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"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

08:27 min | 4 months ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"And really super nice like I think much nicer than I am but a lot of what we do in this business is also our capital. He's focused on making sure that this is something that runs smoothly and spar so for the most part I would say really for the most part. We work together because he's easy to work. I get more annoyed than he gets annoying. But there's definitely those days were were out to dinner or Radha family dinner. It's it's all focused on the That sometimes it's like let's talk about the else. Yeah so good luck with that. I know hard. It's so funny ally. United we come from like Fourth Generation Armenta. Our parents were in the in the clothing stores in south Florida. And I can remember as a little kid and I'm getting to a question here from your kids because around. Our dinner table and our mood was dictated by how the business was going. And if you tell your mom and dad were things weren't good because you know there was tension and there was we always it was. I mean it was just the only way we knew life but it was just the way the world works. It was everything was around. The business has been challenge for your kids to. They're definitely a little bit of that. You know the good days are great and and bad days alike frustrating and scary so now. They're older of my son's at junior college he interned for us a couple summers ago. My middle son is really not into the business. He's a comedian performed. Stand up and write the film though. I don't see him going into this and my daughter is into it and I think she loves it but she also doesn't want to be bogged down with anything that I asked her. How does she? She's sixteen well. That would explain that. So where does your kind of you know plan with the business? Well let me back up. Did you ever? I keep going back to the money questions. But did you ever take like outside investment or if you just kind of growing it organically but it so after three years out of my apartment? We really were growing at a rapid rate. One year. We grew like three times so we that we have more products. Were people were plans to grow the business. We moved to the garment center so after we moved to the garment center. That's when we really started to have this base and act is real big player in this crazy world of business. And that's when we added a Advisory Board the are visory board consists of only friends and my brother in law. So it really consists of advisory of people in private equity also friends of ours. You are very contestable in fields like PR and marketing. And some of those people who are advisory border also investors in the business. Got It so the majority is still my family. And then we do have investors with our advisory board. Gotcha that's awesome not to switch gears but it's one of the reasons why the aforementioned with our family is in the clothing. Business is one of the reasons why we were so excited about Dr Bar to not have inventory and listening to you thinking about having to have inventory again and ironically we started a product business and we had inventory. Dr Are but it it set out to be. We say so far away of having to deal with inventory so I know how stressful it can be found that kind of business. Yeah I mean. There's been one season where we went through a transition of do production per cent and moving our product over to China and India. Like nothing came at Right. We literally took everything back and we were able to keep the business going. It's the type of stories you hear where they fail. So it clear. How quickly businesses could fail if their product isn't made properly or things go wrong and the inventory. Is You know an interesting heart. Because in the beginning when I started I had no inventory and that work to my advantage but also disadvantage because people who wanNA product. They want it right away. They don't WanNa wait eight weeks so that was also interesting. How to decide have inventory that did put be under? It's such an interesting lesson. I was actually just talking to urban decay. That business was growing. We share a private equity investor. And they were talking about trying to cut inventory when they got there because they were trying to save money and the it was actually the opposite. It was like they need to invest inventory. So they're expecting this person to have some cost-saving revelations but actually he was like no you need to really invest inventory and the catalyst to grow that company in leaps inbound from their make sense we have our sales goals and the only way sale could get there that they have that immature to sell you commit to things that we had Johnson styled or colored than we have all the inventory and you don't make certain assumptions but the only way we're going to grow with if we have that inventory so it could be salt so this is funny because allies usually. I'm usually on business. And now he talks about the the softer side. But she's asking about money and I'm GonNa ask for everyone listening at home. I have to admit I wasn't familiar with your company before but I knew you were going to be a guest on your show but the website is beautiful. The closer beautiful. But if someone's listening you know in isn't familiar with your company closed. I know you described your halter tops that got you or is that the right word halter top they got your famous close enough business guy trying to talk the halter style. But how would you now? What is that you know fast? Forward ten years. What is the line consists of how you describe it to people? And where did you get it now online only so initially I was viewed as an items business because I had tops and I won sexy dress because it was really really many people boarded unique but I call the draft. I like many Lao. I like mini. How I need to get you ever join everything. Then he loves that they like what you're wearing guys can't see here but she's very miserably. Sexy thank you have green tiny. I'm sure yours so that was great. The items business additionally I just wanted to Tops for my jeans. You know the customer wants more than just a top and something that looked the same so I had to grow my collection and then I added chance because for my look. I didn't want to show anybody else's pants. I wanted to sell all Ramey Brooke so we made some pants. And then we some of our top lend itself to dresses so we ought addresses and you know slowly but surely we were adding a lot of different silhouettes to the Ramey Brookline and we got on growing and growing so we added to protect the fabrics different silhouettes and I wanted to be viewed as a bulk collection because in the department store they were only putting me with items so I didn't get my own rack. They were putting my red top with other people's red tops. And I didn't want that I wanted to really build the brand and I wanted to women to say go to a party or going out at night or have to go from. Were to dinner like Remy Brooke so now. We are a full collection with dresses. Which is still the majority of our collection bottoms. We add on this past fall which had sold out waiting lists. Wow really hard it was hard and also would as you know where your background with the inventory? I had to commit to all this debt on that. Nobody bought the department store. Like maybe we don't really need you On going to sell it at my own store on my on channels and sold out within forty eight hours. Wow so that's been excited so we now have. We have outerwear we have lasers. We have suiting. We have corrupt which I added your to go which I did that out a win because I like a full look when you go to the pool had to tell like. I don't WanNa like walk around in my babies. I WANNA cover up this. Jill looks like walking to my baby dude but currently out. I like that with a necklace shoes. The whole nine yards and I realized with the corrupts when I went away Christmas time. Nobody knew.

Advisory Board Ramey Brooke Radha south Florida Ramey Brookline Dr Bar China Jill Johnson India
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

06:18 min | 7 months ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"The division has terrific. I mean we've got you know our supply chain or marketing or accounting it's more of the CEO type role the sealed that really drives the overall brand ties. It all together and can really drive that bus and keep everybody in their lanes jeans and driving towards singular goal. What is big all now? Look at her. We've got about one hundred sixty. See some stores open. We've got about one hundred seventy plus in the pipeline twenty. We'll open about fifty next year. Wow fifty I thought more than one a month. It was really hard then we got to like to month but fifty is a whole nother neck at all again. It just gets a little bit more complicated. It gets bigger at at some point. We'll bring a private equity partner and I think the key is you've got to. You WanNa have met with a lot of private equity probably a lot of people you've met with a lot of times. They WANNA look under the hood and you see what you have. They're all up in there. Yeah they are and so I think for us. It's setting all those this things up you know in the sense of we had a supply chain issue. It's something that I didn't want to really address when we're dealing with things like that. I felt that we need to get things back on track which we have get our growth back to where the standards that we expect to get the quality you know I think qualities Bergeford or so as far as the the growth. I don't know I think that the rose will continue and I'm at some point at the right time will bring a partner in that that will assist us. That'd be thought international yet at all. Have you tested anything or is it same with us. Words just too challenging right now right now. Aren't we changing those vegetables. National trying to train the delay. The I'm sure we will go international. We just leave it to go through what you guys have got to go through. But we've got to go through a variety of different from well. I'm sure yeah with. The product is international now primarily and and it was a lot. It's still is a lot in terms of getting getting them up to code and the debate yeah the labeling and the different like requirements different countries have that's a as a massive undertaking still is so I think that goes was again finding the right partner. Go ahead developed uptick there wherever it is when that right partner comes along for the time being we've been pretty busy with the. US has plenty of space in in the US. We still haven't developed. We've found that we've been more of a lifestyle brand than we have at treats brand meaning that the eulogize Jews the yogurts whenever they start usually about spring break AAC and you'll see sales dropped precipitously after Labor Day for us is usually come to the first. The year is starting to lose weight getting shape you know and so forth so usually the January one will be slow this time of year just because people sort of say give up. Ah My hair coat and tie dress party. But but once January hits you know you don't like go to the Gym Star Trek Solutions. Bam you see the tourist bus down. And which extends a cycle of our business march to September from January till about mid October November. Yeah Yeah what kind of marketing do you guys do. Is it for us. It was all in the early days. It was like a lot of word of mouth and now it's a lot more institutionalized in and social media and digital marketing but mostly digital I'd say his mostly local situational digital digitized or digital ads. We use yell as Instagram. We use facebook. We don't use influencers a lot. We will use influences like openings. But the traditionally they will be specific sort of a micro influence in the sense of they might have ten thousand followers and that local community city of young great. You know I think. A lot of a lot of companies are utilizing those smaller micro influencers because of that usually kinda get much more engagement in like a local for us trying to feel local in that area for us as you're driving there to get it. It's not a product that we're shipping anybody so you've got people that one two three mile alawradio. Some have you went into airports. We have been able to crack that not yet. It's been almost many deals in airports. But they've always fallen apart. We've been saying way. We've we've almost and why it's just been very problematic through we've been with hosting air market all these guys and gone through the RFP's and everything else involved eventually. I'm sure we'll get flare so funny. Seem like it would be so much easier for juice because for us it's so challenging because you can't operate near ports on your own you have to go with one of these companies and they have their existing employees that that but that can be trained to. I would think you know. Make juice but for us to train someone to be licensed cosmetology. Yeah I would think so. I was talking to host about that and a lot of people cross train so they may work at starbucks in nectar ended a bookstore. And whatever. But you can't exactly work at starbucks in a bookstore and then go do do hair right back and see how that would be a challenging for me when I first juice space in airports even though its nectar juice bar we actually saw more bull largest PEMEX's this is the bulls eye represents probably thirty five percent of our sales and I would think that most people travel in just like most people. You talk about back in two thousand ten shifting their patterns when they go to airports you still. You'll see the Orange County got Carl's junior and Green Burrito and whatnot. I know for me. I'd rather get a green juice or a smoothie house able jump on a plane so the idea that the airports haven't adapted as quickly as they come surprises me as we need to wrap up his. Our time is up but it has been so fun talking to you know. My favorite part was about turning the vegetables just hitting. It's a really amazing business that you have. I hope that you bring more to La. Get here is congratulations to continue growing tips on the lease of the simpsons. You're.

partner US starbucks CEO facebook Bergeford Orange County La Carl bulls
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

11:41 min | 7 months ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"Just because I thought that'd be more coherent manageable type deal and I just didn't know what it looked like in for our type of experience when you put inside say of a a gym such a store within a store in our space just doesn't really work very and so just isn't what it should be so my concern and was if I put I'd WanNa have a good experience let's evaluate after five so we were just down in Austin a couple weeks ago and so far. The experience were very well. I would imagine that what we're doing is outlining. What we believe you know twenty is GonNa look like where we want to penetrate which stores of all but I think their their strategic? We've had similar concepts similar experience. Switz- torn store where it's you know there's so many brands that want to have a drive or inside of their establishment. The economics don't work. You can't get the same volume we've managed to come up with his a and there's one in Balboa obey club with our friend but where it's an amenity for like a hotel where they just really want to drive are so we've done deals where they pay us a management fee and we put a dry born there so it's a win win. Might be similar for certain gyms or others would want an actor. It is the the win in Las Vegas about it and I was just too expensive to rent some the three hundred thousand dollars and the traffic. I know your store I was just by your store not too long ago Actually I was there because as a revived next door was just saying my dad but anyway but the stores pay at Dj going. It's packed. There's energy was you know whatever you go over to win and it's more guys like maybe you're on our throw us in that same bucket more than that age a little slower. There's not as much retail traffic and I just couldn't imagine getting volume that we needed even though it's nice to say they put win on your on your the COSMO. We're at such great energy there. It's so funny with Nick is not to go on a tangent but we had the toughest time ever getting into Vegas because the rents were way too. High Economics didn't make sense to have a forty dollar blow out in and paying a million dollars in rent until to their credit the cosmopolitan came to us and they got it. They wanted the brand and they wanted the activity and they've made a deal that work and now everyone wants us in Vegas because they saw that but it was it was a long time to get into and what I love about the location because after I left revive and I felt better the Nice Stop to look into Dr Martin got the DJ This that and not only that but you had people actually that were watching it as a theater. There's ten or fifteen people had nothing to do with hair. They were just watching. What was going on for my from a retail perspective and you guys may do this as well frequently frequently? I'll go to different brands or I'll just sit and watch just to look at tumor actions or other engaging or how. They're walking what they're looking at. And so I think it's fascinating. I just love to see the the the experiential aspect of it was just fascinating. Well I think that's kind of where retail is that right now. There's got to be in. which obviously you're onto as well? It's like you have to have an experience. I wish we could have a DJ a full bar all dry bar locations man and when we started nectar that was experiential. Part was very important to us. There's about two and I have three pounds of vegetables that go into every sixteen ounce drink and so we moved the juicy into the very front right next to the cat and so you stand there and you can watch people it also seeing an apple or several just disappeared turn into the Jews in whole foods to or you can see it all being made the same way. Yeah so all of our locations have that a- that aspect and now is is things evolve so quickly what's next iteration look like in twenty one twenty two and so those are the kind of things with the buying inhabit changing with more delivery service providers such as the door dash and post meets the world which had a tremendous impact will positively negatively. Did you guys use that. I mean do people use it for our post mates for nectar or are you on that platform again. That's another one that I resisted for awhile and this is a crazy stat. We tested did it in October of last year. We launched it system wide in January and as of the end of Q.. Three represented thirty eight percent per sale system system. While is that crazy. I would have never believed in it if instead order juice over just to do so and that does combine online's that does combined sales with our with our APP but the but the impact that it's had they charge a lot for the Delivery Services which we obviously have to raise the prices does have an impact on the experience. Listen it's a convenience. Yeah I mean I post mates more than I care to admit. I order a lot. I don't go to stores almost ever anymore when you're on Saturday crazily sitting there and all of a sudden the doorbell ring. And there'd be one guy with little bag and be from Mike Shirley bagels and loved one Bagel on my for my son. Yes big twenty minutes later. starbucks shows up the cost. Your son's ordering on his orders is come down. It's expensive shows up. And so it's just a Howard you know not to go up and a total tangent but it is cost prohibitive. It's like so expensive to work with them. Is that something that has evolved off grid changing or is it. Is it still onerous. It is onerous. It's an you'll they're going to argue that it's all incremental and I don't think there's anything that's proven that that's really incremental. Well I think maybe some of it is but it has caused retailers such as myself starbucks is now testing pickup. Only location if you follow the history of you know Howard Schultz and starbucks. He's always been weird. I want experiential. It was always about the experience you know he started with the Italian. The coffee and the Espresso machine is I expressed machine. He wouldn't allow in because US too high and you couldn't have I contact person. And then he argued against the process the one that made it automatically anything evolution of going from how important it was to to have the aroma and the experience inside of starbucks to evolving to drive through to now evolving to a five hundred square. Foot store that is only for pickups for DSP's he's and for online delivery service providers so dash postman. Sorry the jargon so I just think it's interesting to see how in the food space that will evolve in the sense of. Do we start going to a smaller footprint. Are they going to need to be experiential Santeuil in store my guess is urban areas like Los Angeles New York. We could probably get away with and probably doing good job with five or seven or eight hundred screaming store instead of Oy fifteen hundred feet and use it more that because people wanted to go the more active and more urban areas so yeah and to your earlier point in the parking the problem you know for me like I wanted to go get a law day. Hey this morning and there's no drivers that which is frustrating and then to go and try to get a juicer. A lot you have to park and parking so bad I mean. That's you know Crimea River but that's the problem in La. I want to switch back to something you were talking about before with your supply chain and how you manage to for us. It's probably easier to well. It's not actually quality quality control across the nation. It's civil society lists right but you know we have to put in training and obviously you to train vegetables. No but you have to make sure so. You're sourcing quality actual so I'm just curious how you've managed to his that. was that a growing pain. Have you successfully the vegetables. Vegetables watching veggietales tracks ourself up exactly true streaming name. Yes she's laughing because in brain thinking about being trained mostly fruit. I've actually better. Okay sorry enter that you train your alley. Listen I wore the now. He switched that up a little bit if you look over the past ten year history. I'd say the biggest issue has been over the last couple of years and it has been directly related to supply chain is a brutal. Yeah we've got one hundred and sixty locations. It's just in time inventory. It's fruit it's produce. It's a hundred and fifty different specific skews for our stores have after we deliberate every day and our supplier goes to deliver to nine locations in Houston on a Friday and the driver. Forget to drop off the Asai. So that Franchisee can't can't survive sables for the entire weekend and they've got a hustle out to you know Kaczynski happy happy. And so I think that we recently just signed a Very significant contract with Cisco were converting over to main line distribution out of forty or fifty nine million dollar contract give or take launches December sixteenth and consolidated all supply chain with under one roof with contracts with all the drug suppliers and Cisco acting as the main line distributor. But it really has been a huge issue and it goes back active one of my earlier points when we're talking about the idea of how do you franchise meaning frustrating for food. You know sitting inside the brand awareness and say Idaho or the other areas that we're discussing now all of a sudden if you've got a distributor just by for one local store in Idaho your cost of goods with me much higher now with us by forty million dollars worth of product each year to Franchisee in Houston that was paying forty bucks for box apples now by twenty five dollars you know so it helps everybody's system why to do it but to put this process together been brutal. The growing pains the frustrations Franchisees. He's I have great empathy and I have thankfulness. They've been patient with us in that but Fixed isn't it amazing that you know you had this one idea alley. Had this idea for for one stop shop in in Orange County and now you're talking about fifty million dollar contracts Cisco and Supply Chain for an entrepreneur listening at home you know. You're the entrepreneur the creator I mean now you no supply chain because you've had to force yourself to but how did you transition in the earlier days to make those leaps. You're still making those leaves but it was interesting. I when we got to say twenty locations occasions we were big time. Now we've got to bring in you know the big dogs so we remember feeling that way. Realize number of bonding not a monument milestone. Yeah and so. We felt that time we had to bring in some professionals. That's higher starbucks not the other and so we did bring a bunch of people in from starbucks. But what we found was they didn't and have the passion that they were in more of a managerial role which the argument trained and was one of the plug and play in like okay. We're the books. Were the manuals. There wasn't a strength. There wasn't a passion. The experience they provided didn't drive the brand and so he said you know we're going back to the passion play concept and so that's sort of where we stood at the twenty store location patient as far as the evolution of it. I asked you a question. We were playing golf number months ago. And what was one of the biggest changes that you guys had. And I've heard you allude to this I think on on some of your Other shows as related to bring in a CEO or CEO or things of that nature and to this day. I've been reluctant to do it. But now we're finally ready to go ahead and they do that because then it allows me to free up what I do best. You know I'm not. I don't run supply chain. I don't know anything about supply chain. Frankly I know how to look at things but we've got a great team. That doesn't I'm good with Brandon overall marketing but the day to day and optimization of how to really efficiently do it. Is You know something that I think. Professor at the size is we are now. is we really need to bring in that talent. And I've been maybe kind of like you were at the beginning. Reluctant to give up that control. Right yeah you really been reluctant. I mean I got like in. What was it like your four that I was like everyone was like you gotta start you know bringing in other people you know how to? It's so funny. Hey this is such a conundrum in and there's no right answer because you know I think founders are always reluctant and rightly so because you hire the wrong paid talent. That's not passionate Russian it. You'RE GONNA lose your culture and you'RE GONNA lose. What made it special nectar and drive our special because you guys put your passion into it so but you have to find the right person that has the expertise but also Has the passion and the department heads..

starbucks Las Vegas Howard Schultz Cisco Houston Switz COSMO US apple La Austin Idaho High Economics Delivery Services Mike Shirley bagels golf Nick Crimea River
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

11:57 min | 7 months ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"Oh we're so away or should we just say it's a fun. podcast felt loving life learning and getting played. Oh and we need to say that it comes out with new episodes every Thursday on dear media. Do we say it's called. That's so retrograde. Yes that's a retrograde every Thursday on dear media the APP will you initially asked about the initial vision of that meeting. We didn't open the first door thing. And Hey we're gonNA open you know. Five hundred thousand or whatever it was it was one and then it was too and then it was three and frankly never even thought about the money wasn't as though yes made sure they were profitable. It wasn't like hey if I build a lot I can cash out and make a lot of money it was. We were four years. Here's into it and bankers will get frustrated with me because they ask you know what was my exit strategy. What I don't know yet you know we still relate to sounds? It's like you're talking about cross. My mind wasn't until you're probably four years in when we had to get a little bit more serious on that aspect of it but going back to your point on the franchise. is they do the blood. The sweat the tears. It sounds like you probably have similar experience. We didn't have the corporate infrastructure you know in Texas. We didn't have the brand awareness. We didn't have the people really understood the market and didn't have the district managers. We didn't have. Have you know all the stuff that we have here in southern California so it ultimately came down that we're GONNA maintain corporate ownership in the areas where we have the corporate structure which is southern Californian Arizona Zona and then franchise the rest of the country. But then be specific. And how we franchise. I mean by that. Is that too. Many people branch is for more of a shotgun approach and sends of sometimes. They do it because they need the capital fund the business. And so you're and say you know here we are in L. A.. And they sell one in Boise and one in Minnesota and one in Georgia. It's just too difficult from a franchise perspective and too expensive to support that franchise e because our responsibility to build the brand awareness or assist them in Boise to build it and for us to send up a district manager on a monthly or quarterly basis. And so for us very centric and how we grow the business. I'd I'd like to open three in a particular market markets so it'd be safe three in Orange County and then if it works will expand it. We open three in Phoenix Feeding Scottsdale area. We now have twenty one. We have twenty seven Dallas and so I resisted all temptations fundamentally to go outside of that. It wasn't until recent when we've now stepped out and go out to different areas because I've seen other people I've seen some of our copycat people in Jiu space. I'm sure you guys have had in this base that are popping up and I know Zach was going to happen so there's any fear for the competition that perspective Alexa because I just know from a supply chain standpoint from brand awareness standpoint you know we just get the economics work as well so one of the things that has always stood out to me even before I knew you and as a marketing guy how great stores look how. Great the marketing and the branding. Is You know that doesn't happen by accident but But before we get to that I wanNA talk about the APP and to give you some unsolicited advice. Everything every single time I go in people look at me like with with envy because I just walked to the front line. Go get my thing and I 'cause you're my friend. I always tell them. Hey go get the APP you can order online. And the vast majority of people don't know about it they're like Oh my God thank you so much like the so. There's an awareness issue there and then just another unsolicited. And I'm GonNa do this writing this down publicly because I've done this privately but to publicly shame you into doing this. Wow you're the next level today. Here's the thing I tell them every day when I going because I do go in every day all right is that I don't always have cash on me so I wanna tip on the APP and they want to be tipped the APP because everybody wants to tip but not not everybody always has cash on them so if you can figure out a way to to let customers tip on the APP your employees would really appreciate it. You know it's interesting because you did mention that On the golf course mentioned the tipping aspect of it and I have noticed something here we are in public and I think that's a good idea. I don't think that's a very hard modification. Obviously you've seen it with Uber and such and if somebody Wanna tip they can squeeze. Yeah so I think. That's I think that's a good idea. And people can Use Cash as far as the APP the success of the Abbas been remarkable. We started off. We probably did ten thousand dollars first months with the business. Now we're averaging probably lower half million bucks a week and just interrupt you have to give you've credit where credit is due. It is so unbelievably easy. And it's so fast and it's works really great so knocking this company tone. I should but I wish I did EH. Declining Nad infomercial on. I didn't know that there is not see. No one knows us. Sorry but now now they will. Where are they in La? I mean I'm sure there's lot the really isn't La. We've never really made a presence. I don't know whether that is you know at the time like juice a lot. I mean have you heard of La. I mean it's like a pretty healthy city. Oh see now. She's about the Horn of an easy. I gotta go. Let's wrap this thing up. We'd if she wishes Brazil he's considered one is that you've got a more defined culture and taste as far as the Paladin people have good Jason. La exactly included right so me. I know I've ever nisos them. Just an honest hose by complementing my city. I appreciate it but the reality is that we're more of a community brand we go into the bedroom. Communities A sacrament type areas the mission bay does the LADERA. Ranch is is the you know we're in Pasaden- were number communities in L. A.. But when we come to La we run into labor problems in the sense of labor. So high you run into real estate's very expensive offensive competitions expensive speed of services very important we have one third and Santa Monica's always been a great store for second Santa Monica's fourth locations but for whatever reasons very been very difficult to penetrate it and it hasn't simply been as profitable just based on the Labor concept of the occupancy costs and things like that where I can go into you look air ranch and run twelve hundred square foot space for three thousand dollars in. La Cost twelve thousand dollars. Well can I give some feedback system. I go to literally. I was thinking about it today. Because it's pouring and I wanted to get coffee. Don't look where my coffee from if there is such a need for healthy drive-thrus in general like in the world especially in La. Because like I mean for me. I'm always running around to meetings and appointments and I rarely have time and I feel like I'm always like looking to eat on the go and I know I'm not alone in that especially in l.. A. Or any busy easy city if you were to have a location that has drive-thru in La and you could use the APP to order what you're GonNa get and they just drive through and pick it up and operationally originally the two things operationally. It's difficult and two were competing against Duncan and starbucks in particular for those drive locations. So when you're talking about costs begin. I don't condone slavery. Sorry Duncan but I love Dunkin. DONUTS could loves dug into it. I'm looking at her coffee. She's drinking so we'll say how much she you expect. Don't listen I lie. I lived on the East Coast. I drank Dunkin donuts coffee a lot. It's very good. I feel like there's not really a lot of Dunkin donuts here in La but maybe there are and you're right. I have seen a lot of starbucks. Strive through which you know but can we take a step back just to educate myself but also our listeners. In with regard to you versus press juicery or some of the other well known names you know because I know just because my wife loves it so much and she's such a health nut but explained everybody and to me what what makes it so much healthier years. Well there's a press juicers Berg. The great great products. I didn't do a very good job in their branding is just a different concept idea in the sense of their bottle product and I think that it was easy to see early on that it was going to become a commodity oddity in the sense of now you can pick up a bottle juice at virtually any supermarket and it's not naked juice anymore. It's actually high quality product and win that. The prices the press I started they. Were you know ten twelve bucks bottle. Another five dollars a bottle simultaneously. Labor's GONNA rents gone up so the economics to Mir are different simultaneously the experiences experiences different for us. You'd asked what we're trying to do with nectar and part of it was trying to make nectar that third space making the starbucks coffee if you look at the job juices the world easily very whimsical. Very little scene. It's Kinda kids place. Yogurt type store treat type location so for US wanted to go. With more of a moderate uttered mid-century you'll farmhouse design with seething with music with lighting partner with spotify and other people for channels and book readings and very experiential type. Things things that I thought would be different colors and palettes and that would be a much different experience than used to just spotted something that you to have in common as product. Innovators Peter's you have a new product and Ali has a new product that's charcoal infused and he has charcoal infused vanilla ice cream. Or it's not actually it's not dairy but it's called scoop is food is delicious beginning The almond milk or something basically six Ingredients or less two hundred dollars or less sweep. Turn up amazing saying can you explain to us with charcoal. Does your hair. Well it. It takes out the dirt and impurities of the hair which also like if you're ever like having a drug overdose or whatever and sorry already to go dark hair but like the nave Charcoal to remove like the same thing. It does that for your hair and it's also a very popular product and skin now because it does remove dirt and oil and P- impurities or probably more just impurities from from your hair your skin which I learnt literally looked up last night which is so weird that you brought that up. The charcoal is made from like burning the outside of coconuts I think I got that right. Is that true. I mean Zimmerman. You know. Somebody said it's right right because I looked it up last night. It was reading the ingredients that was drinking one of them and I was like look at that. I never would never even knew that. Yeah it's incredibly good. Do you have any juices or is it something that you but we do have a The model drink and and our space the partnership the we recently Asli side with whole foods. So we've started taking over the coffee and juice experienced from Amazon. Took over like the bar within the shop. They have so smart yes we just opened barrel great great but they have currently and I don't. I don't think they're really make money. That's what they pay attention to what they're good at. I think that when Amazon took him over they realize that. Hey it's all all about their price and opportunity. Let's get released ramming that space and making it nectar destler beautiful so we just opened Malibu and you're going to be a nationwide or is it the testing and out were doing a test. We just opened our fifth or sixth location in Tempe. Maybe a couple of weeks ago on congratulations. Throw about two hundred square feet and they look great and the will remind me of it is that would allow us to sell the charcoal scoop. Right because it's unapproved ingredient the Turco chocolate southcenter for. Wow Yeah. There's gotta got to be I see I wish I remember what the reasoning was because October. We had the scary scoop and it was like a orange cone. That's so fun scoop loop of the is that well. You're only place. Here's in Santa Monica that so far from me there. There's one in on third. You said though right there's is one second there's one and there's some there's more let's talk more about the whole foods the thing because I think it is it something that came to your lab or did you guys strategically go after it or for entrepreneurs listening like it seems like these partnerships added it. How do you make that happen? In this appeal case they reached out to us and they were starting to vet juice bars. They wanted to get a your quality product. Actually how it came about. Our former director of construction went to work for whole foods. Foods he had mentioned. Hey I've got a an up and coming and emerging brand that's relevant that's the same values as you guys might win. Meet with them and throw them in the hat so we met with whole foods up in Glendale and met with them. Obviously in Austin and then we have mapped out well we felt would be a good strategy. Initially this strategy was ten locations. I I pulled back to five..

La starbucks Dunkin donuts Texas Santa Monica Orange County Phoenix Boise California district manager LADERA Jiu space drug overdose Paladin Alexa US Dallas Duncan Amazon
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

12:44 min | 7 months ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"For back in the studio today on very rainy day with the founder of Nectar Steve Schultz who has had tremendous success in this company. And we can't wait to hear more about your growth and development and unlike like every other guests. This is one of my friends not your friend. Oh you guys were friends. Yes see looking Tim Sparky I. My Name's sparky and I was a year. That he takes it in okay. I didn't know you guys were friends. And yes usually. We only have my friends on the show. But Michael doesn't have many friends so this is shocking and it's a small world because my wife has been obsessed with nectar since we moved crying. I literally go to nectar. This is no no exaggeration literally every single day to pick up juicer. Sarah Green juice drinks. I had no idea but I'll tell you this I honestly don't know the story even though we've been friends ends of how nectar started so. I'm guys together in at your place in place that you play not often but we we have speaking that before we get into business on a personal front. So I'm I'm in Las Vegas with Michael so very we're taking the turned twenty or thirty of us were in Vegas and earthly and we're shuttling often like let's hit by the way your name came up with setting you up with my sister because both of you are divorced and direction. I thought this is going because Steve I love you buddy. But there's no possible way. I know him too. Well I there's been a couple of like golfing buddies anyway. Let's not get into that ugly ugly turn. That's so far. I'm going to go there. I don't know if you know this. But he reached out to you on a dating out some well any idea. This was coming for this interview interview. Clearly wow okay well. Now we're going to this genus anyways so I had no idea. Well there we go here we go so tell us yes. Let's get out. Versatile explained those people listening. Who Don't do it? Nectar is in an area where you don't have have an actor. What is nectar so nectar? That was started in two thousand. Ten and the concept behind nectar was to reinvent the Ju- space similar to starbucks Dietrich's and such brie invented the coffee experience. I guess in the early nineties and I had seen that the legacy brands that you know we all know the jobs. And the whatever to me had sort of bastardized ostracized I think the concept of healthy eating and the same time you had so true saris up but the Jumba juices and those Jews companies that are out there. There are so bad for you. And they're so filled with sugar that you're like I like the concept of the idea. But they don't deliver. No I think the concept is good but I really think they've gotten to the point of they get to the point where they were maybe one step below maybe dairy queen and at the same time as you guys remember. We've seen to this day. The proliferation of all foods trader Joe's mother's market even the traditional market's. We're going to fresh fair and the concept is time was what if we got rid of all of the Giancarlo processed ingredients made it simple made it easy understand made needed. Affordable made it accessible to people that really desire to healthy lifestyle and so when we looked at it and I started with my ex wife and we still work together and get along very well so that works out quite well l. and the mayor but the idea behind it was that a Lotta Times people go traditional juice bar and they were kind of overwhelmed. Wouldn't understand the ingredients radiance. You wouldn't know how to put it together so for us we want to do is put together simple. Menus in-n-out did but do it from a healthy perspective so as six juices six SMOOTHIES. Six six as I e balls we're going to put coconut water and housemaid nut milk is the basis for the smoothies and juices. Were all going to be delivered fresh six days a week and what. I mean by delivered fresh fruits and vegetables so as Parsley Kale Spinach Apple. They choke you know six thirty every morning with the trucks. And we'd make it and we took over an old dietrich slash starbucks spot in the Orange County which are flagship store one on precipitation credited Omar One right. There's a second one people drive. All all the way from you know Michael Contrive two or three miles to come at that point was there because now there's so much competition I want to get to that later. And how you differentiate yourself because I think you've you've done an amazing job like dry. We had so many copycat when you open that first one was there just the John Reduces or whether similar concepts ears. There really weren't any center concepts to there's some October of two thousand said that he did. Yeah I like it when we have to women and you know this is so nice. It's always these women and finding more friends. Sorry keep going. The original Medusa really wasn't anybody that was doing what we were doing. So as sort of a new experience experience there is certainly where the mother's markets had sold. But it wasn't in that capacity there are few bottle juice companies. As you know that you're out there but as far as handcrafted making fresh there wasn't anything like and and how many locations are there now. I think we're similar in size to drive our hundred and sixty one day or like in terms of your background like what made you even think of your to tenure right. Nobody was doing this. What made you think to even do this? What is your background like? Why why is the passion Felix Juice with you? Bring up the word passion and I think that you'll for you. Obviously I I. I assume there is some passionate behind it or a little bit of passionate might say that but I do think that passion gets misinterpreted and misunderstood a lot of the times. I mean I didn't grow up at five and say hey I wanna make juice when I'm forty or fifty years old. I just didn't do it and I don't think a lot of people. Do I think that when I started an actor and when it started to grow I think the passion grew out of the people the engagement agent the development the marketing and things of that nature so as they saw. But did you see a whole like in the market for for this there was a need for this and you wished existed like it was is going to Johnson. I was seeing with the nutritional ingredients and people aren't going to put up with that and so I saw an opportunity within that space and say we're GONNA go ahead and do it and what I what my past. Experience actually actually was infomercials and I tried to do. And I purchased a cleanser and coming blueprint cleanse in New York and they shipped it to me and I said this thing that take off like a rocket with an infomercial but the problem being. There's perishable products you deliver it. It's heavy ship. People use the free shipping and it didn't work and my wife was going to mothers market all the time. She said he got to try this out. And every time I go in I I was curious from a business perspective. How many drinks you're selling? What size are they selling? How are people come back frequently and the Manager Cup Sania were two or three hundred people a day two or three hundred the people that wow wow and so was it similar to with us with Dr Are we opened the first one and I was a little skeptical but the thing totally took some bald guy but it totally took off and we started expanding rapidly? Was it similar for you or was it a slower. Trajectory does a very similar similar deal. We started not Tober took off very quickly leave very profitable from very beginning. We opened our second store in. I think March third store and maybe July and continued from a retail perspective expanding. Now one one of the hottest topics on the show and it's always a difficult subject for entrepreneurs in exit. Such a black box for many creative types is raising money alley and I needed to raise money because we wanted to grow so fast I knew some investors at the club but other than that led. How did you finance it early days? The first several stores the first probably four or five six stores were self-funded. My hand a lot of interest from my buddies at the club and a lot of you know but I didn't want to take their money initially based on idea that I wanted to have proof of concept. Make sure I went through a couple of seasons in the last thing I wanted to do is stand on the I T and you X.. Amount of dollars and you're pissing. Whatever money go yeah so? It wasn't until a couple of years later that we did a family and friends raise which basically he was one hundred percent through buddies virus and then shortly thereafter bank came to us and started your traditional funding. Yeah it is complicated in raising money from friends and family can be difficult so I was. I was going to ask the same question and you beat me to it of course about Iran. How to raise money because a lot of people want to understand how to do that? I feel like that question and is something that comes up for us. All the time is money and when it makes sense to go to friends and family and when it makes sense to more institutional route you know and I still I get that all the time. meaning that the we did the family and friends early on we had private equity guys come in at that time we had an by coming approach us about investing that time we had. Maybe you know. Fifteen or twenty stores just didn't think the valuation at that Particular Point Really Mesa where we really need the capital point because again our stores are probably less expensive. I'm sure it open than than yours. Stores and all the land are less expensive than ours. But what was your vision at that point when you're at fifty two twenty stores did you now. You're one hundred and sixty something like did you want on it to be massive. I feel like we didn't really know in the early days I didn't. You know how big it could get. How big the opportunity was kind of you know you kind of keep figure it out as as you go at least? That's how I in early days we went to franchising as as sort of a financing vehicle. Because we didn't realize we could raise the kind of money we could. We had bootstrap the first you know a handful of stores and then we started franchising. Just two people who we trusted. We knew who we could utilize their capital. no-one the private equity guys came in. And they're like well. These things are way too profitable to franchise we pull back on that. And it's ironic only come full circle now ten years later and realizing that our franchise partners are the best stores to operate. They do a.

Michael Steve Schultz Las Vegas Sarah Green Tim Sparky founder starbucks Dietrich starbucks in-n-out Iran Orange County Giancarlo Joe Johnson Tober New York Omar One
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

12:43 min | 10 months ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"How can their workplace have more meaning. Can they have more values. How can they respect people so I think looking at the low hanging fruit of so much needs to be the next but if you can kind of humanize and value is like corporate America and more places. I think that that gets me really excited. Yeah not not to dwell on guns but it's just the data behind it in and you know it's not a stronger campaign to show every other civilized country in the world and what their gun laws are and what they're our per capita compared to ours you know as a parent it gets so you know. I see these stories time and time again and think about it. That was me. I mean if that was you of how magic well that's what I say. Before this woman Shannon Shannon Watts you guys know who she is. She started campaign called. Bite like a mother and she basically goes up. She's always on the news. She's always like she started her own thing basically like you know going against Fan. Ra and she's made some amazing progress. You should follow her because she's relatively small but to your point if someone was helping like get her to the next level you know because there's nobody because there's not a lot of people fighting against this stupid. Nra I mean I think there's that feeling of can make a difference that I think it's for lunch. Small step after another after another. I mean literally you Australian like. Where is your business plan like how did agency like one small step at a time and then all of a sudden not always you know yeah starts to come together. I think once people realize you can make a difference wants and you pull people together. I think that's where you can get traction and it just feels too big and Dante yeah. Listen to prod save America. Yes I guess it listening that everybody you mentioned twitter. I'm when I do listen to the love them yeah like I don't know what's wrong they but like Jon favreau walking and I'm like I love everything may yeah. You should listen to it. So is the agency. Are you guys still in day to day as much as you are. Do you have people that are now running because for such a tough transition into make we've we've really made it on dry bar thankfully but we are still on the way down. I can tell anyone how we got here because that's going to be our little secret going forward but like on the way down we were just talking about and this has been a year of transition for us like we've had some of our sneer leadership has changed and we actually have some big positions there gingrich to be felled which is going to be amazing and we're just ready to get out of the day to day like we're at our best having the bigger conversations. I am relationships and stuff and sometimes as business needs you to dig in your clients also want you but we're the more that we can raise up a- and be at the higher level the sea level talking about those types of challenges that we can help them solve versus the day today so we're very excited. I don't he economically. It's going to be great. I think for us just listening to so many of your guests. You know there's an idea there's a product. There's something that's created and the is always on the end game. You know we have this much time. We're GONNA earned this much money. We're going to sell Gabri. I literally started to grow to fuel our lives. So what kind of work do we WANNA do. How do we want to do it. Who Do we want to do it for and so the work itself has been what we created what we love right and you literally Blink and Oh my God. It's been eighteen years realization. I'm GonNa tell them are so our origin story so back. Due to some of the less pretty part is so I've been at the gap and one most innovative person in the company one near got laid off the next next year so that was part of why we started grow and this one was going through a transition where she had a young son and she was getting a divorce and so we you were about going there. I wasn't sure yeah so we were a lot of transition. We were both in these places where I lost my confidence because I thought it was really good at something something and then all of a sudden this company that I worshiped basically outside wasn't so I've doubted myself seconds. She was going through a place where she was like. I need to make money. I've got to make creative a dad. Who was my best friend to just try to stroke. Not a young boy and it's like I couldn't pretend anymore that my situation was okay array so I was like okay. Let's hit reset which means you know the idea of being an office nine to five not that we don't do that now we do of course and then some but just to have creativity and literally like how are we going to our lives and then we literally met each other and people always go well. How did you know you she'd be the perfect business partner and I'm like it's a love story great like we met and we tilted her head and we listen to each other and we had a glass of wine and we talked about our values and what we had in common and it literally. was that simple like fell fell in love. I always say that I always say like I fell in love with my friends. Always Yeah Yeah Yeah I mean you can but I do believe like obviously. It's not that kind of relationship but there is that thing thing that happens when some women come together. It gets very powerful. Bond refill like you really see each other and get each other especially going through a divorce right now too so especially when you're in that what phase which I see that you have a ring on so you remarried to them since we started raw. Let's see we've had a divorce had three babies a marriage inch many offices homes challenges. I mean the good and the bad time I mean work wives were so intent in each other emotionally and I mean there's or someone else I'd rather have watch my back. Sometimes people are like Oh. You were competitors. Do you guys to compete at the office and we're like God no. Why would we even want to come in but I will so we've been married for a long time. How long we've been married now for? KTAR's but it is I mean it takes. It takes a lot of work. Fourteen years years ago we went to go see American. That's amazing and it was the best thing we've ever done like we both were relationships have relationships and we needed someone one else outside of us to help us do the hard work and it was. Soga well it's interesting to for Michael Ni- we've known each other our whole lives and we brought in our CEO to drive our John Hefner. You know it was like we don't really fight very often and in in the drier day like when we were both in an office together which we're not any more we would occasionally have fights but it was. It was good to have somebody else. Come in who was able to allow more objective about things is that were going on because so much of it got personal with us you know and and we have such a great relationship and there is so much you mentioned like trust and they're so much trust between us and we know we have each other's backs and there's things I don't know and there's things he didn't know we're able to really work together but having that other person as a bit of a mediator every now and again is incredibly helpful to to help you like see things differently when you went to this marriage counselor did was Esmeralda County Story. I if you don't mind me asking if it's not too personal. What was the challenge. You tried to work through it that time well. I felt like at that time. Comedy years. AGO is four years. I thought you said fourteen now now. I think like five or six years ago. Probably it was after we moved in the new building. I think what what was going on for. Both of us is we were just at that weird inflection point. We'd been doing it for eleven years. We both had small children. We were trying to figure out about how to scale the compound scale. It and we were still feeling deeply. The day-to-day push of it and I think that we started to sort of grow apart a a little bit which was weird. Our best will were laughing and especially if it's five fifteen in there is a glass of wine like we are at our best and we totally support each other and that's what we want and we we kind of had grown apart from that and I think we just acknowledged like we don't want us like we want to be healthy and talk about the stuff and just get all the junk cleared out and so smart. It's good advice. It was good I think at the end of the day kind of hear the same thing which is you want to be seen and you want to be understood and heard heard and I think Gibson I can both be just dog on a bone and get done what you need to get done and and you're doing it and are you recognizing the other person's doing seeing your on weaknesses. Are you owning those like how can you come together and we're are you. Do you still want to do this and then we got even closer after that because the appreciation was there. Oh yeah you do that differently than I do and I don't even like to do that and I think going back to it. We started going apart because the company got to a point where we really had to divide and conquer more and people always want one of us on the business and we love that they're coming to us and they want us involved and then you kind of pull apart working on different things so it was almost like we needed a new equilibrium. Graham and there were certain things that cabs didn't like doing and I'm like actually love doing that. Can you value that. I'm doing that because you don't like it and vice versa. I know I value you doing that. Because I don't really WanNa we do not so like lenient we ended up leaning into each other's strengths more than any and feeling heard and seen and appreciate it but I think it's important for partners seeing it as it's a really important relationship cherished and needs energy and time and your company will be better if you too can stay on funding living with each other yeah. I mean I had a business with my best friend before dry bar and she was an incredible interior decorator and party planner and all about and I recognize that and I I felt we should start a business. I didn't have any any experience in that world but I was going to be like you know the people person and getting the business and then she was going to do these parties and events and we we started a company and men did not work. I mean we did not get along. We are so different and I ultimately realized this really. I I had had no passion for this business so it wasn't the right thing for me but it almost ruined our friendship and it luckily we recognize wasn't working and we got out so yeah yeah. It's a tough thing which now that you say that I'm like it makes perfect sense of there's actually such thing as a business marriage coach because or counselor because that's I didn't know that existed visited like we don't recommend best friends go into yeah see other like we met as not Lorenzo businesswomen and colleagues and we came friends and but work wives and best friends those are kind of two different things right cooler and they're both like magical but yeah I have a lot of great best friends that are women and they are not who who I would want to be in business with right right but I think it's is relationship. I think you can have that business relationship and fall in love on that level just a fraction or other other. We always encourage partnership around here like bring on the people who are good at what you're not aware in your shoulder saying like y'all everyone to get your marketing folks like Ryan. The beginning was I mean you got to know what you're not good at talking from the beginning invested in the best lawyers yeah we need people. Who will I'll tell us if we stray to the left or to the right guy knowing. You're not good up. I mean it's funny. One of the things that we believe so fervently as made dry bar so successful full is that all of our strengths were different sort of the partner team between Alley and Cam and Josh is our architect and my wife who's on the culture side and everyone knows their lane a little a little bit. You guys talk about getting to the point of realizing that hey you don't like to do that but I do but would also so important that you said is that and I'm sure this came out of the counseling valuing those other things and that can and letting the person know that its value because a lot of times. It does feel like somebody's doing something that you don't. I mean I'm thinking about Sarah a little bit. You know my wife. We have four four thousand stylists that work for us that are you know millennial artists and what makes one of our shops run so well and when it's not working is the vibe and it's so hard to train to have a good vibe in the shop you have all these rules and here's how you run the shop but to be the type of personality that can run a store where all the employees in. STYLUS are happy makes the client happy and if it's the opposite what my wife does is one of the many things he does is goes around the store. She's also a deejay says she incorporates being. Dj in the store but really connects with the employee and we have our culture we have our heart and soul dry bar and really doing these things that are like again even you and I can pooh-poohed them because it's like these silly exercises that she does where everyone writes heart and soul cards and they all read them back to each other but like that stuff really really matters the things that alley and I why did the early days may have felt more important because we were running the business but also the reality that when it's yours yeah no one can really love it and be as committed to it as you are and they think that there's not part of learning.

America partner Shannon Shannon Watts Nra Gabri twitter Jon favreau Ra gingrich Esmeralda County Story Dante Ryan KTAR Sarah Michael Ni Gibson Graham Lorenzo John Hefner
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

11:59 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"Fun. Little point was way too humbled to everything of it as a real business and never I'm still a job that you were doing always working other. Their jobs as well and also then nothing to do with design no right just always like to find out when it goes from a side hustle to like the Hamam were wow. This is a real business that I can support myself and put everything into yeah. I think it was a along process us because there was that initial stage when I was just sewing the myself and kind of meeting my first factory. It's still felt like a hobby. It felt like I had a big dream and I felt like there was a lot of potential but still really remained to feed on the ground and realized how hard it is to start my own business especially because there was no money. I didn't have any financial backing or anything so it was going to be a very when you say like you had what was the dream back then and I just wonder if it's what it is is pretty massive business hours this with house. Yeah it was in my wildest dreams and I still have dreams of having the company become more but I I really took one day at a time I yeah I knew what it could be so I really believed in it but I was. I don't know if cautious is the right word. I didn't WanNa let my get ahead of myself yeah. He's over expectations Kinda check yeah. So what point did you so. You didn't have the money no you didn't have did you have a business partner. Did you know how did you make that leap. What was the the catalyst I think a definitive moment for me was when I hired my first employee and I was still working out of my house at the time and I had moved from a small room upstairs in my house to a bigger room downstairs and my health the office and <hes> I had my first employer name was is Jocelyn and she worked part-time and I just needed help like fulfilling orders? I just had a website and maybe a few accounts sounds maybe Mohawk general store. Maybe Stephen Allen in New York and I needed help just fulfilling orders and things and so I didn't know if I was going to be able to pay her but I thought I'm going to take her on and take that risk and and I took because she very student on those what I tell on people businesses that are starting out is that as soon as you can bring on some help you are able to yeah you're preaching to the choir we totally you're able to be so much more exponentially more productive and what was. She was like her background. She had her own little bag line. Oh that was like even smaller than mine but she was interested in working part time and then the work very no she they left a few years ago. She stated good long while and she was she was great. She kinda transitioned because she grew with me. Over the first initial year she grew into like head of production because she was the one that was so used to dealing with our factories and materials and things so at this point you hired one person you have a factory who's making your bags and you have a couple of accounts. Yes and city you stop taking the freelance jobs and like focus yes yes and then there was that moment where I was like I can't take this anymore. <unk> can't take the other jobs anymore and I'm going to do this full-time. Who was your first bit? Stephen was a client not to say he's not big. When did it start to really take off? We'll there are fun. Moments like back in the day. There was daily candy. Remember that gus was very important and their allies that was to two thousand antennas when we started dry bar daily candy was like the shit and broke all the new businesses way before it was sponsored and all that but like when when was that it was like two thousand nine so they aurea new was a crystal different times crystal and and before crystal and I were even close but Sam shot crystal mirrors also was the ghost rider on my book and she's just an amazing human amazing human yesterday candy set out a thing and where what were they directing people like did you have yes and I always had a website so I started with that little ecommerce site which now these later years I've learned how great that was that I started off without website because so many brands were not digitally native they weren't fashion brands that is and it took them a while to get on and start selling and still I learned a fashion brands that don't sell on their own side and I'm like what is wrong with you. It's so we work for Nicole Miller and the I couldn't wait to mow but it was not know that unless you do I don't know that I did you know Nicole. Miller is okay. Keep going anyway yeah. She's GonNa say they took forever to get online yeah like a big because at the time ahead of your time by doing that for the mid nineties when this daily candy thing ran it was two thousand ten were there are a few again yes each time it was. It was massive seven such a big deal for me. That's funny. The orders were start coming in and we'd be like thing. I can't remember how I discovered. I wish I could remember how I just feel like you've always been around. I don't remember when I like I started discovering your ran all right so ding ding order start coming in like wow this is this exciting. I'm onto something and the daily candy thing like you went like exponentially more business than you were doing yes each time yeah and then <hes> there were the lego moment each time ever get piece of press that was amazing and then you hire publicist than a didn't until two thousand twelve so from two thousand ten to two thousand twelve those were kind of the really fun time for the website that was growing but also wholesale was that that was where my market was because they didn't have my own stores until I open right I wanted to thousand silverlake in Silverlake was the first store and at the beginning of that year I was introduced to Tom Card Sodas of bedrock manufacturing through Stephen Allen and it was kind of a great situation for me because I hadn't even thought about taking partners but at the same time my business the sales numbers were they sounded really big to me they were there was the biggest number that I had heard him. I my family's not in business. I was doing it myself. There are so many <hes> creative companies that fail because they don't know how to run a business and so I when I was introduced to these people and they seem like really nice people and got it and they weren't scary scary V._C._R.. Private Equity People. They seemed very like all right. You can trust human yeah. There was a real human connection. I thought I'm going to take this opportunity. Even though I'm pretty small I'm going to sell forty percent of my company to these tease guys and one question there was something that they can and I asked both out of curiosity and for people listening about you know because we get a lot of questions about me. And how do you do it. How do you start? How do you even raise money or find your partner and it's so daunting to a lot of people and I'm curious did they? Did they approach you about hey. Let's let partner to this. Is Tom from the bedrock. Manufacturing correct plays had that I'll go down. Yes I was introduced to them through Stephen Allen and I think they were looking for different opportunities and so I was not looking they've so they have you and said Hey. Let's let's make this. Let's do this together and I were you like Whoa or we like. They're great people in this. This is what I need. Yeah I mean I was cautious as cautious as we need to be when we're selling forty percent of our companies but <hes> but you weren't scared to sell I think that's something that we hear a lot and it's such a it's such a varied you know answer from different entrepreneurs who are like a mutt selling anything. I want to keep the whole thing and that was like we've. We've talked about this a lot that I was like initially very hesitant you know when my goals are talking to me about selling selling our equity to basically grow the business and I was like I don't I don't want to sell I don't want to you know and then he explained like being you know <hes> having a bigger smaller piece of a bigger conversation we we really do need to have Steve Berg on the show to give everybody the Cascina from our well not guessing anymore anyway to give the one on one because we've been holding back but but I'll pause here to say for Alley and I with Dr Bar when we raised money we sold some of our equity but we brought in capital to grow the business we we weren't taking money off the table. That's referred to the secondary transaction when you raise capital in to put into business caught a primary but you're bringing capital to grow the business correct yes. All the money went into the company so I guess that's called primary so what I like with alley and it was you know there were different times where we did take money off the table but in those early days is like hey we have to you know we have to give up some equity in this business in order to it. was that about bigger smaller piece of a bigger pie but were you reluctant or was it no because as we know and I think Eileen O.. Of course everyone always thinks about you know your strength and know what no what you're great at but get help for the things that you're not and these people had grown accompany to be a billion dollar company and they had skills that I will never possess in terms of the financial side of running a company so I wasn't that nervous I I I knew because Stephen had already been in business with them. For a year. I trusted Stephen. I trusted Michael My interactions with them like my people reading as pretty good and I fell around them. I felt like they were good people. They weren't never any the friend or at the time. I just saw my bags in his store so he talked me just as another business owner saying I have these people. I'd like to introduce you so you go you make this deal and then the people there they were able to help you with like the business side of your business. Yes yeah which by the way I mean we we always joke around on the show that like everybody needs a Michael because I didn't like you. I was the creative piece of dry bar and I didn't know anything about like right. I did not have a Michael Right right right never Michael so this was going to be my Michael and I remember having initial conversations with them and they're like well. What would you do if we we were your partners? What would you do or if you had this much money into your company? Oh yeah I I as I was like oh my gosh. I don't even know like I was so overwhelmed and we're so busy at the time I got a team of like eight and we're all working like crazy and I we needed everything and nothing. I yeah exactly so I said well. I know I'd like healthcare from my employees. That was my first thing I said I I know that as we grow people are going to start asking me about healthcare and I really would love to be able to provide that and they were like Okay Yep H._r.. Without any higher I remembered that so well when you know Michael again back to you needing somebody who knows how to do this kind of stuff I mean when Michael it was like we need to hire somebody. You know what always Cairns Position Yeah you know and I was like why do we need her. You know and he's like well. You know we have all these stores in like there's so many things and systems we need to put in place all this stuff that we weren't good at and I was like all right and we have to pair how much and you know and but he was right. We needed somebody to get to get the business in line to get structure and half you know it's funny about that is even though I was the pounding the table about hiring these people years later after we brought on private equity partners in we had a board of directors in. I remember the board wanting to hire a C._I._O.. And I was like what do I need a C._I._O.. Four tires debrief you're listening but it was like the best higher we ever made and there was such a the need for I._T.. And infrastructure beyond we don't need C._I._O.. Billy title that happens to me all the time presented with new positions that people's company now we have about women remember l.. Seventy five bucks we now have nine stores so that's including our stores.

partner Michael My Stephen Allen Stephen Nicole Miller business owner Jocelyn gus Cairns Alley Billy Tom New York Sam Tom Card silverlake Steve Berg Eileen O Silverlake Dr Bar
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"Web address. It's ZipRecruiter dot com slash bar. Ziprecruiter is so affected that four out of five employers who post Zip Recruiter actually get a quality candidate through their site within the first day. That's pretty remarkable in amazing, especially if you're running a big business, and you need to hire people fast. Ziprecruiter, send your job to over a hundred of the web's leading job boards, but they don't just stop there with their powerful matching technology, ZipRecruiter skins, thousands of resumes to find people with the right experience and invites them to apply for your job, and as applications, come in ZipRecruiter analyzes, each one and spotlights the top candidates, so you never ever. Miss a great match which is why I love ZipRecruiter. Because it's a place where you can go that makes hiring simple fast and smart. I love this company, and I can't recommend it highly enough. And right now, my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this exclusive web address ZipRecruiter dot com slash bar. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash bar. B. A R ZipRecruiter, the smartest way to hire already. Let's get back to the episode other any in vestments that you made up in companies that you're excited about that. You can talk about fired. I will just say there's one, you know, we invested in a company called kinder- in its retirement software. Basically, it's a really simple problem that we believe is a really big one, which is everybody who's seventy and beyond is just like us on this call in on this interview that is they're gonna live, really long lives. They wanna live longer. They are gonna live longer, and they have to deal with all of their finances in. So this, this great comes. Any kinder- makes a retirement paycheck and basically just simplifies all of the different places that you get your retirement so IRA, your 4._0._1._K inches makes it really simple and dot for me. Is exactly the sort of solutions. We like end again. It doesn't always have to be financial services, but that's a really every day problem that more and more Americans will have. And we believe that the software does some special things to make it just simple. That's that's awesome. Just add curiosity 'cause you're so entrenched in the space or your thoughts on the robo investing, I do you think that's here to stay is that something that it's robo investing. I mean, sure there's who are not. I don't know what that is, is, you know what that is like RoboCop. So she'll basically it defacto that, you know, at the end of the day. Our money is math. Right. It's just outgrow bums, and humans are emotional. So actually having math and. A robo investor, basically says, I'll giving is simple example Allie. You are ex- years old than you on a retire. When you are seventy and as a result, we need to plan to have you accumulate money for thirty five years, and then we'll start to spend it over thirty one or seventy that's an algorithm. And then literally your asset allocation can just be a mathematical algorithm. And it can reinvest every day. Using robo advisors as opposed to a human who may be totally on the ball and making all the decisions and emotional, and I do believe that, that is here to stay. I do believe that for certain aspects of our wallets automation, and algorithms will absolutely tell takeover. It's like it's like self driving cars notes. It's so fascinating the space in. It's such a great time to be an investor in. That's basically do think there are so many unbelievably innovative new concepts coming out in. It's only gonna evolve from here so fund space to be ended. Yeah. Yeah. So. On that note. You tell us about that. You have a new book coming out. Is that right? I do. It's my second book, the first book was called financially. Fearless was a New York Times bestseller. This book is called financially forward, and it's really about the future of your wallet. And again, it's a book designed for somebody who maybe his overwhelmed by money is kinda just like I just want to be told, what to do this book in, like the simplest way tells you, everything you need to do your wallet in plain English, including like a simple, one pager of every app, you should download and how to use them. So very simple, but also includes a little bit of, like where wallets are going and a bit of the technology. That's happening 'em. And all the ways that you can simplify your life. So I'll give you an example. Everything from the security challenges that you may be worried about the like can I trust this can I trust that? And how to simplify those all the way to the smartest way to shop online and all the ways eaten save. More of your money because I'm a mom of a household of three kids in so shopping is something I have to do a lot of. And how do you make it the most efficient, and the how do you save more of your money? And how do you give yourself time back? Exactly. It's, it's I I'm gonna buy a bunch of copies for your of your book to give to I'll give a plug to my wife, Sarah, who recently started a stock club, and I bring it up because these really, really talented smart women who are super successful, sit around and talk about, it's actually not just stocks but that's the premise, but they talk about financial planning investing in. It's shocking to me, how much people need to learn in these are these are women who are successful entrepreneurs who were successful and they really don't really have in almost like something that's

Ziprecruiter ZipRecruiter kinder New York Times Allie Sarah thirty five years
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"I could actually go in cellophane Nanteuil plan. Does that make sense? Absolutely. I think it's scrappy, it was super scrappy the punch. No, it's a great. It's funny as you were saying, seventy five thousand I was, like, man that, you know, that's not a lot, and I think it's a great lesson for people listening is that there's a lot of different ways to skin, a cat, and you don't have to it. So daunting. I mean, we just had somebody on the on the show before you who has a great idea, but really doesn't have any idea while I shouldn't say any idea, they have great ideas, but they just don't know how to get it from like you said, from, like one to two, I think is what? Said it's just they've so many ideas, and they're all over the place and it's not to jump to head too far. It's funny. The reason why Allie and I started this show was because we literally get inundated through Email social media letters mail for people who want help for that, starting a business and you know, because of dry bar, and we literally can't. Possibly talk to them. All I imagine that what you have gone through long winded way of getting to the question is that I imagine inspired capital, allowing you to leverage your experience in building the business in help, not only with money, but with your expertise other entrepreneurs, you nailed it. I think just the punchline is, I've always been a very scrappy entrepreneur, and, you know, I've learned a lot of lessons, not everything, you know, the, the, the macro story is beautiful. If you like looked at the every day, it was, like, you know, being in, in a boxing arena. Getting punched in the face every day. And one of the things I realize I just love is helping other entrepreneurs figure out how to be scrappy, help them think through their own their own vision in shoddy, and I started on the investing side, actually I spent a summer insight venture partners, and then I started actively investing, right when learn bass. Got acquired and I try as I love it, and my own experience, wise, you know, around my board of advisors, you know, some of my best advisors might the people, I went to and things got really challenging where people had built in sold big businesses, and it was because they just they could cut through the noise so fast I can be asking a question. They would be able to finish my sentence in tell me the star because they were like, Yep. Yep. Yep. Here's your two problems. What you don't even know yet it is. So funny. You say that Allie was just a give her a little shoutout. It was just aired, but she was a guest shark on shark tank, which was scary for me, because I agree too. Fifty percent or whatever she invested in my sister has a shopping problem. But she fortunately made some good investments in partnered with Martine result became friendly, with Mark, and there was something that we were just looking at, and that we kinda both liked allies. I said, send it tomorrow to see if he wants to participate, and he wrote back immediately and had, like cut through had like the perfect reasons of this is why I don't like this is right? Unless they did this about. I was like, okay, guess he's not into that. But it's true. And there really is something about that. Like, I feel like we've gotten better at that because we've made some investments that were like I shouldn't have done that, but you have cutting to the chase and just but it is. So I mean, you probably have some more stories about different investors that you had, and we said, from the beginning, when we did our first, you know, outside institutional money, that we just we didn't want someone who's gonna write the biggest check of the largest valuation. We truly wanted someone who would add value, and we got lucky with ours. And I think though, a lot of people don't and choosing who you take money from can really make or break your business. And ensure somebody would be I don't know if you guys have started investing and inspired capital yet, but I think that you'd be lucky to, to have money from you with given what you've been through, and we have started investing. And I'll say, you know, our entire, Dan, a is. So, so that the mission of inspired capital as as. You can tell them kind of emission based on pure, whenever I build something, it's got to have a lot more meaning behind it. So learn bass was about, you know, helping deliver a financial plan to American families, and the software now is the core part of northwestern mutual. And that software is going to their customers every day, which is really powerful within spiraled capital, the division was, how do we go? Find the best and brightest entrepreneurs around the country and provide them with a team of incredible entrepreneurs. So one of my business partner is penny Pritzker, who was in the White House with President Obama. She is, you know, a extremely successful. She's on the board of Harvard, Microsoft, she's builds in, in scale many, many, many businesses and, you know, is one of I think the, the more thoughtful business leaders that I've ever met my life. So she's part of the Vondry, one of the cofounders, paperless post is is part of the fun than a handful of incredible. Other people just ending. A few in, and I think what we said, was, let's go find people built in scaled in sold in executed. Big companies must put him around the table. And let's help entrepreneurs. You know, in a really empathetic way, let's go fuel the next gen of, of the country's builders and we always joke. It's not even a venture funded its builders fund, and that's who we are. And so that kind of wear inspired came from it just came out of my mouth one day. And I said, this is really about the next level the next generation of entrepreneurs

Allie Harvard penny Pritzker Martine Microsoft White House Dan partner Mark President Obama Fifty percent one day
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

08:32 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"The following podcast is a deer media production, this episode of raising the bar is brought to you by ZipRecruiter. Ziprecruiter is actually so effective that four out of five employers who post on Zip Recruiter. Get a quality candidate through the site within the first day. That's pretty remarkable right now, my listeners can try ZipRecruiter for free at this web address ZipRecruiter dot com slash bar. That's ZipRecruiter dot com slash bar. B. A R ZipRecruiter, the smartest way to hire. Hi, I'm E web, and on Michael Landau. And this is raising the bar, a podcast four. Entrepreneurs by entrepreneurs learn how to best new businesses got their start and how you can apply lessons learned to your own venture. All right. Let's do this. We're super excited to have Alexa von Tobel off the show today. She's the founder and CEO learned this, which is an amazing company, and she's just launched another company called inspire capital. She's gonna talk to us all about raising money. She's super smart. Interesting has two books out. You're gonna want to listen to this one. Welcome to the show Alexa, so good. I mean I'm really good. You aren't good. This is I have found my colleague introducing people that is my colleague. Our guest today is Alexa, until Bill and I have to tell you like there's in doing our research for the show. I am so impressed with you in your career. And I have to tell you, I have already recommended your podcast to about twenty friends and colleagues today at particularly the one on Danny Meyer that I listened to this morning on my drive in, man. That was such a good interview. You did your amazing. Thank you so much. And I'm a big fan of both of yours, and obviously alley. So fun to get to meet you. So just honored to be here over so happy to have you. Yeah. You can probably do a better job of explaining, you know what you've done. And it's just been, I can't believe you started that your first company when you were twenty four years old left. Harvard to do that. And then now sold that company in starting something new written two books, but tell our listeners a little bit about your background and how you got here. Sure. I'm so I always like to start by saying that I'm a totally normal person. And what I mean by that is, you know, I have no, like special talents, I grew up in. I was born in Kentucky. I grew up in Florida to a family of kind of doctors, nurses, etc. Nobody who did any of the things that, you know, I set out to do in my career, and I ended up applying to Harvard at first person might family to go to a school like Harvard and, you know, kind of just said, I'd like to ply bear. My mom kinda said sounds good. Good luck, kids and anyways ended up applying to Harvard as studied mind brain behavior in psychology undergrad, graduated with a psychology degree. So I love people. I love getting understand them understand why they take how they tick and just realize I was pretty obsessed with business. And I'd always been an entrepreneur before I even knew that it was, like you know that I was an entrepreneur from there. I ended up going to work on Wall Street realized that, that was not my favorite thing to do. I was far more interested in business plans. And entrepreneurs and I started writing one. And then, basically I when I got into each Bs and I- deferred and was really young. And I was working on this crazy business plan for learn best when a good friend of mine actually called and said, hey, do you wanna come help me with a company and this is in mind in, in New York City in two thousand two thousand seven when the world was, you know, still like Rosie was before the two thousand eight crash ended up going in helping out a friend start a company in Brooklyn that we sold to face both at than had to go to business school. So I went for one semester, and I've been working on my own idea for learn best for a long time now. And I was just super passionate about how do you help everyday Americans understand the wallet too, because let's be honest guys dealing with our money is a pain in none of us feel like we're clip to do it. And so I ended up at being in business school in one a business plan competition in Idid. A really logical thing to do at the bottom of the worst recession in eighty one years, which was dropped out of business school, which is totally bananas, and I moved to New York and the rest is kinda history. I just started really focusing on I you know, building this, incredibly challenging software, but that basically would give every American family financial plan very quickly into turbo tax needs financial planning, and on our fifth birthday, we got acquired for about three hundred seventy five million dollars from northwestern mutual and yet, so I'll stop there. Give the chance to jump in, but it's been a total roller coaster. I was also when we got acquired a nine months pregnant with our first child always pregnant. I know I literally in four years. You've had through babies, so it has been a lot going on on the yet. So it was just a real crazy crazy time of my life. It's, it's what a story. And I'll tell you one of the things that we get questions on so often on our show from our listeners is how people raise money, which seems to be such a daunting thing. Ironically, you're talking about how to help people, you know, invest their money, but entrepreneur seem to get so stuck up on this in fact on in the coming weeks. We're having one of our biggest private equity investors at dry at a it's a company called Castenada Boston coming onto kinda give the the one. Oh, one on raising money in VC, and private equity. But maybe start with you know, you said you didn't come from anything special in, but you, you went to Harvard and you had this degree, and you went and worked in Wall Street. But how did you get learned vest off the ground? You wrote the business plan. But did you friends and family? Did you go out to seize at that point? Maybe help us understand how you got this thing off the ground. Why I love that. Because clearly, the sign of another on newer, who knows how to ask question because that's the really hard part right there. Like zero to one is so hard and I made every mistake in the bucks. So I, I did take all of my savings from when I'd worked at Morgan Stanley. It was about seventy five thousand dollars. And it was every bonus it was like all of that money, and I said, I have enough money to on top of that be able to pay my bills. So I had a basically my own mini financial plan that I had created that said, you know, I can I can live a very lean life. And as start learned dozen, they put that other seventy five in into building. Learn best and basically realized that after X, number months, I turned into a pumpkin. So it was like, if I can't get this off the ground and get this moving than I have to go back to business school or go get a job. So I looked very clear boundaries that I set for my. Which is I can stand up the company with a little bit of money, keep seventy five thousand dollars. Isn't really do all that much as we both know from starting accompany, but at least got us in motion. So I started designing the templates Bob built a very, very, very rudimentary website. So I could show people, what learn best could be, and give people a sense of what we are doing in bed begged borrowed at from everybody. That would give me you know, time to work on it. Become an adviser I basically put together proof of concept. And then from there, I was able to raise a proper see ground funding of about a million dollars because in, in financial services, you know, it's kinda you can't give financial advice without being very legitimate business in. So we had to get going, and I also started a daily newsletter to start showing people that there was a real audience who wanted this. And that was pretty an extended to do. I wrote some content myself I paid freelancers but quickly. Started creating an audience about ten thousand people and it, you know, towed ambassador, it was like, okay there's something real here. And then the last thing I'll just say there, Michael was that basically I also just one business plan competitions because at least it had it showed commercially, it showed that we are, you know, legitimate in some way, before I

Harvard founder and CEO Alexa Michael Landau Ziprecruiter New York City ZipRecruiter Danny Meyer I Bob Morgan Stanley Kentucky Florida Brooklyn Idid Bill Castenada Boston Rosie seventy five thousand dollars
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

07:12 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"Bar ZipRecruiter this martis way to hire. Do you have any like entrepreneurial background, you does Whitney euro some? But she comes from news media. So her which she did before this was basically a production company. She was doing production for basically different corporations in the none of Austin. So it was it was real small business. It was a totally different field. Like. No technological background into. Fortunately, we have a really good team around us. And I think that's the thing too is I think when you're starting something to be able to say like, hey, look, I don't have experience here. This isn't like I can read as much as I want. But at a certain point like, I don't know my ten thousand hours Whitney always says that I don't know how exactly ten thousand. I have my ten thousand hours in blowouts. There you go. See I I don't have ten thousand dollars in anything. I don't think maybe acting. Maybe I mean, maybe. But like how many years do you have to work to get ten hours a lot? It's a lot. But it's true. I mean, you have to like, you know, you have to be really passionate about what you're doing. But it's interesting that and I ask if you're an entrepreneur had anything in your background because I think there's a lot of what I have found in a lot of people we've talked to. I mean on the show and just friends. It's like, they're they're people are really afraid to take that leap. That's what we that's like the recurring theme that I hear like, oh, I have this great idea. But I don't want to take the leap. But you took it without having any experience in it. You know, what was that like for you? It was terrifying. And it still is it's still terrifying. Because I'm like we still may fall on our faces like some of the biggest companies in the world a lot of the biggest companies in the world fail. They just do in. So that's incredibly intimidating, and I think failure is a huge part of entrepreneurship for me. Like, one of the things that I sort of tell people, and this isn't the best advice for everyone. But for me having a co found it was really important one because I was a new mom, right? And had another job in Subic. I just couldn't take it all on in two. And also sorta gave me that extra strength to to move forward into know that someone else would be in the trenches with me. And I think when you're having your bad days, and you can console with each other. Or you're having your really good days. And you can celebrate with each other for people who are free to take that step. Having a co founder can really push you over the edge and be there when you need a kick in the ass. Yes. My brother, Michael who is not said the here today, we talked about that all the time. I mean, it's like our strengths and weaknesses are. So incredibly different, you know. And I think that's it's such a good thing. I think a lot of I mean, I have friends who don't have, you know, have their own businesses and don't have co founders. And I'm like, I don't know how. How you do it? You know? And there's I'm sure there's days for you guys. Like this where you're like so down in the dumps in your like, I just can't do it anymore. And you're like, you can't we can't both be Amanda base. Only one at a time time. But it's it really is such a huge. Like, I like to know that somebody else is like, I got it. I got you like, you know, it's gonna be okay. I think I think you need that. And maybe that's a friend or a spouse or a brother when if you're running a business, you nobody can understand it the way you can. That's exactly right. I think I think co-founder can just really help, you know, give you that that bump you need and assume you guys get along, and we do Dory. We'd you I mean, our friendship is is really rooted in brutal honesty. So which is great. But I mean, we we can go head to head on things. And I think the ability to do that in recover is really important. And we realized pretty early on our friendship that we could do that in our friendship could handle it and got better because of it. So I think that's why we knew we'd be good business burners is because we have those stuff discussion. And be fine. The next day the next hour bounceback. Exactly. Yeah. I mean, I actually once started a business before Dr are with my best friend, and it was it was hard. I mean, I found it. We both were like, oh, we are butting heads a lot. And and it didn't alternately work out. It wasn't meant to be. But and I think that's also important advice to get out. There is like it may not always be the best did. I mean, I think people think I'm crazy to be business partners with my brother and people. Do you have siblings? A brother would you work with him? I mean, we have we just have such different. Yeah. We're so different. We have such different strengths or we, sir. We it might be a great business partner. But we actually probably would pair really. Well, you. Yeah. Probably what were just so different. I can't even imagine like our visions for a business aligning. Really? Yeah. I mean, it's funny because my brother was like always overachiever. Yeah. In the family, and I was always kind of like the late bloomer. Like, what the hell is Allie going to do with her life was kind of what my parents always taught? So it's very. Very like, you know, sweet to me now that like oh you Michael's biggest success? Is you know, my idea at least just fine. Yes. Just as doing. Okay. But you really like that partnership is so important. And I think that people, you know, I think it's also like you don't want to like you have this great idea. You don't want to necessarily share the equity of it. And and all of that. But I I agree. I think it's such an important. I think so too. It's an important part of it. And I think that diversity of thought allows you to not develop a sort of a way of working where you're just in a silo. You know, I think I think we need somebody who will like to your point like disagree with you. Yeah. Absolutely. And I'm not sure if you find this with your employees, and you guys are still small, but like, you know, not surrounding yourself with. Yes, people. Yup. As I say, yes, yes. Yes. Nobody's you're you're right. Yeah. I feel like, you know, as we've gotten bigger, you know, people want to please me and people want to tell me what they think I want to hear him like don't do that. I'll be honest with you have the honest, me and. I think that also takes like Inc. That's how you build a very special organization. You know, like people who are strong enough to say Brooklyn. I actually don't think that's a great idea. Here's why. Yes, do you have a lot of people like that? Actually. I look at sort of everyone in my life outside of work, and those every it's funny everyone around me, my husband, my best friend, my manager, my mom, EV everyone who I'm incredibly close through the huge personalities, and there I don't see how brace, but they are like they're they don't back down there incredibly forward with their thinking. They are bullish. And I find that sort of everyone I surround myself with house that same quality. Yeah. Which I don't know if that's I also like an argument like love to get into a debate. I love to go head to head with people. And I think I look for that in and that's interesting 'cause I feel like I want I like really strong personalities, and I have a very strong personality. And I don't want people to just acquiesce to me. But I also don't like confrontation. I love it. You do. I do. I love it. I mean, I think it's harder for me in a professional sons. Because I think also an I wonder if you deal with this. I think when it comes to creativity I've really hard time with it. Because I think feedback well as like an actor, for example, I think you always have to respect someone sort of still lame to say this, but like someone's process or the way that they do something I think professionally it's like with finery, for example, I always want to respect someone's idea because I think it's a bad idea. But they might be they might have to the brilliant thing. That's going to take something over the top. Right. And so I think with confrontation I have a harder time doing it professionally because I always want to respect someone pointed new, and I don't want to I'll challenge them. But I don't want to challenge it in a way where people don't feel that they can safely like create or

Whitney co founder Michael Subic Austin Amanda base co-founder Allie partner Brooklyn ten thousand hours ten thousand dollars ten hours
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"The following podcast is a deer media production. Hi, I'm Elliot. I know Michael Landau, and this is raising the bar. The founders of Dr which we started about ten years ago, we have over one hundred twenty five locations over three thousand employees, and we've learned so much about running and scaling a business. And we're actually doing it all over again, we just launched a new company in the massage space called squeeze. So many entrepreneurs reach out to us all the time and asks for advice how we've done it. And we try to talk to them when we can. But we decided that this podcast would be a former we could give back and help other people get their start and hear other stories from successful entrepreneurs all of it, you're constantly hearing. From budding entrepreneurs asking us for advice, and how to grow and scale and all the things that we've really learned in the last ten years this podcast is the place to go. If you're an entrepreneur and want to start your own business. Michael. And I are also brother and sister. And we don't always see eye to eye on everything. So you will definitely hear some bickering and some arguing and sometimes my sister needs to be brought back onto track. I'm always on track. Michael lakes to manse, Wayne. So you might catch a little bit of that show. Too much. He won't be on the show anymore. I'm gonna kick him out. We had our last season, which was really amazing. And now we are launching our second season with a whole slew of really exciting guests. We also really want to engage with you. We want to hear about your business. And if you're a budding entrepreneur that has dreams or goals starting your own business. But just needs a little advice. I urge you to DM me on Instagram. Allie Webb a l l I w and just asked us your questions, and maybe we'll have you come on the show. He couldn't be more excited to launch our second season raising the bar. We have an amazing group of entrepreneurs that you aren't gonna want to miss. Go and subscribe, listen to raising the bar. We hope you love it.

Michael Landau Wayne Allie Webb Michael Michael lakes ten years
"bar" Discussed on Two Scientists Walk Into a Bar

Two Scientists Walk Into a Bar

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Two Scientists Walk Into a Bar

"Your science brain. And join us for two scientists walk into a bar. What do you think causes the inflammation inflammatory bowel disease? What do I think causes the inflammation and aired -able bowel disease? I'm guessing it's kind of like an allergic reaction to something you've consumed. Well, dear complicated. I would say it has to deal with your your gut. What's happening in your good as well? Replay of. Does big relation of your own gut bacteria with your ability of your own barrier to respond to it. That will involve a right. They, you know, you you might have you might get some infections, you know, fighting infection. You might cost some inflammation, or your you might have some immune. You know, your immune system if you know, not working right also causing formation. Welcome back. We had a really interesting discussion with Allison bird last episode on the microbiome, so the bacteria that sits innocent on us. And I got no skin this week. We'd like to go into a deeper dive on the gut and focus our attention on a particularly aggressive autoimmune disease called inflammatory, bowel disease or IBD for short simple. This is information in the garden, and that's not the stomach, but rather the small and large intestine and with me today to discuss this is an expert in the area, Mary Kia. Welcome mary. Thank you, Jane. So let's just kind of dive right into the gas inflammatory bowel disease and inflammatory bowel disease is really not just one thing. Right. It's a complex mix of different types of a Barrett, immune responses, where does IBD happen. Yeah. And so that's a key part of the two different kinds of issues. So I believe is broken into two main groups Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis Crohn's disease can happen anywhere along the GI track. So most of the patients probably about sixty percent of them will have inflammation around that illegal sequel, though, just where the small intestine meets the large intestine when that's how that separates the two. Other patients will have clinic disease. Some patients will we'll have to in the small bowel. But that's a pretty small group. That's about five percent of the patients. That inflammation also can be very patchy. So you'll have completely normally Cosa, and it can be next to me Costa where you really have a lot of inflammation. And and Alzheimer's. All sort of Claytus just affects the large mouth. So that's your colon. That's the end part where you have a lot of the bacteria and typically it goes from the rectum up. So most patients have inflammation of the rectum, and then some patients will have inflammation throughout the whole. But there's really kind of a range and typically, that's a continuous inflammation. So all of the coastal will be involved, and there'll be a nice line. It's the way that gastroenterologist typically described as like almost a line of demarcation you have inflamed region. And the next week you'll have completely normal MacOS up. But then you won't have that patchy inflammation that you'll have with Crohn's disease where you're have areas that are right next to each other. That aren't in sequence so MU close a lines the intestine as well. Right. And the next is a natural barrier between the food the bacteria and ourselves. So what's going on during an IB in inflammatory response? Perhaps you could help us visualize this with they'll typically do when they're looking at these patients. Diagnosing these patients is so actually take a scope and that scope has is fitted with a little camera. And then it also has the ability to take little tissue biopsies. It's one of the things about inflammatory bowel disease. That's different from a lot of the other autoimmune diseases. The you're able to really take tissue samples of the areas where you have inflammation. So you can actually look at within these patients how involved you know, how much epithelium if they lost..

bowel disease autoimmune disease Crohn's disease IBD Crohn Alzheimer Mary Kia Allison Costa Cosa Jane Barrett ulcerative colitis sixty percent five percent
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"Okay. Where was the first one? The first one? The first DO that open was with share the singer. So I got introduced to her through power plate. She had a plate. I contacted them and said, who has power fates in LA is twenty seven years old. They quit my job at FOX, and I was like, I need to do this. I just didn't know how right? And so they sent me to her house. I created a business plan shares house today. I didn't know what, but I went there that she was amazing. She was amazing and I trained her for her. Show him Vegas, broader business plan. We opened a studio and West Hollywood. Choose your partner. Business partner was is, was. I'm sorry. Yeah, it was fine, great relationship. But we opened, she decided after four months it wasn't for her. I finance the plates from her is again. It was twenty six twenty seven years old and moved down to a space rate on Los Hannigan. Mama's where play this job is now. So it used to be Todd Trump's were spinning started. It's actually where I think some of the people that Seoul cycles or the women that started soul cycle you suspend there was like a whole gross little gym and back. You're so you're, you're twenty seven years old at the time. Twenty six. So you're working at FOX doing what my stay stuff before faced digital. Are you a personal trainer or do you have experience in that fitness world? I, I was. I was a certified personal trainer. I taught bar. Okay. Oh, for fun. But so before we're a bar class for twenty five dollars an hour because I had a love of teaching fitness, but any business experience at this point. Okay. So and you get thrown into the situation we share. She agrees to finance it on you open your first studio, renting space inside another space. So not a standalone, right? Well, it was called body and soul. So they were going out of business and we were gonna. We rented a space in body and soul, and then we're going to take over the whole space. And did you do that? No, we she decided she didn't want to do the business after four nine out. So we I was out and instead of giving up, I decided to find a space which was down the street. Okay. Open in West Hollywood on Santa Monica boulevard. And so anyway. So I opened their share to close the business down found two hundred square foot space for six hundred dollars or play this yoga is now. Gotcha. And then I opened a space there. So I find that's five plates from her started my studio, got a mind, body account, and then went to the center for early education and just promoted myself got one mom who then. Really loved it, and then told Oliver friends, and then they started training pretty much all the center months. When did you know this was going to be successful? Was it like right away or was it several months or several years in or or are you still figuring it out? I think I think I knew from the beginning I had, you know, when you just have a vision, you know, and it changes your whole entire life and you just can't not do what you're supposed to do. Right. I think you understand that and you just go for it. Right? And everyone tells you that you shouldn't do it and what seems to be knows knows knows I mean the many, many investors and people that said that they were interested in investing in in the business that I had in this disgusting little Jim in the corner. Right. And then I meet somebody who actually finally believes in me and believes in the business and like saw me operate for six months and then has a design I and has like, aesthetically wants to make this something bigger and then and then we come out and we do..

FOX partner West Hollywood Los Hannigan LA Seoul Todd Trump Jim Hollywood Oliver Santa Monica boulevard twenty seven years twenty six twenty seven years six hundred dollars twenty five dollars four months six months
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

14:15 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"There have been so many things that I've been humbled by in this business and learning a whole new set of skills. But I have to say the most embarrassing one was probably when you wanted to name the the styles after cocktails, which was playing on the whole bar theme vernacular, which was great. But I thought it was cheesy tacky, but I have to give her credit for this and a bunch of other things. But on this one, in particular, it's become conic in signature for our brand. Women, even outside of dry bar, refer to getting my tie. My vision was that women will shimmy up to the bar and be like Cosmo to that seems cheesy. He still when you do. When you pitched though as cheesy my God, right. You're right. I was wrong. I was very intimidated by you and a lot of regards. And I feel like I really felt strongly about naming hair cells after drinks, and you really thought it was cheesy, but I was like Michael telling you, I just think I'm right about this and I stuck to my gun. So for all you listening out there, there's something that you feel really passionate about and you have some stupid guy telling you it's about today. Stick to your guns. And on that note on today's episode of raising the bar, we're talking about learning a new business in the middle of your current career with tree spanks. The founder of girls on a clinic, an auto repair shop. Philadelphia run by women for women told us about the moment. She realized she had to leave corporate America to find her. I knew that that was not the way I wanted to live my life. I was early thirties in Kenai spend the next twenty years like this. And the answer was no, what it's like learning an entirely new skill. I was terrified though when I went into the shop because it was the first time I ever touched a tool and how she persevered through the hard times when things get tough, I don't quit. I just, you know, I know how to get through tough times. I know how to be broke. You know, I I know how to do stuff by myself. I'm not afraid of hard work. I'm freedom hands dirty. All right. Let's do this. From Wendy, I'm Allie Webb the founder of dry bar and on Michael Landau founder of bar, and this is raising the bar disclaimer here we wear sometime so badly defend. You consider yourself warn STAN raising the bar. We're talking about starting over and chasing your passion with Patrice banks, the founder of girls auto clinic and auto repair shop in Philly with all female mechanics who won't try to scam you. She also opened a salon next door, so customers can get him any petty or a blow out while they wait for their cars. Trees told us why she quit her nice corporate job to become a mechanic and all the adversity she had to overcome along the way. Stay tuned. Look, whether you're starting a business or just living your life, you'll probably face money troubles. At some point. Probably credit cards can be quick fixes, but let's be honest. Nobody ever really tells you what to do about debt. Once you're actually in it is specially since interest rates can change in your hit with all these crazy fees. Out of nowhere. Average credit card interest rates are over eighteen percent, APR aches, so ridiculous. That's why we love light stream. They'll make it easy to roll all your credit and debt into one monthly payment at a much lower fixed interest rate. That's really smart. You can get a credit card consolidation loan from light stream for just five point, eight, nine percent APR with auto pay, and it's really quick and simple wish this existing when I was in my twenties, I could have really used this anyways. You can get your funds. As soon as the day you apply and light, she will plant a tree for you for every loan. They fund. I love that get a special discount on top of light streams already low rates by visiting light stream dot com slash bar. That's l. i. g. h. t. s. t. r. e. a. m. dot com slash bar subject to credit approval. Of course, rates include point, five percent, auto pay discount terms and conditions apply and offers are subject to change without notice visit light stream dot com. Slash bar for more information. Our guest today is Patrice banks who's based in Philadelphia and calling in for the show for businesses, girls auto clinic, which is a repair garage in Philly. Caters to women, Patrice his businesses. Awesome. She basically saw this hole in the market where you know as women were taking our cars in all the time, but there's usually men who are servicing them and as women, we feel kind of objectified by these men, they can't trust them. They're not giving it to a straight. So she saw big hole in the marketplace to start an all female based mechanic shop, but not a report of traces idea, worked out the way she hope she'll tell us how business almost one under we started our chat by talking about the origins of girls auto clinic. How this idea got started was it was the summer of two thousand eleven, and I'm an engineer. I was working in corporate America and I thought I was an empowered woman. I had my own house, you know, my own car and a great career, but I wasn't auto airhead. That's what I called myself. And I always felt taken advantage of by mechanics. I waited to the last minute to do any. Maintenance repairs because I was afraid I was going to be shamed in because I didn't take care of my car. They were gonna shame me or I was going to be up sold, and I always thought I needed a guy to help me which isn't a very powerful position, especially as an engineer, and I just accepted that this was kind of my fate, my auto, airhead fate, and that I wouldn't be able to get it. I needed a guy. I thought it was ridiculous that I didn't know. And I felt this way and I don't like to feel like I'm powerless. So I started looking for resources online. You know, finding a female mechanic. I Google female mechanic what pops up I is, you know the the ten top stock images of female mechanics and it had that was the first thing on Google and pictures of women and the keys next two cars or just some of the really plain Jane, basic stock images. Nothing really real or someone I could find that actually, I thought would be able to help me find resources that I need to make better choices with my car. And so I started doing some research and I was looking at. The numbers for the automotive industry that talk about women and we're the number one customer in the automotive industry. I'm not sure if you to knew that are more women than men across all age groups. I know that scares the guys because there's more women on the road, but we're out there and we're here, we influence up to ninety five percent of the car buying decisions because you know, women are the CFO's of the household, and if we want that car, that's the car we're getting. And if we're not, we don't want that car. That's not the car the families getting right. And then we're up to sixty seven percent of auto repair. And so here you have women's spending two hundred billion dollars a year on buying and repairing their cars. And so many of them feel like me, right, miss mistreated taken advantage of auto airheads, and I thought, wow, this is an incredible market. There's a need here. There's a space firm power, and I want to go back to school and learn to work on cars and create a business that was going to cater to women. I think it's so interesting because you know, obviously this is. Something. I feel like we come back to this point a lot, and it's good one to point out with entrepreneurs like there's there's there's so much opportunity to start create a business that early exists, which is basically how you looked at this business like this. Obviously, there's there's a million auto repair shops, but there's not any they cater towards women or are women run and operated or women that even worked in them. So it's it's such a great thing that you were able to to see in capture, which I think is probably all around us all the time. There's so much to talk about here with girls auto clinic and before you even started it, but I have to tell you and I'm dying to ask you this question. I think as I was doing the research and listening to all this, I kept thinking, I don't think it's just a girl thing. That's intimidating, like it's entirely entertainment intimidated to well, I don't know anything about cars because I'm a guy. I mean, I go in and you know everyone deals with everything you're describing. So I, I mean, I think it's a great niche that you've done and I applaud everything you're doing. I think there's an opportunity for. And I was curious, here's the question a long winded way of saying, do you do you have guys to come to girls? They want to be serviced by the ladies. Yes, we do have been that come in into kind of like bring both points. You know together is that you know the men, we have about twenty five percent male customers, and yes, you know, men don't understand this stuff and they don't know cars, but they don't have the experiences that women have. They have completely different experience when it comes to maintenance and repair and buying cars, and I'm a problem solver. Like, you know, you're mentioning, you know, looking at the market and and starting a business already that's happened but wasn't catering to this to this market. You know, I'm an engineer on autumn Akanik and growth in this, like I like to solve problems. And I was thinking, why are your number one customer so unhappy? Why does she hate her experiences? And I believe the root cause to that is there aren't women that work in this industry aren't women that look like, you know, mechanics and people in the automotive industry look like us and talk like us. Right and think like us, there's a communication, you know. Lack there. And so you know, I tell a lot of women when we go into automotive shops and they say, we'll talk to your husband or your dad, or they feel like they don't want explain things to us and they get upset. It's not because they think we're stupid and we're not going to get it. It's because they're afraid of us that we're not gonna there that we're gonna be. Have you know yell at them or question them and challenge them, and they don't know how to explain it to us. Right. And they would rather talk to your husband or a man who's they think he's going to say, oh, yeah, yeah, I know what you're talking about that carburetor thing. Yeah, that's what it's doing. Okay. So men have this pride thing where they don't like to admit that they don't wanna directions. Yes. And women aren't afraid to, you know, to their eyes and mechanics sometimes aren't great at communicating. They don't really teach that in school and so they're afraid, how can I explain this? They don't explain things very well, which I think it was. It was interesting when I was listening to your story with NPR and you were talking about, of course, like I don't remember the details because. When it comes to car things, I declare, I'm what did you say auto airhead to. It was like, you were saying how there was. There's this thing wrong with your car and they could have not fixed it without a being a major issue. It was just meant you couldn't be like four wheel drive or something, but they, they wouldn't have dared told you that because they could. They can make, you know it was like something like two thousand dollars. It was like it was actually originally to ground. I think I cried them down. I was crying my eyes. I gotta be kidding me. But I mean, how empowering would have been if you were like, listen, I never use for Dr. Never out in the mountains with my car, like I don't need it, you know? And yet nobody will would would tell you that. Exactly. That's what a lot of our resources are on a clinic is, you know, I do car care workshops that teach you how to take care of car, how to talk to a mechanic, right? What to do an emergency, and it's to make you a smart consumer confident driver you're, you'll never feel taken advantage of again, women love to go to the mechanic after that because they're like, I can't wait to try this out and talk to them and. Sounds to me like what you're doing is not only bringing the female angle too, but you're also bringing a level of integrity and transparency to an industry probably lacked it because there wasn't focus on it and that I think as much as it being run by a female and females is the fact that you can trust this shop and you can trust them to tell you that you don't need a two thousand dollar. Yeah, and that's exactly why we get the men to right number one, the men that come see us wanna see women working on cars because I think it's super cool and dope. You know. Examples of strong women in their lives, and they know women are capable of this, but also because they feel the same way and they're not ashamed to say, I don't know. I wanna learn. I wanna come to a place that is going to teach me that I feel empowered, you know, in a lot of them have daughters, they bring with them and they're excited to be our customer. You had this great job at DuPont. You're making a great salary. Like, you know, you come from a very modest family and you've kind of reached this level of success. And what was it in you that enabled you to take that leap to kind of go back to school to learn something else to quit your job? I mean, that's a hard thing to do. It is. I like doing hard things. I love this question and because I did have a great career DuPont and worked for them for twelve years total. I tell a lot of people. I didn't feel smart at working to Pont there. I was surrounded by incredible engineers had been there for twenty thirty years, mostly white men, right? So they didn't look like me. I'm a minority woman and I was the youngest, you know, and I didn't feel smart. I, it was kind of like it's a good job at pays me well, but I was still looking forward to Friday right snoozing my alarm in the morning being like, oh, I don't wanna go to work today. Just wanna stay home, looking for excuses right to to just not be at work. And I knew that that was not the way I wanted to live my life. I was early thirties in Kenai spend the next twenty years like this and the answer was no. And so I knew that that's actually the bigger risk is staying in a job that you're not motivated. You're not passionate. I tell people I was never a morning person, and I almost didn't start girls auto clinic because I was afraid. Was lazy because I'd love to sleep and I never could wake up early and I'm never going to be a business owner. I'm never going to be an entrepreneur because they always talk about how much work you do and you know how early they get up in the morning, but when you're doing something that you love that yours that you're passionate about that you're excited to work on, that's helping others. Like I don't even knew the set on alarm anymore. Son wakes me up. I'm so excited the work. I tell people all the time, although my sister's different because she just is not a morning, I, I don't think she won't be, but my barometer in life is always been exactly what you said the trees. It is that if I wake up in the morning and I don't want to go and I'm excited about the day and one of doing I know him in the right thing if not, then that's always been my limits test. Yeah, and I think it should be everybody's, I think so many people find themselves in jobs like just like you said, they're like dreading going to work and you kind of just feel like like this is just my lot in life and this is how it is, but you know, it doesn't. It doesn't always have to be that way.

founder Patrice banks engineer Michael Landau Kenai America Philadelphia Philly Google Cosmo Trees STAN business owner CFO NPR DuPont Wendy Jane
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"We've talked a lot about how beneficial it's been to have a woman entrepreneur as the head of dry bar because it really it's a great story. But do you feel like I've never really asked you? Do you feel like you've faced a lot of obstacles being a woman entrepreneur? I really don't feel like that. I don't think I've ever really felt inferior to the men around, you know, and I think that maybe that came from the amazing role model that I had. We both had in mom, you know, I felt like mom was always a very strong businesswoman. She was kind but didn't take shit from people. And I think that maybe that without me even realizing kind of sculpted sculpted who I am not feeling inferior, intimidated by men. And I think there's also so many great, especially today there's so many great businesses that are founded run by women that I think it's a great time for girls who are growing up to see that like there's just as. Businesses run inbounded by women as men, and it's not it's more of an equal playing field than it's ever been. For me. It's always been about credibility and you know how good the person is. It's never entered my mind, but I guess that's, you know, we were lucky that we have that foundation where because you do hear a lot about how women face glass ceiling and and are paid less than men. We've just been fortunate. I remember like when Sheryl Sandberg's book came out Leinen which of course is like the most huge phenomenon. I remember reading that book and being like, yeah, you know, it's like you. You should ask for the things that you want. And I'm like, yeah, I always have, you know, I mean, it was a great book and I think it was an important really important book, but I remember reading it being like, Yep, Yep, check. I do that. I do that. And I think again that comes from, you know, being very lucky to have a mom who is an entrepreneur who, who was that example for me. And so for all the young girls out there that are starting out in the workforce, it's, you know, it's, there's there's so many great examples out there and don't take less than your jus-. As good as a man. I like you say that a lot. I think women actually smarter than men. I think they have to work harder to get to the same place. So I've always when it comes to business or even like the doctors that go to, I kind of prefer women speaking of amazing and smart women on today's episode of raising the bar, we're talking Jacqueline Johnson about create and cultivate an online platform and confrontations geared toward helping women create the careers of their dreams. Jacqueline talk to us about her entrepreneur role models. My parents owned their own company. So my mom is like the finance and accounting piece in my dad does like the sales stuff and why she decided to take the plunge with create and cultivate. Honestly, it was from other people telling me that should be your thing and what practical advice she has from new business partners get the business pre NUP for short. All right. Let's do this. Hundred. I'm Allie wet the founder of dry bar and I'm like, Landau the other founder of dry warm, and this is raising the bar disclaimer here. We swear sometimes so bad language offend you consider yourself work, but I'm working on it Jane raising the bar. We're talking about women in business with Jacqueline Johnson. She's the founder and CEO creatine cultivate an amazing platform. Women entrepreneurs Jacqueline knows what it's like to be a woman in a world that still kinda dominated by men. Jackson told us why she Creighton coalpit and she has great advice for what to do. If you're a woman who is starting a new business or just thinking about it and after we talked to Jacquelyn gonna share some stuff, we're obsessively. So my kids just went back to school and you'd think I'd have more free time now, but is actually kind of the opposite, right with all the after school activities in parent meetings and whatnot, you don't actually have those yet. Duisburg we'll soon. Michael has a little newborn baby, no after school activities for him yet for me since I have busy kids on the go with crazy schedules. Hellofresh has been a lifesaver. It's a meal kit delivery service with classic veggie and family options, and it's delicious. And since my wife and I are new parents, we look forward to anything that makes our lives easier. And we always look forward to our hellofresh boxes. My favorite thing is that they have these one pot recipes so I can basically be quickly making dinner while I'm helping my kids the hallmark and catching up on Email, and I don't have to do a million dishes after which I love and the meals are really delicious and filling in less than ten bucks per serving. We made Cayenne ranch chicken last night, and I'm having leftovers for lunch today. Who did you bring me some sorry for twenty dollars off your first three boxes, visit hellofresh dot com. Slash bar. Sixty and enter promo code bar sixty. That's a total of sixty dollars off what a deal, a low fresh dot com. Slash bar sixty promo code VR six zero. We're so excited because Jackie Johnson is here in the studio today, and Michael being a guy, a bald guy, you didn't know a ton about creating cultivate. What did you think about her? Choosing credible. I mean, I had no idea that this business even existed that those in need or demand for it, but wow, creating cultivate is this awesome business. It's a platform for women to learn about business from other women who've already started businesses. Cool. Yeah. I mean, it's it's a pretty phenomenal thing. I have to say. I went for the first time this past weekend and Takagi and I was a keynote speaker, and I will tell you there was Lancy literally thousand women in the audience. It was, I think, probably more women than I've spoken to and I speak a lot. But one of the things that I noticed was like, everybody was taking notes. You know, these women are like in it to learn something, and I'm sure they took notes from every speaker and it's just it's this great thing that brings women's. What's interesting is just like you and I, she did face some bumps along the road. Then

Jacqueline Johnson founder and CEO Michael Sheryl Sandberg Duisburg founder Takagi Cayenne ranch Hellofresh Jacquelyn Jane Creighton coalpit Allie Jackson Landau twenty dollars sixty dollars
"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"bar" Discussed on Raising the Bar with Alli and Michael

"Today's episode of raising the bar, we'll be joined by Hillary Kerr. She's the co founder of quick brands which is comprised of three sites who what wear dot com by domain dot com and birdie dot com. Hillary will tell us all about the sacrifices. She's made early in her career. We were very, very broke for a very long time to moment. She knew she had made it realizing that I would look at our subscriber list. I didn't know everyone was and what her company is all about. Not about just being expensive. It's about style and how you style something. Okay. Let's go. Wendy, I'm Allie Webb the founder of dry bar, Michael Landau. And this is raising the bar wick disclaimer here we swear sometimes so bad language offense, you yourself one today. Unreasoning the bar. We're talking to fashion, entrepreneur, Hillary Kerr, Joe tell us about starting her first brand and how she turned a good idea into a successful company. We're also going to respond to a listener of western and tell you all about some products. Can't stop thinking about. In fact, it's the debut of our new segment recall obsessed with tune. Welcome to raising the bar today in the studio. We have Hillary current. I'm so excited to talk to her. She was so great. But before we talked to her, we're going to take some questions from the audience because I know you've gotten a good, Jillian direct messages from you've gotten a lot of social media questions about basically how do you start a business, how to raise money, all sorts of things that were going to be talking about on this show. And that segment is called d. m. me. I love that. I love helping our audience bigger shit out giving back. That's what we're all about here. Just because you came in on a gondola today, doesn't mean I would like to point out that I'm wearing a black and white striped shirt from a brand called the great, and it's a very chic shirt. I don't know why you keep making fun of it. If you Google gondola operator, you will see yourself a fucking gondola shirt. This is the DM me part of the show. We've gotten so many questions from all of you that we're going to do that. I. So this one comes from Britney. My husband and I are in the process of building a business and with love to know just solid advice on how you keep going even through the hard times. And then she said, you rock alley. Thank you for being such a positive bad as in my life. You're welcome. Female. I've see. It's all the same to me. No, it's a really good question, and I, Michael both work with our spouses. So we've had our. Moments, it's really challenging. Gosh, I guess. I mean, this might sound cliche, but I think the best advice is like open communication and getting stuff out there and talking it through. And the way is words for us is because we all have such specific skill sets and things that we do in the business that we don't really step on each other's toes and I can speak to, you know, my husband in this regard that you know he's creative. He does all the branding and anything you ever see visually for dry bar, and I'm the hair part of things. And that was always like my specialty. Michael's business side of things. We've may have heard a saga about Sarah. Michael's wife who's at the director of team member experience plus amazing DJ. So we all just have such different things that we focus on that, and we let each other stay in each other's. And I think sometimes it's not always feasible, but I think when you are starting a business and whether it's with a business partner or family, it is probably really good advice for a variety of reasons to. Have people who compliment your your skills for the obvious reason of, you know, help find people who are good at what you're not, but also because you avoid a lot of the conflict because you're stepping on toes and a few, especially when you work with family. The great thing about us is that we because we're family and we all love each other. We trust each other. So there's there's that level of trust that comes along. But I think to her question about how you get through the tough times, the vice I can give from our perspective is what happens is there's usually we're both so stubborn and pig headed and it well. And I think that it's best to let a little time go by even though we don't like it. I think when we cool down and heads prevailed to take it step back and then and then there's always, you know, what I find is someone always has to be. And I frankly think it's usually me not. You has to be the one extends the olive branch, but I think that it's important to, you know, there are times I felt like I didn't do that. We would still be in a fight because you're so stubborn, but I think somebody needs to well. You know, I mean, my husband and I, I don't know if you Sarah have ever been to couples counseling. Cameron and I have gone to a lot of couples therapy and we've been married for over fifteen years, and that is one of the things I feel like a lot of their said to us is take a beat comeback. When you've cool when you've cooled down therapist. Yeah, totally. But I think that that's really, really good advice is to not be impulsive and say, things that you don't mean in that moment. Also another good piece of advice which especially when you're working with your husband or brother, family member is Tanaz. Eighth things like always are never like you always do this. You never do that. Do that. I never do that. But I think is I know something that I think you have work. Because it's like it's not fair to say always, and that's something that drives my husband crazy to because chances are it's like, well, you sometimes do that and it pisses me off. But you know, those are key words and listen. If you're running a business with your husband, I would find a good there. I mean, I'm not kidding. I think that that's the thing about their, it'd be that's great. Is it? It's like a safe, split safe place where you can sit down and I always can say things in therapy that I can't say in my living room with my husband, especially with the kids and everything that's constantly interrupting you, but to be in the safe zone for an hour without your phone without your kids and without your business to just say, hey, here's the shit that's really bothering me and and your spouse just kind of, here's an different way when you do that. And I think that not only helps to marriage but potentially helps the business. I think that that's the, that's the biggest difference. Is your family or husband you're going to, you're probably not going to wear the kid gloves that you would with a colleague mind you how? We grew up with mom and dad because I feel like I remember mom getting mad at dad. Because he, she would say things to him like your, your, treat our employees better than you treat me remember because and I think there was a lot of conversations with them about, like, can't do that. Like you have to give me the same respect that you give your employees. And I think that Cameron I have had that conversation. I'm sure you had that conversation to where it's like you just and I think you need to hear that. You need to sometimes take a step back and say, you know what? You're right and come at the conversation or the argument with the same level of respect you would somebody who isn't related to you, maybe put that hat on while you're having an argument, it's hard. So

Hillary Kerr Michael Landau Cameron Sarah co founder Google Jillian Britney Tanaz founder partner Wendy director Allie Webb Joe fifteen years