through well and you spray it on the blooms now the blooms happen probably probably just about out there as the tree starts to leaf out and that should and will in most cases prevent the polarization of the flowers which then prevents that little fuzzies thing pod coming down and you can eliminate little bunch of like little yellow things is that what you're talking about society.

barak
"barak" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

AM 870 The Answer

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on AM 870 The Answer

"Sorry enemy enemy's within movie dot com god bless you for the very important work that you do you are a man of great courage and we need more men like you less thank you trevor barak thank you very much but this is what is necessary at the country survives based upon great men and brave men like him all right more news i wanna talk take mike from elsa gunar he's been very patient about the gun control issue mike if you are you there i sure am thinking guests your show is just wonderful thank you thank you by the way my mom passed away and she was a survivor from communist russia from the programs mass murder against jews the communists committed just like sorry before communism had committed and the communists are just truly evil beyond what our news media in college professor in high school teachers would ever tell students in communist russia they were committing dr mandela type socalled'scientific neko experiments jewish children my mother was a victim of the survivor of that you'll never hear that from the fake news media and the fake education says self yes you know mike i i've learned about this extensively in researching my book atheist and kim hills it is terrifying the amount of work evil that the commerce have done is equal to if not worse than what the nazis had done the only difference between the nazis and the communists was that the nazis called out for the specific destruction of a particular group of people or people's based upon their race or otherwise but somehow communism gets a pass but nevertheless they did the same thing right there with nazism with national socialism there's a verse in one of islam's idea with which the second highest authority in islam is comes from the words behaviors of muhammad and which were carefully recorded in detail by muslim scholars and followers and there's an idea that says that the muslims have to murder the jews world or they can achieve their very much coveted final hour on earth their end times prophecy and there's nothing like that whatsoever in of course in the bible the old testament new testament mike unfortunately i have to let you go i do have to wrap up and thank you.

trevor barak mike elsa gunar russia murder professor muhammad dr mandela
"barak" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Barak facebook live right now the ron and don show curry to rob what are we talking about here are we talking about are we talking about here today we got an update on the saga of steven long you remember him he's the man living in his truck that won a lawsuit against the city of seattle initial victory for long it three important parts one his truck is now classified as a home to the police cannot have his home towed in three the fees associated with the impound were excessive an unconstitutional earlier in the week i urge the city to appeal this ruling today we learned they're going to do just that i did get quite a response though on my first take of this story like this from john on twitter quote in staying the simple point the author that's me goes to great lengths to prove himself as a bleep with little compassion for other humans unquote or this one from daniel quote as opposed to what alternative repossessing the car and heavy people sleep on the street curb if someone has no safe place to go to sleep with they're truck it's not immoral to tell them they cannot do that unquote so as a point of fact i never said that someone could not sleep sleeping their truck clearly that happens all the time but the thing those completely different about this ruling was the brazen assertion that you could park that truck virtually anywhere with total impunity we also learned through some fantastic reporting from the door matsen show and hanna scott that steven long as quite a colorful past that includes barroom brawls an arrest in probation for a sex offence and another state after a black sabbath concert now the city will appeal saying this ruling is legally wrong and unworkable i agree with that one other question that i have no how does it guy living in his truck who told dory montzen that a two hundred ninety dollar a month apartment was too expensive a ford multiple lawyers including jim loeb ends a partner at a.

Barak seattle john jim loeb partner ron twitter daniel hanna scott steven long dory montzen ford two hundred ninety dollar
"barak" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on RobinLynne

"We have been shown bob much one king oh when she she residents your her empowering yeah barak nick.

barak nick bob
"barak" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Four they have is a dry barak and i got off the bench last night and was showing you would that be julia conduct draw dr to the vast scared he can netted announced side giant and the necker bogra's ended up scoring a hundred and twenty points in a game they didn't need to win but dead one eight seven seven three three seven secs xxx mark calling from bloomfield mark you're on a fan of near exit he what's happening moorish how're you pretty good mark thanks for being part of the program he has our about knickerbocker yet however there are love they're gonna win the lottery aren't they okay that's an upward up in that why why do you seek is such a stretch the think this the jets could possibly compete for uh the wild next year i don't think so i mean that i mean i'd love does i'd love to think that but at bearer at this point i can think that can you well they were talking about him what g eight last year they were talking about the playoffs well there were three ensue and there were playing good football and mccown really was again i mean three into what nobody to other rid of win three games or ids freight though i mean they they were thinking okay maybe in a little bit of a watered down asc the jets might compete for a wildcard spot and after five games that carries the kansas city game did they did everything in well that's true but you know they do win five and winning form war maybe five more that's that's that's a big stretch no no no no i do so positive spread trapping you're saying the will to win but they won five lost eleven evoke now they should have won a couple more bright there's no question about.

barak julia jets football mccown kansas one eight seven seven three th
"barak" Discussed on The Global Politico

The Global Politico

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on The Global Politico

"This is susan glasser and welcome back to the global politico we're delighted to have as our guest this week on the global politico former and perhaps future prime minister of israel yehud barak whose here in washington for the annual savan forum which is pretty much a gathering of a who's who of figures both from israel and from the united states who are concerned uh and make it their business to know what's going on in the region uh but i can't think of any one better and better timing to talk with him then prime minister brock today you have a piece in the new york times that is really i must say kind of an explosive peace you say we must save israel from its government you say ordered the mass on title at the near times said what's what's title a third world room uh change has to com which is somewhat similar out here i somewhat similar at it it it really it's it's it's a call to action in many ways you say that the government of prime minister netanyahu has become irrational bordering on messianic that it's headed right toward a one state solution rather than a two state solution uh you have some strong words about the prime minister's uh devaluing of the institutions of democracy you even say that the prime minister elevated fake news alternative facts and what about ism to an art form long before we were talking about that here in the united states so what prompted this outcry.

susan glasser prime minister barak washington israel united states brock new york times netanyahu third world
"barak" Discussed on The Global Politico

The Global Politico

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on The Global Politico

"This is susan glasser and welcome back to the global politico we are delighted to have as our guest this week on the global politico former and perhaps future prime minister of israel yehud barak whose here in washington for the annual savan forum which is pretty much a gathering of a who's who of figures both from israel and from the united states who are concerned uh and make it their business to know what's going on in the region uh but i can't think of anyone better and better timing to talk with him then prime minister brock today you have a piece in the new york times that is really i must say kind of an explosive peace you say we must save israel from its government you say ordered the mass on title at the new york times at what what's title a record world room uh change has to come which is somewhat similar i somewhat similar at eat it really it's it's it's a call to action in many ways you say that the government of prime minister netanyahu has become irrational bordering on messianic that it's headed right toward a one state solution rather than a twostate solution uh you have some strong words about the prime minister's uh devaluing of the institutions of democracy you even say that the prime minister elevated fake news alternative facts and what about ism to an art form long before we were talking about that here in the united states so what prompted this outcry.

susan glasser prime minister barak washington israel united states brock new york times netanyahu
"barak" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Have to monitor the enemy that's not where i do my recharge for facts because they don't offer any you could that it's kinda funny that all the things hillary clinton did she got all many like probably hundreds of different kinds of games humanities i'm not one has been proven to get south let me i don't know if i don't know if any would be the right word to use as in don't you find a kind of funny no i find it kind of pathetic that cnn cnn's they've never been able to hang anything honor that they keep trying and i i find it not funny but said that you right wing are willing to buy anything they tell you just to get you clinton head on he he received a quarters criminal or right before obama the move with all due respect that's a stupid thing to say barak obama was a scandalous president trump had been in office once and he's really is leaking classified information to the russians and you had the a tacit heed a call pole bothma a criminal yeah he was do all they will admit well you handled uh maybe you didn't like the way he handled it being a liberal and having class and decorum in intelligence but that doesn't make him a criminal if you'd rather have a sevenyearold but these times a day kudo ludgrove view you take that's the way of president should behave as opposed to how obama behave with class and decorum that's your right but it doesn't it quite with obama being a criminal when trump clearly is only a hater he hit a august all vulnerable from germany fan at a all these quaco bomber all going to be very much yes and you need she agrees serri let them take the credit move for him because.

hillary clinton barak obama trump president cnn germany
"barak" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

03:02 min | 2 years ago

"barak" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Um this idea has sort of taking hold among theoretical physicists as i said it's a very controversial like the uh many people think uh some random speculation some people cosmology just since string theorists and so forth think that it's almost the dictated by what we know about cosmology in string theory but it is very very far removed from what we can actually measure or actually uh observe who tell us go through astronomical observations these things are just too far away so uh uh for indirect evidence we look for various kinds of indirect evidence of this multi verse and at present there are a couple of possible ways to detect things that would indirect evidence for it these things will be detected by various kinds of astronomical observations cosmic microwave background uh all sorts of uh future experiments which are taking place now but we will have to be extremely lucky to uh to make these observations and to tell whether this multi verse idea was write them off it's another idea that could be right i think it's right barak again expect surprises now do you have any hope that we can find indirect experimental proof of string theory are the multi verse idea any glimmers of thought can in this direction you out a couple of indirect uh thoughts proof i think no uh it's very hard prove a scientific theory is you know uh with very limited amount of experimental uh evidence and is just so big that to see all parts of it is going to be certainly prohibitive not going to do that so to prove it i think is going to be extremely difficult to get some confirmation to get some confirmation i think as possible we will study the geometry of space in the future we will study the geometry of space and for technical reasons this bubbling nuclear eating monk beavers makes predictions about the geometry of our universe the geometry me whether it's curved whether it's flat whether it looks like a severe weather it looks like a hyperbole uh and the combination of string theory cosmology uh uh this multi versus idea makes a specific prediction it says the universe should look like gay hyperbole all right play beloit that may be detectable in the future it's going to be very difficult uh.

barak
"barak" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"barak" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"The plan groundless epoca this is democracy now torchbearing an militarize white nationalist descended on charlottesville virginia this weekend for unite the rac rally that erupted into violence they're worth three deaths they were met by opponents including clergy students black lives matter activists and protesters with the antifascist movement down as and keep up president trump responded by blaming the violence on many side we condemn in the strongest party civil terms this big reduce display of hatred bigotry violencetorn many sides it's been going on for a long time us donald trump not barak obama it's been going on for a long long time will host a round table discussion with a protester push survive car attack a domestic terrorists and attack when protesting against white nationalist sense charlotte we'll speak with a nurse who treated the wounded as well as john lane schmidt and organizer with the local black lives movements and professor at the university of virginia dr cornell west was there and reverend tracy blackman next if minister of justice and witness ministries of the united church of christ all that and more coming up two welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org the warren peace report i'm amy goodman thousands of people rallied in cities across the united states sunday to protest deadly violence by a mob of kukluxklan members of neonazis during a rally in charlottesville virginia on saturday a twenty year old knocks sympathizer killed one antiracist activists and injured more than a dozen others when he intentionally drove his car through a crowd of people protesting against the kkk and neonazis who were rallying to oppose charlottesville plan to remove a monument of the confederate general roberty leave from a downtown public park on sunday thousands poured into.

virginia barak obama john lane schmidt professor tracy blackman united states charlottesville rac president donald trump university of virginia dr corn united church of christ amy goodman twenty year
"barak" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

Power 105.1 FM

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"barak" Discussed on Power 105.1 FM

"Yeah yeah the james gunn good lin the core but the government kurdi gut gutted wave are you who are you i heard on the ferry get off with a roster either another great mere price for parliament oh my attitude from the the move no the mummy in warwick good luck the barak the number dormant in yamagata philip bowman going so good core curley ooh the cody wait the route we march true moments early mona girl.

barak philip bowman curley warwick yamagata