35 Burst results for "Bar Sto"

John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

07:29 min | Last month

John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

"To the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David. Intra Cosso. During this podcast saw discussed efforts to address social determinants of health with John Gorman chairman of the nightingale partners and founder and former Executive Chairman of Gorman Health Group. John Welcome to the program. Thanks David. Great to be here. especially with another native DC guy here most welcome John's by is, of course, posted on the podcast website. Briefly on background, the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has exposed. The country's failed to adequately address the social determinants of health. Generally defining health access and quality education, economic circumstances, food security, social conditions, and environmental factors. It is estimated that where people live work and socialize determines as much as sixty percent of their health status. Whereas formal medical care accounts for just ten percent. For example concerning. Circumstances forty years of wage stagnation among lower income earners has left forty five percent of working age Americans. With either no health care insurance for insurance without a pocket expenses so high. They avoid sinking care went for example, they developed covid nineteen related symptoms. Healthcare policy makers have slowly begun to take an interest in addressing sto ages as a way to improve health delivery by increasing increasing appropriate utilization and reducing costs. For example, Medicare, advantage plans which enroll more than one third of all Medicare beneficiaries have recently been given regulatory authority to offer Ma benificiary supplemental benefits beyond medical care such as mail deliveries, home modifications, and Personal Care Services. With beginning, discuss, addressing, social determine, specifically use of what are termed opportunities zones. Again. John Gorman. So Jon with that as background. Louis. Begin by asking if you could provide a brief overview of nightingale. Sure David Nangle partners is one of these weird opportunities zone funds that came out of trump's big tax giveaway bill It was actually Cory Booker's program that was designed to encourage investment in real estate and disadvantaged communities and I was sitting on my ass retired last spring and got a notification that the irs had just completely revamped the rags to allow opportunities own capital to be used not just for real estate investment. But also for leases one portly for working capital or for meeting the business requirements of a new company inside one of the nine thousand roughly nine thousand opportunities zones around the country and those opportunities owns David are all. Severely, economically disadvantaged and more importantly medically underserved, and because the irs allowed now opportunities own capital to be used for working capital for meeting business requirements. That's what opened the door to allow us to use opportunities on Capitol to make large scale investments in social determinants of health intervention. So nightingale partners with insurers with health systems with large medical groups to finance design launch, and where necessary execute on our goals to improve. The quality of care for vulnerable populations. In this country, a lot of people like to say and I love it that we packed a Republican billionaire tax shelter in order to improve care for black drought people on that gets me up every morning. Sir Thank you. So this as you noted, this was a provision in the December seventeen tax bill. Specifically page one, hundred, and thirty. This was picked up this previous legislation as you noted, that as you mentioned senator from New Jersey Cory Booker but also the South Carolina African American Republican, the only one Tim Scott. So this is picked up in the tax bill previous legislation and you mentioned the nine thousand. So these are census tracts that meet this low income community criteria wrote and then explain to me. Governors than have to select a discrete number. That could benefit from this. Tax Advantage program is that correct doubts correct and there was a little bit of mischief but some of the governors in the designation of some of those areas and there's been, you know some gamesmanship with this story like you know Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey is. Used an opportunity zone fund open up frigging LAUNDROMAT. In Asbury, Park with Bruce, springsteen cats not the kind of stuff that we do. I'm not surprised to hear that I guess the former governor is a is obsessed with. Mr Asbury Park and again just so on. Understand better more clearly, this is the tax advantage here is that by investing the capital gains on your investment, you can avoid paying the. Twenty three percent the capital gains tax and that basically. Sure go ahead, go ahead. Well, basically, the way it works is that if you invest money or capital gains in and opportunities zone and you leave it in for at least ten years, not only is the initial investment completely tax free but then all of the proceeds that you make on that investment are completely tax free. So high net worth individuals. And family offices large corporations the generate large amounts of capital gains love this program, and indeed it opened up about six point two trillion dollars in available capital based on the amount of capital gains that we generate in our economy. So of that amount, David Roughly a hundred billion dollars has been invested thus far into opportunities zones off. The roughly eight months programs operate. And again, the idea is the long leave the money and means completely tax free for ten years out of step seven years you pay are you're eighty five percent excuse but I know that that number surprises me would you say this this this one, hundred, billion, his far more than was estimated when the legislation was passed. No I think it's probably rolling out slower than A lot of folks had hoped and as you can imagine, the vast majority of those deals that have been done thus far has been around real estate and real estate redevelopment certainly in the healthcare sector I think we're still the only firm out here. That's a healthcare focus opportunities on fund it. You know it we've been the only ones to my knowledge. So we're you know we're granted here, but we have yet even break a billion, but we're that's our goal.

David Nangle John Gorman Cory Booker Gorman Health Group IRS New Jersey Chairman Mr Asbury Park Chris Christie Executive Chairman Personal Care Services Medicare JON
John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:32 min | Last month

John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

"During this podcast saw discussed efforts to address social determinants of health with John Gorman chairman of the nightingale partners and founder and former Executive Chairman of Gorman Health Group. John Welcome to the program. Thanks David. Great to be here. especially with another native DC guy here most welcome John's by is, of course, posted on the podcast website. Briefly on background, the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has exposed. The country's failed to adequately address the social determinants of health. Generally defining health access and quality education, economic circumstances, food security, social conditions, and environmental factors. It is estimated that where people live work and socialize determines as much as sixty percent of their health status. Whereas formal medical care accounts for just ten percent. For example concerning. Circumstances forty years of wage stagnation among lower income earners has left forty five percent of working age Americans. With either no health care insurance for insurance without a pocket expenses so high. They avoid sinking care went for example, they developed covid nineteen related symptoms. Healthcare policy makers have slowly begun to take an interest in addressing sto ages as a way to improve health delivery by increasing increasing appropriate utilization and reducing costs. For example, Medicare, advantage plans which enroll more than one third of all Medicare beneficiaries have recently been given regulatory authority to offer Ma benificiary supplemental benefits beyond medical care such as mail deliveries, home modifications, and Personal Care Services. With beginning, discuss, addressing, social determine, specifically use of what are termed opportunities zones. Again. John Gorman. So Jon with that as background. Louis. Begin by asking if you could provide a brief overview of nightingale. Sure David Nangle partners is one of these weird opportunities zone funds that came out of trump's big tax giveaway bill It was actually Cory Booker's program that was designed to encourage investment in real estate and disadvantaged communities and I was sitting on my ass retired last spring and got a notification that the irs had just completely revamped the rags to allow opportunities own capital to be used not just for real estate investment. But also for leases one portly for working capital or for meeting the business requirements of a new company inside one of the nine thousand roughly nine thousand opportunities zones around the country and those opportunities owns David are all. Severely, economically disadvantaged and more importantly medically underserved, and because the irs allowed now opportunities own capital to be used for working capital for meeting business requirements. That's what opened the door to allow us to use opportunities on Capitol to make large scale investments in social determinants of health intervention. So nightingale partners with insurers with health systems with large medical groups to finance design launch, and where necessary execute on our goals to improve. The quality of care for vulnerable populations. In this country, a lot of people like to say and I love it that we packed a Republican billionaire tax shelter in order to improve care for black drought people on that gets me up every morning. Sir Thank you. So this as you noted, this was a provision in the December seventeen tax bill. Specifically page one, hundred, and thirty. This was picked up this previous legislation as you noted, that as you mentioned senator from New Jersey Cory Booker but also the South Carolina African American Republican, the only one Tim Scott. So this is picked up in the tax bill previous legislation and you mentioned the nine thousand. So these are census tracts that meet this low income community criteria wrote and then explain to me. Governors than have to select a discrete number. That could benefit from this. Tax Advantage program is that correct doubts correct and there was a little bit of mischief but some of the governors in the designation of some of those areas and there's been, you know some gamesmanship with this story like you know Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey is. Used an opportunity zone fund open up frigging LAUNDROMAT. In Asbury, Park with Bruce, springsteen cats not the kind of stuff that we do. I'm not surprised to hear that I guess the former governor is a is obsessed with. Mr Asbury Park and again just so on. Understand better more clearly, this is the tax advantage here is that by investing the capital gains on your investment, you can avoid paying the. Twenty three percent the capital gains tax and that basically. Sure go ahead, go ahead. Well, basically, the way it works is that if you invest money or capital gains in and opportunities zone and you leave it in for at least ten years, not only is the initial investment completely tax free but then all of the proceeds that you make on that investment are completely tax free. So high net worth individuals. And family offices large corporations the generate large amounts of capital gains love this program, and indeed it opened up about six point two trillion dollars in available capital based on the amount of capital gains that we generate in our economy. So of that amount, David Roughly a hundred billion dollars has been invested thus far into opportunities zones off. The roughly eight months programs operate.

John Gorman Nightingale Partners Gorman Health Group David Nangle Cory Booker Medicare John IRS David Sir Thank JON Louis Tim Scott Asbury, Park New Jersey Mr Asbury Park
John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

06:36 min | Last month

John Gorman Discusses the Use of Opportunity Zones to Address Social Determinants

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David. Intra Cosso. During this podcast saw discussed efforts to address social determinants of health with John Gorman chairman of the nightingale partners and founder and former Executive Chairman of Gorman Health Group. John Welcome to the program. Thanks David. Great to be here. especially with another native DC guy here most welcome John's by is, of course, posted on the podcast website. Briefly on background, the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has exposed. The country's failed to adequately address the social determinants of health. Generally defining health access and quality education, economic circumstances, food security, social conditions, and environmental factors. It is estimated that where people live work and socialize determines as much as sixty percent of their health status. Whereas formal medical care accounts for just ten percent. For example concerning. Circumstances forty years of wage stagnation among lower income earners has left forty five percent of working age Americans. With either no health care insurance for insurance without a pocket expenses so high. They avoid sinking care went for example, they developed covid nineteen related symptoms. Healthcare policy makers have slowly begun to take an interest in addressing sto ages as a way to improve health delivery by increasing increasing appropriate utilization and reducing costs. For example, Medicare, advantage plans which enroll more than one third of all Medicare beneficiaries have recently been given regulatory authority to offer Ma benificiary supplemental benefits beyond medical care such as mail deliveries, home modifications, and Personal Care Services. With beginning, discuss, addressing, social determine, specifically use of what are termed opportunities zones. Again. John Gorman. So Jon with that as background. Louis. Begin by asking if you could provide a brief overview of nightingale. Sure David Nangle partners is one of these weird opportunities zone funds that came out of trump's big tax giveaway bill It was actually Cory Booker's program that was designed to encourage investment in real estate and disadvantaged communities and I was sitting on my ass retired last spring and got a notification that the irs had just completely revamped the rags to allow opportunities own capital to be used not just for real estate investment. But also for leases one portly for working capital or for meeting the business requirements of a new company inside one of the nine thousand roughly nine thousand opportunities zones around the country and those opportunities owns David are all. Severely, economically disadvantaged and more importantly medically underserved, and because the irs allowed now opportunities own capital to be used for working capital for meeting business requirements. That's what opened the door to allow us to use opportunities on Capitol to make large scale investments in social determinants of health intervention. So nightingale partners with insurers with health systems with large medical groups to finance design launch, and where necessary execute on our goals to improve. The quality of care for vulnerable populations. In this country, a lot of people like to say and I love it that we packed a Republican billionaire tax shelter in order to improve care for black drought people on that gets me up every morning. Sir Thank you. So this as you noted, this was a provision in the December seventeen tax bill. Specifically page one, hundred, and thirty. This was picked up this previous legislation as you noted, that as you mentioned senator from New Jersey Cory Booker but also the South Carolina African American Republican, the only one Tim Scott. So this is picked up in the tax bill previous legislation and you mentioned the nine thousand. So these are census tracts that meet this low income community criteria wrote and then explain to me. Governors than have to select a discrete number. That could benefit from this. Tax Advantage program is that correct doubts correct and there was a little bit of mischief but some of the governors in the designation of some of those areas and there's been, you know some gamesmanship with this story like you know Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey is. Used an opportunity zone fund open up frigging LAUNDROMAT. In Asbury, Park with Bruce, springsteen cats not the kind of stuff that we do. I'm not surprised to hear that I guess the former governor is a is obsessed with. Mr Asbury Park and again just so on. Understand better more clearly, this is the tax advantage here is that by investing the capital gains on your investment, you can avoid paying the. Twenty three percent the capital gains tax and that basically. Sure go ahead, go ahead. Well, basically, the way it works is that if you invest money or capital gains in and opportunities zone and you leave it in for at least ten years, not only is the initial investment completely tax free but then all of the proceeds that you make on that investment are completely tax free. So high net worth individuals. And family offices large corporations the generate large amounts of capital gains love this program, and indeed it opened up about six point two trillion dollars in available capital based on the amount of capital gains that we generate in our economy. So of that amount, David Roughly a hundred billion dollars has been invested thus far into opportunities zones off. The roughly eight months programs operate.

John Gorman Nightingale Partners Gorman Health Group David David Nangle Cory Booker Medicare John IRS Sir Thank JON Louis Tim Scott Asbury, Park New Jersey Mr Asbury Park
PlayStation 5 UI revealed: “Activity” shortcuts, picture-in-picture

DLC

05:03 min | Last month

PlayStation 5 UI revealed: “Activity” shortcuts, picture-in-picture

"Christian. Spicer what is your story of the week? My story of the week is I wanNA, take a mental picture of right now where we are and I want to compare it to the end of this generation's life cycle because that is why I love you I the playstation five revealed issue I. Finally, thank you. We've seen a lot of the xboxes in the PS five has revealed. It's and the simplified kind of cleaner approach and showed off what can happen by pushing the PS bind on the controller and all the shortcuts, and so you don't need to go into the full home menu kind of get everything you need and. I think it's really slick looking for what I've seen I think it's you know until I go hand on with it I don't know how intuitive it is because there's always that line of like ad in featured and is the thing I want where I want it to be or not But what I'm super curious about is if or when it changes because that is one area where I feel like Microsoft has been very flexible over the years with the xbox one line of consoles and how much of that you I changed and as far as I can remember that ps four Cross media bar has kind of been what it is and I think they're not. Stars, I'm concerned. It's like it is because it it just is what it is. It's like this is my eighty. Corolla. It's great but the STO works. But it is. Yeah a little cumbersome in this I feel like the new one. I like what they're trying to do with it I think but Mario and Jeff I'm curious what your thoughts are on it from a user perspective. We'll let's just before we get into what we think about it. Let's just kind of. Summarize the. which is it's it's much more visual. Right? I mean the cross media bar has been text that comes up at the bottom of the screen and you move across it and pull things up and yeah there's a few images of games here or there but mostly it's it's a menu, right? It's a big long menu It's it looks to be the case that this new playstation five Ui. Is kind of using a card system that highlights what calling game play opportunities. It says, basically, this shows you can go back to things you missed, and so on it also shows that you can jump directly into levels or challenges that you WanNa plan certain games, and there's a new picture in picture feature that lets you view other parts of the game without leaving the screen or area you're currently in so Mario. Christians. Question is a good one. What do you make of it? What do you think is the more visual thing better or is it just more for the sake of more? It's funny because this whole week I have nothing but wanting to see what this you I was, and then of course, in one random day, it just dropped and then we got the state of play for it. So I'm so excited to actually to actually see, and then what I saw was a card game. Much and you know what? I love me some Card Games, the Simpsons Card Games still on my favorite games, I've ever played my life by all about card games. Exactly. But when it came to what I saw. At first I was like, yeah, I'm excited for new stuff but ultimately when it came to cards. My feeling was I just even though they're trying to look try to clean up some stuff with the lower bar with the audio function. Oda Audio functions. But when he got to the cards, things it just to me just look like more of a cluttered mess and I was terrified by it. Now granted majority of those were like it looked like for trophies in terms of percentages and stuff like that, which could lead into more information pilot complete those things that's all well and good. But then there's obviously the developer. Notes on the left where I I mean. I'll be honest I don't read any of those messages that come up when I look at my ps four and so for it to be there, I'm just hoping that there is going to be more customisation terms of how I want it to be in terms of removing certain things and just focusing on certain areas. That's just my. Take of it because every year I felt like my love for the PS four Ui had waned especially up to now where I feel like it is a drag in order to go from one place to the other. Obviously the the biggest thing for this generation is definitely be speed and I really hope that's all speeded up I do like the fact that there's games in media there look like they're separated now in terms of different areas. So if I, really WANNA focus on all my media stuff it'll be in one specific place it is. Now it's not good I hope. It's better. But when it comes to games, I'm also happy to the fact that it looks like everything's optimized for the game that you're playing and overlays on top of that for the most part. That's the big key thing I think is really nice about this. You I. Yeah you're right I. Didn't mention that and that is a big part of it is that all of this overlays on top of the game, you never actually leave the game you're playing or at least you don't have to leave the game you're playing in order to access all those features whereas push. PS Button on your your controller now it takes you out of the game put you on that blue screen and you're you know you're completely in a different

Mario Microsoft Spicer Jeff I Oda Audio Developer
Tyra Banks angers 'Dancing With the Stars' audience with error

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

01:42 min | Last month

Tyra Banks angers 'Dancing With the Stars' audience with error

"Tyra banks had a meltdown backstage at. With the stars. So on Monday there was a mishap and to to people that should be in the bottom up for elimination were not the right to people live on TV tyra cold at the wrong names it got very confusing because there were alive she had to ad Lib it was a little awkward although I think she did a pretty much A. A good job fans were upset on social media tire went onto blame the control room and she also blamed her cue odds for the little bit of that upset that Miss Hab eventually she apologized once again saying it was live. TV show us that a little bit as an excuse. I, don't mind this stuff. I think it makes it more exciting however. TYRA, she was not laughing sources. Tell me at the sto show when she got backstage she was furious very angry. She wasn't mean and nasty. She wasn't throwing things but she's the boss, she not just the host she's the executive producer. This is her show. It is embarrassing. It happened on her watch. Let's be honest. She's a new host. This has never happened before. So now a lot of people are saying, maybe it's tyrod that should get eliminated where are you on this on a? So I get, it is embarrassing. It is a little awkward but as someone who's been a producer and a host, I'm just GONNA. Let ever no right now you're not making any friends in the control room by blaming them. Yes. Producers Make Mistakes I've made mistakes but we've also made you shine so many times without the thank yous and without everything then the one time something goes wrong you go out there and make sure it's known that we messed up. It's not a good look for her.

Tyra Banks Executive Producer Producer
High School senior suspended entire year after protesting remote learning in Long Island, New York

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

High School senior suspended entire year after protesting remote learning in Long Island, New York

"A Long Island high school senior, has been suspended for a year after he kept violating the school's remote learning policy officials that William Floyd High School say maverick STO kept showing up to school on days he was mandated to do remote learning. He protested his school district's hybrid model. Last week. He was suspended for five days and then charged with trespassing after ignoring school rules and still showing up at the school Building Stones. Lawyer says the 17 year old believes online learning is ineffective. That he is upset. By the district's decision.

Long Island High School William Floyd High School School Building Stones
Four tips for navigating a shutdown, turnaround or outage successfully

The Main Column

04:54 min | 5 months ago

Four tips for navigating a shutdown, turnaround or outage successfully

"Project management for Tips for navigating a shutdown turnaround or outage successfully. In the oil and gas sector, managing a shutdown turnaround, or even an outage is an unavoidable requirement. These projects are complex with multiple stakeholders focused on limiting the time. Assets are offline with zero tolerance for safety incidents organization start with the vision to minimize risk ensure operational excellence in ultimately remove uncertainty for maintenance decisions, organizing and executing an efficient cost, effective and safe shutdown. Shutdown and turnaround delivers a significant competitive advantage so getting it right is essential. Avoiding unnecessary downtime is mission critical for owners and operators, the keys to success down to three critical components, people, process and technology crucial steps ensure that a shutdown turnaround or outage event makes a positive rather than a detrimental impact to the bottom line and sets up a facility for repeat success. Planning a successful Sto requires significant time and investment in the planning and scoping stages. This detailed activity is called front end loading. It is vital that the plan and schedule are comprehensive and designed to prevent potential negative consequences adhering to a discipline process is critical to ensure that nothing derails the Te'o kicking off. The project on time is essential, but not easy to achieve as it requires years. Of Advanced, Planning Sto's should be approached with the mantra. Expect the unexpected and plan accordingly, despite how detailed your plan is or discovery, work always occurs. If this work is not accounted for it will impact priorities and the critical path, often resulting in a project, running late and over budget in the oil and gas industry. Any extended downtime can run into millions of dollars with so many external factors implant impacting an sto plant operators must assume that problems will be encountered. Building a contingency into the plan will prevent the STO from being derailed when the inevitable hurdle appears. As part of the planning process time should be allocated for detailed project evaluation, which will help, inform and shape the next cycle if such an evaluation not performed in the same problems may be repeated during the next event. The people factor invest in external expertise. Sto's require large teams, and the makeup of the group is crucial driver of success. Typically, these events are a very specialized activity that happened every five years on average mature organizations, such as Shell and BP have access to teams with a wide array of experience in running these events across their organizations. However, the vast majority of providers lack this knowledge base or personnel power, so adding external expertise is vital an integrated team consisting of highly skilled specialists who helped plan direct and support. The internal team is the right model to adopt when it comes to selecting external. Refiners? Often pick the cheapest option without ensuring that they are bringing in the right set of skills and expertise. Another way they cut costs is to limit the timing of the specialist contractors, keeping them out of the critical planning stage or the project evaluation step were key learnings are determined in the long-term adopting these approaches will drive up costs. External expertise should be approached as a strategic investment rather than an operational overhead. Human Intelligence Bridge. The knowledge gap qualified. Sto leaders are a scarce commodity so structured training should be used to share their knowledge and expertise within the organization throughout the project, due to the length of time between each sto at a refinery, there is risk of investing people that then move onto new projects, taking the knowledge with them, capturing and sharing knowledge throughout the duration of the project is critical. Peer reviews are another way of sharing knowledge and learning from other refineries within the organization. The demographics of teams often add to the knowledge transfer challenge project teams usually consist of a mix of highly skilled workers close to retirement age alongside people that are at the start of their careers. This gap experience is profound inputs further pressure on the need to transfer knowledge. The oil and gas sector is grappling with this generational issue across the globe. All technology is not created equal. Technology is another vital component of successful sto. It plays a critical role when it comes to utilizing the findings and data to replicate the success in future cycles, it is not enough for a company to digitize all its information. The technology deployed must break down data, silos and help facilitate the of knowledge between teams. A technology platform should be selected that his fit pervert purpose and future proved Sto's are complex of that require a mix of scarce skills and a disciplined approach coupled with state of the art software by the tips outlined. Organizations will be on a path to optimizing the cycle.

STO Human Intelligence Bridge Shell BP
"bar sto" Discussed on Trek Capsule

Trek Capsule

08:41 min | 6 months ago

"bar sto" Discussed on Trek Capsule

"I I thought. Oh Man I don't know how to do this and so I don't know how came out but it's But it was. It was fun to do now. You have a couple projects I like to talk about. I don't know if they've been out yet are coming out. One is from called from within you play Pastor Joe in that what. What type of film is at? It's a horror film said You know after my last horror film Remain nameless again. But you know they sent me the script it was actually you know that at least the first half of the script I mean I found it genuinely spooky. Oh it was. It was genuinely creepy and the role. You know I mean basically I flew in on Thursday and I was done by Sunday back on Sunday. All my stuff was squeezed into just a couple of days and the director is this wonderful. Wonderful EP Fading Papamichael who shot you know Three ten to Huma W we shot. And he's he shot walk. The line there was. There was one scene where I'm preaching to you know my congregation the band back. And the you know it's it's very like you know until you know evangelist type thing and and Fade and was saying you know this scene you know we would have shot in in three days on. Walk the line and you know basically from within. We shot it in the morning before lunch. What they did was I mean when I got there. I really was kind of excited about it because they really do. Shoot it in this kind of we shot in this very small kinda beaten downtown in Maryland and they really just wanted to. It was very atmospheric and subtle. You know and they really wanted to get a certain look to the film and I and I think You know so that the cree penis was not hitting you over the head. Just part of the atmosphere and I you know from from what I saw it. I thought they did a really good job. It's been in a lot of Film festivals and it's just been picked up by a European Company for distribution this. Oh but it's but it's it's it's won some awards at some film festivals. And it's it's kind of making that circuit but it's a it's a small little independent film but it's got a great you know Thomas. Dekker is Elizabeth Rice. Oh yeah he's yeah it's got a good cast and fading was was. It was great that that he directed this as a DP his crew working. And if you're gonNA shoot something fast and cheap. It's great to have somebody who really knows what they're doing and what they want and you know boom I. It's you know and can make it happen. And and they were great group to work with. That's cool and then also there's one called leaving Bar Sto which is in California. I know that so. Yeah yeah that's also making the film festival rounds. That was one that another little independent film where they sent me the script. I it's it's a great carry. It's not. It's not sci fi or anything like that more of a human you know coming of age drama and kind of burnt out. You know high school. Physics teacher takes this smart kid under his wing and tries to encourage him. But there's also stuff going on with my character that you find out through the film literally what's eating you know. Okay it really is. It's just about the acting there and Peter Page Who was an actor himself and he was directed a couple of films Directed at and it was. It was really good and and the way they shot that you know he had it was shot in a way it was very kind of fluid and you never quite knew where the camera was and there was something very improv. Satory about it and spontaneous and and it was really good for the movie We're on Yeah Oh cool. That sounds great to to interesting projects to look forward to. Yeah and the leaving. Barstool is one. I know at won the audience award at the Long Film Festival and it's done quite well at a bunch of other festivals. You know I don't know you know if it's going to be picked up for distribution or not but it's but it's definitely making the rounds what's Nice is eventually everything heads to DVD and that's such a great market too. I mean it's DVD's is a billion dollar market so it's just I incredible so yes. And that's you know that's part of what Sag is finding about right now. Yes I know I know. Yeah it's it and it's just the whole industry has just done a one eighty from From what it used to be you know and before you negotiate for movies and television and that's you know and now it's like online you know. Dvd pick up. You can pretty much watch anything online right now. I know I know so it really it. Unfortunately it's really cutting into actors incomes as you know we're not making any money from the reruns anymore and and you know that's kind of how you lived sure that you were able to continue pursuing your career Because the you know when you get paid for an episode residuals for the reruns. It's kind of like deferred payment. Sure a lot of the deferred payment is being taken away and then. I WANNA give anything for online or DVD. So it's so it's kind of we'll see we'll see what's happening. It's huge changes. Yeah I think they'll I think they'll realize no eventually have to pay you. I mean just like with the writers. I mean they've had to do something else. Yeah but but the writers was just the first step right. It wasn't you know there's still a lot of holes in that deal but it was. You know it was on the right track anyway. Yeah it's GonNa take but I think eventually everybody will get what they deserve. Yeah yeah absolutely our industry but yeah but everywhere. Yeah it's just a very very different world and I even find myself watching a Lotta television on the Internet. It's really funny and it's just it's just this thing were you know you can always watch it either on TV or on you know and not what it is. 'cause sometimes you don't have the time and Right right and then and then you get impatient. I'm I'm very impatient watching anything in real time. Now me to me too. I won't do it. Yeah I how record it and watch it later young so I can skip the commercials. Which then sort of knocks hole in holes in the whole financial structure of the way at least mainstream. Tv works advertiser driven so. Yeah so what? Are you going to do? Lots of lots of things to be ironed out any sensory absolutely. It's like great technology but home Senate problems as always yes. That's the way it is. It is yeah I really WanNa thank you for taking the time to speak me. I've had a great time and looking for some of the things you've done and and a lot of memorable roles I mean it's I've been. I've been very fortunate. It seems to keep happening. How many actors can say. I played Bobby Kennedy. Not only once but twice. Yeah so that's pretty good. I mean certainly icon of the twentieth century and then as a privilege and to be on series like you know Star Trek. Once you're in one of those it's like you're you're part of history just doesn't Never goes away. I am very much appreciative of the whole star Trek just to be part of that part of that history because it just seems to me that you know the whole mythos of it revolves around some kind of optimistic feeling about about the future and that that cultures and societies and stuff finding ways to work together and live together. You know and and I think that's a really important message to be you know to carry. I mean especially the original series. Yes on that. It's just you know there. There's a a real message of optimism there absolutely so it's nice to be part of that history. Absolutely well thank you again. It's been a pleasure. This is Tony till auto. Thanks again for listening..

Pastor Joe Huma W Maryland director Bar Sto Bobby Kennedy European Company Thomas Dekker Elizabeth Rice Peter Page Tony Senate California
Easy Money For Podcasters

Build A Big Podcast - The Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

08:53 min | 8 months ago

Easy Money For Podcasters

"I'm David. Hooper in an urban neighborhood. Talked about it before you can sit on my porch. Sit on the steps leading up to my House. You can see the sidewalk in front of my House. And it's not uncommon. Certainly not right now. We're all quarantined. See Somebody taking a break from being cooped up inside their house walking down the sidewalk and that's not just during the quarantine it's anytime I live with what you call a walking neighborhood few years ago. I'm outside mowing my lawn. See A guy ruling up a wheelchair. He's with the dog is he. Comes to my house. The dog enters my yard and immediately takes a huge dump. I got this old guy in a wheelchair on the sidewalk in front of my house. A dog taken a huge dump and I'm trying to mow the lawn. Normally in this situation you might have a guy's got a bag so sorry man. Let me get that. This dude can't do it so it's a little bit awkward. What am I gonNA do get mad about it? No I laughed about. Hey Man stalks fertilizing my yard. I try to be nice. Trying to be neighborly so we talked for a while the small talk. He says he lives a street over and he introduces himself. He says my name is James Brown and you know what I said. Said like the singer and he was like hey say yeah like the singer actually believe it or not. I used to work with him. It turns out this guy's an old school urban radio. Dj It's an am station in Nashville an AM radio. If you don't know it used to be big. Am radio was big bounce off the stratosphere it will go everywhere you can pick it up so much farther than you couldn't FM signal. In fact they didn't even have. Fm Am was big as it was. This am station. It's still around today. It is maybe best known as the radio station. Where Oprah Winfrey got her start. People don't know this about Oprah very some people do I might have mentioned it. Oprah's from Nashville. She went to high school here. Another Weird Oprah connection. My father was her speech teacher in that high school. East high school so anyway. Am radio back in the day. When James was there it was big. It was big when he said he worked with the James Brown. It was because this was the big urban radio station. They call it black radio at the time in Nashville and they would bring these artists into Nashville. They would do promotions for them. They would pack venues and it wasn't just James Brown. He worked with the Eisley brothers every time I would see him. He had headphones on. I used to work with them. He had all sorts of great stories. But if you were looking at him now you would never know that you would see this old guy in a wheelchair with a little bitty dog over the next few years. Because I've got a dog because James was one st over I would see him all the time all the time it always be hanging out wearing headphones listening to music little dog always at aside and because. I'm walking my dog. That little dog will come. Greet s would stop we chat. We both loved music. We both loved dogs and every time he would chat he would have a story. It wasn't always about radio. But being radio myself. I'll get him. Show me how he would do. Intros an out does that old school urban dj way just to see how he would do it. And I would often tell him I would say man. I've got to get my recorder over here and get this on tape. And he always say something now. No that's I don't do that anymore. That's who I used to be. That was years ago last year. I was out in my car drove by his house. And I see a u haul and I was like man James Moven. He got sick of all this development. That was another thing that we talk about about how the neighborhood had changed. She'd been here fifty sixty years more or less grown up in this neighborhood and my father take it back to connection with. My father also grew up in this neighborhood. Just a street over from James was so I've got a connection to this neighborhood to talk about that and James Van. I guess he just got sick of this development because they're always threaten into tears house down. You know that story. Gentrification is what we call it anyway parked. My car immediately went to James's House and they're all these people in their moving stuff out. But no James and there's this dude on the couch and I asked him so what's up and he said James is dead and I was like it was disappointing because he was a friend of mine. This guy's retired as seem all the time I'm working from home. I'm walking my dog. He's out rolling around with his dog. We teach each other all the time and I was like. Oh that's not going to be the same. He's my connection to the neighborhood. You know but also thought about this story that he had and about how I missed that opportunity that history that radio history and those intros and those out rose and the way things used to be in the things that I could learn from him and I've talked about things like this before you now have missed air checks from Great Radio Legend. Here in Nashville. Because I was too scared to do it and with this it was just one of those things that I never got around to that guy that I talked to who sit on his couch. That was his son and we talked about me trying to get some James Air checks recordings. I'm still working on that. A check in with the station the owner of the station. They don't have anything. This was way back before everything was recorded but there are a lot of old air checks out there and James was really popular as a DJ at one time. He didn't go by the name. James Brown for obvious reasons. He went by the name. J Albert Brown. It was weird because he was living among people. That didn't know who was because of that. But sometimes I mentioned it to these older guys in the neighborhood and said you know James Brown a radio. Dj and they'd be the WHO J. Albert Brown. The Oh man. Jail rebrand live here. They didn't even know but they knew him. So sure. There are some recordings out there somewhere. I'm looking for them. There are a lot of people collect air checks. They're out there. I'm still GONNA look but I want you to think about this. This is why bring it up. We take for granted that there is so much on tape these days but there's also a ton of stuff that is it. It's not online. It's not written down on paper. Sometimes the people that might have been on tape there known in different ways than they are now and we don't even know they're around us. We don't know how to look them up. We don't know where to look them up. Maybe the only place they did exist is in the minds of people right now because of covert nineteen one of the things that people are thinking. A lot about is deaf and the importance of relationships. And if you've got the time you definitely have the skills you could be somebody who gets a lot of this important stuff. These stories this history. The intros in Altos of an old radio. Dj that we could all learn from. You could get that stuff on tape. Maybe it's from your family. Maybe it's from your friends. Maybe it is something that you could turn into a business. Think about that. We are on the edge of a lot of people. Dying people. Dial the time. James didn't die from Cova Nineteen. He died because he was old. He didn't take care of himself and one day. You're here and you've got these stories and you can share them with people and you can make friendships and the next day that's gone. It is gone. You can be the one to archive some of this with your skills with the equipment that you already have. You may be familiar with story core. This is an NPR show. They have a great APP. The story core APP that will guide you through a story core style interview. That's where people interview their family interview. Their friends interview people that they know and they get great interview. So if you're a little iffy on interviewing that's not the kind of podcast that you do. Sto Or Y. C. O. R. P. S. That's how you spell it. You can look up that APP. They will guide you through an interview. And maybe you just open up that Mike and let somebody talk. It doesn't have to be perfect to be meaningful. No real marketing device on this one but an opportunity for you. If you are looking to make money with your podcasting skills and definitely an opportunity for you to help humanity out so we don't lose some of the stuff

James James Brown Nashville J. Albert Brown James Moven James Air Oprah Winfrey James Van Hooper Oprah David NPR Mike C. O. R. P. Cova
Decentralization Philosophy Part 1  From Buddha to the Conquistadors

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

09:34 min | 11 months ago

Decentralization Philosophy Part 1 From Buddha to the Conquistadors

"I've been trying to figure out how to talk about this topic for a while because cryptocurrency is this really kind of strange flat structure. That has all of these little hierarchical structures built on top of it and you can take that analogy and you can really really zoom in on it or you can really really zoom out on it as kind of still true really regardless of how you're looking at it and I think a lot of this has to do with just the nature and sort of the oddness oddness of crypto currency and a Bitcoin as a community right as a movement and as technology that also is attached to people getting rich. Sometimes today I WanNa talk about a topic that I've been calling catalysts and CEOS and take a look at what the crypto currency space looks like. Today what it looked like in the past. Ask Talk about some of the different attributes that got us to where we are today. So Toshi said an interesting precedent. They led with their ideas and to a lesser extent their code and the early sparked a was association that contribution catalyzed first Bitcoin and then the crypto currency movement at large those who believed in that vision given an opportunity to get rich in some cases crazy rich rich and that combination of factors lead. I all coins coins than ICO's SAFT'S STO's and I don't think even talked about on the show before and who knows what will come next because clearly the path of innovation that's occurring here is not over at all but it also created what feels like a strange legacy that we're going to explore today as simply put are charismatic leaders who emerge from that flat structure that is the bitcoin protocol more or less dangerous more or less problematic more or less notable than the mark Zuckerberg's the Elon Musk's Jeff bezos. Goes and Steve. Jobs who really lead their movements. There's not that much of a difference between Associate Akimoto and a Jeff bezos except for the way that they fundamentally went about not inciting the change that now has kind of swept the world in one case kind of the e commerce site of and the other case this digital currency cryptocurrency or blockchain bitcoin movement. Or whatever you WANNA call it. Today's conversation is about decentralized catalysts and centralize CEO's the first thing I thought of when you said SA- Toshi contrasted to Jeff bezos. US was the difference. Between a certain personality type blended with introversion versus extroversion an extroverted rated person who is very smart and capable and intelligent and can see the future almost but wants credit and wants to be the face of an organization and is is comfortable in that role. You end up with someone. Like Jeff bezos. WHO's out there? And he's totally comfortable with that even though he retracts heat sometimes but but she didn't want the credit souto she wants to be behind the scenes and gets everything they needed from just being the mastermind. Mind who's kind of silent and letting other people be the face and I think that's really interesting. If you study personality types. Maybe even like the Myers Briggs. Souto Souto she is like your classic. I N T J personality type. They're like the mastermind architect but they don't need the credit and they don't need to be the face. Jeff Bezos as US would be like an E. N. T. J. who's like the CEO and the leader and wants to be the public face. I think that's a really interesting point. But I think that there's another factor here. Maybe okay which is that. Was it a choice. For Satoshi to take the type of catalyst like behind the scenes never revealed role or was that a factor of the not just the disruptive potential but what was being disruptive of course it was a choice. I mean Saito. She clearly thought through the implications of what they were doing carefully but if they really wanted credit they would have justified some way to take the credit and to be public about it. I think you always have a choice. I think another pretty good way to differentiate so Toshi from Jeff bezos is one of them make several hundred million a year contracting with the CIA Eh and the other one was never heard from one someone spoke to the CIA. I don't know who's point that supports but I think the big different factors that there was a legal path for Jeff Bezos to do what he did and even if he was an introvert. It still a good choice for him to do it. If it winds up that he has all the resources and success. I don't think we see that in practice very often where you have a founder. Who Comes in catalyze is a thing and then leaves before it actually becomes successful and their contribution bution isn't largely replaced by what comes after? I don't think it's so cut and dried that. What Jeff Bezos was doing or wanted to do with there was a legal path for him him? I mean he was doing something that nobody had ever done before. What was that avoiding state sales tax? This is another good point. Jeff bezos has been really interested in Star Trek. He wants to create a star trek future and some of the things he's been doing are totally unprecedented. And so it's not as though you can really say. Oh they're definitely legal because there's never been a legal precedent to establish that they are legal. You could say oh well Ijaz doing things that are a gray area or questionable. But he's he's not asking for permission and that's an admirable quality so you're talking about different levels of challenge and so with Jeff Bezos thing and with examples like like Uber. And other things like that. You are talking about companies that are doing very disruptive things but the question is who are they disrupting and in both of those situations the person or the entity. That's it's being disrupted their state governments and so if you're like a national company and you have presence in many many states that actually gives you the ability to play a bit of a game there. The thing that Uber did is kind of the reverse of what happened with napster. Napster was a decentralized network for file sharing then hit a bunch of national and even global organizations that suited everywhere but it was ultimately fighting these national or global organizations whereas Uber. They weren't fighting any global or national organizations they were fighting lots and lots and lots of little regional monopolies and it's to a lesser extent. Sure about Amazon to every state where they weren't collecting sales tax. Well that was an individual a fight so it's not like they had a problem with the United States. They had a problem with each individual state. Look at what's happened with projects in the lead up to the invention of Bitcoin and all of those centralized charlize alternatives. They were competing with the federal government for fundamentally monopolized right in the right to issue currency and control sort of the dynamics of the money that we all use news. And that's a place where it seems like you couldn't have done this as a CEO because people tried that and they basically all wound up getting arrested or getting all their assets season in many cases giving customers assets assets seized two so as we can see. There are definitely reasons why people do decentralized and centralized organizations whether it's from personal reasons just because they don't want the credit in some cases or in some cases because having the credit is dangerous and on the other hand the advantages of taking on that leadership role. Well the thing about a flat structure is that it's a flat unstructured. So even if you're on top of it still major basically at the same level as everybody else but organizations you know. Companies these are hierarchies for the most part and so if you have that role at the top of that structure well. It's a lot higher than you'd be if you were at the top of a flat structure. All of this comes back to one of my favorite books. It's really short and highly recommended. Did starfish and the spider by Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman. I read it actually before I became interested in Bitcoin and it was really kind of formation book for me. We've talked about on the show before but it's been like five five years so I figured it wasn't a bad topic to bring up again. The subtitle of the book is the unstoppable power of leaderless organizations. And if you're a fan of decentralized technologies but I've never read it I cannot recommended amended highly enough quoting from the book. A spider is a creature with eight legs coming out of its central body. It has this tiny head and usually eight is. If you chop off the spider's headed headed dies and that's exactly what happens with centralized organization a centralized organization has a clear leader. WHO's in charge? And there's a specific place where decisions are made if you get rid of the leader. You paralyzed realized the organization now. This contrasts with a decentralized organization. which is a fundamentally different animal? It's actually a starfish. At first glance at starfish looked similar to a spider appearance but the starfish is decentralized. starfish doesn't have ahead. The major organs are actually replicated through each and every arm and in reality. starfish is a neural network work. Basically a network of cells instead of having a head like a spider the starfish functions as decentralized network and you can even in nature see situations where a starfish fish has been wounded and for example in arm or even several arms have come off what tends to happen is that actually both pieces will then grow into a complete starfish and it's another another method that they can reproduce. You might say that that's inefficient from a biological perspective to duplicate or pent-up locate editor. How you even and say that word but to make five copies of all of your major orders and neural tissue? GAFFER's them this great advantage of being able to regenerate just from from a small piece it means that while starfish might not have perhaps some of the advantages that a spider does it also isn't vulnerable in the same way. That spider is to damage to you. Know very small parts of it because again it's just not centralized we're GonNa talk about this concept in a different way a little bit later. But what other comparisons do you like besides this kind of starfish in spider for decentralized and centralized organizations and kind of broader question that I wanna come to his how many companies do we actually think or how many any projects do we actually think like rough. ballpark percentage in crypto actually are starfish versus. How many might be using a network that is a starfish but in reality the are themselves

Jeff Bezos Sa- Toshi CEO United States Souto Souto Cryptocurrency Mark Zuckerberg Napster Steve ICO CIA Myers Briggs Rod Beckstrom Ori Brachman Amazon Satoshi Saito Ijaz Founder
"bar sto" Discussed on Business Wars

Business Wars

03:41 min | 11 months ago

"bar sto" Discussed on Business Wars

"Near there's a safe way you can listen to business wars without the ADS. Well it's not so secret. Actually people who subscribe to wonder plus know all about it. It's Ad Free podcast. Odd cast listening. Not just a business wars you get access to tons of other AD free wonderfully originals. Check it out at one rebe. FM Slash Business Wars plus and upgrade. Your listening experience. reince today it is May twenty-eighth Nineteen seventy-two fifty two year old lily. Gray officer thirteen year. Old Neighbor arrived as she heads out on a southern California highway to meet her husband and Bar Sto. She's been having a few problems with her little six month. Old Ford Pinto. Oh but it seems fine right now after a stop for gas in San Bernardino Gray settles into a sixty mile per hour cruise on the freeway. She sees congestion ahead slows down than changes lanes to avoid the traffic. Some her pinto stalls out. She's powerless to do anything. And just let the car coast to a stop. She's stuck on the busy highway. The car behind her manages edges to swerve out of the way but in nineteen sixty two full size Ford Galaxie is barreling straight for the driver of the Galaxy Galaxy slams on the breaks slowing to somewhere between twenty eight thirty seven miles per hour when it slams into the rear of the Pinto. The Pinto's flimsy flimsy bumper crumples and the Pinto explodes in flames. Engulfing the interior of the car gray dies on the fire. The boy is burned over most of his body he is permanently disfigured. Ralph Nader's grim. Prediction has come to pass an investigation reveals that the design of the Pinto the placement of the gas tank and the lack of reinforcement around. It made this car vulnerable to exactly this kind of accident. Worse court testimony shows that Ford knew about the facts but opted not ought to pay the fifteen dollars and thirty cents per car that it would have cost to make the car safer instead. Ford calculated that it would be cheaper rid of payout lawsuits. Then correct the problems. The boy who survived and his family Basou and there were awarded three and a half a half million dollars in damages and there are other claims about Ford Pinto bursting into flames after rear end collisions. Lots of them. At the urging of federal regulators Ford Recalls Pinto's it becomes the largest auto recall ever at the time in fact there are more to come in nineteen seventy seven. The big three automakers will recall more cars than they sell ten point. Four million in passenger cars of various models in years. Carmakers aren't just battling each other and the foreign competition now. They're grappling with the guts of their own creations. He will become an existential question. How do they hold onto once flag-waving buyers who have now become wary? The two biggest car brands in America board and Chevrolet face a cold truth. The road ahead is dangerous. Indeed from wondering I'm David Brown and and this is business wars.

Ford Pinto Ford Recalls Pinto Ford Ford Galaxie San Bernardino Gray Ralph Nader California Bar Sto officer Chevrolet David Brown America
How to Stop a Killer Asteroid

Science Vs

04:16 min | 1 year ago

How to Stop a Killer Asteroid

"GonNa Start Out Story on February Fourteenth Twenty Tain the world's finest asteroid researches were meeting for a conference in Vienna. Allan Harris was catching up with some colleagues. We had a nice evening in in a restaurant in Vienna talking-shop as people do some of that shop talk was about an asteroid that was expected to fly by Earth. The next day it had been discovered a year before and scientists were tracking it closely. They predicted it was going to just skim pastas. It was coming quite close to the earth. The scientific community entity was ready and waiting and so we were all geared up. We were expecting it. The asteroid is called DNA. It's a potato shaped rock about one hundred thirty eight it across and it was expected to be one of the closest encounters ever recorded between us an asteroid of its size. Scientists have press releases ready and interviews scheduled. It was rather exciting so with the big day ahead. Alan hit the. Hey Jude. Brush my teeth. How To wash amend just fell asleep keep in Vienna? Alan slept peacefully the two thousand miles away in the city of Chelyabinsk in Russia so so gay to Madre and astrophysicist remembers hearing the asteroid as that exploded over his hometown. Cigarette Sto Berlin the Segue says some people were frightened. He also also told us that when the asteroid exploded because the chemical reaction evolved stop. He says the air smells different. Some people even sensed different taste in the mouth they said it had some metal flavor doll across the city. The blast damaged buildings links caging in some roofs and shattering windows more than one thousand people were treated for. Injuries mostly cuts from broken glass. The asteroid ended up causing millions of dollars in damage back in Vienna Allen. Had No idea what had happened while he was sleeping. He wiped out brushed his teeth and headed down to breakfast. All I could see from where I was sitting having my breakfast was a reflection of a TV monitor which was just showing the news and the picture that keping repeated was that of a streak across the sky but then I managed to read the I think it was the word meaty or something backwards. Alan was confused Doue. The asteroid scientists had been tracking. Wasn't supposed to come by earth until later that night and it wasn't meant to hit earth it just come close. He realized that this asteroid that he was saying streak across the sky on the television. The one that had just exploded over Russia it wasn't Wednesday it was an entirely different asteroid. And that's really when I began. My jaw dropped my Georgia's dropped and I got up. I left my breakfast table. Got Up to to actually view the TV screen directly. I gave the screen. I think I saw this I just I just couldn't believe it. This was just total coincidence. Allen just stood there agape for a bit processing what he's saying. He was totally stunned but of course he he had a meeting to get to so we hopped on the Metro. We go onto the train. A dairy majorly just sitting right in front of us. They're where the colleagues from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in. I'm from NASA headquarters so all the people in the world you would want to talk about this event were right there. Did any of them have any idea that this might happen. Not at the toll. Nobody could have predicted this. We didn't know anything about it. You know the only event who predicted was out of the close approach of Wendy Allen says some researches were a little red faced. Well I think there was a little bit of embarrassment. How are we going to explain to the world that we did not see this coming? ooh Yeah I made really how are you going to explain it Ellen. How did you and the rest of the Asteroid Researches spot one asteroid that was passing by US but missed the mets lab into

Alan Vienna Allen Vienna Vienna Talking-Shop Russia Allan Harris Mets Jet Propulsion Laboratory Chelyabinsk Jude Doue Nasa Ellen Keping Madre Georgia
The Legend of Voergaard Manor

Haunted Places

02:35 min | 1 year ago

The Legend of Voergaard Manor

"Vigo hated the bore. Hide stretched tight nailed nailed to the board behind the glass display case. He passed it several times a day during his shift says a tour guide at beauregard manner. He hated the way. It's glass is seem to follow him no matter where he stood in the room he hated the way the skin was displayed. As though killing was something that should be rewarded. He tried to hide his disgust. When tourists made the same crude jokes people posed with it like they had killed it themselves themselves? Vigo was tired of looking at it pretending that it was some charming story. Legend said that the castle walls crumbled to the ground if the skin was removed despite what he said to paying customers. Vigo did not give much credence to the supernatural stories around for guard. She had never seen anything out of the ordinary. People said that the dark spot in the floor wasn't eternal bloodstain but vigo it just looked like rot. There was no reason to believe that this legend will send a tour that the others after the last guests left left Biko stayed behind sticking to the large shadows draped about the castle. He hid from the guards and crept towards the display lake case housing. The dead animal. That disgusted him so much. He bashed the glass in with Iraq. His hands stinging as he withdrew withdrew. Them Blood Weld on his fingers. where the jagged glass shards had slice them Vigo reached inside and grasped the boar skin and he tore it from its mouth leaving small pieces of hide behind the ancient nails the ground beneath I need him began to Rumble Vigo wrap the skin around himself and took off running? The Earth moved beneath him rumbling. Like a great taste roused from a centuries long slumber. He rushed up the castle steps. He tripped on the last one and toppled. The skin slid across the sto- for a moment vigo swore he saw the high ripple as if stretched over ancient muscles a powerful animal laid. Low rock fell away around him. He's swimming air before plummeting into the darkness below.

Vigo Biko Beauregard Iraq
"bar sto" Discussed on Detective Trapp

Detective Trapp

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"bar sto" Discussed on Detective Trapp

"Job isn't easy it weighs on you very heavily we really do see and are exposed to things that are very dark and are very sometimes evil at their core war and It can weigh on you in a definitely ages. You definitely affects your life. You almost need to have something that is driving you to continue to do it and I firmly believe that this is where I'm supposed to be meeker wanted me here and it in a long time to realize that. Is there a reason why I couldn't have kids. I think it's because I meant to do this. And there is definitely nothing that has been more satisfying in my life than to be at least be able to tell them other. I can't bring your daughter back but the person who did it isn't going to be able to hurt somebody else in late. Two thousand seventeen a year. After Gordon's trial doctors found a troubling uterine green mass inside Detective Jealous Trap and she had a hysterectomy she told me. There's a finality to that. The dream is gone she. He decided to throw away things. She'd been collecting her whole life with the idea that she would one day share them with her kids in her garage they were two enormous bins with old school report. Report cards notes essays book reports track shoes and trophies. She kept enough to fit inside a banker's box among among the belongings she found a grade school report in which she promised herself that she would one day. Climb Mount Kilimanjaro. Her husband was game and so a woman who had been camping exactly once announced a co workers that she was going to climb Africa's tallest peak and some people forgot who she was has made the mistake of wagering against her. Okay go little difference between reporters and guides and other climbers there were about forty people in her group and she was the only woman six seven ten fourteen hour days of climbing climbing every day. She watched the helicopters crossover head to rescue the weekend the unlucky and she wondered. Will that be me tomorrow. Her lungs were scorched and one of her toenails fell off on the six day. They stood on the summit in a place. The Messiah call the House of God God on a recent day. She went to the Black Palm Tattoo shop and orange and had the artist. Inc Mount Kilimanjaro on her upper ribcage. The tattooed tattooed joined eleven others scattered around her body most of them hidden under her clothes. There's a Mickey Mouse Tattoo on her leg that she got in her teens and plans plans to have removed because it evokes bad memories of the boyfriend she escaped the swallows under her collarbone represent the children she conceived but I did not bring to term who soul. She hopes to meet when she dies but most of the tattoos. She refuses to talk about not to her friends. Not Not to her husband and certainly not to reporters. She won't discuss the mirrored white staffs on her left wrist or the series of mysterious numbers on her upper right arm arm which looked like latitude and longitude marks and are fascinated about all these crazy tattoos that I have none of them make sense now but they are throwing a story. They're all scar. Are there a scar. There is one circumstance in which she might actually tell those stories. You can get a confession. Would Utah Story Right. Yes I might the difference between killer walking and killer going to prison. Oh absolutely pointed your arm and said I need to know I mean yes. It Ain't no me I wouldn't lie. There's one more part to this story. The unknown victim Jane Doe Number Five the young black doc woman. Gordon claimed he abducted from Beach Boulevard on Valentine's Day. Twenty fourteen where her face should have been among the photos of the other victims. There was this justice silhouette. Nobody even knew she was dead. Trap was certain that somebody somewhere must be missing. Her people always ask and why have pictures of my victims up on wall and it's it's a reminder when I when I come in for work it's they're the first the people I see before I sit down to my cubicle and when I leave there the last ones I see and so it's hard to ignore of a black silhouette staring at you and it's a conserve reminder of your job's not done and so I knew that at that point I it was it was just me. My partners had moved onto other cases is rightfully so they have their own cases to solve and It was just something I needed to be done. I wasn't going to stop until it was finished. It's incomplete. She had combed through missing persons reports and expanding circles. She had searched city databases county databases state and national databases. She had long lists of missing young women who fit Jane Doe Number Five General Description and had searched methodically for any sign that they were alive. After mid February twenty fourteen a social media post a call to family and arrest an appearance on sex trade advertising sites she had flyers distributed around prostitution hubs in Las Vegas Texas. Oklahoma Sandiego Oakland nothing. She clenched her teeth. When people called it the dead hooker case some asked why She was devoting so much time and effort to a case that would likely never be solved much less prosecuted? According to the water cooler talk it was a hopeless effort. All she could think to say was you don't understand. She won detective of the year for a third time. This time for her work on the Gordon. Kanok's her bosses asked if she'd consider promoting to sergeant as she approached her third decade with a badge wasn't at time to move up she liked the idea of a pay hike but it would mean leaving homicide rotating take back to patrol packing up the second floor desks. She had fought so long to sit at. It would mean giving up Jane Doe Number Five who who else would pursue it with such fury. She told the bosses. No she wasn't ready. Her husband noticed the case seemed to have taken can hold of her with an intensity bordering on obsession. It was incomplete and she's not somebody that's would ever be acceptable acceptable to to have something unfinished about acceptable. Every morning. She pulled out the list and went down at again. She called Families Emily's and studied jail logs and crossed off. Names all through two thousand fourteen and two thousand fifteen and two thousand sixteen an end to two thousand seventeen. There was one name. She could not eliminate the name was sable picket. She had been nineteen eighteen when she vanished in February. Two thousand fourteen. A bail bondsman had called in the tip. She had been arrested for prostitution in Los Angeles early that month bonded out and vanished traps studied the photo attached to pick its arrest warrant. She was black five foot three just one hundred and three pounds. She had pigtails. She looked like a kid. She fit the description. Gordon gave the trap was trying to prove a negative that pick it no longer existed. She hoped she was mistaken. But the young woman didn't show up in any jail or arrests logs. She had posted nothing on social media. She was just gone. It was two separate things it was. Who is Jane Doe and then I was trying to prove that sable live and so it was it was two different searches whenever I sit down on my desk and I'm like okay I'm GonNa work on? Mike girl trap called pickets family to get details about her background sable had grown up in common with her grandmother. Michelle Malveaux just just a happy. Go lucky girl a full life. She did what she wanted to do. She wrote points. She liked to write pretty black chocolate younger pretty hair dimples looking at smart she she yeah she was a happy jazz. He lacquer mothers that Sables Mother Dana Lewis. She said sable was a cheerleader at Compton high school and that she wanted to join the airforce but failed the math portion of the test. She met a man she called her boyfriend. and to me they get brainwash about all the money. Pretty purses get your nails done. Go Get your hair done. British shoes driving a nice car and then showing her up with the other girls had Louis Vuitton Gucci purses go shopping in Beverly Hills eleven competent. But you shop in Beverly Hills. What young girl wouldn't want it sometime in early? Two thousand thirteen eighteen after she was baptized at a local church. Sable picket stood in her grandmother's Compton Kitchen and nonchalantly even proudly explained that she it had been turning tricks. She said she was entrepreneur that it was easy money and I had to tell her in the kitchen out. Say No stable Oprah. It's October Kapur. You got a long way to go honey. Grandmother's home is a shrine to Jesus with a big Bible in the living room and verses from scripture picture on the walls I just what if I told you raised like that out no why you do. An ad just went ballistic address. I started fussing and cussing. She knew she wasn't getting off that easy for months after sable left for the streets. Michelle's phone phone would ring at odd hours. Sometimes in the middle of the night there'll be silence on the other end and she thought it must be sable may be trying to work up the courage to say she wanted to come home maybe just wanting to hear her grandmother's voice. Meanwhile Sables Mother Dana was working at a food for for Lassen Bar Sto during shifts. She hoped the phone would ring with news. E adding have no appetite smoking cigarettes going crazy just worried we can you do worry and wonder where your child is. Does she got Dr. I've been talking to this family for almost three years. Not really given a much information and instead just asking a lot of questions it to me she will always call me check in have a heard anything about sable and I would tell her no. I haven't heard.

Jane Doe sable Gordon Mount Kilimanjaro Michelle Malveaux Dana Lewis prostitution Beverly Hills meeker Africa Louis Vuitton Oklahoma Compton high school Utah Kanok Las Vegas Compton Kitchen Lassen Bar Sto
"bar sto" Discussed on SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"bar sto" Discussed on SGGQA Podcast – SomeGadgetGuy

"Qa podcast channel. I'm one Carlos bag now. Some gadget the guy the S G G of this terribly name podcast series in the Qa stands for question and answer. I like to make these interactive discussions fun conversations to start off off our week and we're GONNA be leaning hard on the QA. Today I have no show notes. I have no plans We're we're we're doing it live. We're doing this on the fly. I this is going to be another fun. loopy podcast my wife and I. We spent fifteen hours in the car yesterday with With a very strong willed toddler a four year old. Who I I? I don't think enjoyed being in the car for almost fifteen hours yesterday. And this is coming off of the tail end of a week of travel. So we we were way off our schedules way off our sleep and it was a mad dash to get home too so we could sleep in our own beds we we're sort of inbetween pockets of storms and there were some alerts and some warnings and maybe we might get some more snow. Do we totally didn't get more snow but it it was It was pretty great already seeing some some crazy awesome traffic here in the live. Chat Steve Q.. Three Becker Matt Tyler Gary the firemen All LFA missed you bud at some gadget. I hope you had an awesome week with your family. I mean Thanksgiving Wchs giving is our holiday. I might have to subject you to some to like some home movies about. We do of how we due Thanksgiving up. 'CAUSE WE DO Thanksgiving up right. It was a it was a delightful week several days between visiting my my family and my wife's family we didn't even have coverage apparently rural New Mexico doesn't have the most robust data network and infrastructure thorough. Couple of days. There right. I'm just my phone was a camera because it's all a good. Do Matt Tyler fifteen hours man. The US is massive. So okay I the drive from Los Angeles to Albuquerque is fourteen gene and change if you followed the the the posted speed limits and then you have to account for taking a stop stretching your your legs getting out letting your your your daughter run around and be crazy for a little bit. I actually I gotta say so Lexus. Four years old that that is a that is a bit of a hall we had planned to stop about halfway. Grab a hotel. Get some sleep but we were feeling pretty. Good My wife and I we got real ambitious vicious We we sort of had a conversation with legs. Letting her know what was going to happen. She was very displeased because she wanted to stay in a hotel. And so we I had an old tablet and we fired up the movie and let her watch A couple of movies. That kinda calmed some of the angst. We did get into a bit of a screaming. Fit As we were nearing Bar Sto but we were all. We were pretty confident. She was just hired snacks and she wanted like a real meal. She was hungry. And so what we had was a h- angry toddler and So we we stopped embargo. That's a what is it. That's roughly three hours from where we live so it was like the last stage. You know we've been in the CAR Harford. Twelve hours ish and We're getting into the home stretch. We stop we pulled to a Panera bread. They have MAC and cheese he's LEX IS ECSTATIC. She's out of the car and eating Mac and cheese and all what's right with the world so after having just recently Lee been screaming and throwing kind of a bit of a temper Tantrum. We get her back into the car. After eating heard adult sized portion of Mac and cheese just she had a spoon a fork and it it was like I was motion blur as she was shoveling this Mac and cheese into her mouth even with the snacks. I mean it wasn't like we starved. Her I mean we had food on the road is just you wanted a meal so we get into the car. She's been playing this game where she's a pirate and she even talks with a little pirate voices. They're going after the bandits. We'll be looking for the buried treasure. Her we play that game for about five minutes and then she goes pirate. Mommy Pirate Daddy. I'm tired I love you more than all. Oh the treasurer buried around the world. But I'm going to bed and then she just went to sleep. This is like never happened before. LEX never just goes to sleep on her own. It's always a bit of a cajoling. Her leading burn herself out but she was content. Jetta a full stomach. She was wrapped up in my Hoodie and blankets. You know the air was cool but the heater was on our feet so the car was warm and we just got that one lovely moment of the most content toddler ever telling us she loved us more than all the buried treasure around the world and then then we made the bandits walk the plank so it was a it was actually I mean there is a middle section of the drive that was rough but I love desert driving like when they're CAS. I like to drive from L.. A. TO VEGAS because it's just I love that mountain desert driving same thing Arizona's a bit rough. They love pulling over cars with out of state plates. So you set your cruise control to one mile under the speed limit and just ride it out but New Mexico Driving California driving having high desert driving is just lovely. I mean that's that's where you get that old sense of route sixty six and the the freedom of the open road and I love it. I mean I genuinely only enjoy it. You put on some cool music. I you know my wife and I got to have brilliant conversations about movies TV and music and what we're GonNa do with our family the and you know the the vacation we just had so it was actually a really nice day but I'm exhausted was it was a along along Dr Let me get this out of the way here from Alaa Hassan Sixty one on periscope scope saying Hello John Nixon. Yeah People Steve Q.. Three Becker he also had a vacation he's back from a weeklong cruise. We got a couple of photos from him on the The Patriots it looks like he had a good time to love. Lev Lavon ask Joe. Hey One how was your thanksgiving. Thanks giving was was phenomenal. Thanksgiving is my holiday in my family. Thanksgiving is roughly three days of prep prep in cooking and then days of leftovers and Thankfully we had enough time to do it upright this year where we were out there we were doing all of the prep work We had a Turkey. We had two different kinds of mashed potatoes. We had Sweet potato with scallions. So they were like cubed roasted sweet potatoes or scallions we do a corn and Broccoli baked dish. It's kind of a corn and Broccoli casserole we We do the Green Bean casserole but we did it with fresh green beans and and My sister made her own mushroom soup. So it was almost this like like almost this I don't I don't know the words failing me now now because I have zero sleep but was just phenomenal. It was like this like mushroom red wine soup. That was super flavorful We did a Pumpkin Pie. We did a Mexican chocolate pecan Pie. That was really good. That was new We we hadn't tried that one before. my dad always smokes a Turkey and my mom always IMPRESA Turkey so we had to smaller Turkeys but for US having tube smaller Turkeys or about pretty big turkeys and then we had ten when people for dinner but then most of the family stuck around so we had two days of leftovers going through everything it was it was pretty remarkable job out asja dot nic pirate going after the bandits aren't the pirates bandits so you have to understand. My daughter loves telling STORIES WHERE VILLAINS WINS learn lessons and become good guys so on her pirate ship. It's her pirate family and we sail the seas looking for buried treasure. But we don't take things from other people because taking things from other people is wrong so then when pirates board our ship we make them walk the plank so they get all wet and then when they get all wet then we can teach them lessons on how to be better so we let them back on the boat after they've learned their lessons and then we can all work together. So it's adorable. I really wish I could say like Oh. I was teaching my daughter how to be a good person. She kinda came up with this scenario on her own so we ran with it. Would it was really cool like my. My Dad sort of jumped right in. We were driving around Albuquerque and she started playing it. Because it's just termination game and my dad. Just kind of you know lieutenant. Colonel Doctor Dad Retired air force just went right into talk about those pirates those bandits and then my daughter had to teach. I'm like well we don't hurt the bandits because we're gonNA teach the bandits and my dad thought that was hilarious. Lebanon's Joe Kids are amazing. Amazing little people they really are Charlie Spirit Song Magon. Jeez Yummy and it was a good. I'm so I haven't been to a panerabread in forever was is the only place where I figured we could get something. That wasn't just another burger and fries because so sick of like doing fast food on road trips. So panerabread isn't like amazing amazing but I was able to get a salad avocado in it Wife got like Turkey Chili and then when we saw Mac and cheese on the menu we we go to the register and the guys you want the kids Mac and cheese. And you're like how big's the ball and he puts up like like this Little Cup Little Cup of Maggie's that's not gonNa work for my daughter she she can eat so get the adult and it is. It's like a platter of Maggie's and we set it down in front of her and like I said just has Manian Devil Motion Blur. That's all we would have been able to get it was it was pretty phenomenal. Talks with TJ one. What was your favorite dish from Thanksgiving? Oh Oh man. That's a tough one. I got to say I think the the family favorite that the one that we've never experimented with The one that we ah we all sort of eliminate I is Is My mom's stuffing so she let's She she makes a sour dough bread. She cuts it up into really thick blocks and she lets go stale. And then it's a it's a variety of different veggies. He's carrots and parsnips. So you know spicy carrots with sausage and A little time a good then a couple little cubes of small fruit like like a little bit of Apple. And you kinda mix all that up together and then it gets cooked in Turkey And it's phenomenal so like you get those big cubes of a st dried out stale sour doges soaking up everything in there and and it's it's super versatile so like you can eat it like a meatloaf you can put it on a sandwich with Turkey. He can make like a Thanksgiving sandwich out of it or you can just like eat it as its own bowl of every food from thanksgiving. So that's that's pretty killer. Mike Corner Brickley came out pretty good this year. It's a a creamed corn where we made our own creamed corn I dice up Chop up fresh Broccoli. A little bit of onion Mix them against you kinda. I'll binds together together and then you top it with Rich crackers and you kind of bake all that and it's this really I mean it's it's a corn Broccoli Broccoli really fresh tasting scoop it out. Goes really good with anything so I was really happy with how that turned out this year. Matt Tyler I had a cheese sandwich. I think I lost the Foodie war. Matt Tyler is out in the UK. I kind of feel like if the UK had to celebrate.

Turkey Mac Matt Tyler Steve Q US New Mexico Albuquerque Matt Tyler Gary Panera bread Carlos Lexus Joe Kids CAR Harford UK Bar Sto Apple Arizona Colonel Doctor Dad
Finally, An All-Female Spacewalk

Short Wave

02:01 min | 1 year ago

Finally, An All-Female Spacewalk

"Back in March NASA got US real jazzed up about an all fee Male spacewalk for the first time a one hundred percent female team was gonNA float outside the International Space Station and take care of some astronaut business needed a medium sized spacesuit and only one medium suit was ready to go not a great look for NASA Women Social Media blasted the decision including Hillary Clinton who tweeted make another soup and then fast forward to last Friday Christina Jessica with that the emergency service closed it finally happened I can't we are so proud of you and got a degree today astronauts Kristina Cook and Jessica Mirror both in medium-sized suits floated. into open space to replace faulty equipment related to powering the station but I'm pregnant working with us this morning in this is thirty five years after the first woman space walked in for Ellen Sto fan a former chief scientists at NASA that's too long to wait the you know the time that we have between these milestones You know I just shake my head a little bit because I it's just women are completely capable of getting the job done and in this case it really was a question of opportunity and equipment and now that it's happened it's great you know the fact that they were women was irrelevant they got the job that needed to be done on today on the show NASA celebrates the first all female spacewalks doc but how much progress has actually been made and I get to talk to Christina and Jessica the history-making spacewalkers themselves very briefly from space station this is NPR how do you hear me we have you loud and clear NPR. How'd you hear US

Christina Jessica Nasa International Space Station NPR Jessica Mirror Hillary Clinton Kristina Cook Ellen Sto One Hundred Percent Thirty Five Years
On This Day in History: The East German Balloon Escape

This Day in History Class

04:07 min | 1 year ago

On This Day in History: The East German Balloon Escape

"Welcome to this day in history class where history waits for or no one today is September Sixteenth Twenty nineteen the day it was September Sixteenth nineteen seventy nine eight people escaped communist East Germany by floating over border fences to West Germany and a homemade hot air balloon. The German Federal Republic better known known as West Germany was created in nineteen forty nine when zones controlled by America Britain and France merged the Soviets then created East Germany also known as the German Democratic Republic from their zone of occupation though Berlin the former German capital well was situated within the Soviet zone. The city was divided into West Berlin and East Berlin East Germany built the Berlin Wall in nineteen sixty one to cut off the allied occupied West Berlin from East Berlin and surrounding East Germany. Many people attempted to escape East Germany see for West Germany motivated by troublesome political events in East Germany and better living conditions in West Germany but east Germany punished and demeaned and people who tried to flee the state the border was hundreds of miles long and made of metal fences with barbed wire watched by east German soldiers in watchtowers towers with searchlights sirens fleeing was punishable with fines and imprisonment and many people who tried to make it over the border were killed by landmines in cards still refugees attempted to flee using Abor Riecke tactics mechanic Peter. Sto Vic and his friend Rick Layer Guenter missile were eager to leave oppressive East Germany so they got the idea to escape with their families a hot air balloon after watching television show on the history of ballooning they studied how to make a balloon and realized that to carry eight passengers plus the weight of equipment and materials they would need beat a balloon that could hold ninety nine thousand cubic feet of air they bought rolls of material and bedsheets from shops around. East Germany and their wives stitch spend together to make the balloon the burner was made out of propane bottles and a stove pipe. The cast iron platform had posted on the corners for hand holes in rows anchors and the guardrail. What's a clothesline the whole time they were building the balloon. They were still going to work in their first. A few tests of their balloon were unsuccessful and they experimented with different materials to improve the balloons construction on the night of July third one thousand nine hundred ninety nine the cells family went to a meadow about twenty five miles from the border and attempted to make the trip to West Germany. The vessels cels had backed out afraid. The plan was too risky. Unfortunately the balloon dropped to the ground due to water vapor that added weight to the balloon in in the family did not make it across the border. They abandoned the balloon and wet back home fearing the East German authorities would be on their trails Thune soon. The Celtics decided to build a new larger balloon on September Sixteenth Nineteen seventy-nine. Both families went to the launch site. I took a twenty eight minute hot air balloon trip across the border into West Germany people who lived in Iowa the Bavarian town near where the hot air balloon landed offered the family's food money clothes housing and jobs the Celtics later moved to Switzerland then back to Germany after German Senate reunification in one thousand nine hundred ninety. The story of the balloon escape has been told in a book and movies. I'm eavesdrop coat and hopefully a you know a little more about history today than you did yesterday.

East Germany West Germany East Berlin West Berlin German Democratic Republic German Federal Republic Berlin Wall German Senate Celtics America Rick Layer Abor Riecke Britain Thune France Switzerland Iowa Peter Twenty Eight Minute
An Interview With John McKenna, Chairman of Recreational Aviation Foundation

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:03 min | 1 year ago

An Interview With John McKenna, Chairman of Recreational Aviation Foundation

"We're speaking with john. Mckenna who is the chairman in one of six co founders of the recreational aviation foundation or simply r._a._f. Korea created during a backwoods campfire discussion in two thousand three the r._i._f. Has developed into an organization that stretches from the pacific to the atlantic and beyond what exactly is the purpose of the r._i._f. I think our mission statement says it pretty well. It's to preserve protect and to maintain and creates recreational opportunities rare scripts for people across the united states komo early for recreational opportunities so we're talking about remote airstrips when i have in my mind is grass gris drips in the woods. Is that what we're talking about. That could be certainly what you might see or think of if you were to do the poster but they r._a._f. Has really taken to the fact that where people can go and enjoy themselves with their plane or have a fun time they also count and <hes> so we might sort of break it into two kinds of airports one which would be known as backcountry airport which might somewhat fit that descript or that you just suggested and the other is <hes> perhaps same front entry airport that isn't necessarily buried in the in the back woods or in bottom of a deep canyon if might frankly c._b._s. Not on the lakefront edger <hes> on the edge of town. I think of some in oregon that are on the beach people can frankly fly into their bonanza go for a hike or go set up their tent and bring their children or their grandchildren or friends and <hes> for a bike ride or whatever the case may be so the stereotype might be as you described. We'd like to think that it's expanding recreational use and preserving the fun places for people to go with an airplane. So how many airports like that are you counting and are they endanger of closure well. There are certainly some that are very definitely in danger and when i say danger there are activists that perhaps don't share the same interest in aviation that we all do and they would just assume that airplanes in any way shape or form place would go away and they candidly work at making that take place so there's certainly people who are actively taking to close certain airstrips in certain parts of the country then there are frankly ones where might go but at the other end of the spectrum they've just been forgotten about and there's some use but not a lot so people fly by and they asked the question. I wonder could you land there. Can i land there and our first filter is does it have some recreational value or some interest to it that people might enjoy once they get on the ground bill today. Today i find myself standing in stover mont and we spent a great day yesterday exploring some of this area with some friends many of which you would know touching down on grass airstrips all up and down the shores of lake champlain up near mount marcy and in the mountains of vermont bond and you may not think of that as that country flying but it was a landing in some spectacular places with spectacular views and lots of things extraju yeah actually i've been there and it's a beautiful part of the world i know you're from the west the news the taller mountains than they have in the east but that can be pretty rugged around stowe vermont well isn't that the fun part about airplanes and that is that we get the opportunity to see things that maybe aren't in our backyard and and yes. You're absolutely right. I might have been one of those previously biased people who thought that all the mountains in the west but i can assure you they're not <hes> <hes> somebody left behind right here in vermont and they they go up to some tall elevations and i'm convinced we don't have the corner on the market working out in the west funny so the r._a._f. Is sixteen years in to its existence into its program. How would you evaluate your record so apar- astonishing i think it would candidly i'm both at times stunned and more often humbled when you start out with six people who literally have an idea and sort of parked himselves around a campfire and you find yourself involved with an organization fifteen almost seventeen years later that has some ten thousand plus members scattered all across all fifty states in twelve or fourteen eighteen different foreign countries and you know bill. One of the most interesting things is the foreign members that we have is the r._a._f. Who i every once in a while get a chance is to engage with and their reason for belonging is they want to preserve what we've talked about here because it's probably already been lost in the place they live and they're willing to support it here just on the off chance that they may get a chance to come and do it themselves or they think that we should be pretty vigilant about this because we live in a very special spot that has some are unique freedom attached to it. What are the greatest challenges or obstacles to the r._i._f. Fulfilling its mission. It's probably not much different than most of our businesses or anything else and it's the people and the challenges we are nearly one hundred percent volunteer organization. Asian people are all volunteers. They all do this because they love it. It's surely always the <hes> the challenge to keep the right kind of leadership and people who <hes> have the time to devote to it to that end. We are blessed with a great deal of folks. That are are just passionate about this stuff so i may be you. Don't worry about the same things that others do but yet at the same time i do worry about the interest in aviation. I was just asked yesterday as a matter of fact what do you think of the drone industry and how will that affect what you're doing and we're about the places whereabouts saving the places and maybe my children or grandchildren will help them up way be he delivered to some of these special places in some sort of a vehicle that i don't quite understand yet today but if the place doesn't exist then perhaps they won't make any difference. I feel like we're on the right track. We're basically land conservation group that plies airplanes and probably not bad place to be not a bad place at all and you're at a very very good place right now up in sto- in thank you for your time and good luck with the program. Thank you so much. We appreciate all you do. We've been speaking with john mckenna the chairman and co-founder of the recreational aviation foundation this william garvey editor of business in commercial aviation magazine. Thank you for your time and

Recreational Aviation Foundati John Mckenna Vermont Chairman Korea United States Oregon Komo Stover Mont Lake Champlain Mount Marcy William Garvey Editor Co-Founder One Hundred Percent Seventeen Years Sixteen Years
"bar sto" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"bar sto" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Draw usable electricity directly from the soil specifically using the outflow of electrons from the respiration of job actors now. This is meaningful in in the context of what they were doing in Peru because some villages and dwellings in the Peruvian rainforest don't have connections to the electrical grid mini don't at the time <hes> they were doing this project. <hes> the <HES> project leaders claimed that it was like forty two percent of villages in the rainforest did not have connections in those that do have connections are at risk lose power entirely when lines are knocked out by floods as happened in March two thousand fifteen and and so this means of course after it gets dark people can't read kids can't study for school unless they use like kerosene lamps which apparently unhealthy in her heart on the is. I can imagine that <hes> so this method developed by U._T.. See in in partnership with a company called F._C._B.. Maiyo works to charge batteries and Power L._E._D.. Lamps with a special bio electric box and the box has a plant on top with roots planted in the soil and then electrodes. It's plunged into this grid of little soil buckets that are full of job actors and the metabolic interaction between the plant and the job actors generates excess electric charging soil and that electric charge gets routed up through the electrodes troths that are planted in the soil whisks those free electrons away to charge a battery which in turn powers the L._E._d.. Lamp now we're not sure how scalable this individual technology is but it shows the general principle that you can draw small at least small amounts amounts of power or electricity directly from electric bacteria in the soil when other power sources are not readily available and this seems possibly like an interesting alternative to say you know those the small scale solar panels that you see being used to power individual ritual devices or lights you know things like that yeah like various garden gnomes and whatnot light up or their garden gnomes power. Yeah I think so yes. This is the main place I feel like one tends to see this sort of technology like little little lights that go on your yard that have little solar panel on them but <hes> oh I guess I just never seen one mounted in the GNOME but I see it now can have red light up is yeah I mean I assume there's no there has someone has had to have created one of them but you know it's one something to do to power an l._e._d.. Lamp but I think this does <hes> drive home that even if you're only talking about producing such small amounts of electricity to power <hes> you know very low energy lighting effects that still can make a huge difference in the right circumstances circumstances yeah it can and you can imagine using elements of this bacterial electro biology in concert with other technologies <hes> to build up more capabilities like in his Times Article Carl Zimmer mentions that a cornell university researcher sure <hes> named Buzz Bar Sto colleagues are trying to figure out if bacteria could be of use when paired with solar panels so not in place of them but or he in concert with him in the ideas that the solar panels would convert sunlight into electric current which which would then be routed into bacterial wires down <hes> down to these colonies of a bacterium called Shoe Annella. That's the one I mentioned earlier that was discovered in Lake Oneida shoe in L.. A. And that could use the energy from the electrons. electrons to metabolize organic compounds and turn it into fuel yeah this would really be key for for carbon fixation <hes> so so the study in question here is <hes> two thousand nineteen study title Electrical Energy Storage with engineered biological systems published published in the Journal of Biological Engineering in essentially talking he kind of comes back to the virus move. You're talking about. We're essentially talking about a cybernetic energy storage system..

Peru Lake Oneida Maiyo Buzz Bar Sto Carl Zimmer Journal of Biological Engineer cornell university researcher Times forty two percent
         Sexually transmitted infections on The  rise in The  military

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Sexually transmitted infections on The rise in The military

"Seven a disturbing new report shows dramatic increases in the rates of sexually transmitted infections in men and women serving in the US military, ABC news. Correspondent Mark Remillard, a report saying that three particular infections are most concerned committee gonorrhea and syphilis around the rise within the, the nation's military services, and that has a broader affect on the military would have an effect, obviously, on the personnel both short term and long-term on their wellbeing, but also in their unit readiness and by extension the larger military military, for example, this report cited in two thousand twelve SEI's in the navy accounted for healthcare costs of five point four million. And that's in the navy alone. So there's an economic cost. There's a personnel readiness cost to this, and they're saying that part of the conservative. This is the result of more risky behavior. The majority of our military. Branches are made up by eighty four percent are male. And they say that they're starting to see based on surveys that they done more risky behavior. Especially in the age group of eighteen to twenty five so the younger male populations talking about higher rates of sex with multiple partners, higher rates of having sex with new partners without condoms and things like that, that they are saying. May may be the reason behind the rise in this, these STI's and one of the main contributors to that being what they say is potentially dating apps is actually a one of the reasons that they may be seeing more non counters in these kinds of things. This is an age group of people who simply weren't alive to hear the safe sex message that was, you know, made very, very clear in the immediate. Wake of the aids crisis of the eighties. Yeah, exactly, it actually a part of that, too. And part of this report did talk about HIV being still, obviously, a concern in the military, and that, that there may be members of the military, you don't realize that there are their fellow colleagues and fellow service members who may have HIV now rates of HIV infections are steady between between twenty twelve in two thousand seventeen the rate remained pretty steady. But the rates of these bacterial infections, which are easier to treat they, they can be used by antibiotics rather than viral infections like HIV HP herpes, these kinds of things, which have all decreased these bacterial infections like gonorrhea. And are on the rise. And that is concerning. ABC news. Correspondent Mark Remillard. Thanks for taking the time to talk with us today. Thank you,

Mark Remillard Navy ABC United States Syphilis STI HP Eighty Four Percent
Jeff Bezos unveils Blue Moon lunar lander

Radio From Hell

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Jeff Bezos unveils Blue Moon lunar lander

"Did you see Jeff Bezos? He has he did it like an apple iphone rollout or something. He has rolled out the first moon Lander. Is this a vehicle of? Yes, sort this. This is a this is something that will take people from spaceships to that are orbiting the moon down to the moon. Spaceships are orbiting the moon. They will. Before they get the thing that you do NAFTA that they're working on it. Jeff Bezos, founder of blue origin, Amazon. Dir during the announcement of the space companies vision for operations on the moon. It's pretty impressive looking machine. Mr. beezus says that he described on Thursday, a dreamy ambitious vision of the future a trillion people living in space, not on moons or planets, but in space colonies in style originally envisioned by Princeton physicist, named Gerard k O'neil the space colonies would be built by future generations bees. Oh said he and others today can do they can start building infrastructure in the short term that includes lunar Lander blue moon, a sleek vehicle that became visible as curtain in front was pulled away. And there there was a model of it and the full size model of it. He says we need to get people to the moon as the first that's building the roadway into space for space colonies. There's something about these visions that he has to have. And and what's his name? Tesla has seems on musk seems to have that I find sort of appealing and attractive and yet at the same time thinking, but wait a minute. What they're saying is there's no hope here we've got to abandon this place. It's like it's like, we we've we've ruined this place. Let's go ruin someplace else am I the moon. Happening start at the moon to get further out. That's that's just an barstool all the way to California. You gotta stop and do agree. The moon is like barstool, but you never listened to my loose on never stopping bar sto.

Jeff Bezos Apple Amazon Tesla Mr. Beezus California Princeton Founder Physicist Gerard K
"bar sto" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"From the accident and saved her from being hit by cars, the siege. Peas now looking for the hit and run driver driving elite two thousand model tan Mercedes SUV with this is indicating the car slowed down didn't really stop through something possibly beer bottles out of the car before driving off just off the water. One freeway at a Gora, Pete Demetrio KNX, ten seventy NewsRadio. Download the radio dot com app and favourite KNX to get updates on. Breaking news anytime anywhere with Canucks. Push alerts. Fifty five traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the fives. Let's get the latest on the freeways now with Manny Pacheco LAX expect minor delays on your drive into the airport. Lincoln boulevard. Traveling south is busy century boulevard. Is also slow the backup to airport boulevard. The terminals are pretty congested though. I would allow yourself plenty of time. If you're heading to LAX Lonsdale four or five south at Hawthorn, a two car collision one of the vehicles taking away the slow lane. And you're on the brakes as you approach Gardena one ten south before rosecrans, debris and lanes. Cars ran over it, actually one car ran over it. And now the vehicles over to the right shoulder with major damage heads up as you approach diamond bar fifty seven north before grand driver changing flat, the vehicle along the gore point if you're heading out of Vegas fifteen south the only significant delays. I see is out of Baker by twelve mile slowdown Czyz IX also patches of heavy traffic as you head into your MO. And bar sto one bit of excellent news. We are accident free in Orange County. Our next report ten oh five with more reports. More often, I'm Manny Pacheco in the spectrum twenty four hour traffic center,.

Manny Pacheco Pete Demetrio KNX LAX Lonsdale Orange County Gardena rosecrans Hawthorn gore Baker Vegas twenty four hour ten minutes one bit
"bar sto" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Areas here in southern California. We'll take a look at that coming up at ten forty. It sent thirty five traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the FIS. Let's get the latest on the freeways now from loose towers, and if you're gonna go up to the mountain playground SIS mcshea, take an extra blanket extra jacket and socks and maybe some extra DVD's for the kiddos because it's a tough drive getting up there where especially lots of people going up into the running springs big bear area and Wrightwood looks pretty open right now. That's that's good news for you. But I to thank tipster for calling in the LA metro traffic tip line at three two three four six seven ten seventy. He was on his way back from a bar sto and wanted to know if it was easier to cut across the eighteen through the antelope valley and around rather than try to go up to go home pass. Well, it is. I've seen it worse. Let's put it that way. It's slow coming up. The southbound side of the fifteen up into the cone junction. And then it's a little bit of slowing down towards the fifteen, but it is not bad. And and it does seem to be getting better. So I would stick with home pass. And who knows you might see some snow coming through there. And also in Encino on the westbound side of the ten before haven her still working crash there. A three vehicle injury crash that has been cleared because I'm seeing the one on one on the westbound side right at the four oh five clear up, but it's still a little bit slow on the northbound side of the four zero five getting down towards Ventura boulevard. Next reports coming up at ten forty five with more reports. More often, I'm two hours in the spectrum twenty four hour traffic center Canucks,.

antelope valley Wrightwood California LA Encino twenty four hour ten minutes two hours
Crypto rout drags bitcoin toward 14-month low

BTV Simulcast

04:37 min | 2 years ago

Crypto rout drags bitcoin toward 14-month low

"A turnaround. He discussed his confidence with Bloomberg's Stephen Engle. Take a listen. Economies work where if there's enough miners going out of business that equilibrium is near. And would you look at how markets overshoot both up and down. You can probably say close to the bottom. So where do you see prices in the short term going? So it's very difficult to tell. Initially. I thought towards the end of the year they were always a run up. You could see that last year. See that. A year ago from a lot of people predicted that it would go back again later this year starting from November and December obviously November came in passing. And it was one of the worst months for bitcoin and December right now, there's nothing new. There's no catalysts that will potentially shoot it up. So I will look at it kind of flat. And then started from new year. That's when I think with a new sentiment and momentum. Okay. What is going to be though, the catalyst in two thousand nineteen because in twenty eighteen you had a number of high profile hacks here in Japan, especially coin check in earlier this year. You had a exposed Ponzi scheme a number of different issues and potentially new regulation coming down the pike. One thing in Japan is the Japanese regulators are starting to open up again. So they're starting to approve new exchanges. They're also going to approve new listing. All of these things will start from the new year. Now would also the FSA recently gave oversight. And regulatory oversight to the operators themselves. Yes. How is that going to change? Yeah. So almost every exchange. Registered in licensed in Japan received an improvement order from governance compliance security customer assets secretary's day, these are all to protect the end retail consumer and all of the exchanges are almost complete with their improvement order. So starting new era is going to be a new beginning. How does it really work with the FAA giving you more regulatory oversight? Does that kind of close the door a new entrance though? Yes. And no. So I. A lot of the exchanges. The people who start for the garage or a startup. That's very difficult to do. Now. New entrance is extremely difficult at the same time you need to keep up with what's happening. Global and innovation is key. Especially in this industry is started from cryptocurrencies it went to ICAO's. And now it's going to security token offerings like STO's all of these things. Innovation is an evolution died. You need to continue on and you need to have that. Right. Balance isn't the Versi as well. Looking at regulation on security, tokens, exactly. So the FCC Japan was the first global economic powerhouse to regulate cryptocurrency. Now, they're looking into security token offerings, and they will probably be the first nation to specifically look at security token offerings and put legislation in particular trends, are you looking at from your clients and your customers on your exchange liquid. Are you seeing more increase in institutional participation or retail, and what side shot to that question would be the implementation of high frequency trading? What impact is that having so liquid? We're open to casual traders too, sophisticated institutional investors as well, but our sweet spot are these professional traders, and these are all high frequency traders as in any any financial product from equities fixed income. The global trend is to accommodate these high frequency traders. And obviously we provide full API's for that. So our main customer base are these professional traders and November was our biggest month in our history. In terms of transaction volume in bitcoin and also US dollars does bitcoin of a chance of getting back to the record levels nineteen thousand five hundred and change. I think you will surprise surpass it by at least. Well, that's very difficult. But I would say by end of next year. I think it will surpass the all time high. Coin CEO, Mike Maury there with Bloomberg's Stephen Engle. Well, Microsoft is calling for new legislation to govern and facial recognition software in a blog post Thursday, Microsoft, president and chief legal officer, Brad Smith advocated for human review and

Japan Stephen Engle Bloomberg Microsoft Ponzi Scheme FSA Icao FAA FCC United States Brad Smith Mike Maury CEO Secretary Chief Legal Officer President Trump
The good and the bad - Democratic midterm results

The Economist Radio

03:33 min | 2 years ago

The good and the bad - Democratic midterm results

"We started talking about wave of women nudity elected. Oh, I think it's a huge shift. And I think we'll see it it won't just be the year of the woman. I think the seeds of the decade the women were planted because not only did we elect women in a different kind of woman at the top. But we feel the pipeline with tons of women in state legislative races and county commission races and Agee's people that are running for Senate and president and governor for eight years from now we'll have won their first election last Tuesday. But what's so interesting? I think listening in we've had guests from based parties and also with different positions here on this show. It's not entirely clear who's supposed to be happy with the result. And who's supposed to be a bit disappointed. Yes. Particularly jealous. Help me out here. Well, I think the fat is hassle and having MJ for everyone. I mean, we accomplished our biggest goal which was to take that house and the singularly most important thing we also elected a number of governors, including in the three states that account for Donald Trump being president, Michigan Wisconsin, I'm his Vania. We laugh at eight by eight thousand votes, Donald Trump would not be president. If we had won those states, we elected democratic governors in all three of done democratic governors. Do you make a difference? So I think we accomplished that we also elected a record number of women and mobilized a female base. That's sad. Donald Trump lean in a way that no one else has ever done that we've ever seen in any midterm election democrat or Republican he mobilized the Trump voters, not just Republicans Trump voters. He worked hard to define the race. And did it for. Space. Not so successfully for swing voters, but he proved how formidable he is and how formidable he will be in twenty twenty. I it sounds like you gave him sort of more credit for thinking things through. Then a lot of this was sympathetic to the Democratic Party. Would I be right? Well, I think he's a brilliant strategist he understands its brand. And he understands how to create his reality show, and he understand and he's willing to play a very high risk Dacians role in that reality shows. So I think he's quite formidable letting his team has fight formative on would be very foolish to underestimate him. Because that's a great way for him to get reelected in twenty twenty that love to know, what it is that you think the democratic policy has to learn from these midterms unpack from the fact that Blue Wave became a-, depending on whether you're at Optima sto Oles so preps a series of blue splashes. I think the Blue Wave was more of a blue swell. And but I think it had that makings from the beginning. I think a lot of the press accounts were overstated that's sad. I think there are two things that we learned and saw more than learn in twenty teens one is we mobilize our base. They mobilized their this is the first time in a midterm election where both bases were mobilized. Secondly, the Democrats must get an economic message. Either the election we lost salary. The people who thought the economy was in good shape. And we were fifteen points behind the Republicans on the Konami we could make it through twenty eighteen like that. We will not win twenty twenty like that. The Democrats must get an economic news.

Donald Trump President Trump Agee Democratic Party Optima Sto Oles Konami Senate Michigan Wisconsin Eight Years
"bar sto" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. And if you're just joining us, my guest or New York Times reporter, Suzanne, Craig and David Barstow, two of the three writers who reported just a couple of weeks ago on how Donald Trump engaged in suspect tax schemes as he reaped riches from his father and deconstructs the whole Donald Trump myth about how is a self made millionaire billionaire and our chose like how much money Fred Trump, Donald's father funnel to him and his other siblings, and how they came up with schemes to avoid paying taxes making Donald Trump, a very very wealthy, man. By the time, he was a teenager. Okay. So in addition to you from the tax games, we talked about Fred Trump made a lot of loans to Donald Trump. Donald Trump has always said that he got a million dollar loan from his father and help parlay that into his into his own empire. So how much money would you estimate? Fred Trump gave Donald Trump. Jump in loans. We were able to document in real dollars sixty million dollars in loans. Not one million in today's dollars equates two hundred and forty million dollars in loans, which is on top of the four hundred thirteen million dollars in direct wealth that we saw transferred to Donna what we what we also saw a wedding. What is important? Also is that in many cases, these were loans that were never repaid would take out. We were looking at one particular year, and it was like every month. He's going back to that. And he's borrowing another couple of hundred thousand bucks, and then another five hundred thousand bucks, and then a million dollars. It was just like a monthly run to to Fred Trump to get more money, and we saw especially that the flow of loans increase as Donald Trump took on big new projects or they increase when she was suddenly in trouble you run into another financial Dench. So it was really a steady stream that went well beyond. You know, the notion of a guy in his early twenty s getting a million dollars from dad and then being off to the rays of these are loans that actually extended well into his forties and fifties. So so how did Donald Trump use the money that was loaned from his father? Yeah. He used the money for many of his ventures. He had Trump Tower money that he got from Fred Trump was used to support thought it was used to support his ventures in Atlantic City and elsewhere many of them went under. I mean, especially you look at Donald Trump's history and Atlantic City, he's got several several bankruptcies at one point he was hundreds of millions of dollars in debt. And this is a time he not only the banks hundreds of millions of dollars. He was in debt to his father and was going to his father at these very crucial times for more support. So he gets a lot of money from his father tries to build his own empire and end up in debt in a lot of instances instead of making a fortune from his own investments. It also see that when he fell, you know, when he would fall down the safety net. Was there the Fred Trump safety net was there to catch him? There's one Specht just almost unbelievable moment in the store, and you see it in nineteen ninety and this is a time in the back end of nineteen ninety Donald Trump is incredible financial distress number of his companies are either in trouble. They're facing bankruptcy. And Fred Trump had been there for him at every turn. According to the documents. We can see he's assisting him with money in one case Donald Trump's casinos. They're facing a debt payment, and Fred Trump has a lawyer going to the casino and by casino chips and walk out without placing about. It was simply a way to give Donald Trump money experience million dollars worth of and a half million dollars worth of casino chips and at this period. His father is there for him at every turn, and every document that we can see and Donald Trump at this period has a lawyer. Or one of his lawyers draft a cortisol to his father's, well, essentially, a new well, and this codicil to the will is taken to Fred Trump's house in December nineteen ninety and Fred Trump immediately sees this cortisol as an attempt by Donald to take control of his empire into potentially put it at risk and Fred Trump. Immediately says no he freaks out, and he makes a call to his daughter who is a federal judge in a lawyer and a new Cottesloe within months is drafted. That removes Donal is the sole executor of fried Trump's well inputs, Donald and Robert Trump, an Maryanne Trump in charge of his affairs. And then ultimately a new well is drafted, but you see in the depth of Donald Trump's financial life after all his father has done for him that he makes this move that's incredibly dramatic move and scarring to the family what he did. So what you're saying? I think is that at the end of Fred Trump's life were toward the. The end of Fred Trump's live. Donald Trump tried to take advantage of him for his first Donald Trump's own good to help Donald Trump bail himself out and Fred Trump, Donald father became suspicious of the sun that he had helped with so much money over so many years. What we know for sure is that Fred Trump perceived this as an attempt by his son to gain complete control over his estate in potentially to us. The the the empire that Fred Trump head doggedly impatiently built over many decades to use that empire as potentially as collateral to help bail Donald Trump out of his own financial difficulties. My guess are New York Times reporters, David Bar sto and Suzanne crag after a break. We'll talk about another scheme used to transfer wealth from Fred Trump's real estate empire to his children. I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air..

Donald Trump Fred Trump Trump Tower Maryanne Trump Robert Trump Donald Donald father New York Times reporter Suzanne crag Terry gross David Barstow Atlantic City Cottesloe cortisol Donna Dench David Bar sto Craig
"bar sto" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:23 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is fresh air. And if you're just joining us, my guest or New York Times reporter, Suzanne, Craig and David Barstow, two of the three writers who reported just a couple of weeks ago on how Donald Trump engaged in suspect tax schemes as he reaped riches from his father deconstructs, the whole Donald Trump myth about how is a self made millionaire billionaire, and it shows like how much money Fred Trump, Donald father funneled to him and his other siblings, and how they came up with schemes to avoid paying taxes making Donald Trump, a very very wealthy, man. By the time, he was a teenager. Okay. So in addition to you from the tax games, we talked about Fred Trump made a lot of loans to Donald Trump. Donald Trump has always said that he got a million dollar loan from his father and help parlay that into his into his own empire. So how much money would you estimate? Fred Trump gave Donald Trump. Jump in loans. We were able to document in real dollars sixty million dollars in loans, not one million in today's dollars and equates two hundred and forty million dollars in loans, which is on top of the four hundred thirteen million dollars in direct wealth that we saw transferred to Donald what we what we also saw a wedding. What is important also that in many cases, these were loans that were never repaid. He would take out. We were looking at one particular year was like every month. He's going back to dad, and he's borrowing another couple of hundred thousand bucks, and then another five hundred thousand bucks, and then a million dollars. It was just like a monthly run to to Fred Trump to get more money, and we saw especially that the flow of loans increased as Donald Trump took on big new projects or they. The increased when he was suddenly in trouble you run into another financial ditch. So it was a really steady stream that went well beyond, you know, the notion of a guy in as early twenty s getting a million dollars from dad and then being off to the races. These are loans that actually extended well into his forties and fifties. So so how did Donald Trump use the money that was loaned from his father? Yeah. He used the money for many of his ventures. He had Trump Tower money that he got from Fred Trump was used to support that it was used to support his ventures in Atlantic City and elsewhere many of them went under. I mean, especially you look at Donald Trump's history and Atlantic City, he's got several several bankruptcies at one point he was hundreds of millions of dollars in debt and this time, he not only the banks hundreds of millions of dollars. He was in debt to his father and was going to his father these very crucial times for more support. So he gets a lot of money from his father tries to build his own empire and end up in debt in a lot of instances instead of making a fortune from his own investments. It also see that when he fell, you know, when he would fall down the safety net. Was there the Fred Trump safety net was there to catch him? There's one Specht just almost unbelievable moment in the store, and you see it in nineteen ninety and this is a time in the back end of nineteen ninety Donald Trump is incredible financial distress number of his companies are either in trouble. They're facing bankruptcy. And Fred Trump had been there for him at every turn. According to the documents. We can see he's assisting him with money in one case Donald Trump's casinos. They're facing a debt payment, and Fred Trump has a lawyer going to the casino and by casino chips and walkout without placing about. It was simply a way to give Donald Trump money experience. Half a million dollars worth of. Caterina half million dollars worth of casino chips and at this period. His father is there for him at every turn, and every document that we can see and Donald Trump at this period. House a lawyer one of his lawyers draft a cortisol to his father's well, essentially, a new well, and this codicil to the will is taken to Fred Trump's house in December nineteen ninety and Fred Trump immediately sees this cortisol as an attempt by Donald to take control of his empire into potentially put it at risk and Fred Trump. Immediately says no he freaks out, and he makes a call to his daughter who is a federal judge in a lawyer and a new cortisol within months is drafted that removes Donal is the sole executor of Fred Trump's well and puts Donald and Robert Trump an Maryanne Trump in charge of his fares. And then ultimately a new well is drafted, but you see in the depth of Donald Trump's financial life after all. His father has done for him that he makes this move that's incredibly dramatic move and scarring to the family what he did. So what you're saying? I think is at the end of Fred Trump's live were toward the end of Fred Trump's live. Donald Trump tried to take advantage of him for his for Donald Trump's own good to help Donald Trump bail himself out and Fred Trump, Donald father became suspicious of the sun that he had helped with so much money over so many years. What we know for sure is that Fred Trump perceived this as an attempt by his son to gain complete control over his estate in potentially to us. The the the empire that Fred Trump head doggedly impatiently built over many decades to use that empire. As potentially as collateral to help bail, Donald Trump out of his own financial difficulties. I guess our New York Times reporters, David Bar sto and Suzanne Craig after a break. We'll talk about another scheme used to transfer wealth from Fred Trump's real estate empire to his children. I'm Terry gross. And this is fresh air..

Donald Trump Fred Trump Trump Tower Maryanne Trump Donald father Robert Trump Donald New York Times Suzanne Craig reporter cortisol Atlantic City Terry gross David Barstow David Bar sto Donal million dollars four hundred thirteen million forty million dollars
"bar sto" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:22 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is fresh air. And if you're just joining us, my guest or New York Times reporter, Suzanne, Craig David Barstow, two of the three writers who reported just a couple of weeks ago on how Donald Trump engaged in suspect tax schemes as he reaped riches from his father and deconstructs the whole Donald Trump myth about how is a self made millionaire billionaire and our chose like how much money Fred Trump, Donald's father funneled to him and his other siblings, and how they came up with schemes to avoid paying taxes making Donald Trump, a very very wealthy, man. By the time, he was a teenager. Okay. So in addition to some attacks games, we talked about. Fred Trump made a lot of loans to Donald Trump. Donald Trump has always said that he got a million dollar loan from his father and help parlay that into his into his own empire. So how much money would you estimate? Fred Trump gave Donald Trump in loans. We were able to document in real dollars sixty million dollars in loans. Not one million in today's dollars equates two hundred and forty million dollars in loans, which is on top of the four hundred and thirteen million dollars in direct wealth that we saw transferred to Donna what we what we also saw. What is important? Also is that in many cases, these were loans that were never repaid would take out. We were looking at one particular year was like every month. He's going back to dad, and he's borrowing another couple of hundred thousand bucks, and then another five hundred thousand bucks, and then a million dollars. It was just like a monthly run to to Fred Trump to get more money. We saw especially the the flow of loans increased as Donald Trump took on big new projects or the increase when she was suddenly in trouble you run into another financial ditch. So it was a really steady stream that went well beyond, you know, the notion of a guy in his early twenty s getting a million dollars from that. And then being off to the races these loans that actually extended well into his forties and fifties. So so how did Donald Trump use the money that was loaned from his father? Yeah. He used the money for many of his ventures. He had Trump Tower money that he got from Fred Trump was used to support that it was used to support his ventures in Atlantic City and elsewhere many of them went under. I mean, especially you look at Donald Trump's history and Atlantic City, he's got several several bankruptcies at one point he was hundreds of millions of dollars in debt. And this is a time he not only with the banks hundreds of millions of dollars. He was in debt to his father and was going to this other these very crucial times for more support. So he gets a lot of money from his father tries to build his own empire and end up in debt in a lot of instances instead of making a fortune from his own investments. It also see that when he fell, you know, when he would fall down the safety net. Was there the Fred Trump safety net was there to catch him? There's one Specht just almost unbelievable moment in the store, and you see it in nineteen ninety and this is a time in the, you know, the background of nineteen ninety and Donald Trump is incredible financial distress number of his companies are either in trouble. They're facing bankruptcy. And Fred Trump had been there for him at every turn. According to the documents. We can see he's assisting him with money in one case Donald Trump's casinos. They're facing a debt payment, and Fred Trump has a lawyer go into the casino and by casino chips and walk out without placing about. It was simply a way to give Donald Trump money. Three and a half million dollars worth of half million dollars worth of casino chips and at this period. His father is there for him at every turn, and every document that we can see Donald Trump at this period. House a lawyer one of his lawyers draft a cortisol to his father's well, essentially, a new well, and this codicil to the will is taken to Fred Trump's house in December nineteen ninety and Fred Trump immediately sees this cortisol as an attempt by Donald to take control of his empire into potentially put it at risk and Fred Trump. Immediately says no he freaks out, and he makes a call to his daughter who is a federal judge in a lawyer and a new cortisol within months is drafted that removes Donal is the sole executor of Fred Trump's well and poets, Donald and Robert Trump, an Maryanne Trump in charge of his affairs. And then ultimately a new well is drafted, but you see in the depth of Donald. Oh, Trump's financial life after all his father has done for him that he makes this move that's incredibly dramatic move and scarring to the family what he did. So what you're saying? I think is at the end of red Trump's live were toward the end of Fred Trump's live. Donald Trump tried to take advantage of him for his for Donald Trump's own good to help Donald Trump bail himself out and Fred Trump, Donald father became suspicious of the sun that he had helped with so much money over so many years. What we know for sure is that Fred Trump perceived this as an attempt by his son to gain complete control over his estate in potentially to us. The the the empire that Fred Trump had doggedly impatiently built over many decades to use that empire as potentially as collateral to help bail Donald Trump out of his own financial difficulties. I guess our New York Times reporters, David Bar sto and Suzanne Craig after a break. We'll talk about another scheme used to transfer wealth from Fred Trump's real estate empire to his children. I'm Terry gross..

Donald Trump Fred Trump Trump Tower Trump Maryanne Trump Robert Trump Donald Donald father New York Times reporter Suzanne Craig Craig David Barstow cortisol Atlantic City Terry gross Donna David Bar sto Donal million dollars
"bar sto" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"This story that Russ and his colleagues have contributed to the question to you. David. What could come from all of this. Well, an illegal sense we've already seen the New York State Department of taxation is sending my open an investigation. I think you might see investigations in New York City and New York state, which would have been deprived of lots and lots of tax payments under the system. In addition to the IRS journalistically. This is an amazing story in one of the things that I really love about it is it gives us a template for where to look next, the schemes that Donald Trump's father and Donald Trump of self employed to avoid income tax. It gives us a place to look, okay. Did they repeat those those same schemes and other context is something that's happened more recently under Trump's own leadership and not under his father's David. Do you think we will see? And I guess this calls for a judgment on your part, but you live this story to do you think we will see the president's tax returns in our lifetime. We really asking me if Democrats will ever win control of any house of congress because I don't think Donald Trump will ever give them up at the Democrats do take either house of congress. They will have the power to request and if they want to make public, the president's tax returns, imagine that they will if they have that power, this mother things like some lawsuits that are going on regarding the emoluments clause, where there could be some discovery, it's possible those could lead to the revelation of the president's tax returns. But unless the Democrats get political power and use that power to get those returns, I don't think we'll ever see them because the secret of life is timing. These are live pictures from Andrews Air Force base as the president has landed from. Tonight's rally in Mississippi reminder. The first lady is on her trip on the African continent in Ghana. I off on her trip. He will now switch to Marine One fly over to the White House. Russ just for the folks who are going to read it, have already read it. Is there any way to. Explain to lay people the effort that went into this, how many months? How many people, how many lawyers, how many words the the of of our effort. So it was eighteen month effort. Three of us, my colleague, sue Craig, David Bar sto much of that locked in a room with the shades drawn. We brought in a group of sort of pocket advisors very experienced trust in the state attorneys, accountants, and whatnot who we could run by our findings as they came up. And then we also developed a network of sources of people who were in and around the Fred Trump Donald Trump empire during the pertinent years here. And then through that process gained access to a couple of hundred tax returns later, Fred, Trump's businesses, his general ledgers, his Bank statements, and we were able to collate all that into a sort of cohesive narrative of what transpired. On top of everything else. You must now deal with environmentalists because I'm told you're a tree killer. They added eight pages. Apparently there's a print version of the New York Times website that they put out every day and they added eight pages to the print run that meant bringing in union typesetters and printing workers tonight for the New York Times. So maybe you've made the holidays more joyous for some families, and there are some trees in the Pacific northwest that are no more..

Fred Trump Donald Trump Donald Trump David Bar president New York State Department of t New York Times Russ Trump New York City Pacific northwest Andrews Air Force Ghana congress New York IRS Mississippi White House self employed
"bar sto" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"No, we have proof of the three medevac planes coming in with no explanation for them other than the fact that we know also the air traffic controller I can speak about him now because he passed away this spring. He was also a working one evening when a seven fifty seven with leave the bone yard at Mojave air force errors, Aaron spaceport is called which is just north of of Andrus or excuse me up Edwards, and he was an air traffic controller there and this airplane would fly out. What's called VF are? Flight rules, and it was painted as a US air seven fifty seven. But it wasn't it was leaving from the bone yard. And so now, he had a son who's friend worked on that plane and knew about this plane coming out, and it did this almost every Saturday night leading up to nine eleven and before it would leave a bus full of what this kid thought. And I say kid, you know, twenty year olds and stuff what he thought was a busload of what looked to him to be flight attendants with a little black suitcase on wheels on this seven fifty seven every Saturday night. Well, one of the first night that he found out. It was in a near miss out by bar sto, which is just outside of the restricted airspace of Edwards with the continental seven thirty seven and the continental pilot had to do what's called evasive maneuvers to not get a mid air crash, and they were screaming at their traffic control. So this guy from Edwards started watching this airplane, and this was in the weeks leading up to nine eleven every Saturday night. It would take off. And once it got to Vegas. It would file a flight plan from in the air and go to Washington DC Dulles airport. No, go ahead. Go ahead. So what we are pretty darn sure that that airplane was up at westover and was used as a get-away playing for those people that were part of the operation northwards part the charade or the hoax that was nine eleven those people that weren't part of it. Were their lives were ended there. I'm assuming of because you wouldn't want to shoot them. You wouldn't want to have all the blood and all that. So the best we can figure is they were gas with something somewhat quick and lethal and then their bodies were taken out of that base. The you don't you don't you don't touch a lot on the buildings you primarily concentrate on the planes. So I would assume you would accept the theory of people like Dr Judy would who claimed that the buildings were taken down. Yeah. You know in book four and this article exposure, I've actually been working with an architect who built not just airports, but skyscrapers in the west coast. So we've kind of worked really closely and actually are talking about doing a series of nonfiction books together nonfiction. Uh-huh. Real scientific stuff because we've got enough data to do that. I just wonder a number of architects, architects and engineers who believe that. It was a controlled demolition. Silence through might and now no there might in the dust. And so how do you do Nanno ceremony? This is kind of interesting Nanno, sir might is only available to the US government. I think the government of Israel has it too. But it's a long ways to commute with that stuff. So let's say it's the government issued product. So let's say if you could only buy butter at one store, and you found butter, you would know that came from that store. Right..

Edwards US bar sto Andrus Aaron Vegas westover Israel Dr Judy Washington Dulles twenty year
"bar sto" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"No, we have proof of that three medevac planes coming in with no explanation for them other than the fact that we know also they air traffic controller I can speak about him now because he passed away this spring. He was also a working one evening. A seven fifty seven would leave the bone yard at Mojave air force errors, Aaron spaceport is called which is just north of of Andrus or excuse me up Edwards, and he was an air traffic controller there and this airplane would fly out. What's called VF are? Flight rules, and it was painted as a US air seven fifty seven. But it wasn't it was leaving from the bone yard. And so now, he had a son who's friend worked on that plane and knew about this plane coming out, and it did this almost every Saturday night leading up to nine eleven and before it would leave a bus full of what this kid thought. And I say kid, you know, twenty year old or so what he thought was a busload of what looked to him to be flight attendants with a little black suitcase on wheels get on this seven fifty seven every Saturday night. Well, one the first night that he found out. It was in a near miss out by bar sto, which is just outside of the restricted airspace of Edwards with a continental seven thirty seven and the continental pilot had to do what's called evasive maneuvers to not get a mid air crash, and they were screaming at their traffic control. So this guy from Edwards started watching this airplane, and this was in the weeks leading up to nine eleven every Saturday night. It would take off. And once it got to Vegas. It would file a flight plan from in the air and go to Washington DC Dulles airport. No, go ahead. Go ahead. So what we are pretty darn sure that that airplane was up at westover and was used as a get-away playing for those people that were part of the operation northwards part the charade or the hoax that was nine eleven those people that weren't part of it. Where their lives were ended there. I'm assuming of because you wouldn't want to shoot them. You wouldn't want to have the blood and all that? So the best we can figure is they were gas with something somewhat quick and lethal. And then their bodies were taken out of that base. The dude you don't you don't you don't touch a lot on the buildings you primarily concentrate on the planes. So I would assume you would accept the theory of people like Dr Judy would who claimed that the buildings were taken down. Yeah. You know in book four methodical exposure, I've actually been working with an architect who built not just airports, but skyscrapers in the west coast. So we've kind of worked really closely and actually are talking about doing a series of nonfiction books together nonfiction. Uh-huh. Real scientific stuff because we've got enough data to do that. I just a number of architects, the architects and engineers who believe that. It was a controlled demolition. Termite. And now no through might in the dust. And so how do you? Well, they did they did Nanno Fairmont. This is kind of interesting Nanno, sir. My is only available to the US government. I think the government of Israel has it too. But it's a long ways to commute with that stuff. So let's say it's a government issued got act. So let's say if you could only buy butter at one store, and you found butter, you would know that came from that store, right? Do you think we're beca because seventeen years have gone by now that people just want this story to go away? Would they do they really want answers? No, I think they really truly want answers. I they response to these novels even has been phenomenal. And also there's people like yourself George that lost. I I mean, they're lost family and friends in the planes, or in the towers, they all contacted not all of them. But lots of them have contacted me. There's a guy who lost his son in the north tower lobby. Bob mcilvanney, I think his how you say his name, and he called he contacted me and thanked me after the first two books for giving him closure. At least he knows. Now, what was going on in that second book? And this is not. I mean, I found this in the New York Times, I just couldn't believe other people hadn't figured it out. Now, the only. We did we have in the second book and deception. The DA guys that that we're following this Isreaeli drug ring massad agents, and they have these surface to air missiles and their intention was to take down a jumbo jet leaving Dallas well, remember after nine eleven there was a an American Airbus leaving JFK in November. And it came down crash. Don't forget TWA flight eight hundred is well, we're gonna come back and talk more Rebecca, but as far as my uncle Google, Douglas Gol G O W E L L..

Edwards US Bob mcilvanney TWA New York Times Vegas Andrus westover Aaron bar sto Nanno Fairmont Dallas Israel George Washington Dr Judy Google JFK Rebecca Dulles
"bar sto" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:21 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"No, we have proof of the three medevac planes coming in with no explanation for them other than the fact that we know also they air traffic controller I can speak about him now because he passed away this spring. He was also a working one evening. One a seven fifty seven would leave the bone yard at Mojave air force errors, Aaron spaceport. It's called which is just north of of Andrus or excuse me. I've Edwards and he was an air traffic controller there and this airplane would fly out. What's called VF are? Flight rules, and it was painted as a US air seven fifty seven. But it wasn't it was leaving from the bone yard. And so now he had a son who's friend worked on that plane and knew about this plane coming out, and it did this almost every Saturday night leading up to nine eleven and before it would leave a bus full of what this kid sought. And I say kid, you know, twenty year olds or so what he thought was a busload of what looked to him to be flight attendants with a little black suitcase on wheels get on this seven fifty seven every Saturday night. Well, one of the first night that he found out. It was in a near miss out by bar sto, which is just outside of the restricted airspace Edwards with continental seven thirty seven and the continental pilot had to do what's called evasive maneuvers to not get a mid air crash, and they were screaming at their traffic control. So this guy from Edward started watching this airplane, and this was in the weeks leading up to nine eleven every Saturday night. It would take off and once it got Vegas. It would file a flight plan from in the air and go to Washington DC Dulles airport. No, go ahead. Go ahead. So what we are pretty darn sure that that airplane was up at westover and was used as a get-away playing for those people that were part of the operation northwards part the charade or the hoax that was nine eleven those people that weren't part of it. Were their lives were ended there. I'm assuming of because you wouldn't want to shoot them. You wouldn't want to have the blood and all that? So the best we can figure is they were gas with something somewhat quick and lethal and then their bodies were taken out of that base. You don't you don't you don't touch a lot on the buildings you primarily concentrate on the planes. So I would assume you would accept the theory of people like Dr Judy would who claimed that the buildings were taken down. Yeah. You know in book four methodical exposure, I've actually been working with an architect who built not just airports, but skyscrapers and the west coast. So we've kind of worked really closely and actually are talking about doing a series of nonfiction books together nonfiction. Uh-huh. Real scientific stuff because we've got enough data to do that. I just wasn't a number of architects, the architects and engineers who believe that. It was a controlled demolition those through might and now no thirty eight in the dust. And so how do you do? Nanno fairmont. This is kind of interesting Nanno might is only available to the US government. I think the government of Israel has it too. But it's a long ways to commute with that stuff. So let's say it's a government issued product. So let's say if you could only buy butter at one store, and you found butter, you would know that came from that store. Right. Do you think Rebecca because seventeen years have gone by now that people just want this story to go away? Would they do they really want answers? No, I think they really truly want answers. They response to these novels even has been phenomenal. And also there's people like yourself George that lost. I I mean, they're lost family and friends in the planes or in the towers. They've all contacted not all of them. But lots of them have contacted me. There's a guy who lost his son in the north tower lobby. Bob, michael. Dany? I think is is how you say his name, and he called he contacted me and thanked me after the first two books for giving him closure. At least he knows. Now, what was going on in that second book? And this is not. I mean, I found this in the New York Times, I just couldn't believe other people hadn't figured it out. Not only did we have in the second book and deception the DA guys that that we're following these Isreaeli drug ring massad agents, and they have these surface to air missiles in their intention was to take down a jumbo jet leaving Dallas well, remember after nine eleven there was a an American Airbus leaving JFK in November. And it came down crash. Don't forget TWA flight eight hundred is well, we're gonna come back and talk more Rebecca, but as far as my uncle Google Douglas Gol geo W E L L..

Edwards Rebecca US Andrus Bob Aaron George TWA New York Times westover bar sto Nanno fairmont Dallas Israel Washington Edward Dr Judy Google Dany JFK
"bar sto" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Now back to, Hollywood three sixty with Carl. Amari now back to call the police And I went up the stairs the second floor, to Gomez room was half. Open I gave it a shot And there was Linda Lee On the, floor to bullets in that Cops should. Be used to say it's like that but I guess I'm not They have to. Leave the body lying, here like this grant that'll be tended to by style how could little duties but you believe she did what. Choice have I got even. The first time I asked not to. See Gomez he was. Like a tiger she was really in love with him he was. Infatuated with he went for him because he was. Slickened duck honeymoon's over now Gomez is dead and your wife is up for murder You could say they both got what is dead Good you're a stickler for Justice Somebody's coming You you're supposed to be Command MRs. Bar sto what's happening here we've. Just been talking about What are you doing here take. A look on the floor When the league your friend Gomez girl who killed her new me because. She was Gomez. Girlfriend because you were jealous? Our same way you killed Gomez Now that's a lie what are. You doing here In the league found me this. Afternoon in me to. Be here at six Commissioner She said something about holding an auction altered towns page but it's true, I went by Commissioner told us the whole story just. Before I came over here you're gonna tell the police anything remotely We. Don't speak for yourself bar sto what, I believe her, I got the. Same phone call from his lead she was going to try to sell the name, of Gomez murderer Gomez murderer interesting embarrassed Which reminds me I've got to call. Headquarters headquarters yes I have to tell them where. They can find Linda Lee body what I know it comes, as a, shock. To. You But nobody had any idea where Linda's body wasn't till you told me a. Few minutes ago at your hotel are you're talking about you said you pick the Atlantic club because it would be impossible to get from there to. Gomez, place in ten minutes you say you. Slept when you mentioned Gomez place because you were the, only person in the world who, knew Linda had been shot in this, room now, wait a minute was a simple mistake you assure somebody heard those, shots when you kill Linda and you took it. For, granted they'd send for the police long ago but unfortunately Barstow nobody. Did hear those shots and therefore nobody called the police Down that foam wait a minute now barstool would it down I don't like to lose Commissioner I killed Gomez because he. Was taking my wife away from. Me and in. My book got that right As a man also. The right to shoot Linda Lee what was she taking away from you Linda Lee, was here tonight I shut Gomez from the. Pirates gape she saw me going. To help me throw the blame on pendant for a price and then she made the. Price too high I. Guess I wouldn't pay and she was going to settle me out to the highest, bidder so you shattered you can see yourself Give me back what is on your head you are my wife live. And you were, running around with Gomez. You're not the first man who ever got their run around bar sto right in Jubail out I told you I don't like. To, I'm not going to let you to, keep me from winning either gonna take. More than another, murder to keep you from losing now nobody else has anything on me Commissioner except you two. Without drawing any, stories you're I know Yeah Remember nobody heard the shot the last. Time I don't think they'll hit. A Take. A last look around Commissioner because This is it Commissioner Maja. Commissioner I'm okay I gave MRs pasta with trail at the headquarters and it looks like a good. Thing I did I always bet your beautiful Mijo, but believe me you'll never looked lovelier I love you But somebody coming over. To our table. Oh MRs bars I realized that I'm. Partly to blame everything that's happened. But I. Didn't wanna thank you for all. You did forget it being, a policeman is my business they have. A Commissioner. Victim Tending to be shielding me with that yacht alibi did, he was pretty transparent..

Gomez Linda Lee Commissioner Gomez room Commissioner Maja murder Amari Hollywood Mijo Carl Jubail Atlantic Barstow ten minutes
"bar sto" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"We were in the seventies my dad used to be a truck driver and stop off and go to the restaurant where we didn't have a break and everything and then back in the seventies there wins all the rest areas that they used to be and i saw two red ice i didn't even know tarantulas had i they got him and he just got closer and closer my dad says get away from their you know hurry up and finish to that the tarantula and sure enough my brother being smaller you gotta rock and threw it at that torrential between me and my dad and we both right up to the truck on the road we wouldn't we wouldn't even go into san we stayed on the road cars by everything honky now today we we didn't want to get close to the tarantulas due at least they weren't the two foot big tarantulas that we were talking about earlier you talked about the shamans they're called mateus says and they people have seen them where their all black they like to hiding pres but you know they're there because he likes to rattle the tree limbs they they know when there's a bad spirit or they don't win when somebody's gonna die in your house and they get they get next to your house or your tree and they stay there because they're the ones to carry off the spirits shamans of the engines were the ones who i thought of these they used to be all these be ravens condors texas turkeys you know something big you know with a large wooden spent well i appreciate that man well i'm going to try and squeak i'm going to try and squeeze in a couple of other callers here so before we get to the top of the hour and just hope that at some point we can get back on again hey murphy in bar sto knows a little bit about what those caves we were talking about earlier keys i was a firefighter for the stage for about twenty eight years and to live in north india area but i've been all over those mountains up there all i mean all over southern california but you know the stories patton with his paint training and chirac summit and desert center there are quite a few ks out there that the government actually built in the side of the those mountains.

mateus murphy california patton chirac desert center twenty eight years two foot
"bar sto" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"bar sto" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"We were in the seventies my dad used to be a truck driver and we would stop off and go to the restaurant where we didn't have a break and everything and then back in the seventies there once all the rest areas that they used to be well we got off and i saw two read i i didn't even know tarantulas had i but they got him and they just got closer and closer like that says get away from their you know hurry up and finish the tarantula and sure enough my brother being smaller you gotta rock and threw it at it that torrential elite between me and my dad and we both riding up to the truck on the road we wouldn't we wouldn't even go into san we stayed on the road cars by everything honky now today we we didn't want to get closer to threats the new release they weren't the two foot big tarantulas that we were talking about earlier they come yes two and they have seen them where their all black they like to hiding pres but you know they're there because they likes to rattle the tree limbs they they they know when there's a bad spirit or they know when somebody's gonna die in your house and they get they get next to your house or your tree and these stay there because they're the ones to carry off the spirit shamans and the engines were the ones who i thought of these they used to be these be raisins condors texas turkeys you know something big you know with a large wingspan the chew stuff appreciate that men well i'm going to try and squeak transcribes in a couple of other callers here so before we get to the top of the hour and just hope that at some point we can get back on again hey murphy in bar sto knows a little bit about what those the caves we were talking about earlier some of the cays i was a firefighter for the stage for about twenty eight years and happen to live in north india area but i've been all over those mountains up there all i mean all over southern california but you know the stories of patton with his paint training in toronto summit and desert center there are quite as uk's out there that the government actually built in the.

murphy california patton uk toronto desert center twenty eight years two foot