20 Episode results for "Banana Republic"

Gratitude Meditation

The Gratitude Podcast - Stories That Inspire Positive Thinking

10:53 min | 2 years ago

Gratitude Meditation

"At farmers insurance we know every windshield collision has a unique sound beetle burt boop drone seen it covered it quicker more we are underwritten by farmer's truck fire insurance exchange center affiliates products not available in every state at farmers insurance we know the sound of a perfect hot air balloon landing and a less than perfect quicker more we are underwritten by farmer's truck fire insurance exchange center affiliates products not available in every state hi gratitude seeker for the next few minutes i invite you to find a quiet place somewhere where you can sit which you're spine upright so you can relax and just be now they could deep breath in a deep breath town another one i know you're i haven't done so already been focused right now your heart be aware of how we feel we feel policy thing in your mind repeat that's me bang bang bang q thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you focus on your heart and see how we deal you might begin to smile to steal a deeper connection knife and now ask yourself is working great in my life what could they be raising meaning grateful for right now who are the people that were there for me when they need it down these amazing might nice what makes by life extrordinary what are the things that make me feel so bad that he may just calm using people your heart expanding smile put your hand on your chest and we were hard thank you you can now open your eyes still focusing on your heart hopefully with a big smile and now that you're overflowing with graphic you find someone you can hug and bank or condom and spread the gratitude thank you so much for listening share this meditation with someone you feel if is right for and don't forget to keep seeking and spreading greg thank you vegas banana republic factory plus fifty percents off the entire store i think it's plus take an find your nearest only a banana republic factory hi it's jamie progressive's number one number two employee leave a message at the hey jamie it's me jamie this is your daily

jamie progressive banana republic
Roundabout Roundup: Anti-Contact Tool, Hanes Face Masks, Wild Company

Parenting Roundabout

07:20 min | 10 months ago

Roundabout Roundup: Anti-Contact Tool, Hanes Face Masks, Wild Company

"Welcomed around five of the parenting roundabout podcast for the week of August seventeenth. I'm Nicole heretics here Catherine. Hello Hello and Terry Moro allow. Today, we're taking a break from talking and complaining and obsessing instead shouting out things other people are doing that. We think you'll find as useful are enjoyable as we do. We call this our roundabout roundup. And I am going to shout out a little tool that we discovered Months ago. And my daughter has one and I ordered some for the rest of my family, but it's very appropriate for these days. It's called the clean. door anti contact tool, and it's actually. So it's this little. Tool. That you can attach your key ring and it's Designed like kion, but then it's got these. Extra little attachment. So you can use it to open a door you can use it to. Push the numbers on a pin pad, you can use it to sign. One of those digital signature devices. So basically, it's a little tool that you can use to avoid touching things in public places. And my daughter says she uses hers all the time. So yeah. I'm excited to get mine because I hate touching now I just hate touching things in public but they do they need to do one take it one extra step further and they need to figure out how to hold a gas pump. Because that's the worst mine. But yes, it's called a clean door anti contact tool and it's on Amazon and it's very reasonable. It is only three or four dollars. So how? though that's what I'm shouting out today have you Catherine with? Do you have well going along with the? Theme of Pandemic Related Items. The other day when we were talking about hygiene, we were talking about masks and Terry was struggling with her paper mask So my husband picked up a ten pack of masks from Hanes So basically, if you don't, if you think of them as a t shirt company and not an underwear company that might work better. When you're thinking about masks but Anyway they have like just. It's like a ten pack of masks made out of just a nice Cottigny t shirt material. And they do have the little plastic piece in the top. Seam so that you can make it fit your nose a little better in that helps from fagging up glass helps keep from bogging your glasses, my husband them up. He must have gotten them at just either the grocery store or Walgreens or someplace because that's he never goes anywhere else So yeah, just inexpensive plane. We all need like a stash of masks writing on. The paper ones are good but they they don't fit that that. Well, and this is a nice fairly stretchy comfortable comfortable fabric mask for ninety s not much money. They have them on their website. Also, I never would've thought to look there although I by both underwear and t shirts from hanes. So. I mean, you buy a pack of a hundred for. A pack of fifty one, Hundred Bucks Bucks. If I'm just saying there's a sixty pack for one hundred and fifty. Yeah. So I guess that's for people buying him for us, large groups whatever. Anyway hands facemasks interesting. To add to your collection of face yes. GonNa. I mean feel like you can never have too many. That's right. Lights I when this whole thing started where it looked like there was masks I, bought a few online from this retailer and that they tie in the bath and they're made of denim so they're really heavy and stiff and it's like I put it on and like no. I would pass out with this thing looks Nah it looks so looks good until you put it on and then it looks like. Just something huge and heavy. So yeah, we all need to try different masks out until we find the ones that work for us. and. Then have some backups. Yeah. Because you have to watch them. So yeah. A Lot. What do you have Terry for us to say well, I think I've mentioned here before on the roundabout round up a facebook page called a abandoned republic, which is about the old banana republic before a got gapped. When it was a really really clever mail order catalogue and really funky stores. So on that facebook page, I saw a mention of a book by the founders of of Banana Republic Mellon Patricia Ziegler and so I listen to it on audible but it's also available in paper form. It's called Wild Company and it's just the story of how they came to start this very cool offbeat retailer and sort of the phases. It went through and then how it sort of into the gap so to speak and you know what they how they came out of it. So it was really really interesting to read I, still miss the old banana republic. I, still have clothes in my closet from there. I still enjoy seeing things on this facebook page that I remember seeing in stores or in the catalog, and it was a lot of fun to. In my case. To the story they don't narrated themselves it was near the audio book is narrated by George Newburn and Elizabeth Rogers. So it was like five hours. It wasn't a particularly long listen So I imagine the book itself is not too long to get through. But if you like me heavy sentimental attachment to old school banana republic, you might be interested to hear about its founding and early days. So Wild Company by Mellon Patricia Ziegler checking. Up. And that is it for another week of parenting roundabout. If you missed any of our earlier episodes this week, look them up on spreaker APP podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts to hear what we have to say about virtual learning dress codes, hygiene fails and sleepovers. You can also find all our episodes of parenting roundabout, dot com, and talk back in the comments there on our facebook page or on twitter, we will find us at roundabout chat and please visit our Amazon shop at Amazon dot com slash shops slash Mama Tude. We you can find links to a lot of the things we talk about here have a great weekend and see you back to your own mind.

facebook Terry Moro Amazon Patricia Ziegler banana republic Catherine school banana republic Banana Republic Mellon Hundred Bucks Bucks Walgreens Nicole Wild Company us. Mama Tude George Newburn twitter Elizabeth Rogers four dollars
Roundabout Roundup: Origin Beanie, Banana Republic Factory, and Glow Up

Parenting Roundabout

08:32 min | 2 months ago

Roundabout Roundup: Origin Beanie, Banana Republic Factory, and Glow Up

"Welcome around five of the parenting roundabout podcasts for the week of april twelfth. I'm terry moore. And i'm here with catherine whole echo. Hello nicole heretics today. We're taking a break from talking and complaining and obsessing and instead shouting things other people are doing that. We think you'll find as use four enjoyable as we do. We call this around roundabout round up. And i will start it out today. it's now what is would we say. This is the second week of april end of the second week of april where we're now well into april and probably whether it's getting warmer where you are and so this recommendation will be a file this away for next winter and hope that the product is still offered. But i have to say that. I am getting a great deal of late winter. Early spring enjoyment out of the crimson beanie From origin which is a company in maine that to is all made in the usa stuff. It's incredibly light. It's almost like it's of like sweatshirt material. It's you put it on your head and you. It's not like one of those knit caps that you can feel it pressing. It's real heavy. Doesn't miss my hair up when i take it off her. Put it on but it's super warm. I don't understand how that works. But i am very happy about it. It's really comfortable. I think it's cute. And i have been wearing it even on these warmer days because if my ears even just a little bit cold than i get a headache so i like to keep my head warm. My increasingly hair. Loose head. Warm and So this is a nice light beneath for this time of year. But also i believe it would keep me warm even in the coldest times of winter so if you are in the market for such an item or you are next. Jot it down for next november. When you're doing your cold weather. Buying and i enjoy it. So nicole what do you have this week. why i was. This isn't necessarily is not for me but for my daughter i was out on saturday. Ventured out to some stores and She's she's been out a job for the past couple of months where she's had to actually dress in something other than t shirts and jeans. She's had to look semi professional and So we had to really accumulate. A whole new wardrobe for her very quickly Is she works in an office. And so we've really turned a lot to banana republic especially banana republic factory. Yes they've pretty much. You know helped her with her entire wardrobe now so just the factory especially as really really good deals and it's just nice quality you know not high end quality but just you know step up from gap but it's nice professional just simple kind of clothing and And yeah so. She's an some nice accessories necklaces and earrings and stuff to match. So so she's been using them a lot lately. I have because some course. I'm paying for so. Thank you banana republic for for outfitting my daughter for her job. Because that's always hard like you get a job and then you've got to spend money on clothes right like depending on where you work. Now that's spent. Yeah they have nice stuff there. But i still miss the old funky banana republic. That won't be my amana role of look a safari theme. Yes yes with the catalog and a story of it. Oh to send you some stuff. There's a abandoned republic account on facebook. That has pictures of all their old stuff. And then which you've mentioned a slide. Have i haven't and heartily recommend it to anybody who feels nostalgic for the old safari life style of The olden days banana republic. I also read that. I think i also mentioned here. The biography of the founders explaining how they kinda got gapped but Anyway glad it's working out for your daughter. That sounds nice catherine. What do you have to recommend this while. I'm back with another tv series for you. Okay this is what it's another. I think one of the ones. I mentioned a couple. Little while ago was ink master on net flicks and this is another like competition. Reality show that is called glow up and so it's about make up american artists. And you know it's usually not lake. Let's look pretty for a night out. It's like you know do a makeup look that talks about your life story or whatever to all kind of wild stuff. Some of them do And it's set in london and they have a series of challenges. Obviously you know. Sometimes it is like Make for the runway or make up for For makeup for a fashion show or make up for a magazine photo but sometimes the theater they've had to do but sometimes it's these sort of wild very creative or just off the wall stuff So it's it's kind of fun to see what they come up with and to see what people can do with makeup like we learned from watching this that would you see like for example in the theater or a queen where they like cover their eyebrows input new eyebrows like higher up. You know what. I mean What they do is they take a glue. Stick like the kind that you use in kindergarten and the glue the eyebrows down and then they cover them with makeup and then they make new eyebrow the kinds of things you can learn. Wow information on pull. wow so yeah so In one thing that's kind of interesting about it is that you know they do eliminate somebody every week And they have two challenges per episode and in the first challenge. They usually pick somebody who gets an advantage for the for the second challenge so they basically are the winner of that i challenge and then the bottom two people from that challenge get a disadvantage and at the end than they do the second challenge and then they pick the bottom two again from that second challenge and they have to compete head to head in like a little mini challenge and then one of them gets in home but they don't really declare a winner for the second challenge they just give them feedback and some of them get really positive feedback and some of them don't and they don't like single out one person So sometimes it's like there's multiple winners right. 'cause they don't have the structure that makes them choose. Just one looks kinda interesting. And that is glow up. Which can watch on netflix. There's two seasons available on netflix. Right now presumably all pre pandemic right up in each other's faces a yes so sometimes they do the the makeup on themselves niggers and sometimes it's on other people models Anyway it's fun. Yeah just a little something. And that's it for another week of parenting roundabout missed any of our earlier episodes this week. Look them up on speaker apple podcasts amazon music. Or wherever you get your podcasts to hear what we had to say about our birth and adoption stories day ruin those back to back is a little funny and movie bombs you can also find all our episodes at parenting roundabout dot com and talking back in the comments there on our facebook page or on twitter. Where you'll find us at roundabout chat and please visit our amazon shot at amazon dot com slash shop slash mama to where you can finally to a lot of things we talk about. Have a great weekend and see you right here on monday.

nicole heretics banana republic terry moore catherine maine headache nicole usa facebook netflix london amazon apple twitter
Viral Confession Video

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

07:46 min | 3 months ago

Viral Confession Video

"You can tell a lot about a person by what they connect to their wifi. Are you a gamer. A conference caller or a video streamer. Well whoever you are your wifi needs to keep up. That's why xfinity is dedicated to making sure your wifi gets better. All the time constantly developing new technology for faster wi fi speeds. They're committed to keeping your wifi safe and secure no matter what you connect to it. And they're always innovating to make sure all those connections reliable no one likes wifi disruption especially the gamers so you just keep on gaming conferencing and live streaming because xfinity will always be there to serve up wifi speeds that are up to the task and then some extremity the future of awesome. Hey roy wood junior must stand up. Comedian i'm correspondent on the daily show with trevor noah. I'm a father. I'm a secretary is and i have a podcast called roy's job fair. This show is a therapy session for anybody who's looking for work wants to slap somebody at work or is hiring somebody to work for them to eventually they can slap you do one part laughs part inspiration. I cannot wait to welcome you to roy's job fan on iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast well still trending you guys youtube relationship expert derrick jackson who just admit to cheating on his wife well. A lot of people including us had no idea who. Derrick jackson is or was until recently you know the video was released and he admitted on it that he was cheating on his wife. Denial so two women claim they had an affair with derek and they said he told them at the time he was separated from his wife for four years now in this viral confession video. The couple tried to put up a united front while holding his wife's hand. Derek confessed on cheating to cheating and having sex with other women to comment about video crazy. A lot of people said that derek is full of it because he referred to himself as the third person saying yes dare jackson cheated. His wife also addressed her fans in the video and she released another video. Jackson said she would not tolerate. It's cheating and she did leave but now that her husband is seeking god. She is at peace by his side. You know what if we'll jada going on. Television has sparked this rash of lists. Go talk about it in front of everybody. Man go ciccio s down somewhere. May when you're trying to work it out with your family man. Just go work out what y'all keep going public fall. I don't understand that is is is the need likes and view so big now willing to you wove us for everything. It is cheap. I mean both of them to me. Look crazy he looked crazy up there. Talking about a sheila crazy responded to it and i mean literally they just crazy. I don't know so i guess a blogger. He got a muscle shirt. Oh she got a bonnet on what's child. Doing people are talking about it. Maybe that's what they want it for people dress up. Look like y'all gonna stay together. Y'all be look like y'all in the divorce they were holding hands. Steve i whole hands at thanksgiving family reunion with people like a while. Either she just. I just dairy i- chidi dear jackson. I cheated and they're holding her hand. It just didn't look like she was just like all the way who what he was saying. No she looked like she wanted to be there. I don't want eight al. Because he's trying to save you that part of what he's doing on youtube giving relationship advice. I'm sure he's trying to save that. You know i come back with testimony or whatever put that out the the we separated thing a lot of common man. Who'd only heard that one before. Yeah yeah you're saying that min say that when cheating let me ask you right. Let me ask you is this. Has anyone heard. Did you guys know who he was. Away ain't even interested. I'm just mad at him now. For sit down edgy that bid looking like that. Just don't live right. look like to you. The institute like unemployment lines totally go over there and just go over there and sit down and we're not getting any benefits. They're going through so naturally they're gonna look sad and you know like they're going through issues and problems in their marriage cheated them. I gonna come on looking happy right in. I mean hey argue men or something you know. How many many black women sitting there hold his hand those that don't do it. He's looking now saying that was looking for like zoom call with well. We hope they work it out coming up next the nephew with today's prank phone call. You're listening to harvey morning. Show spring forward at banana republic. Factory with fifty seventy percent off everything shop season favorites from colorful dresses. Too easy talks from one thousand nine hundred ninety nine. Find your nearest store or shop online. Only at banana republic factory shop fifty to seventy percent off everything gap factory. Get sixty percents off. Select jeans and dresses shop. The sale through march twenty eighth at gap factory and gap back. Three dot com. Hi i'm hillary clinton one of the reasons. Why i love my podcast. You and me both is that it's a great way to have honest eye-opening opening conversations about everything that's happening in our country and the world and boy. Do we have a lot to talk about right now. This season we're asking questions like just. How close did we come to losing our democracy and just as importantly. Where do we go from here. How can we heal and get things done. But we're also getting into the fun stuff like how do we make our homes into places where we can stand to spend even more time than we already have had to and of course al. Continue to celebrate the bravest smartest and funniest people out there. So join me. Listen to you and me. Both on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

derrick jackson trevor noah roy ciccio roy wood derek youtube jackson jada Derek apple sheila Jackson banana republic factory Steve min al banana republic
Getting the Apology You Need

The goop Podcast

36:24 min | 1 year ago

Getting the Apology You Need

"Hi I'm Elise Lennon Co host with Gwyneth of the podcast. Today's guest is eve. Ensler Eve is the fifth guests in our special series called women on top which is all made possible by our friends at Banana Republic. The most interesting businesses are born out of curiosity. This is the space the Gwyneth was in when she started goop. It's also the space from which Banana Republic was founded back in nineteen seventy eight by to California creatives with adventurous spirits Laos ball we partnered with team banana republic to celebrate curiosity by talking with women who are redefining. What it means to be powerful and brave and we're very excited to be back for a second series. I hope you love listening to these conversations as much as I love having them and I know you'll be deeply inspired by these women so please keep listening and keep shopping with our friends at Banana. Republic to see our favorites from their spring collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop. Don't hold anything too tightly. Just wish for want it. Let it come from the intention of real truth for you and then let it go. The Mayo soul is like it's unbound. It's limitless but we will use words to limit ourselves when people stop believing that. Somebody's got your back or Superman's coming. We turn to ourselves and that's where you become. Empowered courageous participation attracts positive things. I'm GONNA paltrow this. Is the group. Podcast bringing together thought leaders culture changes creatives founders and CEOS scientists doctors healers and seekers here to start conversations because simply asking questions and listening has the power to change the way we see the world. Today is no exception a letter least fill you in on her extraordinary guest all right over to a lease eve. Ensler is playwright. Performer dominance and activists. You might recognize her from her play the vagina monologues. She's also the author of the apology. Which is a letter. He wrote to herself from the perspective of her late abusive father. The book is both heartbreaking and beautiful and I admire eve so much for writing it today. Shares the deep changes writing. This book has had on her life. We'll talk about the power of the apology. Eve challenges us to think about what radical change could come from abusers and perpetrators owning and apologizing for the pain they have caused eve commands the power of women standing up for themselves and owning their truth. Which is something that can never be taken away and explains how everyone has some sort of wound and although we're taught to avoid them we must develop the willingness to go through the pain of these wounds to experience true freedom and forgiveness on the other side all of us to have developed the capacity and willingness to go through our wounds so we aren't a slave to them so we aren't controlled by them so we are wounding and wounding more people as a result of our lack of investigation into those. I'll let you take it from here. Thank you for being here and thank you for your beautiful book which was so hard to read deeply semantic experience for me and I'm sure for most people and I'm so sorry that that you had to write it for thank you but it was a profound and transformative experience so no worries. I guess that was one of my questions is in the process of writing something like that was it. Did you feel healed before? And I'm sure you're still not healed. But did you feel that this book was the thing or did you have to get yourself to a point to be able to even endeavour it? Well I think anyone who's been sexually abused or physically abused or violently abused knows that it takes many many years to cover and full yourself out of it and transform and then there's all the residue and all the things that have been left behind that you have to begin to work in your system so it takes you know. I think it took me many years but mainly because there wasn't a lot of guidance there weren't a lot of people who had done it before. Do you know what I mean. And I think that doesn't have to be the case anymore because people are finding ways through and we are talking about issues now and there are therapists and there are methods and there are processes which people can recover and not take as long as it took me. I will say that writing this book. Which is a letter that I wrote to myself from my father. The apology letter. I always wanted from his sexual and physical abuse of me that the writing of this was one of the most profound things I've ever done. And from the you know when the book ended and my father actually says to me or old man be gone. My father's gone he really hasn't been back and my life is deeply deeply changed. I mean I I it's it's it's really kind of astounding so I will say that this exercise or X. Or size of a book that had a profound impact on me and I would say to women who've been abused that if if you can't get an apology from your perpetrator that this exercise is really really. It's deeply transformative. I wouldn't do it alone. I would do it with the therapist or counselor or clergy or friend. Who could go through the process with you okay? So let's start here is this. Was this this sort of thing that throughout your life I mean. I know that it's the center of so much of your work. But did it take a certain? Was it hard to get close to it like? Did it take you this much time to be able to actually do this? It did because I think for for for the beginning years. You're just unconscious and in denial and you're not even dealing with what's happened to has happened to you because it's too painful and you've got to really develop enough of an ego and itself to begin to tolerate it and then when you start to deal with it then your student rage for a period of years right now. Mary. You're just you're you can't believe someone's done this to you and I don't think I had the bandwidth or I don't think I had the compassion or the willingness to think for example about what my father had been through as a child which was a core of what made him become the kind of perpetrator he became. I didn't think I I don't think I had interest in it. I didn't care but I must say having now been in the movement to end violence against women and all women girls for the last twenty five years working day in and day out and then seeing this recent interruption of two with all these different men being called out it. It really hit me recently. That all this time that. I've been doing this work. I've never heard a man make a public apology for sexual or physical abuse. Maybe in all the years of Patriarchy I've never heard so it really hit me that somewhere in this non apology it's one of the columns that's holding Patriarchy and what we need to do is help men and encourage men to begin to go through a kind of apology that kind of outlined in the book. Yeah no it's so true. I mean on my drive over here. I was listening to MPR. And I was listening to commentary on the Harvey Weinstein Case. And they were saying that he was falling asleep during the testimony. And it's I know he's just one example but no and and we can look at. How many men I mean. Bill Cosby just said a month ago or a few weeks ago. He's coming up for parole and you'll see no remorse from me. I mean we can look through so many of the perpetrators who have been who have been called out. Who where there's evidence and there's there's just the non apology look at our look at the Predator and Chief. Who HAS LIED TO US? Has undermined is who has committed high crimes and misdemeanors turning everything on. Its head and doing opposite. World not only not apologizing but gas lighting the people who are trying to bring some justice about right and that's a tactic of got. The tactic of Patriarch Tactic of predators. Always reverse it and make yourself the victims right. Yeah what my father did to me. It hurts me so much more than it hurts you to beat. You look what you've done to me that I could become a person who would do this to you right. And and part of what our work has to be is how do we? How do we first of all know what gas lighting and take ourselves? Seriously no our own truth and stand in our truth which is what so many women have so valiantly been doing in the last few years is just really standing up and this is my truth and you can't take that away from me but the second thing is men have to start become willing to go through a process to understand first of all what trees their own families in the culture allowed them encourage them and and created. Then be the kind of men who were capable of sexual harassment or rape or sexual abuse or beating their wives or girlfriends or or lovers and then the second part is like what have you actually done a detailed accounting of that. They really have to look piece by piece and take responsibility and then the third piece is really what has what is the impact of this on the people lying part. How did it harm them? The short term. What did it do to their feelings about themselves? Their feelings about their body their abilities if intimate their ability to enjoy sex their ability to focus and concentrate their ability to remember. I mean what what were the consequences of my action actually sit with the sufferings caused and then the fourth thing of course is to take responsibility and to make amends and then began to start to do. This process will begin to change so radically. Yeah and I think that the inventory that you use in terms of your FA- how how trans-generational this can be an idea too of like if you can you know. What do they say like if you heal? One generation or one wounded goes seven generations up and back but like the wounding that we carry and then continue to perpetrate on each other. It has to start to be undone right absolutely. Yeah I think one of the things I've learned from this book and it kind of the opposite of in a way what we're told in this country you know everybody's told in this country to avoid pain right to stay away from pain deny paying but here's the truth. Every single one of us has some sort of wound. Everybody according to this planet has a wound and most of us are taught never to go near it. Cover it up you know. Put brushfire for broad brush over it. You know what I need. Courageous deny it. The two of the matter is I had to go through the wound. In order to write this book I had to go through and it was very very very painful. For a short period of time but on the other side of that wound there was freedom and it taught me that all of us need to have and develop the capacity and willingness to go through our wounds. So we aren't a slave to them so we aren't controlled by them so we are wounding and wounding more people as a result of our lack of investigation into those and also re victimizing ourselves through the rage or three the fact that when putting ourselves in situations where people are constantly won't right and for so many women as you mentioned You know I don't know the rates which women who've been sexually assaulted but I assume it's close to one hundred percent like some some sexual trauma that deny you know the the ongoing taking pleasure away from women which can you know. Stay with people until they die. And that's such a massive crime to not feel pleasure in your body or to feel like which is one of the main reasons we're here like come on. We're not here to be unhappy. We're not here to be miserable. Not here to be scared. We're not going to be twelfth. We enjoy each other love each other and that pleasure. For God's sakes you know and and the fact that that's rob from so many women right an early for so many women. It's just a huge crime. Yeah no I could not agree more so when you and you talked about sort of the exorcist of your father old man be gone and then feeling like the haunting He was I guess the specter of him had been eliminated from your life as you have a different relationship with him or do you feel like you have just moved on in a hole and sound way. I feel like that story is over. Do you know I think so. Much of my life was within his paradigm his story which is me proving to him that I wasn't a failure or stupid or a liar or a bad person or every victory or success. I had it was like see. So they're they're you know what I mean. But everything was we action to have. Everything was within his within his narrative. And he's in our lives over it's over. I'm in my narrative now and it's very different and feels like I'm just beginning to get you know I've got sea legs. I'm just beginning to find my way with it. You know so interesting. This is such a beautiful passage to write. I refuse to know or see you and this in some ways was the most destructive and punishing deprivation. Isn't that all any of US crave really to be known to be given shape informed by being recognized and cherished for? How else can we trust that we are even here? And perhaps this is why I became so extreme because I was invisible to myself because I had raised and needed to find ways to experience my existence and feel my impact on others so beautiful and horror. Yeah I mean. The book is stunning but I thought that was so resonant on so many levels because it's true that's all it's all we all we just WanNa be seen and it is how we define ourselves and I don't know whether that's that's the beauty of being human and in relationship or it's upon us to define ourselves I just don't know I mean thinking about your your father's childhood in the absence of healthy definition or help from a parent I guess this is where monsters emerge. Yes and I think I think one of the things that was so telling a of of really kind of excavating. My father story granted. It was imaginative but I think the imagination is sometimes more accurate than anything. I think one of the things that really really really got to me was realizing how adored my father was right. And and how? How ADORATION ISN'T LOVE? Adoration is rejection of someone's idealized. Image of you are perfect for affected image of you that you have to live up to and if you fail to live up to that then you're basically outcast and dismissed right so my father was never loved for who he was. He was never even seen He. His mother and his father had an idea of him that he you know he was adored and he was going to be that and so when whenever it wasn't matching who he was with this idea. My father was incredibly heartbroken. Incredibly frustrated incredibly. You know if you if you were experienced. Tenderness or wonder or doubt or cry or vulnerability that wasn't allowed within that idealized adoration right and I think this happens to a lot of boys and so what do they do with their heart. What do they do with their peers? What do they do with their feelings? They shut them down and they push them down and they they push them down and they pushed them down and eventually in in the certainly was in the case of my father they erupt and often they erupt with perversion. Violence distortion aggression sexual abuse. Because those feelings haven't been allowed into the world they become perverted and and and and and mutilated and now they're gonNA havoc on others and so it really taught me like how critical is how we bring up our boys that we have to allow them to be humans allow to be tender and allow them to cry and allow them to feel wonder and curiosity and and magic feel magic in this world. You know yeah no absolutely in the process of writing the book. I know you said imagination. But it's it read to me like it was channeled. Lick it read. Did you like do you feel like you? How did it work well I? I'm really appreciative of you. Using that word because it felt channel to me too. I really feel as if one side decided to do this. My my father kind of came and he was here even though he's dead and I don't. I can't explain to you what the dynamics were. But he was in me on me around me. Roomy for like solid four months. I just kind of lived in my office for four months and and I would. I wouldn't even leave. I would sleep in my office. It was like he was here and sometimes he'd wake me up at four o'clock in the morning and go right. Go to your desk going to tell you the story like it was like that story about the bird like he woke me up at four o'clock in the morning. It's like I want to tell you the story and and who knows what is what who knows you know I. I learned so much about our relationship with the dead riding spoke that we really are in relationship because the dads are all around us and often they really do need us to be in dialogue so they can understand things and work out things and they can get three and I honestly feel at the end of this book. My father was in a very very bad place when this book began where he's been for thirty one years he's been spinning in limbo in in really terrible. I don't think he's there anymore. I use in a much better place now and maybe my fantasy but it also feels very guilty. We'll get back to ensler and just a second. You've probably heard me mentioned that. Curiosity is my favorite state of being. I try to carry that attitude with me every day. And it's certainly easier to do with at a place like goop. The places such a premium value on being curious and feeling empowered to explore. And ask questions. Banana Republic is another company that values curiosity their founding story starts with a California couple who were looking for an adventure. Fun Fact Banana Republic began as Safari inspired clothing company and today the inspiration for their clothing is designed for life in motion or as they put it living a life of possibilities with no boundaries. This can be seen banana. Republics latest spring collection a modern versatile take on work where to see our favorites from the collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop. Although I do like to hit up the store and Brentwood every now and then I find myself spending less and less time shopping for clothing in stores and I know a lot of women who just flat out. Don't feel like they have the time or energy to shop for themselves. Litto is a fashion rental service. That makes it easy and convenient to freshen up your wardrobe regularly for a flat monthly fee their mission to make fashion accessible to every woman every day. Whether you're the kind of person who likes to try out trans or the kind of person he goes weak at the knees when you think about a trip to the mall with Lotto you still get to choose the clothes and accessories e want to wear you browse styles on the totes site. Pick what you want to run. Everything gets delivered right to your door. You wear the pieces as long as he's like and when you're done you just send them back in a prepaid envelope. The tote does the laundry for you so you don't have to worry about that. If you love a piece enough to keep it you get up to fifty percent off the retail price. Check it out visit Tote DOT COM right now. La- tote is offering forty percent off your first two months just use code goop to get your discount today. That's L. E. T. O. T. dot com and use code dupe. Back to my chat with Eve ensler. It reads as very real. I mean that was my sense of it was not that it was a projection from you. It felt like a channel taxed. We really did. It was so so powerful. I mean the story of the bird. The story of BACKHAND THE CAT. I mean even those like injections of like psalm moment of shared humanity. And the way that you your goodness are the way his the way that he perceived you as a baby the way that you. Your goodness triggered his perversion. I mean so in terms of the what you done to heal over the years and then this this final beautiful work like what. How did you start to get close to it? I'm imagine I know you numbed with alcohol and drugs for period of your life etcetera. What have been the most helpful mechanisms for you? Well right I mean I think writing has saved my life. Just trying to figure out a way to turn the poison into some kind of medicine those or some kind of something right activism Reaching out and and trying to help out our serve really or be there for women who are going through a really rough. Things has helped me. 'cause it's made me feel useful. And somehow usefulness gives you meaning and and and being able to other people makes you feel useful. I think you know over these twenty five years. I've had the honor and a privilege to sit with women. In eighty countries you know from Bosnia to Afghanistan to Congo to Kosovo to India to all over this planet. Women have shared their deepest most powerful intimate stories of rape of burnings of of of brutality. With me across the world and I think somehow being able to be in that dialogue with women can be trusted as a holder of those stories and to be on a journey with women across the world that I've been on for the last twenty five years in this movement to have sisters that long in this movement who I trust and who. I'm still rising with you. Know THIS YEAR. We're just ask you know. We're in one billion rising and Bidet season now and there's thousands of risings all over the world one hundred eighty countries. There's five hundred productions of you know vagina. Monologues and other plays are movements fast. And there's something about being embraced by a movement and held by other women who are going through it and to be in the deepest sisterhood and Friendship with women that you really can't be okay. You really can't be okay because there's nothing stronger than the power of sisterhood. How in terms of the context? I'm really curious about your family. And the people who were there to witness and specifically your mom like do. Is there another book of apology coming from her? No because I feel like in my last book in the body of the world which is really about what I went through when I had stage four cancer and as we were building the city of joy in the Congo. I feel like I I really dealt with my mother in that book and I and after I confronted my mother before she died about what my father had done. My mother really went through a deep deep apology process with me. She did and she owned it and chief stood in it and she was she was really there for me and so by the time she left this world. I felt like we had cleaned up. What was between us you know? Did she know or did she a good question? I mean she certainly knew about the abuse you know she was an accomplice but you know how much she knew when when. I said it to her she said. Oh my God. Every sign in the world was there was always taking you to doctors and you had you know nightmares every night and you know. I mean she she was like. Oh my God. It's so clear right. I I don't know how much we know and how much we don't know right. We block out. How much do we like? How much how much does the Senate no right now? Exactly do they know they know everything or they in a twilight state where they're just they just a race their minds or do they know and are they just really really evil. It's really hard to tell right. I'm sure they're all finding ways to numb. Yes right. I don't know I think we all find our ways you know. My mother said when I when I did confront her. She said something very profound to me. She said you know I she days later. She called me and she was crying and she said I realized what I did. You were my sacrifice. I was poor when I grow up. I didn't have any money. Your father was my way out of that. I didn't have a job. I had three kids. I know where to go. I sacrificed you. And it's chilling as I was and believe me that was chilling. I knew it was true right. You know so in a way it freed me because I didn't have to pretend anymore right. Yeah and you know and I think one of the hard things about any relationship with parents as good as healthy as they may be or not is that is those revelations. I don't know when it comes but when you're like Oh my God. My parents are human And Yeah like to be able to go to your mom and understand what she did in self protection or in the perception of self protection and find the grace to understand and forgive. Yeah so when you work with all of these women across the world with trauma how do you is it? So storytelling writing is that in. Do you think that's the best way to get it out of your body like how do how do you see women processing it or you know getting it out? Well you know I think it it. It really depends. I think I've done. I've done things for all I've done is listen. You know and just been there to hold someone's hand and listen and I've done workshops where we've done all kinds of exercises where people have bats and toes and rage and you know what I mean so it really depends on you know. I did a group for years for example at Bedford Hills Correctional Facility Writing Group where women wrote about their crimes and wrote about their histories and I after eight years which eventually became a documentary and it was all through writing exercises. You know and it was. It was writing in the past. It was writing about childhood was writing about the crimes you know so I think there's a lot of different ways to get at things you know but I think really what we're lodges. Itself is the body the body and I think until you get it out of your body. You don't change and when I got very sick. Ten years ago when I had staged three slash four uterine cancer. I had to deal with my body. It was like okay. We're we're not now on the level of your DNA yourselves your body. You know what I mean. Yeah and and it was so interesting reading this article. I don't know where it was. He's in the Guardian or the time just somewhere yesterday where they were talking about. They're now doing all this research with cancer where they're beginning to discover and see when they see the beginning to think that they can identify when the cancer begins to start in your body right like they can actually see little inklings of the molecules and the particles beginning to break down. And I was thinking to myself like I really truly believe that in time using years from now we'll come to see that trauma is equal to cancer. I just think there's so deeply the it's like one word right and I think it it's almost like how do you get down to the cellular level so you can begin to release the trauma the trauma of the trauma tentacles trauma? Dna that is ruling. Your Life Without you even consciously knowing right. That's where we have to go to to really change and that requires concentration work and and you can't skip over no absolutely and awareness because awareness. Yeah I mean and and motivation. You have to want to do that and for me. I I was in so much pain. And so much of my life. Emotional pain that Until the self hatred and stuff Dowden so much. So many tortured feelings that I it motivated me. I didn't want to be in that. You know we'll use you're in a life and death battle and many way. Yeah Yeah what and and in terms of your awareness. Because I would imagine at some point your subconscious. Would you know intervened and blocked off some of those memories like were? You always fully conscious of what had happened to you earn. No no no not at all as a matter of fact like I didn't begin to start having my memories until my thirties late thirties. And I remember being in college to be honest with you. I was drinking with some night and I was drunk and I made a joke and I said Oh. Yeah yeah then my father said to my mother get the kitchen knife and I was laughing. I thought it was funny and my friends. Everyone just stopped the whole just stopped and said what what and I'm telling you until that moment I did not know that was not normal right. How could I know that my frame of reference was like? That's what happened in everyone's family right so that was like a shocking wakeup call. Did you know were you aware of that? What your dad was doing in the process of molesting you did you. Did you make that connection or Dot Com later to all? That came later because so much of like I had so repressed and pushed down but my father had done to me sexually like I knew something weird had gone on because I was always. I had all these years bladder infections and I had nightmares. I was just so screwed up as a child but it took me years to be able to. Do you know what my first memories came back? I my first marriage lit up and I decided to go to Berlin to help chip at the Berlin Wall to help it come down and I went and had one of those baskets and I was chipping away all day at the graffiti and I went to my hotel and that night. I had my first memory amazing. Yeah Yeah I mean I need to think about when you talk about to wounding. I know it's that's that's happened to all of us. Yeah I mean I can only imagine what we've all buried in our bodies and our subconscious and then don't understand why were acting the way that we are. I mean that's been my experience where I've only been able to access memories through like Md Ama psychotherapy session where you're suddenly. You're like Oh my God i. This happened and it's shocking because it then rearticulating are. It's like a straightening of your spine in a way where you're like. Oh my God. Now everything makes sense but somehow you are missing. You know you're like missing the bottom of this show like you don't understand where the story started and so I think I think you're right. I think trauma and the way that it manifests in disease is sort of the tipping point and I think so many of us don't even know it's there and it's hard work but as you say like it has given New Year freedom it has it has and you know it's worth at this work worth it. I WanNa say to people you can get free. You can't have a really good life you can. You can feel pleasure. You can feel happiness. It's possible and and and I think sometimes the second rape or the second abuse we tell women after. They've been abused. They'll never recover from it and it's just not true. We can recover and I and I and I am I. It doesn't take work but we can. Yeah and in terms of getting it out of your body like did you have any somatic experiencing like did you or was it. The act of writing is that was not the explosion or did you so much in my life you know I was always sick up until I had cancer and then I got super thick and basically since then I have been well. It was like the purging. It was the come to Jesus moment it was like wake up you know and I changed my whole life. I've moved to the country. I lived with the trees in the woods. Now I you know everything changed after that but I think I saw monetize a lot and I I will say that one of the things one of the reasons I believe in what I'm doing and rising so much and why we started this dance revolution. Eight years ago is because dancing is the antidote to trauma. It's the antidote to loneliness is the antidote to isolation it's the antidote to feeling of decentralisation of your body it's the antidote to wanted to curl up in a bowl and die it's you know it's so powerful dancing and and I would really say survivors. Dance all the time dance every day. There's as much as you can because it is and it's a way back home. You know your body. I love that. Well thank you so much your book as a gift. Thank you for everything that you've done for women for so many decades. Thank you so much and I can't wait to see what's next. Thanks for listening to my conversation with Eve. Ensler for more on Eve had to eve ensler dot. Or that's E. N. S. L. E. R. And make sure to pick up a copy of her book. The apology available now. That's it for today's episode. If you have a chance please. Rate and review hit subscribe to keep up with new episodes and pass it along to a friend. Thanks again for joining. I hope you'll come back this Thursday for more and in the meantime you can check out. Give Dot com slash the podcast.

Eve ensler Banana Republic rape cancer US California team banana republic paltrow Bill Cosby Harvey Weinstein MPR Elise Lennon Tote DOT COM uterine cancer Dot Gwyneth I Congo
Keeping the Right Company with Tamiko Kelly- CR64

Career Relaunch

34:42 min | 1 year ago

Keeping the Right Company with Tamiko Kelly- CR64

"The longer we stay and toxic environments. It really makes us start to believe that we aren't capable in that. We can't do things that we are not successful. You're doing yourself more harm. Standing in a situation that is no longer serving the welcome to career launch the podcast dedicated to helping you reinvent career. My Name is Joseph. Liu and I'm here to help you gain clarity confidence and courage to overcome the challenges of making changes to your career so you can do more meaningful work and truly enjoy a professional life in each episode is feature people who've decided to step off the beaten path to reinvent their careers and do work that matters we talked through the unique personal stories the challenges they overcame and the lessons they learned along the way to help you understand what it takes to launch her own career today. My guest is going to describe leaving her retail career behind to become become a baby sleep. Consultant will discuss moving forward without a fully formed plan and the importance of getting yourself out of toxic environments afterwards during today's mental health. You'll all talk about how much the places I've worked affected. Ym Hello from Barcelona. I'm back here for the next twenty any four hours hosting another personal branding workshop but wanted to make sure I got this episode out the door and today I'm speaking with Meco Kelly. Who's the founder of sleep well wake happy and the creator of the field like yourself again? Baby Sleep Solution as a certified sleep consultant and holistic health practitioner to MECO Niko helps tired. MOMS feel like themselves again by teaching them how to get there baby sleeping through the night prior to doing this work to go spend her career working in the corporate world doing retail L. Merchandising at some well known brands including Banana Republic and Nordstrom now I found my conversation with D'Amico really refreshing because she's so honest and real about her career journey and also because she touches on some really important points about how much our work environment managers and colleagues can affect our psyche and belief in ourselves. She also also reminded me how critical it is to get yourself out of situations that drag you down instead of lift you up you can get all the show notes from today's episode at Career Relaunch Dot dot net slash sixty four to go spoke with me from Austin Texas good afternoon to Meco and welcome to career relaunch. We're we're going to talk through a few different topics today. Including what made you WanNa leave your retail career behind and how you decided to start your own business focused on as you put it helping tired parents but can you start by telling me more about what you're focused on right now in your career and your life just to get started yes so right now. I am make it a big shift in my business where I'M GONNA be out of the day to day activities focusing on a new offer for our company when you were just super exciting and then personally I am about to start the moving process which we all know can be a little crazy but they're not my hands around me because I'm starting a month early with the prep-work say it will be easier for me and I'm excited about place now. I know you said that you are removing on a little bit in the nature of your work and at the same time I would be curious to just hear a little bit more about what you had been doing even before making this transition for those people who aren't familiar with sleep consultant. Does what exactly have you been doing for parents out there. I helped L. Tired. Moms feel like themselves again but teaching them how to get their babies sleep into the night. My clients call me the baby whisper and basically since two thousand eight. I spent over over-fifties. Gaza ours is public closer now to get on the eighty or ninety thousand now but sitting around time teaching babies how how to sleep in helping their parents be super excited and get a good night's sleep as well. I have not made a baby who I couldn't teach sleep through the night. Also also were toddlers and older kids as well so allergy. Katie can't sleep on definitely the girl who can help you and it all started back in in two thousand and eight so it's been a long while crazy right now. I know that you have not always been asleep. Consultant and I do want to come back in here a little bit more more about exactly what you have been doing asleep consultant but we go back in time and go all the way back to your days working in retail and then we can move forward from there and perhaps we could start with your time at the gap and could you just explain what you're doing when you kicked picked off year retail career at the gap so I used to live in the Bay Area San Francisco for our folks are not in the US and I I graduated for IBM which is Institute of design recognize it in San Francisco and my first job out of that and Sacra at my bachelor's degrees as my second degree was working at gap is a strictly contract position and all I was supposed to do was is to help the pipeline which is no longer existence. We help pipeline this organized their inventories so back in those days actual hard goods sample sick from on the vendors that we use to service in we had a sample room and so my job was has to go into that. Samper Room actually create inventory organization because what would happen is that our team would take pictures of all of the pictures for the actual show website so that people could see look why and videos of back wearing shoes the no. She has had to be somewhere so that was my first stop. Stop Gap. How did you like that. And how did you see your career at that point in time progressing. I loved working at Harper Line because it was literally a startup. It was brand new. The team was excited. I'm a superman time because that never gone into the business before so a super exciting for the whole team to kind of be in the inaugural division of the company basically proven ourselves that we could be profitable etcetera we could actually we do the work and actually make money. Selling shoes had no idea where one of my career to go. I've been in retail for so long that I was super excited to be an actual actual corporate. Anybody who is in retail retail you understand the grind causal store level and I was excited not to be this anymore so I ended. I did not here with job store. It's so hard relying was a super exciting time for me for sure and then you you made a transition. Is that right to work in a high end clothing retail. What happened during that chapter of your career. What made you want to make that shift. Actually after pipeline I was recruited by another division of Gap Banana Republic to come and work on their team specifically work on the men's business in visual merchandising they have had so much experience in visual merchandising. I was actual stylus so I worked with magazines in photographers in Russia's it says dressing laws and all that and so they were super excited to have that experience on that team basically a Banana Republic our photo studio and so my job there was us to help the stylist again keep all the merchandise organized that was my first road within as I was on the team and again promoted to actually work on the digital man's Arjun because where I was working with at the VP of activation and we were actually setting up the visuals that the entire a company with us and we had a studio and I was basically set up the visual merchandising for that part of the business and basically at that time he had about two hundred stores person so also under stores use the work that we produced to set up the visual merchandising so if you guys shop at Banana Republic all of the mannequins the table's awesome awesome it was done by team like when I was on and that was Super Fun super exciting definitely left my time. I'm working in corporate and then after gap was an entree in to Nordstrom and actually got to open up a fabulous fantastic so actually our the norstrom mess backtrack. Here are the Nor'easter before the Gab actually because I opened a store in the Houston Galleria to my folks who work at the gallery is door and I opened the store back in two thousand and three. I believe it sounds like you had such a good run in the retail space and you've got a chance to work on some fantastic brands like the gap and Banana Republic and Nordstrom and I was just curious how you went from that to focusing on the sleep I from a long line of Entrepreneurs Joseph so for me. It was a super easy transition. I knew I always wanted to own my own business. I didn't have any idea what I wanted it to be. I used to have a jury business back in the day the balcony. I'M GONNA open up a retail business like I thought it was true to do something. In the retail world tried my hand at many things nothing really felt right to me and it wasn't until I was in San Francisco and and started to date nights that the light really got switched on my head. I was like I do families. I really do like worked with babies. I've been in the any literally Mahal entire life so maybe this is the route that I need to take and it was with literally there that that's when it started Cisco now when you you say date night. I know you and I talked about this before. We did this recording. What do you mean by date night. I think you said you were a date night. Nanny when we talked before yeah so I'm basically parents nights would hire me. I still con- Valley so if anybody who doesn't doesn't conflicts full of lots of executives who work super duper long hours and basically you're always always were hardly come in and give them in their partner date nights a bit go out enjoy dinner and hang out on the town without the kiddos basically Asia Kate their spouse against so important date night. Nanny and you're helping couples rekindle their their relationships post children and then what happened. What made you then decide that you wanted to turn this into something more than being a date night. Nanny and you wanted to become asleep consultant. You know one of my clients actually said. Hey I need thought of taking what you're teaching mead aid and putting it online is folks have to understand. Is that back in the day when I was doing this. There was no online course that was not a thing back in two thousand the three four or five illy not even industry back then so to have somebody say to me. Hey what do you think about that. I was like what are you talking about. I even even know what she was referring to. She basically was just like hey. I go to school. All my classes are online. It's great for me. 'cause I'm able to do it. Whenever I'm available. They have to go to an actual campus. I think this would be great for you as well as because she mentioned that to me is the current and I was like Oh maybe I can turn this into an actual business and not just random date nights here and there and all of that and so it was through that one conversation Asian that basically the train left the station with conversation so when you went into doing sleep consulting it was in the form of online courses purses than is that right now. It was actually in the form of in-home consultation okay so you went into people's homes one at a time. Can you explain what what that was like to go from working in the corporate setting where you're working with all these like high end brands to then going into somebody's home whether struggling to to get their infant or baby or toddler to go to bed by eight o'clock or nine o'clock yes so. I worked on my think something alongside alongside of my job so it was basically a side hustle for me for many years I would work incorporated and then after work and on the weekends is when I did because hopefully that was really elite driving up and down the bay area. I mean literally. I did the entire so from Novado all the way to Dublin pleasanton. I Live Matteo anybody who lives in the bay area area. You will ask driving families so I did a lot of work to be area and it was through all of the hours I put in working with families in that one on one capacity that I was able to develop our online course many years go to us. If until twenty thirteen is when I finally develop my course okay so five years into doing this work okay and what was the toughest part of doing this kind of work whether it's the self employment aspect of it or the sleep coaching coaching part of it well in the beginning. I basically worked for anybody who had who didn't sleep. I had no. I had no kind of filters who I would work for an all that stuff in I think in the beginning I was just happy to help people as I continue to do the work. I realized okay so I the only WanNa work with people who have X. Y. Z. As I think the hardest thing for me in the beginning was turning away business because I had this fear that if I didn't help everybody that I I would literally not have any clients but it was through that filtering process that really was able to hone my skills and cartwright brought a better Mitch from myself is under the game which is hard to say no in the beginning which anybody new business can totally amen me from that one definitely if somebody is listening to this to me go and they've got some sort of skill or strength that they want to utilize in the form of creating creating their own business and they're hearing you and and they're hearing you say wow I was turning away clients. Can you explain how were you even finding your first first clients so when I first started we didn't have facebook. We had the yahoo form so Yahoo. Groups was still them back right. I'm in Silicon Valley so though exciting I mean just to kind of let people know when I was in the bay area I wanted to I think fifty people to even use twitter. This was like literally my back in the day. Yeah that's right. When twitter two thousand eight was right when twitter her was released to the public like the first fifty two people who even got access 'cause I somebody had to invite you even like open to say hey go come and get on twitter so I mean this was literally when I was starting my business and so we had a yahoo group in basically I helped one mom issue on that Yahoo Group root for San Mateo Game in literally screaming my presents from the tops in front that one post literally my phone rang and then even getting all aw all day every day? I'll be on conference. Calls in meetings will be blowing. Oh get over here. It's very interesting yes. I didn't have any kind of marketing strategy was it was literally our started. The other thing I was hoping to hear about is is what the toughest part. I know you mentioned that. Turn away. Clients was tough. was there anything else that was tough about running your your own business and this sort of service based business you know for me. It was like finding time for it all because I was still working `corporate and it was on the side. It was really elite trying to balance everything there are some days where I was working twelve hours at work and then I would have to his house at night and then get up the next morning to work against I I mean it was just trying to balance it all without chilling myself so much work which I made people buy a good thing. It is when you have a system for that work. I literally had no system of virus pants so just in general that was hard and I think also it was hard for me in as far as rates that was always a hot button topic for me because I didn't know what the charge I just is picked number off the skies at this price and I didn't have any kind of formula system for that and so whenever I decided to increase arrate hours very like Oh my God increase rates and I was very nervous people would pay and they were just like we don't care just can you can and you do what you can do. They will pay you whatever you want us to pay you and so once people told me that it released me from all the pricing chain was given to gap pricing is a really tricky thing because there's so much wrapped up in that not just the financials of it but also. I guess like perceptions Sion's of self worth and the value offer and how much your time is worth so yeah. That's that's really tricky. And how did you know that it was time to turn this abyss from being a side hustle to your full time job so two things when the income started to become very close marketing corporate on a part time basis I I was. I'd okay girl like you have got to really look at this because you're basically almost salary working part time like just on the weekends and at night so could you do if you didn't have corporate at all in the number two. I just got sick of reading corporate like I had. I've had some horrible oh bosses in my career Joseph who really in always say like well we have a moral boss that is God or the universe or whatever you call it giving us the lesson that we need to have a plan in our life and the lesson I had to get from my office when I was incorporated. was you qualify if these idiot monkeys can do their job and get paid all this money to be basically a holes. You're a nice person. People love us so there's no reason why oh you can't run your own thing and be highly successful in it so I think once I kinda got my head around that that I was capable that I am confident and I'm able to be successful in business. That gave me the confidence to be like okay. It's time to lead it. Is I will tell on you. I did not have a game plan. I know a lot of people are like Oh. I'm GONNA have expired our stage and I got a have X. Amount of crimes I didn't do any elderly just said I'm done working. Today is my last day at about two weeks today. I had no money saved up had no backup. Plans like Allahu care. There are just dumb. We're getting I literally left and I got my first twenty. K. Client hours of leaving living in that's what I knew that this was not supposed to be doing. That is a great transition to me. Go into a couple of the last things I was hoping that we could talk about which is what you've learned along the way from making your transition from the corporate world to running your own business and what you just said there about making a leap without having a concrete plan in places. I think quite interesting for me because I'm somebody who struggles to move forward without a plan. What did you learn from doing back from making the leap without having a plan that you could now say at this point in time that maybe you didn't realize at the time looking looking back. I think that I learned that I can do anything that apple ninety like anything that I say I want to do. It's one hundred percent possible. I don't have to you battle with the Dow anymore because I've proven to myself time and time and time again so for me. It's the best thing I ever did. I'm looking back stating proper way too long dealt with way too much yes. I should have left many years years before I left. It's also a reminder of myself to stop holding on so patently tightly to things that are no longer serve me for the fear what may happen in the future and just do what I need to do and just trust at it's going to always work out because it literally always do you have any advice for someone out there who may be listening to this and is feeling some of that same doubt that you were feeling the time and holding onto a job that maybe they feel is exactly right for them any any advice for them about making a change my rest to leave like I think that the longer we stay and toxic environment. It does something to our psyche. It really makes us start to believe that we aren't capable that. We can't do things that we are not successful. I personally have office who sent the most horrible things to be the most horrific things to me and if you're in an environment where people are constantly negative. They're constantly bringing you down. It affects you in ways that you don't even know thank you to your Alabama even realize how ridiculous is being treated until allows no longer in that environment in look back and I was like what in the world are you. Would you life so I think you're doing yourself more harm standing in a situation that is no longer serving you now. Some people may have families. They can't just do like I did this piece out but that a game plan and I can in totally respect that what you have to ask yourself though is can I come up with a date that I say this is the date that I've done. Regardless regardless of what's happened in the business regardless of what my boss expected me. I'm done on this day and put it in my notice on this date and and then I'm GonNa have quit day party like I'm GonNa. Put My notice a mistake and then on the last day. I'm going to have a quick Papeari because whatever you're meant to do your during that waiting for you and the longer that you sit in a position as serving you the less people that you're able to help that is really great advice and and it is so hard. I think to walk away from something. That feels so stable so that's just a really good reminder that yeah you're just burning time and it sometimes you do you have to move on and I think you know know Jarvis stable. I mean literally time Bali during the real estate boom and people who were making millions of dollars from having that always happens zero dollars literally overnight and I just think that you have to realize that civility illusion having a stable job as an illusion and the longer that you keep telling yourselves these lies the longer. You're preventing yourself from doing but you really put on this earth to do. I'm as strong advocate for entrepreneurship because I know that the freedom is giving me. I'm supposed to be that I have in my life that I've never had or anybody who works at retail like you know how crazy schedule is like you literally have no life and so. I am all for us from new ship and all about finding free them on your terms for sure well. Let's wrap up with what you're focused on right now. What is next for you in your business. So what next to me and my business is. I'm working on on on on the new offer that I mentioned in the beginning. You know I'll be able to have other people who will be able to help families that I can't get help or just you know I'm retiring from nights nights for over a decade. Now I just think it's time I pass the baton somebody else and so finding people who can't help my clients who desperately need help with nights without me having to be the person to to do that. I'm I'm and then you know helping new care professionals because in my industry it's a predominantly female oriented industry and so many of the living I'm a meat in conferences and other groups they are just struggling to make ends meet and so our coaching several of them and and so in our our idea of coaching network professionals on how to build sustainable businesses that don't during the life how you freedom and the life that you so desperately want so. I'm working on that too okay and now I know you've also got some workshops that you run and can you tell me a little bit about your workshops. We'll wrap up it basically walks parents through by system right tips for helping tonight we in your baby so they have to be up all night every night feeding your baby every hour and so you know to get your seat now workshop chop sleepworld dot com slash workshop and the MOMS who have join me on that workshop has completely have their lives changed by what they learn so so if your mom lives baby won't go to sleep without a bottle or breastfeeding on that long that you definitely don't want to miss this workshop fantastic. Thank you so much for sharing that a resource to me. Go and just really appreciate you taking the time to share your story of leaving the corporate world to start your own business and how you navigated the challenges along the way and again. I think you're doing really great work out. There and I'm sure there are plenty of parents out there who really appreciate what you're doing for them. So thanks so much for sharing your career our story on the show and best of luck to you with your new endeavor. Thank you so much so I hope you enjoyed hearing some useful perspectives from D'Amico about the importance of starting somewhere somewhere even if you don't have your plans fully mapped out and letting go of the things that no longer serve you now. It's time to wrap up with today's mental fuel where I'm going to explain how much your work environment. It can affect who you are. Thanks to fresh books for supporting this episode of career relaunch fresh books is a user-friendly simple invoicing an accounting tool for self employed it professionals and small business owners. Try It free for one month by going to career relaunched dot net slash fresh books. This is the part of the show called mental fuel or I finished the show with a brief personal story related to one of the topics we cover today and rep with a simple challenge to help you move forward with your own career goals for today's mental fuel. There were a a couple of topics I had thought about covering the I was about self confidence which to Meco mentioned was something she had to build up before she made the leap into self-employment but that's a topic we we covered quite a bit in episode forty nine with Heather Monaghan the author of the Confidence Creator so if you want to hear more about the topic of confidence feel free to check out episode forty nine instead. I WanNa pick up on something to me. Go said about how being in a toxic environment can affect your psychology and self belief and how important it is to get yourself out of situations that no longer serve you and this got me thinking about how much the people we surround ourselves with an on how much the work environments where we spend most of our waking hours can really affect who we are how we behave and what we believe so. I thought I'd just share a personal snow story about how one work environment literally altered my personality just Ella straight how much your workplace can affect who you are in my case. It won't be a story three of a toxic workplace per se that affected my confidence although I did have a couple of those going back to my college internship days but instead. I thought I'd talk about another situation. I wouldn't say positive or negative impact on me but just shifted how I thought about the world around me so I don't know if you've ever taken the Myers Briggs type indicator test also known as the embiid but if you're familiar with it it's a well known personality questionnaire that gives you a sense of how you process the world around you. It's a popular test that in a nutshell gives you a sense of how you operate across four domains in your our life specifically how you draw your energy process information make decisions and structure your life. I'm simplifying a bit here but but that's the gist of it so I've taken this test several times in my life a couple times as a child once in college and a few times when I was working in the corporate world because it's a popular team building exercise to understand how people operate on your team and every single time I took it throughout different life stages an an ages. I always typed as a strong. I N T J which means I'm the type of person who's more energized by time alone alone rather than with others focused on conceptual ideas rather than details logical rather than emotional and planned rather than spontaneous is actually the third heard rarest personality type out their accounting for about two percent of the general population the one exception to me typing as an I. N. T. J. was when I took the test. After spending a couple of years working at clorox which was the first large corporate company I worked for back in my brand manager days after doing my Mba yea and when I took the test their how I processed information changed for the first time in my life from an en to an s flipping from being focused on high level ideas and intuition to details and fact base analysis which made complete sense because the NBA is certainly focused on data analysis assists and Clorox was also a company that relief valued analytics and data driven decision making and planning a few years later when I worked AH GU desserts a startup in London and took the test again. I actually shifted back toward being an N. again which also made sense because Google was a startup back then and a lot of marketing decisions were made based on Gut feel and in tuition so I'm just sharing this as an example apple of how much I've personally been affected by those environments where I used to spend the majority of my waking hours and what I found interesting and almost scary about it was that I've always sort of prided myself as someone who doesn't allow others to affect who I am. Peer pressure was never something that I thought I felt and I didn't think I was someone who's personality was so malleable or driven by the environment around me and yet these places. This is really did change me and this specific case. I wouldn't say it had a negative or positive impact on me but it did alter who I was. All the way back in episode six featuring marketer turned interior designer Nas Massawa. I shared this quote by Jim Rohn. Who said you are the average of the five people you spend the most time with. I really believe that and so with all this in mind it's worth thinking about the company you're keeping during your work days. The people you're spending the most time with at work especially your managers and the behaviors they're encouraging or discouraging your organization and the actions and attitudes values and rewards while it may not seem like one person's opinion of view or one way of working or one aspect of your company's culture would dramatically alter who you are the cumulation of those things especially especially over time can have a significant impact on how you view the world how you think you should act and be in order to be considered successful and ultimately. Camilli what you think of yourself both the positive and the negative. How are your colleagues managers and work environment affecting you. Are they lifting you up or are they constantly holding you back. It's so important to take stock of what impact your environment is having on you and what is and what is not acceptable to you as you think about your own professional health. This brings me to a quote that I couldn't find the author for but really Lee rings true with this topic. Make sure everybody in your boat is rowing not drilling holes when you're not looking know your circle so my challenge to you is to think about the company you keep thinking about what specific impact the people you spend the most time with are are having on your own personal and professional wellbeing. Write it down if they're having a positive impact great but if they're dragging you down all the time you just have to ask yourself how long you're willing to tolerate being around those people and if you feel the time has come to get yourself out of that situation what it's small steps you could take this week to lay the groundwork for moving somewhere else. If you WANNA learn more about that Myers Briggs test all include cluedo linked to some more information about that questionnaire on today's episode at career relaunch dot net slash sixty four where you can also find a summary of all the key concepts from today's conversation Asian with tobacco along with links to those past episodes. I mentioned during today's mental fuel segment again. That's career relaunch dot net slash six four in our next episode. Soda Career Relaunch. We're heading over to Detroit Michigan where I'll be speaking with an automotive industry professional who bounced back from being laid off from her job not once but twice we're going to talk about how she bounce back from those moments and what she learned about what truly matter to her thanks so much for listening to career relaunch an especial thanks again to to Meco Geico Kelly for sharing her honest with us today from Austin Texas. This episode was mixed by Richard Pennington Electrocardiogram wrote and performed our original theme song. I'm I've just flew at all. CNN time

consultant Banana Republic Nordstrom twitter Consultant Austin Texas Joseph San Francisco D'Amico Yahoo Meco Kelly L. Tired Gap Banana Republic MECO Niko Liu Barcelona founder Gaza L. Merchandising
Why Olivia Rodrigo Doesnt Feel The Pressure To Match The Success Of Drivers License With Her Next Song

Direct from Hollywood

02:39 min | 2 months ago

Why Olivia Rodrigo Doesnt Feel The Pressure To Match The Success Of Drivers License With Her Next Song

"Geico knows there many reasons why you ride from the exciting adventure of the daily commute to the peace of mind that geico always has your back with twenty four seven access to claim service and legendary customer service but pamela month had one reason in particular my skin is extremely averse to most fabrics except for the soft buttery feeling of leather thankfully. I found my clan of leather lovers in the bike and community. It's been life changing dargo motorcycle. Fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. This episode is brought to you by comcast since two thousand eleven comcast is connected more than four million students from low income families to the internet. Now they're launching more than one thousand wifi connected lift zones in community centers nationwide to provide safe spaces to get online learn more at comcast dot com slash education with ryan seacrest. It's not every day in artists. Like olivia rodriguez debuts at the top of the charts with their very first major single like she did with driver's license in fact it's essentially unheard of so it could understandably put a lot of weight and pressure on her shoulders to achieve that success with follow up and for libya too key to not come into. That pressure is to remember why she started making music. In the first place she tells popcrush nights. I write music. Because i love writing songs. I don't write them to have them chart stream or even be well received is genuinely just one of my favorite things in the whole entire universe to do so. That takes the pressure off. Because i'd be doing whether or not people were listening while the world won't be listening waiting until she does deliver. That second single could be exciting until then driver's license is out now. That's direct from hollywood. When you play some wager with williamsville stores every moment becomes even more interesting and we have a special twenty twenty one offer to help you all your favorite sports risk free. Download the william hill mobile app. And when you sign up you can get started with a risk. Free bed of up to two thousand twenty one dollars. Use promo code pod. Raf must be president. Virginia twenty one plus only terms and conditions apply gambling. Problem call tech support. Shed are confidential in toll free helpline at one eight five three two three five hundred. Let's make it interesting with william hill. Sportsbook spring forward at banana republic factory with fifty to seventy percent off everything shop season favorites from colorful dresses too. Easy tops from nineteen ninety nine. Find your nearest store or shop. Online at banana republic factory enjoy fifty to seventy percent off on everything gap factory and gap factory dot com shop teas from six hundred ninety nine and joggers from twenty four ninety nine plus extra fifteen percent off online exclusions apply shop the sale through april sixth.

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ICYMI - Kevin Love on Rising to Challenges On and Off the Court

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

09:11 min | 2 years ago

ICYMI - Kevin Love on Rising to Challenges On and Off the Court

"You're listening to comedy central. Say goodbye to huge cable bills Filo has over fifty of your favorite channels like the food network AMC in the history channel enjoy live and on demand TV plus unlimited recording for only twenty dollars a month with no contract needed. Filo is available on Roku, Android. IOS? Fire TV and apple TV to start your free trial. Visit Filo dot TV slash ears. That's P H I L O dot TV slash ears. Please welcome. Kevin love. Welcome to the show. Appreciate you. Having me. Let's start with the most important question or statement that I have in that is how was your birthday two days ago? Happy birthday you feeling? Yeah. I just turned thirty. So I'm still recovering as he can hear my voice is gone a little bit. I was told in your thirties, you stop recovering fast. So is that something? Celebrating with LeBron James. So that online was like hanging out together was a couple couple of fastened shows together. And then, you know, had a couple of drinks and Dumbo is that much too much for people to handle lectures. Because like if I see somebody who's mega famous in the streets. Can is that is that. But if you walk with LeBron it's the two of you. The two of us also LeBron's. He's he's not really Percy's more of a planet. He just absorbs everything. So he has a lot of people fall on him. He's hard to miss, and, but he's a lot of fun to I guess have a glass of, you know, with right and going into that like, you just cute a big money deal to stay in Cleveland. Right. And now you've become the face of this of this franchise. Like, you inherited a really powerful legacy that you have to move forward. I don't know what that's like. But like, do you think you can do it? Absolutely. I feel like everything meeting up to this point. Especially my six years. I spent Minnesota not having a ton of veterans. We had seen the league for a couple of years heading into a situation in Cleveland where we were expected to win the championship. Lebron had signed back with the team in the two thousand fourteen two thousand fifteen season. They traded for me, and we were expected to win a championship every single year. So now heading into a new era. It's going to be it's going to be a challenge. You lose the best player in the world. But I think a lot of the guys are are very excited for the not only the opportunity, but the challenge and growing something, right? And when you went to China, I if there's a true story or not I heard that your luggage had been like tab, and tagged your luggage when you got to China said, LeBron James, and I posted a video on on social media and said on my story on Instagram and say, I can't get away from him. Hey, brother, you're stuck with me forever. So I appreciate that. But it was just you know, wasn't able to get away from even when he signed for the Lakers. It's going to be a really exciting journey for for both the Cavs. I mean, you're a different team. Also because you have the ring. So there's a different atmosphere to the to the whole franchise. But you're also a person who's on a journey in multiple ways. I mean, you you have this which is enough for most people to have as an undertaking. But then you also have a fashion label that you are working with you working with banana Republic designing clothes designing clothes and actually have my own capsule collection coming out September eighteenth. And this is this is part of it here. There's actually my favorite toe. Jackie wearing you'll close right now. I am wearing my clothes right now. See? That's that's the way I've read some of the things you have like some of the I talk about the collection like most motion stretch topcoat. Yes since stripe motion stretch. Suit clad cotton wool should performance stretch. Will like this seems like a lot of stuff that's gets or somebody who plays basketball and works out. Like there's a lot of stretch it is. But it's also very easy for what we do to travel with it. We're we're away and we're traveling for forty one away games out of our eighty two. And then hopefully, we make the playoffs. Right. Right. Right. And then we have to have even more of that going on. So no, it's very fun to make the collection. It was over. But probably a year and a half a foot in this together. There's a lot of legwork and things behind the scenes that would on but very proud of it. And I'm excited for all you guys to see on September eighteen did you just you just? Really want to design clothes for other people. Or did you just trick banana Republic into making clothes for you? Because I feel like you were just like the people also want stretch pants for the traveling. You know, it's really cool after a big game. People wanna wear a bomber jacket over one another jacket. Oh, no. You are really involved in the design. Right. I was really involved with this design, which was fun. Was that in the creative process? We made a bunch of tear sheets. I, you know, what's going on Pinterest doing a lot of primitive things in order to get the collection other. But when we were in the selection process, we've put together an extensive book, and it was backstage with me with my stylish, Courtney maize, and we've gotta show her some love to because then mostly mostly a creative director is right. All right. So we put together a big book extensive book that you know, probably had three hundred pages in it. And it showed different architectures showed wine. It showed classic cars at showed old movies from the fifties. Just a lot of. Banana Republic a classic American brand. There was a lot of that going on in there. So that was a lot of fun to do. And then we we got with the team when from banana Republic creative team and kind of looked at their moves boards. And we found that it was going to be be fall. So here we are. That's properly. Exciting. You have you have the basketball, you have the design and honestly, one of my favorite things that you've done is when you came out, and you you wrote an essay on dealing with depression and mental health in the NBA. I think it was a derozen who came out originally. And he said, you know, I think we should all be speaking about this. And you you came out, and you spoke, and I don't know if this has happened to you. But s someone who's spoken about depression. There's a lot of people who go you. But you, but how the u the you? Did you have people go like Kevin depression? And then they were like, oh, yeah. Or were they like Kevin how I think the sense of community has been the craziest thing for me of any time in my entire career. Plan ten years in the NBA. Now, this is what people see most. And I mentioned that. Because everywhere that I go whether it be men or women, you know, in socioeconomic status sexual preference. Anything I it doesn't discriminate. Right. And especially when you mentioned us people that seemingly have everything right? You know, you're you're in a position that you always wanted to be in as athletes at least for us. We're considered superhuman even consider the mental aspect of it because we have stuff that are that are that's going on as well. So, you know, I saw the Robin Williams documentary on HBO I saw you know, what happened take Kate Spade. And actually one of my heroes. Anthony bourdain had taken his life in the same week and Bryan Cranston, one of my favorite actors that came out and said a beautiful quote. He's six success is not immune to depression. And I found that to you know, really hit home with me because we really are all going through something. So it's it's, you know, really great. That not only athletes are talking about it. But everybody's for furthering the conversation in order to you down that stigma, definitely. Stop the conversation. What I'd mind as you pushed for the NBA to take action. But you know, you you could have come out which would have still be a big step and said, hey, I also suffer from depression this high deal with it. But you also laid out an idea for the NBA on how they should be dealing with it. And why what are some of the ideas that you've pushed, and you know, has been support for that within the league, you know, there's been a lot of support. Whether it's come from, you know, the NBA side, whether it comes from, you know, even with with our community in Cleveland our front office on the players side. You mentioned tomorrow Rosen opening the door for for myself and getting me to a point where I was able to share my story. But I think the biggest thing is knowing I'm thirty years old now that I don't have all the answers in a lot of people don't and whether that's. You know, seeing therapists, whether it's your Medicaid or not finding somebody to talk to, you know, finding new ways in in your line of work or you walk of life to make an impact or find a way to help other people. I think that's a an ever evolving process. But I believe that the NBA is going to do a great job, and they have just started on their journey with that as well. It should become a next level superstar for many people watch him. And thank you so much. Ration-? We'll be available on September eighteenth. Kevin love everybody. The daily show with criminal years. A dish wants to show weeknights at eleven ten central on comedy, central and the comedy central watchable episodes and videos at the daily show dot com. Us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and subscribe to the daily show on YouTube, four, exclusive content and move. This has been a comedy central podcast.

LeBron James NBA banana Republic Cleveland Filo basketball Kevin love Kevin apple Cavs Lakers China AMC Kevin depression Minnesota Percy Anthony bourdain Jackie
Taking Collective Responsibility for Fixing Climate Change

The goop Podcast

42:10 min | 1 year ago

Taking Collective Responsibility for Fixing Climate Change

"Hi I'm Elise loon co host with Gwyneth of the podcast. Today's guest is Tatiana Schlossberg. Tatyana is the seventh gas in our special series called women on top which is all made possible by our friends at Banana Republic The most interesting businesses are born out of curiosity. This is the space that went was in when she started goop. It's also the space from which Banana Republic was founded back in nineteen seventy eight by to California creatives with adventurous spirits. Laos ball partnered with the team at Banana Republic to celebrate curiosity by talking with women who are redefining. What it means to be powerful and brave and we're very excited to be back for a second series. I hope you love listening to these conversations as much as I love having them and I know you'll be deeply inspired by these women so please keep listening and keep shopping with our friends at Banana Republic to see our favorites from their spring collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop. Don't hold anything tightly. Just wish for wine. It let it come from the intention of real truth for you and then let it go. The Mayo soul is like it's unbound. It's limitless but we will use words to limit ourselves when people stop believing that. Somebody's got your back or Superman's coming. We turn to ourselves and that's where you become. Empowered courageous participation attracts positive things. I'm going paltrow. This is the group podcast bringing together thought leaders culture changers creatives founders and CEOS scientists doctors healers and seekers here to start conversations because simply asking questions and listening has the power to change the way we see. The world is no exception a letter. Leesville you win on her extraordinary guest all right over to a lease Tatiana. Schlossberg is the author of inconspicuous consumption and a journalist who writes about climate change and the environment. She has contributed to the New York Times and worked on the Metro Desk Tatiana and I sat down at our last in. Goupil talk about how we are all collectively responsible for building a better world. She teaches us what we can do. Now to create bigger change and both small and significant ways will learn just how much water goes into making one pair of jeans and how we can change this and the people who already are Tatiana understands that environmental issues do feel overwhelming. But the best thing we can do is to educate ourselves and take action. And when we do this. We realized that the issue of climate change is an enormous opportunity to fix the world. We live in today. We often talk about climate. Change as if it's a big loss and sacrifice and it is those things but it also is an enormous opportunity to kind of fix a lot of these systems that have perpetuated injustice in our societies. Let's cut to our chat with Tachi on Schlossberg. I know within your book. You talk about how. There's the onus somehow has become on us as individuals to reduce our carbon footprint because corporations and certainly our government right now and the globe isn't doing its part which isn't appropriate. I think we all feel like what can we possibly do in later? This imminent threat. So can you sort of talk through on a political level obviously voting but like what what you think we need to do is consumers to get companies more engaged. Yeah you know. I think that when we talk about climate change carbon footprints. I think that the narrative of personal responsibility on this topic has been really destructive. Because it's made us look inward at ourselves and what we're doing instead of focusing on the larger systemic and collective problems are issues that are really causing this problem and I think it also makes it seem like you know if we'd all just brought our own grocery bags to the store twenty years ago we wouldn't be dealing with this but most importantly I think it's let those who are actually responsible off the hook and that's you know fossil fuel companies and their lobbyists and the politicians who take money from them and corporation. They're they're guilty as well so I think it's it can be really difficult and I understand the impulse to feel guilty about the things that we do by and I'm not saying you shouldn't feel guilty is therefore you should go do whatever you want but you know. I think we don't need to feel individuals guilty for climate change but we need to feel collectively responsible for building a better world and for fixing these problems and the way that we do that is by engaging in collective action so for the most part that the most effective way to do that are voting as you mentioned and getting involved in the political process but also we have a lot of power as consumers that I think we have kind of abdicated. So you don't have to support a company that isn't at the very least being transparent about what its practices are and then encouraging them to do better and the same thing goes you know making sure that they follow through on the promises that they're making that those promises are legitimate and a lot of companies are realizing that this is a really important issue to a lot of people and they really need to do more and they are responsive to the bad. Pr that comes from having a negative climate or environmental impact. So we can't shop our way out of this problem but we can't shop better and I I think in general. It's not you know we've put so much pressure on the consumer to make the sustainable choice when usually we don't have that information and instead it should really be on the companies to do a better job whether that's limiting the amount of water and resources that they use or decrease in their carbon footprint or any of the the many many things that most companies can do to not have as big of an impact as they do. We can go through different categories but maybe it makes sense to start with fashion because I think we all probably that most of the people in this room tend to buy fewer things that are well-made that they can continue to wear and that's sort of how we used to dress right like you would have things for three years four years and that is statistically just like dropped because of fast fashion and this idea right that we should have whatever we want and as much as we want all the time. All the time I was watching one of those makeover shows and I was shocked because at the end this they threw away all of this women's clothing and bought her a new wardrobe and she had they gave her. It was five thousand dollars worth of clothing. Which is a lot of money right? And they provided her with racks of clothing. It was like forty pairs of new shoes and three racks of clothing for five thousand dollars and it was like this is kind of really fucked up lake. You could buy like a wardrobe of Nice well-made things right without money you don't need this much stuff right but we've all been sort of trained to consume consume consume. Yeah I think that's you know. In general that's how we measure success is in growth and the reason that things are cheap whether it's fast fashion for the most part but also a lot of the things that we buy. I mean proportionately. We spend less money on clothes and we used to because it's a lot cheaper to manufacturer close mainly because they're manufactured in places like China or increasingly Vietnam where they have much lax much more lax environmental standards as well as Labor standards and wages. And things like that. But you know the reason that it's cheaper to produce something in those places because no one actually is paying for the cost of producing them and the cost of producing these things should contain the waste. And whether that's or the problems that are caused whether that's ocean acidification or sulfur dioxide pollution in port cities or water pollution in the towns. Where all these factors are. I mean those things should be factored into the cost of what of what we buy. Because that's part of the cost of making them so so if that happens I think hopefully it would not only encourage better practices but it would also make people feel that they couldn't afford as many things as as we all want all the time. And there's you know amazing statistic that the average item of clothing is worn seven times and then thrown away and in the US. We donate or recycle. Only fifteen percent of our clothing and Aso eighty-five percent is landfilled or incinerated. And if it's landfilled if it's biodegradable material that's can have a lot of methane emissions but if it's synthetic material can leach apostasy and other toxins into the soil or the groundwater in addition to just being wasteful of all the resources and Labor that were taken to make those things right and speaking of corporations I know with the you talk about this but the and we found this cube in the process of making our own label and trying to drive it as sustainably as possible that there's an absence of Information. It's a very opaque industry and that a lot of manufacturers haven't been called to the mat to sort of explain exactly what's going on and so a few companies are something for you mentioned Levi's here in San Francisco being very clear about the amount of water that's required to create the Denim and how they've brought that drastically down there. Trainings Industry Right. Yes therefore sections in the book so the Internet and technology food fashion and fuel so in the fashion section. I write about Denim which is mainly away to write about cotton but to grow a kilogram of cotton so about two pounds us on average twenty five hundred gallons of water to turn that into a pair of jeans could use up two additional an additional two thousand nine hundred gallons of water so it really is like an insane amount of water especially when cotton is often grown in places that are water stressed. You know dry to begin with but so Levi's has kind of instituted this water less campaign where they are trying to manufacture their denim using less water. And I think it's not. All of their genes are not made with that technique but a lot of them are. I think they're trying to get to eighty percent by next year and then they are giving away those methods to the rest of the industry which I think is really important because I mean everybody needs to do better and it shouldn't be up to the consumer you know if you're standing trying to decide between two pairs of jeans you probably don't need you know which one was made with the least amount of water it should be on the companies to use as little water as possible and you know. There are some factories and suppliers. That do that. But they're kind of few and far between. Yeah but no. I think it's sort of incumbent on us to ask and apply that pressure and shoe indicate that were curious and asking and then I think that's how markets are to move in the absence of government leadership I think businesses are stepping in to take on right mantle and that's ultimately what we're part of what we're going to need right. Yeah and I think it's interesting that you guys found the same thing that I found which is that. There's no transparency in the supply chain which allows the companies that we think of as like making our clothes really. Don't actually make the materials that that we end up wearing. They kind of put them all together for the most part so the fact that there is no transparency allows them to get away with a lot and allows them to kind of feel unaccountable. And we haven't asked them to be accountable but we do have that power to ask as you're saying and if that's not coming from government regulation or kind of industry agreements than than it does have to come from from us and from consumer pressure. We'll get back to Tatyana and just a second You've probably heard me mentioned that. Curiosity is my favorite state of being. I try to carry that attitude with me every day. And it's certainly easier to do it. That a place like goop that places. Such a premium value on being curious and feeling empower to explore and ask questions. Banana Republic is another company that values curiosity their founding story starts with a California couple who were looking for an adventure. Fun Fact Banana Republic began as a safari inspired clothing company and today the inspiration for their clothing is designed for life in motion or as they put it living a life of possibilities with no boundaries. This can be seen banana. Republics latest spring collection a modern versatile take on work where to see our favorites from the collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop working out and more specifically. Doing Yoga helps me get out of my mind and into my body. I spend a lot of time in my mind. And Yoga is a form of release for me. I love it but the usual barriers can keep me from staying in a regular routine bulldog. Yoga online removes those hurdles and makes it very easy and fun. To the yoga anytime anyplace with zero intimidation bulldogs online streaming. Classes are designed to work around your schedule. You can jump into a classroom your bedroom hotel room or wherever you find yourself. Classes range from twelve to sixty minutes. Which is great if you promise yourself. He'd squeezing a workout and don't have much time. The classes are easy to follow along to and set to fun upbeat playlists. You can choose from a range of classes and levels depending on what you're looking for. There are more basic classes geared toward beginners aerobic oriented classes that will give you a solid full body workout and even Meditation Series Bulldog. Yoga believes in all the amazing benefits of yoga increase strength. Better flexibility improved mental focus but their goal is to minimize feeling daunted by a certain kind of class atmosphere. So they're bringing the experience to your living room some levity to try bulldog yoga for yourself head to bulldog online dot com use. Promo Code goop sixty to extend your free trial from thirty days to sixty days. That's BULLDOG ONLINE DOT COM and use. Code Goup six zero after your retrial. It's just twelve ninety nine per month and you can cancel anytime back to my chat with Tana and speaking of Supply Chain Accountability that the chapter on Technology was fascinating. Not only because of the attention of brings to rare metals which are typically mind and places like the Congo but also that so many like I was floored. I hope some all of you don't necessarily work in Silicon Valley comedies. Superfund sites are money. Three twenty three superfund site. So yeah it's it's the most polluted county by number of superfund sites. It's not the most polluted in terms of the amount of pollutants. But there are. I think it's amazing for me to learn that there was that pollution at all. Because I don't really think of Silicon Valley is like an industry or manufacturing area. But that's what it was for a really long time. And only more recently is kind of more software and this sort of intangible internet stuff but producing chips and semiconductors and all the different parts of our computers as an incredibly chemically intensive process and requires lots of precious materials. And we don't currently I mean the there are a lot of reasons why you know they're not kind of recycled effectively. But one of the reasons is that the company's kind of factor planned obsolescence into their business model so that we always feel like we have to buy the new thing and then we don't recycle them or they don't reincorporate those things into their supply chain and all of the stuff that's no other it's in the batteries or the computers you know is mind all over the world with huge environmental impact and also you know health problems for the for the people who work in the minds or live around them as well and there. I believe I don't WanNa you can hopefully crack me. But in the Congo there was sort of this recognition of all the human rights abuses. That were happening because of the mining and there were all these. It was like essentially blood diamonds but happening with with cobalt for like Lithium Ion batteries. Which are the batteries that we all have our phones and but also an electric cars and kind of all of our devices. Yeah are you know. But I don't know it's not perfect but the tech industry did sort of move to try to really clean up all those the smelters and the mining operations and to ensure at least things were i. Guess Investigations found that some cobalt from certain minds or mining companies. That use child. Labor was getting into like apple supply chain and they've now cleaned that up but that was kind of the the biggest piece of it. But you know I mean. That's one of the things that I think. Obviously moving to electrification and transportation is really important for lots of reasons mainly for green reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But we don't often talk about what the cost of that is and the cost of that is more if we're not. Recycling is more cobalt mining and lithium mining and graphite mining. All of which happened in other parts of the world with often little or no environmental standards. I know it's overwhelming. I think I'm sure many of you guys will agree. But everything has an impact and everything has a price and everything has a cost. And there's a ripple effect whether it's our words or what we're buying and it's incredibly intense that think about unraveling it to the point where you know and I think as women we liked we tend to be overly responsible and so it becomes overwhelming. Where do you think that people should start? Well you know I. It is really overwhelming. And you know as somebody who reads about climate change all day every day it is really really overwhelming and depressing and things like that. The conversation that we're having about like these materials are mind but we need them for electrification which is essential to fighting climate. Change like those trade offs are really important and important to discuss and it shouldn't be on us to figure out how that happens and that's really the kind of point that I'm trying to make is that this requires like different like a different system or different structures to how these industries work. But I think for me you know before I started writing about climate change the environment. I never wanted to read about it because it just made me feel so anxious and like it was so this problem was so big and so inevitable and what could I possibly do about it. But I found that actually through my reporting and writing this book and by learning more than I've felt less anxious and that's not because the problem became less serious or less scary but that I felt like a much more informed and responsible citizen because I could evaluate when what like what the green new deal actually means or when. Somebody's putting forward a climate policy. Like is that what actually needs to happen. And and the same thing is true for companies like are they greenwashing or is that legitimate or is that just the beginning and I think you know for all of us. I hope we really do need to educate ourselves because this is not the kind of these kinds of changes. Don't just happen. You know. We have to make them happen and that it's really hard if not impossible to solve a problem if you don't understand what the problem is on so I think you know. Learning more is really the place to start. And then you know asking some of these questions that we're talking about of the companies or the where you guys are buying things or who you're buying them from and politicians you're voting for kind of getting engaged at the local level because especially right given that in Washington things are moving if not nowhere in the wrong direction. There is a lot of change that's happening at the city level and state level. And that's those are really important places for all of us to be involved because I think we often think like whatever happens in the state legislature like. That doesn't have a lot to do with me. But that has more to do with you than a lot of federal law and it also has more to do with climate change. And then you think whether it's where your electricity is coming from or what. The city is doing to plan for mass transit and all these different things in local water supplies and toxic bloom right right and I love your book too because I feel like there are so many Jews. Even within the food food chapter there were so many surprises like essentially this idea that we should eat local and of course that's great support your local farmers. Ncsa's but at the same time that there's been a little bit too much emphasis put on that late of climate change that the doesn't contribute that much to ship food right. Yeah it's a baseball complicated. So basically I felt like I wanted to. I had heard a lot about like eating locally in how we were all supposed to do that. And I should feel bad for not doing it all the time but so I wanted to find out if that was actually really true in terms of its climate benefits and basically what I found out was. Farming is so incredibly energy intensive from things like fertilizer production and pesticide production and the energy required to harvest. Something that transportation is actually a really really small part of that. So eating locally in terms of a carbon emissions or greenhouse gas emissions doesn't really do that much like you have to be really really good at eating locally to make as much of a difference as shifting from red meat to vegetables like one day a week but to say that kind of ignores all the rest of the problems which is that. Somehow it's become cheaper and more efficient to grow food in South America and ship it to New York and the the fact that we've all come to expect that we can eat berries in the winter and whatever we want at what particular time and so eating. Local has a lot of benefits apart from that. Which are you're supporting a person for the most part? Who is most likely Whether or not they're certified organic is probably putting in place. Sustainable are progressive practices. Because it's what makes sense for them and you know over the long term like it's cheaper to have better soil health and better water quality and so that's what they'll do. It's really hard to evaluate. You know people always ask me like well. What better like eating local or eating organic. And how much time do you have so really it? Just you know there's so many trade offs in there so many misaligned incentives in all these different areas and so it is really hard to give a straight answer. And that's again why I think it's not fair to put all that pressure on the consumer to make a sustainable choice because like I know that because I wrote this book but if you're just going to the grocery store like you don't have that information and so that's why these systems need to be changed such that were not. We don't have such a chemically and fertilizer intensive agricultural process. That means that it's uses less energy to ship food from New Zealander wherever and do you think that that needs to come from a carbon tax? Is that an ideal scenario and do you think? I want to believe I read. I don't know if you guys have read David. Wallace Wells' book as well. But if you don't want to sleep you read his book terrifying. But he makes the argument that ultimately we and again the more impoverished parts of our world are the ones who are getting destroyed first by climate change which is another great injustice. But that I live in La and your family was evacuated during the fires. I was evacuated and it's expensive right. Like at a certain point we will not be able to sustain all of these environmental disasters which are coming with greater and greater frequency. So do you think that that will force government to act or or is it going to be a carbon tax sort of created by businesses? It's potentially passed on to us but allows us to make good choices cloth diapers or not cloth diaper like those are the plaguing you know. I think that a carbon tax is probably where the starts on the policy level and it would kind of make the incentives align more because it would produce a lot of carbon emissions to ship something from China to the. Us You would do that less because it wouldn't be cost effective anymore and things like that but there are a lot of things that doesn't address people often talk about like. Oh transforming the electricity grid or electrifying transportation and will all be so expensive. We can't afford that but the cost of climate change will be much much more because we'll have to pay for all the disasters as you're talking about but also we'll have to pay to rebuild and it's much harder to do those things you know when the disasters have already happened. Rather than to kind of plan to mitigate against some of the things that will face. But I think it's really important as you mentioned that around the world. Those who are at least responsible for creating this problem are those who will be the most affected and disproportionately. That's women all over the world but it's particularly poor black Brown and indigenous women in the Global South and those are the people who have already been living with this problem for decades. But it's also those people who people often ask me like well. What's the point if we can't you know like if it's that bad? Why should we do anything? Or what can we even do? And why bother and we should bother because of them because this is already killing and hurting people all over the world and I think you know fundamentally what is motivating for me to keep writing about. This topic is that climate change is a justice issue fundamentally you know it arises out of inequality and it exacerbates inequality wherever it is. And I think that's kind of true in terms of the effects of climate change but also in the things that that created so basically we still get about a quarter of `electricity in the US from coal and burning coal for electric produces coal ash. Which is kind of like that contains lead mercury arsenic cadmium selenium kind of all kinds of heavy metals that are toxic to human health and we mostly store next to power plants. Often like in. Rivers are dammed sections of Rivers Lakes. Where can leak into the sounds like a great idea where it can save into the groundwater or stored in landfills it can kind of blow away and it causes all kinds of health problems cancer and lung disease and all these sorts of things and in two thousand eight? There was a damn kind of holding back this toxic slurry collapse in Tennessee. Release billions of billions of gallons of the stuff into a river buried three hundred acres of land the waste to clean it up was carted away to a landfill outside a predominantly black community in Alabama. The workers you cleaned it up weren't given any protective equipment and dozens of people died. Two hundred people were made sick and they recently won a lawsuit against the contractor. So it's one of the worst environmental disasters in American history. It happened in two thousand eight. I never heard about it. I never heard of it before. I became a climate and environment reporter. I never heard of coal ash at all. And that's part of the problem because it's really a luxury to not have to know what that is and there are millions of Americans who live with every day who are disproportionately communities of color low income communities living in rural areas. And you know if I'm using electricity in a particular way that can burns more coal. Those are the people who are going to suffer from that and so I think a society that allows people to be disproportionately affected by something like that because of their race or their income or where they live is a that is less free and less just for all of us and so preventing burning. Fossil fuels means that people don't have to live with that kind of pollution and we often talk about climate change as if it's a big loss in sacrifice and it is those things but it also has an enormous opportunity to kind of fix a lot of these systems that have perpetuated injustice in our societies and those changes come from coal not being burned but also the government regulating the disposal of that particular material and getting rid of the federal regulations on coal ash. Which only went into effect the first ones ever in two thousand fifteen was the first thing that the current EPA administrator did when he got into office so these regulations and and kind of what the EPA does really does matter to all of us. So I think that's for me. What makes me WANNA keep writing about this and keep them make sure that people understand? Yeah no it's a major social justice issue and it was you know being in this recent evacuation in Los Angeles in the fires. Were right above our house and FDA was amazing and saved a lot of homes and nobody died and a lot of people reach out after. And we're like I'm so sorry and I was like you know what like don't I'm fine like I'm good. I'm in a five star hotel with my kids on the beach watching this incredible reaction to no one died two miracle but this is like affluent Los Angeles right like this is not the response and Syria. This is not the response for all of the people who are already climate refugees. They're not refugee ing at the Beverly Hills Hotel. He's not where I was but I think it's incumbent on all of us who you know. Have all of this the privilege to go to those places to make sure that we're not just drowning. Literally of these people right. One just goes to show that no matter who you are. This problem is going to affect everybody. But you know how we make plans for those things and make sure that people who don't have money can also be protected you know that's really important and policy is kind of we think about it in an abstract way but policy is kind of how we determine who has power and who doesn't and so we need to have policies that think about everybody and don't just think about the people who can already afford to protect themselves. Yeah we'll get back to Tatiana and just a second Women and moms especially you can probably relate but lately I am spending less and less time shopping for clothing stores. I'd rather do it online or not at all. But every now. And then it's really nice to freshen up your wardrobe especially when it doesn't require you to spend all day shopping mall. Lotto is a fashion rental service. That makes it easy and convenient to freshen up your wardrobe regularly for a flat monthly fee. Their mission is to make bashing accessible to every woman every day. 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This may make me unpopular but learning about the effects of Kashmir really surprising to him So can I and chief Kashmir sheep Kashmir has led to the you can go for it Okay Stat. Ready so cheap. Cashmere has meant that. There's a huge growth in consumer demand which has led to along with a few other things the explosion of the goat population in Mongolia and parts of China so like nine hundred ninety there around six million goats and it actually is very difficult to get a precise estimate of the population in Mongolia. But I tried and in two thousand and four there were around twenty four million goats so it's really grown enormously and there it's now represents like sixty percent of the livestock there so the goats when the it's very kind of fragile ecosystem this high mountain prairie and when they graze the grass they pull it up by the roots so it kind of destroys the whole plant which destabilizes the soil and then they have these really sharp of that like no matter what source you're reading are described as Stiletto. But they still they break up the soil even further and then it kind of it can blow across the plains and add to this already naturally-occurring process of desertification so expanding the desert and in addition to that climate change is happening in Mongolia in this part of China at a faster rate than much of the rest of the world so the average surface temperature of the earth has warmed by about one degree Fahrenheit in Mongolia. It's four degrees Fahrenheit. So it's getting much hotter and drier and that is adding to this process of desertification so you get basically an additional fifteen hundred square miles of desert every year. So that's like the Gobi. Sorry that's like adding Rhode Island to the Gobi desert every year. There's that and then that dust blows across the country to cities on the coast like Beijing. Where it combines with soot from coal fired power plants and factories and adds the air pollution in Beijing and then in another five days it comes to California so about forty percent of the air pollution in California can be attributed to dust from Chinese factories and so learning. All of that was really incredible. Because I had would never have thought that those things would be connected and also thinking I think we think of our close is kind of belonging to us and not part of these big global systems. Which is shouldn't it's surprising. But it shouldn't be you know when we think about where stuff is made and what it's made from but yeah so learning. That was kind of incredible and I think it's really when we talk about kind of international climate policy. There's a lot of hand wringing about how will we stay under two degrees Celsius of China's doing x? But we're buying a lot of the things that China's making that results in these emissions. So I think it's really important for us to acknowledge our role in these global systems. And there's no way that we're staying. It's were like blasting past three rate at this rate. Well the biggest variable in climate modeling is what we decide to do about it. So we're like we're not yet at one point five and there is a certain amount of warming that is kind of baked into the system. Just by how M- how much carbon dioxide and other gases are in that but I think there are things that could accelerate warming there things that can slow it down so it really depends what we decided to do. But yeah business as usual isn't is not below to we have to make significant changes like net zero by two thousand fifty right. What are you most excited about? Like vacuuming carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere with machine. Don't exist or carbon farms or in general. I think I am not what we in. The climate community call a techno optimist. So basically like. I don't think that technology is going to solve this problem and I also don't think we have time to wait. I mean maybe it will but we need to do a lot in the meantime and there is a lot that we can. Do you know whether it's getting rid of fossil fuel subsidies so that fossil fuels competitive and therefore we can expand renewables you know installing more offshore wind which is a huge opportunity not deforesting Alaska which the trump administration wants to do not drilling for oil and gas and public land's all there are lots of solutions that already exist you know like in the US sixty seven percent of our crop calories. Don't feed people if animals so fixing that so there are really a lot of ways around this that that solutions that are already available and so I hope that maybe there's a technology someday that sucks all the carbon dioxide atmosphere. But we don't have time to wait for that right in the context of food and eating much lower on the food chain. Which touchy on us. Not Convincing you to do vaulter Longo. It's the lawn Jevon Diet guys. What as what. Can we do besides buying things in a more conscientious way to just do what we can? Yeah in terms of food or everything everything okay. In general what I try to do is like consume less. You know? Mostly I don't need what I want and I find it actually very satisfying to shop online without actually buying anything and just imagine what my life would be like that. But yeah you know I the the way to have this diet. With the smallest carbon footprint is eat mostly plants and then also farmed shellfish. So there's that but yeah I think in general to consume less to to really think about what you need. If you I mean buying secondhand are renting. Close the in terms of fashion. That's really good eating less meat eating less dairy all these things are really great but really I think difficult flying less. Sorry UNITED BUYING CARBON OFFSET. All these things are really important but I think that those things you know. I try to do a lot of those things because I want to be the kind of person who acts on new information as I acquire it and lives in line with my values but not because I think that's how we solve this problem but I do think I hope that if we understand why we're making some of these sacrifices and maybe it will make us more willing to make them. Yeah you touched on anxiety and I guess feeling less anxious which seemed like a miracle to me but are you. Are you optimistic? Are you terrified? Like do you think that mother Earth flicks off like a like an aunt. I mean she sending us some powerful signals that that's she's getting ready I. I don't know that I'm hopeful or optimistic but I. I believe that these kinds of changes are possible. I don't think I could do what I do if I didn't but also I think I'm incredibly inspired by the youth climate strike and the suits against the lawsuits against the government. And what's happening all over the world but I'm also really inspired because we've done this before we wouldn't have the Clean Air Act and the clean water act and a lot of the environmental really strong environmental laws that we do have it hadn't been for the grassroots action that led to the first Earth Day and the nineteen seventy midterm elections which changed the makeup of Congress. And you know a direct result of that is the laws and so. I think the fact that this is possible. Twenty million Americans came out for the first Earth Day so at the time. That's like I mean there were two hundred million American. So that's like ten percent of the population which is really incredible. So like we all have that power and so the realizing that and kind of acknowledging that that those things have happened before and that therefore they can happen again. That's what makes me feel hopeful and able to continue writing about all the other terrible things that are happening in the rest of the time. What do you of the new green deal like? How would you change it and then not to put you on the spot but who? Which are there candidates who you think are really like have faith that they will do something about this the problem with anything we will not be able to get a lot done if we have? Republican Congress and Senate even if we have a Democratic president? So that's why voting at all levels particularly the federal level in the next election is really important. You know I think the green new deal. There hasn't been a ton of concrete policy items associated with it so I think it's been amazing in terms of raising awareness and changing the conversation around what is possible and what kinds of radical action we do need and I think the fact that they're getting people to understand. Climate change is systemic and structural issue as opposed to like something we can isolate as being just climate. Change is really important and really significant. Anything would be better than now truly anything so you know and I'm you know. I think there was a lot of people. Were really upset that there was not climate. Change question at the most recent debate which is right for people to be upset about that but like every question is climate change question and I feel like that's really how we need to be thinking about this topic and it really matters. I will miss quote this but essentially Al Gore who I know Blurbs Your Book David while smalls was saying that if he had won and maybe he did but if he had become president and enacted sort of his plan we would be at like half a degree. They would have been a dramatic. Lot of this has happened just in the past few decades so it really matters dramatically. I think for our kids and our grandchildren and I think we sort of all thought. Maybe this'll be our kids grandkids problem and it's becoming at least. It feels apparent to me that this is no problem right like this is going. Yeah fact us. Yeah I think we often. It's like we hear like twenty fifty or twenty one hundred and then we're like okay. That's when it happens but it happens a lot before then too and it's happening. I mean this weather with becoming weather is like a normal events Constantly and it's only going to happen with frequency because we're we're not that far along what's what's to come. Yeah more frequency in more intensity also so the loss of look forward to yea. Thanks for listening. To my conversation with Tatiana Schlossberg for more anti Tsiana had to talk TSIANA SCHLOSSBERG DOT com. That's S. C. H. L. O. S. V. E. R. G. And then say that eighteen times fast and make sure to get a copy of her book inconspicuous consumption. That's it for today's episode. If you have a chance please. Rate and review hit subscribe to keep up with new episodes. Pass it along to a friend. Thanks again for joining. I hope you'll come back for more. And in the meantime you can check out group. Dot Com slash the podcast.

Tatiana Schlossberg Banana Republic China Tatyana US California Los Angeles Yoga New York Times Laos Levi paltrow Goupil Congo
The IQ Debate

The goop Podcast

49:00 min | 1 year ago

The IQ Debate

"Hi I'm Elise Linen Co host with Gwyneth of the podcast. Today's guest is Harriet Washington. She is the final guests in our special series called women on top which is all made possible by our friends. Banana Republic The most interesting businesses are borne out of curiosity. This is the space. Gwyneth was in when she started goop. It's also the space from which Banana Republic was founded back in nineteen seventy eight by to California creatives with adventurous spirits Laos fall. We partnered with a team at Banana. Republic to celebrate curiosity by talking with women who are redefining. What it means to be powerful and brave and we're very excited to be back for a second series. I hope you love listening to these conversations as much as I love having them and I know you'll be deeply inspired by these women so please keep listening and keep shopping with our friends at Banana. Republic to see our favorites from their spring collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop. 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Dramatically affects our ability to have good health. Today we talk about the reasons. I Q is a problematic construct because it's held up as being hereditary by some scientists who are as we will learn deeply flawed in their thinking. I Q scores feed the stereotypes that white people and Asians are more intelligent and have more potential than people of Color. This feeds loop of misinformation. Is Harriet explains all of the factors. Sometimes as resoundingly simple as lead exposure the contribute to how minds function and how many of these factors overwhelmingly effect communities of color communities of color across the country are exposed to an abundance of harmful chemicals and other pathogens these pathogens can cause infectious diseases. That may cause intellectual disabilities and worse. Washington believes that until we fix the systemic issues. We are handicapping people of color and even more importantly they're very vulnerable. Children were tweeting for the wrong things very often because we're not making that connection between the early poisoning and later behavior later deficits all at Harriet Washington. Take it from here. So thank you for being here. It's my pleasure. Believe me and thank you for writing your book which I thought was needed fascinating and startling though. I'm sure it's none of it's startling to you. Unfortunately not but I agree that it's under the radar. Unfortunately so I think it's really important to draw attention to not only physical but also the mental consequences of Rampant environmental poisoning. Yeah so let's talk about hereditary and his And let's talk about the whole concept of Iq. 'cause I know that that's what the book hinges on get. It's also sort of a dumb way of assessing someone's intelligence so do you WanNa take us through the creation of the IQ tests and then sort of how it's been perverted. But it's also these gaps that are perceived to be hereditary are not right you know the free success has the thousand fathers and failures orphan It applies to Iq because he'll find several people who claim to have originated it but it essentially began when hominids psychologists was trying to look at children who are not performing well in school now. That's critical because he intent of what eventually became I Q was developed. A tool for people who they knew had intellectual deficits. I just didn't understand what they were so he worked on this test. An alternate lately after a lot of difficulty came up with the scale. That was you know. You've somewhat successful in predictive but not terribly useful however one of the important things that he repeatedly said that this was a tool to be used for people who were having difficulty with cognitive tasks. It wasn't a tool for the masses for everyone and he was actually expressed fears that it might eventually be used to stratified people and label them as having lower or higher intelligence and of course. It's exactly how it's used today. So it was a flawed concept from the beginning. And what's really troubling to me about. It now is that it's used in a manner. The definition of IQ is something that is simply not supported by What is able to gauge? So we have people including scientists who assume that IQ tells us something about are unchangeable intellectual capacity something about our intellectual capacity that is associated with the SIM will never change cannot be easily lowered or lifted up and something that is going to be. Predictive Hereditary ins take this illogical step farther by without any credible scientific support claiming that differences that are measured in. Iq's translate to differences in cognitive abilities. So they will say that someone who has lower IQ is necessarily someone who has a lower capacity for learning the also say that this is something that's inherited they also claim it's something that stratified by race they quite you know without new ones. They will quite clearly say while nature has color-coded races of People. So we will know who's got a high cognitive ability and who's got low cognitive ability and guess what surprise surprise it's Europeans like themselves. Who have the highest ability except for when they designate Asian some Asian groups as having ability and people of Color with the lowest? If you look at Africa for example a book I Richard Lynn. He claimed to assess the IQ of most countries on earth and every country in Africa saved two. Has I q measurements below seventy and I came measuring low seventy. Don't someone who's mentally retarded so their sense saying all of Africa's mentally retarded and so this claim that it's something that people of color will pass onto their children. Something that can be changed is ready. -Tarian view that's just not supported by the facts. But one of the things I always want people to understand is one has to be wary because these are indeed scientists and we accept their authority as scientists but they are also united by their belief in Eugenics most of these people if not all of them are funded directly by the pioneer fund a self proclaimed eugenic organization. They also all have very strong political agendas. We're not talking about pure science that they have formulated based on data. We're talking about people with very strong ideology or point routing ideas about I q that fit neatly within that ideology so for example when William Shockley in the sixties proclaimed African Americans as inherently debased intellectually with low. Iq's he also had a very important bill he got brought before local Senate's in which he was asking. That all women of color be sterilized nor to prevent you know dragging down the gene pool. Something that would have been quite at home in Germany under National Socialism. You know it's a very clear eugenic racist idea. And so we have to look at these people as who they are scientists. But who have very strong political ideologies and who are funded by Gupta funds eugenics. We had Richard Rich wine at Harvard. Who Not that long ago. I believe two thousand nine wrote his doctoral thesis on the inherent intellectual degradation of Hispanic Americans and went one further by saying that all Hispanic people were they were Americans. Or Hail from countries that they all tended toward criminality and refuse to assimilate and after he earned his PhD. His First Act was to write a report for the government in which he was making a case for stemming all Hispanic immigration to the US so again what people tend to view people tend to view because they've been presented as a gauge of unhealthy intellectual ability that is promoted by scientists. Yes actually politically motivated theory. That is not supported while by the science at all and is simply. Something not accurate. Iq can tell us some things. But it can't tell you your capacity to learn for life simply not what it does. It is good for some crude measurements of deficiency. But not in terms of not predictive. And Not Something. That actually can be comparative. And that's another problem we have here. You know they are trying to compare. Iq'S Q of different groups of people. But that's nonsensical and you can't compare the accused of people who have wildly different intellectual backgrounds experiences and opportunities spleen not possible and you certainly can't compare the Iq of people who've lived entire lives with staggering assaults from environmental poisons and people who have not. Yeah and I WANNA talk. Obviously that's the primarily what we're going to talk about but I just wanted to since you mentioned William Shockley. He's a noblest but for the transistor fact which has absolutely nothing to do with the intelligence various groups of people. So I think often scientists can get completely of their lane. They call it the Nobel curse the non-users and then use their spouses completely. Crackpot theory that has nothing to do with your specialty. Yeah it happens surprisingly often and then you also called out Nicholas Wade. Who was the former time science editor? He wrote a book called troublesome inheritance gene race in human history so establishing this idea that IQ is flawed. And obviously you know if you live in Kenya like the way that you learn. The whole contract of your experience is completely different than if you live in Kentucky. They're not exactly comparable so even assuming that it's flawed you also throughout the book talk about the ways as you just said that you can affected proving that it's also not genetic right so I was staggered the iodine deficiency in the twenty s. And the fifteen point leap. An I q that happened. Throughout throughout the world right throughout the country was now when you argue with hereditary in which is always an interesting experience. I found that if they're back into the walls what they will pull out very frequently is but we have measured a different than I. Q in this country. That shows a fifteen point fishing. An African Americans they have Ikea's at on average are fifteen points lower than those of whites. How do you explain that one can explain that very easily because in nineteen twenty four reclosed a fifteen point gap in Iq and we did it by adding potassium iodide to salt? Now we didn't set out to close the IQ gap. Actually doctors. Were trying to get rid of goitres. Goitres release unsightly lumped in the neck that were known to be a result of deficiency in thyroid. So they thought by giving the people who had thyroid problems it would cure the problem and the disappear and they were right. That happened it by the way. It was extremely cheap. It cost like one or two dollars per tonne. You Know Dan. I salt so twenty five years later when they're doing mass scale IQ testing of military recruits. They discover that men from these low IQ areas of the country. Like parts of Michigan where people had fifteen points lower IQ and miss the country. Suddenly the Capri disappeared. There accused were like everybody else. The gap had been closed by adding to salt. Because they didn't know it we now know that I deficiency is the largest cause of mental retardation in the world unfortunately it still largest causes mental retardation in the world. Because we know this. We haven't actually used that knowledge in other countries and had closed the gap. But the important thing is it should have alerted us to the fact that environmental experiences can be definitive when it comes to Q. Those low IQ men had low IQ's because they didn't have enough I died and I died isn't necessarily component ally Roxanne which helps direct brain formation. Their brains rent bring form properly because they lacked iodide so knowing that it makes sense to look at environmental causes when you see a difference in cume so take us through so they're called punchline communities and essentially the the idea is that communities of color reservations throughout this country are the preferred spot for industrial sites toxic dumping lead pipes that like many things in this country. There's mass inequity in these communities and there are consequences as you're arguing in the book. So is it worth to. We start with love and sats so well no I think. Let us most familiar to me. Yeah we'll right right and it's you know it's pervasive it's everywhere unfortunately and you know some are indeed fence line communities but there are lots of other points of entry of you know toxin toxicants like lead so if we're talking about lead it's staggering poison in the nineteen eighties. When I ran a poison control center we used to worry about children who had twenty twenty five micrograms per deciliter and now and so we worried about them. We had them brought to the hospital. Tried to save their lives and that was a focus on saving their lives. We didn't know enough or perhaps enriching department. We didn't luxury we weren't necessarily worrying how it was going to affect them later in life I mean we didn't know everything but we knew that lead had some effects but indeed it did affect them later in life and now of course we don't worry about kids with twenty five now worrying about kids who with any complement of let because now we what we know down didn't know then was any exposure can be devastating so lead is also cumulative so a kid who has exposed even low exposure early in life it builds over the course of their life. It's not something that's GonNa stop and These exposures are really devastating. Even if they're low in fact cumulative look over the whole country there's no more damage to children from low exposures in high exposures. More kids are suffering from low exposures but no matter what degree of exposure were looking at children who are children of color. There are a lot of reasons for that a lot. It basically boils down to the fact that people of Color in this country have not only been treated differently. They've long been segregated from other people and you have people who are segregated or forced to stay in certain areas than there once. We're GONNA suffer the assault of those areas so certainly during enslavement enduring segregation. It's very clear you had people who simply could not leave certain areas so when you had lead pipes in those areas when there's lead paint put on the walls there when there's lead dust everywhere and a certain point whites could flee to the suburbs to housing that had never seen lead paint that had no lead pipes. It didn't have exposure but blacks were not allowed to creation was officially over de facto segregation. But we had new forms segregate redlining for mortgages things that kept black people out of the cleaner communities. That weren't poisoned. And they're trapped there and there's trapped there now. It's really important to understand that. Although very often the discussion centers around poverty poverty isn't it? A risk factor but race in this country is a much stronger. Risk factor because poor people for example Good illustration is that if you look at who suffers the most in reynolds exiting most poisoning whites who have an income of ten thousand dollars. A year profoundly. Poor people saying APPALACHIA. They haven't exposure to accessing but African Americans who earn fifty to sixty thousand dollars have a greater exposure much greater exposure so although poverty is a risk factor racism. Much stronger one. And when you have people who are trapped in these areas it's very damaging because if you look at lead poisoning as a whole the truth is that lead poisoning and children's country has improved. There's less lead poisoning more. Kids are not completely free if it but don't have the levels of lead poisoning that caused us to have serious worries about their future cognitive effects. But if you look in African American children you see the opposite. You see spikes you've seen very high exposures and so race is a really malignant factor in this country because it stands for so many other things stands for physical segregation in stands for limitation on one's asocial aspirations no matter how much money when hats one camp by a homeless in suburbs when the suburbs have ways of barring you from housing. I remember when we came back from Germany to the US in the early sixties. My father's first move was he wanted to buy a house. He tried for three years to buy a house in suburbs. Couldn't do and I actually saw some of the mortgage applications were interesting at the top of many of them. They actually had the percentage of white in that community. Wow yes it was a selling point for people and it was always in the high nineties if not if not one hundred percent was always like ninety seven ninety nine one hundred percent this the selling point and so there are also clauses in some of the leases saying. You had to promise that you wouldn't sublet to African Americans. You had to promise it. You would not have African Americans in the House that you own for prolonged period of time so the very strong sentiment against allowing people of Color in the in the cleaner communities without toxic nicely. Dang it yeah stronger sentiment. Yeah wow I mean yeah. It's so messed up and I know kids. I thought this was really helpful. 'cause were you talking about sort of critical windows vulnerability for both prenatal development and also for children. Just how why? It's why something like lead which is great for adult obviously but doesn't have the same facs. Can you sort of just cookley walk through white kids in particular or so won't share? That's very very important. Point and doesn't only pertain to lead it pertains to most Hopkins. So what happens is that children are vulnerable because for one thing they have a greater surface skin area compared to their size so for talking about something that can enter through. The skin as lead does not only. Can you breathe in? But it'll lead dust on your skin can actually cause problems in most other toxicants so when you vote largest surface area. You're going to have more you know. Compared to your body area same's true for lungs. Their lungs are larger relative to their body area. So they're going to breathe in more in the affected by more relative to their body area so their body load is going to be much much larger than adult in the same environment. There's also their metabolism especially perinatal like children who have been just born for the first year or so of life. A child spends about eighty seven percent of this metabolic energy building brain. You know we see kids sleeping all the time. But they're actually not just resting. They're harder work building that brain. It's a very complex energy expensive task and it can't do that and ward off the effects of toxicity at the same time. It can't do that and warrant off pathogen infection at the same time so kids who are exposed to lead exposed the fates or who might even be sick you know. I'm getting an infection. They are not going to be able to build a brain properly and improper brain. Building is devastating. There's a phrase. The dose makes the poison which is true. It's also true that the timing makes the poison so when a child is building a structure in the brain. It happened at a particular time if you the child is actually half having to deal with influx of lead or pathogens or daylights at the same time and it can't do both that structure may not be made. Those neurons may not migrate on time. So you end up with the brain is improperly formed and this can be extremely devastating. And what's really insidious about his. It's not always immediately apparent. You know a lot of the harms done to children are not apparent for very long time so if a child is at one years old is not able to build a proper Magdala or limbic system. We start seeing profound behavior problems when they're thirteen and fourteen right. No one tends to connect the two things so very often. They don't say oh. That child was lead poison in Utero or at two years old and that's why they would even know we'll say that child has conduct disorder. That child has psychosis retreating for the wrong things very often. Because we're not making that connection between the early poisoning and later behavior later deficits children are not making their developmental milestones. You know because of something that happened to them before they were a year old and it's not always being picked up on in fact I'd venture to say having talked to a lot of pre neurologists. It's typically not being picked up on and when I say these things happen at certain times I mean it's very precise so in the organs begin. Thank forming from days. Twenty one fifty six the neural plate forms around day eighteen so if they are assaulted by let. I'm one of those days it can be terrible. The brain can become distorted if it happens in next week or the week before the child could be perfectly. Okay Yeah but this vulnerability is really important and unfortunately it tends not to be part of the calculation because I have an. I'm sure you've seen at too. We often hear scientists especially industry scientists. Not only them say things like well true. There's an exposure here but it's so low it's too low to do any damage. It's a quivalent of drop of water in eighteen bathroom full. That can't harm anyone. Oh yes it can. It can harm child. Nutro can hire young one year old so we need to start being more vigilant and paying attention to these early exposures. They don't have to be large. They can infant asmal but they can still completely devastated child's brain. Yeah I mean it just goes again and we talk about this a lot on the podcast to the whole causation. Correlation argument and with tens hundreds of thousands of unregulated chemicals in our in our water lead etc. Like we'll never be able to say although with lead it's probably quite clear this 'cause this therefore no one's taking responsibility for cleaning up the mess and in terms of long term impacts. I was staggered. Fact check me but is it that black men have one hundred percent higher risk of Alzheimer's disease. A hundred percent seems high. I think in some limited populations that can be that high tweet. That's basically twice as much and yeah. That's not unusual. Yeah that's true okay. That's true I need to issue the caveat. It's not true for every single population of African Americans but it is true. They have double the risk. So it's a very serious serious risk staggering and if you look at Alzheimer's Alzheimer's. The interesting thing is at this cognitive decline in adulthood and late adulthood. Alzheimer's is sometimes a diagnosis of exclusion. And we have to think about the fact that we're talking about people who first of all have very often have a genetic of owner ability. We often hear the argument posed as genetics versus environment. But that's not. That's a false dichotomy because the two are intertwined down. Some environmental insults are more harmful or may only harm people who have genetic vulnerability and some environmental insult caused. Genetic problems can cause distortion in genetic makeup for example diethylene Straw Das. Probably the best known and you can re disruptor it can cause genetic changes in the people who are affected causing them have children who are now very vulnerable or have these defects. Because so it's very closely intertwined. It's not an either or thing. But yes the vulnerability is real. And it's much worse retold and it's important to understand that in this when you're talking about 'cause versus correlation I think there's a very basic over-simplification that happens here. People are left with the impression that well if you can show that the correlation and not a 'cause then you don't really have you haven't shown there's a problem that's absolutely not true the strength of the correlations important when you have many studies pointing to the same culprit is causing a problem. That's important to one of the difficulties. In proof is that we're using very often outmoded ways of proof and we also are listening to arguments about poof people who financial stake in the outcome so when you have industry scientists saying that well. You're saying that these failures are causing problems in the children but our studies prove the hundred percent. Certainly it's true. Are they saying anything meaningful? Do we need one hundred percent certainty. Should that be the gold standard and also proof is not just a scientific stance? It's also an economic stands because if a company can prove but company can cast doubt on proof they can evade responsibility. They can you know not have to pay for it or clean up so the more doubt that they can they could spell you know more doubt they can sprinkle around around a seemingly clear correlation the better off they are that's economically useful for them. In fact a really interesting book entitled. Doubt is their product out right. You know I just interview David Michaels. Last week and DC and then his new book triumph flipped out all about pro. He calls IT product Defense Science. He doesn't really like kind of it's not really science. It's a re-cut of existing data to prove whatever they need to prove to create yeah to create enough confusion that people think that their product is actually fine exactly And clearly communities of color are the ones you pay the biggest price. We'll get back to Harry at Washington and just a second You've probably heard me mentioned that. Curiosity is my favorite state of being. I try to carry that attitude with me every day and it certainly easier to do that. Place like goop the places. Such a premium value on being curious and feeling empower to explore and ask questions. Banana Republic is another company that values curiosity their founding story starts with a California couple who were looking for an adventure. 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Will you know hazard or make a diagnosis? But what does that diagnosis? I think what's changing is at seeing the symptoms. They are expanding the the differential tree of that diagnosis to understand that it could be a psychiatric disorder you're describing or it could be the result of this early poisoning experience. So that's what's happening here. We're seeing thankfully and expansion of the of the medical gays. So you're not simply trying to figure out which diagnosis label applies these children but what actually caused it. I think probably the most for me. The most surprising aspect of that was looking at alcohol. Orders you know I think we're We do read and hear a great deal about alcohol. Orders in children of Alcoholics Alcoholic Women and also in native American populations been characterized really well and when in prenatal screening physicians know with these groups of Women Alcoholics and native American. They notice green them. You know for alcohol abuse and try to protect the unborn child by making sure. They're not exposed to that but unfortunately they don't do that was wider populations and there's a lot of evidence of a mess by a doctor named Carl Bell up pediatric psychologists in Chicago when fortunately passed away last year. He looked at large populations of children who interacted with the justice system because when they came in juveniles they had diagnoses. You know behavioral diagnoses and he looked at their histories and found that most of them had mothers who drank socially while pregnant. So what's interesting? Is that the perception that alcoholic women are have. Children who are vulnerable is of course correct but so do young women who don't know they're pregnant until maybe two months out and who've been drinking socially you don't have to be an alcoholic for your kid to be at risk if you're a social drinker. Your child's been injured by the alcohol. You taken just as easily as an alcoholics child and that is indeed. What's been happening? But it's been under the radar. Yeah no it's so interesting. To like US sites they in two thousand seven amherst economics. Professor Jessica will raise released her analysis showing that the reduction in gasoline lead was responsible for most of the decline in the US violent crime during the nineteen nineties. Right now. That's interesting because looking at crime. That's something a bit different and very recently very recently Paul's research and that of Kevin Drumm who found some of the same things has been called into question. People are questioning this now. We don't know who's right science. Frankly doesn't work that way. You know it'll be a while until we can sort it all out but I think when we look at the people who are questioning their data the big big question I have is. What are they doing? Are they looking at it? And finding there isn't a correlation after all or they're looking at it and deciding. The correlation does not rice loved proof. Right if it's the latter. I find that a lot less concerning the reasons I suggested early on. It doesn't have to rise to level of proof you know yeah We're not talking about an either or it could be a factor and also it's like kind of a such a silly debate right. It's like take the lead out of paint. Lick take the lead. I mean it's I know gasoline's unleaded now. But like let's Redo all of our infrastructure as the COMP- country and get rid of lead pipes create some jobs so these are also in some ways silly debates. I think so because they make more sense. If you're trying to defend lead yeah then if you're generally concerned about the health of children because let's say worst case scenario you know four wilpon and drum. Let's say it turns out they're wrong and lend actually not a driving factor in the murder rate. Okay let is a driving factor in cognitive damage. You know in physical health in a wide spectrum disorders. There's no question about whether we want to remove letter. Not Yeah you know. But for the lead industry it might help them to evade responsibility. And that's also that I also am interested in the fact that although I think it's important I don't deny that but I find it interesting. That a lot of Their work has been invested in looking at crying. Because we have to be really careful about blaming the victim here You know lead. I think lead probably is associated with crime because of the effect it has on behavior also the effect it has on curtailing people's lives if you can't get a job if you can't hold a job you can't get an education. You may likely be more likely turn to crime. But I I'm more concerned about the effect on people's lives on that you know. I'd love to see this intensive research not crying but on on people's mental health when they reach adulthood on diagnosis that we make on basically curtailing the damage. Those are the things that I'm really more interested in than looking at crime rates. Yeah so clearly beyond environmental pollution which seems to be the primary threat that you outlined. I also thought it was really interesting when you go into infectious diseases. And all of these things that are happening primarily in the south primarily as climate warms that we of course assumed. We're not here and how they're impacting vulnerable populations and their intelligence as well. So can you take us through Hookworm Chagas like what people are you know the staggering things people are finding yes written a story for the American scholar in which I talk about the fact that these neglected tropical diseases that everybody knows are causing not only physical harmed but cognitive harms in the global south? If you go to Brazil if you go to tyler if you go to Nigeria. You're gonNA find these infections. That have been documented to lower people's intelligence and to increase the rate of mental disorders. So we know that. But there's been a very strong animus against admitting those diseases are also here. They're here not because our climate is getting warmer but because the US has always had pockets where we have a very warm climate revering unusual for a developed country must industrial company treats are not as warm. It's our country is but parts of our country are subtropical the same disorders that flourish in the global south are flourishing in Texas Texas. The epicenter for diseases like Chagos toxic crisis that's A TUX OF PLASMA Gandhi. Still crisis. I mean all these diseases. That are devastating. The global south are devastating The southern part of our country and many of them have devastating effects on the brain. Probably the most you know it's like a horror movie. The most frightening horror show example of that is the fact that trick unnecess- which were familiar with as infecting pork and then infecting people's intestinal tracts can also infect your brain You know in the global south that often infects brain. You have actually have larvae in people's brains and causes epilepsy. Mental retardation very often death and it has become a very major cause of epilepsy in this country. But for a long time doctors had a difficult time seeing that it was the same disorder. So we have all these diseases causing dramatic cognitive problems mental health problems brain problems in the in the southern parts of this country and they also are causing a lowering of IQ allowing intelligence so that you can actually track infection. An I Q and see that. They're on a parallel track as you lower infections. Iq's rise and vice versa. You go back to minute. Iq because we've only talked about the fact that I q is not a reliable of people's cognitive potential but his reliable gauge of people's cognitive achievement. That's why it's still useful for measuring the damage caused by toxins and pathogens. So it can show you where there has been damage to the brain that results in lower. Iq It can't tell you what potentials which are actually going to do with your life which are capable of doing and a really good example of that is in Nigeria. There's an area Nigeria where they happen for different reasons to test the IQ's off fourteen years apart now. Fourteen years is not enough time for anybody. Genetics A- change or hereditary. I have to admit that a big change in Iq. Fourteen years can't be laid to genetics. And that's what they found in Kenya the IQ's left eighteen points on average within fourteen years. And what happened in Kenya in that part of Kenya? There was a public health initiatives. That were very successful. They radically that a lot of infectious disease And as a result you saw people's Iq Metra Dyke's up. Sue kind of thing that happens when you actually attack the source brain damage. Yeah I mean you cite that. In Alabama Lounges County. Which I just butchered that. I'm sure. Sixty seven percent believe are infected by Hookworm the National School of Tropical Medicine estimates. The twelve million people are infected. And then you think you say the big five now affect at least fourteen million. Us residents yes. Yes that's a lot of people in a lot of those people are living in poverty now only poverty. This is the interesting thing it not only poverty. What's what's the real dominator. Here is lack of basic services. So you know we are used to having garbage. Collected regularly were used to having housing. The doesn't have cracks in the open elements into it where you not to living in areas where there are lots of old tires sitting around collecting water from mosquitoes to breed. That's what happens in the global south where these disease vectors like. Mosquitoes breed where garbage sitting around uncollected where these kinds of things breed patent infections. Right that's exactly what happens to these poor areas of Texas or Alabama. You have people living in areas where they're not getting basic services. The garbage is collected. You know their housing is riding so all these things you would think associated with poverty. An often they are. They're also associated with being politically powerless in Houston. Interestingly enough unlike most cities. They don't have zoning so that means that there are areas and cities are protected from certain uses. So you can much more easily have refinery PLOP down next to your house You know you wouldn't be allowed to do that in many states so often. You're talking about middle class suburban communities who for whatever reason you have services being withheld from them kind of thing that you saw in with Hurricane Katrina after rebuilding rebuilding. Wasn't you know equal? We've done better in some places a lot others other someplace. Never rebuilt places weren't rebuilt. You know had a lot of breeding ground for insects. Things like that so it's not always income that but there are a lot of things that we associate with being poor that actually you can associate with being African American or Hispanic in an area where you're not getting the services at your texts are paying for. Yeah so besides voting. What can people do both to protect their families and also to try to rail against these injustices or start to help to to make something happen here at sixty four thousand dollar question. I mean I had two chapters in the book that talks about exactly what people can do but I have to. Preface is saying. It's not really something that can be solved by individual. Yeah not personal responsibility issue. Exactly exactly. Our government should be taking leadership here is not is doing quite the opposite to EPA under trump has rolled back all the advances that were made since the Nixon administration. We'd been doing a you know we've been making forward progress not enough progress. I would say but we were going in the right direction. We're no longer going in the right direction. We're not going backwards. So the first thing that we need is stronger. Epa But individuals can't change that individuals can do it's changed their environment to minimize the heartens and talk and chapter six a great detail about that. But if I had to give a just a few points I would say that if your air quality is a problem often is for African Americans and Hispanics. Then run your air conditioner as much as you can afford to keep your keep your windows and doors shut. It's expensive sometimes. There's there is funding available for that but not always also in your homes. Do Your best to read your homes of dust and vermin many vermin. Carry the pathogens that Cause Mental Disorders. Things like cockroaches dust mites and they're limited in what you can do there too because of you are renting a home your it's up to the landlord but landlords are also governed by municipal laws. That say they have to maintain vermin free environment. Use that as leverage and get together with your you know other people in your building. If you have to vacuum frequently with help him vacuums so these things you can do also controlled type of food that you eat the comes into your home. A lot of food in this country is tainted in fact. I point out in this book that for most Americans. I don't mean Americans of color for most Americans children's largest source of of lead is what baby food every year consumer reports report showing that baby food has has led and it's pesticides in it so. I talk about preparing your own food. Finding safe sources of food finding safe containers canning those kind of things. These are all things you can do. That will minimize the effects and then you also need to try to do attack things that individuals can attack and to do that. You should organize your community. And I point out that you shouldn't try to reinvent the wheel other groups have done this and they're also resources for you really good ones like there are lawyers of Earth Justice Who are dedicated to helping communities? I'm getting rid of the toxic conditions in their area and deal with the laws forcing the government to do the right thing. So I pointed out in the book how to reach out to them how to organize with other ways in your area and there's strength in numbers. I really liken it to the civil rights movement because quite frankly. I'm old enough to remember what I find really interesting. Is that you when you read about it now it all. It sounds like it was something that all Americans behind that everyone had the support of all Americans in ruins saying Koumba. That is not what it was like. You know people who were civil rights. Agitators were often decried as criminals. People were invoking law and order. I mean everyday people. Many people took a very dim view of the civil rights movement until they won. And I think we're in the same situation. Now there's no arguing that things look bleak from the trump EPA being dismantled by the day very scary to think about with the almost universal assaults on communities of color it's very intimidating but that doesn't mean that people can't win and one of the important things people have ways one is that they have had allies in civil rights movement. It wasn't just African Americans who are fighting for their there are whites also joining with them. And I think that's really important because it's important your strength in numbers and we're seeing things like the Sierra Club is now taking on some of these problems as part of their own mission. That's a really really important step. I think and so I'm optimistic. Even the face of all these challenges no good well. I'm glad I mean I agree. Like we need to be allies for everyone who thinks that they would have been an abolitionist like now the Thai. Yeah because it's we'RE STILL CLEANING IT UP. It's still perpetuating systemically. Thanks for listening to my conversation with Harry at Washington. Make sure to check out a copy of her book a terrible thing to waste. I highly recommend it. That's it for today's episode. If you have a chance please. Rate and review hit subscribe to keep up with new episodes and pass it along to a friend. Thanks again for joining. I hope you'll come back for more. In the meantime you can check out group DOT com slash podcast.

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Whats More Powerful Than Fear?

The goop Podcast

44:42 min | 1 year ago

Whats More Powerful Than Fear?

"Hi I'm Elise loon co host with Gwyneth of the podcast. Today's guest is Ambassador Samantha. Power she is the fourth guest in our special series called women on top which is all made possible by our friends at Banana Republic The most interesting businesses are born out of curiosity. This is the space the Gwyneth was in when she started goop. It's also the space from which Banana Republic was founded back in nineteen seventy eight I to California creatives with adventurous spirits last fall we partnered with team banana republic to celebrate curiosity by talking with women who are redefining. What it means to be powerful and brave and we're very excited to be back for a second series. I hope you love listening to these conversations as much as I love having them and I know you'll be deeply inspired by these women so please keep listening and keep shopping with our friends at Banana. Republic to see our favorites from their spring collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop. Don't hold anything too tightly. Just wish for want it. Let it come from the intention of real truth for you and then let it go. The Mayo soul is like it's unbound. It's limitless but we will use words to limit ourselves when people stop believing that. Somebody's got your back or Superman's coming. We turn to ourselves and that's where you become. Empowered courageous participation attracts positive. Things I'm going to throw. This is the group podcast bringing together thought leaders culture changes creatives founders and CEOS scientists doctors healers and seekers here to start conversations because simply asking questions and listening has the power to change the way we see the world. Today is no exception. A letter least fill you in on her extraordinary guest all right. Over to a lease Samantha. Power is a diplomat Pulitzer Prize winning author and formerly served as the twenty eighth United States Ambassador to the United Nations under President Barack Obama. I just read her. Memoir the education of an idealist and loved it. I felt very honored to have this conversation with her today. Power and I talk about something called shrinking the change we talk about the power of empathy and driving that change and we talk about the power. Women have to solve major policy issues and that it's necessary for women everywhere to be politically involved. Power Asks How do we get our voices heard and maybe more importantly how can we all listen? Better finally ambassador powershares how using the tools of public policy can improve lives. She wants us to know that. Even if we can't change the world we may have the power to change many individual world. And today we'll learn where to start. The one thing that that works better than anything in fostering a sense of unity and in causing party identification to fade is shared works and is service. And so you know. I'm a big believer in community service. I I wish it were something that you know. That more people in our in our communities had the chance to participate in. Let's get to my conversation. With Ambassador Samantha Power. Thank you for your book. I settled into thinking I was going to get an education on diplomacy and foreign policy and it was certainly that but then I also I was like I'm were the same person I'm sure you're hearing all over the place from ever diff- very different people turns like when you at the beginning when you talk about your anxiety and you talk about longer. I I was like are you. Hyper you chronic hyper ventilator. Now says no it's different. It's it's constriction. So it doesn't have surface manifestations no longer can be. It could go a lot of different directions. It's your lungs but for me it was. It's just the sense that you just you kind of can't get enough air and you can. You can't breathe so you yawn. You try to sigh and and air in other ways. I don't know does that. Count as hyper. Hyperventilation is associated with more kind of breathing rapidly and now it's chronic hyperventilation because I have to do the exact same thing and my dad's actually a pulmonologist and I've been to. I have subtle asthma. And yet your your body believes it's not getting enough oxygen and so you're over breath yes and then it for me. It lasts it can last for months of the yawning sighing cycle. It's exhausting. It's terrible and unfortunately it comes back when you talk about it so thanks. Oh I'm sorry. Thanks so much. They the one thing that has helped me is not overly caffeinated myself. Yeah anyway but then I was in the in the context the rest of the book so much of it as the fellow working mom clearly not not quite the same hours as you're is you polled. I loved to the conversation about Maria and how essential she was to your fourteen hour days. Yeah I mean I think too. Often we don't make visible you know. All that lies behind are sometimes seemingly effortless juggling acts and they're never effortless. They're always effort full. They're usually graceless in all kinds of ways. You know when you're living at yourself as a as a working parent but then the people you rely on to make it happen and who you know. Everyone talks about the sacrifice of the public servant and being a national security at high levels and people so generous and thanking you for your service and Maria doesn't get thank you know when she walks down the street and she's the one who she left her kids and her grandkids to to come be live my family in New York After being with us for four years in Washington so I I again to give texture to what is actually going on. I think it's enlightening for for people. Who only see what comes out of the black box if you know what I mean. No absolutely and it. Yeah it's all of that invisible and essential labor and I think I can't remember exactly what you said in the book but essentially it was something like Maria. Your your children by having this other person who loved them like that they their some of their most redeeming qualities came from her and I feel very much the same about my life in that just means we're lucky and we we've hit the Jackpot but but he just the care. Industry may just the number of us who are able to work because we have people who are taking care of our parents or kids you know it just makes it makes all the difference. Yeah so in the making of the book it seems like it was clearly sort of statement of your legacy and probably clarifying for people who didn't necessarily know what was happening inside but like a the revelation of what was in your heart and it was a fascinating insight into all of it diplomacy journalism but and it also seemed like an act of therapy like what what was the main motivating force for writing it. I think my impression since I left government in January twenty seventeen when trump took over is that I am surrounded by people who are activated in some way in their hearts but are often held back by a feeling of being small in the world and and not having sufficient agency or power to make the change that they wish would happen the they seek and and so. I think what I what I saw to do was less. You know. Frankly about my legacy Obama's legacy or or things that were would be dated but more I tried. I don't know if I succeeded but but I hope I succeeded in in kind of telling more enduring story where unfortunately or fortunately I happened to be the character in the vehicle for it but basically about caring and trying in the world's getting a bruising every now and then getting up trying to adapt and trying to apply lessons and trying to be effective against a backdrop of problems that really can feel daunting and so it might my ideal reader. You know is is not somebody who's going to go into government or foreign policy or even necessarily a working parent although appear to have a lot of those readers luckily but more just people who who feel that kind of conundrum or that internal struggle between kind of knowing that the world should be different and and softer and that there should be more looking out for one another but being busy and juggling a lot of stuff and not having a whole lot of confidence that one can make a difference and yet still kinda wanting to put one foot forward and trying and so so in a sense. Whether I'm in a war zone you know where I hope. Most of my readers aren't going to end up or in the situation room. You know in the White House in a way. Those venues are almost just like backdrops For these larger questions which I think are a little more universal. Yeah and and highly individuals like that Richard Holbrooke quote blaming the UN crisis like blaming Madison Square Garden. When the New York Knicks play badly? You're blaming a building like I think. Sometimes we forget we get overwhelmed by the size of these systems and then and without remembering that it's often the power both positively and negatively of single individuals. I think to open up in a few opened up a newsroom or like an editorial board were many people. Are you know criticizing the New York Times for their twenty sixteen election coverage? But if you if you put yourself in the shoes of people who are grappling at the time with you know how to cover this new phenomenon in politics Donald Trump and if you put yourself in a political campaign and if you're in my shoes you're you're getting you're in your first political campaign you're getting way to attach to your candidate and way too angry At the negative ads that your opponents you know airing and you lose your temper and but by being in that room you know where those things are happening. You can identify much more and just understand kind of why things are happening the way they are. But also how you make your way and and you know. Tried to adapt and leave your mark so then. The Knicks analogy is great. Because again it happens to be used in the context of the UN but in any institution. I mean on one level. Well maybe facebook is a bad analogy because Mark Zuckerberg does have so much more power than than any one individual has at the UN but but sometimes blaming even a corporation for something is like blaming a building. You know and that you'd be much better off taking the lid off and peering inside to see who's up who's down you know. How power has has shifted. What what the sort of internal politics of place are with. The petty politics of the place are with gender dynamics in a place are which can weirdly have a outcomes as well as kind of internal processes and and group dynamics and so you know I think I think just sometimes books about how history is made you know they. They just treat almost what you call in Sports. The box score. You know kind of what what happens at the end of the at the end of the game after nine innings and and not the the. The books tend not to focus on the humanity of the discord or the friendships. Then make really great things possible or yeah or the just the general complexity. I WanNa talk about evil people and that idea of the evil individual but I to just going back to what you had said about wanting the book to be assault for people who feel powerless. If you don't there's this one section in the book that I love near the back where you talk about the doom loop and you write. I worried about individuals experiencing kind of doom loop in which because they could not single-handedly fix these large problems they would end up opting to do nothing whenever my own thoughts about the state of the world headed toward a similarly bleak impasse. I would brainstorm with my team about how we might shrink the change. We hope to see which I know is the heath brothers so like in the context when you're when when you think about all of the things that are happening in the world right now and I'm curious as to whether you feel like things are far more riotous than they ever have been or it's just a virtue of mediaworks. What do you like? How do you want us all to engage well? I think that it's a highly personal decision. For starters in the sense that I think once empathy. Interestingly grow up in exactly the same community with very similar backgrounds and what triggers your empathy might be so different than what moves me and and so. There is definitely no one-size-fits-all idea but since the the feeling of smallness does seem quite universal these days I think this shrink the change idea which is not mine but which comes from this great book called Switch By the heath brothers Dan and chip eath. But I think it's a brilliant way to think about slicing outside problems into bite size. Bits and one of these apples. I offer in the book again because I was the presence human rights adviser and then a kind of quasi human rights cabinet member that was kind of my portfolio. I was very conscious of the fact that freedom and human rights were receding in the world after the kind of high watermark of the post Cold War explosion and civil society and democratisation we reached a peak and then there's been gradual backsliding still. Have you know our adder near the all time high in terms of number of democracies but within democracies even like our own you see you know slippage in a lot of different areas and Not to mention inequality and and other social economic dynamics like that and there. I was the President President Obama's dedicated human rights adviser. You know in different roles for eight years and this was happening on our watch like this didn't start with the current administration by any means and so I said to my team you know. What are we gonNA do about the human rights recession and we did all kinds of things like creating special rapporteurs on freedom of association so that you know these human rights groups around the world would feel helped you know we ensure that when we're engaging the Egyptian government that the fate of Political prisoners or really draconian media laws was raised and described kind of scrambling around and trying to come up with things that might work and certain point it just started feel so large the problem and our solutions to seem so abstract almost like they were often about inputs. Like what did you ask another government to do rather than outcomes for anybody specific and so might wonderful team you know of Career Foreign Service officers Civil Service officers the deep state there now call but they're not the deep state but they've been working and republican democratic other administrations there but many of them are really knowledgeable different. You know different regions. They speak languages. They've lived in these countries. I should we. Let's make this more concrete. We've got a human rights recession. Why don't we try to get a bunch of people out of jail? Let's just make a list? And so this was shrinking. The chain I had passed out this chapter of this book switch to my team members and so they just took it and they run with ran with it and we ended up designating twenty female political prisoners from China Venezuela Egypt. You know all around the world countries that the United States had positive and large and substantial relationships with where our ambassadors might have been very skeptical about rocking the boat and allowing you know who country was jailing. Getting in the way of you know warm ties and countries that we are often criticizing for their human rights record like Venezuela and we made jumbo portraits of these women and this is more activist stuff than you normally see in government but I would go every day and I would hang a portrait of one of these women in the lobby of the US mission to the UN which was across is across the street from the United Nations. And we did so at a time when all the heads of state were coming as they do every September for the UN General Assembly and so the heads of state would walk or driven by these portraits of these women into one after the other popping up and there were at that time this was twenty fifteen twenty female senators in the US Senate Republican Democrat. They threw their weight behind this campaign And became known as Hash Tag. Free the twenty and it is so small and idea and honestly so small a contribution to a much much larger problem but in the end we were able to help. Secure the release of sixteen of the twenty women and these women went back in to writing about corruption in their communities in the case of was women who've been arrested for protesting sexual harassment. Which was something. The Chinese government claimed that it supported but then locked up women who were rocking the boat in that way. And you know it was tempting to just feel almost the inadequacy of this effort. Right in the first instance but then you think about their voices again being raised in their communities and the ripple effects that those voices will have you think about the campaign and the the light. It Sean on you know the corrupt judges who had been in the tank. When the key the cases against these women were brought forward in the first place or the draconian laws that were on the books that should never be on the books in the first place or the NGOs or social movements. These women were part of and sort of the broader amplification. And then you just think about their families and their kids right law. These are working. Moms who've been jailed for for exercising their voices and so you know. Some of this is just about turning abstractions of injustice into efforts to secure concrete results for individuals. But some of it is about taking large issues whether it's climate change or economic inequality in this case the human rights recession and shrinking. Your slice of it into something that you could reasonably expect you know hope to impact not expect because I I confess that I did not expect we would that sixteen of those women would end up freed but I did think it was worth for that set of other reasons of what it drew an exposure to and also what it showed the United States as as carrying about and so. I think there's a lot in this idea of shrink the change for people. Now you know whether it's homelessness or anything related to the environment which can really overload the system because of the sense of the clock moving too quickly compared to our politics whether it's racial injustice the state of our schools. I mean there's just so many issues domestically internationally that one can focus on but you can just get overwhelmed when you think about the scale the scale challenge and to your question that you posed. I think which is. Is it worse now than ever before you know? I think polarization is the extent of our polarization. Is A is a compounding factor? Now that makes things feel a lot harder to surmount and you know a new dynamic that is contributing to pull relation is echo chambers and is the fact that we are entitled to her own opinions but we really shouldn't be entitled to our own facts and yet we're kind of lacking that foundational factual consensus over which we can have disagreements about what to do like now. You know it's feeling like we don't have a kind of terra firma on which to have those even those disagreements and so I think that's what makes it feel much harder today and there is you know. We are experiencing more conflict around the world than we have in in. Three decades and there is backsliding in democracy. I mean so. There's you know if it feels if it feels like things are going a little bit out of whack. You know where there's smoke there's fire for sure but then they're also a lot of contingencies. In all of this I mean if if our tech companies some of them would make different choices about you know how to safeguard our democracy alongside you know what those companies are seeking due to for their bottom lines. You know we we could end up with a different media backdrop if if the courts would in a different direction on issues like gerrymandering or even money in politics. That would change a lot. There'd be much more of a chance I think of building a a more egalitarian democracy than the one we seem to be sort of drifting toward so i. I think we shouldn't exaggerate the the obstacles but but definitely take note of them in order to figure out how to chip away. We'll get back to ambassador Samantha. Power in just a second You've probably heard me mentioned that. Curiosity is my favorite state of being. I try to carry that attitude with me every day. And it's certainly easier to do with a place like goop. The places such a premium value on being curious and feeling empowered to explore. And ask questions. Banana Republic is another company that values curiosity their founding story starts with a California couple who were looking for an adventure. Fun Fact Banana Republic began as a safari inspired clothing company and today the inspiration for their clothing is designed for life in motion or as they put it living a life of possibilities with no boundaries. This can be seen Banana Republic latest spring collection. A modern versatile take on work where to see our favorites from the collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop. Recently on the podcast. I got to sit down with Dr Robin Bersin. An incredibly wise functional medicine physician. We talked about why she believes. The scope of our healthcare system is dated and how we can bridge the gap between wellness and medicine. When Robin realized our current healthcare system was due for a major upgrade she created parsley health. Parsley health combines the best a modern medicine with the functional holistic approach their mission is to get to the root cause of illness instead of just treating the symptoms and ultimately help people optimize their wellbeing. When you sign up with Parsley health. You can expect long. Doctors Appointments Advanced Diagnostic testing. That looks at everything from your hormones to your gut. Microbiome their doctors work with you to create a personalized health. Plan that factors in nutrition fitness sleep and supplementation. You'll also be paired with a health coach to help support you and keep you accountable when you need it. A Parsley health membership includes five. Doctor visits as well as five health coach visits per year. And now they're online care program which is called complete care anywhere allows you to access your doctor and personal health coach from anywhere. You might be. I recently signed up with Parsley health. And I really appreciate how easy the site is to navigate and how all of your tests information is in one space. Parsley health is offering our listeners. An exclusive offer of one hundred and fifty dollars off a year long membership. Just go to Parsley. Health Dot Com and enter code goop. That's P. A. R. S. L. E. Y. Health Dot com and use code goop to get one hundred and fifty dollars off a year. Long membership back to my chat with ambassador. Power feels like it's not only an echo chamber is just an echo gas lighting chamber and one of the things that seems to be happening particularly in this country is sort of this orchestration of like a fear campaign and it seems like. We're all for all of the reasons that you cited whether it's economic or environmental or it is because there's just seems to be no basis for truth it's I think we're all operating from a place of fear and that's it's hard to get out of it or to pull each other out of it and I think for Moms just thinking about your empathy which I've of course related to as well because my a I always had a fair amount but when I had kids you know just ratchets it up so aggressively and I know throughout the book like your focus on the suffering of children around the globe in particular. But it's I feel like women are the ones who gonNA solve these MOMS like how high empathy is going to solve a lot of this stuff. But it's hard to because I feel like we're the ones who are in some ways most the victim. We have the most to lose lear or the are. Maybe I'm speaking just only for myself where it's easy to put me into a fear state. Well I think fear is extremely powerful and it has caused people to tighten up and to tense up. And to when you when you feel fear the appeal of people who promise order Goes way up in history and there are a lot of people promising order who aren't delivering order but nonetheless the use of fear as a political strategy. I mean it's not new right. The Lyndon Johnson ran the daisy ad of a little girl picking pedals off a off daisy and then a nuclear bomb goes off in the background and basically says if you vote for Barry Goldwater you know your children will be nuked And that was what like a half century ago? I mean the the people's appropriation of fear and and instigation of fear as a way of presenting themselves as a kind of simple solution has been with us. But what's interesting is I think in with the Echo Chamber dimension of it. It's hard for voices to get in and be heard. And and they're not even seen as credible right unless they come from the same for like better were tribe could be political tribe or or something else and so. I think it's it's been absent Walter cronkite or some kind of centrist voices who have credibility on both sides. You know we're we're sort of in a game without Umpires at the present. It feels like but you know at the end of the day. I think people also you mentioned like where does the solution lie? I mean two thousand nineteen. The year that just passed was a year in which we saw more than more political protests than we've seen more countries in generations and interestingly it's hard to get the statistics across you know particularly protests in some developing countries. But it looks like the vast majority of people coming out to protest in most countries were women including in a country like Sudan which I have worked in and on for much of my career and if you had told me two years ago that Sudan was going to erupt in protest that would bring down a leader who'd been indicted for genocide over what he had done in Dr Four and that it would be principally women who would constitute the protests and That indeed you know people who have been victimized in an individual whose family had been victimized in the genocide are become the justice minister within two years. I mean I would`ve. I would've thought that that was very very farfetched. And and so you do sense. More and more people trying to take the political destiny of their communities into their own hands and women who are parents certainly see the stakes of issues like climate change. See the urgency of it for the younger generations. Think all working parents are all parents who C- who have to answer the questions that our kids are posing to us about how we could have let this happen? Feel an enhanced urgency on on an issue like that and you know. I guess what has to happen. Though as we go forward is that has to be turned into even low grade political participation. I mean fewer women voted in the twenty sixteen election. Then voted in two thousand twelve. Even though the stakes in the twenty sixteen election were were really really high for issues that concern women here end and around the world. Young people voted in abysmal. Numbers in two thousand sixteen but the two thousand eighteen young people voting numbers were way up from the previous midterm election. And so hopefully there's some learning about what merely nation You know Buys you because it just if if all you do is is you know? See the darkness and and you can't find your own pathway to contribute you know it's a bit of a self fulfilling prophecy. Alas yeah now I mean I I. It seems unlikely that there will be much complacency before November. I mean it feels. Like it's as heightened as it's ever been if not more so when when you're someone who's been in the. Who's WHO's assess these genocides and massive global issues and incredibly evil regimes thinking about Assad. What's happening is it. The power is it one person's ability to somehow create again. Maybe it's built on fear I don't how is it? Is it groups of people conspiring like how. How does this happen? Like how does something like Assad and Syria? How does how does that happen? I mean I know that's a complicated question and I know it's not as simple as removing one person because then the aftermath can be equally abysmal. Yes No it's a great question and complex. I suppose but but I would I would start with is what happens before the moment in which evil takes full form right namely you know the the kind of background conditions the enabling environment you might say and so almost inevitably an absence of a free media an absence of checks and balances on the centralization of power whether checks and balances of the kind we have in America across the different branches of government or kind of bottom up checks civil society or local government state government. And so so that's the enabling environment. I think without when you when you have those checks in place. It's much harder for an individual just to concentrate power in a manner that him to to perpetrate. Great crimes of the kind that you've that you're asking about and then you know. I think the sort of a ruthlessness and indifference to shame. So no personal sense of morality or shame but also you know international condemnation just kind of washes off the back at. What's what's interesting about some of the big cases of genocide that that I studied Before long before I went into government But was how often in order to get foot-soldiers to perpetrate for example. Something like the Rwandan genocide or the law which occurred in Nineteen ninety-four where eight hundred thousand people were killed in one hundred days by their neighbors by their neighbors. Yeah so so there a couple to get those foot soldiers. A couple things are required. I mean first of all back to fear to really convince your would be footsoldiers that if you do not killed if you if you do not perpetrate what you would have you know a month ago or six months ago. Viewed as evil. If you don't do that it'll be done to you and so always a self defense rationale. I mean Hitler. Why did he invade Poland right because of the threat the encroachment on the German people and so forth Miss Nonsense? You know almost all of the time the other thing that you see in so many of these cases were neighbor. Turns against neighbor is drugs and alcohol. I I don't mean like the habit of drug and alcohol but people numbing themselves to perpetrate crimes deep down again. They know that they will come to regret. And so while the leader may be inoculated and removed in some way from from victimizing his people. Those who actually have to to kill their neighbor with a machete or feel instructed to kill their neighbor with a machete or to mow down eight thousand men and boys as happened in in eastern Bosnia in one thousand nine hundred five which was a foundational event in my life because I covered. That has a journalist in my twenty four years old and in this thing happened but To understand you how many of those people are just downing bottles of vodka rum? Before they start firing at the people they had gone to school with so they. They've told themselves if I don't do this. These people are coming after me but they still need something to to dull. The human sensibilities that that that live on. Yeah to yes exactly. Yeah so when you think about twenty twenty and you think about like do you and I know we're in unprecedented as you said. Sort of the extent of our polarization as extreme like do you see a path toward some sort of reconciliation within the U. S. or? Do you feel like we're headed for civil war. You know I think. Reconciliation is is imperative. I think we've missed our institutions of miss some opportunities to speed that up you know everything from facebook's willingness to you know to run lies paid for by political campaigns. That's not going to do. Reconciliation any favors to the supreme court in a five four decision turning its back on its role to protect one person. One vote and and really true enfranchisement in its gerrymandering decision To look the other way for these maps that cut a look ridiculous. You know these loop the loops. E which allow effectively state legislators or members of Congress to choose their voters rather than voters to choose their elected representatives. So you know these opportunities. It's a shame to have missed them but the I think the reconciliation will come when platforms of fear and fear. Mongering are rejected by a majority of people. I mean the the last election which proved which has ushered in and even more divisive phase in our history would that election was settled by seventy thousand votes. Yeah spread across three states. And it's it's easy to forget that because you know it's been such a a one eighty reversal on so many fronts. But just these are the razor thin margins and I'm not saying you know again necessarily that a Democrat winning would bring around by by any means that it would bring you know motherhood and Apple Pie back to the center but you know the the one thing that that works better than anything in. Fostering a sense of unity and in causing party identification to fade is shared works and is service. And so you know. I'm a big believer in community service. I wish it were something that you know that more people in our in our communities had the chance to participate in but if you could imagine a majority or you know that that would hug the center. Let's say on the right and the left feeling exhausted and disillusioned. Let's say by the way in which we seem to be talking past one another. You could imagine service being a place of entry and you know there's a reason that mayors for example are tend to be much less polarized for example at their national mayors conference every year. Republicans are learning from Democrats and vice versa. And you know there's there's just not anywhere near the same heat or noise. It's it's focused on. Hey what what worked in terms of transportation and you're downtown and and you know how exactly is that clean energy project working and did the solar panel you know. Have you managed with solar to replace the jobs that are lost because the coal plant was shut down and and so just you know when you have individuals who are whether at the citizen level or at the elected official level or an NGOs or civil society who are thinking about just concrete problems? I think that lends itself to getting out of the you know the the pitched battle mode and mindset that many of us find ourselves in these days. I wish we could almost stripper way. The I wish we could strip away party designations and just make everyone run on platforms and issues because then I think it would force people rose you listen and I think so. Many of us like I think about moms demand action and the progress that they've made on a state level for safe commonsense gun laws. And that's you know it's probably primarily Democrats but there are a lot of Republicans who are working on those issues and so I feel like two people like we kind of all want I mean many of us want the same things and yet we can't even listen because it's it is so polarizing. Yeah and as you say it may be that the two-party system for this reason. You know that there ends up being a gravitation to something else or or better yet again. Something that has caused driven. I mean things can shift in a hurry. we saw you know on nine eleven Very traumatic and and catastrophic event for our country creating kind of unity that that hadn't that was slipping away. I think even before recent years you know slipping away before nine eleven so events like that you know the rise of China I think is a very complicating factor in the world around us and is going to have big implications even on what goes on inside our democracy and I. I hope it's not you know that people don't take this in the direction of and new Cold War but it but it can also focus the mind on on on the necessity of more cooperation across the aisle on our in D. and on infrastructure and on technology. And if you know what I mean because because that's a in China of course it's forced unity Because there's only the the diktat of of one man an authoritarian and an leader for life. But they're you know the the sort of Nimble -ness of a system that can plan ahead You know we're big. Expenditures can be undertaken with longer term cycles. Those are going to become comparative advantages to a country. Like China. If we can't if we can't get our act together as well and so so there you know these kinds of dynamics even outside our own family dysfunction they can. They can focus the mind if nothing else what what are you. Do you imagine a day when you'll go back to government. I would love to serve again in some fashion. You know I do. Being a citizen again is wonderful. I teach hundreds of Harvard students about social change. Legal Change Political Change Revolutionary Cascades. You know why does history surprise us so often we've all these studies about trend lines and the intelligence community around the world spending billions of dollars political consultants thought they knew what was what going into two thousand sixteen and so to understand a little bit better that contingencies of history and to try to learn from them but it definitely to be in a position to apply some of those lessons again in public service. I would love that but I also feel responsibility to to share with young people. What I've learned so they can avoid some of my mistakes and and feel you know that I what I notice again when I left government was I suddenly had this fancy. Cv I'd been UN ambassador and had all these bodyguards and represented my country. And I I noticed that my students started to see me in a different ways. If somehow my advice was no longer as valid because I had operated at this rarefied level but one of the reasons I wrote. The education of an idealist. The way I did in a very personal invulnerable way. Was You know to remind people that you don't have to have all the answers to give it a go of trying to make a difference and you can fall massively publicly flat on your face and become a global villain as I managed to do on occasion and still somehow bounced back from that and and so you know I wanna serve again but I also feel if I can find a way to draw on on what I've learned through my service by by telling stories? Not In some wonky way or you know dreary way but to to to show the exhilaration that you can feel in in using the tools of public policy to to improve lives. I mean that role of lighting that fire. It's a role others performed for me when I was younger. And and so for now you know when. I'm not serving. That's that's my way of trying to expand the community of people who feel like there's there's plenty to do and there is say in my my book and my Mantra Enliven. There's always something one can do. And so two to just remind people that just because you can't solve the whole problem. There may still be a slice of it that you can chop off and and make make headway on and even if you can't change the world which we all you know grow up hoping to do one day you can change many individual worlds and sometimes we forget that. Thanks for listening to my conversation. With Ambassador Samantha. Power for more on her. Make sure to pick up a copy of her book. The education of an idealist. That's at today's episode. If you have a chance please. Rate and review hit subscribe to keep up with new episodes and pass it along to a friend. Thanks again for joining. I hope you'll come back Thursday for more. And in the meantime you can check out group dot com slash podcast.

Banana Republic UN Barack Obama Ambassador Samantha United States Samantha Power China Maria United Nations facebook California President Pulitzer Prize Assad New York Knicks team banana republic New York Times
Federal judge slams President Trump's comments about Andrew McCabe's case, likens it to a "banana republic", Trump claims he has "legal right" to intervene in DOJ cases despite Barr asking him to stop DOJ-related tweets

Erin Burnett OutFront

43:01 min | 1 year ago

Federal judge slams President Trump's comments about Andrew McCabe's case, likens it to a "banana republic", Trump claims he has "legal right" to intervene in DOJ cases despite Barr asking him to stop DOJ-related tweets

"Out Front next Banana Republic. A federal judge slamming the president for getting involved in the case against the former. Fbi Deputy Director Andrew McCabe this as Attorney General Bill Bar tells the Justice Department to take another look at the Michael Flynn case plus just eight days until the Nevada caucuses. Could we see a repeat of the Iowa debacle a man overseeing multiple precincts? There tells me he has not yet been trained and Bernie Sanders moving onto super Tuesday states topping more new polls is the Sanders Democratic Party. Now let's go out front and good evening. I'm Erin Burnett out front tonight. Banana Republic Federal Judge Tonight with withering commentary about the Department of Justice. Judge Reggie Walton saying quote. I don't think people like the fact that you've got somebody at the top basically trying to dictate whether somebody should be prosecuted. I just think it's a banana republic when we go down that road now this federal judge Walton Judge Walton by the way is a Republican nominated senior federal judge clearly slamming the president of the United States in this particular case over trump's insistence that the department of justice investigate the former FBI. Deputy Chief Andrew McCabe now tonight. The Department of Justice is dropping that pogue probe but at the same time the Attorney General Bill Bar tonight is giving trump yet another huge present an official telling CNN that bars privately ordering a reexamination of some high profile cases including one trump cares a lot about his former national security adviser. Michael Flynn Flynn is awaiting sentencing for lying to the FBI. Well this reexamination is surely music to the bosses ears. They ought to be ashamed of themselves. What they've done to General. Flynn what they did to general. Flynn is very unfair. In my opinion look at Flynn. It's a shame and now here we are for the second time and basically as many days bar appears to be caving to trump's bidding and the fact is that bars moved to order the case we examined is highly unusual and it comes on the heels of his attempt to overrule career. Doj prosecutors in pushing for a lighter sentence for another trump crony roger stone now overruling sentences for cronies is the sort of thing that happens in a banana republic which made me why judge Walton added this damning and sobering thought about the current president of the United States. The integrity of the process is being unduly undermined by inappropriate comments and actions on the part of people at the top of our government. I think it's very unfortunate and I think is a government and as a society. We're going to pay. A price for Sanchez is out front. Live outside the White House tonight So so Boris. You have this federal judge you know. Really WITH WITHERING COMMENTARY ABOUT TRUMP. When he's talking about a Banana Republic This as the Department of Justice drops that probe into McCabe. What was the president's reaction to that today will earn? We're told by sources inside the White House that president trump did not know that. This news about Andrew. Mccabe was coming and that he was furious. Attorneys apparently having to try to calm the president down trying to swayed him by presenting the legal rationale for why charges were not being brought against Andrew. Mccabe A we're told that the president Really try to force the issue with them that he was adamant that. Mccabe should face charges. Of course he's been targeting Andrew McCabe for a long time now for years and he's repeatedly suggested that he should be locked up calling him a deep state operator and such. The timing of course is interesting with this news coming from the Department of Justice that Attorney General William bars going to reexamine these cases. I including Michael Flynn's case that is likely music to the president's. Here's as you said Erin He's repeatedly suggested that. Flynn was ambushed by FBI investigators even though he pled guilty to lying to the FBI. So in a way this could be seen as a sort of consolation prize coming from attorney. General William Bar to the president not going after one of his political targets one of his perceived opponents but offering him some consolation with Michael. Flynn Erin all right. Thank you very much worse out front now. Someone who worked with Bill Barr the former Deputy Attorney General Donald Air he served in the George H W Bush administration where he was senior to bill bar at the time. And I appreciate your time. Thank you very much Mr so so judge. Walton worries about a Banana Republic. Sobering Commentary He talks about inappropriate actions of the top of the government. What's your reaction to what Judge Walton said. Well I agree with what Judge Walton said. And I guess I'm at a point in my myself of of thinking. We really have to look at the at the bigger picture. Here of what's been going on for a long time and I and I really think when you do that you come to the conclusion that it's time for bill. Barda resigned as attorney general so so so it I mean look. It's a serious thing to say you know him you've worked them. You know the good You now see what he is doing. Now we obviously have him right now looking into another case involving trump loyalist Regarding you know examining the case in this case sentencing and the other obviously I'm referring to trump's friends Loyalists Michael Flynn and Roger Stone So so how do you get to resign? It's not a small thing it's not and and and and I think the bottom line reason is that it's clear from many things he's done since he took over but also many things. He said that he doesn't believe in our system of government in which no one is above the law And you can go through the record of his performance. We're looking at it right now in these events intervening essentially on behalf of the president. But there's a whole series of events that goes back over his whole term of service for the last year and then a whole lot of things. He said that show that he really doesn't believe that. The president is is not above the law. And so I'd be glad to talk about some of those things. What are what are some of them because obviously now he's saying what he does interview right where where he gives trump. What TRUMP WANTS. Ready Defense Trying to overrule the the sentencing right for Roger Stone but he says stop tweeting about it. You're making my job impossible. And some people interpret that is he's actually standing up to the president Does not sound like that's how you see it. No I think what you have to do is look at look at what we do. Not What we say. And there's a long series of events than in most people's minds they start with bill bill bars whitewashing of the molar report back in March and April of this year. Many people will remember in October. You know you. I'm sorry. In December you had the issues report. Who had done a long inquiry into the FBI investigation of Russian interference in the and the the headline finding of that report was that there were problems in the FBI but the predication the factual basis for the report was entirely proper and there was no bias. Founder indicated among the people overseeing the investigation Attorney General Bar immediately immediately said That he didn't agree with that he didn't think that was correct. And he actually got his. Us Attorney Durham to say the same thing. you've got bar behaving very unprofessionally in the context of that investigation before it was over when he goes out and he said lately as well that that the FBI was spying on the on the campaign you have you have the attorney. General misstating the conclusions of the Muller report when he talks about in the president's words no collusion well. They didn't find no collusion. They found no conspiracy no agreement with the Russians to actually interfere but plenty of collusion. Lots of people having a meetings with Russians and that sort of thing so but what do you think happened? I mean I would I would I I look. I'm I'm impressed with the fact that you're willing to come out and say something boldly and without fear and you think he should resign but but you've known him for a long time you've known of him for a long time you've known of his reputation. He's a guy who respected executive power. He was known for that but yet by by most accounts he seems to have gone way farther than anybody expected. What do you think happened to bill about trump? I don't think anything happened. I think all you have to do is read what he has believed for apparently most of his life and and he really believes I believe he believes that the president should be essentially above the law. He wrote a memo which I think a lot of people. You probably talked about it on this show in June of two thousand eighteen when he was. I guess hoping to be considered for Attorney General and the memo came out with this amazingly broad sense of of the president's powers among other things he said. The president is the executive branch and he went on to say very specifically That the president had the power indeed the obligation to be in charge of and make decisions if need be in investigations including having the right to decide in an investigation of himself. What ought to happen. Well that's the definition of the president being above the law and that's bill bars conception of the president's powers Lots of other things. He's done have carried through on trying to prevent meaningful interference or prevention of his exercise. The powers there's whole series of ways in which bars Justice Department has supported preventing the effective effective role of checks and balances in our government. You know he's He's he's litigating the case involving the Urgency Declaration where the president couldn't get Congress to appropriate money for the border wall. And so the president made an emergency declaration and said I'm going to use that even though he said it wasn't really an emergency and I just WANNA move faster I'M GONNA use that declaration in order to divert money from something else. We'll bill bars. Justice Department is litigating his right to do that. Which is which is indefensible. Bill Bar Bill Maher's Justice Department Has pushed the whole concept of absolute executive privilege Multiple opinions of the of the Office of Legal Counsel Preventing Congress from playing its traditional role of having effective oversight. Ah I appreciate your giving all these angles and I and I appreciate your taking the stand. That you're taking your coming out and saying what you believe. You believe that he should resign. I appreciate your time. Donald Airs I said former deputy attorney. General Evan presses out front with me now obviously covers the Justice Department. I mean Evan. You've been talking to sources inside the Department of Justice. You know you have a judge coming out today referring to Banana Republic about the president's role and and and Department of Justice in some senses You have here. Former deputy attorney general calling for bars resignation. What is the mood inside the department you know? Look I think there's a lot of unease About what has happened this past week. Erin look I think a lot of the things that the pre That the attorney general has been saying some of the rhetoric that he is adopted from. The president was already uncomfortable for a lot of people. But until this week we hadn't seen any of the of the actions so publicly done right where you have the Attorney General Publicly essentially Disavowing the work of career prosecutors who were simply following the guidelines that this administration has set forth. And so that's one of the things that is now giving people unease inside the department about exactly what is happening. Maybe these accusations of the that the attorney general is simply Too politically involved carrying out the bidding and the president. Maybe those things are true. I think a lot of people are very very nervous about it. I think the Attorney General doing interview this past week where he Pushed back on the president's tweets. I think he needed to do that. To Quell some of the unease inside the department right now of course then the next day Doing again with the president wants in part in how it's A. Yeah all right. Thank you very much. And next president trump trying to get the last word via tweet after bar asked him to stop tweeting plus a volunteer in charge of several precincts in Nevada. Raising serious concerns on this program tonight about the upcoming caucus there. Could it be an Iowa repeat? I'll talk to him and Amy Klobuchar stepping up attacks on Bernie Sanders. I don't think that is where a party is. And I certainly don't think that is where our country is. Is She right? Everyone Barbara McDonald here hosted the brand new podcast from Hsen down the hill. The Delphi murders in February of twenty seventeen Abigail Williams and liberty. German went for a hike on a warm day in Delphi. Indiana and vanished. Nearly twenty four hours later their bodies are found in the woods. Police began working a crime scene. They say they'll never unseat. They soon find libby cell phone which has video and audio of the killer. Three years later remains on the loose search for down the hill. The DELPHI murders wherever. You're listening now. A book to Steam Room. Everybody Ernie Johnson and Charles Barkley. We own a role right now. Is this a chance to blow off? Steam yes I can't brag about our show but that just make you an apple. Subscribe and download the steam room on your favorite podcast APP. Every Thursday subscribed new tonight president trump trying to have the last word after his attorney general. Bill Bar said this to ABC. The president has never asked me to do anything in a criminal case. What bar needed to say that because trump keeps saying things that seem to imply he's doing that and today well the response came on tweet a twitter which irony their rights and still bar said? Could you just get off it? Nope trump says this does not mean that I do not have as president the legal right to do so I do but I have so far chosen not to now. They're I guess. He's referring to the criminal case intervention right now former director of the Nixon Library. Tim Neftali and White House correspondent for the New York. Times Maggie Haberman so Maggie bartels the president to stop tweeting and so he responds in a tweet to something important. Really important. They're built are said which is He hasn't asked me intervene to criminal case. The president's response on twitter. Yeah but I could if I want right Erin. It's very in line with what we have seen this president's say in a number situations where it was the same with Robert Muller and whether he had the right to get rid of him it's been the same with ambassadors and whether he had the right to get rid of them whether he had the right to have a kernel Lieutenant Colonel Din moved out of the NFC in the White House after his impeachment. Testimony the question of whether he has the right to do. It is actually generally not the case. The question is whether he should be doing it. And whether he is crossing lines that other presidents have not or or when they have they have come into trouble The president was according to all my reporting not pleased with what Bill Bar said We've not seen him reacted the way that he typically does because we've seen with him that when his back against the wall and when he actually has to be disciplined for a short period of time he can be. I think has been warned by people. Look we saw it in the final week before the election that he actually simmer down but when it was pointed out to him That his he he had not been using his twitter feed as much in the final week of the election. He got angry. That was noticed and started tweeting to make a point of that. That's exactly what you saw him do with bar today. I don't know that it means a change for their relationship. Going forward bar has a lot of latitude with this president but sometimes as president gets an idea in his head about somebody and it's like a germ and it just boroughs in his brain and I think we are going to have to see how this plays I know. And you're you're in the in the in the context Maggie saying you're talking about bill bar and we just heard a former deputy attorney general calling for the resignation making the point about Bill Barnes expansive view of executive power so portable bar. That goes. Yeah I have that view but then I got this person that when when he doesn't interview and then he does. What Maggie's talking about today? What does Bill Bar Blanche? Well I think bill bar has his own agenda I think Gore went back into government to achieve some and I think that he views trump as his enabler as much as he enables trump. I don't think they always agree on how to use power. I look at Bill Bar is doing right now. Bill Bar is investigating the way in which the intelligence community does its assessments of Russia that is hugely important and could have a big chilling effect on intelligibility. Bill Bar has just launched an investigation of the Flynn Prosecution. I think bill bar was saying to the president. I've got things to do. You're making it hard for me to do. Those things and those things are not good for the country. They're not good for the rule of law but their bill bars agenda as much as practicing certain Jodoin Judge Walton as points out a Republican nominee. Judge would agree with what you're saying Maggie to your point you know when the President says when someone tells them I was sort of chuckling when you use the word when he gets disciplined but when he's totally can't do you can be disappointing right. He can behave with discipline but yes when when he gets told. You can't do something. He likes to prove that he's doing so. And so I wanna just give a few examples of the I have the I could do it if I want. Sort of here are three times. He did it. To your point I never told Don mcgann to fire Mueller. If I wanted to fire Mueller. I would've done it myself. It's very simple. I had the right to on this. All Res Joe Biden Funds Name. We've been pretty. Why don't even mention it? But certainly I'd have every right to. I put no pressure on them whatsoever. I could have. I think it would probably possibly have been okay of. I did but I didn't he. It's funny in the context of Muller which was the first example like that that I mentioned where he said you know he he. He didn't want Muller fired but he he had the right to do that. Actually was shown in the report that he did one molar fire and by the way. It's not just that. He said he had the right to this was a lie. According to others under testimony he did tell Don mcgann fire. So there's there's the dishonesty plus the exactly. Yeah and so. I think that when he says these things that I never did that but I had the right to. You have to bear that in mind one thing. I was struck by listening to bar in that in that bitches now and I think. Tim is exactly right. I think the bar has his own interests that he's tending to But when when Bar Was saying you know. I've never. The president ordered me to do this. I'm not sure the president has to if you think about the one of the most important things that Michael Cohen said in his testimony of the president's former lawyer before the house was basically he doesn't need to give you a directive that you know what he wants and you follow along with. That is anybody. Who's the president's twitter feed unclear on what he wants? I think it's it's really all right out there to be saying no it's true. I mean you know and Essense billboarded need. I mean take the very specific example of the Roger Stone sentence right bombardment. What trump wanted. Everybody knows trump on it. Well I I also think it's important for us to make clear that it is a crime to intervene in a criminal matter. The way the president is doing he actually does not have the right to do this. His role as president means that saying those things in fact is pressure. Maybe if we said this on television it might be interesting. But we're not in a position to put pressure on the Justice Department. He is so I think that when he says it he's actually committing a crime and so it's not just he doesn't have the right to say what is just another question. There are people now and you hear this all the time. I'm sure people say OK. Trump just does it in a more whatever brazen or childish or offensive way but other people did it before this is what they do meaning president in this case. People say that. But it's not true I don't know what the comparable I don't even know what the comparison basis is for a lot of the cases that we have seen under this president where you have had so many Former advisors to to this particular president who have come under investigation or been charged I understand that bill bar has issues with how the Muller report in the investigation was handled But he then said that he felt stone prosecution was right and he thought that the just the the outcome was right. I don't I just don't understand how you would line up with previous presidents. I guess is the most breaking answer that all right. Thank you both very much and next questions tonight about whether Nevada is prepared for the upcoming caucus we are going to be using an online tool throughout the process. And we have never seen or been trained on that to you. Saw The look on my face. You'll see more Bernie Sanders polling in the top tier even in the state of Texas. Is it his Democratic Party? Now how's go to hop warns the game show? It's just hot sauces questions. And eventually some heartburn. I didn't know it was possible for your eyeballs to sweat. Sean Evans hosts hot one. The game show a new series on TV. All Star weekend roars into the windy city. Rising Stars St L. Star Saturday night and the NBA All Star Game and the twenty one February fourteenth to sixty TNT. But just eight days until the Nevada caucuses growing questions tonight about whether there is any risk of an Iowa debacle repeat now some campaigns and volunteers in Nevada say they are concerned about the new caucus calculator and ipads. They're going to be handed out to them that they're gonNA use for the results earlier. I spoke to Seth Morrison. He is going to be in charge of several precincts in Nevada about the training that he's received we are going to be using an online tool throughout the process. And we have never seen or been trained on that tool. They told us that a night or two. Before the caucuses we would pick up the IPAD and all our other materials but they there is no provision that has been shared to my knowledge to do the detailed training. So how do you feel about this? You know I am concerned. Well okay. Nevada was supposed to originally use the same. Abbas Iowa before the disaster there. So that's part of the reason they had to scramble and put something new in. But Seth actually said he was trained on that APP so before Iowa Nevada had a big day a whole day. They were gonNA train on that APP. And here's what happened. We had a large day long training where they were supposed to show us the APP but they ended up spending the whole day trying to download the APP and most people in the room could not so we left that day knowing clearly that there were problems out front now. Tom Perez the chairman of the Democratic National Committee and in terms of press. I just spoke with Seth Morrison. He's going to be in charge of multiple precincts in Nevada. For the caucuses there He says that they're going to be given ipads but not until the night or two. Before the caucuses. He hasn't seen the the software tool they're going to be using and he's concerned. What's your reaction? Well listen the Nevada Democrat Party. I have great confidence in. Our team is out there as well and they're not going to be using an APP. Let me be clear the the APP that was in place in Iowa. They're not using it. Our goal is to have a caucus that is as low tech as humanly possible while preserving efficiency. And so. What does that mean Erin. Well tomorrow when early voting starts people are going to use a paper ballot and they'll use paper ballots for the next four days. In the meantime one of the lessons we take from. Iowa is that we need to be talking relentlessly with our volunteers and so we're doing day in and day out now. They had to make some adjustments after Iowa but the good news is that they always had a backup plan. So they're not starting from scratch by any stretch. So you're not concerned. When Seth says that he's not getting any training and doesn't anticipate getting anyway. He said he did on the APP that that Iowa use that Nevada was going to use and they had a whole day of training. Couldn't get any training because I never got the darn thing to launch. But he's a little worried. He's not being trained. But you're saying that that that is misplaced that it'll be. I saying that training is critically important. And we understand that. And by the way. I'm very appreciative for Seth and all of the volunteers in Nevada People have stepped up in remarkable ways. And they're going to be at the eighty plus caucus sites tomorrow and then a week from tomorrow at caucus sites across the state so these volunteers are the lifeblood of this effort. But we also have at the same time. The Nevada Democratic Party aided by an army of people elsewhere including from the DNC and our goal and we will implement. This goal is to make sure that everybody walks in all of our volunteers. All of the people who are running the caucus walk in Saturday morning if next week when we do have the the actual caucus understanding what their role is with a person to call. They don't have to use their own technology. They don't have to use an APP in Iowa. People were using some of their own technology and we made sure no that is not the case. But you're saying people like Seth He. He will get training that he seems he would be more comfortable getting at this point since he has an absolutely without a doubt that he will get it and everybody else who needs to be trained will be trained and there will be people in caucus sites or readily available on a phone. If you have a question you will feel free to call those people again. I have great confidence in the leadership. Team in Nevada. In Senator Reid and senator. Colorado's Masto in Rosen and then in the team in the Nevada Democratic Party so we have obtained document chairman press which shows that. Dnc officials played extensive roles in the development of the APP wet. That was that was used in Iowa. The contract with that APP specified that the company had to provide the DNC with access to its software for testing work together on an ongoing basis. This is all from the contract to develop the software. So now you've looked at this whole situation. How much responsibility do you take for? What happened in Iowa Chairman? Well listen Our our partnership with the State parties the Iowa Democratic Party while they run the caucus and and They administer the caucus everything we do with. The state's is a partnership we all succeed together. We all fall short together. And the language that you're referring to is language that we have put in place in contracts to make sure that we are paying attention to cybersecurity. Now the the contract that was entered into with shadow which was the company that fell short with the APP that contract was entered into between the Iowa Democratic Party and Shadow. But the language that you're referring to is something we include because we care about cybersecurity. We have learned a lot of lessons. The hard way about cybersecurity. And here's the thing about Iowa and these things are just provide you with access software to tech for testing. Did you test it advocates? Absolutely the these. These cyber Iowa's failures were not a cybersecurity failure. The language you're referring to was language we include in these contracts so that we are cyber ready with hindsight and again our rules and bylaws committee inquired into whether it had been pressure. Tested put aside cyber security whether it had been pressure tested so that it could work at scale and we received assurances that could and with hindsight we together with the Iowa Democratic Party should have tested it more but you and I have talked about some of the criticism that you're taking about adjusting. The criteria needed to make the cut for a democratic debate. Right who's on the stage? It's an incredible power to make that call. And you've made the case for changing the rules to focus on poles and not just donors which gives Michael Bloomberg who was pulling solidly but self-funding in. So what do you say chairman to those in your own party and there are a lot of who are dismissing Bloomberg. And they're saying you know what he's the Guy Reagan it. He's buying his way onto the stage. That's not legitimate. Well first of all I would say to people. Take a step back. Look at what we did as a party. When I became chair almost three years ago we engaged in a very inclusive process of reform. We did remarkable reforms. We reform the super delegate laws and again this was supporters Secretary Clinton supporters of Senator Sanders others working together. There was no delegate super delegate counter in the run-up to Iowa unlike four years ago because we reform the super delegate role so we return power to the voters to those say. Well someone like Michael. Bloomberg can buy his way onto the debate stage. I say the following number one we need to reform citizens we need to overturn citizens United Reform our campaign finance laws. That's part of our platform and number two. You do have a remedy if you believe that someone like Michael Bloomberg shouldn't be able to effectively sell funder race and your remedy. Is this get out there and vote? Make Your Voice heard get out there on. Super Tuesday or whenever your primary issue is someone finding because it is it's a circular it's a circular question. I understand that but if someone's willing to put their own money in. Is that a bad thing well again. That's going to be up for the voters Aaron to decide because I read recently in the last couple of days you know there have been stories written about statements that Mayor Bloomberg has made about stop and Frisk. Well one of the best ways to and full disclosure. I was at the Justice Department when we filed a brief Opposing stop and Frisk in a number of people. Want to know what's his position. One of the best ways to answer. That question is to have him if he makes the debate stage and he hasn't qualified yet. That's what debates are about Charon prize. Always a pleasure. Thank you for your time. My pleasure front next. The twenty twenty candidates are coming together to take on one of their own. Plus we brought you the story of Andrew. Yang's wife Evelyn. She talked about Set being sexually assaulted by her doctor and since she came forward another thirty seven. Women have come out with allegations about the same doctor. And you'll hear from one tonight. Great me or you didn't know if the attack was over. The wait is over coming to H. L. N. All new episodes of forensic files follow the evidence and crack the case forensic files to Premiere. Sunday February. Twenty third at ten only on a Gel with a no-holds-barred election right around quarter. Take a look back at some of the most hard-fought presidential races throughout history the CNN original series race for the White House is back for a brand new season. Sundays at nine on CNN tonight. Who's afraid of Bernie Sanders? Well apparently his fellow Democrats Amy Klobuchar warning that Sanders is not only out of step with the party but she says with the country. I was the only one on that stage that are raised my hand and said that. I didn't think we should have a socialist leading the Democratic ticket. I don't think that is where party is and I certainly don't think that is where our country is. King law is out front. She is in Nevada. The candidates are campaigning. So Kyung Senator Club showers far from the only one going after sanders for his left of center politics. Although she's right she's the only one who did raise her hand on that stage in New Hampshire saying she had a problem with a socialist at the top of the ticket. What are the other candidates saying? Now it's the other moderates who are joining her in this belief. It is getting a bit more forceful more direct and expect it to get more pronounced here. The state of Nevada. Why because the Culinary Union has told its sixty thousand members that a vote for Bernie Sanders would equal the elimination of their union healthcare. And they are talking about Medicare for all listen to Pete Bouche and what he said about Bernie Sanders. When it comes to healthcare this is just one example of an issue where we have this my way or the highway politics that suggest to people that you know. If you're not with me you you must be against me. If you're not for the revolution you must be for the status quo. We don't need a revolution. We want evolution and we need a nominee who can deliver it and that of course. Mike Bloomberg taking that same that Pete Budaj made and expanding it to say that Bernie Sanders simply can't win the general election against trump so chung a sanders. Though tonight. You know you're in Nevada. He is not there though even though it is the next day to vote He's not actually in South Carolina. Which is the state after Nevada? He is looking ahead to Super Tuesday Trying to really expand the map stopping North Carolina and Texas today a delegate rich Texas. And here's why take a look at this poll? This is a poll that just came out today and look who sits at the top of that. Poll it is Bernie Sanders. He is at Twenty Four Biden at twenty two Warren Fifteen Bloomberg ten P. Buddhis- seven and a reminder Pete Budaj was the one who was top of the heap in Iowa. Aaron all right thank you very much. Kung obviously a wide open race. It seems like right now exchange so quickly though. Thank you and out front next. What is it about Michael Bloomberg? That has trump's so obsessed plus follow up to an exclusive story that we brought you. Andrew? Yang's wife says. She was sexually assaulted by her doctor while she was pregnant. And thanks to her coming out. And her bravery thirty seven more women have now come forward with allegations about the same doctor. He raped molested all these women. And nothing's been done at the making of history. Cnn presents a story of the world's most famous royal family but windsors inside the Royal Dynasty Sundays at ten on CNN. Once upon a time this was the news the is flat. Devil Israel everything that we not. Then you'll wreck debu semi dark ages a Miracle Workers Anthology sees ten thirty nine thirty central on. Tbs tonight more than thirty five new. Accusers HAVE COME. Forward since Evelyn. Liang the wife of former presidential candidate Andrew Yang said of the CNN exclusive that she was assaulted by her doctor bringing the total to nearly seventy women who say they too were assaulted by that same doctor now. He never spent a day in prison prosecutors. Cut Him a plea deal in two thousand sixteen now as more and more. Accusers emerge the district. Attorney in New York is being pressured to file. New Charges to Griffin is out front an attorney now representing dozens of former patients. Say this man. Dr Robert Hatton could be one of the most prolific sexual predators in New York. City's history all the more stunning to his accusers. That this former. Obgyn has never spent a day behind. Bars is a tired. He raped. Molested all these women. And nothing's been done and that makes me Sheree us. How can that be Amelia? Heckman the latest to come forward says she trusted hadn't even believed he was doing her a favor squeezing her into being his last patient of the day back in two thousand twelve. She was told to completely undress and says well naked on an exam table. He assaulted her from a rubber glove examination to a tongue beard and I recoiled ten. Stop he just brought. We got up and I put my clothes on really fast etc no. We're the last ones in the office and I didn't know if you if you sort of eight me or some. The attack was over. Yeah Yeah I didn't I ran out and you never saw him again. Heckman was a young model at the time. She says she didn't tell anyone about the assault. Worried no one would believe her years later. She learned there. Were many others in two thousand twelve. New York. Police first arrested heading for allegedly licking another patient's vagina but prosecutors didn't file charges and hadn't returned to work at Columbia University's medical clinic for more than a month. That's when he allegedly assaulted at least two more women including Evelyn. Yang wife of former presidential candidate Andrew. Yang what happened to me should have never happened. He was arrested in his office and he was led back to work. Two years later hadn't was arrested again. This time indicted on nine counts involving six of his patients but even though the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance new of nineteen potential victims. Prosecutors cut a deal. Dr Hadn't pleaded guilty to two charges gave up his medical license and walked away. No prison time. No probation not even community service at fake getting you know slapped in the face and punched in the gut the DA's office is meant to protect us is meant to serve justice and there was no justice here since. Evelyn Yang told her story on. Cnn last month attorney says dozens more former patients have come forward saying they too were assaulted. Amelia Heckman and forty other patients who were not included in the plea deal want the. Da's office to reopen the case district attorney to revisit some of these cases. I want to be included. I wasn't included before Heckman and Yang along with dozens of other women are suing Dr Hatton and Columbia University. His former employer saying Columbia did nothing to stop the serial sexual abuse on countless occasions in legal filings. Columbia says it did. Nothing wrong. Hadn't has omitted guilt involving just two of his patients. Heckman listed in her lawsuit as Jane Doe Number Twenty Three says after Evelyn. Yang came forward her husband. James Heckman a media company executive encouraged her to go public. I think the more victims come out and show their face like hey. I'm a real person not just change. Oh you know maybe the district attorney will listen to that. Amelia Heckman says she plans to present her complaint directly to the District Attorney. Aaron the Manhattan District Attorney Sivan's hasn't spoken publicly about the hadn't case he's refused our request for an interview but in a statement told us that while we stand by our disposition of this difficult case we regret that this resolution has caused survivors pain. The alleged survivors of Dr Robert hadn't say that's just not good enough. Aaron all right drew Griffin. Thank you very much. And we'll be right back tonight. Trump's obsession with his rivals and what he sees as a particular shortcoming. Here's teeny there is nothing many about the height war. Little Michael will fail in a matter of minutes. President trump called Michael Bloomberg mini. Mike said he reminds them of a tiny version of JAB low energy. Bush suggested no boxes please as in no box for Bloomberg to stand on at debates reporters. Read the tweet storm from there founded mini. Mike is a five foot. Four inch mass of dead energy. Never mind that Mike. Bloomberg is actually around five seven. The White House even shared a photo shopped image of Bloomberg made to look extra petite but there was nothing petite about Bloomberg first response a Carnival Barking Clown Bloomberg said people call the president. Donald where I come from. We measure your hike from your neck up. We measure your height from your neck op is Bloomberg comparing brains on a more cerebral notes. A Bloomberg campaign tweeted a quote from gladiator time on a regular civil soon. President trump has been dishonoring his opponents this way for ages glitter rocket man. Little Marco a little mark. Oh a worry about it. A Little Marco but when he called Senator Joe Manchin Munchkin Guess. He's confused on that because I am a little bigger than him. He's got me about thirty pounds on weight. Ever since Sean Hannity Played Word Association with the President Michael Bloomberg very little. I just think of little partisans on both sides have been churning out me shrinking the other guy or is Hans. The Washington Post noted since one thousand nine hundred fifty two. When the age of television began. Twelve of the seventeen presidential contests have been won by the taller person. There's nobody I'd rather run against then little Michael. But his one anchor noted Bloomberg same height Ladimir Putin. And you don't hear President Trump calling him little. Vlad jimoh CNN little Michael. We measure your hike from your neck up neal and coming up this weekend on CNN. We have a brand new series about the world's most well no royal family least right now. That's for sure. Don't miss the premiere of the wizards inside the Royal Dynasty An excellent show and it is Sunday. Night is the first time you can see at ten o'clock right here only on CNN. Thanks so much for joining us. Anderson starts now.

President trump president Nevada Iowa Justice Department attorney Bill Bar Bernie Sanders Michael Bloomberg Flynn Erin Deputy Chief Andrew McCabe White House Erin He Michael Flynn Flynn Deputy Attorney General CNN Banana Republic Walton Judge Walton roger stone Cnn
When Our Stories Move the Culture

The goop Podcast

47:08 min | 1 year ago

When Our Stories Move the Culture

"Hi Elise Linen here co host with Gwyneth of the podcast today I'm talking to a true begin kindness as I like to call her her name is Catt Sadler she's the next guest and our special series that were hosting in partnership with Banana Republic called Women on top you know it's like all of that I think took more of a toll than I realized until I left okay twist to see it all and to shop Banana Republics Ball collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop culture changers creatives founders and CEOS scientists doctors healers and seekers here to start conversations because simply asking full stop believing that somebody's got your back or Super Men's coming we turn to ourselves and that's where you become empowered courageous all right over to a lease Catt Sadler is an award winning journalist mother and champion of wage equality she also has her own podcast tissot patient attracts positive things I'm GonNa Paltrow this is the Goop podcast bringing together thought leaders surplus clothing and the rest is history when we talked to the team at Banana Republic about partnering up on a special podcast series their vision revolved around the I mean let it go the Mayo soul is like it's unbound it's limitless but we will use words to limit ourselves when p started goop it's also the space which Banana Republic was founded back in nineteen seventy eight when to California creatives with adventure spirits began up cycling military questions and listening has the power to change the way we see the world today is no exception I'll let a lease fill you in on her extraordinary guest actually really like watching E. 'cause I liked you shush now you've like you brought a certain kindness room boss how she takes care of herself and manages the inevitable anxiety that creeps up and we talk about how important it is for us women to build a community for ourselves and it's her from her former work on e. a career she chose to leave because of a wage gap issue today we're talking about her courage when she decided to depart and how she became don't hold anything tightly just wish for want it let it come from the intention of real truth for you act as much as possible I did not realize how tired I was I did not know I was so used to just getting up and going and the light goes on and idea living a life no boundaries this is the inspiration behind their clothing today it drives how they source premium materials from around the world the ways they choose to end AK- which I was honored to be on a couple of weeks ago cat is a dynamic personality and pretty much lights up any room she walks into I'm a big fan you might recognize chew spokesperson around the gender wage gap she shares her fears were how she overcame them and just how she's been doing since we talk about what it meant for cat to them become or maybe all of the most interesting businesses were born out of curiosity a desire to explore to ask questions and cherry answers this is the space that Gwyneth was in when she to celebrity reporting that made it feel not so naughty to watch such an interesting assessment eight with designs and how they think about infusing style with substance this is all underplay in their fall collection which combines iconic banana republic styles with the monitor somewhat struggled with this idea that oh my gosh I'm not changing the world I'm just doing entertainment news and I'm reporting on all the happening get to my chat with Catt Sadler I was talking about you earlier today you were yet to the mark that you were coming and like you know I used mom could put it in two words thank you I take that as a huge compliment thank you it's so funny that you say that because I think I always you know even though I'm sure you're like why am I standing on this red carpet I WANNA die but definitely red carpets those are hard yeah there are a lot of amazing things and one of the things that kind of fueled me every day is just like you just don't know I just I would like try to like Basque myself in a certain in the kind of impetus for just getting up doing what I did sometimes yeah no and it felt you have your very curious person and I think that that you telegraphed that things about that job and being an entertainment journalist but you lose all your dignity the people who are so tired of being harassed right yes and no I mean I think yes sometimes that was the assignment light and just be a good energy and then I'd randomly from someone halfway across the world getting e unlike Switzerland that would just be like you made a difference in my day doc down at New York fashion week on the catwalk like with people trying to mob Kylie Jenner and who could stick the microphone in somebody's face somehow I I managed to circumvent that a little bit more of that when I was in local news out of very like much lower level girl is accused of murdering her baby or something horrific and then I'd have to go knock on the door of her family and like try to get a soundbite like that was willing and through divorce through anything and everything I was going through you have to discontinue ha you know and if you look good and and you have to be willing for people to tell you look like shed and then the well when I was covering general assignment stuff because that was like romantic yeah it was like you know this girl is like the sixteen year old having equal pay for more work it wasn't even equal work it's funny point that out it I still feel a certain Mike guilt about like pointing stuff out like that I and it's yeah yeah I that I can imagine having to ask and having to harass and ask and really pretty much in studio the majority of the time I didn't have to do too much in people's faces of that style's a feel like who you are sort of a beacon of kindness and so i WanNa really nice thing to say are and I have my in December of two thousand seventeen wow so yeah yeah and it was like a month before yes so he met when you were sort of you'd knew that you are not horrifying and then but by the time you know you're on national TV that the beauty is that because I was hosting a show called the daily ten first and then it had like this brightness to you and you don't know what but thank you and I'd be like what really young so is as weird as that seems that sometimes that was my contract and I'm so proud of you for not thank you I really awesome no regrets let me tell you and you and Gwen older in that they might agree no but I I we met I don't know maybe eighteen months ago when did you leave e I loved I wouldn't have sought the support encouragement or just the ears of people that I looked up to mentors of mine and so you know what got me in that room with you girls so nice because I was really at this point where I was not desperate but I think sometimes really like a certain curry some of finger and walked out were you what was what were your immediate sensations like then and days and weeks later that is actually true especially within that last year I was doing an interview the other day and the people like yeah you work the same hours you were there the same amount of time in the back of my head and sisterhood moments were it was very comforting oh well it was lovely to me you and it's been nice to see you in the modern sense and I sort of feel like well the my very last day and mind you this was twelve years after being there so it is funny because I remember I seen people come and go all those years on air p person so and I know you love your co worker so but now I think yeah I guess it was a month before and you're debating whether you were going to take it and sign partner while you're in bed with someone else there are no rewards for that there are no reward you're wasting your time you just Kinda clog up I couldn't threaten them that well if you don't pay me I'm GonNa go tell the world you know it was a very like sensitive issue so my last day I told the the disparity and the unfairness and it was also almost a slightly litigious thing where I couldn't like blackmail them a war I'm just kidding but it's slightly abusive clearly and it can be so it's so hard I mean I I I never would have kept cruising and being that girl that I'm good at my job I think and work hard and keep my head down but I was so frustrated one of those big energy people were if you're like it's like the whole and this is I'm sure so not like the actual expert like Funk hsi-wei like approach but it's like if you have that ages born out of just being so pissed off like I you know I used to anger was a bad emotion like we as women you know don't don't get angry and angry is just an e you know what I knew and not being able to really share that with anyone it was kind of like still this very unspoken thing even though my team and my agents articulated going on air and trying to be grateful but at the same time just so pissed off is highly emotional I remember like going to my dressing room after it was like the last couldn't say why was leaving so it was that was very difficult emotionally to know I was like knowing what I knew knowing that I was leaving for the reasons I was leaving certainly did this and I know my friends have where you're just like but I'll stay until something better comes but the reality is like no you're not going to meet your next romantic clock of me saying thanks everybody till like six o'clock us weekly or someone had said she left over a pay disparity issues so then I immediately posted to almost like when you're in a relationship and you know it's bad but it's comfortable and then you know pays your rent even though wish he'd pay my rent I've never had that Z.. Emotion and nothing comes from that but I was so angry at that point I felt so kind of taken advantage of that it spawned me into doing things and reaching out to people about how to tell my story or if I would even tell my story I wrote that on my blog but worded already leaked like somehow between like four hey I was like you know it was a really unfortunate situation but to just have even just your support in your ears it felt very much like one of those girl like girly clutter and if it's all clogged up then you're just going to be stagnant you have two free that up in order for the other things to come into your life for sure yeah so when you symbolically sort of gave it goodbye after five days a week for twelve years and just kind of collapsing literally by myself closing the door and just like collapsing and just kind of crying because I was like thousands the viewers on the morning live show that I was on and then also on e. news that night you know just goodbye and thank you for watching and it's been such a great run but well actually go there at seven and he got there at eleven you know in the last year anyway but I try not to be too tired because you are a nice kind advocation for not if not matching the not least if not surpassing than matching surpassing that's really funny at least maybe but in line with what most people get incrementally year after year and I just said to them point blank it was the president of the network at the time the the person overseeing the news division as a whole to men and I just said I just got no like what is it is he doubly good yeah and I know it's it's clearly a pernicious problem and we have a major wage gap and it's hard because everyone wants to factor in bowl and I remember like you know Juliana had left at one point and my coast terrence Jenkins a left on one point and I remember always watching these goodbye farewell parties and thinking too a hard but then I had planned and I had already written my reasons for leaving on my blog and after a lot of thought ends I mean the different lenses to me it's like it's been this way it's a systematic discriminatory pervasive it is I am is he good at his job as he just what is it and they just said or just looking through a different Lens and then there reason you know it was I finally got face to face like after kind of the decision had been made and I decided to leave in is but he didn't always so it was you know excuse after maybe another excuse they brought up the fact that I had a long that they allowed me to do they were after a lot of back and forth they were at their Max of what they were GonNa pay me which in their eyes was a substantial incremental kind of not substantial whether or not they like even vert lead think of it like that that's in my eyes what was happening yeah no I mean I think that that's that seems like a fair assumption any subjective qualities like oh I he's more familiar to me because I am also like a white male sis borne until about ten days after I left so time's up wasn't even a thing when I wrote my little blog on my website so I didn't know that you've thing that happens in corporations where if you're if you're a guy and you're part of the boys club and you're out golfing it's just like he's seen as more valuable that's just how it's been because he's a dude and I was so just like fed up I was like screw it I'm emailing with you know and I had not maybe been in that position I wouldn't have said bird heterosexual dude right and these things play out and they obviously have major repercussions for women and people have called my blog I wasn't gonNA push it to the next day I was just going to give that day that day so then I put up my kind of letter to the world right then what was there just learned particularly women of color absolutely did you in that moment feel was there part of you that was just relieved like you knew you needed to go at some point and of like well you you don't need the money your families but I think obviously people are missing the wider picture that this happens at every and every of that yeah that license right so that was a tough meaning but it was just so crystal clear as like there is no within by the way the differently ear 'cause that that whole narrative in my head which was like how will it infrastructure you when I knew that it was my time to say goodbye I was like so this was remember them saying things like but he's done red carpet like a cup by the way there were how many read like award show red carpets there's three a year right or an I do those two I don't you won't even notice a really care that was honestly just for me to kind of just reconcile everything that had happened share my truth while not he was because otherwise no one held accountable and I think the more people even understand aware of the fact that the parody the pay parody it continues industry at every level we need incredibly visible women to step forward and and get into the fray as well apparent to me I got a lot of really good like universal energy really leading up to my last day so even though it was really hard for me I think I was of myself I wonder what mine is GonNa look like I'm not going to be a forever no matter what anyway but I wonder what it'll be like and the did cut to my final day Dan which I think is kind of a righteous and awkward but a righteous thing to do I know salesforce spent many many millions of dollars to feel like a universal intervention that's a wonderful question looking back yes shortly after definitely us I'm trying to decide win that became like there's you know when actresses and people like you who are highly visible speak out about this stuff sometimes people have sort of a not an aversion or there's an anger quite authoritatively that women are just as insistent about asking for raises they speak up they push and yet we are are important battle for women because it's there too many of us I think to who are like oh I'm just happy to be here and I don't really know my value and who outside of my job that had to bring me money right so like she they've more work on the side was in boy was I no transparency into compensation there are few few major companies that have the publicize all of their pay data more salary information on me looking back to never even asked the question yeah I didn't know I didn't ask although I will say in your defense that the research suggests and and points of this and the transparency pieces huge I think for sure and I mean even in a short time now since I left I first ensuring that there were no that there was no pay inequality throughout their company and raise people up and when you say righteous do you think it's like congratulatory represented and more and more women opt out for various reasons including lack of pay parody and so I think that it this was always going to be my story because I couldn't quite figure out when I leave her wide lever how will go down and how my departure would look and I and so there was a bit of an Aha because they related so much and they're like well holy shit she just she took that leap how many of us want to maybe do that totally idea and I was it Henry and Heidi test case I can't remember the names at Harvard Business School but it's a Ken Rosen and Heidi Rosen and they presented it was like a v I mean economy went like wildfire and that's when I was really like Oh boy this isn't just me obviously this is not a singular story this is so many women's stories because people cared so much alike or who would announce that this was gonna be like this but immediately I mean that's the other kind of wild thing because time's up wasn't even want it all like Oh let's just throw a network under the bus it was just like this was my story and I'm going to share this story but then see raise and half of the students got the name Heidi and half of the students got the name Henry and same pitch different job responsibilities or something very vague like the whole Internet on twitter like just rush defense I'm pretty sure as alert seven most nights it's like thirty I think or or Forbes just came out with one hundred most innovative people and business guess how many were women that it's were where so much there are you look at the fortune five hundred and they're so few CEO's that are females. I mean it's crazy happen in part because it's veiled right like the only reason they get away no is because you work in a world of agents but for most people at companies there's I don't WanNa know depressing five one oh one I mean and there's been an outrage and across the Internet and Forbes we don't are often overlooked we were that by pushing there's a there's a slam down the men's perception of being you know it's the it's like the I'll tell you a little more about that before we get to our conversation some of the most interesting businesses I came to my defense and that was really that was gratifying. She's because just in the pudding yeah they lost a viewer and me was taboo like it even on a mammy by the way there's always the onus on us as individuals also to a degree and I'm like well shame buying things at least in my situation was that because it is a public story and because I by definition Emma public figure having been on television the woman was an ego maniac and you know the part were missing is that they part because the day part I guarantee you is when when the network did kind of give their justification which was something to the effect of well she's focused on mornings and now and he's night and you know enough how can I give to you or why would I even suggest that you follow in my footsteps when this is what's waiting don't need a systemic Crete's competitiveness that's that's unfair and this sort of like tokenism are to or not only like if I don't Jordy Man Yeah Base right I don't sell the mix that's what we have to you think yes because I think part of the programming that's that's happened for women is that I'm pretty sure like I was going through my phone just recently trying to get the ten thousand videos off of my iphone and I was like Oh there wasn't night this happened I mean it's disgusting right so but this is it happens up and down but what happens I think to women as you look at the leadership of these companies and you don't see yourself same everything was a dental except for the name and the women they did not like the woman and the man they thought was assured and self confidence all and embarrassed that I still don't know that still leads scratch or at least in my personal experience that that to this day I will say I mean one of the most Grad it was just going like I didn't even at the time look but I still have those videos on my phone I was like yeah I'm pretty sure that was like I was there at seven stiller to like but the viewer issue that happened just a total overall I think transparency is probably the only way and accountability it's important that the people at the network are accountable like we're doing this the right way and they do for pr reasons or a good good I mean and like like a good like this these are I mentioned a few weeks ago on the podcast that curiosity is my favorite state of being I try to carry that attitude with me every day and it's certainly easier uh we'll get back to Catt Sadler and just a second Time you can check out google dot com slash the podcast Yeah Oh back then yeah I think I always had I you know it's it's it sounds pretty like cliche but I was that like slash in Goup help back to my chat with Catt Sadler so going and today the inspiration for their clothing designing for life in motion or as they put it living a life of possibilities with no boundaries there fall collection ordinary practitioners teachers and culture changes leading classes and workshops we'll be covering a lot of ground physically and metaphorically will learn about intimacy the power of connects an an republic to get their fall collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop. It's that time of the year again loop through our special podcast series women on top I hope you'll listen to every episode these are the women who lead with power grace and curiosity who I think define what it means freed and psychiatrists will sue who are teaching a joint workshop on manifesting your Authentic Self Wall Street legend Sally Croatia will be leading a masterclass on money curiosity their founding story starts with a California couple who was looking for an adventure fun fact Banana Republic began as a safari inspired clothing company incidentally my favorite pastime and because it's goop you can also expect B twelve shots Galore amazing food and drinks and some surprises along the way if you've been to an needs to break boundaries and maybe most importantly poor working hard so that others to can live a life of possibilities so keep listening and keep shopping with our friends Shen fasting tools for reducing stress and how to quiet our inner critics we'll be joined by some of the people I admire most like psychotherapist and psychological astrologer Jennifer cousins I was directing videos and I was you know leading the play and we're always playing make believe and then when like home video cameras came out I'm really aging myself but in the Judy White is teaching a workshop on what dreams really mean vaulter Longo is giving us his longevity secrets and you'll get bounce on mini trampoline with more in roxborough which is all town girl who always had the itch of some description I mean I wasn't here only creative I actually I was in my family with help before I hope you'll be back and if this is your first time I can't wait to meet you the summit is on Saturday November sixteen and you can get tickets now a goop dot com it's like conic banana republic styled for now so there are utility inspired styles made from premium materials think your favorite dresses and pants updated an animal prints what would that have been like the eighties and I was like a world opened up to me and I just

Banana Republic Catt Sadler Elise Linen Gwyneth conic banana republic Forbes Sally Croatia California roxborough vaulter Longo Jennifer cousins Shen Judy White twelve years eighteen months sixteen year five days ten days
Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: The Jim Rome Podcast (BONUS 1: Mark Cuban)

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

46:05 min | 2 years ago

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network: The Jim Rome Podcast (BONUS 1: Mark Cuban)

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You have everything to gain once again, brickhouse, Rome dot com. That's brickhouse, Rome dot com. Right now at banana Republic factory save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire store. Let's take an extra fifty percent off clearance stocked up on dresses. Follow starting in nineteen ninety nine thank you nearest store. Shop online only manana factory right now at banana Republic factory save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire store. Let's take an extra fifty percent off clearance stocked up dresses, Apollo starting in nineteen ninety nine thank your nearest store. Shop online only banana Republic factory. Dirk is the most disciplined human being ever met in my life. But after every season, we would take trips to Vegas and just have fun. There was one time we were in the palm, and we're doing sake bomb. You don't have talking bombs work, right? Yeah. Well to the table powder details for literally all of our heads were not enough. An hitting the table. Yet they played asked sleep. Welcome to the Jim Rome, podcast and welcome to episode seventy nine with my guest, the one and only Mark Cuban Mark Cuban is not preneurs. He is the owner of the Dallas Mavericks. He is a business mogul ATV personality. A media pioneer. He is one of the most interesting people on the planet. I am pumped to show this conversation with you hard to believe, but I've been rapping with Mark Cuban for more than two decades. And this is that kind of conversation we cover a ton of ground all the way back to when cubes was teaching dance lessons to sororities to nearly losing a digit chopping ham in Pittsburgh to slamming sake bombs with Dirk Nowitzki in Vegas all the way back to the officiating in game one of the rockets warriors. If it sounds like we covered a lot of ground. It's because we covered a lot of ground. So pot up at seventy nine with the legend Mark Cuban starts right now. Mark. I gotta say it's been a minute or two since you and I visited in fact, I can't imagine this case, but maybe not sense you win you and I used to text back and forth about the release of our beloved T mobile sidekicks, though it was ever how rat asked that was, you would hit me up on technology, all the time, and I had to try to brag about what phone I was getting, and I would tell you about my new Samsung fold, but got recalled. They already recalled that thing. Yeah. They brought it back. My phone was great. Man. I loved it. I mean, I it it opens up. So the, the screen is big. And you know, it's the only downside was it didn't have a headphone Jack kind of like the iphone. But other than that, I love that thing. I can't wait to get back on your that's really something I did not get one, because the fact is marquee, you know, it's kind of crazy. I'm I'm an iphone guy, not because like I'm such a disciple of that. But the ecosystem is so crazy that I can't live without the I message literally everything I do is because of an I message. Is there any cure for that? I believe my attitude is I actually have three phones, one on each different networks. I've got t mobile, I've got Reisen, and I've got AT and T. And so, two of my phones were Samsung on one is iphone, but, like when I travel, you know, me, I'm not a meetings or or phone call guy. And so if I can't get access to a network to do my work, then then I'm stuck. And so I, I have a little bit of everything. So I'm I'm equal. Equal opportunity. It really is amazing. Given what? You've accomplished. You are not a meeting guy. You hate meetings. Don't you hate a man? It's just the biggest waste of time ever. I mean, I'd rather listen to two nails on a chalkboard. You know, because you got to sit in there and you got it. So how the kids where the doughnuts what's going on? Then you got to set up the meeting, and then, you know, the people who have to talk have to talk. And then it comes down to okay. What are we going to do for our next meeting where I'd rather be like, okay, just send me an Email? I'll ask you my questions. You know, you give me your answers and not only, you know, can we do it? Whatever time we do it, but I have emails, going back twenty five years. So all I can search back and literally I could go back and, you know, brag about, you know, Jim Rome being on on audio net back in nineteen ninety six, you know, and have emails from back then got that is so great. In fact, what about that, Mark, you go back to nineteen Ninety-six? And I think that's right around the time you and I started communicate when you when you back then we're trying to push things like internet broadcasting, when people didn't even know what the internet was if what was the. General reaction when you were pushing audio over the internet, how much pushback was there was like you moron just turn on a fucking radio. Turn on a fucking TV. Yeah. Right. It's just like what are you doing? You full. You know, it's just like don't you know how to use a radio, but you know, because back then to just to get on the internet. You had to have a PC with the modem download TCP IP software. Then connect to you'd have, then you have to have a browser then you had to figure out how to type in the WWW, you are L, and that was complicated. And it was slow, and so, you know, and it was expensive, too. So people really didn't get it that, you know, it was pretty obvious to me, and a lot of people that all that stuff was going to get easier and a lot less expensive. And obviously twenty some years later, you know, it is what it is. But if we go way way way back, I mean, now you obviously one of the most successful and recognised launch preneurs of the generation, but you grew up in a working class family in Pittsburgh. You don't when you were coming up when you were growing up where you kind of set aside is like some sort of prodigy the wonder kid every. Had extremely high hopes for. No, not at all man. It was. It was. It wasn't that way at all. I mean I I was smart. I mean I wasn't the smartest kid in class, but I was up there, but I mean my dad did upholstery and cars, and my mom had odd jobs, and I mean, I remember being in high school, and my mom being worried about me. And so she got me a job. She was working in a real estate office, and she got me a job, working for the owner of the company lane carpet, because she wanted me to learn trade, just in case things didn't work out for me where I couldn't afford college. It's amazing. So she want to make sure something to fall back on time. You gotta hustle you already were you were working your hustle already. Oh, what kind of jobs, did you have on the way up, what types of things did you do? Oh, lord. So, like I still baseball cards when I was like nine ten years old, to kids in the neighborhood, I would, you know, Pat repackage them, so you had a pirate, you know, in because I grew up in Pittsburgh, then full garbage bags. My dad got me a job for a little side hustle. So I can get some basketball shoes. I sold magazines door to door. I mean I can still. I remember some of my pitch, you know, bam bam, bam. If I you know, if you this is back in, you know, in the seventies and eighties, if you told your husband that you were spending twenty nine cents a day for the education and enjoyment or your family when he'd be really proud of you. And then I just did everything I was a stock clerk. Well, this place Ralph discount and Pittsburgh. That's so listerine and I would balk on boxed listerine and put it on the shelf. I worked at a grocery store called gracie's. I worked at a place called is lease in Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh. There's like a local delicacy called chip chop Pam. And so like the first week I'm working there. I'm I'm slicing ham, and I wasn't paying attention. And literally, I sliced off the tip of my second finger, and it's just like blood everywhere, every fortunately, it didn't do any real damage. I just gotta let funky fingerprint, but, you know, I just did everything into college. I mean I paid for my junior year with a chain letter. It was just doing disco lessons. I just, you know, I think I invented the work side hustle. That was my life. I was gonna say your mom was worried about your mom was worried that you might not have something to fall back on when you were grinding it out. By the way, the disco lessons was that help pay for college? Or did you do that to meet chicks all the above? I mean literally, I got paid twenty five dollars an hour back then to teach dancing to, to sororities. It was the best job ever. I mean twenty five dollars an hour. Are you kidding me? I think that job now that is so much money, then is so much money. So then you go to you go to Indiana. And then you bounce from there. And you go to Dallas at that point, so you get out of college, how much money did you have in your pocket? Then in what was the plan when you headed to Dallas? Oh my God. I had nothing. Right. So. I literally had a bar that I own with a friend in Indiana. And we got shut down for underage drinking. We let our friends in, and so, and that was probably the best thing that ever happened to me, but I had, you know, I didn't really have money. I had a nineteen seventy seven Fiat x one nine with a hole in the floor board. And I had a bunch of buddies that had gone down to Dallas and one of my buddies. Greg shipper was, you've got to come down here. You know, the weather's great the economy's good. There's jobs. The women are hot. You can stay with us. I'm like, wait back up. The women are hot definitely and so I get my car and, and I probably had sixty some bucks to my to my name, I had nothing and I had to, you know, one of those deals where I had a hole in the floor board, literally, I had to put oil in, you know, every sixty miles, and I get down, and they were living in a place in Dallas called the village, and we had six guys in the three bedroom apartment, I slept on the floor. Let's one of my buddies had a booty call, and then I got sleeping in his bed. We're on the couch. Ouch. Yeah, it was a mess. It was a mess. So what was that job? Where did you work down there? So my first job I got working as a bartender at a place called a lawns. And so I was the rookie bartender, and so, you know, I would fill in, and then I would do barbeques, type stuff and clean up and stay there till like three in the morning. And then during the day, I was just looking for jobs and ended up getting a job after a little bit at a place called your business sofware, which was like one of the first retail software stores in, in Dallas, and I didn't really have a computer background at all. And so I, I remember the question the guy asked me in the near he goes, well, you don't know a lot about computers. If somebody comes in, and asks, you a question, what are you doing? I'm like, look, nobody knows a lot about computers in PC. So I'll read the manual. And he goes, you'll read the manual, and I'm like, yeah, hired and that was actually a good job for me. And I was there about nine months till I got fired what happened. It's so you know, part of my responsibilities because it was a store where. You know, wipe down the windows and sweep the floor and make sure it's presentable for opening then unlocked the doors. And, you know, I was still, you know, working on commission and starving affectively living with all those knuckleheads. I was living with, and I had a customer, who was willing it was going to be a fifteen thousand dollars sales, and I was gonna make fifteen hundred bucks off of that. And that would have been what I needed to move out, and so, I called the owner and I said, look, I got this whole thing set up someone to watch, you know, clean the, the windows and open up the store and, you know, I'm going to go pick up the check and he said, no. And so I'm like, oh man. Come on. I, I need to close this deal and the guy I mean, they went out of business long, not long afterwards. So it wasn't a shock. But I'm like, okay, I'm gonna make you know, my first executive decision in my career. And I'm going to go pick up the check thinking, you know, this guy is going to be cool with it when I hand them a fifteen thousand dollar check. So I did just that. And he fired me. No wonder they went out of business. Right. I mean you tell me I like I was in sales, and I failed miserably Mark, but fifteen grand who the fuck did he add? That was closing fifteen thousand dollar sales beside you. Nobody. I mean that's network. I learned so much, I learned so much about business from that too, because, you know, the things he would tell me that we're his advice. Right. He's like Mark, you know, you need to go to this place to buy suit, so you look presentable you know, and you need to drive a nice car. I'm like, I'm wearing two for ninety nine dollars suits polyester suits at stand up on their own. You know, I didn't take him to get dry cleaned. I'm wiped them down. Right. And, and he's giving me advice on. You know you gotta look good. And here's if you ever wear glasses goes this place called peeps. I'll never forget and but you know he was not he would not go on sales calls. He figured, I'm the sales guy and there's people who walked in the door. And you know that'll that'll be all we needed, and I learned right there. And then that, you know, you gotta sell if you're going to start a company you got to sell. And when I. Got fired my buddies, and I went on a trip down to Galveston, and that was a shit show in and of itself. And then I came back and started a company called micro solutions, what happened in the Galveston. You know, it was like six guys, you know, just swamped in this place. And we have pictures of it, it's hysterical, where, you know, we found this girl who wore these suits that, you know, back then. I'm not even gonna go there. It's. But in any in any event, you know, it was just a whole lot of cheap beer, and, you know, being stupid and, and doing rotgut vodka and having fun. You know, Mark, I don't wanna be irresponsible you and I are close in age in like I said, you when I go back some more than twenty years gift. Like you just said, I don't wanna go there back in the day. You and I would have gone there in a heartbeat right in the world's changed. Like I mean, I talk about this all the time, like I'm really proud that I still obvious show in a brand and a podcast, blah, blah, blah. But damn the show is so much better back in the day because we could go there. How do you navigate and is somebody who runs the companies that you do and social media being what it is? You gotta pick your spots now, right? Yeah. You do. I mean you always have to be aware and you just, you know, anything you are. I say you just assume somebody's gonna repeat it somewhere and you know. And you still I don't want, I'm never going to be completely politically correct and all that. But, you know, and my kids are nine twelve and fifteen to. And so, you know, I think that has more of a bearing on what I say than anything else, I mean, it's too late to go back and, you know, recover the things I said and did when I was single, you know when I was younger and, and, you know, that was done is done there. And but I guess that I think more about them than than what somebody might say, and social media, just because they're obviously checking it out and seeing it, as well there, this is Julie. Hey calendar. What's my morning like Julie's about to have a long day? Ten purchase birthday card nine zero five dry cleaning. Did you just go backwards? I'm sorry. I can't fit that question into your schedule. Nine fifteen cry for differ days, that won't end let schwann's help with swans he can get delicious meals. Like go from freezer to table in minutes, not hours ordered delivered done. That's homemade easy. Visit today schwann's dot com right now at banana Republic factory save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire storms. Let's take an extra fifty percent off clearance, doc addresses, the polo of starting in nineteen ninety nine thank you nearest store or shop. Online, only then Republic factory. So I'm slamming his much, Johnny. Oh product into my closet, is I possibly can. I love Johnny. Oh, johnny. Oh, invented and patented the Twitter. Button me tell you about that. It's a hidden button between the second and third button and it's featured on all Johnny. Oh shirts. The Twitter button is the first panic button to. Make sure that you're not to buttoned up and you're not to unbuttoned. What it comes down to is this the hidden button, solves the age old second button dilemma, should, you bought one or should you button to it's no longer a dilemma it solves the issue for you, and every single, Johnny. Oh shirt comes with their patented Twitter button. So you're always going to look just right. It is a total game changer. Try it yourself right now. Use the promo code Rome and get twenty percents off your first order at Johnny dash, Odom, comma checkout, that's who may thirtieth. That's twenty percent off the regular price button ups, which come into range a fabrics patterns and styles and shipping is free for orders over eighty five bucks, again, Johnny dash Odom dot com, promo code Rome, and get twenty percents off your first order, free shipping on orders over eighty five bucks. Go to Johnny dash dot com for your Twitter. Shirt at twenty percent off. Check out the wide selection of shirts, and other products ranging from polos too shorts pants women more, Johnny dash, oh dot com. He co founded broadcast dot com. And then you took that company public in nineteen ninety eight. It explodes is an IPO. It's up two hundred and fifty percent. The first day I mean, you've probably had a lot of amazing days and your business career. What do you remember about that day? What was that? Not a lot. So here's what I remember. So we were I remember being in the car going into the NASDAQ stock exchange. It's not really an exchange as digital, right? But they have this big wall, and everything where they were they showed the openings of stock, and we were betting on, you know, where the stock would open. We had priced it, so that it would it would have a big pop because we, we win this thing on the road show, where you sell the stock to different investors and people didn't have any clue what we're talking about. They didn't understand anything. We were saying didn't know what streaming was or internet. Broadcasting was, but they were willing to buy anyways because the internet was so hot. And so come come the day, July eighteenth nineteen ninety eight we're, we're going there to the NASDAQ, and, you know, we, we price it eighteen and other folks in the car are saying, you know, it's going to be twenty five and I'm like, no, it's going to be thirty three and they're like you're crazy. No chance it's going to be thirty three and so we get there and we're waiting. Thing, and we're waiting and we're getting nervous because the market in New York opens at nine thirty. And here we are at ten then eleven and twelve o'clock and it's still had no been meaning the number of orders, they couldn't match up the orders from the buyers, and the sellers because there weren't enough sellers, which was good for us. And the next thing you know, is probably close to one o'clock. It opens up at six sixty one or sixty two and then hit seventy two and then closes at sixty two and three quarters, which was at that time, the biggest one day jump for any stock IPO in the history of the stock market. And so we had to do you know what? Knuckleheads would do. We went out and found some bar arts. I forget it was like the a historic historic Wall Street bar. We all go there, right? Harry's. Harry's. Yeah. Harry's. And we go straight there after the market closes, and we turn on CNN or CNBC, or whatever it was called back then. And every time they mentioned broadcast dot com. We had to do a shot. And so, by four thirty five o'clock whatever it was. We were obliterated. And so we had we had cars where selves, obviously. So we take her car back to where we're staying. And we're like okay we're sleep for four hours and will wake up and we'll do it again. And that's exactly what we did we went and realized we had a bunch of our friends, and so the deal. Well, we raise money when I'd funded the beginning of it like the first I don't know how however many hundreds of thousands of dollars. And then we let our friends in for thirty K for one percent of the company and that thirty K turned into twenty two million dollars. Oh shit. Yeah. No shit. Right. And so that, so our buddy. These were were just like freaked out as well. And so they took us to a place called lot, one. Oh one sixteen or something like that. And just literally, no lie. They ordered two of everything on the menu and two bottles of everything, everything that they could find I don't even know what the tab was. But, you know, we went until I dunno till they kicked us out. Whatever time that was, and I don't remember the end of the night, but it was it was a hell of a night, why what a story. I don't know what the tabloids by guarantee was less than thirty mil. Well, that is something else. So now Mark, you are one of the stars and investors on shark tank, which is a massive massive hit. I gotta know what did you think of this show? When you first got your shot as a guest, and what was your mindset in your approach to your appearances. Yeah. You know, when they first asked me about coming on the first before it started the first year, and then when the SEC came after me before I kicked her ass. That ABC said, no, it's probably, not a good idea to have Mon and then by the second year, the show was struggling, and they brought me on as a guest shark. And I went on there thinking that the show has no chance that was bouncing around from like Tuesday nights to Thursday nights Sunday nights. But, you know, I'll go on there and just have fun and just, yuck it up. And by you know, hopefully by couple of businesses or investment couple of businesses that would work for me. And you know, so I do my guess shark three episodes. And then they invite me back fulltime the the following season. And then, that's when the show took off it just exploded, not necessarily not because I was on there. But just people got used to it, they gave us a spot on. Golly, what was it wasn't Friday night yet? Maybe it was Tuesday night, and then event, and it, it, it hit, you know, and, and I was shocked as anybody because I really didn't think it would last night, actually, I think that it's got lots with them putting you on as. Regular some curious. What what's taping the show like what are those days like how many deals do you see any given day? So here's how it works. We should probably two two and a half weeks in June in the same in September, and we'll get there. I, you know, we go on we're supposed to be on set at eight thirty. We start shooting at nine I pulled up about eight fifteen throw my food. They throw on some makeup. I mean you know what it's like when you do a TV show, right? So they, they print all up and started nine o'clock we start shooting. And when the first deal when the deals come out, we don't know anything about them other than their name. So when they walk out on the carpet and the deal set up there on the carpet, they start pitching us, and that's the first we know anything about them. And you know from there it's just whatever we want to do. I mean, there's, there's no set you know, we don't get information. They don't tell us what to do with our money, and it's all real. You know, the questions are real everything. The answers are real. It's all, you know it can be really intense and I guess the other. The thing is on television. The deals last about ten minutes in real life. Like if it's a really stupid deal. It'll last twenty minutes if it's, you know, marginally interesting, the less forty five minutes, but if it's intense, and we all wanna piece of it, it can last an hour and a half or two hours. And then they have to edit it down to something that's usable for television. And so in any given day they'll bring in we'll see ten deals and I feel sorry for the deals right after lunch because, you know, the first went after lunch we're like half asleep. But yeah, so we'll see ten deals a day, probably two hundred fifty to three hundred deals in a season, and then they'll cut those down and probably of, of the deals. We see twenty five percent of them won't air. And so, you know, there's some unlucky schmucks that just come in there with the life on the line. And I feel horrible for them. And you know, but they just for whatever reason the producers didn't think they were good enough to be on TV shark bait shot for sure. So really quickly. That to a couple of years back. Alex Rodriguez was a guest shark on the show, and you and he ended up together an investment with the gronkowski brothers protein shaker bottles. Right. That's not surprising. I am curious about Alex Rodriguez though, this guy was the face of the Royd era. The poster poster boy, for cheating now is the voice of baseball. He's Jlo's fiance. He's a guess shark on the show is a business partner of yours. I'm not never seen. A guy bounced back quite the way he has. How do you think he did that? I'll tell you a little story that most people don't know when Alex was going with suspended and going through all the shit. Right. Some mutual friends connected us instead, and they said, you know, Alex Mark has been through the SEC shit again where, you know, you're under attack, and you find yourself on the front page of every newspaper. And everybody's talking trash about you go talk to Alex and Gimson. But vice how you got through it and we sat down we had lunch and then kept in touch. And basically, I told him was look, if you're gonna fight all the time. Fans are knocked in like you. I mean that's not going to benefit your brand, and the league is all reroute on it. So you're not gonna you know you can make it seem like you didn't do it but fans, forget people forget. And but you gotta you just gotta let it go. And what I would recommend that you do is just say, you know, when you come back the next season, how grateful you are, to be a New York. The Yankee for your last season. How much you love the fans how much the support of the fans matters to you and just take this positive? I love you all attitude, and that's exactly what he did. And I'm sure he got the same advice from others as well. But it just turned his brand around and turn people's perception of him around, and then you know, he, we worked his way up and, you know, he calls me up the producers at asked him to be on shark tank. And I'm like, yeah. You know, Alex is actually got a really good business mind. He's, you know it's not like he's got this deep education and business. But he works really hard at it, you know, he puts in a lot of time to read he puts in a lot of time to. To talk to a lot of high end management people and, and investors and entrepreneurs. And so when he by the time he got to the show, I mean, he knew as wheelhouse, he knew he has gym he was operating, you know, a variety of different investments and he always talks about. He's the type of investor that invest in the jockey more than the horse, and that's exactly his approach, and it works great for him. He was. He was a great guest shark shark tank. I'm sure it'll be back in a month Tomase. And you and I can have this conversation. Get this far into it without talking basketball, but twenty twenty years in since buying the Mavericks. How's that sound has that make you feel Razi crazy? I mean you know what? It's like. I mean we you know we were the young dudes, right? Ninety. Not anymore. Not. Yeah. I know. Right. We were tearing it up and, you know, now it's like fuck. I've been here twenty years, and, you know, in the low in some respects, a lot is change, and in other respects, nothing's changed to twenty years. And, you know you like to point this out as somebody who is in the sports business father time is undefeated father time is undefeated, so things run feed it in the history of the world father time is one of those things, so you have Dirk retiring, I got to know what is dark, dark meant to your franchise in really the NBA overall. I mean you know what he's meant to the Mavericks. I mean he is the Mavericks, everything everything that we are. He is. I mean, we got from him just his attitude who he is on the court. You know, the first end I out, you know, the fact that the superstar of your team is humble, and he works harder than everybody. You know, he's got a good sense of humor. He's self deprecating. Just all, you know, all the things you want to see in somebody. That is going to be the face of your franchise. And in terms of the global expansion of the NBA, the face for all of Europe, you know, if not the world, and, you know, he's, he's just that type of guy, and I, you know, we talk a lot, and I was just talking to him at the gym the other day at a practice facility, and he's like our we put on twelve pounds fifty nut is on its way. I'm like you're going to be a piglet in a minute here at is great how much dad he is. He is Mark, you know this better than anybody is great a player as he might be a better dude. How much shit talk? Oh my. You know, I it's so passive aggressive. I mean, and he comes up with his own words, you know, or his own little phrases or selling, settings stains like what like everybody's a burger, right? You know, your burger your burger or if somebody, you know, something good's, have something good happens guy makes us shot that he never had no reason to make, you know, everything's happy birthday. You know, or if it's not going, it's a circus out there, you know, he's just got these same ranson seines that he's been using for twenty years. It's just and we, we all just die. And you know Dirk, he's always the last one out of locker room because you want to be the first in literally last guy out. So after a game we're always waiting on dark did I mean it it's, it's gonna be sad. I mean, it's we'll we'll miss him but I know he'll be around it's going to be so hard. I would imagine, so he actually came on this podcast. Mark few years back, and he described his relationship with you in a perfect way. He said, quote, how many own? Owners come to their best players, bachelor party and quotes, obviously, you guys were you guys were obviously tight. If you're a bachelor party, I asked her to elaborate on the party. Here's what he had to say. Listen in the mind, and we had a blast and that kinda shows what kind of relationship we have and had over the years and it's been. It's been awesome eased or anything you can share about the bachelor party involving cubes. Yeah. We went one night within Toronto and then with the two nuts in Vegas. And that's that's about as much as much as I could say there are some Mark. I know better than to ask the same question twice. But is there any stories that you can give away from Dirks bachelor party, not from the bachelor party? But I can tell you, they're, they're we've gotten kicked out of more than one bar. He's got to be a good guy to throw back a few with right? I mean and dirt. So Dirk is the most disciplined human being ever met in my life. I mean literally when you know during the season, he won't eat sugar. Nothing fried no alcohol, nothing. But. After every season, we would take trips Vegas and just have fun. And we, we, there's one time we were in the palms in Vegas and one of the Chinese restaurant, maybe tau, I forget the name of it, and we're doing sake bombs, and, you know, sake bombs work, right? Yeah. And so we're all positive pounded table to literally all of our heads were not enough in hitting the table. And it. Yeah. They, they platelet asked us to leave. Oh, they ask you leave were the were the Maluku, still there at the point that this was back in the day in day asked you to leave leave. And it was just you. We're were kinda loud. Make it up to making noise was launched the ghost bar at that place. Member upstairs, this is that one of the restaurants. Got it got it so more twenty seven. And I really appreciate your time, Romans, they're turning eleven you want it all you want, it all was that think about the one. Do you find yourself thinking about the one that you one or the ones that got away the ones that got away? Yeah. I mean, winning is amazing Balu losing his always far more bar, more painful. Why is that? Everybody says that it's so true every great athlete. Coach owners always said that. Why is that? Why can't folks on you win? I guess, and you know, it, it means something didn't go the way you planned. Yeah. I remember, you know, the countdown the, the most intense moment, the year we won was the last thirty seconds where it dawned on me that we were going to win, you know, we're up ten or eleven with thirty seconds to go, and it was over and then running on the court hugging everybody, it was almost like 'climactic right there. And then, you know. But, you know, the times we lost, you know, particularly when you think you're going to win or you have the better team and, and it didn't work out for whatever reason that that's the most painful, because you just you just question everything that you've done. And you know that, you know, there's nature of the NBA is that, you know, some guys get older and that impact their performance or their contracts are up. And, you know, you have cap space limitations. Whatever it may be. And you don't know if you'll get the same opportunity again. What you've got that one. They can't take that from you. Right now at the nanna Republic factories, save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire store, plus fifty percents off clearance stock up on dresses. The was starting in nineteen ninety nine find your nearest store or shop. Online only factory right now at banana Republic factory save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire store. Plus, fifty percents off clearance stock up. Dresses, the palm of starting in nineteen ninety nine thank your nearest store or shop. Online only Panetta factory. Listen, I may paid professional and as a pro, it, keeping all of you in line and interviewing the right people in the right sports at the right time. Here's some simple advice that can help you when you're looking for pro tips on vehicle, maintenance or repair look, no further than O'Reilly, autoparts, whether it comes replacing your battery getting advice on proper car, maintenance, or even just getting the best bang for your buck. Their expertise them can help you out every step of the way. O'reilly auto parts. Better parts. The prices every day. What do you make of the officiating in game? One of the rockets warriors series and overall the state of officiating in the game right now, you know, I've been tweeting about that. So let let's start with questions to the state of eating, you know, if you want to know, the future of NBA officiating look at the league because without exception, at least to this point all the rest come from the G league, and I just don't think we spend enough time, money or effort in training them. And by the time we promote them to the NBA because, like we said earlier father times undefeated for referees as well by the time they get there. It's almost too late to make them great. And so you, you get who they are by the time they get promoted. And we're not I think that's creating problems for us, and we don't we're starting I think we're supposed to start recruiting international officials more, but, you know, we don't and and you know, we don't go out there and just grabbed the best college officials you know, just bring them right into the NBA. So, you know, in some things have got to improve our. We're going to have challenges in terms of, you know, the officiating right now, you know. It always can be better and they'll admit that, and everybody will will with that. But it it's it's again I think it comes down to management more than anything else. I you know, we've had so much turnover in the person who's in charge of NBA officiate in my twenty years we've had eight people. And so, that's what two and a half year term for everybody. And that's just that's just not going to get done in something that's so critically important to our business. And so I mean I have issues there in terms of game one, you know, in terms of three point shots might the way I've always looked at our learned and different referee indifferent, wrestle, disagree is don't, you know, when you think of a three point shot, don't think of it as being, you know, specific or unique because it's behind the three point line if that, same, that same shooter did the exact same thing during the layup. And there was contact and the player wasn't vertical. Is it a foul? So if James harden, you know, contorts himself during the layup we call it a great athletic play. You know if you can, you know, even if it creates the contact even if it's you know as long as that, that defender is not vertical then it's a foul, and it's the same thing in for three point shots. You can you know you can control your body as much. As you want. But if that defender comes straight towards you now the defender angles. That's different, right? Because then there's not truly a contest and you're not going to the shooter. But if the defender goes straight at you, you can make your body do anything you want. And if you can create the contact more power to it's again on the flip side for defender, if you if a guy's driving to the basket, and you can get in front of him, and he hits you straight on and you fall down. It's always a charge. You know, but the onus on that three point shot is on the defender. And so the real question becomes, if you know if they should be called should you even contest it, you know, or should you make sure you're just straight up and down like you would be right in front of the basket. Jaba given this little bit of thought so bottom line. A lot of money. I know lots of money. I really appreciate your candor on that, too. So bottom line with the rockets. Do they have a right to have a beef or did? They let it get into their heads and get away from right to. Yeah. If it was me, I'd be, I'd be calling up the head of officiating, and just, you know, just be giving him shit left and right asking them to change it. Because, you know, like I said, it doesn't matter wearing the court, you are as if defender is going what they call eight to be from where they were toward you and they're moving towards you and it's direct line and they create contact. It's a foul. The story if you're shooting got it Margaret equipped before you go. You've been on the cutting edge of technology for a long time, because of that people want to know where you come out on artificial intelligence. You know where I'm going with this lawn. Musk is terrified of it? He's tried telling everybody that he can that it's a dangerous dangerous threat to our future existence. Bottom line. Are we creating our own demise or is there a way to manage the? Power of artificial intelligence. So, yes or no? It just depends on what we do. They'll be things like robotic dexterity. You know, staying power batteries, because right now, batteries are too big and, and too, bulky, and don't in don't can't last long enough to, to really create a robot or a or Terminator. If you will that can move and do things. And in terms of generative AI where they start to think for themselves. You're also going to need to define the algorithms or you. Depending on the circumstances. You you're going to have somebody that has to originate it. And that's something you can maintain a monitor and police. And then there's also the chips that go in there. And I think, really the, the best opportunity is to serialize and manage all chips that are made beyond a certain specification, because the big problem and, and miss miss. This is that there's only a few chip fabs places that make really, really high end chips in the world that, that can do the best of the chips and one's in Korea Samsung and one's in Taiwan. Taiwan Semiconductor, which are both neighbors to China. And, you know, China thinks that Taiwan is still part of China, and I think that's our bigger. That's a bigger risk right now than terminators taking over the world. Us something else. Remember those those two way pagers back in the day time they Tom port nine. Those things it's changed. Now man. That was great. That was. Oh, I just Don one last thing. I saw, I'm a huge riccar laogai, you probably know that I saw with some curiosity that the Lakers may think about this. I know you're not surprised by anything you see in the NBA at this point. But what about the current state of the Lakers? I mean, could you imagine one of the most storied franchises ever? Having lost more games than anybody in the league in the last six years and magic just quit as president of basketball ops. Andy told the media before he told his boss, and his defacto family. And Jeanie Buss when you look at the Lakers, what do you think right now? We're things one. I really liked Jeanie Buss. She is just everybody does. She's the best. You know, a lot of respect, she's the heart and soul. The NBA on the other hand, nothing makes me happier. You know, I've said it before, you know, it wouldn't break my heart at the Lakers stuck forever. You go. I think we're gonna walk off on that market. I am. So glad to have you on the spot. You guys gave us the dotted audience back in the day. And people probably would never have a clue. I am if it weren't for you. So I'm really appreciative. Right now at banana Republic factory save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire store. Let's take an extra fifty percent off. Clearing, doc, addresses Apollo starting in nineteen ninety nine find your nearest store shop online only banana Republic factory right now at banana Republic factory save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire store. Let's take an extra fifty percent off clearance stock up on dresses. Apollo starting in nineteen ninety nine find your nearest store shop online only banana Republic factory. Hear me out. I know it can be frustrating, especially if you're running late or you're in a big hurry. You find yourself at a railway crossing, and you're waiting on a train. The signals were going between isn't even there yet, and you feel like you know what I can make it across the tracks. I'm just going to do this don't ever for any reason because the train is going faster than you expect it to be, and the train cannot stop even if the engineer hits the brakes right away. It can still take a train over a mile to stop. And by that time, what used to be your car is just a crushed hunk of metal, and what used to be you probably better that we not even go there. The point is this, you cannot know how quickly the train is going to arrive. The train. Can't stop even if it does see you. And the result is the worst thing ever. So if the signals are on the train is on its way in, you need to remember, only one thing, you need to stop. Because trains can't so how good was that fine me? Another owner in sports who shows up like Mark Cubin. You can't huge shutouts Mark for the conversation. And the candor SOGA finally get caught up with him. Speaking of catching up if you've ever missed an episode of this podcast, all seventy nine of them are available for playback on demand at all times, and you want to go ahead and get some scribes so you never miss whenever again. Because once you are subscribed, every time I push out a new episode it will automatically hit your device and download it's easy. It's simple. It's smart and clutch. So make sure you do that. Now I know a lot of you have been waiting on the voicemails and your wait is finally over here, they are catch next week for up eighty with Golden State Warriors, GM Bob Myers. See, then I'm out. I knew message. Steve motherfucking Elkington. No bring that damn voicemails to this daring Acuna and I am out. Message saved next message, Jimmy marrying rally here. First thing new to the podcast game, but listen to your podcast. The hell is the fucking man. He should be a weekly contributor to the show. He is a fucking. Man message saved next message. Facetime. Jim. Message deleted next message GM with from southern Oregon second in a little high on your podcast, but do the Ricky Williams interview was amazing, how intelligent and enlightened is that guy. Holy shit. And speaking of enlightens, I'm, I'm pretty pretty high right now. And drunk and, and hawk sunup. You're still Sparrow to me kidding, buddy. Can if you're with L here. Cool with me. Nice job on the twenty six or fast and furious. Paul Walker forever. Message deleted. Next message a Jim. This is Bob Kraft. Just wanted to call in talking about this handful of show Jay's in Palm Beach county. This is basically just a Hindi excuse. 'cause we win the Super Bowl every year. I'm not going to take these charges lying down. You know, it's just half the deal with this is just kind of hard to swallow, I'll talk to you again. But probably not before Palm Sunday message deleted next message. Hi, jim. Are you going to tell us on the podcast, who the hell that ball diet message saved? You have no more messages right now at banana Republic factory. Save big to seventy percent off your store. Vicky. Doc up dresses starting in nineteen ninety nine find your nearest store or shop online only banana Republic factory right now at banana Republic factory save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire store. Let's dig to fifty percent off clearance stock up. Dresses the poll starting in nineteen ninety nine. Thank you nearest store or shop. Online, only factory.

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Fight Like a Mother

The goop Podcast

45:02 min | 1 year ago

Fight Like a Mother

"<music> hey guys i'm elise lunen the chief content officer here goop. Today's guest is shannon watts. You may have ever heard of her. She is amazing and she's the first gas to kick off a special eight episode series that were hosting in partnership with banana republic called women on top which i'm excited sighted to tell you more about <hes> some of the most interesting businesses or maybe all of the most interesting businesses mrs were born out of curiosity desire to explore gas questions and share answers. This is the space that went was in when she started goop. It's also the space as from banana. Republic was founded back in nineteen seventy eight when to california creative with adventurous spirits up cycling military surplus clothing and the rest. I was history when we talked to the team at banana republic about partnering up on a special podcast series their vision revolved around the idea of living a life no boundaries. This is the inspiration behind their clothing. Today it drives how they source premium materials from around the world the ways they choose to innovate with their designs and how they think about him using using style with substance this is all in display in their fall collection which combines iconic banana republic style with a modern twist to see it all and to shop an an republic collection had two banana republic dot com. Don't hold anything too tightly. Just wish for it why it let it come from the intention of real truth for you and then let it go now. The mayor soul is like it's unbound. It's limitless but we will use words to limit ourselves when people stop stop believing that somebody's got your back or super men's coming. We turn to ourselves and that's where you become empowered. Courageous participation asian attracts positive things. I'm gonna paltrow. This is the goop podcast bringing together thought leaders culture changers chirs creatives founders and ceos scientists doctors healers and seekers here to start conversations because simply asking questions and and listening has the power to change the way we see the world. Today is no exception. I'll let elise fill you in on her extraordinary. Guest all right over to elise shannon watts is the founder of moms demand action and the author of fight like a mother. She's also a mom of five. She admits she never i thought it would be so involved in politics policy change but after the sandy hook shooting. She said she couldn't just sit. She had to take action today. Moms demand action is one of the largest grassroots movements in the country focused entirely on preventing gun violence. Shannon is confident that this issue will be fixed and we've made a ton in a progress she gives us a lot of reason to be hopeful and to not give up ever and so you need to learn how to take failure as feedback and and even if you lose one battle a very long war you can learn in win the next one and we have done that over and over again in our organization shannon shares her own vision for how she thinks things things will change in the upcoming election cycles and she explains how together we can turn those hopes into reality above all. I think shannon reminds us our voices matter after one note before i turn it over to her. We spoke earlier this summer. When shannon was in town so this conversation was recorded prior to the heartbreaking shootings and murderers and dayton el paso also south haven in gilroy. Everything shannon says remains relevant arguably more important than ever stick around to the end to learn about ways. We can all help now. Let's get into my conversation shannon watts. Thank you for being here. I always feel a little guilty guilty about asking activists to take time out to talk to us just because i now valuable your time is i appreciate that but honestly it's so important to talk about the work. We're doing in the fact that that were winning getting that message out alone that we are winning when so many people think this issue or or other issues can be hopeless. Reminding people of all the progress. We've made is such an important part of what i do yeah now. I loved that just so everyone knows your book came out in may and it's great not only for what it lis- out in terms of the progress we've made on gun sons and gun safety but this idea to that anyone can not only join a movement but start a movement. I approve of that. <hes> you know i certainly never imagined that i would be politically active or that. I would be an organizer organizer that i would be the tip of the spear on such a volatile issue but here we are. I know so. Can you take us back to your kitchen right. After sandy hook with thirty two twitter followers. I didn't even have one. I had a twitter handle that was inactive but i had seventy five facebook friends and i was folding laundry. You know which is sort of a fulltime job from five <hes> i had been a stay at home mom for five years after leaving a career in corporate communications and i saw the new starting to come in that there had been a tragic shooting in newtown connecticut at an elementary school in no one knew at that time really how bad it was and and i can remember just sort of saying to the universe. Please don't let this be as bad as it seems. Now we all know it was a million times worse than really even today that we can fathom that twenty children and six educators would be slaughtered in the sanctity of an elementary school and just like you and everyone else in america. I was absolutely absolutely devastated that this was happening but then i became really angry i saw pundits and politicians come on television and say will the solution is more guns or it's arming teachers and i didn't know anything about gun violence. I didn't know anything about gun laws but i knew our nation was broken. I knew that was not at the answer and so i thought i'm gonna look online and join something like mothers against drunk driving. I'm going to get off the sidelines and get involved and i searched for probably almost in our and i couldn't find anything at all out there. I found some think-tanks in washington d._c. Mostly run by men. I found some state or city organizations again again mostly run by men. I wanted to be part of a bad us army of women that was like mothers against drunk driving which was so pivotal for me in so many in the eighty snuggling up yeah it was this idea of going from everybody's parents kind of had a few drinks and then drove to they were pariahs really socially if they did that and so i knew that the power of women and specially moms when they got together and and i also felt that moms were the union to the gun lobby zhang that the lobby had made this very vocal minority afraid that their guns we were going to be taken away but that eighty million moms regardless of the political party who were afraid their children would be taken away would win the day but again all of that. I didn't know when i started this facebook page which <hes> i didn't have a focus group in my kitchen so i called it one million moms for gun control soon after my daughter who's gay told me that one million moms was a group trying to get ellen. Ellen degeneres not to be the j._c. Penney spokeswoman which is bad and then i got a call from a congresswoman who said we don't use the word gun control like that's verboten <music> phrase in d._c. Which i didn't know when i was in indiana and so we changed our name pretty immediately but the power of social media in those first few hours days as weeks that caught fire with so many women and moms across the country and and men too who said it was time for them to get off the sidelines totally. I loved that passage in the book. I don't remember exactly who was saying but it was another concern mom and she i think had been agitating are having the same feelings as you and as it would turn out almost every mom in america and she was asking herself who will lead and i thought that was such a poignant but small point in the book doc of you saying. I guess i'm going to lead which so many of us i think it's that it's like when the crowd gathers a no one takes action because there's always this expectation that someone else will step forward but seems like it needs to be an unconscious choice where to really happen. I i would agree with that. You know if i knew in retrospect what this would turn into or or how my life would change you know you would have trepidation to again be the face of of something that will immediately started receiving threats of death threats of sexual violence to me into my kids but i'm so incredibly grateful and honor to do this work work every single day. I'm a full time volunteer and we are run mostly by volunteers on the ground and all of them finding ways to carve carve out time from their busy schedules whether they are working moms or stay at home moms <hes> many treat this like a job and they take incredibly seriously and we've created needed this culture that empowers and emboldens particularly women to get off the sidelines and to use their voices and their votes and the power levers that are available to them right. We're only twenty percent of state. Lawmakers were only twenty. Five percent of federal lawmakers were only five percent fortune one thousand ceo's but but we make the vast majority of spending decisions were the majority of the voting electorate and that's why so many lawmakers want our volunteer standing with them and the red shirts because because they know our voices matter ramp and i know you through this movement as more and more of these moms have come into contact with their local governance right. They are all asking the same question which i think i've always felt since i was a child like why this person like why is this the person creating legislation and why is this person my representative. They don't seem to read any of the legislation. They don't even seem to know what they're voting for their. They're centrally voted along party lines or out of fear and so i love this idea that all these moms demand action volunteers are now also running warning that somehow you know you talk about this in the book but men seem to have no qualms about raising their hands regardless of qualifications indications whereas women feel like we need to be eaten credibly overqualified to do even the most menial tasks so i think i'm just exposing all these women to how government functions is in of itself of service despite we've already done for it's so interesting i never spent time certainly in my state house and now so many of us spend our sitting in gun bill hearings or showing up at rallies or having meetings things with our lawmakers and what you realize is they are not rocket scientists. There are many of them. I wouldn't trust to get me a cup of coffee. Let alone make the laws to protect my family and my community and we had one volunteer north carolina. Who said you know i. I really thought that when i went to my state house they wanted to hear from me. They wanted to hear what i had to say that my input mattered. She's now a state lawmaker north carolina by the way but we had forty of our volunteers run in two thousand eighteen of the forty seventeen one everything from city council the congress a former moms demand action volunteer lucy macbeth whose son jordan davis was shot and killed in florida a black teen. He was shot and killed by a white man who said his music was too loud. Lucy became a volunteer with our organization soon. After and now she's congresswoman from georgia so we know ooh that when women go to the polls they vote on this issue and we know that when they win office when they're elected office they legislate on this issue and that's why it's so incredibly important to turbocharged charger efforts by not just the advocacy we do but actually turning our volunteers gun violence survivors into lawmakers and it doesn't matter if it's school board or city council or congress all of it matters totally so let's talk about small local government 'cause i know you guys have had an incredible amount of success and and i would imagine except for potentially some incredibly red states i mean ninety percent of voters want commonsense gun laws cracks the vast majority of americans so about ninety percent of americans support stronger gun laws eighty percent of gun owners seventy four percent of n._r._a. Members this is is really about an extreme radicalized leadership of the n._r._a. It's not about their members so this is not a polarizing issue among the general public it is in and can be among lawmakers and that's why our work is so important when we go into state houses we do two things one is that we play offense. We've pass background checks now. In twenty one states we've passed red flag laws in seventeen. We've disarmed. Domestic abusers in twenty eight states all of those laws proven by data and research to save lives. If you look just at twenty eighteen alone we stronger gun laws in twenty states nine of which were signed by republican lawmakers so they're working across the aisle better than than congress does but there's also another piece of this which is to play defense. We never realized we would spend so much time. In state. House is is beating back bad and our bills like arming teachers or putting guns on college campuses. <hes> stand your ground laws. Something called permanence. Kerry where you can carry a hidden loaded handgun a public with no training background check so these are bills that show up over and over again and we have about a ninety percent track record of of killing those bills last year alone. We beat back over a thousand bills. So that's another big part of this work and can you explain what red flag can you go into the domestic violence what was previously allowed by law in terms of domestic abusers ability to keep their guns and sort of how that because you make the point throughout the book clearly things like sandy hook these national tragedies arrest all and stop us all but most gun violence is in the home. It's primarily perpetrated against people of color and it's primarily perpetrated against women right women black teens so so when you when you look at gun violence in this country it's twofold and it's not just the mass shootings in school shootings which is what brought me into this work but it's the daily gun violence. It's the gun gun homicide in city centres. It's gun suicides in rural communities and there's research data that shows that there are solutions to all of it and so when we work on for example domestic violence laws the federal definition of a prohibited purchaser convicted domestic abuser does not include stalkers stalkers or dating partners and we knew that about fifty percent of all the women who were killed by intimate partners with guns in this country are dating partners now because they are waiting longer to get married so so we have to go into the states broaden the definition of a domestic abusers and then we have to put teeth in the laws that allow law enforcement to remove the guns a domestic abuser already owns that could be fixed for example right now in the violence against women act. There is a new piece of that that would close what we call the boyfriend loophole poll but in the interim. We're going state by state to do this work. A red flag law is essentially a temporary restraining order that a family member burger or a police officer typically can get a judge to put into effect that temporary removes the guns of someone who seems to be a danger to themselves or others. We started working on this back after the u._c._s._b. Shooting when the parents of the shooter said we told police our son was armed and he was dangerous and we knew that he was going to do something whether it was to himself or others but there was nothing police could do and so california was one of the first states that we worked on passing this bill and on just this year <hes> we passed them in nevada and hawaii so these are again bills that are overwhelmingly supported by republican governors and there's something that american support art but the problem is for too long the gun lobby has been writing our gun laws and they do not support these laws read one of the most ingenious parts of the book is the starbucks example simple to and because i had no idea and you know i'm from montana i obviously a gun state lots and lots of hunters people who provide for their families families by hunting and i was home a couple summers ago with my family and went to the farmer's market and missoula's very liberal and so there was like a whole pride pride a pride march and i was like oh we should move back here. This is so great and and then i saw a young family and the guy turned and and he had a weapon a gun and i was i'd actually never seen that i'd seen gun racks and windows of trucks express never seen an armed pedestrian like that which freaked me out and then i realized that it's not only it's totally legal in many states and it's also many are sorry many businesses allow it and so can you take through the starbucks example yeah so open carry is carrying a semiautomatic rifle or handgun open on your person and it's legal in forty five states in this country. I see it all the time where i live in colorado and it's up to restaurants and retailers and other companies to decide whether they'll allow it in states where it's legal and about six months. After i started moms connection i was watching the news and saw that starbucks was no longer going to allow smoking including electronic cigarettes twenty feet outside at stores regardless of state state law and we had seen open carry inside their stores happening and so i called them and said you know you still going to allow us and they said we're going to keep following local laws pertains to guns and we decided we were much more afraid of secondhand bullets than second hand smoke so we embarked on what we call a mom kat and we were so small we're only six months old and we only do skip start starbucks saturdays. We do not have the power to to actually do a fallen economic boycott and even then the soccer. Moms gave me a hard time time about no starbucks on saturdays we did it and we showed using the hashtag skipped starbucks saturdays we showed images of what open carry looked like inside starbucks because when we did this gun extremists pushed back and they just started showing up at so many starbucks opened carrying and within three months we were able to get the c._e._o. Of starbucks howard schultz to come out on television and say in fact he said guns were no longer. Welcome either stores not just opened kerry and we realized realized that this was a way that we could win that we did have a lot of power and we've replicated a dozens of restaurants and retailers. What's interesting is now companies. Don't have to be dragged kicking and screaming into this issue anymore. We're having so many companies come to us and not just for advice on their policies but to join our coalition volition companies like toms shoes dick sporting goods and levi's and that is a a real sea change yeah. No i think so much of this is driven. Out of people bolt just not being aware of the law. You know i was shocked. If i had seen guy with an open carried gun walking through santa monica i would have called the police. I would've called a vote neighborhood schools. It's such an insane concept yet and it is illegal in california but where i live in colorado there was someone in colorado colorado springs walking down the street with a rifle and a woman called nine one one in the operator said that's legal in the state and then no sooner does she hang up the phone and he opened fire and killed four people. So how are you supposed to know who's a bad guy. Who's a good guy exactly it's in total vanity so i know like in terms terms of what's happening on a national stage. The only good thing teams from president trump is that because people aren't concerned about anyone taking away their guns anytime soon gun sales are in the toilet. We call the trump slump since donald trump was elected. Gun sales are down at least one hundred million dollars and that's because they don't don't have a boogeyman in the white house to make people afraid every time there's a mass shooting so because of donald trump's presidency and he received about thirty million dollars from the array. You would think that immediately the n._r._a. Would turn around and pass their priority pieces of legislation that they had been trying to pass for years and years they had a republican president republican congress and they failed because we've gotten so good at playing defense and so now here we are going into twenty twenty and the n._r._a. Is weaker than the ever been. We're are stronger than we've ever been and there's a real chance that that this election will be pivotal. Let's take a quick break. Aac i mentioned a few weeks ago on the podcast. That curiosity is my favorite state of being. I try yeah to carry that attitude with me every day and it's certainly easier to do it at a place like goop the places such a premium value on being curious and feeling empowered to explore and ask questions russians banana republic is another company that values curiosity. Their founding story starts with a california couple. Who's looking for an adventure bun back. Banana republic began as far inspired clothing company and today the inspiration for their clothing is designing for life in motion or as they put it living a life of the possibility with no boundaries there fall collection is conic banana republic styled for now so there are utility inspired styles made from premium materials serials think your favorite dresses pants updated an animal prints and menswear patterns and quintessential suede jackets and cashmere sweater the aware for many seasons to come and now banana republic is celebrating and true modern icons with goop through our special podcast series women on top. I hope you'll listen to every episode. These are the women who lead with power grace and curiosity who i think define what it means to break boundaries and maybe most importantly for working hard so that others to can live a life of possibility ability so keep listening and keep shopping with our friends at banana republic to get their fall collection had two banana republic dot com you weeks ago. It was my eighth wedding anniversary and as we come out of wedding anniversary we season i've been thinking about the different ways we celebrate certain moments and how we can create memories in our lives and if you've listened to my conversation with chip heath on this podcast you know this is something i think about a lot weddings and anniversaries are of course often marked by the exchange of a special piece of jewelry. Although some of the jewelry that is most special to me wasn't necessarily tied obvious date on the calendar simon g. jewelry specializes in fine jewelry for the traditionally big special occasions and and for the moments that we can make into special occasion over the past three decades simon. G. has become known for combining old world romance with modern techniques. Their pieces are glamorous us and timeless at the same time and if you happen to be looking i'll say that simon g. makes incredibly beautiful engagement rings to which stole the show and keeps engagement story this past smae around that time also launched our i g label fashion capsule for men and now simon jesus released their first collection to their eighteen piece collection includes rings necklaces and bracelets and eighteen carat gold diamond and rubber so to shop for that special man or woman in your life had to simon. I'm angie jewelry dot com and find a retailer near you. That's s. i. M. o. n. and then the letter g. Okay breaks over. Let's hear more from shannon watts pie in the sky. What do you think is possible. We need a background. Check on every gun sale so that just like license sales. People selling guns privately also have to perform background checks. That's how guns get into the hands of dangerous undress people. They buy them online by them. At gun shows by the garage sales and background checks required right now more than half of the states in the country allow guns ans sold with that background checks so we need the federal government to change that that's really the foundation on which all of the other laws exist <hes> but it would be great to also finally closed closed boyfriend loophole or federal level to pass a red flag law at the federal level to start funding gun research again you know the the government stopped funding ending c._d._c. research on this issue in the ninety s so we don't really understand fully the extent of our crisis or how to solve it and having more research go into gun. Violence is prevention would be incredibly important yeah and particularly for neighborhoods where i mean. This is an astounding statistic in the book one one that american civilians own close to four hundred million guns more than the population of the united states but that black-americans are ten times more likely to be killed by a gun than a white american an black child in america is fifteen times more likely to be killed by a gun so how have you i know you guys have worked really hard to build a really big tent to quote you. So how have you worked to address. All of those issues we we are paying attention to every single tentacle that gun violence has whether it's gun homicides suicides unintentional final shootings. You can't really talk about gun violence without talking about racism in this country and so we work at all different levels at a community level the state level at the federal level a to research gun violence to pass laws and policies that will address it but ultimately to change our culture of violence that is really a big piece of this for for so long the gun lobby has been insidious and they have really stripped all the responsibilities that go along with gun rights. Were not against the second amendment. Many of our volunteers are gun owners or they're married to them. This is really just about restoring the responsibilities that go along with gun rights totally yeah. I think that whole the second amendment sort sort of god given right to own a gun is so strange to me like it is a human given right. Thank you talk about this. It's a government right in needs to be respected. Did there is a ton of responsibility. Obviously that goes with it so looking at your movement and what you've managed to build and i know within the book you sort talk about activism and general staying on message which i'm sure so hard right and a time of all of these issues that you probably wish you could throw your weight into but you guys have been incredibly tight about staying on point brand. Having those red moms demand actions shirts like how how do you what do you credit with what you've built. Will you know i was in corporate communications for a good ten years or more. Before i started moms demand action i i cut my teeth at general electric and they taught me a lot about branding and communications and marketing and all of that was incredibly helpful in showing that we were credible that we were sophisticated that we were empowered and that we were in this for the long haul and we about a year into moms demand actions existence we partnered nerd with mayors against illegal guns which was a group created by mayor bloomberg when he was still the mayor and every town for gun. Safety is the umbrella over all the organisations were the grassroots grassroots arm now of every town but this this look in this feel and the fact that we are women mostly and that we are mothers <hes> of course now like mothers against drunk driving where mothers and others the brand that we have empowers women in an emboldens women but on top of that other people in america see that were winning. They see see the red shirts they see the momentum that we have on the ground in a we are not only the largest gun violence prevention organization were actually one of the largest grassroots roots movements in the country so the fact that we have hundreds of thousands of volunteers nearly six million supporters a chapter in every state this issue isn't going away and it is going to get fixed in several election cycles and it's just so important at that everyone understands that we are winning this and that we're not going to give up. Do you see a time in the future when you have i wen- we have such bulletproof no pun intended but when we are so buttoned up in our gun laws that the organization will morph and take on other issues or you're gonna retire. I see this being again. Like mothers against drunk driving took them about twenty in years to pass all the laws they need to significantly reduce the amount of drunk driving deaths in this country into completely transformed the culture of drunk driving and make it totally unacceptable. That's not our goal. Our goal is just to restore the responsibilities that go along with gun rights but i think this is going to take several election cycles and once it does then it will be up to our volunteers but also volunteers from the next generation to protect the winds we've made. I'm not really sure what's in store for me. Mm-hmm i would love to take a nap and learned a garden dare to exactly so for people who are listening and scattered got it across the country. What do you guys most need. Representation in numbers of women in red shirts strength in numbers is a huge part of this when we show up dozens dozens or hundreds of us at state houses. It's usually all of us versus one or two n._r._a. Lobbyists and the more lawmakers see a that will have their backs fox if they do the right thing but be we'll have their jobs if they don't that does depend on showing up and so for people to get involved you can actually just text the word ready ready to six four four three three and you'll get a volunteer call and someone will tell you how to join locally where you are but also to understand that that there's no activism that is too small we even have something called optimism so we have some volunteers who just make calls or send emails or use hashtag while their kids are taking up that what matters you don't have to carve forty hours a work week out of your life to work on this issue. Even if you only have a couple hours we're taipei a women moms. We will make the best use of it now. I love that. I also love that you welcome volunteers with the call because it feels like i've certainly had this experience of really really being moved in the moment to try to do more get involved and then to lake. I often run into a wall of like. We're not taking people right now. Are you will never hear that from other action but that or you know all of the families have are like we've covered. We're covered and then you're sort of like i don't know where to start. We we had so many people. Tell us that you know we started after sandy hook and they had called other organizations. You know whether it was gonna be on prevention or women groups or whatever it was and they would say you're the only ones who called me back and that's because we now have this entire network volunteers some of them who that's their only job is to call not only welcome volunteers but to immediately immediately get them involved in event where they live because we know that when we lay eyeballs on you you're much more likely to stay engaged. Let's take a quick break. <hes> there's a workout then there's a coupe workout and then there's goop league goop league. Our first major fitness focused experience. We're launching this new event the weekend of october twelfth to thirteenth in a city that we love and and it's become something of a second home to us that's austin texas guys and we'll be at our favorite the line hotel in downtown austin right on the river. What in the world can you expect from the google team. This time jubilee is all about tapping into the incredible potential of the body bringing together some of the most talented and cutting edge instructors and experts from the world fitness. These are the people who are redefining physical wellness and shaping the way we think about an approach the mind body soul connection as suggest that group league. You'll get to take three classes with these top practitioners in several different studio spaces ground lit pulse burn and released yeah and some of my very favorite teachers will be there like an array a former dancer from l._a. Who has developed a wholly unique compelling fund movement method that revolves around reconditioning your fascia. It's extraordinary. I promise and call at donkey from the nest in new york city will also be there. The executive team mchugh recently did the necessary new bounce and sculpting classes together. When we were out on the east coast it was hard knocking ally but it was kind of hilarious and very cool and of course i get to see and do a lot more you come to league there will be our pop-up shop food drinks and a bunch of power stations where it will have tools for soothing muscles relaxing and and just finding a little fan so to join the group league. You can get a pass for the event on saturday october twelve or sunday october. Thirteenth just had to google dot com slash goop leak okay breaks over. Let's hear more from shannon watts. So what advice do you you have for people whether they're going to join moms demand action or get involved with other issues that are relevant to this sort of our future. I guess collectively. Where would you recommend that people start. You could read fight like a mother. You know my my goal was for it to be part memoir to talk about what it's been like the tip of the spear for this issue part manual because i get so many calls from particularly women who say how do i start something like this but even on another issue in my neighborhood or my community or my state and so i wanted to put on paper exactly how he did it and then part manifesto because i want women to move from shaping policy to actually making take the skills they learn activists and translate them into being law and policy makers but i would say if you're passionate about something then then you should jump in and learn as you go and i talk about this book flying the building the plane as you fly because you don't have to wait until you know everything thing i mean for me. The first year was drinking from fire hose. Learning all about gun laws research and how to organize there were so many things to learn and if i had waited that year the moment would would've passed the other thing is you should expect to lose their another chapter. In the book is called losing forward. You aren't going to get involved in any issue that that needs to change whether it's legislatively or culturally and not lose you're just not and so you need to learn how to take failure as feedback and and even if you lose one battle in a very long war you can learn in win the next one and we have done that over and over again in our organization and so i talk a lot about that in the book but ultimately it is about perseverance and understanding that much of this work is a marathon not a sprint but it's also a relay race right. You have to hand the baton over when you're tired or something. Your family takes priority or precedence and understand the work will still be there when you come back. Now i thought very resonant and conversation conversation that i have had with many of my friends particularly post twenty thousand sixteen of this incipient burnt like it's so hard to say engage. I'm i'm waiting for someone to create. Maybe this is it but the framework of like how do you divvy it up. How do you tie in and out take a break. I think anyone who's empathetic can can i don't know any mother who is not extremely empathetic just overwhelming unless you take a moment to step back so i i love the idea that there are people who sort of cycling and cycle out or do they're almost term seems like for the organization and then slip out before reengaging yet. That's the structure. We've created yeah. So was there ever a moment when you almost gave up. Oh my gosh so many especially in the early days but the amazing thing about this work for me has been that every step of the way the obstacles have been removed. I can remember very early on our our facebook. Page was taking off and survivors particularly from the sandy hook tragedy would send me photos from their family and entrusted me to share these photos and tell their story story and we were just overrun by trolls who would say the most horrific things and it was becoming a full time job for me on top of all the other stuff i was doing to delete in block doc those trolls and i can remember i was literally laying on the closet floor crying feeling so overwhelmed my life had changed changed so much overnight and at that moment i got a call from a woman who said <hes> i live with a disability. I'm home twenty four hours a day. I'm actually just a few few blocks away from you. In indiana i would love to spend my days deleting all of the trolls from your social media outlets and she did that for several years so it has been remarkable to me that when i thought we couldn't go on we always found a way to and i also think that is partly because we have so many taipei women who just will not go backwards only forwards well exactly if you want to want something to get done ask a busy woman yup and a busy mom yeah no seriously seriously. I think it's incredible. Is there any coming legislation anywhere in the country where calls emails postcards redshirt redshirt are needed. Yes so we have something called the gunson's action network so no matter where you live you can put calls into states or into lawmakers and so there's a very important the election this year in virginia. Every single seat in the general assembly is up for election <hes> we could win a gun since majority. We only lost it by a few seats in the last election so that will be a big focus but also going into twenty twenty. You know we will be working at the state and federal level to elect gun since candidates. We flipped the makeup of seven state legislatures in two thousand eighteen. We've already gone into those impasse. Stronger gun laws in many states so this will be an incredibly important election cycle. Are there any candidates. He think are particularly particularly outstanding. What is so amazing about. The twenty twenty race so far is that for the first time ever every single candidate support support stronger gun laws even the republican who's primarily the president with the exception of donald trump. The democrats are competing to see who can be the best on this issue. If you remember just a few election cycles or even won election cycle ago. They didn't want to talk about this. This was something they thought would be divisive or would would be a drawback for them and what they've realized. It's not only not polarizing it gets people out to the polls and so we are seeing a complete sea change in election politics because of the work of <unk> yeah i love the idea to of how horizontal the organization is and the fact that issue based because the country has become so politicized. I think when you actually unwind it and unpack we all agree with more things than we don't and that's right and it's also about incremental change. Uh i always say that people who are doing the incremental work that leads to revolutions while people are complaining about incremental ism right that is such an important part of democracy and and the structure that has been built for us to work in it is about incremental change and it isn't necessarily going to happen overnight and you you have to kind of dig in and accept without an count all your wins because stopping bad bills as a win passing good bills as wind changing out lawmakers is a win <hes> but that is is work work that doesn't happen overnight totally and it's also i think so much about that issue education so much just gets swept up into party politics and then when you don't do the work of unwinding what these things actually mean people end up subscribe to things that are actually diametrically opposed to their own values so so it's it's. I love seeing issues like this. Unravel across democrats republicans libertarians and the unity like progressive aggressive and hardcore conservatives can absolutely come together on these types of things. Nobody wants to watch kids die so i think arkansas such a great example of of of what you're talking about because it was a state where it was very hard to organize. I think people felt kind of hopeless on this issue and so i would go out to little rock doc every year or so with the same handful of very lovely women but we weren't growing there and what happened was we suffered a huge loss which ages that the governor signed guns on campus bill it sailed through the state house governor signed it standing next to era lobbyist very proudly it even allowed guns sons in razorback stadium where alcohol sold and what happened was amazing because women and moms started coming out of the woodwork and we went from about two local groups to over a dozen across the state and we were able to take that size and power and carve out exemptions so that guns would not be allowed in razorback stadium stadium and then the next year to volunteers ran for office including one who ran against the man who put the guns on campus bill forward both won their now arkansas lawmakers and then this year we were able to completely shut down the n._r._a.'s agenda including a standard ground bill in the state of arkansas and some some of the republican lawmakers there have even said that the energy has become too extreme and that theory too extreme arkansas so that's how this work it's done done. It's kind of like drips on iraq but eventually you do reach this point where you realize you're more powerful than your opponent totally and stand your ground so that everyone knows that's. That's someone's right to just shoot shoot first. Ask questions later essentially which as we know is particularly harmful for communities of color yeah. I just want to ask one final question. Clearly you work with a lot of people who have been traumatized by gone. Who've lost children spouses friends. How do you is it sort of action is the antidote and that this work is inherently very healing. How do you handle how do you work with people who have experienced experienced such unbelievable acts of horror. It's become incredibly inspirational for me to work with gun. Violence survivors often survivors will say to me. I'm grateful that you're working on this even though you haven't had a horrific loss but i say to them i can't believe i believe that you have found the strength and the courage to work on this given what you have experienced to me that is heroic and every day i'm inspired fire to work with people who have decided that they are going to turn their pain into purpose and help save the lives of perfect strangers so that they don't have to you experience what they've been through. I don't think it's for every survivor to get involved in activism but for those who do. I certainly think that they find healing. I have worked worked with so many women and mothers who feel like they found their tribe when they joined moms demand action and it's a real support system for them and they also feel like like making a change is in honor of their loved ones well. Thank you for all that you do. Thank you for leading thank you standing up and putting up a facebook page one one of the most inspirational stories around i appreciate it. Thanks for listening to my chat with shannon watts to learn more about how you can help go to mom. Samantha action dot org get a copy of shannon's book fight like a mother and as she mentioned to get more involved you can text the word ready to six six four three three even if this is not your particular 'cause fight like a mother the incredible guide to how to get active g._p. Said it. I've said it and i'll say it again. If you wanna get something done give it to a mom.

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Wednesday 5/8/19 - Bicycling In The City

Chicago Dog Walk

16:06 min | 2 years ago

Wednesday 5/8/19 - Bicycling In The City

"REI may today's Wednesday may a Chicago dog walk. That's the day is Carl Carl's been a little bit. Glad to have you back on the show. How you've been. I'm glad to be back. I know you were on the road. You've been interviewing some weird people. Yeah. You know, we we talked to some some people at some universities. I was in Vegas last weekend. So it was just kinda got a kind of didn't cross passer for a little bit. How you've been with everything I've been good while you've been gone, so many people keep reaching out to and they have the perfect desks for dog walk, and they'll be like, it's the CEO of or it's the president or it's this famous by Mike, you're missing the point. Funny. I I'll ask ad when he gets back. He's currently interviewing a lunch lady at August Santa. Yeah. But the thing is I'm not like specifically. I'm not so to speak against these people. Oh, I'll talk to whoever. I don't really care. I just kind of go with story you're trying to tell all exactly like if someone brings up someone who's famous or someone who would kind of fit into that box. How about yeah. Sure. I'll talk to them. Why wouldn't I talk to them? But there's just certain type of person I gravitate to naturally. So that's kind of it. So but today, I kinda wanna talk to you about you have gotten into the bike game. Yeah. And what does that entail? Like, I think there's a lot of people out there who want to dip their toe into riding a bike around the city, but they're too afraid terrified they should be. It's a concrete jungle out there. I got a bike. Maybe like six weeks ago. We've been talking about it at the end Redline radio. I try to come up with like one quick funny story every week of something that happens, and I got the bike a couple of weeks ago because I just got fat. Man. I don't know. I'm thirty two. I got married in September. Like, you know, I've got that classic. Former athlete turned corporate America business casual shopping at banana Republic quietly put on thirty five pounds overnight, which reminds me of like a famous blog you have about chili dog in. I gotta get I try to recover that blog at the lead. It we could that's another dog walk, but my buddy chili dog. He's a great guy. Can you give a brief synopsis? We'll tell the full story late chili dog is chili dogs a guy in my group of friends who like killed it in college. He's like the sweetest dude ever. Like every night. We went out like he was getting laid is easy as you possibly imagine. And he's just like the coolest guy in a social circle. And then we got out and like he just could not adapt to like being an adult and it took him like years to adapt. And then he put on like all his weight and just became like, the sloppiest piece of shit, and then his nickname was chili dog. And he turned the corner. Fuck man, he came out like blazin like Phoenix. And now he's he's not making like he's. If he made more than half a million dollars last year. I wouldn't be surprised married alike. Smoke show British chick. I am the story all started with a bike. Yeah. So that's just like chili dog just wanna lose a couple pounds. As like, I'm going to start biking, a work, and I drew inspiration from that. And so the nice thing with Barcelo is like well before I'd have to wear a suit to work a lot of time. So you can't ride a bike. You're totally limited in that. Like, it's part of the you you get into corporate America. And then you just instantly put on weight, and you instantly become inactive it becomes impossible to go to the gym and stuff. So when we got the jobs with barstool one of the biggest things is like I have to get back to that college lifestyle where you have to go to the gym in the morning. Are you have to find time to like work out and stay active because it's important you, and I that shit matters to me, so you so I guess there's a few reasons why people would ride a bike maybe because someone wanted to save some money on some gas. Someone didn't want to worry about parking and obviously to get in shape. So you fall into that third box. I guess yeah. That was the primary one. The other thing is. I live in south loop. And it's twenty minutes in the car to thirty minutes in the car to get over here in the Ukrainian village, and I'm not driving very far. I mean, it's max, maybe four miles. And so that can be very frustrating in like, I write about traffic every now and then bar so like that shit really destroys me like sitting behind the wheel car on ninety ninety four like trying to get off my fucking Axat. It's that stuff really bothers me it does. But you ever find one near traffic, you kind of do like some of your best thinking, I for some reason I do when I'm just sitting on the ninety and I'm just I'm bumper to bumper pens wear. I'm going when I'm leaving somewhere, and I don't have anywhere to go. Now, I'm going home in the days over I am unity my best thinking, but if I'm coming in here to dog walk with you, and I don't know what the dog walks about. I certainly don't want to be sitting in traffic. I don't wanna be thinking about my eleven o'clock blog that I'm going to be doing on Kyle Hendricks with the infobahn. Like, I don't want that stuff to be clouding my mind. So sure that's a good point. Because you know in a great time for thinking was was when we do Redline. We still had our our our corporate. And after the show, it'd be like midnight. I just be driving home, and it would just be done. Nothing going on you'd be thinking. Like, okay. I did that for the week. And I gotta get back to regular life. I'm like how can I get better for next week? What else can we do? That was always nice self reflection time. So I want to get the bike. So I'm like looking online, I'm like fuck bikes are expensive. So I went into this bike shop in the south loop. And I and it's just like this. I thought for a long time living in the south loop every time I walk passes plays on like this a front like these guys are laundering something cash. Only business. I go in. There is like a seventy year old guy behind the counter, and I just told them is it could be considered a negotiation tactic. But I was like listen, I don't have a lot of money. I'm looking for a bite to go between six and twelve miles. Like max, can you help me out fine like a light reasonable bike? If it gets stolen. I don't like it doesn't matter. And he's like how much is not a lot of money has not a lot of money at all. He's like I got this great track right here. Two hundred bucks cash. I'm like done. So I came back the next day. The thing was spinning around perfect. It's. Like this guy's on business. So I love you love their stuff. I loved by the bike from that guy. Yeah. No. Because bikes it's another thing on top of it all is they're expensive. Yes. So that is a great deal like two hundred dollars cash like I feel like that's a perfect amount of money to pay for a bike. They are gonna use what five months out of the year. Yes. So I mean because it really is a bike is like what what else falls in that category? In chicago. It's like you really can't get as much use out of his you ought to because of the fucking winter like a boat, obviously, good pair hordes compares her really, whatever. But that's that's a great deal. Right. And and you know, like this guy's using that two hundred bucks, though, Ike whatever by case a beer afterwards. Like, I would be surprised if any of that two hundred bucks went to Ogle Sam like this guy is trying to keep his business alive. There's fucking high rises going in all around him. Like, I'm there to support Carmichael in the south loop business. You know, like I like that stuff and it was used bike right yet used that bike Vitali came out of the back of a truck. Now, I said I said on Red Eye Radio after I got the bike. I went through the maybe like the first. Two rides afterwards. I wrote it up to like this event that we had with Jeremy Roenick on the north side. So from the south loop up to like, Logan square. So as I can eight mile rides have them outright, whatever and something happened on the way, we're like one of the back tires like one of the back breaks broken. I didn't know. So like the back break was like permanently locked in. And I'm like Ryan the bike. I have on my walkman so out of shape. Like, I am so dog shit out of shape. And then I rode the bike all the way home. I told my wife, I'm like, I gotta throw this fucking thing in the garbage like this needs a piece of shit. So then I'm looking at it. I'm like, oh, it's it's broken. They're ever you said, you let me tell you guys. I don't think I'm cut out for this. This is not going great. And you just didn't know there was there was a bike malfunction as embarrassing. Here's another observation in driving, and I get worked up behind the wheel. I I, you know, I gotta take a right here. But there's no right lane there. So I'll just cut overthrew the bike lane. I'll just shimmy down a bike lane for a couple of car lengths, then I'll jump over stop doing that guys. Yes. So stop doing that and start using hellofresh. Hello, fresh meal kit delivery service shops plans and delivers step by step recipes and premeasured ingredients. So you can just cook eaten enjoy hellofresh mixed. Cochran the kitchen a reality with deliciously, simple recipes they do all the meal planning shopping and prepping she you could just focus on a healthier you. And a happier family there. Three plans to choose from the classic the veggie in the family with options to switch. If you don't like what you originally pick to get out of that recipe rut and star cooking outside your comfort zone by discovering new delicious recipes with hellofresh hellofresh is great. I think we've all tried it at this point. You know, they got the pork chops to burgers, really, whatever you want the menu as analysts, and it gives you the exact amount that you need to cook. What you want to cook? So go use hellofresh. And how about this for right now for eighty dollars off your first month of hellofresh coulda? Hellofresh dot com slash at eighty and enter Eddie eighty that's right. Hellofresh dot com slash Eddie eighty and enter Eddie eighty that's EDI eight zero it's like receiving eight meals free or you get twenty dollars offer. I four box. Sorry, carl. Let's get back to that. Don't be an asshole when you're driving your bike. That's bad. I used to do that all the time now is a biker and someone in the bike lane. I fucking I get so mad when I see cars in the bike lane. Whether they're parked at the warning lights on or it's a lift drop and somebody off it's like because it is so dangerous like going down Roosevelt, so twelve south. So like the main drag in the south loop where you've got like all the shit off of it. And they have the bike lane. Like in the middle of the road in on the right is the bustling. And then there's two lanes of traffic in the speed limits. Forty fucking miles an hour and everybody there's going fifty fifty five coming up and down the bridge on Roosevelt. So you're riding your bike on fifteen miles an hour owners busses wizened by shit like that like stay off Roosevelt show is it that bad. I'm pretty I was thinking the other day riding on Roosevelt. I was like this is no different than if you took a bite, Pat this wide so wide. I don't know. It's it four feet wide. And you elevate it like one hundred feet in the air. And you can't. Right off that bike path relish. You're gonna fall off and die. Like that's how I felt right now rose like God. If I fall off the ledge hermit get run over by some Prius, and like that's gonna be it. Did you take any tips? Like, did you read any blogs Facebook groups up nothing like that though nothing? She just kind of late to watch good bikers. So when I'm out biking and someone's zips past me, I liked it. Why gazette guy riot? Okay. Let me see that guys pedaling away faster. But like I'm trying to pick up tips from good bikers or like, if I'm stopped at a red light and Pilsen or something which is a biker hipster community in the world. I will talk to the guy next to me. I've always had a single gear would you ride in there? I'm trying to be a part of the community. What's another reason? Why people would stay away from getting a bike? I think we talked about it is you get somewhere in your instantly sweaty. Aw. Sh. Yeah. In like, it hasn't even hit seventy five eighty degrees. Is that humid yet that it'll be I'll be real worked up. We'll see how much biking in the summertime because you showed up to we had an event that whiskey business about a month, wedding profusely. And you're you're sweating. You're like, I've just accepted it like this is me. I'm just going to be the sweaty guy. And I it it comes with a cost. But you seem like you're a good trade off for. I'm not joking though. I'm already down like ten pounds. I traded out. So like going up to cubs games. And went to my six Cup game on Monday. Ryan the bike like, that's it. I don't care how hard it is or whatever. 'cause you soon as they get up there. I know I'm gonna have a couple of, you know, responsible Miller lights and. Yeah. In the beer, just probably tasted better. Yeah. You earn it a little bit. I think you do. And you said that you had a good point let you do a lot of thinking. But you do a lot of good thinking out of bike. If you're listening to some good music. I've been listening to a lot of Joe Rogan podcast because I think he's I think he's one of the best, and I love his interview style. So I'm like trying to figure out like, okay? We'll kind of lock are we going with? I had the kryptonite which is the it's everybody's got this lock really like me. And my buddy Danny who had you know, Welsh meter. We went up to a cubs game the other night, and we were riding around and he's been a biker for a long time. And we. Were roommates together. He used the deliver cookies when he would ride his bike, and we were roommates he'd come home with these cookies, he's always by. Yeah. And he rides his bike twelve months a year two s guys a warrior, and so I was so excited when I got the bug. I say let's go to Wrigley and ride our bikes around and sure shit. He pulled out his lock it was kryptonite. And I was like oh Faulk has he sold like he knows his shit. So that made me feel good while the crypts, and I live that's a big. That's a big stop. Yeah. That means you're real you're not doing our chain. Like, so people don't use. The you lock. Your mean, the kryptonite is a you law. It's the top of the line model. Ed HOGAN, so different was the lock more expensive on the bike. No, no. The lock wasn't more expensive. The the helmet was sixty five or seventy. That's a bright, orange helmets fart. Yes. And then I think the lock was like twenty five again, this all cash the locks are definitely off the back of a truck. Like, you know, because he's just reaching it all box like scrammed, the lock and just here you go. Have you? Had any run ins with any other biker so far. There was one biker when I was coming on State Street in the loop. Because there's only one the Dearborn street in the loop to go north south the interesting thing about that though is Dearborn a one way that goes from south to north. So it's a one way going north. They've got the bike lane on the west side of that. So why you're literally going against traffic and that so it's a little uncomfortable. So my off on I'll just stay on State Street. And so like, I was riding there was this like I said I like watching good bikers. It good biker in front of me in he cigs egging around the buses. So I'm kind of weaving him Bob and following him. Maybe like a bike length behind maybe a bike length and a half. And then we after about five or six blocks, we get stopped at like Adams or like Madison on state need turns around. He's like you ride my ass salt AM like well, fuck you. I didn't like that is your fucking problem in views. But I didn't I was up. The reason I got mad though is because I probably had bad out of kit. But did you tell them like I was just admiring? You like I wa I was I saw one good. No. I didn't. I that would have been awkward. I'm sorry. I've just admiring at your pace in you're pushing me, right? Yeah. Your decision may gain is is so flawless inefficient. Yeah. I'm getting a free tour free right now this guy he had like he had the pants coughed up. You know? So then and I liked that move. He had like vans. I you just look cool. Like this guy looked like a cool biker? Now, I'm not saying this is somebody who want to hang out with that. You know me. Yeah. But like if I'm gonna do something, right? Like when I was selling insurance. I wanted to sell insurance the way you're supposed to sell insurance if I'm throwing a fucking out too fast ball in college. I wanna throw like whatever I'm doing. I want to do it the way you're supposed to do it. So when it comes to riding a bike like I want to I want to have good form. I wanna paddle appropriately. I wanna be efficient. I wanna ride it in fucking look like a guy who belongs on a bicycle. I don't want someone to be pulling up in a car meal. Like ace Turk. You fucking idiot. You look like a moron you want. Our learn from the people that do it. But I don't want somebody to see me right at by say, that's a guy who's riding a bike. There you go. I got you get a bike. I dunno. I wanna. Hey, I live a little far too kind of bike here every day, but I would like to bike. But I'll be I loved riding a bike is a kid. What did you have at Dino out? Yeah. What kind Donald zone? Nice. Yeah. Ninety nine or two thousand would you could you like pop wheelies? No, nothing like that. It was just it's just for show. Did you do baseball cards in the spokes? We never I never did that now, but you have to lock your bike up when you were kid. We did the old you turn it upside down because it it you know, what stop the robber or the thief from taking it as fast. You know what I mean? Yeah. Put it on its seat arrows a kid like, we're fine. Like did. You know, anyone who's like you guys were in the white hand and someone had they're like, oh, yeah. Bike stolen, buddy. Kevin got us GT on out of Jimmy Johnson north in Harlem on time. And was a sad day. That is saying it was it was really upset. There are few other people that got their bikes along hiawatha park. But yeah, it's part of the process when here kit like, you know, when you're right knows Dyno's. There was do would always see like. Welsby mythical white vans of people that would say that they saw driving around. It will be loaded with kids Dino. So he got a knew the risk. You just kind of had to be smart about it. And while that like rush like, you know, when you come out, and you're like now, here's the thing is like I was in a coffee shop, maybe like two weeks ago, and and I was gone from the bike for awhile. And I had that same time awake. When I was coming out the dorm like I haven't been in this neighborhood in a while. I don't know what's going on. And when the bike was air, you're like all nice. I'm still here. That's great. We'll carl. Thanks for coming up. Thanks experiences. As pleasure art, everybody. We will catch you tomorrow.

Roosevelt Carl Carl chicago Redline Eddie eighty Ryan America cubs Vegas baseball CEO Jeremy Roenick Logan square banana Republic president Mike Facebook Joe Rogan Kyle Hendricks Ed HOGAN
Special Report: Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blach  (2018)

The Projection Booth Podcast

27:24 min | 2 years ago

Special Report: Be Natural: The Untold Story of Alice Guy-Blach (2018)

"Right now at banana Republic factory save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire store loves to connect to fifty percent off clearance. Doc. Dresses follows starting in nineteen ninety nine. Thank you nearest store. Shop online only banana Republic factory right now at banana Republic factory save big with fifty to seventy percent off the entire store. Let's take an extra fifty percent off clearance stocked up on dresses and follow starting in nineteen ninety nine. Thank you nearest store. Shop online only Annetta factory. You ever heard of our ski Bush on the Laker. I've never even heard about never heard about her with a win four. Nope. Never adding people think you're making it up. Eighteen ninety-five. It'd be me asked present the first public demonstration of their new invention. The scene motto off the first reliable method to project motion pictures. Among those invited young secretary. She thought why not use film to tell stories? She writes directs and produces one of the first narrative films ever made. He's one of the first to utilize many film techniques, including close ups hand, tinted color and synchronized sound. At least found her own company. She directs and manages all aspects of production following two right now at banana Republic factory save big with seventy percent off store, plus two. Let's to fifty percent off clearance doc up dresses Impala of starting in nineteen ninety nine. Find your nearest store or shop online only Panetta Republic factory decade career comprised of a thousand films that she wrote directed or produced at least disappears from filmmaking. How could such an important figure in the booth cinema? Now be known. I was determined to do something about it. My name is Pamela. Agreed. And I'm working on. Shake. Look at the film's train coming into a station on the beach. As the beach. Past boring. Subjects do Billy needed people? Like Alice gives a comment shows. There was more to the cinema than just a stunk shot. She might be really one of the very first directors in the history of film. These are things you connect. Of family artifacts. Simone. Acting in the scope of or she suiting beautiful artistic shots. She was filmmaker of rare sensitivity with a remarkably poet guy. Most of her films were lost the stories in the films that did survive groundbreaking and innovative. The greatest story of all miss Rome. Folks, convey, special episodes of the projection booth. I'm your host spike white on this special episode. I am talking to Pamela beat green the writer and director of be natural. The untold story of Alice guy Blache who is one of our earliest filmmakers, and has not necessarily gotten all the credit that she deserves this documentary talks a lot more about her her career. And maybe why she has been somewhat written out of the history books. So let's go ahead. And enjoy that interview right now, I've never talked to somebody who does what you do more than a day to day basis as far as the title creation and all the stuff that you do. And I'm curious how you got into that line of work completely Winton that was working for a company called kaleidoscope. It was one of the first trailer company, and and they had all these different divisions. I just wanted at job I could fail and bringing work before that I worked on DVD menus and is before the Indy world and. Before that. Or in Atlanta, not doing a lot of stuff for Turner network CNN at cetera. But in a different medium, and I was just happy to have any kind of job. Basically, it was my learning ground because they had posters that did the movie marketing and had a graphics department there, and they talked about moving titles. And I remember seeing Spiderman at the time and panic woman I was like oh my God. I was like my favorite films, and I hit it off with the graphics team at the time because it's like, oh my God. You know, she gets it that you could tell stories through the graphic medium. That was interesting to me. So did you go to school for graphic design? Nope. I fell into being in the work. And then I would comment on it because I could have direct, you know, website design, and like presentations country singer is a child I was a dancer, maybe that helps me with editing. I did the work, and I learned as I went so would have. Been some of your favorite wants to do. I like the storytelling one I like sex mis city because I was a show that I watched and I really enjoyed putting the toil pieces together of how that whole thing came about up to the the film island cabin in the woods. I like the kingdom. I like Bhutto does not one per se. I like them all for different reasons. It's hard to for you finger on something because bring different disciplines each job somewhere. Just to set up story with archival summer just complete graphic design interpretation of what you about see kind of a setup along the Boyne movies. So that's kind of like we capping what happened in the film Annette abstract graphic way. So anything is great medium to tell stories and also info-graphic wise, it's Clinton's short shorten content, while how do you go from working in that for twenty years to then directing? Feature documentary not twenty years yet. Everybody's making the older while I figured with the with the menus in those things I was probably what late nineties. Oh, man. I'm really old. I started really young. Yeah. And do and it was a program called director where I would do these. It was a new solution to ugly PowerPoint presentations. There's a program called director where you could animate and do stuff, and I think what was doing with premier back then before was premier of today, which is so interesting that chance you question is I was building my suitcase of tools once I had those tools, and then I discovered this story I use the bag of tricks that I learned along the way and apply. Those to be able to tell the story while there's the few interviews with your interview subject, and then there's the interviews that kind of support that. But then you use the graphic design so much as a storytelling device. It's wonderful. I want them to feel modern inexpensive. -able for an audience that knows nothing about film into correction. Stephen in the opening is people are soon. Everything happened only what you know, the tourist Hollywood, postcards Hollywood Hollywood that. And then no that's not where it happened. And you know, little tease on fort Lee, just so they get a little tease. And then you go from there wooden was the first time you heard of ilise ski probably almost ten years ago. I seen something on TV. And I thought I'm not surprised. You know, heard of this other thing, but I'm not surprised because women are not recorded documental mind. You my English she was predominant room nail. And even my job. I look for designers and animators are hard to find at the time. Only when I look back member thing. But yeah, I was a woman working in a male dominated industry of design and animation in in Hollywood, it bugged me, and I asked more people and more people in more people and the more people I realize it was a problem. So I investigated more. And then when I saw some footage of her talking it just felt like even looking at the picture when I saw her that she was almost beginning to me saying, I'm wrong place here. I'm not where I belong, please. Give me out of this. Because this is not who I am. And I feel like in the way she came subjects. Pick you. But basically, I came on board to help her. We still heard legacy. I say always having the last chapter of her life because she never got to do the things that you need to do to restore her legacy. So I did it for her so much of the film it plays like an investigation. And I'm curious how you decided or when you decided I'm going to document all of this stuff early on because I knew that was the most compelling part of the puzzle because how many times can you look at drifting picture. I mean, I knew it was gonna make a graphically compelling. But so what who cares you can make a beautiful, but if there's no spying who cares and everybody said who wants to watch a Skype call who's gonna wanna watch that. Nobody cares about this stuff. Nobody wants to see you on the phone that another another though all this stuff. So anyway, I thought the Nancy drew show combs kind of thing. I'm personally interested in detective stories. I'm a detective fanatic. So I love discovering new stuff. All the time. So for me it was under the bring. Okay, we will. But also how that love history. We got a history of I book, my Nitzan, and the whole can you? I would miss all the museum the wonder where the winds were like we need time away. I'm gonna try to stick it back on. I can go into this other room. That's awesome arms on the floor. And I was obsessed with the Mona Lisa because the history was constantly changing. I love if anything Indiana Jones, I should have done adventure. Archaeologists. Oh my God. Yes. But I like journalism as well. So it's a combination. You said you came across these key about ten years ago. So when did you say to yourself, this is my project, I'm going to start working on this documenting this? I couldn't put it down just five. Yeah. But then you have the funding. You know, a lot of what the film being why did you go about giving the funding and saying this is going to be the project, and I need to have support with this. Just keep writing checks to devote my job, and I didn't care after that. I the Kickstarter because I couldn't afford anything. Nobody would want to help me you and then through the Kickstarter I met women will Gena Davis introduced us to jail Dreyfus. She bought on Medina Scully and involve Kim on mitre. Notice. Mention all these women, however, did have Hugh Hefner that came on board as well. They alleged something that seems so unusual. I remember, Hugh, Hefner would support the arts. But it just seems like such an unusual project for him to support not really helped a lot of women documentaries from about birth control and activism to win it. He just didn't talk about it. He didn't talk about a put people to college. We'll don't know. He covenant should did. He help them as well. Sure. You know, he considered himself a cinnabon. He never heard of her thumbs. And then in the women, it was a woman, I talked to years to get you very Thomas. Four on the thing that amazed me the most was when you mentioned her towards the beginning. And there were at least what three or four other female directors that I really hadn't heard of either give it three times five mentioned. Did he's like do all these women did know Indiana good now, we know about Alice, but but all these other women should have metropolis coming. And then she herself says I didn't realize there was so many. So I hit that in their subliminal in a way that's not like in your face annoying because we don't want to make our victim. But she wasn't recorded a document. Clearly, what about those interviews that you that you showcase with her throughout where were those recording. And what were the circumstances of those plans? There was a cinema special. I in Belgium, she will do with the daughter, and then the tapes were found in the garage of the professor scam. Some down them who happened to be Alice's neighbouring the Munshi realize. Who she was better document. This is what you do like you need somebody have this feeling. I mean for me. Anyway, I will only on my God. I better outer this person material. So they have immediately before they're gone because you it's your tattoo in the moment. It's important how did you balance working on the day job? Because like I said you are very prolific away do versus we're kind the documentary. It almost killed me. I barely financial. I had to my father. We went down most nothing. I love jobs. I couldn't do it. I I mean, I try to do both. I did both for long five years straight, and then just had to give 'cause it affected my health. It was very difficult. I wanted to give up and throw everything away. But I get going because I had this support of these women cheered neon and men key gone. He going get it done. Can do it. You can do it. But I wanted unplug the drives and had tantrums on my went home, and I would call Jones lineman or Jovan or genie and just say, you know, what? And it's very hard to keep going. It's very nice to stack when you finish something. And it's hard on the circumstances. Like, this that are extraordinary able to finish something like this. Did you have to do a lot of traveling for this a lot a lot of not only that about a phone calls? Viking. I mean, I would get up at four AM and topa midnight everything could be able to get a hold of all the different time zones. The now the buggy escaping the Becky the doing the interviews. Emailing clean. Teas please do this foods from this. It was just never anything. If anybody else would have done. It's probably would have taken us longer. So it's a sacrifice at the time. I wanted to really like just thought I'll way Livingstone I want to give up looking back. I get emotional about it because I feel like something if I was gone tomorrow. It's like, you know, what I did one thing. I was toward this woman almost not there yet. But I'm I'm more money that's more important than the film itself. Because I was restore. There as making phone, which is kind of fun think back to the future we have that polaroid photo. And all of a sudden, it just took a different and now he can Google, and you have all these amazing any Virginia lists before. When I was starting out. I'm not saying that people that in before me certain things, but I'm place I took with. Issue. So many different things Jesus and be focused. I mean, just connecting all those dots is so important to have all those different points of view, all the different scholars and professors teachers not only them, but then also people in the industry. I mean, just such a wide swath of people that you talk to to be able to get all of this information in one place as remarkable edited before. So I was told that it was terrible that that a lot of man's again. If I didn't do this crazy step of involving Hollywood and pushing the envelope forward, and I didn't have the funders. I wouldn't have been able to do. I didn't have the internet the poster at photos sound two weeks before I got into can completely by coincidence. I was like something out, and that proves the she was on the set for the life of greater so you know, what a bit of so hard. So, you know, without those women are still there that keeps putting me, you know, because I'm still anything you find maybe into you know. I'm old. I do have to tell you going back to what you said earlier, you do actually make Skype phone calls. Very interesting. Luke, you could put them in now, but it can ignore people. Forgive excited like what call somebody in Moscow. Oh now in what we now. Boeing like where we're going the fun that doesn't matter it shouldn't. Yeah. Some people understand the involved in resurrecting somebody, you know, but also the journey fun. I call her we're going to be here now because most people will never go to places, so they're experiencing it through the film, which is kind of fun. I like that when I'm watching stuff on there and on then I get into it. I wanna go there, you know, after working on this project for what ten years at least. And we're going to take a nap affects you question. No, I was curious as far as how much did you have to leave on the cutting route floor. Because it's bullying you have to channel story and don't actually get to the end you have all this stuff. And you can't figure out the connecting. It's gotta go. I'm I I in a motive of because when the, and you know, I had people which means I can't be that would make it shorter or just cut out completely. But I think with different with me is instead of killing stuff when most a lot of long phone people just kill stuff. I knew that with it where it might be completely short. But it's still impact. So because I come from short fun longtime people can do short fun. So it took me a while from this doing short from my day job to figure out how to do bomb for him. And then in funny now, I'm back in the marketing of the phone because I've been cutting a lot of the pieces myself I had to go back to short from. And I'm like, wait a minute twelve and even shorter. What do I need like had for because we've got to go back to the fun cutting again. So. Oh, it's two different disciplines. So what was that? Like actually seeing this with an audience off with. No viking. No sweating. Hold time to our street. I just wanted it to end ready people it was just ending ovation. And then there was a gentleman by the name of PD ham and the stood up. And he's like I'm going to read about this. I didn't even know who he was. I was like, okay. And I just was like, oh, they don't hate it in guys the magic began. But people were seeing what we were seeing, but that was an eighteen minute longer cut. And you know, so stressed out because I was like well now gone. Yeah. And again, it's like it doesn't matter people come with woken progress. Other time and was like. I have some stuff to do when they accepted me was much that he I last year at forty minutes to cut that was still not together, and you need to be animated all those books when the animated, and I cut him it as stills quickly. So my funders thought that they were animated like, you know, and I said, no, these are all stills all that need to be animated all of this stuff needs to have movement. It was insanity. Running around with our heads cut off. This woman is about it yesterday. And then remember the pain something about it? So when did you finally lie the picture, or are you still noodling with it? No, no, no. That's it. I think that's the run them. I finally that would after London. There was no more than just finessing little bit in like November. I was in did somebody for kademi consideration. So I had stopped for last year because I didn't want the movie to open in August. Because of that distributed moved up the schedule to March, which became. April. But I just I was like I don't want the movie to it's time like movies got to get out there. We're talking now for would have been August. But my folks. Get to know when to let it go who is disturbing in. How can people see this? Di guy and in association with Keno couldn't be Louis in LA at the let me Monica n teens and then expand and then it opens in New York on the twenty six th and expand and multiple cities on like ice website. Then the Atlanta in Chicago, you know, we're doing it slowly. And then it's like the movie building building building Keno ends like iced are known for quality products. And I'm curious are they going to be putting out any Ellis ski movies as well? The ocean way fall in raves in Cohen his money. So on hoping my go to do they always keep on Beijing, US DVD cook film? So I'm definitely going to talking to him about that. But we've been running their heads cut off trying to get everything. Very well. I have to ask the question that I hate to ask. But what's next for? You can tell you what I'm not sure I'm available highest when pan she show series of helping just different my day job. So and living and loves to. Oh, and I'm about miss green. Thank you so much for your time. And it was a real pleasure talking with you. Very much humidity, Mike, and and I'm glad you like the phone at grease for it on social media. Oh, I definitely will. And yeah, I was even just talking about it yesterday. As far as how people just get written out of history. And I am really glad that your movie is around to help kind of right things. I mean that scene at the end at the cinematheque or wherever in seventy seven oh my God. I almost lost my shit. Oh, the round table. Yes. Yeah. The radio really be two hours. I cut it down. I was cut that out to can you imagine? No, no. You have to the editor Wyoming to cut that out. I mean, I was upset when you mentioned that the that the cinematheque didn't have that photo of her anymore and then drink and then lingua wants to just cut her out completely. Oh, God some use of the material. And the the thing I discovered it by rewinding and playing rewinding and playing because I didn't realize she was talking about long boss in one. Take realize it connected learning on the job. And then I found this footage. And I was like, oh, my bad about on the wall. I found all these connective tissues. I lost. I lost my show too. So if I didn't speak French on there was no internet. We would not have happened. Well, I'm glad you do. I'm glad it did. And I'm glad that you made this. So thank you so much. Much by the word. Napa know this month get a five core jug of Napa full synthetic motor oil, plus a Napa platinum oil filter for twenty one ninety eight that's a pretty unbelievable deal. But trust us. It's totally real. But only for a limited time, so get Napa full synthetic and Napa platinum oil filter for twenty one ninety eight today quality parts, helpful people. That's Napa know how. No, general states pricing sales presses to not include a state local taxes recycling fees. Offer ends four thirty nineteen. No an ad from dad. All right. Save money on car insurance when you bundle home and auto with progressive take these right? What is this? Wow. Where did you get this? I'm talking to you with the hair. Yeah. Where did you get this? Good stuff. Solid. That's not veneer that solid stuff. Progressive can't save you from becoming your parents, but we can save you money when you bundle home and auto. Progressive casualty insurance company affiliates and other insurance discounts not available in all states or situations.

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Changing the Perception of Wellness

The goop Podcast

50:00 min | 1 year ago

Changing the Perception of Wellness

"Hi Elise Lunen here co host with Gwyneth of the podcast. Today's guest is Dr Robin Burden Person. She is our next guest and our special eight episodes series that we are hosting in partnership with Banana Republic called Women on top. I'll tell you a little more about that before we get to our conversation some of the most interesting businesses or maybe all of the most interesting businesses is were born out of curiosity desire to explore to ask questions and Sherry answers. This is the space that Gwyneth was in when she started goop. It's also the space from which Banana Republic was founded back in nineteen seventy eight when to California creatives with adventurous spirits began up cycling military surplus clothing and the rest history when we talked to the team at Banana Republic about partnering up on a special podcast series their vision revolved around the idea of living a life with no boundaries. This is the inspiration behind their clothing. Today it drives how they source premium materials from around the world the ways they choose to innovate with their designs and how they think about abusing style with substance this is all in display in their fall collection which combines iconic banana republic styles with a modern twist to see it all and to shop Banana Republics Ball collection had banana republic dot com slash goop. Don't hold anything too tightly. Just wish for it want it. Let it come from the intention of real truth for you and then let it go. The amihai soul is like it's unbound. It's limitless but we will use words to limit ourselves when people stop believing that somebody's got your back or Superman's coming we turn to ourselves and that's where you become empowered courageous participation attracts. It's positive things I'm GONNA paltrow. This is the Goop podcast bringing together thought leaders culture changes creatives founders founders CEOS scientists doctors healers and seekers here to start conversations because simply asking questions and listening has the power got to change the way we see the world today is no exception a letter lease fill you in on her extraordinary guest all right over to Elise Dr Robertson is a practicing physician and the founder and CEO a parsley health an amazing program that combines primary care with a functional approach to Madison Robin Designed Parsley because she wanted to help people get to the root cause of disease rather than only treating their symptoms during her residency she realized just how little time doctors get to spend with their patients and how our healthcare system continually sacrifices quality for quantity. She felt compelled to change the game. Parsley health is an APP designed to increase the time spent between doctors and patients which allows doctors to deep dive into the roots of Disease Robin believes in being the architect of your own health and she and her team at Parsley or there to help guide you you download the APP and pay for a membership and then you can see their doctors throughout the country have locations in New York and a second location in Los Angeles coming in West Hollywood this ball get your mind on board with your body like you can't fix your your bod without looking at mental emotional spiritual and whether you have a meditation practice or an exercise the practice or something that allows you to self soothe be present kind of get into your physicality and calm that that is when your body's in a para sympathetic state which is your arrest digest relax and he'll state and when the bodies there and then the body can start fixing things but if you never let it go oh there then you don't get to fix anything okay. Let's get to my chat with Dr Robin Burson. I obviously have known own of Parsley and your work and we've met before and I've been able to interview before but never like this ever like this. That was a very fun panel though it it was fun yeah you held a down. That was good. Those panels are always the highest ranking events too. I mean people are just desperate as as you know in your own experience I guess for clear concise insight into how to navigate their wellness really yep. So how did you get here. How how did you land up functional medicine. Did you have a healing crisis. You know I'm it's interesting story because didn't have a personal healing crisis if I like. I've had to dig way back because sometimes I'm like. Where did this come from. Why am I doing all of this but when I did way back and I think back to college where I was not premed did not think I was is going to be a doctor but ended up in the middle of college at some point taking this course on cancer and the sociology biology epidemiology of cancer and it was topped by Eh this incredible geneticist at my university one of the top four most researchers are researchers and cancer and at the time I think what inspired me to take the course looking back is that my grandmother was dying of colon cancer and she had smoked cigarettes her entire life and that's one of the number one causes of colon cancer answer and as I started digging and researching I ended up writing this paper on alternative therapies for cancer and cancer prevention and kind of getting into the medical research. Which is a world? I'd never touched before and if I think back it was really that moment that helped me think I'm kind of really interested in this stuff and so I went to medical local school Columbia knowing that I was interested in public health chronic disease primary care prevention holistic forms of medicine by that time I'd become a yoga the teacher at a meditation teacher that was like my side Hustle in med school and those things really stuck with me as my interest areas and through that discovery discovered functional medicine got it and so were you practicing for a period of time before you started parsley or did you just go right to it relatively soon so along along the way also co-founded a healthcare technology company enterprise offer for hospital systems with a buddy from med school and that kind of got bit by the Tech Bug and then after training in med school residency. I was in this kind of crosshairs where I was consulting and health tech but also practicing medicine and a really amazing integrative the greatest functional medicine clinic in New York City and I think I had this moment of these two worlds Soda Line. I'm really passionate about both of these things. I see how technology is going to transform healthcare care. I see how the functional approach transform healthcare but like how does that match up for me in any way and those experiences has crystallized in this idea wow I can actually bring them together and can we almost create a new healthcare system that brings the best of primary care the best of functional medicine and the best of new technology in a model that makes this form of medicine accessible and so that was kind of the German nation and I saw how powerful powerful the functional approach was to help people heal and I saw how important it was to bridge the gap between healthcare and medicine as we think of it and wellness in a world where ninety percent of our disease costs are due to chronic lifestyle driven diseases where we're living ourselves sick but I also observed how the functional and integrative space had had become extremely inaccessible from a price point standpoint from the way that it was operated and I don't know crazy ideas. He is were were born and this is where we are no. It's so interesting because I feel like functional. Medicine is often at its own thing. I think some people who don't know what it is are often like that makes so much sense right. This idea of understanding root causes rather other than treating symptoms and also this what has become very modern mashups of technology. Is You mentioned and lab testing and really understanding or baseline like your data and then care because too often when you're when you're theoretically a healthier while person you go go through your you know you get your pap smear. You have a quick conversation you don't. There's no other real at least for women. There doesn't seem to be any other other baseline. Check and what's happening. It's kind of wild like you're. You're hoping for the best and I remember when I came to open. The first time I started are working with functional doctors and having that moment of like de feel joy in your life. I know some of those things are creeping into Western medicine as well but that that sort of those stop you in your stops questions about how you're living your life my no. That's not a question but like it's M- it's missing right. I mean we've we've lost some fundamentally important things. We've lost the long-term relationship. The research shows that when you have a doctor who knows knows you who knows who you are costs are lower. Outcomes are better patient. Satisfaction is higher but we've made medicine really transactional and we've made it really inaccessible like one of the crazy things about parsley. Is that three hundred sixty five days a year. You can write in and ask a question or get a refill. You have this constant. Communication and health is happening in your life. He knew ninety ninety. percent of your health is having your life. It's not happening in a doctor's office and yet our medical system is pushed us into this place where we have these very transactional transactional often desperate moments in those are only interactions with the medical system and so in this way having this relationship. Where are you going through a divorce or break up. Are you in a new job and you're really stressed out. What's happening with your family your health and happened today. It's an amalgamation with everything that's happened to you in your life that got you here and so you have to get to know someone as a whole person you have to look at someone over time because what happened in two years ago or twenty years ago matters and then you have to look at all of these things that get sort of pushed aside in medical culture as soft and yet they they drive the majority of health outcomes which are the social determinants of health. What you eat how you move your environment how you manage stress Your Relationships. These these things are driving most of your health and doctors drugs procedures interactions with the medical system only actually account for a small percentage of it but medicine sort of ignores an entire really the rich data set and then you have all the cool diagnostic testing it takes new information seventeen years on average to get into medical school education and so we have the microbiome and genomics and hormones and toxins and so what I love about functional medicine is that it's bringing together the best of modern medicine and the breast of primary care but with this holistic view which is what we need for today's world. The old system doesn't work anymore and to your point about women you know the research shows that women and minorities minorities don't get heard by doctors in the medical system as much our pain gets ignored or symptoms get dismissed but that's it's crazy when you think about it because women are medicine. More than fifty percent of doctors are now women. The majority of primary care doctors are now women women. Dr Eighty percent of healthcare spending in this country and only like something like thirteen percent of healthcare CEO's or women and so we have this entire service layer. That's like fundamental to the functioning of our lives that's been designed for and by men over time and where women haven't had this voice and then subsequently aren't heard in the same way and so it's just a space that's so ripe for so much change and parsley as part of that. There's there's lots of folks who are part of that. I think what you're seeing right now. Is this kind of ground. Swell of saying wellness is amazing now. There's a kind of force function or an energy energy pushing to say this has to come to medicine to exactly because I think too you know the wellness movement is trivialized or mocked you know as is this trait undertaking people who have too much time and too many resources and I know we started on that line now. It's it's very dangerous because it's as you mentioned it's primarily led by women who have been overlooked who know we know our bodies. We know when things aren't right and like being well is obviously both an essential part of longevity and being there for your family but also also infinitely less expensive but I do want to get you going. Where do you think that that comes from the fact that the healthcare system was designed by man Dan or where does this. I mean I know it's like hysteria and the uterus and wandering uterus and yeah I mean I think it comes from so many places I mean I I think it comes from the medical system and in its history of of being somewhat reduct reductionist and thinking and sort of you have this symptom take this drug rate and that was important in a world where infectious disease was like the number one thing we were dealing with and in a world where we have chronic lifestyle driven diseases heart disease diabetes depression gastrointestinal issues infertility autoimmune these things that are a slow lober and that we live our way into that kind of whack-a-mole approach doesn't work anymore and I think it comes from that. I think you know women. Dr Eighty percent of healthcare spending and there are also the early adopters of all health tack of all healthcare a wellness of yoga of all of these things the research shows that at least historically men only engage age in their health once they're already in crisis true and so women are been the ones listening to their bodies and our bodies are awesome rate the only vehicle you're going to Hafer life. You'll have for life and they have so much information to share with us and we're you know for whatever reason I don't know why maybe a little bit more tuned in but women are listening to that that and I think the wellness movement comes from that and when I said don't get me started. It's it's the dismissal of wellness by medicine that makes no sense when we know that again nutrition mental health environment relationships movement these things drive so many of your health outcomes we'd rather spend hundreds of thousands of dollars ripping out of your leg and tied around your heart when you have heart disease than spending a a couple of thousand bucks up front to help empower you to understand your health into live differently and that that is an economic value system right and so oh you know a lot of my work is around. How do we bridge that gap between medicine and wellness because they're they're part and parcel of a continuous same thing and we don't want to throw the baby out with the bathwater. Pharmaceutical drugs are awesome really important tools. All of the modern testing guide nerd out on that stuff all the time. That's what we do but it's awesome but it's not enough yeah I think too. It's important to understand where the resistance is coming from. Anything change in general is hard and I think we're also living in a world. Obviously that's becoming much more bottoms up where people have access to information and validation Chan they don't necessarily have to go to their teacher their doctor their priests whoever it may be like the Patriarchy is crumbling right but I also feel to like there is this it's not a war but it's unclear who it's unclear where the resistance is actually really coming from because I feel like I meet so many a conventional doctors and so many researchers at university who are completely on the side of lifestyle medicine and absolutely think it's important like that's the first thing they want to understand is what people are eating also. I'm curious where you think it's coming from this because it feels like it's kind end of ally. This created that there's this tension establish that when you actually start poking holes in it you it's hard to to find people who aren't who are on different sides. Oh I I think they're they're oh yeah yeah. Yeah I mean coming from you know the proverbial ivory every tower of medicine in my training. I definitely know it's there. you know even my dad just retired as chairman of medicine at a Community Hospital for after thirty years of of practice to seeing you know. It took him quite a while to kind of get it. I think it's generational. I think it's our research paradigm you know the randomized controlled trial. L. which is the gold standard his pretty old research paradigm and it's pretty clunky like it's somewhat narrow and its focus and so it's great for showing if a drug is better than another drug or drug will kill you or not but it's not great at looking for these multifamily to`real overtime factors jurors like what are you eating and how does that impact you and then. I think it's also our healthcare system is a is a big well intentioned and awesome beast right. That is an anything like that. You know turning a speedboat is much easier than turning the titanic and I think think that just by the nature of it takes time. I had this incredible experience this week. One of my professors at Columbia Med who's just just to renowned doctor. They're probably in her eighties at this point and she sends me this email hi Robin. I don't know if this is still your email address but I had to tell you patient of mine her daughter was stealing with kidney failure and no one could figure it out and she ended up seeing one of your pediatricians and being diagnosed missile toxic mold and she's better and I wanted to commend you for seeing a future as it didn't yet exist even even when you were here because she knew me and I like cried when I got that email because yeah that validation matters to me from these incredible institutions Susan's where I train but where most people were not necessarily on the same wavelength than I think. Sometimes you can think how does not everybody dot just see not this right yeah and yet I think to your point is changing yeah. No I think that there's mold is an interesting example too of this. This idea like US imagining some sort of crisis but to your point like toxic mold is deadly and there are so how many things in the environment and in that are already circulating within our bodies that are problematic and yet that that concern is often also invalidated elevated by your body can detox itself and the idea of trying to sweat more or being careful about what you can see him or put on on your body is not essential like your body can handle it which I think. We also know that sort of a fallacy. Do you imagine a time. When will that will look back and be like that was so crazy. Oh Yeah I mean. I think that we'll see that because what we're talking about here is just thinking outside the box thinking more broadly right. I always describe the toolbox that you learn in medicine as being really fantastic but being primarily composed of certain tests certain drugs certain procedures and when you start to think of nutrition and sleep and meditation and supplements and this wider and more more modern array of diagnostic testing is adding to your toolbox. It's not an or it's an and suddenly your ability to help someone heal which is what doctors are here to do. Teach and heal and guide is just so much broader and I think I do absolutely think that we'll get there and I think that and I mean you guys like Goop is a huge part of this rate. It's we've seen in the past five to ten years. Especially five years assist ground swell on the consumer side on the the individual side saying we wanna feel well being alive and existing isn't good enough right and we want to feel well and we WANNA listen to ourselves when we don't and we want to pay attention to the signs in our body when we don't feel that way and medicine is great for keeping you alive but it's not going to necessarily help you thrive in those those are two different things and I think what were talking about. At least partially is like how do we expand the mandate of medicine and make it bigger. Yeah I think to you know so much of it is if you remove the problematic factors right the body will heal itself. Do you think that will come to a time when and it seems like this will happen and it can't be that far away when we'll each have sort of a blueprint to our solves like our genetic potential failed points and the ways in which we can steer ourselves that we'll have ultimate autonomy not that we won't obviously need doctors and nutritionists and need guidance but that will be so dialed child and to how we individually need to live that will have most of the power. I think we'll be much more more empowered than we are now and I think that medicine is moving towards personalization. We'll absolutely like as we understand. I mean we're at like the what I call the snowflake on the tip of the Iceberg Connecticut understanding rate. We're just like fairly scrapping scratching the surface in terms of what we know about how our genes impact our health although we know and that snowflakes pretty bad right we know a lot and we partially we use that information all the time but to your point. I think it's just about personalizing treatment rather than saying one-size-fits-all size fits all and the research was done on the smog of people and we're going to ignore that maybe those people aren't like you or whatever all man yeah exactly exactly and we're going to begin tailoring things to you and using your personal data that includes everything from your genetics epigenetics which are the genes jeans that are turning on and off in real time your gut microbiome your skin microbiome to your mental state and your spiritual state and your emotional state. Which are we know huge drivers of the neural hormonal cascade happening in your body every day if you are stressed and living in fight or flight? Ah Sympathetic overdrive he proverbially running from the lion all day. Your Body can't heal. It's immune system. Your Cortisol goes up your blood. Sugar goes up your metabolic bollock disarray you crave sugar all of these things happen and they're coming from from the mind right and knowing that to we sort of separated mental health and physical health yeah in our current medical system and that's another thing. I love about how how how to work as a doctor or is that I recognize that those things are not separate and how could we possibly consider one without the other yeah and even the idea of the placebo effect which is and how how it's perceived as like if you get a placebo and you get better your dupe right like you you're so gullible along among the mind is incredibly powerful and the placebo effect is incredibly high bar for these studies to beat and and the fact that we have continued to downplay the power of our own minds that that these outcomes are imagined right is also really frustrating that whole thing needs to be rebranded yet. I mean our minds are incredibly powerful tools vice versa. We have so much power over our our mind state through our bodies. You know the ability the way that sugared creates inflammation in the brain the way that simply exercising exercise goes head to head with a a lot of antidepressants if you're not moving than you are probably not sleeping and probably not pooping and lots of things should be happening in your body are not and if you sit in front of a desk all day and you kind of calm the jitters with the wine at the end of the night and then you don't sleep well in your honor. Rinse and repeat cycle you are on a crash course for things things like depression and anxiety and so one of the things in that's been really cool and gratifying to see how many mental health providers whether they're psychiatrists psychologists or therapists are healers referred to us at Parsley because they love to see like what else is going on in the body. That could be driving this one donate women in her lifetime will be diagnosed with thyroid condition. If you are constipated have dry skin gaining weight and depressed you could have low thyroid word function but so often women get told oh you're just depressed. Take this medication. You need to work out more. It gets dismissed right back to the not listening when you're just getting old yeah. It's just aging yeah. You're thirty four in the valley flat. Yeah and you're like no what what's going on here. In the new test for it's there and we're you know a little bit too too much like zero to ambient in this culture yeah and not asking why not looking under the hood. We've had some incredible success helping women get pregnant within avoid. IVF simply because we helped balanced blood sugar balance hormones John's lower inflammation understand the underlying triggers of some issues that were then identify thyroid problems and these things all when unsolved resolved resulted in healthy pregnancies and women who were told that they would never get pregnant without Ibn often these things. Are you know. The power is there. We'll get back to Dr Burleson in just a second I mentioned a few weeks ago on the PODCAST. Curiosity is my favorite state of being. I try to carry the attitude with me every day. It's certainly easier to do it at a place like goop that places such a premium value on being curious and feeling empowered to explore and ask questions. Banana Republic DOC is another company that values curiosity their founding story starts with a California couple. WHO's looking for an adventure fun fact Banana Republic began as Safari Safari inspired clothing company and today the inspiration for their clothing designing for life and motion or as they put it living a life of possibilities with no boundaries raise their fall collection is iconic banana republic styled for now so they're utility inspired styles made from premium materials think your favorite dresses and pants updated an animal prints and menswear patterns and quintessential Suede jackets and cashmere sweater the aware for many seasons to come and now Banana Republic is celebrating some some true modern icons with goop through our special podcast series women on top? I hope you'll listen to every episode. These are the women who lead with power grace and curiosity who I think define what it means to break boundaries and maybe most importantly poor working hard so that others to can live a life of possibilities so keep listening and keep shopping with our friends at Banana Republic to get their fall collection had two banana republic dot com slash goop. There's a workout then there's goop workout and then there's goop leak coop. League is our first major fitness focused experience. We're launching this new event the weekend end of October twelfth to Thirteenth in the city that we love and that's become something of a second home to us. That's Austin Texas guys and we'll be at our favorite the Line Hotel aw downtown Austin right on the river. What in the world can you expect from the team this time group. Lee is all about tapping into the incredible potential of the body. We were bringing together some of the most talented and cutting edge instructors and experts from the world of fitness. These are the people who are redefining physical wellness and shaping the way hey we think about an approach the mind body soul connection as a guest that group. League you'll get to take three classes with these top practitioners in several different studio spaces ground lift pulse burn and Relief and some of my very favorite teachers will be there like an array a former dancer from la who has developed a wholly holy unique compelling and fund. We've method that revolves around reconditioning your fashion. It's extraordinary I promise in call at Dong from the nest in New York City will also be there. The executive team cube recently did the nests new bounce and sculpting classes together. When we were out on the east coast it was hard knocking ally but it was kind of hilarious and very cool and of course you'll get to see and do a lot more if you come to keep league there will be our pop shop food drinks and a bunch of power stations shins where it will have tools for soothing our muscles relaxing and just finding a little thin so to join the group League? You can get a pass for the event on Saturday October twelve or Sunday October thirteenth just head to Goop DOT com slash goop league back to my chat with Dr Robin Burson so in terms of the breakdown of who uses parsley what percentage of it as people who are just WANNA maintain or improve their overall wellness or maybe rebuild their immunity and and how how many people come to you because they are out of options nita to help detective cannot figure out what's going on across the board so we have three core user groups there folks who are optimizing ising. They don't have a diagnosis. They don't have symptoms oftentimes. There's a personal trigger. Maybe a family member diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Maybe they had kids hits and they kind of want to clean up their act. Maybe they've been reading Tim Ferriss all day and are really just ready for that. Genetic tests I know and we love working with those folks because everybody gets sick sometimes and the data that we have available to help people optimize awesome and then we're there for them. When I have one patient in New York he's like a thirty year old guy looks like the healthiest person on earth and he is and he's one of those people he knows he has two copies of Asia four so he wants to reduce his Alzheimer's risk. This can optimize heart health but along the way he got ticked by the lime disease side effect reaction to a drug and other doctor prescribed him like stuff happens happens right. We're human no matter health how healthy we are so that's one crew. The next crew is symptomatic but doesn't have a diagnosis so that's folks who are trying to figure it out. They're not feeling well. They're bloated. They're breaking out. They're exhausted. They're anxious. They're digestion zoff. They don't have a disease. They're not looking you you know for the last ditch detective but they want somebody to put the pieces together and then the last group is folks who do have a diagnosis. Maybe maybe they have heart disease or a mass or infertility or depression or whatever the case may be and they're frustrated. They're the ones who say I'm frustrated frustrated with not having time with my doctor. I'm frustrated with asking for these tests and having them look at me like I have three heads. I'm looking for a quarterback for my health. I'm looking for somebody to managers and figure it out and so as really across the board in New York which is our originals center. You know we started seeing kids too and we're going going to extend that across the country but now we see families and that's really cool and so it's kind of everyone it's men and we work with men and women were slightly slightly more heavily female population because again women are the early adopters. They're the ones that jump on board which is awesome but it's kind of our oldest patients eighty nine and wow yeah. I know it's been. It's really hard to get men engaged in health. I know this from my personal experience where my husband is literally like pre-diabetic. I mean his his his his blood. Sugar is out of control but that I can't I'm working him into. You know getting some testing but he's going to resist yeah well. Sometimes they see the numbers though Oh yeah for that type of of perspectives sometimes these see the the data and they get a little bit competitive calls which is a lever you can pull. It's also ironic because I feel like most men I know are the hypochondriacs and our diagnosing every single thing on the Internet. Hey where women are like. I'm sick and I'm still going to go to work. So what's your so for the people who are generally well wanting to to maintain their wellness. Like what do you recommend like. How do you like people to eat. How do you like people to supplement. Let's assume it's a thirty five year old. Women are thirty five to forty five year old woman so we developed something called the symptom tracker at Parsley and it's forty five questions look at nine body domains and I have rarely seen the person who takes this two minute quiz who says that they're perfectly healthy. That has a score zero never happened so we all have something right and I think I think that's the starting place the other starting places just hearing your history your story. Do you have a family history what I might recommend for that thirty five forty five year old woman with a strong family history of breast cancer or heart disease might be a different set of tests and a different diet or different things than somebody who doesn't right so you need to look look back in time as well as right now but then from there it's often about on the nutrition side taking out the crap so refined sugar a fine flour processed foods all the things that come in a rapper bag that you pop open something that didn't grow out of the ground. Those foods are poisonous. They're filled with pesticides and dyes and preservatives and things that our bodies were never meant to work doc with right and so and then just the sugar and refined carbohydrate factor when you spike your blood sugar and Spike your insulin and you do that on a repeated basis you create this massive downstream fact that affects your hormones your brain your gut and then from there your immune system and everything else and so a lot of it's it's not about you know eat. Paleo Kito Vegan like those specifics might be right for a given person in a given context and we will recommend a very personalized nutrition plan in that way and at times we may recommend intermittent fasting or a ketogenic diet and those things have their place but the number one thing that we have everyone do is get got all of that stuff out and eat real food which takes more time and a little bit of Huntin and a little bit of sort of wherewithal as I discovered covered in the airport in in Boise Idaho this weekend coming back from a wedding amino. You have to kind of say this is what I care about in this one. I'm going to do and to not beat this thing and find something that that fits here but that's number one and then supplements. I noticed like such an annoying answer but it's so highly personalized personalized. Some people don't need any supplements and some people really benefit from I benefit from these glaciated helps me sleep at night. I benefit for methylated deleted b-vitamins because I have certain genetic so they boost my mood for shore. If you're pregnant or thinking about getting pregnant you need a certain type of prenatal but you don't need that leader. probiotics can be really really helpful but aren't necessarily needed all the time so it really comes down to those things and then the last thing is get your mind on board with your body like you can't fix your your bod without looking at mental emotional spiritual all and whether you have a meditation practice or an exercise practice or something that allows you to self soothe be present kind of get into your physicality and calm that is when your body's in a Paris empathetic state which is your rest digest relax and he'll state and when the bodies these there than the body can start fixing things right but if you never let it go there then you don't get to fix anything. Are there supplements since obviously not all are created equal all from claims on the bottle and not being matched by what's inside or the amount to issues like it's an unfortunate pro. It gives supplements a bad name because there are some bad players. Are there any brands that you particularly like so you know you you say it like there's some bad players and then on the consumer market. It's just like impossible to know what the good ones are a shelf it here pharmacy or your local grocery store and it's like my is cross in there right so for us because we're doctors we only work with supplement companies that only work through physicians and and so they don't sell direct to consumer so there are made in what's called. GNP certified facilities which are pharmaceutical grade facilities that are vetted they have third party data meaning a third party hardy analyzes what's in them and says yes this thing actually contains what it says it does and isn't contaminated with scary things and so forth and so anything with like our label on it as made by one of those companies anything that are we carry in. Our office is made by one of those companies and there's a bunch of them. There's ten the fifteen of them that I could rattle off. The mostly aren't selling direct to consumer aren't all but that way physicians because to your point supplements can be really powerful and supplements can be powerful tools and they can be really helpful and they can be much more of a side effect and better long-term game plan some MHM case than a drug or they can just be supportive in a certain period of time whether it's magnesium or adopted Jin. I know you guys have an amazing line and so it's about without knowing where they're coming from a knowing that whoever's representing them some something that someone that you trust yeah now for sure. I mean that's been our experiences in gem be certified and all you have to do ingredient testing and you have to do ingredient testing lab testing like sourcing horsing. It's a mess and you have to know right and I think the biggest problem with them. A lot of what's on the market is that it's not that it's going to hurt you some of it well but most of commits won't but it's that most of it is so little of the active ingredient that it's like taking a quarter of an antibiotic and wondering why your sinus infection doesn't go away like it's just not useful and so. I think that's where the professional grade stuff and you guys are using professional facilities to manufacture. You're getting different potency and quality of ingredients. That thing's going to like work yeah if you're going to bother to take it right and so that's for us what we what we stand behind yeah is there when you sort of look ahead both tactically and otherwise like what are you excited about. Are there certain things that are mainstreaming. Now are becoming available that you think will be transformational. I'm really excited about all of the diagnostic testing that's kind of getting into our hands and empowering us with information so I'm a big fan fan of all of that home diagnostics a lot of doctors like hate them because you know people say oh people don't know what to do with this information. They don't know what it means. There is a risk of some of these struck consumer tess not being you know medically accurate so obviously we have to regulate that but I think it's great because I think why should we not want people to be more curious and interested in what's going on in their bodies like that's a good thing. I do see people left a lot of time sort of unmortgaged with that information it could be something so simple as a vitamin D and they bring it to us and they're like what do I do and how much to take and how often what should my levels be. When do I retest and that's one point. The re-testing is really important. Don't test once like test taking action test again. I'm just excited about how accessible all of this information is becoming becoming and how much people are excited to like learn about their health and wellness into you know I saw a long time ago like a some article in the newspaper about like it's so bad that all these people are obsessed with wellness and WanNa know all these things and they wanted to like the author was a physician and I wanted to like shake that person and say this country's problem if you just WanNa focus on the US for a second this country's problem is not people will be too interested in their health and wellness. Yeah sure there are some people who might take that too far but the vast majority of people need education and motivation and inspiration Beret Shen to get excited about their health and to learn more and start doing something about it because that's the cool part we actually can transform totally and the and having the transparency into what's actually going on and having access and an understanding of what those levels mean also breeds accountability and I think we aw want that for ourselves right. It's very disempowering. Feel like you have no control over your health. When in fact I think we know we can fact dramatically are their baseline task for people who can't get parsley doctor you and what what age for women do you think that they need to establish. I like a hormone baseline or baseline in general I mean as young as possible like when you graduate from here European attrition and whenever that happens for you for some later than others earlier than others but you are I think in a great moment and even as early as your early twenties to understand we are heart health. Your hormones learned some things about your genetics and become empowered with that information and and then to retest it periods in the future right and to see where you're landing. I think there's no like time. That's too early we sort of have said in culture culture well like with any of that raid and why are we waiting until it's too late to test for things. Most of these tests are most of the things you can do. Blood work in their are relatively cheap or inexpensive covered by health insurance if you have it they're not you know we have. We certainly offer at Parsley lots of what I call fancy pants tests but not everybody everybody needs those and that's certainly not necessarily where we start. We start with in-depth blood work and these are things that lots of doctors are doctor owner looking at your thyroid looking at your female hormones looking at your nutrient levels looking at inflammation markers looking at what's called an M. R. Profile of your heart health so the shapes and sizes of cholesterol particles not just the total number which is not super helpful kind of getting those deep dive looks or as early as possible because then you have a baseline you know where you were yeah no it's interesting and even thinking about something like cholesterol and our understanding of it and how that's evolved and how I mean as a child I have. I have high cholesterol total number and I was a skinny little kid Kim but I was put on a very restrictive diet with this idea of forcing that total cholesterol down and then I was sort of let off seemingly seemingly let off the hook until recently when I don't know if you know Dr Echoes but he was looking at some of my genetic factors and he essentially was like you are not someone you can ever do bulletproof or eat high fat and high fat with the Bandon because of your genetic attic predisposition toward high cholesterol which I thought was fascinating to sort of in a way Yup come back to it and that's a great point like we see people doing a lot of these this diets and there are people who really need to be on a plant based high fiber diet and cannot get away with these high fat diets and so people are doing them without out the diagnostic testing not knowing that you know it's a smaller percentage of people that that happens too but I I we see it all the time where yeah you gotta get that. MCAT DT oil and you know high fat dairy like out because it's not it's not working for you and so that's what I'm like excited about all seen seen more of just as everything kind of shifts do you. How do you feel like this. Whole world becomes more accessible muscle for people I think as we see more and more medical grade but consumer available diagnostic testing and will put pressure assure on the system to take the veil off of what are somewhat false prices I think that as you get more education per providers here's out there. One of the things we've done is we've built in house fellowship that trains doctors in the functional approach and just we need more providers to understand this but I think that well because I think is you have greater availability right. It's kind of like basic economy demand supplies you increase supply of people with this knowledge base who are on the provider side prices will come down and I think that you're seeing it just across the space of everything happening and consumer health right wait. There's just more and more and more of it because people want to feel good and that's a good thing this not might not be an appropriate question but do you collect elect and I. This is like a potentially triggering. I'm I've been watching the facebook documentary but do you think you'll have a data set at some point that you can extract bigger vaguer learnings bigger cultural learnings that are applicable to a wider swath of people. Yes absolutely that's one of the sort of driving missions Shin's of Parsley. We you know it's all anonymous we don't. We're not selling our data but we are tracking outcomes. We've actually shown that we reduce chronic prescription drugs by. I seventy seven percent. I mean we have real data already in cohorts around gastrointestinal disease blood sugar autoimmune conditions Hormone Moan imbalances already showing that we're helping people immensely improve more even resolve these conditions and so as that data is set gets larger sure one of the things that I've always had as North Star for Parsley as we started out at a very relatively affordable price point at about five bucks a day. Eh for the membership and we don't bill insurance directly because insurance hasn't quite caught up to the model that we have but it's getting there her and one of the things that were one of the reasons we're collecting outcomes data has to be able to work with the insurance companies and say look at the how we move the needle look at how this approach approach to care moves the needle and look at how people investing in their health in this way are changing their own health outcomes and how could you not pay. Hey for this right. How could you not reimburse this. Do not reimburse it not at the peanut like primary care rates that has forced primary care doctors to see forty patients a day at fifteen minutes each not getting anybody anywhere. How can you reimburse it at rates that are commensurate with the value. That's being created and that's one one of the things that's a hopeful in the American healthcare system is that there is this underlying movement towards value base care. We need to get away from volume pain pain for volume and pay for value because if you think about pain fee for service or pain for volume the system is incentivized for you to stay sick because it gets paid every time you come back and in a value based model which is what Parsley is where it's a membership and there's many other examples of that or a health oak. There's lots happening that sounds centers for Medicare and Medicaid. Services is really prioritizing this. You're seeing this movement towards understanding and always be a blend. I think of value based in fee for service. It's hard to do just one or the other but a move towards recognizing. How do we create more value for people now and so that's another way I think prices we'll come down and yes the the onus of Parsley at looking at our own outcomes? De Data is to be able to affect that kind of change. Thanks for listening to my conversation with Dr Robin Burzan. You can learn more about her at Robertson. MD DOT COM that's B. E. ARE Z. I N. and check out parsley health a parsley health dot com. That's P. A. R. S. L. E. Y. That's it for today's episode. If you have a chance please rate and review hit subscribe to keep up with new episodes and pass it along to a friend. Thanks again for joining. I hope you'll come back this Thursday for more four and in the meantime you can check out dot com slash podcast uh.

Parsley Banana Republic cancer Dr Robin Burson US New York City New York depression Sherry California WanNa Dr Robin Burden Gwyneth heart disease Elise Lunen paltrow
Roddy Ricch Drops Details On His Next Album

Direct from Hollywood

02:48 min | 2 months ago

Roddy Ricch Drops Details On His Next Album

"When you place a wager with william hill sportsbook every moment becomes even more interesting and we have a special twenty twenty one offer to help you. Bet all your favorite sports risk free. Download the william hill mobile app. And when you sign up you can get started with the risk. Free bed of up to two thousand and twenty one dollars. Use promo code pod. Rif must be president michigan. Twenty one plus only terms and conditions apply gambling problem in department of health and human services gambling disorder helpline at one eight hundred seven zero seven one. Seventeen let's make it interesting with williams sports bark. Hi i'm phil donahue and marlo thomas. We fell in love on live television and got married over forty years ago now and i knew podcast. We visit the homes of our favourite long married celebrity couples to talk about enduring love and all its challenges family career conflict. Everything a couple can face. Listen to double date on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts with a ryan seacrest. It's been two years since roddy riches last massive album. Please excuse me for being antisocial which is quite a long time for any artist in this era some rappers dropped several projects in a single calendar year but roddy assures fans. It'll be worth the wait. He tells complex with my next project. I'm going to be more vulnerable. I'm going to bring fans into my world. I'm learning the balance. I'm not really on instagram. So i feel like. I've got to bring them into my life so they can know who. I am a little bit more coming up. One of the biggest albums i could've done. I feel like taking fans back to the basics with me is the thing to do. That's what i'm on a mission to do with what i'm working on. Roddy wouldn't give up any specific release dates but it sounds like the wait for new. Music won't be too long direct from hollywood. When you play a wager with william hill sportsbook every moment becomes even more interesting and we have a special twenty twenty one offer to help you. Bet on all your favorite sports risk free. Download the william hill mobile app. And when you sign up you can get started with a risk free bed of up to two thousand and twenty one dollars. Use promo code. Raf must be president. Virginia twenty oneplus only terms and conditions. Apply gambling problem. Call techs or chat are confidential in toll free helpline one eight eight eight five three two three five hundred. Let's make it interesting. With william hill. Sportsbook spring forward at banana republic factory with fifty to seventy percent. Everything shop season favorites from colorful dresses too. Easy tops from nineteen ninety nine. Find your nearest store or shop online. Only at banana republic factory enjoy fifty to seventy percent off almost everything at gap factory and gap factory dot com shop teas from six ninety nine and joggers from twenty four ninety nine plus extra fifteen percent off online exclusions apply shop the sale through april sixth.

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Lebron Switch

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

03:55 min | 3 months ago

Lebron Switch

"It's women's history month and kohl's is proud of the talented women who make a difference every day at kohl's like the women who make up their kohl's diversity design council a group that includes female designers who've developed a special product line promoting the empowerment of women but calls isn't just elevating this generation of women there elevating the next generation to kohl's invested one hundred thousand dollars in the smart girls program part of the boys and girls clubs of america to help club members. Navigate adolescence learn more at kohls dot com support for this podcast comes from pal. Small business owner pay pal. Qr codes or the safe and easy payment option. It's all the security pay pal is known for online in person cash. Only qr codes. Allow you to accept credit or debit with everyday. Low fees no additional hardware or software needed. Use the app to generate your unique. Qr code customers scan your code with their pay pal app to pay you learn more at paypal dot com slash. Us slash get qr code making money move news nba legend. Lebron james as just signed a new multi year endorsement pepsico leaving coca-cola in the cold after a seventeen year run with that company. I didn't know it had been that long. He did with coca sprite. Same he just right for long time. But i was seventeen years. Of course there were hints of this new deal back in january of this year when he has already been promoting mountain dew. rise pepsi's new mountain dew energy drink but the questions are answered and king. James will be joined by other wellness influencers and athletes and cheering mountain dew. Rise which is supposed to have the caffeine content of two cups of coffee with other vitamins and such coca-cola doesn't seem to be too broken up about it and acknowledging the split they're saying it is mutual. what else what else. What else can they threaten. Well i'm gonna tell you right now. They all broken up about it. Because leaving coca-cola's monthy leaving to go to pepsico that's a whole nother thing. That's their only. That's their own a nobody in class with coca cola except pepsico. They spend money in a different way but coca-cola's a huge brand a huge brea. All right. Well congratulations lebron. We'll have more of the cbi every morning. Show coming up at thirty three minutes after the hour. right after. this ain't even track. You're listening to steve harvey morning show spring forward at banana republic factory with fifty to seventy percent off everything shop season favorites from colorful dresses too. Easy tops from nineteen ninety nine. Find your nearest store or shop online. Only at banana republic factory shop fifty to seventy percent. Almost everything gap factory get sixty percents off select jeans and dresses shopped. The sale through march twenty eighth at gap three and gap factory dot com. So what does runningback do after his playing days are over. Hey this is former. nfl star. Mongering for me. I started podcast. Each episode bring world of competitive gaming and eastwards to life with my podcast games. I'll bring my experiences from being a collegiate e sports head coach of the interviews with the top video. Game streamers gamers from hollywood philadelphia media and pro sports. listen and follow a greens damas lounge on the iheartradio app apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts.

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