35 Burst results for "Bangladesh"

From Crowded Camps to a Remote Island: Rohingya Refugees Move Again

BBC World Service

00:59 min | 1 d ago

From Crowded Camps to a Remote Island: Rohingya Refugees Move Again

"Bangladesh has begun relocating hundreds of re hinge a families to a remote island despite safety concerns and the lack of consent from the refugees. More than 1600 refugees have sailed on seven birds from Chittagong to bash in Jar Island in the bay Bangle. Really a million were hinge a have taken refuge in Bangladesh after fleeing violence in Myanmar is amber, a sanity Rajan, the Hindu refugees were packed across the decks of Bangladeshi naval vessels on plastic chance. The journey from the port of Chittagong, the Boston Short island, Take several lovers. Doctors say its facilities in the island are much better than in the overcrowded camps and Cox's Bazar. But aid agencies say the island which emerged from the sea 20 years ago, is vulnerable to cyclone and flaps. Some refugee families say they are being relocated against away but the government in nice transferring them forcefully. Authorities want to relocate around $100,000 in debt to Boston Chart

Jar Island Bangladesh Boston Short Island Myanmar Chittagong COX Government Boston
Bangladesh begins relocating Rohingya refugees to island

Mike Gallagher

00:35 sec | 2 d ago

Bangladesh begins relocating Rohingya refugees to island

"Human rights groups urging Bangladesh to abandon its plan to ship thousands of ro hinge of refugees to a remote island nearly a million looking job taken refuge in southeastern Bangladesh after fleeing violence and Myanmar. The government wants to relocate at least 100,000 refugees to the Boston Char island in the Bay of Bengal to reduce conditions in the camps. Group of Refugees are already on their way to Chittagong City. From there, they will be taken to the island around 2500 refugees will be moved in the first face. Rights groups have described the movie as

Bangladesh Boston Char Island Myanmar Chittagong City Bay Of Bengal Government
Fire devastates world's largest sand island

TIME's Top Stories

05:16 min | 4 d ago

Fire devastates world's largest sand island

"Gladys boo knows firsthand. the devastation climate change is already visiting on the world. The twenty five year old has vivid memories of kale island a tiny islet in the solomon islands archipelago where she used to swim and barbecue on the white sand beaches. It's also where her grandparents used to live decades back but kale island no longer exists. It was declared lost in two thousand sixteen after it fully submerged beneath the water a victim of rising sea levels. She worries more of her home. In the south pacific could share the same fate if global temperatures continue to rise at the same pace and just decades. My country's map has changed drastically. She says boo and others who have personally experienced the worst effects of climate change took center stage at a two week. Summit for youth climate activists. The virtual event was organized out of frustration at the postponement of the twenty twenty united nations climate. Change conference also called cop. Twenty six meeting between nations called mock cop twenty six. The summit was attended by more than three hundred fifty delegates from one hundred eighteen countries and included speeches from activists and stakeholders from around the world including the uk government minister in charge of the original cop twenty six in a year dominated by pandemic related disruptions. The mockup to six may be one of the largest international meetings focused on climate change. Even if it lacked official status but another goal of the event was to elevate the voices of those most affected by climate. Change it's a conscious decision. Based on consensus among youth activists that people in the developing world and other marginalized voters are not being represented in the climate movement which has largely focused on activists from developed nations. Be a greta tune. Berg's fridays for future or extinction rebellion which was established in the uk. The climate movement has been often inaccessible and is generally dominated by middle class. White people in the global north says a mercedes rodriguez richer to an activist from the uk student climate network. We can't stand up to this challenge without listening to the people whose voices matter the most in an attempt to be more inclusive. The virtual conference says granted more delegates. To what organizers call most affected people in areas or mapa including the philippines and bangladesh these countries and others were granted five delegates as opposed to three from most developed nations. Giving them more speaking time. More than seventy percent of the delegates represented at the summit or from developing countries. Having more delegates also gave these countries more representation and say in the wording of the final statement from mockup twenty six many behind. Mock cop twenty six. See this as a first step toward changing the emphasis of the youth climate movement. Several studies have shown that a warming planet will disproportionately affect developing countries more than developed nations however mainstream climate movements of faced criticism for not being inclusive of the most vulnerable nations earlier. This year. vanessa. Nakata a ugandan. Climate activist was cropped out of a photo in which she posed with four activists from europe including gratitude berg. It felt like i had been robbed in my space. Nicotine told time in july if climate justice does not involve the most affected communities than it is not justice at all. The photo was later replaced by the new agency that published it when we include everyone. You realize how a lot of the problems are. Common across countries says mitzi thanh a twenty two year old activists from the philippines who has been volunteering at the summit and is one of the speakers representing her country. Thanh has lived through extreme weather events in her native manila which has witnessed progressively more powerful typhoons with each passing year. She says activists like her who have seen the life altering damage. Climate change is already inflicting can go beyond being just sad stories and statistics and take an active role in creating a global solution. There's evidence this approach might result in more effective action to a twenty nineteen report by the united nations development programme found that vulnerable developing countries are leading the world by enacting ambitious pledges on emissions and climate resilience so the narrative. Necessarily isn't we are drowning. We need help says samira sarala a climate change policy expert at the united nations development programme. But rather look how we have seen the consequences and taken the destiny into our own hands. Abu the activist from the solomon islands feels that amplifying stories like hers will help people understand that the climate crisis is already a reality for people in many parts of the world when people who don't believe in climate change. Listen to our stories. They will hopefully empathize and engage she says.

Gladys Boo Solomon Islands Archipelago Kale Island Student Climate Network UK South Pacific United Nations Philippines Berg Mitzi Thanh Rodriguez Nakata Bangladesh Vanessa Thanh
Washington DC Restaurant owner gets help after giving free meals to the homeless

Paul Murnane

01:31 min | Last week

Washington DC Restaurant owner gets help after giving free meals to the homeless

"Of a Pakistani restaurant in Washington, D. C. Is receiving some much needed help after he provided it to those without anything to eat. CBS is Nicole Killian has his story. The subpoena. Hello, Grill. Owner Causey Manana has always served more than just food giving is a joy. I make everything fresh. That was evident when we first met Causey back in February. 2019 this arrest me from of love. When he offered meals to the homeless, free of charge, we will honor you respect you the same way way, honor and respect, you know, paying guest. But in the midst of the pandemic, the tables have turned. We have a huge lots in the revenue. When did it hit you? That you could no longer serve meals to the homeless are early July. Did you feel it Just hurt like you know, it's in you that you wanted to give, but you your pockets that empty and so the man who never asked for a penny to help others set up a go fund me page, the world responded. People from Bangladesh. London Heady we raised over $250,000. Which will give me a question to last through this pandemic. On start offering a free meal that is going to give me the joy that I was talking about once again, filling a need in a a season season of of giving giving the the cold cold Killian Killian CBS CBS NEWS NEWS Washington Washington

D. C. Nicole Killian Causey Manana Causey CBS Washington Bangladesh London Killian Killian Cbs News News
To save the climate, we have to reimagine capitalism

TED Talks Daily

04:29 min | 3 weeks ago

To save the climate, we have to reimagine capitalism

"I am a tree hugger. I spent much of my childhood on the great lower limb of a massive copper beech alternately reading and looking up at the sky through its branches. I felt safe and cared for and connected to something infinitely larger than myself. I thought the trees were immortal that they would always be here. But i was wrong. The theresa dying climate change is killing the cedars of lebanon and the forests of the american west at. It's not just the trees since nine. Hundred and ninety. Eight extreme heat has killed more than one hundred. Sixty thousand people and unchecked. Climate change could kill millions more. How did we get here. There are many reasons of course but one of the most important is that we let capitalism morph into something monstrous. I'm a huge fan of capitalism at its best after all i'm an economist and a business school professor i think genuinely free and fair. Markets are one of the great inventions of the human race. But here's the catch markets. Only work their magic when prices reflect real costs and right now prices are badly out of whack. We're letting the firms who sell fossil fuels and indeed anyone who admits greenhouse gases cause enormous damage for which they do not have to pay and that is hardly fair. Imagine for a moment but my hands of filled with a cloud of electrons ten dollars worth of coal fired electricity. But caputo your cell phone for more than ten years. That probably sounds like a pretty good deal. But it's only so cheap because you're not paying for the harm that it causes burning coals sense poisons like mercury and lead into the air increasing healthcare costs by billions of dollars and causing the death of hundreds of thousands of people every year it also emits huge quantities of carbon dioxide. So another part of the real cost of coal is the climate damage it will cause and is already causing more than a million acres burned in california this summer. A massive floods put a third of bangladesh underwater. Hundreds of studies have tried to put a number on. These costs. my sense of this work and here. I'm relying on my colleagues in the school of public health and my friends and economics is generating ten dollars worth of coal fired. Electricity causes at least eight dollars worth of harm to human health and at least another eight dollars worth of climate damage and probably much more so the true cost of this handful of electrons. It's not ten dollars. It's something more like twenty six. The hidden costs of doing things like burning oil and gas and eating beef a similarly enormous and justice. unfair everyone. Who's trying to build a clean economy has to compete with firms that are heavily subsidized by the destruction of our health. And the degradation of our climate. This is not the capitalism. I signed up for. This is not a market. That is either free or fair. So what do we do. The easy on is that governments should insist that anyone who admits greenhouse gases pay for the damage that they cause however the moment. There's not much sign that governments up for this partly because the fossil fuel companies have spent the last twenty years using their heavily subsidized prophets to deny the reality of climate change and to show the politicians who should be regulating them with money. So here's my crazy idea. I think business should step up. I think business should fix capitalism. I know some of you are probably thinking fat chance. Did i just say that. Companies are the ones denying the silence distorting the market and lobbying. the politicians. I did but fixing. This is squarely. In the private sector's interest.

Lebanon Bangladesh California
Making Art in the Modern Day

Innovation Hub

07:02 min | Last month

Making Art in the Modern Day

"In 1993 the group. The Breeders released this song Cannonball, and it started to climb the charts. The lead singer Kim deal was by that a pretty important person, alternative rock, not somebody who seems like they would later be featured in a book called The death of the artist. She's a big indie rock icon and has been for a good 30 years. Maybe more. William to Russell. It's is the author of the Death of the Artist in which he argues The arts world, which has always been hard to break into, and is always hard to squeeze a middle class living out of It's crumbling. As Kim deal has seen, you know she grew up in Dayton, and she lives back in Dayton. She's doing okay, she said to me, but again, fame does not equal wealth and she said to me, you know, I'm a coal miner, I'ma steal man. I'm just another person whose industry is gone. Obsolete. The perplexing part about that door is wit says, is that while Cole is not used in the same widespread way that it once was in America, we still listen to music quite a bit. And it's still produces a ton of money. But not much of that money goes into artist pockets. Instead, lots of it goes to the tech companies that bring you the music. These companies are too powerful. They can dictate terms, especially to independent artists and even tow labels and publishers because there's so much bigger and so much more powerful, and we need to do something about that power. We need to reduce that power. Then there is the notion that we can all record her own songs with tools on our Apple computer and People we can break through the noise. But sister Jesuits That's mostly a pipe dream, one that has gotten way too much traction like this is a profoundly irresponsible message to be disseminated, and it's been disseminated with all the marketing power of Silicon Valley. Still, he acknowledges that Tech has in some ways widened the playing field. It's increased access, even if that's no really consolation to those who Ping to turn art. Into a living. My argument is not that the Internet has been terrible for the arts. In every respect. I think it's been terrible for working artists financially. It's done a lot of good things, and one of the things that's done is that it has democratized creation, and I think it's great for a lot of people. I mean, I'm a big fan of amateur creativity and people making their music and people writing their books. But there's a big difference between that and serious. I'm gonna just say it's serious, talented, dedicated artists who make the stuff that the rest of us actually want to read and listen to. I mean, that's the issue, right is like, Think about it. First of all, think about how much time you spend in an average day consuming art, meaning every kind of art music and narrative television and books and everything. Probably several hours. And then think about how much of that art is created by amateurs who just put their stuff out there. Probably none. But in any case, maybe at best, very little. So God bless all the millions of people who want to do this and put their songs online. This is not the way to have a culture. And it's also not the way to have an arts economy. Are there break spots You mentioned television and ah, I for all people over the last 68 months, we're doing a lot more television watching. Not that we weren't doing plenty before. Are there places for screenwriters or things that that have bossom DH because of technology because of streaming services like Netflix, and I'II bet Amazon in the TV business and on and on Yeah, There's no question that television has blossomed, You know, not just in terms of the numbers of shows, but aesthetically artistically, right? I mean around 2000. We got the Sopranos, and there was a 1999 the same years Napster and then all these terrific shows on HBO and Showtime and L. Amazon and Netflix and Lulu. And it's great. I mean, TV is the one art that's that's confident. That's blossoming. As you said, Why is this happening? It's not because we can get TV on streaming versus our television sets. It's because we pay for it. We pay a lot for it. I mean, if you add up the money that goes to television in your cable bill, Amazon Prime Netflix, HBO Max ESPN, plus all the money that each of us is paying every month. That's flowing through the system, and that's why television is flourishing. That's why movie stars and movie directors and screenwriters have migrated from movies to television because that's where the artistic Opportunities are if somebody does the television what Napster and now Spotify have done to music that's going to disappear. Overnight. Okay, People are not going to you know, Nicole Kidman is not going to do a TV series for 10 bucks. And maybe that's when people will realize what's been happening across the arts. I wonder what you see ahead. I mean, obviously. You know, when you talked about this notion of sea and like the death of the artist that was even before, as we talked about like that arts in many ways, kind of shut down for several months. What is the way forward? I don't know that there's a good answer. But let me let me say this in the last few decades already something we now call the food movement has arisen where people have realised, you know, we're eating a lot of processed food, reading a lot of fast food. It's bad for us is bad for animals. It's bad for the planet. It's bad for the people who make the food for us. We need to consume in a more responsible way. So people have started to pay more for food, and we've Started to restructure the food system a little bit around the edges, then, more recently, the same thing with clothing. People call it fast fashion like like fast food, and we're trying to be more conscious consumers of you know, cheap clothing that's made in places like Vietnam and Bangladesh. I think we need the same kind of movement for art. Because now we have what I call fast Art. Because this stuff has to be produced fast if you're going to make enough To make a living. At the very least, you have to make a lot and it's produced cheaply and it's consumed in haste. Music, text, visual images moving images, everything. So Yeah, I do think that we need to become more conscious consumers and pay what we can but also like with food and fashion. Larger structural changes also need to be made and the more conscious we are as consumers and the more we are aware of. The need for these changes and demand them from our public officials. And again, That's especially going to mean taking on big attack, which we now have so many reasons to do this, I think has the potential to maybe turn things around.

Netflix Kim Deal Amazon Napster Dayton Nicole Kidman Silicon Valley William Cole HBO America Russell Spotify L. Amazon Showtime
As anger rises, thousands of Muslims protest French cartoons

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

As anger rises, thousands of Muslims protest French cartoons

"I'm T. fronts protests continue in Dhaka Bangladesh as anger rises among thousands of Muslims to be smaller in the Bangladeshi capital off the French president's final to continue the right to betray the prophet Muhammad continues to roil the Muslim world the protesters burned an effigy of Emmanuel macron during the March the protests come amid rising tensions between France and Muslim majority nations which flared up earlier this month when a young Muslim the head to the French school teacher who's shown concrete tools of the prophet Muhammad in class I'm Charles the last month

Muhammad Emmanuel Macron France Charles French School
Rape is wrong but death penalty, castration, not the answer: UN rights chief

UN News

01:27 min | Last month

Rape is wrong but death penalty, castration, not the answer: UN rights chief

"U N High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet has called on governments worldwide to redouble their efforts to prevent rape and other forms of sexual violence. She also appealed for a right spaced approach to prosecution after highlighting a new law in northwest Nigeria, which allows surgical castration for male rapists and the death penalty where the victim is under fourteen tempting as it may be to impose draconian punishments on those who carry out such monstrous acts we. Must not allow ourselves to commit further violations she said in a statement, the development follows numerous rapes reported around the world in recent weeks including in Algeria, Bangladesh India, Morocco Nigeria Pakistan, and Tunisia people have rightly been outraged and are demanding justice for the victims and measures to prevent such assaults from happening. Again, Miss Bachelorette noted in an appeal for greater assistance for victims prompt criminal investigations and prosecutions. I share the outrage and standing solidarity with the survivors and with those demanding justice but I'm concerned. Are also calls and some places loss already being adopted, bringing cruel and inhuman punishments and the death penalty for perpetrators they main argument being made for the death penalty is for it to deter rape. But in fact, there's no evidence that the death penalty deters crime more than other forms of punishment the death penalty or other measures such as surgical sterilization of perpetrators will not resolve the barriers victims of sexual violence face in accessing justice misbash let said

Michelle Bachelet Rape Nigeria Commissioner Algeria Tunisia Morocco Bangladesh India Pakistan
10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | Last month

10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

"Ten years is a long time for US humans on Earth. Ten turns around the Sun. When I was on the Ted. Stage a decade ago I, talked about planetary boundaries that keep our planet in a state that allowed humanity to prosper. The main point is that once you transgress won the risks, start multiplying the planetary boundaries are all deeply connected but climate alongside bio-diversity, our core boundaries they impact on all others. Back then we really thought we had more time. The warning lights were on absolutely, but no unstoppable change had been triggered. Since mytalk, we have increasing evidence that we are rapidly moving away from the safe operating space for humanity on earth, climate has reached a global crisis point. We have now had ten years of record breaking climate extremes, fires blazing, Australia set area California, and the Amazon floods in China Bangladesh and India. During heatwaves across the entire northern, hemisphere we risk crossing tipping points that shift the planet from being our best resilient friend dampening are impacts to start working against US amplifying the heat. For the first time, we are forced to consider the real risk of destabilizing the entire planet. Our children can see this they are walking out of school to demand action looking with disbelief at our inability to deviate away for potentially catastrophic risks. The next ten years to twenty thirty must see the most profound transformation. The world has ever known. This is our mission. This is the countdown. When my scientific colleagues summarized about a decade ago for the first time, the state of knowledge on climate tipping points just one place had strong evidence that it was on a sears downward spiral. Arctic Sea ice. Other tipping points were long way off fifty four hundred turns around the Sun. Just. Last year, we revisited these systems in I got the shock of my career. We are only a few decades away from an Arctic without since summer in. Permafrost is now thawing at dramatic. Scales Greenland is losing trillions of tons of ice and may be approaching a tipping point. The great force of the North are burning with plumes of smoke, the size of Europe. Atlantic Ocean circulation is slowing the Amazon rainforest is weakening and may start emitting carbon within fifteen years. Half of the Coral Great Guy Wreath has died west Antarctica may have crossed the tipping point already today, and now the most solid of glaciers on earth east Antarctica parts of it are becoming unstable. Nine out of the fifteen big biophysical systems that regulate climate are now on the move showing worrying signs of decline in potentially approaching tipping points. Tipping Points Bring Three threats I sea level rise, we can already expect up to one meter this century. This will endanger the homes of two, hundred million people. But when we add the melting is from Antarctica and greenland into the equation, this might lead to a two meter rise. But it won't stop there. It will keep on getting worse. Second if our carbon stores like permafrost enforced flipped to belching carbon, then this makes the job of stabilizing temperatures so much harder and third these systems are all linked like dominoes. If you cross one tipping point, you lurch closer to others. Let's stop for a moment and look at where we are. The foundation of our civilization is a stable climate and the rich diversity of life everything I mean everything is based on this civilization has thrived and a goldilocks zone not too hot not too cold. This is what we have had for ten thousand years since we left the last ice age. Let's zoom out a little here three million years. Temperatures have never broken through the two degree Celsius limit. Earth has self regulated within a very narrow range of plus two degrees in a warm into glacial minus four degrees. Defy. Sage. Now we are following path that would take us to a three to four degree world. In just three generations, we would be rewinding the climate clock, not one, million, not two million, but five to ten million years we are drifting towards hothouse earth. For. Each one degree rise one billion people will be forced to live in conditions that we today largely consider uninhabitable. This is not a climate emergency. It is a planetary emergency. My fear is not that Earth will fall over a cliff on the first of January twenty thirty. My fear is that we press unstoppable buttons in the Earth System.

Antarctica Amazon Earth System India United States Arctic Sea Europe Greenland Australia California China Bangladesh
Bangladesh to allow death penalty for convicted rapists

Democracy Now! Audio

00:27 sec | Last month

Bangladesh to allow death penalty for convicted rapists

"And Bengladeshi. The approved the use of the death penalty for convicted rapists. This comes following widespread protests over several high profile rape cases including a gang rape and a remote village which circulated on Social Media Human Rights Watch US South Asia director knock. She ganguly noted that most cases are not reported or prosecuted and conviction rates are low and the government should instead focus on reforming Bangladesh is justice system.

Rape Ganguly Bangladesh Director Asia
Bangladesh to Allow Death Penalty for Rape Convictions

Dan Proft

00:35 sec | Last month

Bangladesh to Allow Death Penalty for Rape Convictions

"To introduce the death penalty for rape cases following days of protest about the country's high level of sexual violence against women. A 37 year old was attacked in No Carly in the southeast of the country. It was only after a video of the assault went viral that police took action. A number of men have been arrested ones alleged to have raped the woman at gunpoint several times in the past year. In recent weeks. Other gang rapes in the country have also made headlines The government's being criticized for its failure to address sexual violence. The U. N surged Bangladesh to conduct a review into its handling of rape cases. Report for the BBC. Mexicans have

Rape Assault Bangladesh BBC
Neanderthal DNA May Be COVID Risk

60-Second Science

02:05 min | Last month

Neanderthal DNA May Be COVID Risk

"The risk factors for covid nineteen are many old age obesity, heart conditions. But early genetics studies have identified another trait that some people who developed severe cove nineteen seem to share a cluster of genetic variations on their third chromosome and that DNA sequence likely derives from neanderthals says Hugo, Siegburg of the Max Planck Institute it is quite striking that S-. This veterans has lingered until house years fifty thousand years ago is. The approximate time humans and neanderthals interbred, and over the Millennia, those neanderthal variants have become more common in some homo sapiens populations than others for example, about sixteen percent of people of European descent carry at least one copy of the neanderthal stretch half of South Asians do and nearly two thirds of Bangladesh's, and that's kind of fascinating is so high that points towards that it must must've been beneficial in the post. I mean it's much higher than we expect. Undone. It's totally expunged in east as shown in China. Some something has happened driving the frequency often certain placing removing a token, the other places they details are in the journal, nature. See Bergen is colleague right that perhaps the NEANDERTHAL DNA happens to boost the risk of developing severe covid nineteen and they point to the fact that in the UK people of Bangladeshi descent have twice the risk of dying of cove nineteen than the general population. But as Epidemiologists Neil of the University of Nottingham pointed out in an email people of African descent in the UK are also being hurt more by the virus. Despite, having hardly any neanderthal genes instead, it's social factors like crowded multi, generational households or working frontline jobs that are more likely to be driving the trend seen in the UK that's according to Andrew Heyward Director of the Institute of Epidemiology in Healthcare at University College London, and as both epidemiologist pointed out, it's worth remembering that you can only develop severe covid nineteen if you're exposed to the virus in the first place.

UK Max Planck Institute Andrew Heyward University Of Nottingham Hugo Bergen China Institute Of Epidemiology University College London Director Bangladesh
Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

TIME's Top Stories

07:28 min | 2 months ago

Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

"Are now emerging in refugee camps. Why did it take so long for the virus to reach them By Melissa Godin. For a number of months, the world's largest refugee camps appear to have been spared the worst of the coronavirus pandemic but human rights groups now say cove nineteen infection rates are on the rise in the temporary. That house millions of the world's most vulnerable people with alarming consequences both for those vulnerable groups, as well as the world more broadly the United Nations high. Commissioner for Refugees reports that globally twenty one, thousand of the world's thirty million refugees have tested positive for the virus across ninety seven countries at the end of September. Thirty two new cases were reported in the refugee camps. In Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh home. To seven hundred, forty, five, thousand Rohingya an ethnic minority fleeing violence and discrimination in. Myanmar. In Greece, more than two hundred, forty refugees have tested positive for the virus on the island of Lesbos, and in Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. Cova nineteen outbreaks have occurred at several camps over the past month though UNHCR reports the numbers rose sharply in September. The true number of cases remains unknown because of limited testing. Aid agencies had long expressed fears about the potentially devastating impacts of the virus for those living in crowded camps where medical services are sparse yet for the first six months of the pandemic case rates remained far lower than expected while low testing rates in refugee camps could explain why so few cases have been reported experts say camps isolation from host communities, as well as the imposition of strict laws down measures curb the spread of the virus even if refugees have so far been spared the worst of the pandemics immediate health impact, the outbreak has taken a huge toll on refugees lives. The global economic recession has led to major cuts to humanitarian funding for refugee camps, causing food shortages, and. Employment Opportunities for displaced people with the Norwegian Refugee Council estimating three quarters of displaced people have lost income since the pandemic began lockdowns have also further restricted refugees mobility with countries like Greece placing tighter restrictions on refugees than the rest of the population. Moreover, many experts say governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to violate refugees rights. Governments are using covid nineteen as a pretext to block people from the right to seek asylum says bill freely the director of human rights watches. Refugee. And Migrant Rights Division. It runs roughshod over the basic principles of refugee protection. He says now, as the virus begins circulating in camps around the world experts worry that refugees who have already suffered so much from the pandemic may not get the medical support they need. If the disease gets introduced into more refugee camps, it would be a tinderbox says freekick noting that the virus would spread rapidly the low case rates we have seen so far free lick says are just a lucky break. Why have cove nineteen rates been lower than expected in refugee camps? covid nineteen rates in refugee camps or unexpectedly low in part because the camps tend to be isolated from surrounding communities limiting the odds of the virus spreading into the camps camps are situated often in the most desolate unwanted land that a country can find free like says, no one casually goes in and out national lockdowns also help protect refugees from the virus in Jordan, for instance, which hosts seven hundred. Forty seven thousand refugees mostly from Syria the government implemented. One of the world's strictest lockdowns, shutting down airports for several months and jailing people who broke quarantine. There was tight lockdown that was put in place towards the Third Week of March including the shutting down of all the borders and airspace says, Juliet Toomas. UNICEF's Chief of communications for the middle, east, and North Africa, about Jordan this help she says. Additional restrictions placed specifically on refugee camps also helped limit viral spread. Many camps have reduced the number of people entering and exiting. For instance, in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar only twenty percent of the usual number of humanitarian workers were allowed to enter during the first few months of lockdown and deliveries were made less frequently in order to reduce potential transmission according to Saad Hamady a south. Asia campaigner for Amnesty International many of the operations except the essential ones were carried out remotely Hamadi says, these are the measures that might have reduced or delayed the spread of the virus. There are other factors however, that could explain low case numbers. Half of refugees worldwide are under the age of eighteen according to the UNHCR and their relative young age may make them less susceptible. To having a severe infection with the virus if young people are ACM dramatic or have mild symptoms, they may also be less likely to get tested. It's also possible that there have been cases of course at nineteen that have gone undetected and camps. While some testing is available, it's hindered by shortage of testing supplies and medical personnel to carry out the tests. Some refugees also don't. WanNa get tested for fear that they may have to self isolate and therefore be unable to carry out any income generating activities they rely on for survival in Cox's Bazar the world's largest refugee settlement in Bangladesh less than one percent of the population has been tested. The lower case numbers could therefore be a result of low testing rates. The actual number of cases could be higher. But experts say that despite low testing rates cove in nineteen infection rates in camps still have not been as bad as expected. Even if you carried out a large number of tests, it still likely to be a low number of infections says somebody if Cova Nineteen was spreading through camps undetected camps would witness rising numbers of people requesting medical attention or rising numbers of deaths neither of which have been the case in several camps according to UNHCR data I do think there's a hidden outbreak to an extent, but we're not seeing other indicators showing a massive outbreak says to Jacobson cares country director in Syria were not seeing a host of people falling ill or dying.

Unhcr Bangladesh COX Norwegian Refugee Council Syria Government Cova Greece Jordan Director United Nations Melissa Godin Commissioner Myanmar Migrant Rights Division Juliet Toomas Asia Unicef
Khan Academy: Sal Khan

How I Built This

06:58 min | 2 months ago

Khan Academy: Sal Khan

"Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood.

Sal Khan Pat Brown Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana Founder United States Airbnb David Dukes Affi-. New Orleans Jefferson Parish School South Asia Bangladesh Mary Representative President Trump Metairie India
Pre-marriage encounters

Not Another Mum Pod

07:04 min | 2 months ago

Pre-marriage encounters

"Task Do you have any funny stories about meeting with its when yourself or your family members anyone. I really have any money ones for myself but I remember my sister. had. Quite a few I've gone sister. And we as older than me. She's -solutely. Stunning right especially with women younger like every single person who met have, which is four head over heels in love with her you know what? Out of assist designed really know which one you're talking about. Exact. Back in the day like she had everyone off to have right and my dad had been desperately trying to marry her off Sushil. Sixteen bit like your dad a few also worried that she doesn't know all run off with somebody else. Too much interest to competent hurry up and so her house from when she was sixteen, he was like trying to find people who by his which is bringing the wrong people my sister she was he job she prays all that she's not the most religious person Navy format, but he would bring in these proper holy problem on up types. Yeah. And I remember one like into the House and she must have been about eighteen at the time. Else fourteen and he had a really really big bed heels skinny his very clock initial show Wa Camis at the top Ian. Getting shoes. I, pull off when she saw him right. Anyway, so they're in the room together and wadden whose idea was to be in the room as well. Yeah. Fourteen year old mock anthem his sister was in the room to. So he sister spoke the whole time she didn't get a single word in heating guessing wanted the system which is going on on on on her. For about half an hour and see my sister she's looking at me Schlep peas get me out. Get me out of here. Right. So finally our top the courage to say so do you have any questions for my sister? DISA- quickly jumped in she'll slide say questions and often all these different things and finally my sister was like so what you're looking for in a wife and he was mortified that she'd even spoke Nina he was looking at the floor was bright van. Dislike, he mumbled something and we're like, sorry what did you say his? Piety and that was it. Literally, that will only word. He said the whole time. Right they left the house. My Dad was how did it go musters smoking happening, right? Mom Fund straight away and then she was like, yeah, we really liked everyone. We're interested WANNA go ahead and my dad was like he didn't know missing. I don't know what came over him. He told my sister. You know what? You tell them that you don't WanNa marry the. Alcohol and tell him. You know what you told the by just did and she's long in that utility Lonard even though the didn't say one way to me I'm not saying it and who's like what I'm working if my friend yeah, you keep saying not everybody you ruining relationships with everyone you didn't. Do it. Are. List on. The worst. Be Locking someone's misery. Have I wore her that could won Gina I have so many like we could do another show on them seriously I have got so many one of the most funny ones the I'll tell you about is I went to Bangladesh on a holiday you know what that means you know a lot. Marriageable Age or was on holiday is a marriage or trip? Yeah. I was twenty three, maybe twenty four and I was quite capable. I may say not obviously not like now but anyway I was in prime shall I say and so it was a normal day I didn't even know why I dressed up for no reason. No I just decided I'm going to dress up today had Mahara had coupon the comedian and the community itself was really small as well. I'M mmj Just came in a he knew he was avoiding me actually he was hitting me like like the plague and I wondered what was up with him. He sent somebody to tell me to look decent because someone's coming to see me and I was like no way. I went mad. You can't just spring a guy on me and out of rebellion I just decided not to get change. They can see me as Western as I look you know even though I was Bring Asian. My show. Great. I went to the hairdresser's yesterday. It was really sure and I just refuse to wear anything traditional. Oh, look any different than what I was wearing just if you want them to come and see me, they have to see me how I am and my dad didn't. Surprise. You didn't get clue slaps. On No, I didn't but you just wait until you hear what happened. I thought you have got one up on everyone I'm just GonNa stay like this. Anyway they came and guess who came. Not. The guy but the whole family came except for the guy and I was like if there's no guy, why am I meant to look at hia pardoned? The Guy was traveling on the parents didn't want wait for the guy to fly to. Bangladesh at some point. So they thought while I was dead they will just catch me Davis worth him meeting you Chinnawat decides never happened before. So horrified sounds like what is the point of all this? So anyway, the mum. Came bless her. She was really sweet. You know my told my sister I. Don't know if I've told you before she's really attractive and very young king and everybody like says, she's really the Patrick. Bengali. doted material and so she was really shook the cool. Very friendly sociable. So she was looking into Kenyan they the mother in no the potential mother. No, she was like staring at my sister on like all wise and she went door or in no wise in at her. Look at such long and I was sitting opposite the lady and my art was sitting next to me. I just whispered to my artists at you a bit. She thinks my sister knows me I. Don't know why I said that it's just the way the mother was looking at my sister. No. Mantis was like, no way of course she knows it's you. I said now look at look at my sister, nor this is going beyond long gang is this is. This is this is my daughter knowing that kind of on my on very politely said so you've met officer, the Commun- office in the Bengal Leeway. Were heavy and she put her arms around my bear arms and kind of shoved me a bit. Frontal. This is enough this. You know I'm the look of shock on the mother thinks. She saw did A. Hundred Sixty degrees ton and faced me. She was like that. Does that sad what Sandra I? Looked to me like what the Hell it's you oh my God and then she started looking at me with fresh eyes and obviously you look long just turned to disappointment. and. Then that disappointments turn to quiet defeat an acceptance before she left she gave me you know sometimes give you a gift giving a. Book to though isn't it? Yeah. She gave me this book. How did you know Oh my God? She she gave this book. I took it obviously, but I just feel so sorry for Hasso oppo you. You know you didn't get the DOJ want

Bangladesh Sandra I Gina I Wa Camis Disa Mom Fund Hasso DOJ Mahara WAN Nina Officer Davis Bengali. Chinnawat Bengal
Myanmar soldiers confess for first time to mass killings, rapings of Rohingya

Marketplace

04:14 min | 3 months ago

Myanmar soldiers confess for first time to mass killings, rapings of Rohingya

"First time members of Myanmar's military have openly confess to slaughtering members of the country's Rohingya Muslim minority to soldiers have admitted to killing dozens of civilians in 2017 and burying them in mass graves. The soldiers deserted the military and are now being held at the International Criminal Court in the Netherlands, one of the man private meal win, Tune said in his video confession. That his superiors told him to shoot all you see, and all you hear, including Children and Amy and get confusing. My general in his actions were part of a scorched earth campaign when Myanmar security forces for some 750,000 Rohingya from their homes into Bangladesh. Matthew Smith from the Thailand based Human Rights group. Fortify Rights has analyzed the video confessions. Matthew these air, really stunning toe Watch. What are the most explosive admissions? We here In these videos? Both of the soldiers in these phoned confession's admit to killing upwards of 180 civilians between the two of them. That's men, women and Children. Both of these soldiers were operational into different areas of northern Rick Kind state at the same time, and the fact that they both were given orders to Qilong Rohingya or exterminate all Rohingya. Essentially they were given orders to commit genocide in the fact that they were in two separate areas at the same time would indicate some coordination at the higher levels of the Myanmar army. There's also the issue of rape and sexual violence, You know, in one village called Jet Jochen, we knew there was a tremendous amount of rape and sexual violence committed by members of military against Rohingya. And one of these soldiers on an intern was operational in jet Yo pin while this rape was taking place, and he confesses to standing guard, while superior officers raped several running a women You've analyzes confessions. We can't independently verify their authentic. Why do you think they're credible? Essentially everything that these two men share in the testimonies can be corroborated or already has been corroborated by Our previous human rights documentation as well as the U. N fact finding mission and others and these two men appeared on the Bangladesh border presented themselves to Bangladesh authorities seeking protection confessing their crimes further. Yeah, That's also an interesting part of the story. How these confessions happen. They just appear together on the border at Bangladesh told their stories offered names and ranks of 19 of their superiors who say they gave the orders for war crimes. That seems like a really risky move on their part. So why did they do it? Do you know what motivated them? I want to believe that they were motivated by a desire for justice by desire for the truth and a desire for the BMR military to be held accountable for its actions. I think it's also noteworthy that both of these soldiers come from ethnic minority groups and for a very long time, we've know that some pretty at times brutal discrimination takes place within the ranks of the medium or military itself. I mean, I think of Aunt Song Suki, Myanmar's most public politician, She's artfully dodged the allegations of genocide. How can the Nobel Peace Prize laureate possibly walk away from this body of testimony? In many ways, her credibility internationally in shot. She has become a mouthpiece in many ways for the Myanmar military. She's doing the work of the military in denying that these atrocities had taken place. The Rohingya that you're in touch with Matthew how they reacted to these confession videos. Many people in the community are very hopeful. Right now. This is a moment that a lot of people for a very long time we're telling the writing of people this would never happen. A lot of people were dashing the hopes of the community saying, You know, The Hague is too far away from me, Amar. The military is immune from this type of accountability. And I think today a many Rohingya have expressed quite a lot of hope for justice and accountability. Think the people that I'm speaking with running in the camps and wrangle were in Yangon right now and elsewhere in various countries in the world? They know this isn't a silver bullet. They know this is not the answer, but they do recognize that this is a tremendous blow to Myanmar's denials.

Myanmar Matthew Smith Bangladesh Rohingya Myanmar Army Rape Qilong Rohingya International Criminal Court Fortify Rights AMY Netherlands Yangon Tune Intern Toe Watch Rick Kind Jet Jochen Thailand
Almost 300 Rohingya found on beach in Indonesia’s Aceh

BBC Newshour

04:01 min | 3 months ago

Almost 300 Rohingya found on beach in Indonesia’s Aceh

"Rohingya Muslims who have been stranded on a boat on the and, um and see for six months have landed on a beach in the Indonesian province of There were 800 of them who set out from Bangladesh in March and the people smugglers split people up into smaller vessels. Another group landed in Indonesia in June, they had endured terrible conditions. They're nearly more million refugees in camps in Bangladesh who fled Myanmar three years ago when the Burmese army launched a campaign against them. I've been speaking to Chris Leela, who is Thebes actor off the Arakan project, which advocates for advocates for human rights protections for the Rohingya Muslims. I asked her first How did it take six months for this boat to land? Yes, it's quite extraordinary, isn't it such a long time when they left in March, they encounter problem deism back in Malaysia or even the whole region, especially at the time. It was shortly after the pandemic was declared so many country closed their borders and actively prevented People like to linger to enter into a Malaysian waters, fakes and multi waters and stood in addition to all the problem related to the credit crisis is also the fact that smugglers of course we're keeping these people at sea until the family paid the ransom. So when when you say they were waiting for the families to pay a ransom that suggests that these people were being held hostage? Well, yes, exactly. That's why I use that term. In some cases. I mean families have paid a while ago, but the smugglers insisted that all of them would have to pay. So many of them were women as you know, and also some Children, So this's the combination off to different issue at the same time, it's created this situation that the last Oop have bean six months at sea. The earlier group that disembarked in June had been living at sea in the most appalling conditions. What's known about the conditions of thes 300 people When the first group that arriving June they say that 30 off the passenger had already died. By the time they were able to design back also that there has been some act of violence, especially beatings on the boat by the smugglers. The group here We haven't been able to talk to them yet, but they also talked to other People in that city and mentioned similar things. Based on what happened in June with the people who disembarked Then has there been any consequence it all for the people smugglers. Not as far as we know, and we know the survivors are still detained in Malaysia. Those who arrive in June then and then those who arrive in June in Indonesia also kept in camps in province but We don't know anything about any smugglers or traffickers being arrested from some of the pictures that we're seeing of thes refugees. There were many women and Children on this particular boat. How common is that? That it would be many women and Children? Yes, that is something quite different from about five years ago, when we have a major crisis in the Andaman Sea. Many off them are young women, some of them, of course, they decided to go on a boat in order to try to reunite with their families in Malaysia because the husband had moved there some years ago. And as you know the ruling a state less so they don't have documents. There is no other way for them to travel than taking this illegal journeys. But also we see a lot of young women to send them as rights to Malaysia to marry other growing gum in there. That

Malaysia Bangladesh Indonesia Andaman Sea Burmese Army Chris Leela Myanmar
4 steps to ending extreme poverty

TED Talks Daily

04:41 min | 3 months ago

4 steps to ending extreme poverty

"We. Are Witness to monumental human progress. Over the past few decades expansion of the global marketplace has lifted a third of the world's population out of extreme poverty. Yet, we are also witnessing astounding failure. Our efforts to lift people up have left behind doors in the harshest forms of forty the ultra poor. What it means to be ultra poor goes beyond the monetary definition that we're all familiar with living on less than two dollars a day. It goes even beyond not having assets like livestock or land to be ultra poor means to be stripped of your dignity purpose and self worth it means living in isolation because you're a burden to your own community. It means being unable to imagine a better future for yourself and your family. By the end of two, thousand, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, about four, hundred, million people were living in ultra poverty worldwide. That's more than the populations of the United States and Canada combined. And when calamity strikes whether it's a pandemic, a natural disaster or a manmade crisis, these numbers spike astronomically higher. My Father Fuzzy Ahmed gave up a corporate career to establish BRAC here in Bangladesh in one thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, two Bangladesh was a wreck having just gone through a devastating cyclone followed by a brutal war for independence. Working with the poorest of the poor my father realized that poverty was more than the lack of income and assets. It was also a lack of hope. People were trapped in poverty because they felt their condition was immutable. Poverty to them was like the Sun and the moon something given to them by God. For Poverty Reduction programs to succeed, they would need to instill hope and self worth so that with the little sub support people could lift themselves out of poverty. Brat went onto to pioneer the graduation approach solution to ultra poverty that addresses both income poverty and the poverty of hold. The approach works primarily with women because women are the most affected by ultra poverty but also the ones most likely to pull themselves and their families out of it over a two year period, we essentially do for things. One we meet a woman's basic needs by giving her food or cash ensuring the minimum to survive. To, we move towards a decent livelihood 's by giving her an asset like livestock and training her to earn money from it three, retrain her to save budget and invest our new wealth and four we helped to integrate are socially I into groups of women like her and then into her community. Each of these elements is key to the success of the others. The real magic is the hope and sense of possibility they women develop the close mentorship they receive. Let. Me Tell you about jury. Jury was born in a remote village in northern Bangladesh. She never went to school and at the age of fifteen, she was married off to an abusive husband. He eventually abandoned her leaving her with no income and two children who are not in school and were severely malnourished with no one to turn to for help she had no hope. Join a joint brags graduation program in two, thousand and five. She received a dollar week to cowes enterprise training and the weekly visit from a mentor. She began to build her assets but most importantly, she began to imagine a better future for herself and her children. If you were to visit join us. Village today. You would find that she runs the largest general store in her area. She will proudly show you the land she bought and the house she built. Since we began this program in two thousand to two million Bangladeshi women have lifted themselves and their families out of ultra poverty. That's almost nine million people. The program which costs five hundred dollars per household runs for only two years but the impact goes well beyond that researchers at the London School of Economics found that even seven years after entering the program ninety, two percent of participants had maintained or increased their income assets and consumption.

Bangladesh London School Of Economics Cowes Fuzzy Ahmed United States Brat Canada
"bangladesh" Discussed on Darknet Diaries

Darknet Diaries

08:09 min | 3 months ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on Darknet Diaries

"Dark net dairy shop. This is for a limited time. Go Grab Your Free Money at privacy dot com slash dark net. This is a big story to help tell it. I brought in Jeff White. So Jeff Whites on an investigative journalist and I come technology for. Among. BBC. News. Channel Four News on my Kost. CYBERCRIME INVESTIGATIONS JEFF has had his head in this case for over a year trying to unravel stand and crack this case he knows more about this case than anyone else I could find. So let's get into it. A billion dollar bank robbery. That's the goal here. But that's like impossible. We're woo. Who would have a billion dollars lying around for someone to grab a billion is a lot of money your average consumer bank like your local chase or Wells Fargo Bank branch not going to have this much money anywhere probably not even in their bank headquarters your typical bank is out. So we have to aim higher possibly like a federal. Reserve Bank, or something some bigger place that has a lot of money. Robbers. Knew that national banks would have a large amount of money like this like countries Reserve Bank. So they started looking around for what national banks might be a good target. chose. The Bangladesh Bank? This was an interesting target to choose as far as central banks go Bangladesh has a growing economy and is starting to really flourish, but it's still a developing nation and its central bank. Does it have the best security? No, which might make this an easier target than a more developed nations national bank. Like the US Federal Reserve Bank. So the Bangladesh Bank became the target which is the National Bank of Bangladesh's like the Federal Reserve. Bank the Bank of England it's you know it's like the country's bank billions of dollars of reserve currency is sitting in the. All right. So the target is set. Now this group has a special weapon they're pretty good hackers. So they're planning isn't to bust down the door, draw their weapons and shout everyone on the floor Gimme a billion. Dollars now, that's not an option here. Instead, the plan was to hack into the being Podesta Bank and transfer out as much money as they could before anyone could catch them. It starts a full year before I think it was January twenty fifteen. The first email started popping up inside Bangladesh buying your employees get the classic phishing email. It's a it's a zip file contains the Stevie for somebody who looks like a job applicant opens it file. Has a look at the survey or baps doesn't forget the CV but nonetheless, they get infected three people open the Mellon Bank and at least one of them in fact. Okay. So the hackers or in this case, the bank robbers infiltrate the network. Now when they get in using a phishing email like this, the only get into one person's computer whoever that person was, who opened the e mail not it they just have access to that one computer from there. They have to try to hop around to other computers in the network once they get in, they used three types of malware to set. Up for the next part, an awesome way, one of them created the back door into Bangladesh Bank another of them create the encrypted channels so that you can pull stuff out to that back door without being spotted on the third piece of software is used to scan navigate across the network. So they spend some time mapping out the network of the Bangladesh Bank moving around establishing persistence and learning about how to transfer money around. One of us to do they workout wet Bangladesh banks got his money. So it's not all sitting in Dhaka, the capital buying dash the money that. English buying. A phone incumbency reserve account in. New York at the New York Fed and there's a billion dollars sitting there. So the criminals like that is a billion dollars that would be good if we can get that. In order to transfer money banks system called swift swift is is the international bank transfer system doesn't International Bank. Version of the hot which transfers millions billions of dollars around the world. So swift is a network used to send payment orders between banks. There are over eleven, thousand members, financial institutions in over two hundred countries around the world who used swift to send payment orders to each other. So anyway, these realize okay to transfer. Billion Dollars Out. Of The New York Fed, we're going to have to get to the swift software and do a series of transfers using swift. That's exactly what they're doing when they get into Bangladesh. Bank. They're trying to navigate their way around the network and find the compute saw the skull swift on it. So they can then manipulate that computer and transfer the money out of New York and out of the nuke account this bank. So the thing about swift is that it's pretty secure. It is secure it has to be because it handling this very sensitive financial communications. It's practically impossible to hack. But as with computers, there is a weakness and one of the biggest weaknesses is human error hackers routed around the Bangladesh Bank network looking for the right computer that can authorize being transfers, and of course, they find it. The computer authorized to make swift transfers BINGO. So instead of trying to hack into the swift system, they got to the human users of the computer terminals that ran swift, and they watched how users interacted with it, and they learned how to impersonate those human users and then trick the swift network into thinking that they were authorized users making real transaction requests. But I the swift terminal I mean, I don't know about you. If I was confronted with the Swift Terminal I would have no idea where to start I'd probably make some mistakes. It did not take these guys very long at all. To make the transfers to transfer out the money. This makes me think that these hackers are probably already familiar with the swift bank system. Perhaps this was someone who had done work for swift before or someone who hacked into a bank and did some swift transfers already since they knew how to use it right away without having to sit and watch how a typical bank operator does it. Very interesting. So they got that piece sorted, but now they needed to figure out how to hide their tracks to blend in to do this, they obtained bank transfer record and use them to learn what a typical large transfer would look like studied the banks high dollar value transfers. What kind of transactions were the? When were they made into who they used these insights? To plan their theft, they would use transaction that look like the banks typical large transactions to steal their billion dollars without raising suspicions transactions they lined up not only do they know how to swim, but they knew what to type into swift to make the transfers look legit I and they had this almost in advance it was almost like they knew how swift land. With. The right key strokes on this computer, they can move that one billion dollars to another bank account and account owned by the hackers. Behold up even if they now had access and a plan for making the transfer blend in making one giant transferred to themselves, still might not be the best idea using the strategy might have raised a flag somewhere in the system. Transfer like that might require additional authorization or something, and why put all your eggs in one basket if one billion dollar transfer fails then everything fails. So the hackers decided to break up the theft into many smaller transfers is classic money laundering technique. So in May two, thousand, fifteen, five bank accounts were opened in our CBC Bank on Jupiter, Street in Manila capital of the Philippines. Each of these accounts were opened with an initial five hundred dollar deposit. These accounts sat untouched for nearly a year until the weekend of February fifth, two, thousand, sixteen by that point the. Bank robbers had everything set up the launched a successful spearfishing operation on Bangladesh Bank employees which them to get access to the banks computer network and the swift terminals, and they figured out how to impersonate Bangladesh banks credentials.

Bangladesh Bank Bangladesh US Federal Reserve Bank Reserve Bank dollar bank National Bank of Bangladesh Wells Fargo Bank countries Reserve Bank Bank of England Mellon Bank International Bank Podesta Bank CBC Bank New York Jeff White
"bangladesh" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Niamey Campbell and and aircraft boarding routine that she goes Surrey when she gets on the plane and she's got the pointy end as well by the way she's coming up business causing she puts on rubber gloves. Yes I saw it on a mosque and she's antiseptic in two seconds watts and she writes down everything the seat the armrest the T._v. screen the table everything then she comes in a blanket on then she sits said for the entire flight with this Moscone and she and saints stops from getting sick because whenever pains disdain people start coughing and sneezing having to travel with the General Public Niobe well I thought of you when I saw that because you say that you walk down your title trying and onto the remote for the T._v.. Yeah yeah well. I'll do is at high of what my kids get but I mean you can just have one little you just had give everything quick rub down but he doesn't have to get the spray bottle out and put rubber gloves zone. That's the top Naomi getting get a grip there. Would I do agree with you houseplants when you go biking. Do you just let him die. Yes unfortunately that is what happens. Well Kentucky who partners of World Meds they've started in London for their children's a plant hotel you can book them into Kentucky's Plant Hotel loves. Thanks thanks for that Phil Phil Very Lucky. It will die match to have a culturally diverse team of people and one of those one about same members is as she happens to be. Hey from Bangladesh wasn't Bangladesh Ashe from Bangladesh my God wouldn't that be something that would make it much more memorable common sometimes condit but ads from Bangladesh is it is it ash short visits cashback so there you go so it's not quite ash I K- alright so let's get your story fist before we chat about food. How did you come to being Australia so yeah? It's a very good question Kim before you get into the third well. We're just GONNA talk about food for the entire. So is it GonNa Wolmar fluffing going on so Kim. <hes> my parents actually emigrated over here when I was about five years old why Oy so my dad he studied overseas when he was in union right and <hes> he studied in the U._S.. Actually of all places and I think he when he went back to Bangladesh think he enjoyed living in the West if you will and his kind of thinking of countries countries to go two YUP and don't think America was somewhere he wanted to take his young family to at that time it was kind of like late eighty s early ninety s I think he'd lived in Washington D._C.. At the peak of the crack epidemic and <hes> and chatting to my dad he kinda shortlisted down to Canada Australia where the two places those are the if you look at the patent of immigration to those two countries there is quite a distinct if you will community from the subcontinent and both Canada and now developing in Australia and I don't know what it is. Maybe it's the whole former colony Commonwealth thing going on there but my dad decided to come to Australia as a five year old then when you arrived here it. Did you speak any English. Just kinda school. I judge is no. I didn't didn't didn't speak English so I was enrolled in what's called E._S._l.. which is like an English as a second language sauce actually came just as kindergarten with starting I remember the weight would be divided between quote unquote regular kindergarten class and then me and a few other kids that had English as a second language speaking should always go after a special class to pronounce things like chair in Bowl and elemental things you take for granted now obviously as a growing growing up man you this part from looking at you? This kind of noise sign that you off from from Bangladesh is that does that make you sad or if you kept in touch with your roots..

Bangladesh Australia Niamey Campbell Kim Kentucky Phil Phil Plant Hotel Surrey Canada Australia Naomi condit America London Canada Washington two seconds five years five year
"bangladesh" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"It's not just about saying the landscape and oversee. Let's see when you're on a boat. You got lots of time to take things in into to look back to to move about but it's also the interactions with people while while it was all got chatting with various people because I'm guessing it don't get massive foreign travellers on the ferries and so to some degree people curious as to what I was doing on the hurry in why and it was just really nice because I lost a little informal conversations with people inside on the decks outside looking at the scenery and it was fantastic because it's just such a lovely lovely. Why a slow travel in what I didn't realizes just how extensive network is that and is this a fair bit of water there? I mean when you look at it on the map that some massive river delta the whole country really said of water. I mean that's absolutely right. The Waterways Planet critically important role in everyday life that I was told that the network stretches for eight thousand kilometers of roughly five thousand miles it through the country in his that is phenomenal so in many respects the the fact that the gun Jesus was Estan out of the Dow to that if you don't travel to so many great experience the full the full nature the countryside. I'm at the Bangladesh was a lovely place to photograph because if you enjoy street photography joy people photography travel you'll be aware eh law places it can be all. Could you know people can not want to be photographed. People can turn the backs you know in in certain Congress might be slightly difficult for men to photograph women in Bangladesh. I love the owners of the the people because the first experience that I had of this what I was still in docket. If one of the I didn't went down to the mark the wholesale fruit and veg market at the camera in <unk> people start the note that in the beginning asking to be photographed like fear missing almost <unk> tonight people photograph may continue phonograph may them so they ended up getting a whole. Load lovely lovely at portrait photographs of people work at the bucket and that was pretty much true throughout travels in Khukri but one of the one of the absolutely lovely things is it it was a two way process because people come up to me with smartphones and asked two tuff either photographs taken me all occasionally <unk> whole child and we'll get a photographic soul zoll together. It was absolutely lovely and then obviously people are Morrison the kind of thing you're in in a lot of western countries but I guess when you put a six the full ginger blog <unk> in Kansas <unk> chattan end it was it was just a lovely experience because it shows it shows that the country's not one of those places this overrode mine tours and how people welcomed to to Ferns Athol he could have started you story with a six foot four ginger. Ah It's so hints. The interest people switched off. We're going to be shutting food lighter in the episode because you also mentioned how wonderful Bangladeshi food is but ah it's always great to give to give listeners travelers. Some tips in one of yours is in fact feel. The last couple of podcast destination podcasts we've done with fate should road trips but this is not something that you advising Bangladesh all the roads tides the roads are it's like being on the moon in places. This big pot holes. The traffic in the cities is really quite white something <hes> that the dense density the traffic act rosia Indah Amnon typical was was phenomenal. I mean look from where I was sitting. I could see imposes scraped. It was interested in many ways to be contract for that round because he is you don't keep them straight. You see the same people in the bus the whole time and the kind of stock staring wave at each each other it was interesting to save rickshaws had had kind of weeded out none actually making things any quicker to chief flying so <hes> it was it was it's interesting..

Bangladesh Morrison rosia Indah Khukri Congress Ferns Athol Kansas eight thousand kilometers six foot
"bangladesh" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"Look at we're told it's the paralleled friendliness and hospitality of the Bangladeshi paypal that really sticks out. We'll say we're here in this episode anyway but it's also country nine for its cuisine from home kitchens two straight food. It's rich and culture on the country's tiny flat on that's because it lies in the world's biggest river delta of course the Delta from the jeeze well in this episode we do here for Mash who we work with here. He immigrated from Bangladesh aged five and we find out a few things about Bangladesh that you probably wouldn't have thought of but let's kick off with Audrey and together she and her husband Dan have been described as adventurous professionals and most recently Phil as well travelers in storytellers so waited all that begin I laugh because I'm thinking getting where to begin. So unconquered market originally started. I guess it's about twelve years ago so we were kind of one of the first bloggers and it originally began on a round the world journey that my husband Dan taking and we thought will documentary travels and will use unquoted market as a sort of portfolio of the creative work that we wanted to do in terms of writing and the topography and videos and things like that and what we didn't I know back then <hes> because we thought we were just going to travel for about twelve or eighteen months is that appointed market <unk> on a life of its own and it became kind of grew as logging grew and so it turned into a business and the website side of exploration and are focused on our goal has always been to explore places that perhaps are not very well known and tell a different story or perhaps taller story that doesn't usually get told and so that's one of the things that brought us to Bangladesh rush the one of the things that you've got these these a beginner's guide to Bangladesh. What what are the top tichy give somebody when the hitting Bangladesh so Bangladesh is not your typical tourist or travel destinations still and my top tip is to go with it sounds cheesy but it open mind in Bangladesh is very different from many other destinations and it's right next door to India says some people think oh it's going to be like traveling in India but it really earliest quite a unique destined? It's a unique place in culture in and of itself and Bangaldesh doesn't get very many travelers and so you as a traveller especially Western traveler you might find yourself the object of attention and and it's because everyone is just so curious in in the questions we got from people everywhere retrial among the dash or wonderful <hes> everyone was just really interested to know where we were from what we thought of their country never so happy that we visited and so so you don't necessarily go to Bangladesh to see famous sites or incredible buildings you really go there for the people in the culture and just the experience of being in a very very unique place the the shared a number of humanity Eddie in people in Bangladesh can be quite intense but it's also quite remarkable when you realize they're all there when we didn't. I used to joke that when we walked down the street we couldn't stop because otherwise people would start gathering around and it wasn't anything ominous it was just people were really curious and they wanted to to connect with us. So it really is quite an interesting place it that is consistent with a chat that we're going to be having lighter in the podcast with a guy who says exactly the same thing that normally he would travel and be respectful and not tight hike functionalize betting Bangladesh they want you to take the fight is they want to have fight is tikey with you so they're very very curious..

Bangladesh Mash Dan unquoted India Phil Audrey Eddie eighteen months twelve years
"bangladesh" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on Super Station 101

"Donate one radio welcome back everybody do a little research for you guys out there i actually said that again as twice where the culture is getting to the yankee news is coming down there will research for y'all jeez actually said you guys that is the second time in three weeks if i get to us guys is over almost like your southern court away that is so wrong i was looking up where bangladeshi as you all know where bangladesh is it's just just right beside india it's right like in the indian ocean right there becomes to a point you know you're like i failed geography or whatever it is but it's it's right there it's about india the dots not that now you can't say that either is that is india taj mahal india bangladesh why that matters is because border patrol agents in the laredo sector texas they have arrested two hundred nine bangladeshis since october now you've got to really be working hard to walk from bangladesh laredo texas and you gotta swim loan loan way but we don't care all the people coming over the southern border they're just from poor little central american countries looking for a better life except for those few bangladeshis bangladesh's bangladesh bangladesh's here's the interesting part we're talking about the law in the first half a cost who is one of the border patrol people he's a chief border patrol age assistant chief patrol agent he said that they don't even try to not get called they just they just let themselves get caught because the transnational criminal organization that helps smuggle people into the country tells them what to say so they make this statement of credible fear quote credible fear we're in fear where fear for so now they're on the road to asylum big dave is like i just heard about that today and i'm ticked off mike welcome to the program good morning.

bangladesh texas dave laredo bangladesh laredo three weeks
"bangladesh" Discussed on Le Show

Le Show

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on Le Show

"Believe the things i'm seeing how about some things off hurt it'd be crying mercy and dome no the meaning of a bad situation sure enough getting words bodies crying and don't know the meaning the word everybody's and don't know the meaning this is the show and we continue our conversation with dr homer venter's of physicians for human rights the bangladesh government as finds itself now with the job of attending to the needs of city of six hundred fifty thousand people in the what little i know about bangladesh suggests that they're not swimming in resources to handle job like us that's yeah that's very true one of the poorest nations and also i think one of the most densely populated nations on the earth now has an even more densely populated and even more poor cohort of people to care for i will say that the the just recently was at a an event where i was on a panel with a representative of the government bangaldesh and they have very publicly said you know we are an asian that does not have a lot of resources but we will take care of the people that are here and so there has been real up to this point generally very good interaction i think between the row hingis certainly i've talked to imams village headman and others who have told me it's very important to them to make sure that their colleagues are hinge understand and express how much of a strain this is on the government of bangladesh.

dr homer venter bangladesh government bangladesh representative hingis
"bangladesh" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The obviously did not create this situation with the intention of taking them back i'm sorry i'm being skeptic but i have seen no measure no action no gesture we suggest that the man mound government is welcoming them back farc beer is country directory in bangladesh for action aides speaking to us from dhaka in bangladesh thank you for joining us thank you mm welcome back thanks for being with us this hour on the take away ipods will at old saying laughter is the best medicine it is but that doesn't mean it doesn't work at all there is some evidence that it might help humor is important when you're finding things funding it does these a wonderful things for you a shift shifting your perspective has cardiovascular effects so i think that these findings i hope that they are part of a new wave of research on humor in its possibilities for happiness in for health that is psychologist dr belinda campus strees part of this week's episode of the science of happiness we visit with signs of happiness podcast every week to try out a different happiness exercise training the brain to help you be just a little bit happier well this week we're looking at the three funny things exercise so the idea here of course is pretty simple at the end of the day right down three funny things that happen to you or that you saw and then reflect on them decker kelner is the host of this.

bangladesh dhaka cardiovascular effects
"bangladesh" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on 1A

"From some quarters for her response or maybe lack thereof to this crisis talk about this stress that this influx of rookie injure refugees has put on bangaladeshi just over the border from myanmar what has this year brought in terms of that that exit us well that's a great question bangladesh is already one of the poorest countries in the world so it's coping with this sudden influx of well just under seven hundred thousand people again the population of washington dc and there were already four or five hundred thousand range living in the country so the international community of course has been responding with the usual aid and assistance but the scale of this thing is so mind boggling and imagine happening in the poorest country in the world so the bangladesh government we know has been quite quite understanding and synthetic under the circumstances but there are also being pretty tough on these refugees for example they're not allowing these refugees to you cell phones the not allowing them to use taxis so they could conceivably get into other parts of the country they're keeping them very isolated because they don't want them coming out into the rest of the country and perhaps taking people's jobs and that is a recipe for all kinds of future problems and you know but but again how do you solve a problem like that is as one of the poorest countries in the world and they're being asked to deal with one of the most horrific refugee crises in recent memory except.

myanmar bangladesh bangladesh government washington
"bangladesh" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"These guys they come back from afganistan uh they come back to bangladesh now you remember the original osama bin laden 512 of 1998 had five signatories one of them was the guy who was in charge of harkatuljehad islami bungling daesh so people were always confused about who was this fifth dude that signs the fatwa but this so this you know he lingers in academia obscurity because we don't really see what's happening in bangladesh so while throughout the 1990s we see you know pakistan has fallen prosecuting its jihad in kashmir it's fullon prosecuting and supporting what will eventually uh you know first um the warlords and then the taliban in afghanistan bangaladesh's churning right this idea of are we muslim are are we bengali first this debates churning out the 1990s and you begin seeing um groups calling for sharia law but these guys are not typically terribly violent and they're not typically um you know landing on international newspapers with that changes in two thousand five when in the summer of two thousand five this group which no one had heard of before outside of bangladesh debt detonates about four hundred bombs in sixty three of sixty four of is districts with in an hour and two appreciates logistical feet of this bungled has more navigable rivers than roads so these were calibrated 10 not kill each of these bomblets for like the size of a pack of cigarettes but it it's taken old that we could kill you if we wanted to kill you and that guy's name was bunglow by and um he's been subsequently caught and killed.

bangladesh taliban afganistan pakistan afghanistan
"bangladesh" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Support for this podcast is provided by clarke universities international development community and environment department administrations change global problems persist innovate solutions to global challenges like climate change hunger in equity and injustice turn research into action apply at clark u dot edu slash id c e a garment workers dilemma today on the world i'm mark a woman the head of the garment manufacturers association in bangladesh says sexual harassment is impossible there this is a muslim country he has six will at us meant is very difficult because it people would v is by us so it is no man noting that day in we had us a woman female garment workers in bangladesh disagree also the twomatch firefighter battling the thomas blaze and preserving his tribal heritage plus a free history of synthesized voices a pounded opic's flat carl vital expressions who value that's all ahead today on the world i'm mark a woman and you're with the world thanks for being here this friday about two weeks away from the end of the year 2017 has been the year of women saying no to sexual harassment and assault in the workplace often risking a lot to speak out not just here in the us but in many other parts of the globe as well where show that connects across boundaries said today we start with one woman's story of harassment from halfway around the world and it's a store that shows how risky speaking out can be for women especially poor women who simply can't afford to lose their jobs or whose lives could be in big danger if they speak out our across women's lives correspondent jasmine gars was recently in bangladesh reporting on women in the garment industry and while she was there she stumbled upon a case of sexual harassment jasmine joins me now welcome jess high markelle so how did you discover the story of sexual harassment among the dash i actually wasn't looking for eight i with in bangladesh doing a series about the garment industry and i.

bangladesh harassment opic carl assault us jasmine gars climate change two weeks
"bangladesh" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on WTMA

"And here is winner up on national radio olive wavell wars michael seven we hope that this tara is coming from one place and we cannot condemn an entire religion but on the other hand we can't be blinds the fact that all terrorism is coming from the holy book i'm not asking you to confirm it biggest they'll crucify you if you said i agree with you you don't have to agree with me donald but when your president we need to change things that we're not going to survive this we will change things and don't forget i'm the one that called for a temporary ban on coming in i mean it's ridiculous what's going on you just look i mean these people aren't coming from sweden norway or denmark or frankly from china they're not coming from the coming from a certain part of the world and we have to be smart and we cannot be politically correct that was president trump on the savage nation not even a year ago on march twenty second twenty sixteen we were talking about the necessity for travel ban then right here on the show while others were ridiculing you call you trumpers trumpet tears trump at so now licking his boots a while others were backing of the candidates i was here with donald trump with you he knew what was going on which is why i backed him and today we learned that the new york city bombing was conducted by i'm sorry to tell you a gentleman a gentleman akai edited allegedly from bangladesh member the concert for bangladesh by the beatles and the other hippie musicians the bleeding are liberal junkie musicians poor their hearts south a bangladesh in the sixth these the fools that they are white came here through chain migration uh you may not know that the department of homeland security spokesman tyler hamilton tweeted hours ago that the terrorist allah is a quote lawful permanent resident from bangladesh who benefited from extended family chain migration unquote now chain migration is a process that allows emigrants to sponsor the migration of extended family members as you well know that is the road to perdition and death a recent report from fox news.

president norway china travel ban donald trump bangladesh beatles fox news sweden denmark new york akai department of homeland securit tyler hamilton twenty second
"bangladesh" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Rush is eternally trying to catch up to the giant in the north china who has the market cornered and other asian countries are always trying to take bangladesh his place so nobody here wants to make too many demands that could push the retail companies to go somewhere else winter weather in bangladesh is absolutely perfect it's exactly warm enough and the sun is never too distant but never to scalding ramallah and mina take me for a walk to the market to get some vegetables and maybe some fish on our way we stopped at a fabric store where they get their clothing made who an odd the vibrant coloured fabrics were the governor's as such as a disaster one scarf catches there i it's beautifully woven a rich dark winter she'd i can't help attract the tac goal it says made in china for the world i'm jasmine guards in dhaka bangladesh whatever country are clothing might be made him we all want to look good right but it's not always easy to find fun fashionable clothing when you have a disability doing up a button tying a shoelace pulling on a sweater this stuff can be a daily challenge for people with physical limitations victoria farmer is one of my colleagues with public radio international she's based at pri headquarters in minneapolis and she's written about how the fashion industry rarely gives much thought to people with disabilities victoria what prompted you'd right about this topic well i work in.

Rush north china bangladesh minneapolis ramallah dhaka
"bangladesh" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Minister i talked with him and he had had it is citizenship stripped and could no longer run for office because he was deemed to be uh of ruhengeri blood this is the reality that these people face in terms of not being able to even speak up for themselves recently we've seen the horrors of this decades old persecution and there is a fringe group are so i'm a fringe militant group might that is has carried out attacks there and thus sparked a new round on top of the old pogroms that we saw over the last few years directed against the the road hanke so now you have an estimated five hundred and seven thousand rick of that have been driven from their homes a vote most of that had been forced to cross over the border into bangladesh hundreds have been killed but as i say we we don't have journalists able to cover the story there denied access to the area so i'm sure it's more than the reported number much higher two hundred villages have been burned to the ground landmines have been placed inside burma's border her with bangladesh so that is maiming some uh seeking safe haven it's little wonder that the un's human rights chief called this a textbook example of ethnic cleansing uh bangladesh deserves credit and i talked again with a bangladesh ambassador the other day they deserve credit for opening their borders to this influx of refugees the government uh i know will honor its its promise in bag bangladesh to build shelter for new arrivals and provide medical services in response to this crisis the trump administration announced that it would provide thirty two million in humanitarian assistance and uh twenty made millions of that is going to bangladesh right now to uh and the remainder is going is supposed to go into rakai in state in in burma and that's most most welcomed the the state councillor on sun suci she's a noble pro nobel prize winner but she must make it a top priority.

rick bangladesh burma un nobel prize human rights
"bangladesh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Two thousand fifteen dean and bangladesh has done pretty well in achieving all those goals is to reduce poverty by half by two dozen fifteen now as dg goals which is this next one from two thousand sixteen on west who doesn't thirty will be reducing it two zero so first week come to the half and bangladesh has achieved and not only achieved this goal also it's it's you two and half years before the tubman the doubling of date of two thousand fifteen we did it but the middle of two thousand thirteen so that's a what celebration that the country lie which was supposed the most one of the most bob pop up poor country in the world could achieve to reduce poverty behalf biteau doesn't look good for bangladesh but didn't world hunger climb from 2015 could when they took it has as many countries failed to do that but some countries have done then so now we are moving into the next wrung so that we address those issues in the political issues come in and the financial issues coming and also the structural issues that i have been raising aimed to it that's what kind of business world wound create how to address dose ding said all it'd be doing but charity by donor money do that of normal i've said that you have to build the capacity inside the country and that's what happened in bangladesh repeat create lot of insight capacity for people to have just that all our healthcare or has achieved with tremendously uh although our health care as index was among the lowest in the whole region before two thousand yet two dozen but end of two thousand fifteen we came at the top of dole the eight countries in the region so this has to do with the energizing the individual person in the village just a village and pushed them into situation would they can take care.

bangladesh
"bangladesh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Anger was really just so affecting so there was story after story there was nobody we talked to his nobody we talked to who hasn't had a mother of brothers an uncle sam family member who was killed by who was killed by the military this is a this is a horror story they have fled to bangladesh a very poor country what are the conditions right there where you are is it an organized refugee camp or or is it more ad hoc them well it's very ad hoc and in these these these camps have been very makeshift there that we're talking about four hundred thousand people on top of as many as half a million roma hangar refugees who are already in bangladesh probably roughly about half of the new arrivals are in these makeshift facilities people are living in squalor wearing the rainy season mud is ankle deep international providers are doing the best they can end the government bangladesh is doing the best at it can you know his basic question here which is has the government covering of bangladesh recognised its responsibility to take care of these people and at this point at this point the governor bangladesh has said yes that this is a challenge is prepared to take on and that's extremely important eric schwarz is president of refugees international speaking with us from bangladesh near the border with myanmar thanks for joining us thank you are.

bangladesh eric schwarz president uncle sam myanmar
"bangladesh" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"What is the longer term future facing these refugees then that is a very good question and one of the difficulties for bangladesh which is normally has a policy of not allowing people lane but actually has been allowing very many people now as we know in the tens of thousands to come into the country is exactly what's going to happen to them because they already have about three hundred four hundred thousand ranges from previous crises still in bangladesh and they have some that are in the capital registered in recognized there are others that the tucked cost as it as illegals in an registered now they've got all these new people now it seems very unlikely with the burmese government's policy at the moment weather don't recognize these people as being part of that country there steve lomas nationals that they're going to be allowed to go home and of course also the question of what the going back to any way when their homes have been destroyed but then the wider question is will who's going to take them and agassi bangladeshi saying we're doing everything we can at the moment but that keane that other people help with the hosting that was awesome of asia editor jill mcgill vring the kenyan opposition leader raila odinga says his coalition won't participate in next month's planned rerun of the presidential election mr dinka said he wanted legal and constitutional guarantees put him place the result of the original vote was annulled by the supreme court after complaints of irregularities mr odinga told a news conference today that kenya's election conditions need to change norms of world for lots of incomes.

bangladesh burmese government keane jill mcgill raila odinga mr dinka kenya steve lomas agassi asia editor presidential election mr odinga
"bangladesh" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"bangladesh" Discussed on PRI's The World

"But what's also striking is that ambitious action on climate is not just in the high income countries bangladesh for example has been very compelling in its responses to cyclones developing protective structure so that they can raise up livestock and keep them safe and also tapping the power of communities to provide early warning when a storm is coming those changes you mentioned in bangladesh of they had any real impact yep there are a lot of comparisons you can make before and after whether that's looking at some of the events that had very profound mortality consequences and how they did better whereas other areas in the region still had very high mortality so a big theme in adaptation is that not all poor people remarkable and not all vulnerable people are poor that's something we've seen in example of bangladesh were they've been very responsive in terms of preparing for cyclones they have experienced and will invariably experience into the future we also see it in terms of communitybased adaptation across the african continent some of the most ambitious city scale action for example has happened in durban south africa we see communities in terms of agriculture coming together to think about what does that mean for planning for increased risk of flooding in some places increase risk of drought in others and communities that are already more on the margin as compared to what we experience here in the us now let's look at the flip side of that other places that are either unable to respond well because of a lack of resources.

bangladesh africa us durban