20 Episode results for "Baja California"

Ep. 214 - Unraveling the Mysteries of Baja's Botanical Bounty: A Conservation Story

In Defense of Plants Podcast

45:32 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 214 - Unraveling the Mysteries of Baja's Botanical Bounty: A Conservation Story

"You're listening to the indefensible plants podcast, a show designed to cure plant blindness around the globe. Support for indefens- plants comes from listener donations if you'd like to give your support to in defensive plants, please consider becoming patron over at patriotair dot com slash in defensive plants. And together, we can help care plant bindis one episode at a time. Hello, everyone and welcome to the indefens- plants podcast official podcast of indefensible plants dot com. What's up, this is your host met? How's everyone doing this week? Joining us today is Dr sue Vanderplank. She is a freelance botanist whose talent see her doing botanical work on a variety of projects. But today in particular, we're focusing on her work on the flora, of Baja California through the San Diego zoo's institute for conservation research, Dr Vanderplank leads expedition to remote regions of the Bob peninsula to look for rare plant species with extremely limited distributions, and then focuses that work on cross-border conservation of rare plant species that are shared because, of course, plants don't recognize political boundaries. It's fascinating work in an incredibly important in biodiverse region of North America. So this is one of Pacific. You're definitely gonna wanna listen to. So let's just jump right into it. Without further ado. Here's my conversation with Dr Vanderplank. I hope you enjoy. Dr Soula Vander play. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast. How about you tell everyone a little bit about who you are in what it is? You do. I'm a freelance botanist, but I went closely with the San Diego natural history museum, working right now with San Diego zoo, global to focus on rap plants of California, that also found him by California, Mexico, wonderful and I'm super excited to talk about that because it is an incredible region full of diversity that we're only really starting to get our heads wrapped around. But what brought you to plants in the first place is this something that you've always had a passion for or did you kind of discover them later on in sort of your education or career path? Well, I grew up on a Anna nursery that specialized in passion flowers, but also did wholesale plants when I was a girl in England a wealth, and I remember I think about twelve now as having one of those very preteen moments where, you know, I certainly didn't wanna work with people, and I didn't wanna work with. Animals because they ran away. And I was convinced that the only way forward was plans. They never hurt my feelings. They right where you left them. And this is destiny going to be my Kripa hits. Awesome in it's rare that you actually hear someone that feels that way so early on, but apparently being immersed in it from your early days, left. Demark wouldn't you say, oh, yeah. It was very happy, childhood, sometimes even pollinating flowers in the morning before school and working with my dad was really special to me. I did so right up through university in until I moved to America. Well, it's really cool. And obviously, there's a lot of different ways you can get involved with working in plants nursery being one of them, but you've taken more of the conservation route. So how did that kind of trajectory play out? Where did you realize you wanted to work on plant diversity and conservation? So I got an undergraduate degree in botany in the UK, but I always feel like how is botanically on it? Run to sundown botanic garden. I moved to California. To take a job in the, the barium research collection, wrench onto botanic garden, two thousand five and feel like that's when I really found my own interest in my own piece of where I was gonna work in botany conservation. And it was at first trip to California where I was really moved in felt like okay, this is how I want to spend my time what I wanted to Kate, my, my time to its powerful stuff, and you're not the first person that said that the botanical garden that did that to them. So some going on there. It's a special place, for sure. And in getting to Baja in seeing what Irit region has to offer it kinda staggers the mind at least for my temper mind that you think of the desserts, is sort of this dry in hospitable place with not much going on. But that cannot be farther from the true. So what really stood out to you were there? Any groups of plants that really kinda did it for you, or was it sort of this holistic view of, of seeing this landscape playing out before your eyes? A great Christian. So I think it's a little bit of everything to some extent. But I remember that fish. They're just everything looked so different. And at the same time, there were different languages. Differ. Foods, different sounds and you know it was very inspiring. But I actually work, mostly in the California province of Baja California Annette's, because at the time that was the limit that I was given by my boss says you can work in California, as long as it's still California, I province. And so I had gone straight to sort of the southern end of the California I e province and started studying the diversity there. And I think that opened a lot more doors for me than I ever realized into zoos, botanical curiosities, because right on that transition that sort of Eka toned from Mediterranean climate into desert region. We get a ton of local end among a lot of local plants found nowhere else in the world. And I think that was the more grip me really pulled me was why we got so many plans just here, you know, in this tiny. Any area. Like you say, in zone getting more more more arid, but still strongly influenced by California plants, and it turns out this actually one hundred ninety nine of California's red plants found in northwestern behind California, CMPS listed plans. Yeah. So it's really special place. Definitely end for those out there, that aren't familiar with this. Is that little peninsula, that comes off just south of California cross the Mexican border and it's incredible because geographically speaking, it's not a large area. It's, you know, this little spit of land that sticks off, and you mentioned, they're sort of this California florist province meets the desert. And so in trying to picture what's going on in Baja? What geographically geologically? What do you mean by that? You mentioned sort of Mediterranean meets desert climate, but it what is so special about, Baja as a region in general before we can get into this end in diversity question. So the peninsula's actually one thousand kilometers long, so. Oh, it's very long thin. It's not a giant landmass, but it does span latitudes from the tropics all the way up to the Mediterranean. So from our own California type flora all the way down into tropical, vegetation. The key reason at the tip, and suggest that span of latitudes gives it a lot of climatic diversity. It also has quite a lot of top graphic diversity from the peninsula ranges that run from California all the way down through into the peninsula. And then on top of that, this isolated from the mainland probably about ten million years of 'isolation from the mainland. The peninsula has obviously makes it a very special place. A lot of unique clouds, right? So for students of evolution a lot of those requisites you need for specie Asian are all present there, you've got different climate zones. You've got 'isolation. You've got a lot of topography and it all kind of mishmash is into this combination of different Flora's, which have obviously very much taken advantage of that. And, and in thinking about sort of the dominance, you've got. California flora, you've got what I would assume to be mainland Mexico, flora, because Baja was essentially connected to Mexico. Not that long ago or geologically speaking. Right. Right. Sound, we think that, that, that seaway opened up around ten million years ago? Separating the peninsula from the mainland on. There is a lot of commonality in that sonar desert shared flora is also a lot of hypotheses about whether or not there were inland seaways across the peninsula, whether or not the Cape region of Baja actually migrated up from closer tonigHt from tropical part of Mexico. So there's, there's a lot of unanswered questions about some of the geological incident tectonic origins of the peninsula. But yet a lot of shed Laura, it's just a topic of hot debate. Honestly in China to take size. Really think about that. There is still debate going on this isn't something that's settled in well known in part of that story can be told through the plants, right? I mean understanding the Florida's sort of understanding the origin of this region to some extent or at least part of that puzzle. He has a definite natural breaks in distributions of plants and animals on the peninsula, that suggests historical isolation on the presence of peninsula. See ways in the past is this, a lot of sort of car debate an hypothesis about where those were and how they've affected species end Missouri. And sometimes you get quite a different story from the king reptiles versus plans, the different distribution pans. But that certainly in area of ongoing research. Right. And so thinking about all of these plants in the end is in that makes this region so special it really does stem at least originally from sort of this collision of diff. Flora's oftentimes people get southern California as largely desert. But that Mediterranean climate does produce different types of flora. And then when you have that intersection like you mentioned that you went down to the extreme southern tip where this Mediterranean climate meets this desert climate, that in effect. Does breed a lot of that enemies um, right? I mean is that kind of the, the big takeaway message with a lot of the floor is just, it's the perfect combination of different things in you get on these borders or boundaries. A lot of natural experimentation going on. You know, it's interesting when we look at the distribution event among the peninsula is not quite as you would expect Unser. Obviously, we have in Demings to our skylines. Highly Vatian mountain ranges on those very a lot from north to south because in the north, it's very much conifer forests alpine environments, very similar to California in the southern tip of the peninsula tropical forest. So you're up in tropical dry forest with vary different Montaigne elements but still. Will a lot of localized undiminished to like the Sierra Laguna, the tip the sky all along the way have particularly interesting flora, because it's often very religious of what vegetation would have been, like may be in the Pleistocene when conditions were a lot wetter and cooler in. So we often get a lot of more ancient shop rallying Jews and oaks into the Mediterranean outcroppings actually all the way down the peninsula. The indicating historical budgets when it wasn't so dry. Conditions were different. So that's one sort of patent of end that we see another is in all these major e cones where you're switching from one major climate degrees to another. We tend to see a peak in localized in DM than so the, the big one that I study is that shift from Mediterranean to desert around the city as parallel thirty degrees for those of you that nobody near hours, are you? But then again in other parts of the peninsula in news transitional areas will get pockets of very localized end. Gives them an impact. We think that is where either to agree or local climate has formed a refuge. Emf assertain, Taxotere, uneconomic Sabe areas that were more meaningful to species through times of changing climate and so along off coast. We think it's related to coastal fog, so where we have fungi coast, foggy coastal deserts that can really reduce the impacts of climatic change in climate variation, sort of Buffa climate change in so we see really unexpected patterns of ends along the coast, as well. That's really fascinating in at something. I really appreciate coming from the north where the glaciers, you know, that's where they were that's where the fullest effect was felt in. We owe a lot to these sort of refuse ja throughout the continent in terms of restoring some of the flora, that was once localized there. But it can also mean a lot for localized diversity within those refugees as you mentioned, you've got these sort of climate buffers, whether that's because title of Asian and slightly, cooler than the surround. Areas or close enough to the coast. And so what that means really then is that you see through time these areas that haven't changed as drastically as the other places around them. Right. That's kind of the concept of the refusal that protected some of the older floor from being wiped out as it was elsewhere along that region. Exactly in, in the case of fog. It people have the idea that is because fog adds moisture, and that's not really the whole story fog just by blocking the sun emerge using solar radiation, reduces, temperatures reduces drought stress really improves conditions for EPA transpiration for plants plant life. And so, even the presence of low clouds and fog, the marine layer even for a few hours a day, makes a huge difference to the stress put on those plants in, so it does make conditions, you know, much better really for a lot of species, and so that in and of itself creates a refuge for a lot of plants where they can continue to survive, where they might have been wiped out elsewhere it has a lot of other facts. So lot of plants can stop flowering earlier in a foggy zone and they can fly for longer. The so it also intern can have an effect on pollination unseat set in the process, these fee, logical processes. So, for example, if you go further inland is a very short. Window after rain, the plants can flower and set seed, that means they're doing everything very synchronous -ly. So that's often thought to may be improved punative visits. But it really also increases predation pathogens attacks and shorten Joe window to get things done whereas on the coast. If you've got a much longer growing period, which wrong, the flowering, period, you gotta lot more time to get pollinated to make you see, it's probably improving gene exchange. Right. Because you're not flowering synchronous Lee. And in sixer moving. Great distances to move pollen and said as I see a lot of different processes at work that are improving your survival. If you're going along the coast versus land, I hadn't really thought about it that way, but that is fascinating to think about the reproductive side of it because I selection has to come in some form as a barrier between reproductive events in. You can imagine say population as you just described sitting on the coast. It's conflict a lot longer throughout the year and then a population farther inland that happens over. For like very small window of time, maybe a couple of days to a week. That means there's not a lot of gene flow between those two right in that could have lent. Also, to some of that intimacy, I'm guessing because now you have two populations kind of following these trajectories based on the very localized often climate, that they're experiencing. So in addition to disorder survival, these differences now in pollination patents, gene flow, the inland flaunts with a lot more pressure to go too much more post life cycle at things along the coast, really with a, you know, a lot more chance to exchange genes adapt. Do different things in the not, of course, has trophy poses to so it affects their herbivores it affects the way seeds are being eaten a kind of pulses all the way through so the birds or behaving differently you the mammals behaving differently, so the abilities different. So this, there's a lot of things at work. It's an area where we need a lot more research. It's really sort of emergent right now for our region to understand fog impacts on biodiversity a lot. The two lunatic. And again, just thinking of that all kind of centered around the dynamics of fog. I mean, how many people that go into plants start thinking about in that context, unless, again, you're on the coast, where fog is far more common or prevalent? That's it's remarkable end to think about how much of that lens to what you see about the specialness of this region just adds to the mystery than the lower really of this place. I would assume. I remember seeing early paper that how to map the distribution of endemic plants on the peninsula. It should this band along the coast on just didn't make any sense, confined. Topographic baria. There wasn't a change in soils. It was that early question of, why would you have all these plants restricted to the coast? And I think you know, in the fog, we found a lot of those onces, but in many more ways than I expected in it was not the simplicity I imagine at it is true now of, of the hundred seventy two plants completely restricted to that Mediterranean, climate portion of California, which is only five percent of the California. I province more than half. I completely restricted to our coast. So, yeah. It's really interesting patent. Yeah. An important one to study. I'm curious to is certain families that stand out. Or is it kind of across the board of Lucien airily on the tree of life, there or other groups that really seem to have taken advantage of this more than than others? That's a great question. So fascinating, the it's it doesn't seem to have any kind of genetic restrictions across families. It's also I think that's 'cause we got that Jewell effect. So part of it is this creation of a refuge. That's got a lot of more ancient lineages. We see a lot of things that monitor pick generaux species with no close relatives. It more more attention. Lineages, the dipietro of not changed even things we know from the fossil record will once much more extensive that have become reduce down to these sort of small refuge. But at the same time, we're seeing the proliferation of a lot of new attacks and things that we go, lots of species, inhabiting, very small ranges through their like the deadliest has already is kinda to purchase. He's at once you've got some species. Seems to be actively going on at the same time as that sort of refuge for the older taxes, paleo index Neo index in the same corridor. That's such a cool concept to get your head wrapped around. And again, if you really appreciate the flora, that just makes it all the more fascinating to study. I would assume now and it's also incredibly beautiful. Working on the coast of California, isn't a miserable experience. It's pretty fabulous place in the islands to really amazing. Have a lot of unique plans. I can jealous thinking about it. I've seen pictures. I've never been but yeah, just adding all of this cool. Evolutionary stuff to just liking flora, and then the uniqueness of the appearance of the place. But also just the specialness of being there in experiencing holistically in, you know, you're by the beach you looking at these dry-land adapted species, but also couching that all into the appreciation for whatever Lucien is doing in has done e-e-e-e-no is almost like h is perfect garden, because you've got a place where all different life phones come together team. And so, in our succulent maritime scrap, which is one of rack coastal habitats. It's the most diverse coastal sage, scrub type really becomes more dominated by succulent. So we get evergreen plants get deep-rooted plans. We get geo fights drought. Deciduous species succulent, and also combinations in stem secular. Leave secular narrow growing together in a very diverse. Sort of open garden, where you can really get a good look around you see a ton of diversity from a single spot, and I think that's really special. And when I think about that much diversity in that much, and Missouri, and also the beauty of a place like this the aesthetics of it and just being near the coast. I also think about what's being done on the human end of things. And I would assume Baja is no stranger to the human impacts right now every single time I go to the field some part of my study site has been lost. And, and that's been a really hard part of working there for the last fifteen years, some of the wisdom packed habitats June's having just seeing the destruction of our fragile June, June habitats been really hard on that the coastal habitats in particular, they lend themselves. So ready to agriculture to development organization tourism. We all know that most people in the world live on coasts, coasts, tend to be the most heavily impacted because systems in the world. So, but has no exception. And that's a major part of your work, right? I mean with that much rarity and that much human tension. There's bound to be some endangered in threatened plants along the way you've just spelled it out tragically. Is that every time you go down there? Moore's being gobbled up, so on that side of things. I mean, where does your research in your work, take you in terms of these rare threatened or endangered species in the Baja peninsula? There is some amazing organizations working really hard to conserve the flora tattoo peninsula is a nonprofit that Ellison magnificent preserves in the areas where actually my master's work, which was completely unprotected when I worked there now delighted that there's large reserves. They're also hunting Potanin cosign, contain the seventeen botanic garden has of unapproved reserve up in the region. And undesired is as pro stereo, some Puna Tura, who are also working hard to protect wetland habitats than in other parts of the state. So there's a lot of actors. On the ground to. It's fantastic to have these amazing collaborators who I cannot be more grateful for the years of collaboration and support on the ground in Baja California. And now we've got a few new players in so this new project, where Sunday gazoo is also getting involved and the center for plant conservation. And we're starting to lick by nationally at protecting rep plants that Rabbo sides of the border. So as I mentioned earlier, we have a hundred nineteen nine CMPS listed plants found in northwestern by California, and we're working on a shortlist of about eighty right now that are targets for the next few years to try and get the documented and seed banked, and it's quite a different picture, working in behind California, because we don't have the necessarily the depth of knowledge about the flora that we have in California. So a lot of work is just locating populations. Or maybe we have one specimen for many, many decades ago with no coordinates and a pool to the Kelly. Sometimes it's really just. Finding new populations spending that time in the field trying to figure out where some of these rare plants getting that documented, documenting the threats trying to figure out who owns the land. What's going on? We're also collecting genetic material from each of these populations. So the future, we can do genetic analyses across the range of these by nationally, read tax in we're collaborating with the seat Banca Unum. The National Autonomous University of Mexico City with their seed Bank source seeds deposited in Mexico, and basically trying to put together the conservation landscape for these plants that are by nationally read the really both countries should be working together to conserve and extremely noble cause, but in thinking about the task at hand, you know, one hundred ninety nine is not a small list, and from your perspective, at least your influence there. Where does that begin? You mentioned how maybe these have may be one record or a record. That's poorly tips. No location. What is what does that process? Start like how are you choosing plants first off, and then once you have a species, or group, is be in mind where do you even begin when the records are incomplete or sometimes non existent, gross fries? I am concerned. Everything starts in the barium. We offer fortunate in buckle, phony to have to excellent Harare, one in the northern state in inside NADA, Weber sake reached by Dr Who said video, who is a great friend in Claverie to for all of us. And in the southern state in LA pass, we have the signal ovarian was Dr Hussain loosely on the lose who also we all work very closely together, and we have a collaborative database for herbarium specimens. Copa huff, Laura dot org, which is actually based at the Sunday, go natural history museum, because their strongest holdings from California. And so we have this regional consortium, includes several other Harrier in the region to, but these are the three key Herria that we're using data from for this project on so the consortium of freely available online for anyone that wants to use it. But we start by pulling up all the historical specimens in trying to figure out. Can we figure out where that was really collected in his population still there? And what does that detective work? Even look like how do you decide if? Where you should even begin to look, I mean, obviously, if there's a locality or some sort of map or instructions that's one thing. But you mentioned some of these records are woefully incomplete. You know at this stage of the game we have to approach. This is our first year of the project. So I would say at this point, we're going for some of the low hanging fruit tryin-. What do we know? We could get done this week. So many things to be done. But this to approach one of the things we're also doing just targeting some of the rarest things on the peninsula. And some of that very serendipitous in so working closely with doctor doom Redmond at the mystery museum when he discovers a new species, or goes on an expedition to rediscover some of these law species on the peninsula can tag along collect the seeds in collect the DNA in fill out the status reports, and so on. And so some of that were just working together with existing projects and programmes to try and leverage more funding in support that we may be have the other part of this, this real focus on those national plant since they, we have that list of eighty targets I try to put together. Okay. Which habitat has several of these, where could we go that we've got a good chance? You know, finding maybe five of the things on this list. And so at this point in the game, it's okay if we hit the vernal pools, we know we're gonna find several attacks. If we go into the Gabriella crops, we're gonna find some we go to these coastal bluffs, in the maritime chaparrals. We've got a good chance here in. So this point this, some kind of triage based on general distribution habitat, but it's gonna get tougher and tougher. He said he started with the low hanging fruits, and then all that's left is like, oh boy, where do we even start with that? You know what are some of the ones that today, since this is kind of a fresh new getting off the ground water project? What kinds of species have you worked with us far? At least had some success in, in finding in mapping relocating. Okay. That's a great question for that. That I that I talked about this throughout the peninsula. We've done some expeditions in particular to the remote islands in. We picked up a lot of rat island exposed to go filings on, on the Pacific islands. We went to dot islands and picked up a, a new species day that looks like it's in the genus painter rea- as close to this. But that's a distinct that we're pretty interested in making sure carefully conserved. So we've been doing some expeditious to those regions for the cross-border things we cently, we've been working on recently got a big collection of Soviet brand DJ from a couple of different populations. On the coast. And so that's a good example of one of these species. That's in very coastal habitat really within that fog reach zone. Right on the edge of its range in pockets, and there was one population, we revisited that was completely gone. Now, everything was under agriculture, which was pretty upsetting but we were able to get a couple of really robust seed collections from other outcrops, a lot of the things that we went to track at the moment recycling flower. So we haven't been able to seed Bank yet. So on this last trip, we also targeted some clay lenses when these these areas with very heavy clay soils, where the sort of swelling and shrinking of the soil means that no perennial plants tend to survive this. So they tend to be little patches of all annual plants in a lot of things occur. The so we did actually find massive populations of accounta- Eliza Olea does our ram ace Amon in San Diego County. So that was really exciting. Find earlier this year. Yeah, we were able to rediscover a couple of old populations of things like that on also. Applying code California, mccraw, FLA, which looks very similar to a rhodium but is actually are native. And it's a restricted to these claim aces, also and actually very rare in Baja California. We only really found a few plants, but it was pretty good to find them. We also went to the Junes the sand dunes and in particular, the Elsa Caro area has this massive June just home to a lot of rarin endemic plants. And actually, I did my master's thesis research, in that area, and found it to be the area with the highest density of endemic plant species in the whole area, and that we were looking for things like faciliates Dolores, we were able to recover a population of faciliate Dolores. We also found a lot of than Datta, which is another one of our targets and we were looking for theory Meriva there beside Lee didn't find at this time. So, but yeah, again, we're targeting by habitat at the moment and trying to find as many things as we can make sense to kinda go from the habitat approach because if you just picking Faye. Everett's. I would imagine it would mean okay we have to go all the way over here, now, now, we have to climb up this hill, and then that can get complicated. But it is exciting to think about relocating in finding some of these before the sad stuff happens, as you mentioned, some of these, you've already gone found that they're under agriculture in its it's gone for good in that spot. Now, but backing up for more of the botanical expertise perspective that you can bring to the table here. I'm only beginning to appreciate the presence of annuals, especially in the context of places like California, Bob because it's something I we don't have a lot here in the midwest with our annuals, but they're not necessarily as democ, or is special is some of the plants that are found out west in, in your botanical perspective, do you think annuals can often be more at risk of extinction, due to disturbance in everything else, that threatens plants or is it kind of Perennials because there, I don't know. I mean, does that lifestyle change the way we work on conservation? I guess the real question, I'm trying to ask. So that's a really great. Question. The of. The best I can. So as you move more into the drylands we tend to get a higher percentage of annual plans overly show on a two questions. I think they're always more risk of extinction, because they're so less visible so hard, so much harder to detect and we're so much less aware of them. So on the one hand, you've got a real conservation issue that people don't tend to appreciate the diversity of annuals. It's much harder to work with them. It's much harder to document them. It's hard to know what they are, and their populations fluctuate. So wildly. It's hard for us to have good demographic, data and understand, they really doing well, you know, a lot of annual plans won't come up one year, and then they come up in thousands the next and I think it's very difficult for us to understand. Does that mean the seat banks fine? They're going to be okay. Ella, more difficult for us to maybe see when the suffering, if we're dealing with Perennials. You can come in. You can say we'll crikey, you know, the big percentage of these shrubs are dying or their senescent or things. Don't make good or you commodity reproduction a lot more easily. So distant. Terms of us being able to gather knowledge in prioritize. I think that annuals are always more risk on that front. But in some ways, they may actually be a lot more resilient to climate change in other things because they've got these amazing strategies doesn't plants in particular often have a lot of bet hedging strategies so we have plants that, for example, may retain their seeds released the over several years, the different times, hedging against different climates in different years of whether different kinds of Surani, rec-, this and things like resent the Brigitta, which actually, it's an annual plant, but the, the dead plot will hold onto many of the seeds for several years. So their slogan least over years. Yeah, I think a lot of doesn't plants have really fascinating. Adaptations, this ability to hunker down as a seed and just wait until conditions are right. Actually, may put them in a slightly better place in Tim's of resiliency. I'm going out on a limb, Hugh, this really important to think of. About. And again, it's a lot of it really like you said, kind of comes down to our perception in our biases and just the timeframes that we have to travel for work in the funding cycles, and stuff like that. These are just are like you said, easy to overlook, but with a little bit of knowledge, with good timing. A little bit of planning, there you spelled it out. So perfectly is that they actually might have some resiliency built in that we just have to then put that attention towards that or at least making tempt at doing something for these species that, you know, are a lot harder to study. You know be honest this year. Trying to find on your plants in seed Bank member trying to get the timing. Right. You know, it's been up, what she late for these, not what you really for these and I think that's part of once amazing. Right. Is there ability to just respond to local conditions live their whole life cycles in such a short amount of time, obviously, as you get down into drier, and drier, areas, it is more common life strategy as it gets harder and harder to find year round. Order a lot more things are annual get a much higher proportion of annuals. But, you know it in all honesty, when one of the ships are working with Hassake aggressive bulliest rights, you Tien sus was known from a single population in California, and it's, it's a perennial shrub. We think we hit it right? At what should have been peak, flowering. But we spent hours scouring the area weren't able to refined it yet. So it could be just just as challenging working with any. To if you don't have good baseline data. Wait a minute. Didn't you pick to work with plants because they were easier to locate fight. You're talk at this. This is the twelve year old girl. Changed. We've all things. No. But that's, that's a perfect point to make is so much of this is just again the effort in the planning has to go into it in one of the things that really kind of amazing me in really inspires me as the sort of cross border, collaboration, you have going on in that you hinted at throughout the entirety of this interview, so fired, and that's really, really important because plants don't respect political boundaries. Right. We've made them up, and then we expect everything else to conform to them in, you know, it's not like you get to the Mexican border and suddenly, our flora stops, it keeps going in provided we don't put up too many borders in, but yeah, this is something that also has to be kept in mind as you have to time things around permitting, getting across borders. So I mean this would be impossible without cross-border cross country collaboration. Right. It's really it's such a great arena to be working 'cause you've got so many fantastic collaborators and people who want the same thing, but it's a very difficult place to find funding for cross-border project. Lot of funding. National release stops at the border when the plants don't is a lot of government funding in a lot of us would have normal conservation funding sources won't cover these crush things. And so it's fantastic organizations like zoo, are getting on board in saying, these are plants doesn't matter which side of line, they're falling these rare. We want to conserve them in a bi-national way. And I really hope that this is a trend that's going to increase the we're gonna see more and more sort of support in funding for these by national efforts, because they're clearly so important. So necessary kind of amazing they're out more. Yeah. In the think about it that zoo is really setting this forward in, you know, people have their own opinions about zoos, but you think of going to see animals but to hear about any zoo program really embracing the fact that without the plants without the plants that make up that habitat. There would be no animal life. So really conservation starting with botany is one of the best means by which we can help protect life on this planet. Because again, plant. Are that habitat, so often, you know, undeserved has a strong history of actually having a role in plant conservation? And they have the best buy California garden I've ever seen at the San Diego world. But I think also since the merge with the center for plant conservation of the Sunday gazoo we've got a real stronghold for conservation. I think we're understanding more more like we were talking about with the fog. What's happening with the plans is also often happening with the animals on the importance of conserving them together. Yeah. These, these holistic approaches are the only way forward. I mean, otherwise you're just kind of picking out little pieces of art to say, well, we'll just put this on the wall and look at it and remember when it was. It's challenging. So what's, what's next? Do you have any big projects coming up in our correspondents that you're always responding from the field? So you're obviously out there working. I mean what are you currently working on? What's kind of just over the horizon for you with this project? So this is one of several projects that don't currently working on actually spread between handful of different projects. But many of them are based in Baha, California, in one of the other things that I try to do every year is help organize expedition to a remote area where we can be documenting areas that kind of black holes for knowledge or areas that we know have conservation priority. But we don't have good temporal recent data. And so that's something, I'm very passionate about two in often de these hand-in-hand with the Sunday after his museum we bring experts from every discipline, also with them, the next generation of Sonoran, desert researchers, who have couple of networks. We worked together will bring groups to different parts of the peninsula and try to really focus in get sort of baseline, almost like a bio blitz of kinds, but a lot of baseline data furniture area that we don't know much about. And we often do this in response to a major conservation challenge. Wjr on. Sometimes we just do it, because they're like, wow, we don't know anything about this place, an inaugural human also. Sometimes it's I'd love to go there. But I feel like some of our biggest conservation wins in recent years have also been being able to provide data to areas that are currently threatened and so on the peninsula right now. A lot of that's mining the expansion of mining in. We did a lot of work in response to the threat of the less Cardona mine in this year. The Laguna also in development and places like Capela Puma. Oh, we've been able to come down and provide data in the face of large scale developments on the coast. The things like that are most recent expeditions have been to some of the more remote islands like the reveal hito archipelago, which was declared a national park for Mexico, just a believe just last year, and so trying hard to feed our research efforts into areas where that information is needed if it forms the management plans, if it helps to create a protected area, or, or if it's an area to we need to raise attention about the value of the, the biological resources. And so. So after chipping away, you know, the next expedition, trying to understand where efforts are needed as well. Awesome. Well, if you ever want someone tagging along recording. You don't forget. Number. That's fantastic though, in, it's so good to see the sort of passion meeting data driven science, but also meeting conservation at the end and again, all of this being sort of collaborative effort there in so in moving forward, I always like to leave my listeners with some sort of concept of, like, okay. This is a tragedy in a lot of ways because so much of this is triage, but it's also an opportunity to do something in, in your experience. What can the average listener do for places like Baja, or just plant conservation in general, where do you think the most bang for their buck because not everyone's, the scientists not everyone's working in conservation. But a lot of people do care and want to do something. I mean, where do you think a lot of public efforts should be focused funding is conservation. I'm gonna have to be honest. It's the show answer. But the need for funding is huge in, and I think just even if you can make a tiny contribution to a nonprofit on the ground that's doing this work or to an organization. This doing the things you care about. You know, it's always important, and Zora. So few funding sources for by national way, I couldn't really overstate the importance of that. But I think another really important thing is just be knowledgeable stay on the list serves on the websites know little bit about what's going on and just knowing what's happening in conservation. And who's who so that when the star is aligned, and you have a Pacino teas or you see ways you can help your ready knowledgeable situation, and I think it is it's following those people on Facebook. It's following these organizations reading those newsletters. Sometimes just being engaged community, member goes a really long way and every now and then you sign that petition of every now and then you make a small donation. But just get involved just be informed to be part of the community. And I think that goes a lot further than people realize, it's a really good point, because that is where we make our biggest impact is at the community level. You know, the it's really disheartening it a Nash. Scale or specially at the international scale, but there's so much we can do in our own backyard citizen that, that do volumes for these organizations. So I'm not even gonna try to ask you. If you've got a favorite plant that would not be fair of me. But in thinking about these expeditions in all of the time you spent in this area are there a is there field story that really stands out to experience that really kind of shaped the wave moved forward with all of this. You know what really has stood out to your time in working with this amazing region? You run we can talk about a couple. You know, I'm gonna cheat. Okay, because I, I, I think for me, it's the element of discovery it's the getting to that place where you're pretty sure no one's ever being seeing those things for the first time, or even lots of other people have been there discovering them for yourself, and has been so many moments of discovery in NFL, that such an important learning teaching tool for all of us. But there's moments when you go somewhere on you really find something that's new to you the excites you in the blue mind. Whether that's the top of a really remote island or whether it's getting down over the edge of a hill in finding a beautiful canyon fuller. Brad plants those, those moments when you're like I found it. I think I think that's what keeps you inspired keeps you wanting to move forward, even when it gets tough. And I, I feel that way with plants that are super common that I've seen a million times. So I can only imagine all of the effort, that goes into finding relocating or at least discovering something new or something. So extremely rare that must be compounded. Tenfold. Will we will have some funds more than others? Careful. I could ask you about that one. Do you pick favorites? So if people wanna find out more about this project if people wanna find out more about your work, in general, I mean, where do you recommend the star doing their homework my recommend, to interested in Florida, California, visit Florida org? If he wants to know more specifically about this project, please, go to the pages of Sunday goes global, and look at our project pages. We also have several blogs about recent trips where you can reveal about what we've been doing in the species that were working with. Or you can contact me directly. Wonderful. I'll put up links to those in all of the show notes. But Dr Vanderplank, thank you so much for taking time out of what is definitely a busy schedule to talk with us. This has been fascinating stuff, and you're doing such important work. So keep it up. Thank you so much met, we have you have yourself a great day. You can. All right. Excellent work. I have to get myself down to Baja such an incredible place. It's so amazing to think of how relatively small geographic area is, but how incredibly diverse it is in terms of its Flora's. So thanks to people like Dr vanderploeg in her colleagues. Hopefully, some of that biodiversity can be maintained into the future heart everyone that does it for this week. Thank you, all for listening special. Shout out to our most recent producer credit. Joey, thank you so much for your support of this podcast. End forgiving, the producer credit level. But also, thank you to everyone, who has given over at patriot. It really means the world to me. I literally could not be doing this at this level without your support. If you wanna become a patron, or just at least see what we have going. On over their head on over to patriot dot com slash indefens- plants. Also, if you wanna get some stickers or other merch, you can either go to indefens- plants dot com slash shop or head on over to t-. Spring dot com slash stores slash in defense of plants. In the all the cool apparel and other things we have over there and a portion of every purchase is being donated to the rainforest trust. Stay tuned. So many great things on the horizon, and the best way to do that is to hit that subscribe button. But while you're over there, make sure you give this podcast review on whatever pod portal e used to download it because reviews help us reach a wider audience in, if we're gonna cure plant blindness. We gotta get more people listening, all right until next week. This is your host met signing out audio everyone.

California Baja Mexico indefens- plants Mediterranean Flora Baja California Dr sue Vanderplank San Diego Baja California Missouri Lucien airily America Dr Soula Vander Florida UK Bob peninsula Demark
57: "The Joys of Birdwatching" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

06:32 min | Last month

57: "The Joys of Birdwatching" Week

"Hello, and welcome to feedback with ear buds the podcast arm of ear buds podcast collective. I'm Maryelle your host and the founder of ear buds. This episode covers the week of November second through sixth twenty twenty. Election. Day in the US is November third, please make a plan to vote if you have done. So already at the moment of recording and publishing of this episode, you still have time. You're buds podcast. Collective is a listening movement. We send an email every Sunday that contains a theme and five podcast episodes on that theme and each week's podcast picks are curated by a different person. Anyone, can curate list. This week's newsletter and podcast come to us from the Casual Burger podcast. We'll tell you more about that show later on. On this episode of feedback with Ear Buds, I'll share our five podcast episode recommendations of the week and some more information about the episodes. Well, then share some sponsor information as well as some extra podcasts related tidbits. I STOP OUR EAR BUDS PODCAST RECOMMENDATIONS This week's theme comes to us from Suzy Buttress of the Casual Burger podcast. Here's why Susie chose the steam she says. Hi I'm suzy buttress. And the fee my choices the joy of bird-watching. Hope these podcasts encourage people to take a look outside and watch and listen to their local birds and find joy in the natural world. Here. Are the episodes chosen by Susie for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode Monday's episode comes to us from Song burning and is called morning meadow songs. It's twenty minutes long. Here's the description. The meadows are again full of melodies. This time a mix of Field Sparrow Song Sparrow, northern cardinal tree, swallow, eastern toe, he and more. Next. Up The women burgers happy hour and the episode is called Marissa Ola scissor tailed flycatcher fifty three minutes long. Here's the description. Marissa. Olivo works in environmental education in the Rio Grande Valley. But has experienced sharing the love of the outdoors recreation and wildlife with others around the world in. The next episode comes to us from the casual or podcast and has called backyard birds in Baja California it's twenty minutes long. This episode was recorded in the garden of susie buttresses vacation rental in Baja California Mexico the Cossiga had a mature garden and thirteen bird species visited during their first full day there. The next episode comes to us from bird shit and his called uncommon facts about common birds. Corbett addition it's thirty nine minutes long. Here's the description. Every joke about corvette nineteen has already been made. So let's skip to the good stuff birds. We'll share some fascinating little known facts about one of the bird world's smartest families, but let's be honest. All birds, smart. The last episode, the week comes to us from bird curious and is called episode one Goldfinch. It's twenty three minutes long. Here's the description. While most birds are in decline. It's now easier than ever to see gold finches penny and Joe explore the surprising success of these charming birds. Those are the episodes chosen by Susie for this week's theme the joys of bird watching. You can follow along with the discussion of this week's podcast episodes by using the Hashtag Bird podcasts. Each week in our newsletter are curator gets shout out something that they love. It can be a movie that they saw a project they're working on a nonprofit, they support or anything. Here's what Susie. Wants to share. She writes. I hope these podcasts inspire you to take some time for yourself and to get outside if you can to a park a beach, a nature preserve listened to the sounds of the birds around you. I'd love to hear about your experience. You can share it with suzy on twitter at the casual burder pod. Thank you to the Casual Burger podcast for their support of this newsletter and episode listened to the Casual Burger podcast joined susie. As she takes bird walks tells you about the wild birds she sees speaks with other enthusiasts and share stories from birdwatchers around the world. Another shadow goes to another one of our sponsors. That's buzz. Sprout bus route is the best podcast hosting site in the game. If you're looking to start a podcast and who isn't these days buzzed sprout is your best bet they make it super easy to submit your show to all of the podcast platforms. You can easily create sharable soundbites and other funds, social media images. We will have a link to buzz sprout in the show notes of this episode, and if you're interested in starting a podcast and you click that link, you get an Amazon gift. Card, once you sign up. This week's podcast spotlight is on knock turn. There are twenty four hours. A day seems pretty straightforward. But what do you really know about the hours between say eleven, PM and six am From graveyard shift jobs to secret identities who we are and what we do at night is often less fully perceived by others whether by choice or by circumstance, learn more by tuning into knock turn wherever you get your podcasts. You can apply to have your podcasts spotlit by our newsletter. Ear Buds podcast collective DOT ORG. Head on over to our social media to find links to the episodes that we mentioned. We're on twitter at ear buds, pod call, and we're on instagram and facebook at ear buds podcast collective. SIGN UP TO RECEIVE PODCAST recommendation newsletter at ear buds, podcast collective dot org it goes out every single Sunday night. This show is written and produced by me on this black. It's edited mixed and designed by Daniel Turk. Our newsletter is edited by ABC Lonski and our theme music is by Sweet Oh. We'll be back next week with more podcast recommendations in between now, and then please make a plan to vote get yourself to the polling place and listen to tons of podcast. If there's a long line, you can always turn on a podcast recommendation from US happy listening and happy voting.

Susie US Suzy Buttress twitter founder Baja California Mexico Baja California Rio Grande Valley Daniel Turk ABC Lonski Olivo Corbett corvette instagram Joe Amazon facebook twenty minutes twenty three minutes
The Expedition of the Science Ship

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

15:06 min | 1 year ago

The Expedition of the Science Ship

"Hi I'm Lindy and I'm Marshall Welcome to tumble. ooh Don't even worry about getting seasick because we're not actually getting on the boat you're just listening we're Before we get started on this week's POK MON expert who's turning eight November Fourth Florence Galvin Mom and Dad love you her libby the tough Colorado girl happy birthday on November fourth winslow aw I'd also like to give a shoutout to Elisa and Lucy Puszta Janowski whose names I mispronounced Mark Happy Birthday wish from yours truly on our podcast just go to Patriot dot today we're going to experience life on the joint resolution ship that travels get at least a jacket a Ma underwear. My name is Dr Janine Cash Janine ash is a geochemists Neyland Mexico in Baja California getting to be on this boat as an this is actually her third time on an expedition even with all her experience see one of those cruise ships with a giant water slides on deck it's as big as a cruise into the sea the drilling derrick which is a really tall pointy tower looking what does she mean explored beneath the sea floor you you can't explore beneath millions of years in this is where the drill comes in it's not this draw full of geological cake is called core yummy the question no in fact it'd probably be pretty disappointed about Earth history geology and biology and even its future the low so all kinds of scientists could be interested in them yeah but news those cores come on deck as geochemists I'm interested surface so I have to be there to sample it right away and lock those samples is Janine to record it for us I wanted to get us as close as we can the real listen tried to make a movie in your mind imagine yourself standing there right it's five twenty and so a core has just come up on deck and you're hearing is obvious chains and police being moved around it's windy and with the water but the part of the drill Derek that holds the pipe does not keeping the drill pipe semi beneath us all right oh I see our new car mm-hmm unscrewing from each other right hypes are coming up so or Ondeck Ondeck and so this whole airman about to be filled technicians in this part I'm trying to do some gas sampling so sometimes when the that I used a punch through the plastic liner and that I attach a syringe to right one two three four five technicians Consciouness tool okay yeah so I want everyone the gas hisses right out and sediment comes with it so it's like the phone yeah and it smells it smells like making fun there's a ton of hydrogen sulfide that's made and all Into pick expedition that I imagined well an expedition can be full going to do after she gets back on land so a lot of the information that we data for their own research but I will personally have hundreds learn more about the extreme environments where tiny microbes live because this weird environment hidden beneath the ocean could earth that helps us sort of understand you know our place in the universe she planet like who or what is farting on Titan hint end on this scene at the end of her shift. Janine climbs the stairs to the top are about to take off from our site they've brought all the pipe up from the C. Four never seen anything like this in my life before and of course the sun is rising places wild man chemistry sediments possible alien life dolphins as far as the I can up to crew on the joint resolution if not what's your investigations at Rice University and minute pain yod SELENA's helping coordinate and record on a ship in the middle of the ocean if you WANNA learn and I'm super excited about the bonus episode we have for supporters on Patriach the Patriots Dot Com Slash Tumble podcast Sarah Roberson Lenses more stories of science discovered

Dr Janine Cash Janine ash Lucy Puszta Janowski Florence Galvin Ondeck Ondeck libby Neyland Mexico Baja California Colorado Elisa SELENA Rice University Derek Sarah Roberson Patriots
Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

Young Charlie by Hollywood & Crime

07:52 min | 8 months ago

Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

"Your heartbeat is through the roof. The walls are closing in. You look up and all you see is a warm white light. You're sure that there is no way out of this. Dire dangerous situation from the voices of generation Y in the minds of madness comes deadly misadventures. A thrilling new podcast from wondering follow the true stories of people as they face near certain death whether they are trapped at the bottom of the ocean or find themselves alone in the middle of the Amazon here how they made it out or how they almost did. You're about to hear a preview of the deadly misadventures episode titled Stranded in the Sea of Cortez in it. You will follow. The unbelievable journey of a man stuck on a remote deserted island with his best friend trapped after being shipwrecked on the islands hostile rocky shoreline. Their survival comes down to luck and a roll of the dice. Retraced their path to uncover how they got there and what it took for them to survive some only come face to face with death. Others are not so lucky. You can subscribe to hear new episodes. Every week on apple podcasts or binged the entire season ad free on one plus one degrees deadly misadventures. You have to hear it to believe it back. The following episode deals with mature subject matter listener discretion is advised. Joseph Rangel found himself stranded on a desert island with his lifelong childhood friend. Lorenzo Madrid Andy. Young untrained fishing guide half his age WRANGEL and his best friend were on their last day of a five day sports fishing trip. In the Sea of Cortes it was ending with a smile. A nod wing for Milady lock but Lee. Luck can be fickle indeed. The trio suddenly found themselves almost out of gas and with no other choice than to shipwreck themselves for the night on a hostile and rocky shoreline of an uninhabited island. Will their survival come down to lock or will they roll the dice with their own lives for a chance to survive this deadly misadventures? Joe Rangel was on vacation of a lifetime. Despite not being very good swimmer Joe Love the water and more specifically he loved to fish he also always dreamed of taking a once in a lifetime vacation to charter a fishing boat in the Sea of Cortes for his fiftieth birthday. He decided to book a six day fishing trip with a lifelong buddy. Lorenzo Madrid. Joe. Is Married with adult children and grandchildren. He worked in Anaheim California as a product inspector for Electronics Company. His best friend. Lorenzo was also married with adult children and he worked as a drugstore manager in Malibu. Neither of them were in the best shape or physical condition. In fact John Wrangles suffered from type two diabetes and Lorenzo. Let's just say was not his ideal weight. Both of these conditions limited their mobility. But they found. Fishing was the great equalizer. When you charter a boat you have assistance from deckhands day charter captains and they do a lot of the heavy lifting literally some people choose activities that are relaxing and peaceful and others choose hobbies for the exhilaration of chase. Rangel Madrid chose fishing because it provided both each time. They cast their line. It was no different than rolling the dice. Unknown of the outcome was half the fun with each fish on the line that day. The excitement mounted then crescendo. When they inevitably conquered their formidable ocean dwelling opponents. The men were on the last day of their fishing charter on an eighty seven. Foot boat called the Celia Angelina each day would anchor in the mid drift which was an area where the northbound and southbound currents met stirring up nutrient rich prey from the ocean floor which served as a lure for all types of game fish. The Celia Angelina hired local fishing guides to manned twenty two foot fishing skiffs to take their guests in between the series of remote islands off Baja California's coast for specialized fishing. There Guide was Jose. Luis Ramos Garcia. The last day fishing was declared the best fishing trip. Ever the trio decided it was time to head back for the short trip. Back TO SAM PHILIPPI SAMPLE. Ebay happens to be the largest northern Baja California town instead of fishing on the recommended eastern side of the island Garcia took them to the western side where it was remote and desolate. It was private and serene each time. They cast their line. They were rewarded with fish bigger and more spectacular than the one before they thanked Garcia for sharing. See once in a lifetime experience with them as they headed back in wrangled noticed. They were going in the wrong direction but they're guide assured them they needed to backtrack the way. They came in to meet up with their boat which was anchored on the northern tip of the island Garcia believed as they were fishing tour boat had passed them but after a few hours a backtracking he was no longer sure of its location or of their location. As darkness fell in the temperatures dropped became clear that their guide had become disoriented. Now heading in what they believed was the right direction. Garcia realized that they were low on gas. They decided to beach their boat on one of the many uninhabited islands until morning and wait for rescue to avoid being pulled out to sea currents they headed for the closest island and the largest island they could find the only problem with the plan was the closest and largest was the Islah. Angel Daily Guava which happens to be marred with shoreline of jagged rocks in sheer cliffs and when their boat became trapped by the rocky outcroppings. They had no choice but to jump out of the boat and into the water and carry whatever meager supplies could carry. Lorenzo Garcia managed to make it from the boat and swim to a narrow shoreline. Wrangles landing wasn't as graceful as he prepared to jump from the bill. A large wave rocked the boat in propelled him into the rocks. Now the trio were injured. Wet kolding hungry. The needed to prepare for a long night ahead. Without a radio life jackets flares or emergency provisions. The men were on their own so do bad days that was just a preview of deadly misadventures. Subscribe to hear new episodes every week on apple podcasts. Wherever you're listening right now or binge the entire season ads. Free on wondering plus.

Luis Ramos Garcia Sea of Cortez Lorenzo Madrid Andy apple Lorenzo Garcia Lorenzo Madrid Lorenzo Joe Rangel Rangel Madrid Celia Angelina Joseph Rangel Amazon Anaheim California Joe Love Joe Malibu Wrangles landing John Wrangles Baja California Lee
Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

Dying For Sex

07:50 min | 7 months ago

Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

"Your heartbeat is through the roof. The walls are closing in your sure that there is no way out of this dire dangerous situation who doesn't love a thrilling story of adventure from the voices of generation y and the minds of badness comes deadly misadventures. An exciting new podcast. From wonder follow the true stories of people as they face impossible situations and daring adventures whether they're trapped in a sunken ship at the bottom of the ocean or find themselves alone in the middle of the Amazon here. How they made it out or how they almost did. You're about to hear a preview of the deadly misadventures episode titled Stranded in the Sea of Cortez in it. You will follow. The unbelievable journey of a man stuck on a remote deserted island with his best friend trapped after being shipwrecked on the islands. Hostile rocky shoreline. Their fate comes down to luck. Retraced their path to uncover how they got there. And what it took for these two friends to get home again. You can subscribe to hear new episodes every week on Apple podcasts or bench. The entire season ad free on one plus wondrous deadly misadventures. You have to hear it to believe it. The following episode deals with mature subject matter listener discretion is advised. Joseph Rangel found himself stranded on a desert island with his lifelong childhood friend. Lorenzo Madrid and young untrained fishing guide. Half his age wrangel and his best friend were on their last day of a five day sports fishing trip in the Sea of Cortes. It was ending with a smile. A nod in a wing for Milady. Lock But lady. Luck can be fickle indeed. The trio suddenly found themselves almost out of gas and with no other choice then to shipwreck themselves for the night on a hostile and rocky shoreline of an uninhabited island. Will their survival come down to lock or will they roll the dice with their own lives for a chance to survive this deadly misadventures? Joe Rangel was on the vacation of a lifetime despite not being a very good swimmer. Joe Love the water and more specifically he loved to fish he also always dreamed of taking once in a lifetime vacation to charter fishing boat in the Sea of Cortez for his fiftieth birthday. He decided to book a six day fishing trip with a lifelong buddy. Lorenzo Madrid Joe is married with adult children and grandchildren. He worked in Anaheim California as a product inspector for an electronics company. His best friend. Lorenzo was also married with adult children and he worked as a drugstore manager in Malibu. Neither of them were in the best shape or physical condition. In Fact John. Rangel suffered from type two diabetes in Lorenzo. Let's just say was not his ideal weight. Both of these conditions limited their mobility but they found fishing was the great equalizer when charter a boat. You have assistance from deckhands Eh Day charter captains and they do a lot of the heavy lifting literally some people choose activities that are relaxing and peaceful and others choose hobbies for the exhilaration of chase wrangle in Madrid chose fishing because it provided both each time. They cast their line. It was no different than rolling the dice. Unknown of the outcome was half the fun with each fish on the line that day. The excitement mounted then crescendo. When they inevitably conquered their formidable ocean dwelling opponents. The men were on the last day of their fishing charter on. Eighty seven foot boat called the Celia Angelina. Each day would anchor in the mid drift which was an area where the northbound and southbound currents met stirring up nutrient rich prey from the ocean floor which served as a lure for all types of game. Fish the Celia Angelina hired local fishing guides to manned twenty two foot fishing skiffs to take their guests in between the series of remote islands off Baja California's coast for specialized fishing. There Guide was Jose. Luis Ramos Garcia. The last day of fishing was declared the best fishing trip ever. The trio decided it was time to head back for the short trip. Back to SAM. Philippi Sam Philippa happens to be the largest northern Baja California town instead of fishing on the recommended eastern side of the island Garcia took them to the western side where it was remote and desolate. It was private and serene each time. They cast their line. They were rewarded with a fish bigger and more spectacular than the one before they thanked Garcia for sharing once in a lifetime. Experience with them as they headed back in wrangled noticed. They were going in the wrong direction but they're guide assured them they needed to backtrack the way. They came in to meet up with their boat which was anchored on the northern tip of the island Garcia believed as they were fishing. The tour boat had passed them. But after a few hours of backtracking he was no longer sure of its location or of their location. As darkness fell in the temperatures dropped became clear that their guide had become disoriented. Now heading what they believed was the right direction. Garcia realized that they were low on gas. They decided to beach their boat on one of the many uninhabited islands until morning and wait for rescue to being pulled out to sea by currents they headed for the closest island and the largest island. They could find the only problem with the plan was the closest and largest was the Islamic Angel Daily Guava which happens to be marred with a shoreline jagged rocks and sheer cliffs in when their boat became trapped by the rocky outcroppings. They had no choice but to jump out of the boat and into the water and carry whatever meager supplies could carry. Lorenzo Garcia managed to make it from the boat and swim to a narrow shoreline. Wrangles landing wasn't as graceful as he prepared to jump from the boat. A large wave rocked the boat and propelled him into the rocks. Now the trio were injured. Wet kolding hungry. They needed to prepare for a long night ahead without a radio. Lifejackets flares or emergency provisions. The men were on their own to do and win. Do in bed days to that was just a preview of deadly misadventures. Subscribe to hear new episodes every week on apple podcasts. Or wherever you're listening right now or bench the entire season. Add Frey on one day plus.

Luis Ramos Garcia Sea of Cortez Joe Rangel Lorenzo Madrid Joe Apple Lorenzo Madrid Lorenzo Garcia Celia Angelina Joseph Rangel Lorenzo Amazon Lorenzo Joe Love Madrid Anaheim California Malibu Baja California Frey Wrangles landing Sam Philippa
Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

One Plus One

07:50 min | 8 months ago

Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

"Your heartbeat is through the roof. The walls are closing in. You look up and all you see is a warm white light. You're sure there is no way out of this dire and dangerous situation. What will it take to survive from? The voices of generation y and the minds of madness come deadly misadventures. A thrilling new podcast from wandry. Follow the true stories of people as they face near certain death whether they are trapped at the bottom of the ocean or find themselves alone in the middle of the Amazon here how they made it out or how they almost did. You're about to hear a preview of the deadly misadventures episode titled Stranded In the Sea of. Cortez in you'll follow. The unbelievable journey of a man stuck on a remote deserted island with his best friend trapped after being shipwrecked on the islands. Hostile rocky shoreline. Their survival comes down to lock and roll the dice. Retrace their path to uncover how they got there and what it took for them to survive some only come face to face with death others are not so lucky you can subscribe to hear new episodes every week on apple podcasts or binge. The entire season ad free on one plus wondrous deadly misadventures. You have to hear it to believe it. The following episode deals with mature subject matter listener discretion is advised. Joseph Rangel found himself stranded on a desert island with his lifelong childhood friend. Lorenzo Madrid and young untrained fishing guide. Hafiz Age Wrangel and his best friend were on their last day of a five day sports fishing trip in the Sea of Cortes. It was ending with a smile. A nod in a wing for Milady. Lock But lady. Luck can be fickle indeed. The trio suddenly found themselves almost out of gas and with no other choice than to shipwreck themselves for the night on a hostile and rocky shoreline of an uninhabited island. Will their survival come down to lock or will they roll the dice with their own lives for a chance to survive this deadly misadventures? Joe Rangel was on vacation of a lifetime. Despite not being a very good swimmer Joe love the water and more specifically he loved to fish. He also always dreamed of taking a once in a lifetime vacation to charter a fishing boat in the Sea of Cortez for his fiftieth birthday. He decided to book six day fishing trip with a lifelong buddy. Lorenzo Madrid. Joe. Is Married with adult children and grandchildren. He worked in Anaheim California as a product inspector for an electron IX company. His best friend. Lorenzo was also married with adult children and he worked as a drugstore manager in Malibu. Neither of them were in the best shape or physical condition. In fact John Rangel suffered from type two diabetes and Lorenzo. Let's just say was not his ideal weight. Both of these conditions limited their mobility. But they found. Fishing was the great equalizer. When you charter a boat you have assistance from deckhands day charter captains and they do a lot of the heavy lifting literally some people choose activities that are relaxing and peaceful and others choose hobbies for the exhilaration of the chase wrangle in. Madrid chose fishing because it provided both each time. They cast their line. It was no different than rolling the dice. Unknown of the outcome was half the fun with each fish on the line that day. The excitement mounted then crescendo. When they inevitably conquered their formidable ocean dwelling opponents. The men were on the last day of their fishing charter on. Eighty seven foot boat called the Celia Angelina. Each day would anchor in the mid drift which was an area where the northbound and southbound currents met stirring up nutrient rich prey from the ocean floor which served as a lure for all types of game. Fish the Silia Angelina hired local fishing guides command. Twenty two foot fishing skiffs to take their guests in between the series of remote islands off Baja California's coast for specialized fishing. There Guide was Jose. Luis Ramos Garcia. The last day of fishing was declared the best fishing trip ever. The trio decided it was time to head back for the short trip. Back to San Felipe Bay. Sam Philippa happens to be the largest northern Baja California town instead of fishing on the recommended eastern side of the Island Garcia. Took them to the western side where it was remote and desolate. It was private and serene each time. They cast their line. They were rewarded with a fish bigger and more spectacular than the one before they thanked Garcia for sharing once in a lifetime. Experience with them as they headed back in wrangled noticed. They were going in the wrong direction but they're guide assured them they needed to backtrack the way. They came in to meet up with their boat which was anchored on the northern tip of the island Garcia believed as they were fishing tour boat had passed them but after a few hours of backtracking he was no longer sure of its location or of their location. As darkness fell in the temperatures dropped became clear that their guide had become disoriented. Now heading in what they believed was the right direction. Garcia realized that they were low on gas. They decided to beach their boat on one of the many uninhabited islands until morning and wait for rescue to avoid being pulled out to sea by currents they headed for the closest island and the largest island they could find the only problem with the plan was the closest and largest was Islam. Angel Dela guate- which happens to be marred with a shoreline of jagged rocks and sheer cliffs and when their boat became trapped by the rocky outcroppings. They had no choice but to jump out of the boat and into the water and carry whatever meager supplies can carry Lorenzo and Garcia managed to make it from the boat and swim to a narrow shoreline wrangles. Landing wasn't as graceful as he prepared to jump from the boat. A large wave rocked the boat. Propelled them into the rocks. Now the trio were injured. Wet kolding hungry. They needed to prepare for a long night ahead without a radio. Lifejackets flares or emergency provisions. The men were on their own Bain doing bad days that was just a preview of deadly misadventures. Subscribe to hear new episodes every week on apple podcasts. Wherever you're listening right now or binge the entire season ad free on wonder plus.

Lorenzo Madrid Luis Ramos Garcia Joe Rangel apple Sea of Cortez Joseph Rangel Island Garcia wandry Amazon John Rangel Cortez Hafiz Age Wrangel Anaheim California Baja California Madrid Celia Angelina Silia Angelina Malibu Bain Angel Dela guate
Introducing Deadly Misadventures

The Moment

07:50 min | 7 months ago

Introducing Deadly Misadventures

"Your heartbeat is through the roof. The walls are closing in your sure that there is no way out of this dire dangerous situation who doesn't love a thrilling story of adventure from the voices of generation y and the minds of badness comes deadly misadventures. An exciting new podcast. From wonder follow the true stories of people as they face impossible situations and daring adventures whether they're trapped in a sunken ship at the bottom of the ocean or find themselves alone in the middle of the Amazon here. How they made it out or how they almost did. You're about to hear a preview of the deadly misadventures episode titled Stranded in the Sea of Cortez. You will follow. The unbelievable journey of a man stuck on a remote deserted island with his best friend trapped after being shipwrecked on the islands. Hostile rocky shoreline. Their FATE COMES DOWN TO LUCK. Retraced their path to uncover how they got there and what it took for these two friends to get home again. You can subscribe to hear new episodes every week on Apple podcasts or bench. The entire season ad free on one plus wonder he's deadly misadventures. You have to hear it to believe it. The following episode deals with mature subject matter listener discretion is advised. Joseph Rangel found himself stranded on a desert island with his lifelong childhood friend. Lorenzo Madrid and young untrained fishing guide. Half his age wrangel and his best friend were on their last day of a five day sports fishing trip in the Sea of Cortes. It was ending with a smile. A nod in a wing for Milady. Lock But lady. Luck can be fickle indeed. The trio suddenly found themselves almost out of gas and with no other choice then to shipwreck themselves for the night on a hostile and rocky shoreline of an uninhabited island. Will their survival come down to lock or will they roll the dice with their own lives for a chance to survive this deadly misadventures? Joe Rangel was on the vacation of a lifetime despite not being a very good swimmer. Joe Love the water and more specifically he loved to fish he also always dreamed of taking once in a lifetime vacation to charter fishing boat in the Sea of Cortez for his fiftieth birthday. He decided to book a six day fishing trip with a lifelong buddy. Lorenzo Madrid Joe is married with adult children and grandchildren. He worked in Anaheim California as a product inspector for an electronics company. His best friend. Lorenzo was also married with adult children and he worked as a drugstore manager in Malibu. Neither of them were in the best shape or physical condition. In Fact John. Rangel suffered from type two diabetes in Lorenzo. Let's just say was not his ideal weight. Both of these conditions limited their mobility but they found fishing was the great equalizer when charter a boat. You have assistance from deckhands Eh Day charter captains and they do a lot of the heavy lifting literally some people choose activities that are relaxing and peaceful and others choose hobbies for the exhilaration of chase wrangle in Madrid chose fishing because it provided both each time. They cast their line. It was no different than rolling the dice. Unknown of the outcome was half the fun with each fish on the line that day. The excitement mounted then crescendo. When they inevitably conquered their formidable ocean dwelling opponents. The men were on the last day of their fishing charter on. Eighty seven foot boat called the Celia Angelina. Each day would anchor in the mid drift which was an area where the northbound and southbound currents met stirring up nutrient rich prey from the ocean floor which served as a lure for all types of game. Fish the Celia Angelina hired local fishing guides to manned twenty two foot fishing skiffs to take their guests in between the series of remote islands off Baja California's coast for specialized fishing. There Guide was Jose. Luis Ramos Garcia. The last day of fishing was declared the best fishing trip ever. The trio decided it was time to head back for the short trip. Back to SAM. Philippi Sam Philippa happens to be the largest northern Baja California town instead of fishing on the recommended eastern side of the island Garcia took them to the western side where it was remote and desolate. It was private and serene each time. They cast their line. They were rewarded with a fish bigger and more spectacular than the one before they thanked Garcia for sharing once in a lifetime. Experience with them as they headed back in wrangled noticed. They were going in the wrong direction but they're guide assured them they needed to backtrack the way. They came in to meet up with their boat which was anchored on the northern tip of the island Garcia believed as they were fishing. The tour boat had passed them. But after a few hours of backtracking he was no longer sure of its location or of their location. As darkness fell in the temperatures dropped became clear that their guide had become disoriented. Now heading what they believed was the right direction. Garcia realized that they were low on gas. They decided to beach their boat on one of the many uninhabited islands until morning and wait for rescue to being pulled out to sea by currents they headed for the closest island and the largest island. They could find the only problem with the plan was the closest and largest was the Islamic Angel Daily Guava which happens to be marred with a shoreline chat rocks and sheer cliffs in when their boat became trapped by the rocky outcroppings. They had no choice but to jump out of the boat and into the water and carry whatever meager supplies could carry. Lorenzo Garcia managed to make it from the boat and swim to a narrow shoreline. Wrangles landing wasn't as graceful as he prepared to jump from the boat. A large wave rocked the boat and propelled him into the rocks. Now the trio were injured. Wet kolding hungry. They needed to prepare for a long night ahead without a radio. Lifejackets flares or emergency provisions. The men were on their own to do and win. Do in bed days to that was just a preview of deadly misadventures. Subscribe to hear new episodes every week on apple podcasts. Or wherever you're listening right now or bench the entire season. Add Frey on one day plus.

Luis Ramos Garcia Sea of Cortez Joe Rangel Lorenzo Madrid Joe Apple Lorenzo Madrid Lorenzo Garcia Celia Angelina Joseph Rangel Lorenzo Amazon Lorenzo Joe Love Madrid Anaheim California Malibu Baja California Frey Wrangles landing Sam Philippa
Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

I, Survivor

07:52 min | 8 months ago

Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

"Your heartbeat is through the roof. The walls are closing in. You look up and all you see is a warm white light. You're sure that there is no way out of this. Dire dangerous situation from the voices of generation Y in the minds of madness comes deadly misadventures. A thrilling new podcast from wondering follow the true stories of people as they face near certain death whether they are trapped at the bottom of the ocean or find themselves alone in the middle of the Amazon here how they made it out or how they almost did. You're about to hear a preview of the deadly misadventures episode titled Stranded in the Sea of Cortez in it. You will follow. The unbelievable journey of a man stuck on a remote deserted island with his best friend trapped after being shipwrecked on the islands hostile rocky shoreline. Their survival comes down to luck and a roll of the dice. Retraced their path to uncover how they got there and what it took for them to survive some only come face to face with death. Others are not so lucky. You can subscribe to hear new episodes. Every week on apple podcasts or binged the entire season ad free on one plus one degrees deadly misadventures. You have to hear it to believe it back. The following episode deals with mature subject matter listener discretion is advised. Joseph Rangel found himself stranded on a desert island with his lifelong childhood friend. Lorenzo Madrid Andy. Young untrained fishing guide half his age WRANGEL and his best friend were on their last day of a five day sports fishing trip. In the Sea of Cortes it was ending with a smile. A nod wing for Milady lock but Lee. Luck can be fickle indeed. The trio suddenly found themselves almost out of gas and with no other choice than to shipwreck themselves for the night on a hostile and rocky shoreline of an uninhabited island. Will their survival come down to lock or will they roll the dice with their own lives for a chance to survive this deadly misadventures? Joe Rangel was on vacation of a lifetime. Despite not being very good swimmer Joe Love the water and more specifically he loved to fish he also always dreamed of taking a once in a lifetime vacation to charter a fishing boat in the Sea of Cortes for his fiftieth birthday. He decided to book a six day fishing trip with a lifelong buddy. Lorenzo Madrid. Joe. Is Married with adult children and grandchildren. He worked in Anaheim California as a product inspector for Electronics Company. His best friend. Lorenzo was also married with adult children and he worked as a drugstore manager in Malibu. Neither of them were in the best shape or physical condition. In fact John Wrangles suffered from type two diabetes and Lorenzo. Let's just say was not his ideal weight. Both of these conditions limited their mobility. But they found. Fishing was the great equalizer. When you charter a boat you have assistance from deckhands day charter captains and they do a lot of the heavy lifting literally some people choose activities that are relaxing and peaceful and others choose hobbies for the exhilaration of chase. Rangel Madrid chose fishing because it provided both each time. They cast their line. It was no different than rolling the dice. Unknown of the outcome was half the fun with each fish on the line that day. The excitement mounted then crescendo. When they inevitably conquered their formidable ocean dwelling opponents. The men were on the last day of their fishing charter on an eighty seven. Foot boat called the Celia Angelina each day would anchor in the mid drift which was an area where the northbound and southbound currents met stirring up nutrient rich prey from the ocean floor which served as a lure for all types of game fish. The Celia Angelina hired local fishing guides to manned twenty two foot fishing skiffs to take their guests in between the series of remote islands off Baja California's coast for specialized fishing. There Guide was Jose. Luis Ramos Garcia. The last day fishing was declared the best fishing trip. Ever the trio decided it was time to head back for the short trip. Back TO SAM PHILIPPI SAMPLE. Ebay happens to be the largest northern Baja California town instead of fishing on the recommended eastern side of the island Garcia took them to the western side where it was remote and desolate. It was private and serene each time. They cast their line. They were rewarded with fish bigger and more spectacular than the one before they thanked Garcia for sharing. See once in a lifetime experience with them as they headed back in wrangled noticed. They were going in the wrong direction but they're guide assured them they needed to backtrack the way. They came in to meet up with their boat which was anchored on the northern tip of the island Garcia believed as they were fishing tour boat had passed them but after a few hours a backtracking he was no longer sure of its location or of their location as darkness falls in the temperatures dropped became clear that their guide had become disoriented. Now heading in what they believed was the right direction. Garcia realized that they were low on gas. They decided to beach their boat on one of the many uninhabited islands until morning and wait for rescue to avoid being pulled out to sea currents they headed for the closest island and the largest island they could find the only problem with the plan was the closest and largest was the Islah. Angel Daily Guava which happens to be marred with shoreline of jagged rocks in sheer cliffs and when their boat became trapped by the rocky outcroppings. They had no choice but to jump out of the boat and into the water and carry whatever meager supplies could carry. Lorenzo Garcia managed to make it from the boat and swim to a narrow shoreline. Wrangles landing wasn't as graceful as he prepared to jump from the bill. A large wave rocked the boat in propelled him into the rocks. Now the trio were injured. Wet kolding hungry. The needed to prepare for a long night ahead. Without a radio life jackets flares or emergency provisions. The men were on their own so do bad days that was just a preview of deadly misadventures. Subscribe to hear new episodes every week on apple podcasts. Wherever you're listening right now or binge the entire season ads. Free on wondering plus.

Luis Ramos Garcia Sea of Cortez Lorenzo Madrid Andy apple Lorenzo Garcia Lorenzo Madrid Lorenzo Joe Rangel Rangel Madrid Celia Angelina Joseph Rangel Amazon Anaheim California Joe Love Joe Malibu Wrangles landing John Wrangles Baja California Lee
Girls Trips, Moms Nights Out, Female Friendships

Mouse and Weens

55:28 min | 1 year ago

Girls Trips, Moms Nights Out, Female Friendships

"Range here. We go doing her thing and now this weekend would you do it was was your big whip oh rookie yes one of ours put in and what's going on some good storylines no now I wanna know something it's just really hot overheated so tell me we're no okay you're being so weird she threw out there that maybe we could all do this wine tasting chip because there's this new region of Baja California that's getting well-known for wine tasting and you you can tell you I'll tell you why you need as well I'm fine we had a nice weekend some friends and I we did a lot of sitting around chatting in the lovely atwater village area can take tours and her friend runs tour so you can it's like your tour bus years sting tour bus where we crossed the border we have to get off the bus watch it anyway how's it going what have you been up to issue I know I miss you too I feel like I wanna find out more about your world I have been working on the hit show that into Mexico so if you look at Mexico there's little finger thing in that's Baja California so there is a tour it was my friend's birthday and go across the Mexican border get back on the bus and continuing and we went to three wineries and then out to dinner and then came home so the whole day yesterday me how was your Mexico trip what happened yes this weekend I went to California which is just south of San Diego what's the bled whatever with you lucky we wait for real got some nice friends yes what about a year what are you telling me date the nodding your head like that well I just posted all of your your season two trailer which was attention ladies and gentlemen that's right at one zero seven that's right see the hit weans on the hit show the rookie yeah and we had so much fun last weekend in La Hey this just happened we had a blast it was really fun and it got me thinking about girls trips and how important they are but I've been feeling a little bit of mom guilt to on the podcast only we have a video option that we're doing too so go to youtube and or website Masson weans dot com it's tries to get my voice how are you I'm good how are you good for those of you that are listening or just go does not remind guilt but that I've been gone each of these past weekends because I did the conference in La with you last week again and the weekend before that was not when I went up to La to party with you in that whole thing too so it's been three weekends in a row that I've really unlike why will you tell me later yes oh okay come on carry on I'm really hot can I take this trying to look presentable I've been home which is odd for me as a stay at home mom and so used to always being there right but with kids that are fourteen twelve and eight independent Dave is happy to take care of them or so he says and I don't know I think about almost fifteen but every weekend in a row I'm feeling like three weekends in arose little match or is that good is this what like working mums go through when they leave there isn't parenting that you've been a sole parent or I would say or the main go to person for the main amount of our just the summer that dad went away for stunt work is that what you're thinking to that was the only time I remember that and they went to Hawaii for trips there's conferences and they travel every week and and it's just normal mice growing up my kids are they going to remember this is the time that mom was being selfish or is it there's a day now I would who am I to tell you except that it sounds healthy to have that balance of getting away here and there and things like that we wanna deceit grandma's boobs God Old Lady boobs look like head underneath is he just saying that is there a little bit of a guilt trip he's trying to throw in there or is he just teasing me because he would say things like oh welcome back mum we we it are you getting blowback from your heavy no I'm not well no I'm not I couldn't read between the lines I really was like yeah see my mom had been there I wouldn't have done that so see screwed up for life all right I don't think there's anything to worry about got in the bathtub and shut the door and then I ran to my room crazy I think our ten come on you're curious normal curiosity my feelings I think you guys probably need and deserve it and you should have as many of them as you can tolerate and by the way we had brunch and not a breakfast because you had to sleep until we don't have to divulge too much you look at you don't we're podcast you just lay down in her bed folks and she's a Do you ever get resentful is it hard or what are you what are your feelings on that for real from your heart real no honestly it's holds a little childhood since it's all we have related reference sue anyone leaving and you being messed up over I love you honey it's so great knowing that I can just go freely and I have your full support one hundred percent support right right so Z. because we already have a routine established so this is your return on your investment of creating that routine Ceesay uh it was fun wine tasting we'll just say that but now you when you take care of the kids and you're doing all the house stuff when I'm gone he really is okay with it and wants me to finally enjoy my time he does recognize all the time I put in back in the day and still do I guess nightstand that has a little shell in there so she could get a peek at grandma boobs I was just curious about the yeah some of the things that they say about female friendships well first of all tell me about your friendship stroke because you were it's true that boobs droop so I snuck in while Graham was changing to get into the bathtub but I was so afraid to move that I just stayed behind the nightstand the whole and with my husband this is Dave I hi I just got back from this girl's trip wine tasting and talking about this a little bit recently to offline I think that I have my handful I've always had a few good friends you can count on one hand and have had them for twenty something years Oh you look like you know and so I'm sensitive to it so for me I was like the heat me he's mad at me but I did I so that's good but why mom guilt exists it's a real big thing why didn't you okay let's validation from everybody to tell me that it's okay looking down beauty of hair spread everywhere all right so when I was looking up all the staff trying to make myself feel better I found a lot of studies do you want to hear the classroom WanNa blow their identity and Willia- but and then you know both of you that was that did you catch all that that was so cute so it's all good feels pretty genuinely is a in this crew this weekend we have one that she's always the one that keeps us on the calendar and keeps US scheduled and Stephanie the next morning we have branch and I just wanted to hear Dave you're Feelings on girls trips and girls night outs in that kind of thing time the little fabric circular nightstand table and I knew WANNA put my little years up from behind to see what she was doing so I just hid there until she there's no like they know your history there's no judgment it feels like it's just kind of boil down to those core people next weekend I'm going to be gone the weekend after that you cool I'm totally fine with that I don't think your mom guilt will allow for that but yeah and how important that is but I feel pretty lucky that this is having because I think it is tough to see get through a lot of the stuff in female relationships right past all the immature staff and jealousy and insecurity and it's GonNa be since forever but but yeah my girl groups to I have kind of different little clusters sounds like you do too where it's like you know elementary school really being able to be out there with them in fact okay do you want to hear now we did a little recording while we were there because they knew I wanted to talk about this with them so so Dana Judy and a new friend Sandra Pompton last outing those girls are always fun all right I'm GonNa do this one okay here we go ready I am in Guadalupe Baja California Mexico and I'm here with my girlfriend and demaim fence and that's been the most recent the current one you know and but it's fun because those groups you can always fall back into and she's my Seal Beach Pal and I can call her with anything to noon that group of girls so it's Jannine Debbie and Brenda and we are on a girl's trip it's one of our friend's birthdays so I was just talking to them we're talking about monce trips and how important is she and then the Lake F. and little initials behind their name Jennifer be from New York I have Rachel see his gallivanting around the US for a crescent city heated. I'm sorry I just said Snug I've known her since our kids were what two years old time twelve stay at home moms where our sole job was nursing these babies feeding these babies making sure there and now we're at the age where they're more sneeze here too I've known her the exact same amount of time and she likes me more than Stephanie has been our organizers so tell me what your guys I've got more but those are probably people that call for stuff steph could tell them anything and then I have you know interviewed him today I got him to say it into my little phone you WanNa hear it shot and see what he says okay I'm GonNa pull it up real quick ends then there's college friends than work but club that kind of started from work so that's Kinda conglomerate it and then L. A. Friends are probably more recent but wonderful and owed Jennifer Martin too I forgot about Jennifer I'm sorry to forget about her tenants usually gems the glue that holds all that together where she always has a vincent things have we all shopped you see the party planner one that is a huge win that was when you were pregnant with Elliot that's right no we can say names and it's been forever but we have gone through evolution as MOMS Madman for all of us to stay connected number two we've had one person Stephanie Who's committed to meet a scheduler and gets out there and says really to have other moms to talk to well I think we are also all sociable people that were needing to get out and we were first time moms so we didn't Taylor as mothers and then take that home and feel good when we're with our kids and with our husbands and I was just talking to Cari how have any other friends so we had to find some Utah and so and we were all stay at home moms to which meant that we felt like we deserve to take it out this one's fourteen now so what is what is led us us five to still all be together and I think it's a couple of things first of all it's a super big man was very organic very like we we join this to cope with other moms and have something to do but the way we met was not and of course in the beginning only because it was like an organized thing but then as we hung out and a huge group we all found our people right like we kind of found each other because yeah and we can finally go out. Tell me your philosophy on mom's nights out mom's outings and Stephanie mistakes go have a cocktail and I think that was something they're women Cari that have cocktail everybody that's our on MOMS MOMS night outs MOMS trips mums outer vitally important to our well-being and how we relate be and it was it was natural we were able to be vulnerable and talk about that life is hard hard vulnerability is the key to doc once a month or twice a month and I think what's made us last over time no 'cause that's the difference I don't have a couple of nights but are her and our kids have gone to different schools and we still trust in different we all have different friends and that's okay but we've just special bond that no and you know and like this is the perfect example this weekend where we're in this country where I was here three weeks ago but then it was suggested we come here and I thought well I was just here but I don't necessarily I was just happened and warm this wonderful friendship that we've gone so many moms trick moms outings we we found each other through a playgroup so it was this girl's time it's it's vital it is vital it is what keeps me keeps going it's all a balanced so I love girls I love Yukari I love you too offense and get it out and then put back together by our tribe and dad were like anything I tell you guys I feel so comfortable that I'm going to be accepted actually having a good time or this is really our kid right now or I don't like my husband or I'm having a tough times God it's good and we know that will do anything for each other and we'd love when we can get together on a priority to all of us to make it happen not going to happen it's not gonNA happen each other's little sister wives we can all help each other's kids out we bounce parenting ideas off each other and go through situation the parents of the same what would you say or wanted something to do the stroller strides thing was an exercise thing and getting together have your kids integrate and guilty why is important things like that but there are some studies about female friendships oxytocin I read one of them yeah switching teams we'll get to that in other Okra said but these are rancor all I love him dearly and I can't say enough about ends and we really do lean on each other so anyway yeah so it was good we had a fun time I did look up some stats because I was feeling like about gotten a full sentence out honestly never they're like I I always joke that my son has an ear in my pocket because he is I love you and that was a ladder girl talk but that's so sweet so what do you think is different about us in Mike how did other people fall away how do we find what's different I think it's I love that it's what a great group offends you have yeah it really is real I mean we really do it's our tribe I love when Cari said that we are Tad Light Sir can't pass is we've had parents pass away I've had is with children I guess Dan miscarry this just say one thing my mind Joe you got a crowd connects and I don't know talk without our kids interrupting us without when was the last time around our kids or me life I am telling you it's true it's so true if we could all just like own our shit and say what our problems are and other and just say I'm not hey when are we getting together next and then I think we all generally have a really fun time together and we report a spouse is also we really genuinely care for each other and love each other let's I'm GonNa play that earned our K.. So estimate was too loud you ready Oh thank you you too all right parenting styles I would say styles socio economic can help having ask that we all just generally light to go out and have fun and we all like to the issues where sometimes we just WanNa like dish it out and get somebody else to acknowledge what we've gone yeah valid would it hurt let's okay I also had my friend Daphne whose birthday it was she gave us a little soundbite as well as Carla do we were GonNa play those real quick you want to go back but I'm not gonNA miss the chance that all five of us can be together now song came but it has to be a commitment it has to be in some times we that's like a small small percentage for sure bashing it's really just ending it's understanding where we all come from we all have like as parents and his mom like we have another part of us that we're not we always privy to share and we get a chance to share it with each other and and the thing you were at last night I was having cocktails are your best friends with those I can only be friends with some many right and I we found that we liked I do think it's so important to have MOMS night outs girls night out girls weekends girls trips well we okay whatever it is because all of US support each other's families right and I think that's what it comes down for sweeping through rely we've had divorces I moved my space too it's two hundred eas via Rancho Parkway and can beat out it's right by the North county all right so here's Carla yes you are one of my best best best town and we start a lot I don't know I mean in this world of social media and being perfect mom perfect volunteers all you have to stop a lot you really are are y'all can be honest and real and now so dave is always I do you guys decide go out and bash guys and I mean under six months later you start a germ line when I finally made it happened it was so cool is such a huge part of my sanity just like keeping it balanced otherwise I get lost in being a mom in being on on duty and this Ed's and we the time to be genuine and be silly yeah spirit to real girlfriends two we have right that's Carla she's my betty that's so cool I love she thought of that and he goes encourage the knee year's resolution thing that is that what you mean yeah yeah she's cute we we do that we will sit down sometimes we are kind of Dorks but will do these big trips you're like wait what did you say family we call it figures I'm like I can't talk big ears listening right might be a couple of rooms away and he's always like Because she gave quote I I tried to interview her but she got tired and she slept through one of the wineries the nurse on the backside on the backside and you walk right in you just find your way into my studio and it's great it's it's a big space a fun outside of being moms and it wasn't just about motherhood commonality and be wives and being who are we before and who are we going to of your bet she did this for me today she sent this to me so let's hear her thing whoops hold please took a nap on the bus which was great for her I couldn't believe she could sleep through all that noise but she did an woke up all refreshed and ready to go to the next one and I didn't get to in as women in general you know we're always second guessing to have whole group of people giving you encouragement yeah so it sounds like such a great group of friends awesome awesome we love her much in I can't imagine our friend little girls without you we have so many stories that were just so honest and so real and every time afterwards I might cracking up but it's it's free began we just we know that how the stress levels are reduced by friendship and especially for women that it's different in women versus men here we go the tend and befriend notion developed by Doctors Klein and Taylor may explain why women consistently outlive maybe once a year and we do what we call the compliment circle and we all sit there and go round the table and we give you the complimented so there was all these studies done and it was in men just traditionally were the subjects and they showed that ah under stress there's the fight or flight response but with the women they finally realized that there's a different response because they see I'm GonNa find it when women feel close to someone levels of progesterone a hormone that helps reduce stress the person so they believe that it played a role in establishing social bonds over the course of evolution they to mouse in Weans I'm mouse I'm Joel down in San Diego things eighty go up on this is from a University of Michigan Study and the surge also linked to a willingness to risk one's life for the Out Says Dr Klein that friends are helping us live longer okay so that was one thing that kept coming up all these studies I would look up was we have this to say and it's like as you're always in my flipping pocket your pocket no it's true is true well I have to say that you are the right word but for the most part it's just like we want to talk about things in our lives that are relevant that are important that are there like past like little things of why we love him and what they're good at and I don't know it's just so I think as moms you don't hear that an ally enough or just and I mean there's not many skeletons in the closet I mean not at all over all these trips and all these weekends and all these night-out no all right man study after study has found that social ties reduce our risk of disease by lowering blood pressure heart rate and cholesterol there's no the job they're good anyway there was all this science about it do we have time do you want yeah the science of it okay I mean play Daphne real quick she was the birthday girl the am with with the color. Can I say Whiz is that I mean don't go to the bathroom and say with and I it's a to it we're like do it you got it you did it you did it yeah okay Carla just opened a new hairstyle and you want to say the name a copy here studio and yeah I hope you all find a sister wife in life because it's super important we all make many sister right my family that's my sister sinead and if we remember to remember that one mom signed out where we all sat down and we said what are dreams were and one of yours was starting your own hair Salon Ali urging you and you're like I don't know I don't know how many years lower yeah like later not that far later asked me to be a woman it's true right we need to every connection are who we are sure we need this time or getaway in gone girl trips there superbowl that's right that's right and we call each other sister wives out to we give when they're together the oxytocin comes in and decreases that fighter flight feeling and lets you kind of hunker down with your kids and with your female when stress levels go down decreases risk of heart disease obesity depression no but there was something else about how it's fight or flight yet in women girlfriends or I mean I guess if you were lesbian would be different except they're the way that I see it is here's the it's important those good friends that will lift you up raise you up and I think there's something to just having no incentives with Oh Ucla School of medicine study about the OXYTOCIN and another study this one was cute prayer evils goal is scammell mole thing it's a monogamous rodent so they mate for life when researchers let me start that over when researchers asked more than ninety thousand women between fifty and seventy nine don't however women with strong female social ties girlfriends live longer than those without them okay so this is good friendship pretty reliable because it was out of such a large group so it's less likely to be coincident says Nancy freeborn Dr p h adjunct professor of Health Administration and policy boy that was anticlimactic. Maybe we cut this Roy up it's important for our health to have these friendships you guys this the bottom line self esteem what other letters there's all sorts of studies married men live longer than single men yet women who marry have the same life expectancy as those who so we're highly influenced by our girlfriends important for girls to not just women but we need to know this for those of us who have daughter the friends can help you live long I think it was just it was in this supervisors already being Hetero that there is no incentive from curls when you're just solid solid tiny just listens tells the good here it is okay this is that I think Daphne said it the tend and befriend instinct we weren't now Friends can motivate you to be healthier close friends doing exercise saving money volunteering good behaviors friends teach you about yourself I'm GonNa go get yourself all dolled up you're not going to try to put on airs or be something you're not because you're not trying to like meet with them or attract them or something like that if your friends in the workplace they help you with promotions networking mentoring opportunities career development advancement and how much social support they had those who said they had more support were likely to still be living in the follow up years later the difference was slight but the data is love soap and they had that big they indicated that seventy percent of women feel prettier because of their relationships with female friends is keep you razor-sharp so something about a memory function friends can help you live longer friends can boost your career yeah good okay here's some quick points I'm going to do a quick list ready friends lower stress free they were raised with Oh gee that with I think it was the oxytocin receptors on a certain part of the brain the whole thing there so they conducted a survey and two thousand American women mothers were surveyed and they had kids between ages five and twelve years old they started the day okay okay good you found it friends lower stress when women feel close to someone levels of progesterone the same thing drew than this net versus wants to talk so saying incentive meaning like you're not is that what you mean just that you have because there's not sexual energy in my case from the Women Exchange Yell at your and so because I kind of made that promise I feel indebted to that a little bit like I owe that and so this evolution as the kids get older and I'm finding more anybody be healthy are you mentally healthy to be able to let me ask you this on a personal note do you feel more refer tend to our young and be with our friends versus the men who are fighter flight so all in one study there's also I have when a male vol- is put in a stressful situation he runs who's female partner and females been stressed immediately rent to the female per week and they put in the equivalent to two and a half fulltime jobs so that's really only just nine point seven hours a day it just helps you see yourself in your friendships friends help you feel better I'm a lack of friendships and social support increases the risk of developing about myself again and looking into my own interests. I guess it's just the self-imposed guilt and a need to drop that this is where I need to keep them Ashton available for your kids were excited to be with them after you've taken this weekend show okay yeah so isn't it healthier for your kids to have a better mom I myself this is my block is feeling guilty feeling like I have to be the one doing the parenting and being in control and I don't know I think there was innings diety or depressive disorder Oh yeah and then how much do moms really work this was crazy I saw the study it was a news source in two thousand seventeen not putting on airs or just seeing some looks good to try to woo them or get them through something or get them in the sack whatever honest feedback yeah off glasses friends don't make fun of you in your eyesight goes yes people strive to present themselves as positive Dan do all one thing all the time so a little bit of this a little bit of that I put the question out there I'm just the young dumb newly married me kind of made a promise with Dave I remember having this conversation like hey if I had become a state Mesa this stuff in hearing from friends here from you and just retrain my brain that way so just remember that one hundred hours a week how could this is yours we're all just trying to build each other up there at least I felt that way made some really good friends there too it needed to still very cool okay at six twenty three a m and they clocked out at eight thirty one PM which I can relate to that's like my schedule they work fourteen hours a day and one hundred hours aw healthy it was healthy when mom and dad went away which they didn't very often but and they went on a week vacation and were hanging out grandma knows very important time it was good or their partner or they'd prefer to be alone that they don't prioritize I guess going out with girlfriends or they're gonNA die earlier saying that mom's night outs and things like that were a little bit overrated overweight just that they'd prefer to be with their spouse why I don't want a mom's night out but she says when she does get alone time she likes to spend alone she doesn't want to opted people and I've found that as people talk about their friends they are often talking about their current or the stuff they'd like to become so I guess or healthy available parent helping out I know when you hear statistics like that because you know that's true I know that's true about you yeah this is the stuff I need to keep to get a job like I'm leaving more often and I'm going and doing my thing so it's it I think shows them that balance good right you at home mom I will cook clean I will raise the babies I will make the food I work out I just put myself into this really traditional role I mean yeah it's all like choices and it's fine but and then I found this blogger who said the same thing her article was titled Aldrin or something or maybe her mom friends aren't at that level rate maybe they're more like superficial 'cause then she says something else which the idea of a break from my kids is taking a shower without them in the bathroom for fifteen minutes not an entire evening of leaving my husband with the kids while I go out with was surprising she said everybody says you need girl time she goes I get that girl time when the kids have plates or get togethers it's just a bunch of MOMS there with anybody watch her kids like she's picky about who watches her kids she feels like she'd rather be enjoying a good book or spending quality time with her husband okay your sleep meals personal care and mental breaks so all combined would you ever feel guilty about taking a girl's trip when you have another other moms it's just not my thing I was like okay girl you I just can't see that fifteen minutes in a shower that's enough time the other thing is healthy I think for them to be away from you and for them to bond with Dave and all of that is all good they can't I think there's something unhealthy about having your mom available the time they need to know yeah I mean really I'm not just saying that to make you feel better kids when I take the kids dance class or soccer or church or it's it's nothing but girl time she goes it's all the same conversations take that to the bank okay suck it Well I get I just hear stories like the so much and I don't that's what leads me to believe that she doesn't have that deep real friendship where she can talk candidly it must just be all surface level MOMS night out you know where they talk about the kids amy because they don't have my own kids than guilt that comes with it but there's so many people that write about like stop you're kind of driving yourself into the ground and kind of healthy let's see this lady also says you need a break from your husband and she's my word do you people marry men you do not is me up in that I'm passionate about and they appreciate more when I'm home I think in you know it is kind of like stay at home mom goes she's true right don't you remember working at Nerkin and the female friendships and we all can lift each other up and now I don't know there was none of the kind of cutthroat this is them so she's coming crazy but I'm raising little people I enjoy being around and socializing with do get tired of parenting somedays absolutely but my yeah because then I'm really like wanting to bonding let's sit down let's play this you know look the I looked them in the eye it's yeah you need a break from your kids and she says no I don't need a break for my kids she says I'm starting to think that other parents just don't like their kids as often as they want breaks for okay so you're really needing that person to feel good about yourself

Stephanie Who Cari Baja California Jennifer Martin oxytocin Roy Ashton heart disease scammell Utah Oh Ucla School of medicine steph Carla Elliot vincent L. A. Taylor professor of Health Administra sinead Salon Ali
Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

Over My Dead Body

07:52 min | 8 months ago

Wondery presents Deadly Misadventures

"Your heartbeat is through the roof. The walls are closing in. You look up and all you see is a warm white light. You're sure that there is no way out of this. Dire dangerous situation from the voices of generation Y in the minds of madness comes deadly misadventures. A thrilling new podcast from wondering follow the true stories of people as they face near certain death whether they are trapped at the bottom of the ocean or find themselves alone in the middle of the Amazon here how they made it out or how they almost did. You're about to hear a preview of the deadly misadventures episode titled Stranded in the Sea of Cortez in it. You will follow. The unbelievable journey of a man stuck on a remote deserted island with his best friend trapped after being shipwrecked on the islands hostile rocky shoreline. Their survival comes down to luck and a roll of the dice. Retraced their path to uncover how they got there and what it took for them to survive some only come face to face with death. Others are not so lucky. You can subscribe to hear new episodes. Every week on apple podcasts or binged the entire season ad free on one three plus one degrees deadly misadventures. You have to hear it to believe it back. The following episode deals with mature subject matter listener discretion is advised. Joseph Rangel found himself stranded on a desert island with his lifelong childhood friend. Lorenzo Madrid Andy. Young untrained fishing guide half his age WRANGEL and his best friend were on their last day of a five day sports fishing trip. In the Sea of Cortes it was ending with a smile. A nod wing for Milady lock but Lee. Luck can be fickle indeed. The trio suddenly found themselves almost out of gas and with no other choice than to shipwreck themselves for the night on a hostile and rocky shoreline of an uninhabited island. Will their survival come down to lock or will they roll the dice with their own lives for a chance to survive this deadly misadventures? Joe Rangel was on vacation of a lifetime. Despite not being very good swimmer Joe Love the water and more specifically he loved to fish he also always dreamed of taking a once in a lifetime vacation to charter a fishing boat in the Sea of Cortes for his fiftieth birthday. He decided to book a six day fishing trip with a lifelong buddy. Lorenzo Madrid. Joe. Is Married with adult children and grandchildren. He worked in Anaheim California as a product inspector for Electronics Company. His best friend. Lorenzo was also married with adult children and he worked as a drugstore manager in Malibu. Neither of them were in the best shape or physical condition. In fact John Wrangles suffered from type two diabetes and Lorenzo. Let's just say was not his ideal weight. Both of these conditions limited their mobility. But they found. Fishing was the great equalizer. When you charter a boat you have assistance from deckhands day charter captains and they do a lot of the heavy lifting literally some people choose activities that are relaxing and peaceful and others choose hobbies for the exhilaration of chase. Rangel Madrid chose fishing because it provided both each time. They cast their line. It was no different than rolling the dice. Unknown of the outcome was half the fun with each fish on the line that day. The excitement mounted then crescendo. When they inevitably conquered their formidable ocean dwelling opponents. The men were on the last day of their fishing charter on an eighty seven. Foot boat called the Celia Angelina each day would anchor in the mid drift which was an area where the northbound and southbound currents met stirring up nutrient rich prey from the ocean floor which served as a lure for all types of game fish. The Celia Angelina hired local fishing guides to manned twenty two foot fishing skiffs to take their guests in between the series of remote islands off Baja California's coast for specialized fishing. There Guide was Jose. Luis Ramos Garcia. The last day fishing was declared the best fishing trip. Ever the trio decided it was time to head back for the short trip. Back TO SAM PHILIPPI SAMPLE. Ebay happens to be the largest northern Baja California town instead of fishing on the recommended eastern side of the island Garcia took them to the western side where it was remote and desolate. It was private and serene each time. They cast their line. They were rewarded with fish bigger and more spectacular than the one before they thanked Garcia for sharing. See once in a lifetime experience with them as they headed back in wrangled noticed. They were going in the wrong direction but they're guide assured them they needed to backtrack the way. They came in to meet up with their boat which was anchored on the northern tip of the island Garcia believed as they were fishing tour boat had passed them but after a few hours a backtracking he was no longer sure of its location or of their location. As darkness in the temperatures dropped became clear that their guide had become disoriented now heading in what they believed was the right direction. Garcia realized that they were low on gas. They decided to beach their boat on one of the many uninhabited islands until morning and wait for rescue to avoid being pulled out to sea currents they headed for the closest island and the largest island they could find the only problem with the plan was the closest and largest was the Islah. Angel Daily Guava which happens to be marred with shoreline of jagged rocks in sheer cliffs and when their boat became trapped by the rocky outcroppings. They had no choice but to jump out of the boat and into the water and carry whatever meager supplies could carry. Lorenzo Garcia managed to make it from the boat and swim to a narrow shoreline. Wrangles landing wasn't as graceful as he prepared to jump from the bill. A large wave rocked the boat in propelled him into the rocks. Now the trio were injured. Wet kolding hungry. The needed to prepare for a long night ahead. Without a radio life jackets flares or emergency provisions. The men were on their own so do bad days that was just a preview of deadly misadventures. Subscribe to hear new episodes every week on apple podcasts. Wherever you're listening right now or binge the entire season ads. Free on wondering plus.

Luis Ramos Garcia Sea of Cortez Lorenzo Madrid Andy apple Lorenzo Garcia Lorenzo Madrid Lorenzo Joe Rangel Rangel Madrid Celia Angelina Joseph Rangel Amazon Anaheim California Joe Love Joe Malibu Wrangles landing John Wrangles Baja California Lee
Scientists at Work: The Art and Science of Saving Mangroves

After The Fact

17:11 min | 1 year ago

Scientists at Work: The Art and Science of Saving Mangroves

"Mangrove forests, those trees that grow between the land, and ocean are one of nature's best protectors against hurricanes, and ce`namas. They're like, big powerful sponges, providing a barrier between coastal communities and storm surges. And they soak up carbon dioxide, essential in a time of growing concern about climate change in this installment of our scientists at work series. We're meeting a scientist fighting to protect these critical habitats using his camera. for the future. It'll trust. I'm Dan led Duke, and this is after the fact mangroves don't always draw a lot of attention, especially considering the important work, they do for our planet. But here's something you need to know, over the last five decades fifty percent of the world's mangroves have been lost that fifty percent is our data point for this episode and it highlights daunting, threat facing marine ecosystems today, saving mango forests consume like an insurmountable task like David struggling against Goliath. But marine biologist Octavio Burt. Oh, is working to do just that. And he's doing it. In a way you may not expect from a scientist. He's using photography to capture the beauty and wonder of ocean life in the hope. It'll help others understand his research. In fact, David, and Goliath is the name he gave a stunning underwater, image, he captured with his camera. That went viral a few years ago, I talked with Octavio to learn more about how he got started in photography, and how it influences his current work using drone technology to get a new perspective on mangrove forests. You are a scientists and photographer. And when one sees how amazing your photography is, you could have easily be the photographer. Scientists we reverse those labels. Tell us how you got started in both science and photography in which came first. I think the scientist started first than if over because, in my pin ninety I went to study in biology at the university of Baja California, sewer, it's at estate in Mexico independ- into of Baja California. And when I was a student, I was able to use video cameras, and photography cameras to do my science. My mom asked me what is the kind of job? That kind of stories that I was doing. So I started taking pictures for my mom in order to show. How beautiful in west the life, that I was studied, what a great audience because you, you've also said, I know that scientists must be able to communicate their findings for them to have any impact. And if you need to be able to tell your mom, what you're doing if you can do that, you can probably relate it to anybody, right? Yes. Actually, after status taking all these emissions and after several years of conducting science doing more photography. I really wanted to share all these photography to communicate science. So after one moment, I started using the cameras to translate my science in pictures, or images that tell the stories that I wanted to tell for not only my mom also for a bigger Audis so much of science immune if it's not communicated to. Those who can make policy decisions and the rest is for not. I mean, it's it's knowledge for knowledge is sake, but nothing can really happen, unless it can be communicated. I think scientists we have the responsibility to tell our stories and communicate our science in different ways. So this is what I come in new in the last ten years and so far in some topics, like, marine protected areas or mangroves. I have gotten very interesting results in terms of inspiring, this should makers and the society in general to make changes bullshit changes to protect and under Sunday succeed. Dems, the majority of my work is in Mexico, but also I have been working in different Latin, American countries for the last ten years, I have been supporting research on, conducting research in the Gulf of California or we have in starting up these. Fisheries. We have been studying coastal ecosystems, marine ecosystems, but also I have been dotting, or estimating cut goo the band, Kevin the results of the decisions to implement conservation efforts, like, for example, marine protected areas or fisheries relations. That's active you in the field. Snapping photos along the coast of Baja California sur in north west Mexico. One of your most popular photographs is David and Goliath popular in that more than twenty seven million people have seen it on the internet. And we put on our website and what you see is, this small diver standing on a seabed holding a camera and a giant, what looks like a tornado of fish, called jacks, right next to him. Yes, them Jackson. It's have family of fish that are very similar to tuna. They rather different from from Tunis, Jack's spend most of their life, close to two reaps on in this particular photograph. We capture a moment weaving, their Mateen retrial, these jacks perform these beautiful dance every year when their full moon of October, and who moon off November happen. And during that week this Jack's congregating in big numbers, we have counted more than six thousand of these individuals, and basically, they, they dance they moving on in this very amazing patterns in that particular moment, were what I took the picture. They were creating these kind of tornado so that the fish were moving in a circle away from the bottom of, of the reef or the way to the surface, and it's almost twenty meters that so really, really some, it's an, an a Mason, reach while an amazing behavior and during their food moon of these moms, basically, they come to the surface and a spouse on, on these this is the beginning of their life. Cycles. The Larry's will born in the in the water and later, they will go on find refuge in, in coastal habitats, like like mangroves and after some years, they will come back to the reef to repeat these life cycle. It's very, very important for us, skewered Stu on understand sand that we need to protect each of these stations in order to disrupt this sequel of life, that pitcher, it took us three years to take this picture to have the right conditions, the right be civility that picture actually west. They can in one of these areas where conservation efforts half produce an amazing results, these pictures staking at tiny community that is called Kabul, MO, and the picture watt. Taking the help of a friend, that his name is Debbie. And he's in front of big school of, of jacks, and I basically put the name of David and Goliath, for this image because, well, first of all his name is, but I think the image represent the challenges that humans have in order to protect nature and not only because these challenges are big, but also because I think once humans realize that they can really really make important positive impacts. They can recover marine ecosystem in an amazing way you know so much of your work has been underwater until now. But your new work is, is taking you up in the air and looking down on the water of tell us about that. Yes. I coming working. In with coastal cushy stem says, well, and one of the most fascinating ecosystems are mangrove forest mangroves are threes, that live in the transition between the ocean and land destroy his a ball from terrestrial plans. But they adapted to leave in these brackish water. And actually, they use salty water to produce for the syntheses, and they had a patient to excrete the south and continue leaving in this in conditions. Tha very. Stress conditions, but this, this threes can leave along different coastal areas. They are very, very important because they protect the shore, protect the coastal areas for many countries, and they produced many benefits for humans, for example, they roots create habitat for many juvenile fish and also they capture a lot of carbon from the atmosphere and they Bori this carbon in their sediment. So the carbon sequestration that these three generate it's berry berry large actually a unit of area. Mangrove forests are the eco-systems that sequester more carbon compared with their eco-systems. And, and so in a half century, we've lost half of our mangroves. Yes, that's correct. That is. Because there are many drivers for many problems that these forests are facing they compete or other economic activities human activities compete with these mangroves. Let, for example, in, in several countries are, especially in the past, the Ishrat IMP aquaculture was one of the economic activities that replace mangrove for shrimp want. Now, they there are other economic activities like palm oil industry that it's basically competing and degrading basic was systems. These said palm trees compete with mangroves for resources for freshwater for space. So these industry is the one that, for example, in Indonesia, and also in many parts, Mexico. It's removing a lot of Mandra, various on in certain places even you ran developments, especially tourism, developments, basically, these industry is replacing Monroe for is for a hotel buildings and homes. So there are different drivers and different problems that we are facing in order to stop mangrove deforestation now. So do you view part of your role as a scientist to help people understand the value of the mangroves? Yes, I am trying to show to society Jenner the bully. But also, the she should makers that just crabbing, healthy mangrove forest, it produce, more economic benefits in the long term that replacing these ecosystems for any or they're kind of infrastructure the problem. Right now is that when we remove these mangrove forest or a hectare of, of mangrove, we only consider the benefits for one economic activity. So how are you putting your photography to work to help understand what's happening to mangroves? Well, I'm I'm doing to kind of photography's right now to on the sand value of mangroves right now, the technology that we have with satellite images even that they very nice relation is not quite a resolution that we need in order to separate between what is a mangrove on what he said, another kind of vegetate. And actually that resolution is not enough yet to separate, even between mangrove species. Like, for example, we don't we'd satellite images. We cannot separate what is red mangrove from white mangrove for or at black mangrove. So we still need to calf better satellite images. And probably that will happen in the next five years. But right now, we drone technology, we can get that resolution withdrawn technology. So we are using drones. And we are using very, very nice Camara's to produce these three dimensional map, we've berry berry, high resolution, and using that maps we are creating algorithms to separate between mangroves and on Monroe Sam between different species of mangroves. And once we have an office Lucien with the satellite images this. I'll rhythms will be used by this all the technology. So in some way, we are using drone on till we have an over resolution with the satellite images the other way that I am using the images is I am capturing beautiful portraits. Beautiful images of these systems and every time that I haven't. Avenue, paternity two percent, the images and these portfolios in big the room. So with students or with Joan people I always go on percent, this portfolio of images, and the most important thing is that you can take this picture. You can send it to a decision maker, or you can post it in social media, and everyone will know what is happening and why all of those who really, really should care about what is happening with these problems. So these new perspective of taking area picture to understand a problem of forest is changing radically cow. We are doing science and car, we should or are, we are tackling all these problems or manner of the four station. So I really really have hope to, to change the. The way that we are doing things especially in coastal and marine areas. I, I like a lot to tell stories at like a lot to do science. So it has been a pleasure and commitment, basically, to create more storytelling related with Santa Fe results and saying ticket for feel. I will continue doing that for sure in the coming years. Well again professor, but the thank you so much for your time today. And we wish you continued. Good luck with all the work you're doing. Thank you very much on. These has been a pleasure to, to we you're, and you're allience. again. We have some stunning images from Octavio for you to see. You can also take a video to or through the mangroves, check those out on our website at pewtrust dot org slash after the fact and if you like what you're hearing, you can find us on Pandora in addition to the other places you find your podcasts. I'm Dan, Luke. Thanks for listening after the fact is produced by the pew charitable trusts.

scientist David Octavio Burt Mexico Goliath Baja California sur Dan Tunis Jack university of Baja California California west Mexico Pandora Indonesia Mateen Kevin
Mexico: What Travelers Can Expect During COVID-19

The World Nomads Podcast

37:13 min | 2 months ago

Mexico: What Travelers Can Expect During COVID-19

"In this episode, we really visit Mexico currently one of the most popular travel destinations with some of the easiest covid nineteen entry requirements in the world the war nomads podcast it's not your usual travel podcast. It's everything for the adventures independent traveler. Hi. It's Kim and filled with you from wherever you get your favorite pods and with Cohen still affecting the way we engage in the world. It's important to plan wisely and travel responsibly by for your own safety, and then if the places that you visit Rodman's same pain. But as we were engaged with the world, you'll luckily planning vacations not far from home. So, we'll can help by providing travel safety tapes, inspiring content. We've got some news coming up about traveling shirts designed to protect you while traveling. That's right at the time that we couldn't. It's right now it's mid September twenty twenty Mexico has become one of the most popular travel destinations with reportedly some of the easiest covid nineteen entry requirements in the world. Before we go getting into these destination, some you do need to Nari might be easy. Place make sure you to your own race. Mexico, for example, doesn't require negative covid nineteen. Or reputation for entry as an example, nate to quarantaine. But obviously, you do need to follow covid health requirements which include wearing masks in some locations and obviously washing hands regularly, and am for at least which thickens or is it thirty seconds? Thirty whatever the time it takes to sing. A minute. On you social distancing as well. We'll have a link to an article in show nights. Spells at is requirements correctly even more even more than we can do. Trustworthy actually now. We'll also have a Alvarez nine meds. Mexico travel alerts that are updated regularly. So you can click on that at any time and you get the latest. Let's get into it Phil who did it to give us an idea? Just how safe Mexico is is a local but not covered safe generally because we do hear a lot of stories don't worry about he's Mexico Saif. Horse big question people are school just watch Netflix. You caught out with Ruben from Mondo Jovan at a conference in Scotland. But that was a couple years guy. Wow I. Born and raised in Mexico so. To, give us this insight into how safe it is. I mean in this industry for fifteen years. And I. Always. Next of these story about a lease in all the time when where are you from Mexico and immediately zane euros how do you sort by black? People immediately he's like. Feeling that I'm landing Damascus probably. Every time that I get home. But he's not later. Of course there is a problem of course. Will I will be lying to you. He fight on and. Consider That we have we have a problem. We have a big drug problem probably since. I know. Since ever. Since the. Bigger and bigger and bigger in the last. Twenty. Years. or he was more obvious in the last twenty years on, it's it's really simple to understand. where? We have a big neighbour for. We'd be. Yep I. WE are big producer. So in order to six. Any conflict has to do need to have two parts YEP OUGHTA. Why couldn't be just one? I think the Mexico I speak problem. Is We. Have a terrible biard. Terry will pr condition in terms of the news. you can see the war is precedent ever history that we have is right now thank God he's he's gone this this administration. Considering so many facts considering. Corruption. Thinks that we've been. Terrible. But it's it's pretty simple. Decide that there are. Lots of places which are find, but there was some places which are not correct. So it's very like lights anyway. So he finally go to Mexico. How would I find out the information about? What other site places guy on the not safe places to avoid bore there. He's always the hot spot not in the right way I mean. Because the geographically position next to the US board there. were. Probably. You're going to get the biggest conflicts. Costs Natural. Conditions of of these people trying to get. All this. Stuff into the into the country, and then about the cities or about the destinations they're they're they're mostly man's donation, which is Mexico City Cancun or all the other. Beach destinations you're going to have these. Otherwise. The ball suitable problems. Yeah. because. All the interaction there is involve around. I mean. There are always people looking for these amount and there's always people having these offer. So if you are in bold or you're looking after this and you're. Looking after that kind of action you will get into trump we'll get into trouble. But that's something that he's going to happen in. Mexico or. Anywhere else. Are, tell me about your favorite parts of Mexico with with your what which part of your country do you love the most? I, Love My City I. Love Mexico City, then my second favorite place of Mexico. Is Ease Chapas. With cheese in the south. Yes. Saudi specs ago. They have a beautiful beautiful beautiful landscape. It's. Green, a lot of community and local community people and they have beautiful beautiful, beautiful green zones and it's a mix between jungle and. A lot of art. On a lot of traditions And all this sewn surround for me. One of the most beautiful parts of. Mexico. Next to you well, close to them, you get done for as well for me. It's my one of my favorite places and he's my grandma hometown which. Obviously put it in in the hot part of the list. Dainty. Well, Mexico City has changed a lot. The medium-term was once not a very nice place to go. So what change they were, how did it become such a great destination? How to become a hotspot? It's a lot of investment in the city in their last ten cure will say. much more efficient communication and. a lot of big brands hotels and be luxury runs. Around the city. and. developing. I mean you feel comfort when you're next to the CD or walking around the city and there are so many things to do and so many things to. To see around last last question I want you to tell me a secret spot in Mexico. City falls to visit there. Where would you say me? That's not the usual my secret spot in Mexico. Samnang. For Me Sung Kelly's. Is One of the most non. Well. At amazing neighborhoods. that perfectly shows you. How is The Real Mexico City. So get lost in San Hill. Take a look about the houses. And you're going to know exactly how is how is Mexican how he's Mexico City Dodge. Ivan is an educational travel agency aimed at all types of travellers especially, first timers. Who our God it step by step process to go abroad to study all the links in the show notes. Yeah, plus Ovarian Safety Guide to from Mexico will put that there as well. Now Cassandra runs skyping in wide offers gripped, who is I really like this because when he had the term groups Off. Plays because she does group to the people who don't do group to us. And she helps solo travelers plan their own adventures and Cassandra has spent a lot of time in Mexico. So I. started in. Baja California and I did a whale-watching road trip all along for Ninsula. Camping and stopping at different locations to see Wales and I been completed my scuba diving certification in Baja California, and then I went to vital Carmen about two years later and did my advanced scuba diving certification. So what scuba diving like in that area? Oh, it's. It's amazing. It's amazing. Say in in pinal Carmen it's one of the best places in the world you see turtles uc a large fish, you see algae UC. I saw titanic Eeo that apparently just lives in this shipwreck and I was so surprised to find him and then was told after the that he's just always there every single day waiting for divers to come down and say, hi, when you're in Baja California, you then hitchhiked with a couch surfing friends I did. So I met her actually the previous year. Anti. Tijuana, she lives in Tijuana and she wrote me and she said I go to the whales every winter would you like to go with me? So I did I flew back. To San Diego and then I crossed the border into China and we made a plan to go down the border and we actually found another couch surfer to go with us and he drove for the first couple of days which was really nice because when she went to pick up her tent, we realize that there were no. In the tense. So we would have been into or a terrible surprise where we went to go set up a ten at night. And when he had to go back to WANNA we hitchhiked. We hitchhiked the whole way down the peninsula. With a lot of Canadian retired couples who would learn vacation in Baja California Mexico every winter and there's like these massive RV camps and lots are all along the peninsula. So they would they would drive us to wherever they were going. We would spend the night and then we would find someone to take us the next stretch said jumping in with mom and dad grandma. GRANDPA seems a lot them what I was envisaging. Yeah, it was. It was very safe and we did have other offers and we will use their best judgment as to single women are there were offers from we got an offer from a truck with three men in the front and we decided they might be very nice. But we didn't think that that was the best option for us off. So we let that pass and when we had a Mexican couple of male female Arlene in their thirties that were driving on a short vacation until they gave us a ride. So one of the city's we ended up staying at their boots how? That night just because we got in too late to try to find any accommodations, we're going to chat about safety in Mexico lighter in the poll cost but generally, did you feel safe? I, yes. One hundred percent I'm in Mexico at least a dozen times I've traveled all over the country and I've always felt extremely extremely safe. There I mean there are areas I won't go to like around the border and there are pockets of violence. And that violence is real, but it's also it's in very specific places for the most part and so it can be avoided now you mentioned nasty surprises. Changle diarrhea. Why I'm so interested in this that feeling I appreciate we're going to have to do an episode on. Around the world because it's kind of one of those things that happens to everyone but no one talks about it I talk about it I I, send out a monthly adventure newsletter that has it talks about my personal adventures and upcoming group trips that I lead and travel tips and everything and one of them that I sent out was jungle diarrhea in Mexico at. What I? Like you can't use that as a title I was like Oh. Yes. I can like people want to know and if they don't like fishing subscribe to my newsletter because I. Keep a real and let them know. What's going on? It's A. It's a part of travel like mess. You're just GONNA. Stay in your house for the rest in your life. I've gotten sick at restaurants in New York City in. The country. So this particularly, also out jungle diarrhea happened when I was going on a road trip with friend of Mine Pedro who's a taxi driver in Mexico City and we drive his taxi all over the country roads shirts and we were going through San, Luis Potency and we stopped in a small town because we were tired and we went to low street fair and food was good. Am Hedera had me sample his his drink? it was a Tamarind. Sweetened tamarind water has like man this is good. I should get out and I. Like man, this is really good. I should get another. I had another and morning I woke up just sweating. Like. Isn't it hot in here and he's like, no, it's not. and. I. Sat up and I was dizzy and it was it was it was really bad but we had hiking to do that afternoon. So we went hiking. And we haven't hiking the next day through these These ancient ruins in the middle of the jungle and it was he was in the eighties and the Nineties Day it felt to me. It felt like just boiling like my blood was boiling. Hiking through these, these mountains are no bathrooms in sight. At night we were camping and we found this really cool campground with teepees. So we had this nice TV, but then I had to climb out of it and you know run to the bathroom which seemed like it was a kilometer away. I was grateful for it. So any. Any accidents or did you make it to the Louis every every time I did make it every time I'm surprised to the next campsite we went to I had to cross the river. I had to like hop over rocks to get to the other side of the campsite to get to the bathroom but I was so grateful that there were lights and there were there was toilet paper and eventually a couple of days. Later, I was able to do this waterfall jumping tour in on the way split to see Mexico with no accidents. Thank goodness we. been interesting for some under underwater gopro filming. The video viral and every travel logger in every business person wants him viral video like that would be the viral video that I would be subjected to. Tell us about this friend in Mexico has then he's a taxi driver and you drive the taxi around the country, I also met him on Couch Surfing. I met him like ten years ago and it's I talked about crowd surfing for years and I've gotten so many more questions recently about it recently hosted a guide from Iraq and I WANNA I wanNA, do some more writing about that. But I met him in Mexico City and he had responded to it was a dancing group dance salsa and so he wrote me in that group and said, Hey, I can't host you at my house but I'm a driver. If you need I, can pick you up from the airport and take you to wherever you're going to be saying. Oh that works out. Great. And so we ended up hanging out in went down there like two years later we met up again and we decided to take a day trip to Puebla, which is like two hours from Mexico City it was just going to be a quick day trip. Go there come back and on the way he says, Hey, what do you think about spending the night in Blah Blah and driving another six hours to the Haka in the morning? I thought that sounds like fun. Offer like something we should have planned for before. We left Mexico. City as we don't have our clothing or toothbrush or anything. But it sounds like fun. And when we got to Web la, we went to the Internet cafe and we posted on there and we actually bound some hosts that we're going to take a bus to walk in the next day, and so they let us stay with them. They had their bedroom and we all drove in his taxi to Oaxaca had a great time, and then we had a bunch of adventures since then in his taxi and now the taxi driver on my group tours to Mexico. and. He has a million stories it's on. Now CASSANDRA's LAWF- alone will be enough. Fa made a joint. She's great fun links in Shy Nights and to avoid jungle diarrhea. She suggests making sure the water is filtered, which makes sense but it's not often hardly not often that easy to do in small towns. Who knows? Exactly. I do know that. has a blog tiles of a backpack. Oh, she also has a. backpacking God to Mexico, which we will share in shy nights, and she's a big fan of the places of destination having spent months there. I I looked at I looked there. I didn't really have much expectations and Mexico City to be honest because. It. All. The stories that it's big and it's dangerous instead team polluted. but actually, that wasn't my experience all. I, was in a really nice area of the city, a place goal Roma. And and it's like leafy avenues as low as cool bars and restaurants, and I had a whale of a time I really didn't want to leave actually. A. Be for like a month and I just lights is so much I decided to stay as long as I could. Give me four reasons you decided to stay for four months. The food. But Mexican food is ridiculously would. The street food actually is amazing. You can buy sort of Trae Tacos for my Dala. And it's really really good. The people is they found the people really friendly kind and open and again. So it's not really. At expected from Mexico, given all those stories ahead. What else the culture I'm actually really amazed by how many museums Mexico City Harley is only Paris. Has More. Museums. Than Mexico City. So this so much to learn. In Mexico this. An. Apology easy and that's obsolete incredible. It's huge has exhibition halls of every pre-columbian civilization and in Mexico. And they have this. The Aztec Sandstone huge massive stone based like three and a half meters across and apparently ways over twenty tones. And it's. Amazing carvings. And didn't really know what it was useful but I think my calendar will for astrological purposes but I mean that was just incredible for me to see that and You know considering how long been Nestle and they'd actually design saying. Yeah I would play by. Three things what else full things? Just someone that was just it was fun. There's a square in. Mexico City Plastic Ira Baldi, and you can go there on this Mariachi bands clay and everywhere. Could Saturday Jew is an area called Shashi Milko, which is way you can go on. Like a really colorful boat around all these canals. and. If you got a week had a holiday is just massive party and all these boats filled with people drinking beers. And Sig. The Marriott, cheap boats the come alongside and like Saturday Jew and you can. Composite the house selling like tacos in the little corn on the call and. I I just looked. As if it it really really really enjoyed it. Like I said because my expectations were. Pretty. Much Day or I just totally blew me away pay a fakes but can you expand on what you do because it easing just Mexico? Yeah. No I just. I decided it was about three years ago. Now, I was working in in Spain. Is I could take his job anymore. So I decided to quit my job and go travelling. Around South America. For about ten months that was backpacking around South America And I I looked at it and when I came back after that, you know is only supposed to sort of once-in-a-lifetime trip. When I came back the soul of work in office that and it was just awful. So yeah. I decided to work a lot harder on the on the block. So. Yeah. Tells about cocker it's. Solo, female travel travel around by myself. Budget travel but still spending money on unique experiences because I think if you're GONNA travel. And the something incredible Econ Daniels in the world swift spending a little bit of. An. And I just want to. Inspire people to take the plunge and do. You know when I when I quit my job, there's so many people that sites male I wish I could see what you're doing. And Yeah? Obviously, if you've got family and mortgage and stuff, it's hard. But. I think in a life is still you should just take the plunge in if you can then just do which is great. But the big question I clear is you must have had some money in your pocket before you hit it off the the first trip that I went on this because of this ten month adventure to South America like I had some some it hired since a Mike on Parents and they passed away before was teach odds and saving could Sadat. Within. One out I was volunteering hostels and stuff like Klatten staying in staying hostels like it wasn't. I'm not spending money. And that ease. Gutu. He considering clues mission Phyllis to share with you the very best of a destination without biking breaking the bank. Good. Okay. Tim Neville is a travel writer. We featured him in previous PODCASTS. He's great to have chapped t he went kayaking in. Loretta obey Jacques Cousteau Cool Mexico's Sea of cortes the world's aquarium. Found out he said that I thought man that is just absolutely perfect You know it was my first trip to that part of Mexico and I am just dying to go back is just I just can't describe what a wonderful feeling it was to go down there especially when the weather appeared. In Oregon where I live is not so great to go down there and have just wonderful temperatures and so on. When we first arrived, of course, weather wasn't so great but but it's Mexico. It's always going to be a little that was going to be better than where you are and so lease generally speaking of it say so to jump. into. A place but just crystal clear water just spectacular scenery is very desert of then this cool refreshing waters contrast or just wonderful and then you pack all Wildlife Newsday Wow was all side rather be right now now you saw Marlon account imagine what that would be like to see a Marlon swimming when you not actually fishing one if that makes. Right exactly that's the first one I'd seen you know not mounted on a wall in a seafood restaurant. So be I couldn't believe it. I just paddling along and look down kind of a disturbed revealing when you when you. Your body can sense. There's something there before you really realized something's there. And I just said that just a little different down under the boat and all of a sudden realized that was moving and then I realized Oh my gosh, this is a giant fish of and then. Tau What it was even though it was, you know was probably maybe four feet below. That until it turned it would it turn the summit, hit it sides and then it just lit up like by Canadian spaceship of that just just blew electric light Gone so yeah that was definitely a highlight orbits is fully there's so many turtles in dog birds and things like that that you begin to get a little bit used to this let's say. To have something like a Marlon go by which was those still living whatever seeing a pretty special something, it won't forget. That's for sure. Doesn't leave up to John Cousteau, is theory that it's the world's aquarium. Well. You don't know read biologists, but it's just the average guy likes to go down there go kayaking. It is certainly one of the more spectacular places you could go. Tons and tons alive wildlife. There's great places snorkeling. We would stop off into these little coast. That's the fun thing right about kayaking that. Not. Only do get to sort of. Ride in your backpack let's say you're carrying your your your. All in your boat, but then you get to use it to go or the fun little looks and crannies that otherwise pretty difficult again too. So we can pull into this little coves. beach the guy accidents swap out for circle gear and go play around with the fish for a little while you described it it goes from these arid desert feel into this beautiful crystal clear water. But you also in the story that you talk about some champion little seaside towns had had is it'll connect you know. So it's it's definitely a mix to. Where you start off there. But there's several places you can start their retto It's just a wonderful little tender on just just that whole portion of Mexico I think I think in a Mexican so big and diverse that that particular area Mexico, Ogden's legit has this unbelievably chill vibe to it. It's like you know we've got great weather. We've got these great beaches and all these animals. Awesome food. It's like why worry? So everybody's Naturally. Kind of happy relaxed. diseasing, go hang out east of sidewalk cafes I walked restaurants, fish tacos or. Margaritas, whatever it is that you want and just just really really shed. So some of daily in stress guests that you have in your name and your life. But at the same time is it's culturally fascinating and historically so rich, you've got to remember that. These. have been set a long before. You know by Europeans obviously about before anything where I'd that where I live. So you have these old visions you have these talents, our own you have just this will. Very very colorful culture niches permeates everything. So to have both this this wonderful don't let's call it urban by at Man this wonderful natural vibe you those two together in Mattis Paradise you know it's it's right there on our doorstep and so wonderful. Fascinating, culturally as A. Food. The unique. No excuse to go the whole. It's right there. So I've had a lot more time down there for sure. Feel it's not fair to say we've left the best until last, but we cannot have an episode on Mexico and not explore the food absolutely and I think Mexican food sometimes has a bad reputation. I've heard described as pre masticated food but I think that's a west of waste inversion and I'm away that there is an entire different. Mexican. Cuisine. We're about to find that out who better to do that within kindle. He'll. He's an Australian journalist specialising travel food and people features, but he's also the author of bestselling responsible coast and it contributes to gourmet my pilgrim Spain and Mexico volumes some guessing kindle you know what you're talking about when it comes to Mexican cuisine I wouldn't. Be An accident Mexican presenting because you've made up of blog funds I. think to get across everything that's involved in. Aden quantities. Of. Book as you've been inside I'm. Thinking about Yeah Phil, same to summit up his premedicated. Let stetzer refried beans tex-mex stuff that you get in shape China outlets that sort of stuff I'm talking about he's not proper Mexican food is it? Not. Talking from an Australian mistake. We get right Mexican food. We think been a sort of a hot massive things and save studying mentioned. You inside it's not I mean means you can present is actually an analogous has. Given. Interest not laze Spanish win win win nine Bein is they brought. Pool can, and you know the sort of common Mesa where where it makes didn't have beforehand and then you had had widely been. WAITING TO IN LEBANON I But I'm. Sort of. Treasury. Antipasto costumes that. Informed the way makes 'cause aimed. At the Hampton Incredible And Mixing Chocolate comes in. Chile things, Matters Thompson leading ebeling, grading we mentioned without modern. But but there's will Michigan side to Disney's. For. Anyone makes. You saw. Sort of a MAC understanding of how much that those united site Mexico world not. At. All of the my favorite foods. Yom. Any country that gives you chocolate. Some debate now come from. The South and letting Americans but suddenly. The mayans. Transplants. PERCENT I. Drink I came to impress you him both of you probably more. So Kendall when I Cook Chili Con Con. I put chocolate in it You're not. Mall. Languages. Disciples of. Is Mexican cuisine not side takes a long time to prepare twenty hours off and often has more than city and grading that that often has chocolate means I know on the rock track. Putting at the chocolate in either down, you'd want the sun dried chillies well. Franchisees. Not Turn I came nor do use the fresh take on board that advice and he's been twenty four hours preparing. It came twelve hours. Twelve hours local got put the time in I would speaking of cod is I can't imagine what a Guacamole dip in Mexico would Thais Lot compared to what we we thought fills in that kitchen based on the recipes that we've given or even in some restraints. Is there a difference? Very. In other countries say knighted cuisines when we got there and ate them. He's got lot to do with questions and Guacamole. Next my French so leanness of busy. INTO MA in the laundry. On watercraft together. do I mean every kind of come from the joke I'm I'm one of the states makes. Advocaat is in the world so Quality Ingredients, that Ohio's from. That thousand I could be depression under. The. Grading. To the price. So they probably ten out. and. That and that say across. The beaches in Mexico with my. Thing very soon. Cool. Mentioned earlier about things and shave, and what have you been there. Uh. Mary. PAREN-. On and simony somebody giving positive changes I Making Mexico. That they too. Many ingredients I had. So I can. Travel around. And have one. Five that it will never ties Simon. You'll be. Just as experience for me when I. Went up there to things revelation. You can have. Bain. And and not get not get bored and still not basic cries and the loss of. Some of the ways and Then I mean Baynes but make some Bra. Equivalent abroad and somebody I just been. stop. It's yeah. Well. You're already covers all biases that you've written for us. We'll share that in China Kendall is it all washed down with little shot of Tequila? That was your ring. Yes. The among. You know who is guys by? Looking at production was early morning and you know had to sit. There and Not Shots Tequila. Stuff. Not many, my team I think probably got it for at the and probably lot of which is I'm here with sort of keillor's salsa around. Launches put some Shit and chillier Baptist go. To make the world. And something natural magic sauce. Conquest soy and then you put the be on top of that. Is especially hard time. This bag and cyber reysen is Sort of a little bit buddy marriage but not quite as could. Be But it's Ok that and I'll have to keeler shorts in a moderated. Find, you can fit on the table candle. Thanks so much for chatting. and. That's Mexico just one of the destinations world pushing through the pandemic and allowing people to travel. Yeah. Awesome. Now, Vietnam has done a pretty good job managing covid nineteen, and next week we made a woman who found herself stuck there I think she left. For these journey in February and as we know it was declared a pandemic in March. So she stuck the will stuck inverted commas with her family. Feel it's changed the hallway that she views travel moving forward, which is fantastic. Look forward to say up by. Nomads podcast royal boundaries.

Mexico Mexico City twenty Mexico Mexico City Cancun Mexico City Dodge Baja California Mexico Mexico City Plastic Ira Baldi China South America Netflix Phil Baja California Spain New York City Rodman Nari Alvarez Damascus Kim US
AP Headline News Nov 16 2018 15:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

04:00 min | 2 years ago

AP Headline News Nov 16 2018 15:00 (EST)

"Introducing the amazing iphone tennis you'll love on team. Oh, but most loved and wires. It's the perfect way to stay connected to those you heart. Most fall in love with I phoned ten s on T mobile and right now trading. Ineligible. Iphone and you'll save three hundred dollars. Visit a store or call one eight hundred team. You can't service remaining balances to while service and finance agreements required to seventy nine ninety nine down plus thirty per month times twenty four full price. Nine hundred ninety nine zero percent APR for well-qualified buyers plus tax on full price allow eight weeks for rebate. AP radio news. I'm Ed Donahue, President Trump says he hasn't submitted yet request from Russia investigation special counsel, Robert Muller to series of questions, I've answered them very easily. Very easily the president told reporters he answered the questions, not his lawyers. Those be careful when you answer questions with people that probably have been intentions, but. No. It's the questions were very routinely answered by me by me, the president did not say when he would turn over the answers to Muller back to work today at the White House four C N N's Jim Kosta the AP saga megani. Reports. Judge told the White House to give back a Costa's credential a week after the administration stripped his badge following a news conference tangle with President Trump a cost a walked onto the west wing driveway. This was a test. And you know, I think we past test judge Timothy Kelly a Trump appointee did not rule on CNN's lawsuit against the White House. But did order the administration to immediately return a Costas pass saying the White House did not give him due process? And that he suffered irreparable harm president. Trump says the administration will work on ways to make news conferences, more orderly. Listen to the rules and regulations will end up back in court and we'll win saga megani? Washington or Central American migrants have arrived in Tijuana Mexico. The AP's Elliott. Get reports they want to go to the US, but there's a push for them to stay in Mexico. State. Government officials said yesterday that there were seven thousand jobs in the state of Baja California for anyone who could obtain legal status. Seven people received the medal of freedom at the White House today. One of them posthumously Elvis Presley, President Trump has memories of Elvis seeing him in Las Vegas. The fans were ripping the place apart screaming they were going crazy in the announced Elvis has left the house. This is AP radio news. It's very early, but people in the south in northeastern digging out from a pre winter snowstorm in Albany, New York, we caught up with merit of Butler clearing off her car parking on street for thirty five years in Albany. So you know, snow is always tough. But I like the northeastern I like snow and it's good near line passengers including at Logan airport in Boston had to deal with cancelled and delayed flights an apparent error. By a prosecutor has revealed the founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange is facing charges in a case, it appears tirelessly unrelated from the insomuch WikiLeaks matter. The only thing that the Justice department is saying on the record is that this filing wasn't he'd made an error and the name Assange was not meant to be in there, the AP's Eric Tucker in Washington reports the case involves a man accused of coercing a minor. It was not clear what the charges were or when they might be made public. I'm Ed Donahue, AP radio news. Have you heard metro by t mobile now includes Amazon prime? Yes, enjoy the best of shopping and entertainment movies, TV shows music, free shipping and much more all included for just forty dollars per line for three lines all on the T mobile network. Discover the smarter way metro by t mobile that's genius one offer per account offers subject to change twelve ninety nine per month. Value offer valid for new Amazon prime members netra customers may notice reduce speeds versus some t mobile customers video at forty p capable device required. See store for details and terms and conditions.

President Trump White House AP president Robert Muller T mobile Ed Donahue Julian Assange Tijuana Mexico AP Elvis Presley Washington Amazon Albany Logan airport Costa US Baja California
Double Your Tourism Bookings | 5-Part Free Tourism Marketing Training | TBS 79

Travel Business Success | Helping Tourism Professionals Realize Their Dreams

14:06 min | 10 months ago

Double Your Tourism Bookings | 5-Part Free Tourism Marketing Training | TBS 79

"Travel Business Success Radio podcast episode number seventy nine. If you've wondered how you can get more people to make an enquiry or booking especially from your website you are in the right place we all face the same common issue and the same common question. What are the most effective tourism marketing strategies? Guaranteed to help you. Book More Tours. Rooms somewhere travel increase. Arrivals sound familiar. That's why I've decided to do a special four or five part series. What I'm calling w tourism bookings where I'm going to go take a deeper dive into the steps. The tactics the strategy the psychology and the science that has helped me in hundreds and hundreds of super successful tourism professionals around the world. Increase their quality leads. Increase your bookings increased their profits and make your business more successful. Join me today. Thanks welcome to travel business. Success PODCASTS. Teaching you how to start and grow and succeed with your travel business marketing and career brought to you by Adventure Biz Success Dot Com and your host Jim Warren. If you're looking for free tips tools and resources by industry experts to improve your bottom line. You've come to the right place. Join him now with more interviews trends best practices and seasoned advice to help US succeed. Folks is tourism. Tim Warren here with a special series dedicated to helping trumpeters attractions lodging privileges. Even destinations deal with something that we all face as towards the professionals. How the heck did we get more people especially visit our website design that we're good choice in in make an inquiry or better yet booking a buyer service visitor saner lodge visit even bizarre destination where you are in world a matter how big or how small this is a common issue. We all face for though so you don't know me my brother and I've been in the business now for thirty years As both a trumpeter and the soft adventure ecotourism spaces bomb Mexico as well as the ECO lodge owner and manager runner and were still engaged and proud to say that we are the number one specialty tripadvisor lodging in Baja California Las Animas. Equal lunch That so I think I want to share with you now like today. It really started this special series of really similar. The biggest hobby moments the biggest takeaways. That I've learned that I wanNA share with you on really what has helped us now. They become while the top largest but more importantly profitable growing coupley of because with either you can have all the traffic in the world can have the greatest product Ridge Lodge. You're not converting ingress in most very websites. Is that as Darwin the world. You'RE NOT GONNA you're not gonNA grow in. You may not be able to stay in business. You will struggle so what I WANNA share in. This special series is something. I call social media. Tourism Marketing side social proof of marketing. And it's really it's been the very basis of what has helped myself and many many many people just like you around the world increase their leads and more increase their bookings from the existing traffic at got. We're not talking about technology here. We're not talking about SEO or how to get your website working getting more traffic that's important. We're talking about psychology. We're talking about the choices. That consumers make often in seconds about who they're going to travel with what's logic in a state with even even though to travel agents or destination. He really doesn't matter. Do have a lot of competition other other people offering similar things to you may be in your area or even in that nature space. I can assure you we're we're not the only Cooley go towards lodged in the world. There's many cool places. People can travel to so people have lots of choices. So really what I thought in. Starting this special series only introduced the concept of some questions that you need to be asked to yourself about how you make purchase decisions. And how does that apply to your tourism offering or what what you do. So would so when you're considering so here's a question when asked you when you're doing research or considering a purchase of a product may be a tour. Even a destination honeymoon even a movie or restaurant. What influences you wonder choose. How do you know you're making a good choice of your time and your money when you do go online and he do a search for for? Let's say Food Tours of Florida done doing an interview on someone in a share in this series is a dozen food doors and some other doors. It's are you overwhelmed with a lot of choices and let's say that's looking for of course you are and so are your consumers and so- honey no which one to go to. How do you know what's website is is going to be a good is by default? It's got the highest ranking necessarily a many view of got craig tours crate offering great lodges. But you may not even maybe better pricing better service it into the business longer but you may not have a high ranking as your competitor. Is that make them better than you? I say no employee now. I think it's really more about what I've I've this concept that I'm going to introduce to. The series of was social proof tourism marketing. It's really about CUCKOO's who's more of a quality operator. Who's more seasoned? Who has who has the what's called the social when you're looking at a choice of a purchase. Who Do you go to a friend's family? Do you read social media reviews about fewer about articles Consumer reports and were. You know we're always looking in that for the magazine in the service on which one has the highest rating what has the greatest utility which has which has the lowest repair rate in consumer. Boards is an awesome resource to help make the decision in a very crowded market. But how different is that from people orchard near Tours or your larger travel agency. I mean. Let's let's go raymond down to a daily decision out how you know a new restaurant. You'RE GONNA go into new restaurant of the senior down or your area. How do you know what what do you look at to make a decision as a tonnage voices? What if what? If what if you're driving down the street and trying to find a place Lib Deed? Are you going to go to the one that is see lots of cars in the parking lot? Lots of people in the restaurant are GonNa go to the one that is no cars and hardly any people. I'm willing to bet you'll go to the one that has people in it Seat because if he didn't know that restaurant because why are almost people there and the other one doesn't have any these seems SORTA decisions same sort thought processes that your perspective consumers are are considering so in this series of one. I WANNA do is ready to take a little deeper dive into what is social proof towards marketing. What's in it for you? How how is this? GonNa Improve Your bookings and your bottom line. How was this going to help? Grow Your Business Profitably We're going to look at so we're going to look at what is it wasn't for you. Why is this important? And what's the science behind this? What's how to prove this to Megyn? Okay we will. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA take it out of gas work. We're GONNA look sites and we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA look at some actual numbers we're GonNa look at a Ho Ho works and we're GONNA. I'M GONNA share with you. Some of the top tactic strategies and tactics that make up this this social proof tourism marketing share examples actual clients an actual people who've been through my program that are just like you. It could be tour operators. They could be lodge owners. They can be enlisted in Los Angeles facing loss of a small and medium size businesses. And I don't care if you're in Timbuktu or to Toledo if you're in in Lombok Tar by Golly or La Paz Bolivia issues that you face as a small business in the tourism travel hospitality sector attract attractions to we all face the same issues. How do we get more people to choose US? And not a competitor to give us learning and how we make it easier to make it flow. I mean again as all business. You have to wear a lot of hats. Hell yes we have to wear a ton outs and so I'm really interesting about give you actual proven principles as you can apply to tourism marketing easily and that will have quantifiable and profitable results for you over. Time Natalie. Short run but that are scalable into the future so this is tourism. Tim Warranty would travel business. Success Radio PODCAST and tourism marketing team. signing off on a special series and look forward to more short episodes of where we get a little deeper dive into this in in Louisiana. Give you a more information that you can start having your own home moments and apply this to your marketing and have more success to thanks for listening. Thanks for sharing this. And if you have questions you have comments where you're seeing this video on youtube or on travel business successor. Maybe seeing it Social Media Group on facebook. Please ask questions please Sharon. I'm pleased cognate questions and sheriff because we're all in this together and I promise you I will address your questions and help. I hope to be your guide on this journey together or one of your guts. All right take care thanks much of. Hey thanks for listening today. More than any other skill that you can learn to start and grow a successful travel tourism hospitality retraction business is the art of attracting qualified prospects generating enthusiasm and interest in in your product or service and converting that into a book and you could have the best product the world the best service the most outrageous location. But if you can't convince people fast that you're equality experienced in safe operation people will not book with you and they'll usually go somewhere else. That's why I've decided to start a live training Which will be converted into an online course that you can reach that you can access at travel business? Success Dot com forward slash. Double Dash Your I. Oh you are dash or ISM bookings. And we're going to be focusing on the proven art of generating enthusiasm and mass amounts of trust in your brandon who you are very quickly in your primary marketing tool your website. So that you generate more quality leads and you and you convert those quality leads into bookings of all the things that you can do and I understand. There's tons of different hats to wear. It's very confusing. Sometimes not to know what to do but of all the skills and all the things you can put energy into that have the biggest impact the most generate the most revenue. For Your Business. It is learning how to market your business brand through your website effectively inefficiently and in this course and ended with Downloadable guides checklist best case best case studies examples. Coaching and on and on and on you will learn what has proven to help me in countless other people just like you around the world radically increase their business scale generate more money so that you can step into the higher levels of your business and really prosper in your tourism dream again. That's travel business. Success DOT com. Double your tourism bookings go there check out the course see you soon take care. Thanks for joining your host Tim. Warren on another travel business. Success podcast since nineteen ninety four. Him and his team have helped hundreds of startups to season pros but valuable seminars articles books and no nonsense advice for additional tips tools and news plus a free marketing mini course visit. Adventure Biz. Success DOT com.

Tim Warren US Mexico Ridge Lodge Consumer reports Ho Ho Los Angeles Jim Warren Cooley Baja California Las Animas Tim youtube craig Florida raymond
Aftershocks Rattle Southern California Following 2 Quakes

Environment: NPR

03:53 min | 1 year ago

Aftershocks Rattle Southern California Following 2 Quakes

"Aftershocks continue in southern california after a massive earthquake last night the seven point one magnitude earthquake was the largest hit the area in decades people reported feeling it as far away as phoenix and baja california epicenter it was near the town rich press california about a two hour drive north of los angeles npr's nathan rot is there and he is with us now nathan hello thanks for being here yeah having a beer so seven point one is a massive earthquake what's it like in the town you know a town the got jolted by something of that magnitude 'em it's actually kind of amazingly in pretty good shape 'em i've seen very little damage driving around you know stop lights at are working stores it had their merchandise thrown about a you know some structures were damaged destroyed there were fires caused by ruptured gas pipes and some trailer trailer parks at were knocked skew us roads were closed some fractures rockslides and authorities do say the some buildings collapsed in a nearby town of about two thousand people trona now a but authorities say that so far knock on wood there had been no major injuries or reporters they tally set that's excellent news but i'd imagine that it's still in pretty scary for residents there how where people doing you know it's a bit of a mixed bag a a lot of the people i've talked to understand look this is southern california the land of many many seismic faults earthquakes just kinda come with the territory but other folks they're very shook i talked to one woman who said she lives through a lot of earthquakes but his never had anything like what you experience last night and remember the quick last night was the second major earthquake to hit here in just a couple of days on july fourth a six point four magnitude quake which is nothing to laugh at corrupted at the exact same spot so seismologist now see the that was easy for shock to last night's bigger event so you add those two things together in a lot of people are very much on edge i talked to some folks who slept outside last night in their yards at the backs of trucks they're planning to do that again tonight because they know this is not over on here's dionne bowman and i talked to who is loading up on water and supplies at a local grocery store we knows feel more calm i mean nothing has settled the ground still shaken as we speak so i mean right now were just taking it a day at a time in basically medicine seconds at a time i mean that's all we can do you know what he wasn't kidding right after i got done talking to him as walking back to my car and there was an aftershock that i kind of felt in and waived around a little how long do seismologist expect there to be these kinds of aftershocks days weeks months you know i think doctor lucy jones who's southern california's where the preeminent earthquake expert a sudden we could expect to see aftershocks from this birth quake for the next year a now the odds of another big seven point zero earthquake are relatively small at about three percent according to seismologist caltech odds of six point over higher at about twenty five percent but remember again this is an earthquake prone area seismologist at a press conference earlier said that this high desert area were in the mojave used to be known as be earthquake capital of the world we just haven't seen one in a while so where do people go from here what did they do knowing that this isn't over you know so local and state authorities are gonna continue to check for structural damage and houses roadways 'em they're definitely gonna keep checking major infrastructure bridges dams in area none of those have been reported

california twenty five percent three percent two hour
S5 E4: Black Voices in Healthcare: Hair

The Nocturnists

33:07 min | 4 months ago

S5 E4: Black Voices in Healthcare: Hair

"You're listening to the NOCTURNE EST black voices in healthcare I'm Ashley mcmullen. Story. My black hair is the story of my life, our spending, my mom's feet as she braided and plaited and pull twisted my curls after a long day at work. Our spinach salons in that intimate space for black women are free to let their hair down and take respite from a world cannot handle their magic. I started straightening my ear in grade school using chemicals to break it down to willow into submission into something acceptable something more professional, something less black. I stopped I traded the chemicals and flat irons for box braids twist outs in Washington goes. I, love my hair. I love the culture that's represented in every curl a culture that will not be broken. That will not be subdued and will not be erased. This week we heard about your hair story. So much love and care alongside so much vulnerability and pain. Here it is episode four. Here I didn't think much my here when I was a kid growing up. I mean I have. Very vivid memory of it, I remember. The stinging that burn field as the hot iron sissel the top of my ears and. The sounded made. sloughed through the grease on my scalp. The same sound that was made by my mom that seem morning cooking bacon. I remember I remember the colors I. Remember how orange my hair would turn in the southern California Summers. From the Chemicals in the swimming pool on my friends yellow. trusses turned green. But I really was finally a weekend. That I possess this gift on my head. In College. My boyfriend tonight decided to take a trip down into. Mexico. into. Baja California. So My? Mom. Put my hair into the tightest corn roles that she could buy skin stretching tearing feeling like it's tearing from the scenes so it would stay. And we packed into our four wheel truck and just headed south. It was mostly just sleepy fishing villages. And it was one of these little villages. That I discovered Mike Gifts. So. Sitting just in my chair watching the ocean. And I heard laughter. And I turned and saw a group of children. Just looking at me and giggling. I mean, it hadn't occurred to me really until that point that. They probably have never seen an American. Thank me. In that part of of Mexico. One, brave little boy decided to come up close to me. and. He put his Brown little arm next to my brown arm. Look me dead in the eye with just such wonder. And the puzzle came and he pointed to my head and said. Ill. The hair. At which point the rest of the little village kids can run. and. It's not like it is in the states where someone looks at your hair go oh, my God, how do you do that? It was more like they had such. Off. I was a goddess to them. and. They wanted to touch it. I mean how many times did we hear that can teach your hair and it's seems so insulting but I felt like I was able to give them this gift. I was going to allow them to who goddess yes you may touch the. I mean, there's nothing like if the joy of children. I still see it today in practice pediatrician. Whether they walk in and they're looking at my locks. And they like Dr. Wash your hair like that steering my head pointing. But I could tell there was a true curiosity. They wanted to know. Why I was bestowed such a gift why I was able to be the goddess. and. How was I able to get these locks? So every day I walk into my office. And sat have to put these trust away because a covert I'm afraid of some four year old sneezing into them. But the second the office I'm letting my locks go because I recognized that. This is me. I love my hair. Oh. So much love. So much love is locked up in my curls. But Lord knows my hair has been a blessing and a curse all my life. Now I've always had a really interesting relationship with my hair. When I was younger, I hated it because it took away from my play time. My aunt he's told me stories of how I used to friend screaming. As. A child away from anyone with a comb because I just didn't want to deal with it. My hair is this piece of my identity. That is so huge. Because I had hair. Man I. I could be accepted in certain circles excluded in others. It was just. The world seemed to define me and literally find me by my hair. News. Is One time at like barely scratched this car next to mine was sixteen trend rush off to in order concert in. A look in didn't have a piece of paper to leave my number on this Chrysler are Adra. site and was GONNA go about my business in my life and got a call the next Smith. Is owner of the car that I barely scratched had found me because I was a tall light skinned woman with a massive amount of hair on my head. There were only so many of those in my neighborhood. I guess and. There I was sitting in the police found me so. I did get out of that one. Okay. And that's why on all my medical school interviews our at out. Wild free and beautiful in biggest could be. because. I knew. That while I wanted people to focus on what I had to say. I knew that they would remember. The girl with the hair. I do love my hair. And my I here has loved me right back. Explore with it in test different things out the more it. Seems to teach me. Growing up as a black boy I didn't feel like my hair was important. I grew up thinking that. Black men always wore their hair short. Close, cut in a fade you know. something. Like that. It wasn't until two my twenty S I realized I know there are more options for black men than corn rows and get an fade. Group having this kind of jealousy not that I didn't like my hair but I grew up in time where on Disney channel on Nickelodeon all Esau were why guys and they kit where the hair slightly longer get combet over could spike it and I just felt like all the black kids could just swear. A fro-. Corn rows or keep it short and the majority of them just wore close cut. Close could haircuts. So that was my my thought was just that that's what black men did. Now. That I've been liberated as an adult. It's interesting to see how black men. Have evolved to take care of the here. We see the wave you know people want waves. Now are people are wearing their hair and dreads more and braid it styles more and. Curled and spiraled like patterns a lot more and so I think Blattman have been liberated to express themselves with the hair more than they have in the past. I comb apart in my hair and it's like, I. Don't know if it's turn anyone else but I came up with the term micro and that's kind of where I'm at now. My work as a nurse has informed me that. I can use science to have a healthier scalp into have healthier hair and. I take pride in that. I. Want Black men in little black boys to know that like you're here is a part of who you are take care of it and you can use it to express yourself. There's something beautiful in that. I have this really. Distinct memory growing up of. Setting down. The, Disney Princess Coloring, book and. aerial and I remember my dad saying to me. How come you never color any of the Disney princesses. Black. and to me at the time, it seemed like. Such a simple answer. because. None of them are black. None of them look like me and I'm not going to be wrong be wrong. And I just remember you know growing up I went to a predominantly white school at school. Your life that's where you do everything. That's right. Friends are three spend all your time, and we also lived in a predominantly white neighborhood. One of their three black families total in the steak white affluent. Suburban neighborhood. Feel like for most of my childhood I was. Just trying to fit in. Our most kids I guess that to me specifically I think the Learning how to? Not. Draw any attention whatsoever to the fact that. I was black. The first time I got my hair pressed I just felt so beautiful just to see it shining and smooth and flat. Like all my white friends. That was beauty to me until I was pressing my hair in Manchester Permian my hair. That was the whole thing's. Going to the hairdresser to get your your hair permed than if you've been scratching, you knew that you have was going to be on fire. Hated it when it would start to grow out in, you know wouldn't be flat against my head anymore sudden. Puffy in bigger. Remember this girl in middle school passing by with a group of her. Friends white friends saying something in front of my hair like about how big frizzy it was just feeling totally mortified. Sustain that felt. Like it could potentially betray me. I ended up ornamental school and. Starting to feel a little bit more comfortable in. Being who I was and decided to just let my hair grow out until I let my hair grow out and. started growing dreads. And At first, that felt like a really avangard thing to do. My hair just got wound up in this whole thing of my identity. Also in residency I ended up falling in love. With a woman. Coming. Out To. My family. As Gay. and. I matched into fellowship after residency in a city that felt like I could just. Explore the rest of my identity in. So the week of orientation and fellowship shaved my hair down real short. Basically buys the hawk. So that I could be tree. Headed turns out it wasn't all that liberating terrifying because I hadn't done any of the rest of work. I don't know. I just been reflecting a lot lately on. Everything is going on in the world and what does it mean? What does my skin me? What is my identity me? What is my family treat me to me in all the people that have come before me to get to where I am now and that reflection and doing that sort of work and that sort of thing in. GRONK that is. Finally, started to grow. And so I'm just. Leaning into figuring who I am now and now. My hair is growing again. Just took dislike me I guess. Hot Combs is sort of grounds were hallmark of my childhood. Two things on the back of my ears, I heard the hot comb sear my desire to look like her help me conquer all my. By SIS, on the TV screen here, permanent perfection her skin match my complex in but that as I hadn't yet learned the lesson. The lesson that no matter how much I straighten my hair I wouldn't be welcomed not here nor there professionalism to become the poison of my air. Suffocating that you couldn't believe please just let my blackness breeze my survival your comfort seems like I'm always in between. Because in this country MELA nation God's beautiful creation is seen as something in need of ablation but still they claim with racism, they have no relation. Therefore, my hair has become not so subtle active resistance reclamation of the crown rightfully ours since our existence. So I feel opulent in boardrooms with sense of cocoa and Afro, probably on display have. Today either way my blackness has come to play. Black has always been the standard of beauty. Despite was shown on the movies. I am proud of the resilient roots from which my hair grows which part of my history. So says go ahead with your three C. Four C.. Bald and beautiful short and boat corn rows without bands who knows ponytail kitchen now front lays poop poop Afra- Washington you already know whatever it is just no. So beautiful. Black hair is a mosaic of beauty. To protect it as our duty. For too long we play by the rules never created for us. And that was time to say enough is enough. So. Go Rock. Your Crown Queen. and. So professionalism to get with it. So I was in residency in Boston. If you needed a bikini wax, you just went to the local place. You've got your nails. And woman would take you into the basement and without batting an. I. Without Making comments would help you get your bikini wax done. So that was what I was used to and when I moved back home to Minnesota I thought businesses as it usually is so I decided to go get a bikini wax. Pick, a large business thinking that should be fine and I walked in to deal with you know Bikini Waxing. There were these young twenty year old white girls who were working at the store, and that should have been my first warning but I thought. You can't be racist maybe these people are professionals just go in there and do what you need to do. So I went in and so all my ladies out there you know what? I mean when I say getting a bikini wax is a little bit. Vulnerable Right. So I am all proud and I could tell that they were visibly frustrated with having to deal with black hair. Now. We all know black hair and I love my hair it's curly. It's wild. If I, WANNA, make it straight it has to be tamed with a lot of fire. So I love my hair and I have no problems with it but to see them visibly frustrated with having to do a bikini wax. Made me feel an acute sense of shame. I just really wanted the experience the end, just get it over with so I can go back home. And at this point I'm in my thirties and I wish I could tell you I said something I just laughed I was like I'm not giving you my business but I didn't I was thirty years old and I sat there and I took in their discomforts felt my shame Peed my money and I bet you I even tipped them but I gave them my money and I left and my only recourse is I'm never coming back here again. How many times do we do this? How many times are we put in positions of being shamed and we take that story with us and we leave and we never speak of it again. Fitches for me is that, I'm bald and been that way since about two thousand, seven ish as I was transitioning into the clinical years of medical, school. A sort of think of it as having had to sacrifice my foyer of here to become a doctor since no one on either side of my family to my knowledge has been hit with this kind of male pattern baldness. When it comes to the word considerations. Is mostly been a matter of maintaining my head cleanly shaved limited razor bumps and cuts stuff like that. Is You know I like to stay fresh? I think the hairstyle definitely has an impact on how perceived. But exactly how hard to say I feel like some people maybe intimidated, but then younger people Kinda love it. I've had a few encounters when patients either asks or they just put their hand on my head and those are younger patients and honestly if felt like a little bond experience, I remember one kid in particular. Enthusiastically saying Yo my son got the dome after put his hand on my head. That was too funny into cute. I've had my hair mostly bald I mean basically all this time. In practice, and so people are able to appreciate the actual size of my head, which is like. A little bit bigger than average. All say. Anyway. Practice. One of the things that I'm really good at is paying attention to details and remember small things at patients share with me. So, one time in an interaction with a kid and I mentioned one of those details he acts. Oh. How do you remember that? I give him this. Are you serious expression and I, say I got a big as headman I. Remember everything. And, we shared a good laugh together. I still remember the day I met her. On rounds a taken over a service on the inpatient HIV service. And she had been in the hospital about thirty days and I was getting to meet her on a Monday taking over service. Young girl. Advanced. HIV AIDS. Battling a couple of. Opportunistic infections. And she was starting to finally get better was being wind of oxygen. And was starting to regain appetite with started on antiretroviral medicines in the hospital. Are Member meeting her and probably twenty, four, twenty, five. Slightly older than my kids. And all I could remember was how? Little she looked. At, how much cash had? A Hale was. Big It was huge but it was matted. And she'd been in the hospital she'd been in the ICU on through all of that. The transfer was back and forth. No one looks at her hair. I've spent many years in the hospital. I'm used to bring in ties and get now the little rubber bands on my wrist to give to a patient 'cause I know. Black Women. Are Hair is important I. Hair is part of what defines us and when people in the hospital. A LOT OF TIMES That just falls by the wayside. The little balls at the bedside with a one shaving steak and low tiny comb doesn't cut it never has never will. and. There's nothing like having your hair done to make you feel like getting better. But this one girl will young lady. was just finally getting better. and. I told myself. I would break her hair. I'd never done that for a patient but there was something about her she had this fight in her eyes and she was going to get better. And I know that just feeling better about how she looks would help. So I asked you how she likes her hair. She said, oh she always gotta hair done to a sprayed different things but in the hospital and just looked like a big old mess. So Saturday morning. God Donna rounds. Pretty early didn't have a lot of admits to appre call and I just went into her room and I said Hey do you to braid your hair. She was surprised Sadako. You're going to I said Shaw. Said I've been Brady, my sister's hair for a longtime at three youngest sisters. I have two daughters I said I'll braid your hair. Sat by the bedside I like to tell myself that my hands are. Soft no matter how Tendai Skopje's because both my daughters USA fall asleep with me braiding the head. She had how phone on on some youtube video. WIFI was bad. So he kept cutting in and out and braided hair I put her head into eight Collin rose to the back. She looked fabulous. She loved it. She cried she said, do whatever braided my hair is nice. I said I'm sure they have but I think I'm pretty good. But I think just after thirty two days or more in the hospital. She just was ready to start looking like she did before she got really sick. But soon after that, she was discharged. Something as simple as just brady her hair made her feel better. When I was a senior resident i. was working in the pediatric intensive care? Unit. And was taking care of this sweet little boy. Who I'll call J. J. was about eleven months old and. He had been born prematurely had spent much of his young life in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit I. But this time he had gotten pneumonia and they didn't really take much for him to have respiratory failure and end up on a ventilator. And so for much of the month that I was there in the pick you I was taking care of him. His mother. She had two other small kids at home. She was very close in age to me, and she used to come into the pick you in the evenings in her work uniform looking exhausted. And it wasn't always easy our interactions and I'm thankful for one of the senior nurses who always reminded me that. You know there's nothing normal about coming to see you baby every day. After work. Anyway I build a strong report which as mom because other thing in addition to our age that we hang common. Is that we would only black people in that. Pick you me her and her sign. I grew to really care about his mom and I grew to care about him a lot. And what I remember about him is that he had this beautiful chocolate brown skin. And he had the biggest fluffy Est.. Afro. that you could ever imagine. I mean like if you were to reach out and touch a cumulus cloud, that's what it would feel like his hair. One day Jay was doing a lot better attending and the rest of the team decided that we would try to extirpate him. And We did and he did great and I cannot wait to call his momma called her up and I was like y'all guess what Jay is off the ventilator and she was super happy and. You know we all look forward to seeing her that evening He'll such a great day of so happy and went through my day doing the things I had to do and also recalled that I had to leave and go to clinic that afternoon. But all afternoon, I just could not wait to get back to the pick you to call so that I could be there when Jay's mom got there to see her baby off that ventilator finally. And so I. Russia, back into the pick you and I get there and I ask the nurses and staff does she come yet? Did she come yet and they had no she's not here yet way to you you baby. Oh my goodness he looks like a little man. Oh my goodness. Wait till. You see him and all the nurses where like Ami up here. Rush over and stand outside of the glass and look through the sliding glass door into his room and. It was like the wing got knocked out of my chest Helix so cute. Somebody. Put Him in this little outfit It was a little. Sweat suit say Mommy's Little Angel and. He even had on some of those little soft soul fake sneakers. and. He looked like a little boy I mean he didn't have any tape on his face. He he looks Oh. Peaceful. And then I noticed it. Psychot- my God Oh my God I was like shaking their like what I said. Please God. Tell me the you did not. Cut his hair. And a swung my head over and looked at his nurse and all the color just drained out of her face and she was like, no, I just want I just wanted him to look really nice with mom got here. I just trimmed it. So, here's the thing. It's already not a good idea to cut somebody's child here. Okay. Let's just say that for the record regardless of your race. But you do not. Could a black baby boy's here before he turns one. Do not cut his hair and fact the old tale is that If you cut his hair, he'll never speak but the point is regardless of the reason, everybody seems to follow that rule. And had cut his hair. So, in this mother got there, she walked in look through the glass eyes widened feel with tears when she saw her baby dressed in an little outfit she was moved just like I was in e she noticed it. She ran an errand looked at her baby and we she tore up out of that room. I have never seen anybody in a hospital as mad. As his mama was in that moment. She said he'll cut my baby's hair and I just kind of stood there staring at my feet like a little kid thinking, I didn't do it. The nurse was crying. She said I just wanted him to look handsome when you got here. His mom was like he was. I can't believe you did this and then in the middle of it, all of a sudden she rounded on me. Pointed at me and said. Was You. Know why are you let this? Why Lady Come I BABYSAT? And she was mad at me than anybody else. And in moment I realized. Oh, my God. ME BEING THERE A laid a lot of concerns. and. I had just under estimated what it meant to her to have me this black pediatrician there helping care for her baby. It was terrible. But What ended up happening. Was that the SMO-? Senior nurse in that pick, you should stepped into the middle of all of this and. Santa. Mom, I am so so sorry. And then she had this little box in her hand. and. She presented it to the mom and when she opened the box. It was little curls of his hair. And mother just cried and cried, and she fell into that nurses on this older senior white woman nurse. And just wept. Couple of days later I went and saw him on. He had gotten out of the ICU one much better. and. His hair was in Cormoros. and. I looked at his mom and I said well I like his hair. Did. You. And she said, no one of the nurses did it. And it Kinda raised an eyebrow and said was that okay. She said. She could it. And we both start laughing. This has been an actress black voices in healthcare. I want to thank our core team executive producer Kimberly Manning. The doctrine is founder Emily Silverman podcast producer Apollo sound engineer. John Oliver and medical students, Rafael oppose, ner, and more and Wootton. Thanks also to Executive Producer Ellie Block and program manager, Rebecca Groves, and Communications Intern Becker are. Are Ashley Floreal and our theme song is by Janie E. Lot poison healthcare is made possible by the California Medical Association California Healthcare Foundation and people like you. Who donated through our website and Patriot page Thank you for supporting our work in storytelling. If you'd like to add your voice to our project, visit our website at the NOCTURNES DOT COM, we'll be back next week until then remember. Black lives matter. Like health matters and black stories matter.

Black Women Washington Jay Mexico executive producer Ashley mcmullen Brady California Summers Baja California Mike Gifts Mexico. Boston Brown Disney Esau John Oliver youtube Blattman Chrysler Manchester Permian
Trapped Underwater and Running Out of Air

Outside Podcast

45:19 min | 4 months ago

Trapped Underwater and Running Out of Air

"This episode of the Outside podcast is brought to you by hydro flask makers of the new trail series bottle, which lets you go farther with less weight. My name is John Cupet I'm director of design at Hydro Flask. John led one of the teens designing the trail series step. One in their process was talking to customers to see what they wanted in a new bottle made specifically for hiking and backcountry adventures. The first thing that we do with every project is we we try to better understand our users. Hydro Flask is known for their stainless steel bottles to keep liquids cold for up to twenty four hours or hot for twelve hours. They're also extremely durable. Customers told John and his team that they love those features. But also that there was one thing they'd like to see improved if possible. During the conversations with him, what we learned was that they would like a lighter product. Then there was the improvement, the people didn't realize they need. We were watching people. US are inland bottles out on the trail. You know their hands are slippery from sweat there. Sometimes, they're holding the bottles along the body rather than the Kerry strap just to have a different hand position. And that's something we noticed. His team took all that back into the lap came up with the trail series bottle lightest weight vacuum insulated bottle on the market full twenty-five percent lighter than hydro flask previous wide mouth bottles. Made from a thinner metal, but it's just as strong. The bottle is also narrower. So it's easier to hold in your hand. It fits better in your pack on the cap is a rubber handle with a flexible strap. We perforated the straps. gave us a couple of. Benefits one was lighter way and it just an added level of performance there. We designed it basically. So our fans could do more and go longer with less away. The Hydro Flask trails you is bottle is available in twenty four and thirty two ounce sizes in a variety of colors it weighs less so you can do more. Learn, additional details and purchase yours at HYDRO FLASK DOT com slash trail series. From outside magazine NPR rex this is the outside podcast. So it's August which for me means one day day. It's time to swim. Because it's hot because it's still summer because it's really fun. I find that the longer August goes on the deeper I want to dive under the water. You Get fifteen or twenty feet below the surface and it's dark and cool down. I. Love It. Just, the other day I dove into a mountain lake where under the water, the renumber of these really large submerged trees. There was this one particular giant tree that was hollowed out treating kind of underwater tunnel. Thought coup, I'm going to swim through there. But then. I got down and I poked my head inside I thought wait. I get. Stuck. In Near. Run out of air. I could die. This is a rather common consideration for anyone who likes to swim deep under the water and it's something that scuba divers in particular talk about all the time. They all kinds of precautions to avoid this kind of scenario. But. Sometimes they get stuck anyway. And they die. And then there are those stories of divers find themselves trapped somewhere between life and death in truly bizarre circumstances. Four years ago shortly, after we launch this podcast are former host Peter Freak right along with outside producer Robbie carver created an episode for Our signs of survival series that investigated one of the most incredible and perplexing scuba diving legends of all. Time. Today. In the spirit of diving, deep underwater and coming back alive. We're going to replay that story which I'm betting that. Most of you have never heard because we were a small show back then. Here's Peter. Let's start out with Richie Kohler. Wreck diver, from Massachusetts. So when you are underwater and in the shipwreck, are you what are you feeling? I'll give you a perfect example. Each shipwreck has its own characteristic, a shipwreck like titanic I made two submersible dies on Titanic. Two and a half miles down this absolutely no light. It's pitch black. Has I am going around imaging the wreck of what is arguably the greatest shipwreck in history. I am aware that this is a mass grave. Around me. On the seafloor are side by side men and women shoes. And, that's all. That's left of the fifteen hundred people. Wreck diving gives you a view. You don't get anywhere else. Koehler says the dictum. To look at a shipwreck is delicate disaster. It's destruction tragedy and be death. On permanent display. The ship is a shadow. of its former self, you can almost see ghosts inside where there are still hallways and doors. Everything's recognizable as you swim along, you could pick up piece of crockery. and You wonder to yourself with somebody eating off of this when. This accident happened. In the titanic, these remnants are littered like tombstones. But not shipwreck is a graveyard. If we look at other ships that are in shallow water where the sunlight reaches them and they're surrounded in life and. They become an ecosystem to themselves covered with quarreled millions of fish taking up homemaking. Now, their habitat, this is a remarkably different environment. Even if there had been terrible loss of life, it's masked. The Ocean is covered it up. In fact, over the course of forty years exploring shipwrecks, Ritchie notice that their place where an old cliche becomes exaggerated. Where there's sunlight, there's life. Where it's dark other is-is that moment of death. Even, when I dive and I explore shipwreck, I can go from one phase of that to the other I come down the anchor line in this cobalt blue water below me is this this swarm of fish that are. Just surrounding this this. Huge shipwreck and I you know during the descent I could see a shark. I can see all of these wonderful sea creatures but then I get to where I need to go. And I go out of the blue and into the black go inside the shipwreck where now. Everything's dead everything still nothing grows time is stopped. Today sizes arrival we've story takes place in the dark. It's a mystery. One we're trying to raise from the deep to the shallows. So to speak. Titanic is stagnant still and dead shower rex are alive. We don't own them anymore. They now belong to the ocean. And while this is a story that's never been told before I have to pause a second does a some not stem some background noise so you'll have to wait and under to tell it we're GonNa take you beneath the surface of our show it's going to be a minute to. Hold on a second, always these guys that I had. WAS THAT HE DATES Awesome all. Right Out Thank you Sir Mack okay. So on titanic there is this sense the story doesn't actually start with Richie. Kohler. It starts with my co producer Ravi cover making phone calls. Your name and pretending people sometimes call him Robert. Hi. This message is for Michael Proud foot. My name is Robert. Carver is what I mean. But they don't. He's Robbie Haines podcast series We are looking for a specific Michael Proud foot who was scuba diving in Baja in nineteen one. And had a pretty incredible. Hello. Excuse. Me I'm sorry I'm I'm not that one. That one. Okay. Let's start with what we know. We heard this story about a guy named Michael Proud foot who had been exploring shipwreck of the coast of Baja Mexico in nine, hundred, ninety, one, his regulator. Piece. It's unclear exactly what happened but one imagines him frantically searching for an exit his body demanding air, is vision going gray But instead of an exit, proud foot found an air pocket inside the ship's Galley Kitchen. You could breathe. Some time. In. Battle. A lot of time because any waited. And waited. For a full day. He waited so long got thirsty. So he looked around and found undisturbed tea kettle full of freshwater that he could drink. And, waited another full day. Proud of it was under water for forty eight hours. So we got hungry. And at some point, the story goes he also found an eight surgeons. And when we read this, we thought this is one of the most incredible survival stories we've ever heard. The problem is. We can't find him. Number has been disconnected. From Michael Proud foot began with an article that told a very similar story about a man named Harrison oaken. Keen Oh Kean I liked that. Harrison oak is a cook who worked on a fishing boat that sank off the coast of Nigeria. The whole ship went down in Okinawa was trapped. But like proud foot he found an air pocket. And he waited. For more than two days. There's a video of his rescue. On the seething. It's from the helmet, Cam a rescue diver wearing. This guy was on a body recovery mission. He had already found the rest of the ship's crew. suspicious. When he grabbed oaken his hand. Grip back. We reached that okay. But never heard back. Eventually I talked to some other radio producers who had gotten in touch with them, but he only does interviews for money, which is a big. No, no in American journalism. Is was pretty much everywhere for a while. A couple of those journalists had stumbled across a story of Michael. Proud. Foot. But known it actually tracked him down. All. These news outlets sort of repeated the same details diving in a shipwreck smashed regulator tea kettle sea urchins two days. So, we tried to go deeper than there's this hyperlink. On proud and this is like the the the. The opening of the rabbit hole is right here is hyperlinked. Searching. For Proud online was like walking into a hall of mirrors historic pops up all over the place. Consistent story with no apparent source. Sometimes, the details would change little bit but not much. We called an email, every Michael Proud foot, we could find. At one point I even got in touch with the former Olympic pentathlete and swimming coach in England thinking that if anyone was comfortable enough in the water to survive two days, it would be him. But it wasn't. We reached out to scuba shops, scoured newspaper archives port over forms and kept falling rabbit holes but no rabbit. Until we started to notice a pattern. Every. So often instead of pointing to one of the date, Lewis blog posts, one of the hyper links pointed back to a scuba diving forum. It was an old line it seemed to predate most of the blogs. And deepen the threads of that forum there's a link back to a children's book. It's one of those elementary school textbooks with cartoony graphics and it's called disasters across curricular theme. And here's where I got excited because it had an Australian publisher. So. Maybe proud of it was Australian and he had an accident on vacation did make the news in Mexico but was so incredible that they covered it in the local paper back home. Then maybe that story it made its way to the Children's book author. Either way it looked like an Australian rider had talked to him, and at the very least we could talk to that writer. Rather because the time difference in Australia, makes it really hard to get people on the phone during business hours. We somebody else to do it for us. Oh Hi Debbie. This is Kerry. How are you? Hi, I'm Oh. Thank you. Reached out to carry sheer a freelancer in Australia and her to dig around a bit. She contacted Rico Publishing and talk to Debbie. Hendrix the research coordinator is there any way to actually get in touch with the author because? Even if he could remember like, oh yet I read it in a newspaper or something like that. You know that might just help us how we how we rock take that. We have a number of Rogers and they. Produce I broken could be several different ride on the same product. Excited would have been a story? No is the short answer. They didn't know her. Telling her actually roach that particular pace in fact, they don't even know when it was. Sorry. Tell me I could trying to find the date of that the release of that book and I. I can't find it like when I'm looking at the book it doesn't actually show that. Hey. Till the I know and that is very unusual. We all looked at that and want your publication, which is what we always put an ad book. So for some reason, I, don't know why he doesn't have the year publication and as I said. That's right. We can trace all the internet references of Michael Proud foot to a single entry in an Australian Children's book that according to the people who published it hasn't known author or date of publication. So D-. Do you get the sense that they are as mystified as you are? Yeah I do they are really confused as well and we press them for a while and then moved on. Eventually carry found Damian up like a professional salvage diver dry see repairman in Australia in whom clients place a lot of trust. So yes. I got your number from diapers go to you to repair their dry suit. Divers that look in two pits. Working pooping they didn't tell me that. The guy that professional divers trust to keep it dry suit between them their professional I do a lot of working through its clients in in Sewerage system. Wow. So I guess that's really harsh on their dry suit then. Also everything Damian this sort of known for collecting dive stores. And he knows firsthand just how scary and dangerous shipwrecks can be. Got Lost in a wreck. A wreck told the prints of wild. And Out of death and had to feel out. And we're in derived usability trapped in a world. Full of. Five hundred skeletons. And got. Out. Actually not gas list just by lock. That says scary. Guy had a ringing bell. Any Fan, the hatch out and we're in derive USABILITY. So just feeling you buy around tracking a world war? Two wreck. Flashed before my eyes for about half now. So if the story had worked its way back around to anyone would have been him. Did you see anything about have you heard about Michael Have you ever heard of this case? I tend to our. Most of the stories in and around and of not we heard about one. But he does have a theory about where this came from most dive is full of Shit though he may be biased. Given his profession I love talking about themselves stories Remember the moment that it went from being like we're actually going to find the sky too I wonder if this is even possible. Yet. Totally. For me it was when I started cold calling. Proud feet. Despite the fact of this story had to be true because we'd read it on the Internet. After Daming, pointed out the diver full of Shit. We wondered if it was time for us to call bullshit on this whole story. and honestly once we stood back from this one a little bit. It did kind of sound like the plot of a rejected baywatch script. So we decided to change tactics. We went from searching for Michael Proud foot. To See if we could disprove his entire story. Based on the scraps of Real Info. We can find it seemed like there were four factors to investigate things that either should have killed him or that helped them survive. The Air Pocketing Mitch Defying. The hypothermia should've gotten underwater. The Sea Urchins he supposedly eight. The freshwater is supposedly found in a tea kettle. Disprove any one of those factors in the whole story would collapse. We toss it back. which brings us back to Richie Kohler who we heard from at the beginning of the show. Thank you. And it turns out that this was right up his alley because in addition to years of wreck diving and exploring both the titanic and its sister ship that Britannic color was host of the history. Channel showed deep sea detectives. He had years of experience is a professional diving sleep. And, one of the first things he pointed out was that in a shipwreck air pockets don't last very long. Even, the simple Process of a shipwreck rusting. Consumes the oxygen within an environment making it anaerobic or non oxygen so although you're looking around and you call it an air pocket, it's really a nitrogen pocket or carbon dioxide and nitrogen pocket. There's not enough oxygen to to live. Even a tiny little spot of rest will eventually react with the oxygen in the bubble. But. The process can be very slow or very fast. There's no hard and fast rate of consumption here. Factors such as the coat of paint on the ship and the type of damage it sustained affect how long oxygen will last. The point is eventually the oxygen will either leach out of the pocket or degrade to the point that you can't breathe it. Another rule taught to every scuba diver is never take your regulator out in an airspace inside a shipwreck or cave. The reason is simple. If you did that and that shipwreck had diesel fuel or gasoline or propane you have no idea what the gas you think it's air but you have no idea and now you're about to breathe it in and there are many divers that have died doing exactly that taking their regulator out thinking Oh, this is cool. But then taking a breath of something that was poisonous and war had absolutely no oxygen. So. Proud of it would have needed to have been exploring a wreck sunk recently enough that it still contained oxygen. But not already contaminated by some sort of noxious gas or poison. So that makes a situation extremely unlikely. But we already knew that his next problem however is that he's brought his own poison with him. What he's going to wind up doing is eventually replacing the oxygen carbon dioxide. and. Carbon Dioxide is a killer. When you take a deep breath in hold it. Your eventual urged breathe doesn't come from the fact that you're running out of oxygen. But the you have too much carbon dioxide building up in your system like garbage piling up in the trash can. You've got to take it out. If you don't exhale co two starts to clog your blood. It can't take an oxygen because there's no space for it. You'll start to fixate because your blood chemistry is off your lungs will burn. Then your diaphragm will begin to spasm uncontrollably. Trapped in a small underwater bubble prophet would have been slowly losing the ability to exhale co two. Every breath took would have had just a little bit more. He'd have had to debris faster to get rid of it, which would increase the CO two levels in the bubble is a positive feedback loop. When his air pocket hit four percents to he begin to hyperventilate and what happens is he'll stirred I get a headache. and. Then eventually, he'll pass out because the. Effort to the fraction of oxygen in that room. Fall to such a low point won't sustain like. Even with hours of oxygen still left in his bubble. He'd suffocate. So we did some math and it turns out that in order to survive forty eight hours in shipwreck, he would need an air bubble roughly six feet by eight feet by nine feet or about the size of a small bedroom. and. No Way an airtight pocket that large is hanging out in an upside down ship. Unless the ship is done at depth. In. which case something called Boyle's law comes into play a little bit of science here. But every thirty three feet, the atmospheric pressure, the weight of the water on you double. So right here at sea level, the weight of the air is fourteen point seven pounds on every square inch of your body. Okay. If you go to thirty feet, it's double. That twenty eight feet every thirty three feet beyond that it doubles again. So the deeper you go, the more water pushes the same amount of air into a smaller and smaller space. Imagine I take a glass and I hold it upside down at the surface filled with air. When bring it down to thirty three feet, it would be half filled with water. It's not that the water came into the glass it's that the air collapsed or was pressurized shrank. If you will. What this means is that the size of the compartment proud of it would've needed is relative to the depth of the shipwreck. The deeper, the wreck, the smaller space that would support for two days. The smaller, the space, the more likely it would be to hold air. So if we give proud foot the benefit of the doubt and say, he was a sport diver exploring the limits of his depth roughly one hundred feet deep. We can put them in the space three feet by three feet by six feet, which is just a little smaller than your typical bathroom stall. So okay a bit more plausible. Maybe it was worth trying to track down the boat itself. The hard thing about researching shipwrecks and Baja is that there's a surf break in called shipwrecks. So. Most everything redirects. There's also a whole bunch of boats that have been sunk on purpose shipwreck diving parks. But none old enough for product to have been. There's also a shipwreck called the Baja California, but it sunk off because the Florida so it was no help. We are still looking for a needle in a very wet haystack. But then this diving forum pointed out a way that we might be able to make the haystacks smaller. This guy throws out this extra little detail. The wreck would have to way more than ninety, two, thousand, four, hundred, forty pounds to stay down with that pocket. So so they've crunched the numbers to say that the air pocket has to be. Has To contain this much air for man to plausibly survived for two days right? Well, that much air has a certain amount of buoyancy. The reason, this is a big deal for us is that records of very large shipwrecks, your oil tankers in World War Two vessels, and what have you are fairly easy to find. So if the ship needed to be really big to hold down a proud foot-sized pocket of air, we might be able to prove that there was no shipwrecks of that size sunk recently enough to contain good air off the coast of Baja at that time. Would basically debunk the whole story. So I got all excited about this this is like like ninety thousand pounds. That's really really heavy unfortunately when Robbie showed me a picture of a ninety thousand pound. All we learned is that both are heavier than you'd think. So when you found this, you were like Oh yes, this is gonNA. This is going to show me exactly what type of both this is, and now we're like, well, it's about. SO TO RECAP We can't disprove the fact that he found an air pocket. And the size of the ship you've been on. The size that might disappear in Mexico without being reported. All We'd learned is that we were crap mythbusters. So. We got a little more creative. We'll be right back. Earlier. We heard from John Cuban head of design and Hydro Flask about how the all new lightweight trail series bottom. Let you go further. A lighter bottle was what hydro flask users said they wanted but his John tells it wasn't sure he could deliver. I have to be proud of the fact that we could reduce the way that was a challenge that we didn't know. We saw at the beginning hydro flask engineers tested numerous blends of professional grade stainless steel until they found a unique mix that allowed for the thinnest possible walls of a bottle without compromising its durability or temperature retention. Know a back and forth building lots of prototypes testing in the lab testing out in the trail In the real world, you know taking them on hikes seeing how they perform their and we did lots of drop tests we. Did lots of impact tests to make sure the The durability was what our customers expected on the way they look for every possible way to save weight, which is why Hydro Flask completely re engineered the wide Mouth Lyn all the way down to the lugs, the lid construction itself we have a hollow surface in the top part of the lid that made the lid more compact at reduce weight. We perforated, the STRAPS, the lugs we changed out the material from stainless steel aluminum, and then hollowed them out court them out. All of those things that we looked at helped in reducing the weight by about twenty five percent. The Hydro Flask trail series bottle weighs less so you can do more. Learn additional details in purchase yours at HYDRO FLASK DOT com slash trail series. All Right Pete. You you WanNa tell me what you're wearing. So Yeah. I'm wearing a four three serving wetsuit. Okay. So after finding an air pocket profits next problem would have been hypothermia. Water heat twenty, five times more quickly than air. So unless proud foot air pocket was big enough that he was able to get all the way out of the water he'd have trouble maintaining his core temperature. The peak water temperature off the coast of Baja California is sixty seven degrees. So proud foot would have had to survive that for forty hours. So, we decided to run an experiment. We call the hot tub down to sixty seven degrees stuffed pete into a wet suit and plop them in. The does it feel downright tropical I. This is what I would think the water in Baja California would be like is like just slightly cold to the touch button like totally pleasant. Then we took his temperature it's under your tongue in one work. If it's over your time, it's under your. Temperature I'm just checking man, you know you you only eat spaghetti so you might not know some of these things. From there, we monitor the rate at which Pete's core temperature decreased to see if he could reasonably stay alive for forty eight hours without succumbing to hypothermia. I was told to pull him out if he reached ninety three degrees. Why did we settle in ninety-three degrees? Exactly because my mom made us. She made us have a safety plan in place I just WanNa make sure that you're. Like not in the Lenin go too far into this. You should have been cut off temperature shen. Okay. Ninety. Three have A. Anyway back to. The reality is that even tropical waters can still bring you to the brink of death even if the water feels warm your rapidly losing heat, you just don't realize it. It's called warm water hypothermia like the the frog in the pot. Yeah totally. You're the you're the frog and the by. Being cooled very slowly. So slowly that I'd never get out of the water and what we found was that this frog at least with consistently losing his heat at a rate of point two degrees every fifteen minutes. We kept Pete in the Cold Tub for two hours. Just to make sure you're shaking. Only, because I was thinking about it I don't need to shake. See I can I can stop anytime I want. Why don't you take your temperature right now and then we'll probably just get you out. Now. You're severance. You can barely keep that thing in. Ninety four point nine. Jack. That's colder. That's definitely a you're in the ninety five before. We've seen a really consistent point, two degrees. Every fifteen minutes point eight, an hour. I was a little bit below ninety seven nominee little bit. Read. was exactly two degrees. So, yeah basically consistent. What's yeah. What's the lowest do temperature that you can get to? Before you're just you die from hypothermia. Oh was in our frozen episode. That's what I'm getting at. Do you remember what was? Trying to ask you. Here's where we play a clip of tape of crystal saying that line from the frozen episode. The lowest recorded core temperature in a surviving adult is sixty point eight degrees. In thirty eight degrees. Thirty eight degrees exactly. He can lose. Yeah. Okay. If he's losing at the rate that you are currently losing it at, which is point eight degrees per hour. How many hours is that? Divided by point eight. Forty seven and a half hours. So he would have died a half hour before getting rescued if he was there for exactly two days if he's there for exactly two days if he was underwater like if he was completely underwater up to his neck if the. Dim. It wouldn't have been fun but according to our bulletproof scientific experiment. If proud I had been able to get part of his body out of the water or if you had a dry suit. Or even a thicker wetsuit. It was conceivable that he could have lasted two days underwater right? It's just barely plausible enough. Oh my God. You would have survived. A made it. After Pete rolled around in the sunshine for a while. Much warmer at we moved onto improbable factor number three. This is so awesome. See Our chins. He ate sear Jones for two days to survive. It's like the last sentence and every one of these internet paragraphs that was kind of my my next thought was okay. There's this detail as eating CR chins than the ship had been down there too long lately that the the air would have become toxic or just leeched out. You know all that kind of stuff that we've learned about for our purposes. Satan's our way to measure time. It's kind of like CSI they look at the kinds of insects that are in the dead body and can tell how long it's been dead. And since we know proud foot needed a relatively recent shipwreck defined breathable air we thought if surgeons could establish a time line, they could disprove the whole story. They could solve this thing. But. No, quite literally one of the very first organisms to occupy a sunken ship. Are Sarah Urges. If. He's going to eat anything in a ship that has been. So recently sunk that it still has auction that breathable. It's going to be surgeons. Yeah, wow. Who Thought Right? Yeah seriously. There's only one chance left to disprove proud foot story the tea kettle. Or was it a pot? Or according to some sources at earn whatever that is here. It's a pot kettle. Is at the pot calling the kettle. The the pot calling the kettle non-existent. It's still an open container, right which becomes problematic in our search. When we talked to Richie Kohler, he came down hardest on this point no ship is going to sink in such a way that a tea kettle stays upright and still contains drinkable water when most ships sink. Ninety percent of them always land on their side generally water will come in from one side or the other and toilet caused the ship to list or over to that side. According to colour, there are really only two types of ships that land, UPRIGHT The first, our ships like the titanic that sink in water. So deep that the hydrodynamics shape actually return them to the normal position as they sink. The other kind are those that are intentionally sunk for recreational divers to explore. They don't want any air pockets in the ship. They cut many holes that no air pockets would affect the buoyancy of the ship as it is sinking, they want it to sink not necessarily rapidly but evenly, it's it's implausible than that. He would find a an undisturbed tea kettle full of fresh water. If if ninety percent of of natural shipwrecks, I guess for lack of a better term fall on their sides. That's absolutely correct. Case closed. Finally. Signs of survival is produced by me Peter. Rabbit carver thanks to carry shear. So I just wanted to run something by you. Okay. So on one of the details that Pete Nye dismissed pretty quickly was that some of these blogs called the tea kettle earn. We. Just thought it was a weird colloquialism and didn't think too much about it. But a few days later, I actually looked up what an urn once people it's It's that big metal. fully enclosed carafe with a little lever with the the liquid pours out of like a gatorade cooler, but for T-. Yet, and we kinda like grabbed onto this idea that freshwater in a tea kettle never survive. Getting sunk underwater as like okay. Well, this is the one thing that we can say, okay this story must not be true. The smoking gun of the tea kettle the steaming kettle. Exactly. But it's an earn I went back and checked in the Children's book as best as we can tell the original source for this called it an earned. The Tea Kettle, pot, and all these other names are the product of a game of journalistic telephone. Yeah and it and it would be. plausibly watertight. So. It wouldn't matter if the if the ship were upside down or what? But Koehler is still had some questions about the psychology situation. Why? If he had the ability to be breathing air bell why wouldn't he have tried to get to the surface meaning? Take a deep breath. Hold it in your lungs come out of the shipwreck and then start to swim to the surface remember Boyle's law. That if the moment proud foot had reached the ships bubble, he took a large gulp of air. He would have had twice the oxygen in his lungs than the same amount of air on the surface. So as long as you exhale your lungs expand, you could literally get to the surface on a single breath. And Koehler says most people doing a wreck dive would have known that but spend too much time at depth. and. You risk what divers call the Ben's. which are basically death bubbles. Dissolved gas building up and your body's tissues due to pressure. The longer you're down there. The worse it gets. The best way to describe it as imagine when you're looking at a bottle of coke when it's sealed, you don't see any bubbles but the minute you open it, hit a hiss of the expanding gas, the pressure being released and these bubbles form in the liquid. Well. That's the same thing that would happen to his blood bubbles would form in the stivers blood. The Ben's our depth plus time equation and it comes into play anytime you descend beyond thirty feet. Go to three hundred feet and immediately resurface in your fine. But spent ten minutes there, and you'll need to spend a full hour returning to the surface. That means if you're proud foot, you've moments to decide whether or not to self rescue. Because soon, the pain of cent would be too much. Needless to say bubbles in your lungs your heart, your brain or a bad thing and usually results in instantaneous death. Bubbles in your spinal cord result para paralysis bubbles just caught in a joint or painful. And that's where the Ben's gets. Its. Name. From. Most Ben's cases are minor and occur and a nerve in a joint causing people to ride in agony and bend their extremities to these odd angles to try and alleviate the pain. So the big threat is hesitation. If you wait you put yourself in serious trouble. There's a point of no return to this that hued probably know and then, and then it's like, all right. If I go up, there's a good chance will be paralyzed. There's a good chance I'll die on the surface I have no choice. But to wait for rescue or you know the the life that I lead will not be recognizable to me, and so maybe I'll just stay here right and then, and then you do jibbidy reached the point where you are choosing your method of death. What would you choose? Now God You know if I'm being honest, I would probably stay there and hope I was rescued. Because I think a s if we're talking about having reached that point. The hope. Of being rescued is probably a stronger hope in the hope of surviving the math. Of Decompression, if you know it that well. The does that make sense like? But. If I knew that nobody knew where I was. Then I would hope that I would take the risk and swim I can't imagine a commercial diver even a semi experienced recreational diver down there without anybody knowing I mean that's the first rule of anything is tell somebody where you're going go with somebody. So if we assume that then we assume that that you get stuck, you have hope of rescue and so you just stay put. And so this story becomes. To me one click more. Plausible. Yeah. Yeah toll I mean. We. WanNa just officially. Like myth bust this story. And put a stamp on it that says now fake like here look at what we did. We solve this thing right? Exactly. Here's all of the scientific reasons that this story is bunk. And we can't do that. We we cannot disprove it on scientific grounds. But we can't prove it on journalistic grounds. So that makes us. Magical realists. By this point. I. Think it's safe to say that we've unraveled this thing to the best of our abilities. As improbable as preference foot story might be it actually might hold water or air. We can't sufficiently disprove it. That's really annoying. Where do you think this story came from if you had to guess You know there was probably some truth to a story. where? was trapped in a ship Brac and they got out. And, that could have been the guy went in the shipwreck all of the sudden he had problem he started running out of air. But then he got out. And that happens he you know that that happens people make mistakes but there by the of God they get out. And it's possible that the story. was told then told again and then it was he didn't get out and then you know how things have the ability to grow a life of their own. In other words, the story just kept gathering details like a shipwreck in the shallows gathered fish and plants. At. A certain point it's gathered so much new life it barely resembles the original. You can hardly tell what the ship looked like. There's no way to know where it came from. That was Peter fit right and Robbie carver. Investigating a story remains a mystery. When we first aired this episode in Two Thousand Sixteen we ended up by asking listeners to write in if they had any leads to the whereabouts of Michael Proud foot. Even just a clue to the origins of his miraculous story. Never ended up getting any information that led to anything. The maybe you weren't listening back then. And maybe you know something. If you do email us at podcast at outside. I am DOT com. We'd love to run a follow. All of the science of survival episodes in our archives were made possible by the Alfred P Sloan Foundation enhancing public understanding of science technology, economic performance, and underwater air bubbles. More at. Sloan. Dot Org. This episode of the outside podcast was brought to you by hydro flask makers of the new trails series bottle, which leads you go farther with less weight learn more about it in purchase yours at hydro flask dot com slash trail series. We'll be back with all new episodes starting in two weeks.

Michael Proud Richie Kohler Hydro Flask hypothermia Pete Nye Robbie carver Peter Freak John Baja California Kerry Baja Koehler producer Mexico US Massachusetts Boyle NPR
July 29, 2019: Police look for answers after a shooting at a California garlic festival

5 Things

05:41 min | 1 year ago

July 29, 2019: Police look for answers after a shooting at a California garlic festival

"This episode of five things sponsored by madison reed put the time and expense of a salon behind you with madison reed. It's salon quality hair color delivered right to your door. Five things listeners get ten percent off plus free shipping on your first color kit with code. Five things at madison dash reed dot com good morning. I'm taylor wilson and this is five things. You need to know monday. The twenty ninth of july twenty nineteen the gate. You started a shooting at the gilroy garlic festival in northern california killed four people on sunday and left fifteen injured gilroy police chief scott smith he said at a a press conference that police shot and killed one gunman shortly after he began firing a rifle but a possible second suspect is still at large smith. He said that witness reports show that a second suspect supported the gunman but that they currently have no identifying information on him. The gunmen cut through a fence to get into the festival avoiding metal detectors at entrances smith he said quote it's incredibly sad and disheartening that innovation that does so much good for our community has to suffer from a tragedy like this on quote many festival attendees initially initially thought the shots were the sounds of fireworks celebrating the end of the three day festival a storm heading for hawaii could become a hurricane by late monday tropical legal storm eric formed southwest of baja california late last week and is expected to continue to gain strength as it heads for the u._s. Island state as of sunday night maximum sustained and winds were at around forty miles an hour with even stronger gusts according to the national hurricane center for its part accuweather says that it's still too early to tell if eric will be a direct threat two why but rough surf increased rip currents are expected to impact the big island next up the scenes in san juan last week puerto ricans joyously awaited the resignation of disgrace governor ricardo rosillo meanwhile a rally was planned on monday and puerto rico's goes capital in opposition to wanna vasquez the woman in line to replace him button. There's just one catch. She doesn't want the job. She said that she hopes rosillo will appoint a secretary of state who will then serve as his successor when his resignation becomes official on friday. She tweeted on sunday. I reiterate. I have no interest in occupying the position of governor unquote. Many on the island view says as a clone of the governor then cold for her ousting before she was ever in office well after taking singles by storm at wimbledon tennis wonder kim coco golf is turning to a new challenge this week doubles the fifteen year old is matching up with another youngster seventeen year old katie mcnally get the city open after the pair won the doubles title at the two thousand eighteen u._s. open junior. The stage is a little bit bigger this time though with the d._c. Based event involving some of the world's best s. players golf said quote katy and i are a great pair together on the court and playing with my friend of the court is cool too and last up <music>. I'm rick dalton. It's my pleasure mr shorts but that your son nuts doubleclick booth last night we've watched. Hey picked dalton double feature shooting. I love that stuff. You're killing a lot of kill them. Final numbers numbers are expected on monday for quentin tarantino's latest film once upon a time in hollywood and it's looking like the director's biggest opening ever had finished a clear second behind another stunning weekend for disney's remake of the lion king but bested the two thousand nine opening of tarantino's inglorious bastards by two million bucks and also made a strong showing for an or rated nearly three hour film that wasn't a sequel or remake and was aimed at adults it also might be the last feature length film from the legendary moviemaker here brad pitt and leonardo dicaprio who starred in once upon a time told the associated press that tarantino knows as well as anyone that directors time runs out. He's really speaking to the shelf life of of directors that he studied. There is no in love and and there's a method. There's a real method to his madness. There's a science find it. I always imagined it as little box set that he wants to just hang on the wall and that's it that completes tarantino so <hes> cinematic jane's once upon a time in hollywood is in theaters nationwide. You can catch new episodes of five things monday through saturday on apple podcasts. Yes and wherever else you get your pods including the google home and amazon echo. You can also subscribe for free and leave us a rating and review if you'd like five things as part of the u._s._a. Let's say today podcast network. Take coloring your hair at home to the next level with madison reed. You deserve gorgeous. Professional hair color delivered to your door for less than twenty five dollars for decades. We've had two options for coloring our hair outdated at home color or the time inexpensive salon tons of madison reed clients common. I'm anne how their new hair color has improved their lives for the better. Everyone loves the results gorgeous shiny multidimensional healthy looking hair. This is great covering game changing changing color. You can do at home and look if you just came from the salon. Madison reed color is unique in that. It's crafted by master colonists who blend nuances of light dark mark cool and warm to create over forty five stunning multi tonal shades find your perfect shade at madison dash reed dot com five things listeners get get ten percent off plus free shipping on your first color kit with code. Five things at madison dash reed dot com. That's code five things at madison. Dash reed dot com.

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Ep. 256 - Spurge is the Word

In Defense of Plants Podcast

41:47 min | 9 months ago

Ep. 256 - Spurge is the Word

"Would you like more infants of plants each month? Well you're in luck and defensive. Plans is now offering bonus mini episodes over at our patron page to find out how you can gain access to this bonus botanical content head on over. Patriot dot com slash in defensive plants and consider becoming a patron as always. Thank you for your continued support of independent plans together. We are helping care plant blinds around the world one episode at a time. Hello everyone and welcome to the defensive. Plans podcast official podcast of indefensible. Plants DOT COM. What's up this is your host map. Welcome to the show. How's everyone doing this week? I recently returned from one of the most inspiring conferences of ever been to. I'm not generally conference guy but southeastern partners in plant conservation. Inspired me so much because I got to see a ton of different people. Doing incredible work to conserve plants specifically in the southeast but it is serving as a model for places all over the continent to do better by plant conservation. I just WANNA give a shout out to everyone that stopped by said. Hi introduce themselves all the new faces. I got to meet and faces. I got to put two people. I only know through voices. Thank you so much and expect to hear a lot of conversations with people that I met at that conference in the coming weeks but yeah today is a really interesting conversation. I've recently become obsessed with the euphoria family because I was sort of in the dark on. How truly diverse it is. I MEAN EVERY SHAPE. Form Habitat lifestyle. You Phobias are doing some incredible things and joining us to talk about. That is forbidden specialist. Nathan Taylor Nathan is currently working on a project to kind of a outline the for Ba c. e. of North America. And he's doing it all through naturalists which you can find in the show notes for this episode. But his specific specialty or preference within this group is a small subsection of AC called the initial film. In as you're GONNA hear you're probably very familiar with plants because these are the prostrate splurges the spot it's Burge's those that you see growing in San Mats or in the cracks of sidewalks in urban areas. They're very familiar plans a lot of them. Do extremely well disturbance and it become pretty abundant wherever humans live but they're also fascinating from their biology's to their ecology is in his. You're GONNA hear we get into it. It was a really cool conversation. I love these sort of specific esoteric topics within botany. It's what keeps me going. So let's do this without further ado. Here's my conversation with Nathan Taylor. I hope you enjoy all right. Nathan Taylor thank you so much for coming on the PODCAST. How about we start off with a little bit about who you are in what it. Is You do high map. My Name's Nathan Taylor and I I've been studying you for is for about the about seven years now. Hey Sand Yeah and I particularly focus on a little group called the section Nisa film which is sort of the San Matt like Lance so like spotted spurs prostrate splurge those weedy plants that you get your Your Line Darden. That have that White Milky Sap yet. It's cool that the you know. Those are something I grew up recognizing I mean. I didn't know what they were as a child. But it's it's a familiar group of plants to me you know. I think a lot of people that don't live in arid regions at least. That's probably their main introduction to the Spurs family. But I'm curious. What brought you to this in the first place. We always plant person. And how did you discover you four? Ac's kind of your your focus. Yeah so the main way that I found plants is I live in Dallas. I at the time and I was told by my family that we were moving out to the desert. And where you know. There wasn't really any lush vegetation at all and in the spring. I just saw all kinds of wildflowers and being the kind of person that I am. Naturally I wanted to identify every single one that I saw hand. It just kind of snowballed there now. How I got interested in You. Four via is. I had a mentor of time. Whose name is Bert Williams. And he he knew basically all of the local on the southern highpoints Texas and you four was really just the one group that he sort of just assigned the genus name to and didn't even try with a species. So I I sort of took. That is a challenge and from there when I went to Soros to get my Bachelor's and master's I decided that the best way to study these things would be just a photograph every species in the specimen cabinet. And then go back and look at those at home. Well it turns out that some of the species. That photograph were actually misidentification. Ooh that that added a at an added another Another way to sort of you know. Just push me right into into the groove things. That's a really interesting dive into this world. And from a standpoint of sort of species identification and taxonomy I mean some of the Spurs family's pretty easy to recognize although there's probably plenty of minute details but others can be pretty cryptic which I'm guessing lens to some of the taxonomic end species. Id Confusion You just mentioned definitely. Yeah I mean every every time I go to a herbarium I ended up with a a really good big Saka misidentified before so. This is a big family. And it's one of those that every time I think I have my finger on the pulse of what's going on. I see a few representatives that completely blow my mind in. Send me for a loop but how do you begin to even focus in a family as large as before be acn? I guess from there. We can kind of talk about the subdivisions within that group. Right so I mean the the big thing with you for AC. I mean I'm not. I'm not a huge expert on four. Ac as a whole but but it's really sort of divided by the power structure. You know some some species have pedal some don't Actually probably most of them are money. Isis and then with you for specifically you have the ATM and the site in is is sort of this. Modified infrared essence. That looks like a flower. It's sort of like the composite family in that. It has this the Sudan via this false flower that made up of of an invalid occur and then Various flowers in the middle of it. It is pretty wild to think about that in the context of it being in fluorescence in. It's one of those things that when you say or see anyone on the Internet say you forget. Flowers already. Goes actually. It's a safe but it is a really fascinating structure in it. I'm guessing is kind of what makes you for AC unique or one of the characters that Kinda unites a lot of them Under this taxonomic umbrella definitely and it. It is the essentially. The uniting structure of Euphoria message genus very cool. So how did you end up falling? Into the subgroup Are With the chemist icy type growth form that we've mentioned earlier something that I think a lot of people especially if you live in urban areas or have a sidewalk near your house can probably recognize so it fits into a couple of categories for me that I sort of came to appreciate early on and For whatever reason I really like we species and I really like plants that are small and so this is spit imperfectly for me. And in the fact that the Trans Pecos region of Texas. Which isn't that far away for. Me Is sort of the center of diversity for the group. That's sort of where the plants evolved initially he? The region has sort of a representative of all of the major lineages within this within the section. Oh that's really cool. And so they've just sort of radiated outwards from there and made their way up into the super tempered areas. I'm guessing now because of human activity can be found over a much wider range than the initially would have in a natural setting right right. I mean that that said the you know the the group is actually to diversified on its own worldwide. Yeah so I mean except for the Arctic climates course but yeah it especially in desert. The plants love desserts and really sort of exploded in biodiversity In desert regions around the world. That's excellent and in thinking about the success of a group like this that can conquer so many different types of habitats. I you just said the desserts I see them in temperate zones see them in wet habitats. See them in prairies. A lot of that comes down to the fact that they figured out how to utilize a lot of different types of photosynthetic systems. Right yes yes and actually it is the only see for Winnie edge in phobia and within the section. You actually have both see photosynthesis and an intermediate to photosynthesis which not many people know about. I didn't know that that the but yeah. So it's it's a cool sort of intermediary step that uses a a two carbon molecules sort of funnel the the Co two to the bundle sheath cells instead of a a c four molecule like malic acid and came ascites also has a single C. three plant. Euphoria and Gus Sir. So C four photosynthesis really did serve. Diversify I with this section in this film group he I may have mentioned And basically that sort of the old genus name for it so still switching taxing on gears a little bit if I if I say that that's okay. It's hard to keep up sometimes especially with such complexity in morphology in types in you know this is a group. People generally pay attention to so. Of course there's going to be a lot of changes and updates. But I'm GONNA on the subject of photosynthetic Percy it may be the only genus known that also had as pam it has all those for photosynthetic systems so like the the second species in Africa. He those are actually cam plants so like like tactile out West so you have a wad of diversity in this group as far as photosynthetic systems. It's pretty wild because you know they're plants. Photosynthesis is kind of the main stay of that entire lineage of organisms for the most part and to think about all of the variety in that system you could possibly have. I mean just the thought that there could be an intermediate step between this the C. Two thing that I had never even heard of before until now and I'm wondering if you know is there any indication of what the sort of the end type was for this group or for you phobia in general or is it kind of independent evolutionary trajectories depending on where these originated in how they diversified into what kinds of habitats right right so the the origin of euphoria in general? Masada occur in sort of the South Pacific islands around New Caledonia And it sort of a one of a most ancestoral fees. It's actually not a euphoria. It's I can't remember Gina's name off the top of my head but it has a site apium but it's not quite as well structured as a regular you forget ended sort of a sort of a shrub plants in in that area now the the origin of section in this film. I know a lot more about their a lot of really cool features that sort of unite this group but one of the main things is that I mean it it. It evolved from plants. That looked more. Like let's say the gophers purge so like four elaborate before the rigid That sort of SEO like structure the seventeen setiawah basically it. It has this of main stem with with alternate leaves But the emperor essence is sort of KSM with the world of leaves at the base and then it has Casal Branson's That sort of come off that importance and all on that occasion it has opposite leaves he in section and this film they only have opposite leaves. They don't have any alternate leaves at all and that sort of led to the speculation that basically announce analogous to a an import about SC group Now there have been some studies that had caught sort of cast that hypothesis in doubt. But the key uniting feature is basically that at the seed leaves they sort of come out and then you have this first pair of truly will right after that first pair of truly leaves the Chimera Sam is actually absent. It's completely absent. And so what you end up with is is branching from those basil nodes outward and then after that initial branching those eight comparison. Sims also absence. So you have this symposium branching that occurs that it it looks like hotness it's not exactly dichotomies it's technically pseudo diko communists because it's not an actual splitting of the Marasigan. It's more of a termination of him. But you have sort of this. Forking of branches occurs throughout the plant. And that sort of the main uniting factor the other thing that sort of goes along with that is these symmetric weeds. So you have have these these leaves that are very oblique at the base and sometimes the sort of longer lobe can extend beyond the edge of belief on the other side of the mid vein along with that you have a course the the C four photosynthesis wants that actually evolved. And you also have a sort of this Dorsal ventral structure. Where there's a clear upper side of Sam and clear lower site side to the Sam? Yes so the they're sort of all. These factors contribute to what constitutes a member of euphoria the A. Section and missile fell on. That's fascinating and it's cool to kind of get into the nuances of growth and development. Because that's a lot of where the morphological species concepts are based in as minute between different groups in it's hard thing to kind of convey to people trying to learn field identification because so much of it seems arbitrary but it does represent these unique developmental pathways which suggests a unique evolutionary origin for that group. And it is interesting to about this group which is largely these mat. Forming species is is that absence of that a pickle mayor stem kind of makes than like you say branch out laterally. And then you have this dorsal ventral side distinction between them. That's why you end up seeing these weird mat forming growth habits right. Yeah exactly and in fact it seems like they didn't actually start out as is prostrate plants if you look into the ancestral forms they're actually pretty erect. He but the section seems to have sort of taken advantage of that sort of fall in their their developments early on to sort of take advantage of the prostrate habit which guessing would have put them closer to the ground kept the matter. Harm's way maybe sheltered them from desiccation or too much UV light. I mean there's a lot of adaptation or at least a lot of benefits to such adaptation right right and it also allows them to maybe fill Anna ecological gap. Wasn't there at the time. I mean when when you think of the desert southwest. There's not a lot of trees auto out and things that they can get in your way from having you know more low to the ground habit. Certainly yeah I mean the limitations of the environment itself dictates how evolution is GonNa go but it is really cool to see how these plants though conquered other habitats. I mean I see these on my sidewalk cracks in I am by no means living in a desert right now but they do really well because they're not standing up they tend to go unnoticed. They're not getting trampled as much right. You're and they and they don't suffer from herbivore as much either. So are they toxic like a lot of the forbid? Well as far as I know there haven't been a whole lot of studies done on it as far as I'm aware but I do know that they're very very irritating. He my mentor. Burr Williams that I mentioned earlier. He actually had to go to the emergency room because he got some of sap in his I e yeah. It's it's a pretty pretty caustic plant and it's not only toxic to animals. It's also toxic to other plants release. Some species are Leila Pathak. If you if you wash believes in sort of use that wash on seedlings they actually inhibit seed grew so. It's not even the SAP itself. It's not even like the decomposition of previous years materials. It's actually something. The plant is actively producing on the outside of its tissues apparently Yeah pretty incredible. And it's one of those again. These plants that a lot of people were recognised whether they notice or not and probably a lot of people get annoyed with them because they show up they make their sidewalks look messy and stuff but Dang if there's ever a group of plants that deserves some recognition in respect for just being hearty survivors that can dictate their future in the environment. More so than people plants credit for. I mean here's a group of plants really were focusing on right. That's pretty amazing. I love it. Yeah it's within a few minutes. I can already tell why this is such a a focus of yours. Yeah yeah well you know. There's even more to it than that. Though I mean like for instance the seeds are strongly Musa lodging us and so they can stick the two birds feet easily and their fruits are explosive the his sons. Yeah Yeah So. Even though they're loaded the grounds you know the the capsules this just explode. So like for instance when out plank collecting a lot of times. I'll put a plant specimen in the plant press. And if you if you listen to it you actually hear popping especially with the with the marchers species. I'M GONNA have to listen for that the summer. I've got plenty. I let him go. I really enjoy the Especially when you don't disturb it or walk on it it's a really beautiful pattern that forms uneven. Then they can take a beating before they really succumb to any sort of disturbance right right but it explains pretty well how they get around now. Is there any evidence that answers are involved in sort of posts sort of secondary seed dispersal for them? Actually yes there. There was a a seventy done in In Japan actually on for the IMMACULATA and they actually do disperse the seeds a little bit. And that actually reminds me on one year Podcasts about Macaw macaw Fanie. I think is how how you pronounce that mccown. Yeah Yeah Yeah that actually Opened my eyes to a lot of interesting possibilities because I've actually had a hard time getting these things grow for not. They always seem to succumb to fungal infections. So it makes sense that they're transported by ants primarily. If if they you know sort of rub off some of that into microbial compound. Yeah it's a fascinating thing to think about the interactions that are unseen or unmeasured at this point. And it's it's funny. You mentioned that because there's so many other what we would call common or weedy plant species that I actually do struggle to get going from scene and it does seem like there's a very strong difference between seedling establishment an adult establishment and persistence in. It's like that first. Hurdle wants to get over it. They're essentially unstoppable but until they get there. There's probably a piece missing that. We don't fully understand recognize. Yeah Yeah it is really really interesting to think about that. Yeah and so when you're looking for these plants or collect. What are you working on these days? What's what's been your focus other than just really enjoying this subgroup of forbe's e so I do a lot of naturalness. It's really kind of interesting. How that sort of opened up my ability to study these plans. I I really enjoy identifying clients. I enjoy writing papers as well but since you know since I'm not actually added university at the moment you know mostly I'm just spending spending my time enjoying the identification of these things you know. Most of the key characters actually on the seas. Yeah so it proves a particularly fun challenge to identify these points from pictures. That's one thing that sort of I sort of. Skeptical eye naturalist. If if the EPA start because really kind of need seeds to seeds inside atheist he identified these things but it turns out that the vast majority of species even in section in this film are identifiable from habit in leaves and whatnot and actually sort of sort of opened my eyes in a number of ways because I found out that one of the big challenges would section in. This is that the leaves are quite variable. But there's actually a pattern to that variability. They produce like three to four different sets of leaves and some of those are more tax nominally informative than others particularly the second set to the set produce right after the very first leaves or developed and they tend to be more asymmetric than the rest of the leaves and they have a more consistent shape to them and consistently different from from other species. So that that's one thing that I've sort of found using naturalists and the other the other thing is i. I've also been able to to see even some undescribed species by naturalists. Yeah Yeah and that's proving to be particularly crime now. Is this a situation where someone just takes a picture and post it and finding Golick? Hey that's something we don't know yet. And they were unaware of it or you just kind of commuting back and forth with a lot of other people who are some level equally obsessed with this group. Well so it's mostly mostly the former. Yeah Yeah So. There are some some other forget experts that have gotten on on naturalist as well but they don't add as many observations Mostly this is from from casual citizen science. You know going into the backyard or going to a national park and photographing a plant. You know identifying it as you phobia and I just come along and you know gerate the Huron they. Hey this is interesting. That's really neat. And it just goes to show you. That technology can be a tool a lot of times. People will bemoan the use of it. The people are always on the run. But Hey if they're taking pictures of species all over the place in discovering new ones in the process I mean there's definitely benefits to these tools. Yeah definitely and you know. It's allowed me to look for all around the world Everywhere from Australia. India South Africa. Europe Made it really does expand your horizons to look at things from a global perspective and not as much on a on a local perspective for sure and going back to your point about recognizing some of these patterns that might change. I mean think about the effort would have taken even two decades ago to get all of these species together. Get enough or Barium records or specimens together to see that change in the patterns of variation among species. I mean this is a really good example of how within the Click of few tabs. You can have such a rundown of what these species are looking like all over the globe multiple individuals so that you can recognize these patterns. That probably don't even end up in useful keys. I mean this is proof that it's not there. There's more than one way to identify plant but the biggest thing is just getting familiar with the form in differences of form that you can expect from anyone group. Yeah yeah and I can't really speak highly enough of I- naturalists it really. Has this sort of expanded expanded things so much Even on the local perspective even or on the more local perspective. It's you know I've gotten to see a lot of plants particularly from Baja California that His sort of made me wonder about The evolution of maturation so in spotted Spurs. You know they're sort. The spot is sort of oblong spot right in the middle of the League. And you know I've I've always wondered. What the heck's going on there well it turns out that in Baja California there is a species that has the spot in sort of two different forms and in in in one form in some populations it sort of spread out in. It's actually like you know sort of random accusations around the leave but another it's sort of centralized and then there's another species where the centralized itself is actually made up of riddle spots. So you get sort of amorphous centralized spot. Instead of the Nice continuous oblong spot yet in the Macula later and the thing about spots is that they're not particularly consistent. So sometimes they'll in in any species that can produce them. They can be absent and so that makes them difficult us. But the shape is actually tax nominally. Formative and you know. Looking at those Baja California plants. It really makes you wonder okay. Well first of all is there any utility in the points producing this to the plants. Get a benefit out of this and seconds how maturations form you know right is there. A genetic component is it. Kinda like fingerprints were sort of the early developmental processes and stow casting events said forward. Yeah yeah and I mean. That's one thing that I've really liked to study more in the in the future I ever Ever get get into the region. Yes like you. You need to schedule a trip. Yeah in thinking about the eye naturalists component of this and the fact that so much of your identification just comes from average citizens taking pictures traveling around not really necessarily knowing what they're looking at or even if they are not sure of the importance of it. What's cool is you kind of? Have this breakdown on I. Naturalist for your euphoria species of the United States Journal. We actually have tips for photographing and then specifically photographing in harvesting seeds. Which like you said is one of the more important components of proper species identification in this group. Yeah I've I've got a lot of work and too harshly because I want to try and find a way to save time when I'm commenting about. Why think it's this season? Instead of this species you know just sort of put together some of the stuff and in some species I really do need seeds in order to identify him and I decided this. This is easy enough to write up Write this up and posted through the Journal. And then just you know. Create a link to it so yeah. I'd I spent a lot of time trying to help. People understand the differences. And you know hope. Hopefully that's paid off. I mean there I think Around sixty thousands euphoria observations on naturalists. Now Oh yeah I've I've only curated about forty thousand not deal yeah But Yeah I encounter a lot of people wondering how you distinguish the will. The cool thing now is by putting these resources out there. They're readily available for anyone willing to look for them and you never know again what's GonNa Hook someone and in thinking about getting people excited about plants even non professionally. They have these questions now. They have someone that can kind of curator point them in the right direction but they also have all of these great resources if they want to dive deeper. It's not a matter of That'd be interesting and then walking away it's one quick. Google search away from having a lot of answers available in in potentially making another botany nut in the process right right well. That's one thing that I I really have come to appreciate about for is that everyone knows of a species in one form or another. I mean poinsettias is an excellent example. I mean they're they're very people who I know of that. Haven't really encountered that that plant it would be weird. Yeah yeah it it. It serves as a an amazing entry. Point to talking about this group and not only talking about this group but also ristic complexity. Because I know when I talk to people there are sometimes surprise the red wheaten brats or not pedal slave and then not only that but it it gets more complicated because the CY atheist are not flowers. Either he it's it's another level beneath the at and it. It's it's just kind of blows people's minds you know that's perfectly way of putting it because we all have the standardized assumptions and even if you're not familiar with these groups you kinda go in carrying that baggage of Lake wallflowers have pedals. That sort of thing. But yeah when you start digging into this anyone that's remotely curious about. It has so many different things to glum onto and the site atheist thing I mean for species that aren't large and and very easy to see what the naked eye you grab a Hamlin's suddenly you've entered into a really complex world of micro structures in Anatomy. It is so cool to see one of these things under magnification right right well and even even looking at the leaves under magnification but the cool thing about Amici Bruce. The Section in this film group is because they have C. Four synthesis they produced this intricate Crohn's anatomy. Okay we'll say yes it's basically it's the methyl is sort of wider than the bundle sheath cells because the bundle sheath cells on these are the cells that sort of encircle the vascular bundles. That's where the concentration appliance store that allows for that sort of separation between carbon capture. An pro synthesis rate which side by for anyone. That's not following this. That's a water storage released a water saving mechanism because they don't have to keep their still mata open during the day. When it's super hot out right right and more than that it also keeps for visco which is the the main thing that sort of take. Co Two and starts that processors turning it into sugar it minimizes contact with oxygen because winning when oxygen becomes functionally inert. It's it's at least not really used to the point at that point and so it sort of minimizes that contact with oxygen. So it's more more efficient too but getting back to the Crohn's and Adamy basically it's it's this mosaic of dark green against light green and it. It's it's most easily visible in idiolect implants basically when the when the plant becomes leggy. Because they're not getting enough sun so if you wanna see this in person you know all you gotTa do is look in a a really shady spot yard and look for look for virgin prospects. Virgin you know to sort of look at it under the handlings. You'll see this really weird. Maze like pattern of intricate dark green against lightning and lizard the bundle sheets. Oh that's really cool really minute aspect of anatomy becoming visible in a with relatively cheap abilities to magnify There's so much when you when you look at this plant under the under the microscope too to study and so many ways that this plant can blow your mind. Yeah and in thinking about the the flowers on these released. The in fluorescent since atheist aspects of this This group you know. These are relatively small and a lot of cases. Who's pollinating these plants? Do they sell a lot? Or they're insects out there that tend to like to visit the site via glad you asked about. Because in the in the Sonoran desert in some species in the desert it's actually pollinated by the smallest be in North America. Yeah Yeah I think it's Paradise Minimu- not all species are pollinated. Some are Some are definitely suffering. I think like most of the we plan slight SPA Birds. You poor be IMMACULATA and Prostates verge before you prostrate Those are those are selling. I think they can. They can out cross but some species especially in the Sonoran desert you know. Do Half to cross pollinate. There's actually a a rare species in book. Kenya called Euphoria Golan Drina and it frequently produces proof that don't look like they've been pollinated so it's gotta be an out processing plant. Hey now what pollinates that? I'm I'm not sure it's actually. It's really hard to study the the pollinators on these things for you know what I. I assume are fairly obvious reasons this just so tiny Gab But I have also seen some some little flies and little lawson them occasionally and so the the glands that are produced on on the edges of the polluter Those things produce a little bit of necker sometimes and so. That's that's pretty much. What the with the insects are are going for I've also wondered if they're they're ant pollinated Some species the the problem with that is a read a lot about the pollen. Actually not being able to germinate once it comes in contact with the compound that prevents Fungal Development at sort of Antifungal compound on on ants. So it's not clear if that's actually going on if it's actually pollinating or if it's just visiting the site Avia and actually causing a detriment to the plant that's another thing that You know is possible. It's not unheard of but again it's it's relatively rare because of the aforementioned pollen issues but again going back to this idea of naturalist and Citizen Science Observations. I mean a lot of these plants are probably growing around people's homes or neighborhoods and a little attention to detail on a decent lens on. Maybe a camera phone or a macro camera can reveal new insights into. Who's actually visiting? I mean it might not tell us exactly what pollination is happening but at least gives you an idea of the sweet or could give you an idea. The suite of insects and other arthropods could be paying visits to these tiny sorta. Outta mind flowers. Yeah exactly and I even I even have a project of those kinds of observations to that. You know you can sort of collect them. Collect them all together. I think it's organisms associated with with you for your nothing nothing to creative to the point though. Yes yes so yeah. I'm fascinated by that aspect as well and you know it. It's also just kind of cool to to able to say that My organisms of interest are pollinated by the smallest North America. You know that that that always Gets me a little rural excited? Yeah that's a really honorable distinction. I think for plant. Yeah yeah that's exciting. And so what are you excited for? Moving forward I mean like. What are you aiming for? I mean you're creating all of these great observations. You're helping people understand this group a lot better and hopefully getting more people interested in plants in the process. I mean what's what's kind of the the the the future holding for you in terms of the directions you'd like to go with it so ultimately I'd like to try and monograph section Issa Film that's A. That's a pretty long term project. They're like over. What is three hundred fifty species and they are all around the world? And so it's it's it's definitely not a small task in certainly not anything that. I'm going to be able better to work towards until I get a little bit closer to a good herbarium so sort of with that in mind. The next step is really just getting into university that Start my doctoral work so that I can be in close contact with herbarium and actually study these things on a on a day to day. You know in the meantime. I've got all kinds of ideas of checks to work on. I mean this going through what all we talked about I mean looking at a pollination steady is certainly not not out of the question Looking at smack development. That's not really out of the question. And even have those undescribed species that have got a got actually get get to describing Plenty of opportunities therefore you and again a lot of this is all fueled by citizen science on I naturally didn't observations of people with camera phones Yep cancerous highly how useful it is for for people to do that especially in those places that are more out of the way like you know. I get some observations from from Peru occasionally unions and Brazil Argentina and those places. Those are brief are out of my way. Yeah Yeah I mean the global call to action to help someone that you know like you don't have the resources to travel or do it very often. So that's where the sort of communal power of observation comes in handy. Yes definitely very cool and so people want to contribute or look up more about your project in just understand what's going on with you phobia on naturalist howdy recommend they find out more about what you've been up too. Well so They can. They can visit my euphoria species of the United States product. That's probably the the best place to at least see what? I've been what I've been up to now if they want to. Contact me specifically I- naturalist is is really the best way to do that. I I'm probably even more active on I. Naturalists than I am even on email. So that's a that's a really good way to contact me. If you want an excuse just post a picture of a of a phobia section in this film and you know nine times out of San. I'll see it and identify it There's a you know there's another way to get in touch with. He'll whole bait him in Yup. Nice while you're men who knows what he likes. I appreciate that. This has been awesome. Nathan thank you so much for talking to us. You've definitely opened my eyes to a group of plants that I think I've probably taken for granted up to this point but I'm going to have a newfound respect for moving forward from here. Well that that was. That was the goal. So I'm I'm happy. Excellent thanks for talking with us today. We really appreciate it. Thank you thank you matt. I'm I'm a big Fan of independence the plants and keep doing what you're doing now. Thanks I appreciate that. Thanks Abbott. One Youtube all right. That wraps up another fascinating episode. I think Nathan for taking time out of schedule to talk with US and his passion for these plants is just so intoxicating. I talked to that guy for hours. Really Fun and I highly recommend you check out the show especially if you use naturalist you can help them out in his goal to Kinda catalog and understand you for AC here. In North America but to be honest seems pretty active on that thing and he can probably hope you no matter where you're at across the globe before I let you go. I want to give a big shoutout to our latest producer. Jocelyn they went over to Patriot dot com slash in defense of plants and became a patron at the producer credit level so they get all of the benefits including access to those bonus episodes. You keep hearing about so go. Check that out. If you want to become a patron really helps keep the show up and running. And if you can't afford to become a patron which I completely empathize with and understand the various considered subscribing to an reviewing this podcast on whatever pod portal you used to download it helps indefensible plants reach a wider audience. But yeah as always so many good things on the horizon. Stay tuned for that and Otherwise have yourselves a fun and safe week this is your host Matt signing out audio everyone.

Nathan Taylor North America Nathan Taylor Nathan Spurs Texas IMMACULATA SAP Crohn Sam Sonoran desert Baja California producer official Burge ascites Burr Williams San Mats Ac United States San
William Walker usurped Nicaraguan presidency - July 12, 1856

This Day in History Class

07:37 min | 1 year ago

William Walker usurped Nicaraguan presidency - July 12, 1856

"From fireworks on the Fourth of July two long holiday weekends away there's plenty to look forward to during the summer but why way to celebrate new deliciously spreadable could Khanna cheese singles is giving you a reason to celebrate every single day with their their single best. Stay sweepstakes visit create with Kana Dot Com for your chance to win fifty dollars daily prizes and a grand prize of one thousand dollars plus get tips and inspiration to help make every single day the best day ever this day in history class is production of iheartradio. Welcome to this day in history class where we bring you a new tidbit from history every day. Today is July Eli Twelfth Two Thousand Nineteen. The Day was July twelve eighteen fifty six American filibuster William Walker. Walker was inaugurated as president of Nicaragua Walker was born in Nashville Tennessee in eighteen twenty four. He went on to study medicine in law and later he became the CO owner and editor of the New Orleans Crescent Walker Walker wasn't inherent of the philosophy of manifest destiny. A nineteenth century believed that U._S.. Territorial expansion across the North American continent was inevitable and destined by God. It was a belief that encouraged the displacement and persecution of many indigenous people and people of color on the continent after moving to San Francisco then Marysville near Sacramento Walker began devising a scheme to conquer parts of Latin America to create new slave states to add to the United States. This was not a new idea filibustering or freebooting was the practice of engaging in unauthorized warfare against countries that the U._S. was at peace with the government did not approve these armed expeditions and they were a violation of federal a law that said it was illegal to wage war against countries that were at peace with the U._S.. In the years before the civil war many foolhardy Americans set out to seize territory in central and South America Walker made his motivations clear. You're saying the following that which you ignorantly call Filibuster ISM is not the offspring of hasty passion or ill regulated desire. It is the fruit of the shore an airing instincts which act in accordance with laws as old as the creation they are but dribblers who speak of establishing fixed relations between the pure white American race as it exists in the United States and the mixed Hispanic and Indian race as it exists in Mexico and Central America without the employment of force Walker I look toward Mexico. He tried to get permission from Mexico to create a colony there under the guise that it would serve as a fortified frontier but when Mexico said no walker decided to just plan an invasion he went back to San Francisco and began recruiting people for the invasion who supported slavery and manifest destiny and who were looking for some sort of success in eighteen fifty three he and his crew captured Lopez the capital of the Mexican state of Baja California and called it the Republic of Lower California later called the Republic of the Nora he declared himself president and adopted Louisiana State codes which made slavery legal though more Americans joined him in Mexico supplies were lacking. And neither Mexico nor the U._S.. Government were happy with his actions by eighteen fifty four walker and the band of invaders were forced to surrender and leave Mexico still when Walker went to trial in California for starting an illegal war and violating getting the neutrality act of seventeen ninety four the jury acquitted him and just eight minutes so walker continued his filibustering efforts could took advantage of civil war in Nicaragua to bring mercenaries in the country and captured the city of Granada U._S.. President Franklin Pierce recognized walkers regime as legitimate and on July twelfth eighteen fifty six walker became president of Nicaragua Walker reinstated slavery declared English the official language and encouraged immigration immigration from the U._S.. Through changes to currency and fiscal policy. He promoted the filibustering expedition as a way to expand slavery to win the support of U._S.. Southerners but Walker had already earned the anger of Cornelius Vanderbilt who controlled transit businesses in Nicaragua Costa Rica El Salvador Honduras and Guatemala also opposed Walker and his plans of military conquest Walker surrendered to Commander Charles Henry Davis of the U._S. Navy on May first. I eighteen fifty-seven Walker was welcomed back when he returned to the U._S.. But when he went to Honduras on another filibuster in eighteen sixty the British government had too much strategic and economic interests in the region to tolerate his ploys and they shut the operation down a commander in the British Royal Navy sent him to Honduran authorities instead of Cindy come back to the United States. Walker was executed in Trujillo on September twelve eighteen sixty once the U._S.. Civil war broke out in eighteen sixty one filibustering died out before the end of the war Walker was remembered. Fondly in the southern and western United States for his exploit dubbed the Gray I'd man of destiny by his admirers many northerners on the other hand saw him as a pirate Central American countries viewed his defeat with pride but walkers recognition soon faded into history. I'm Eve Jeffcoat and hopefully you know a little more about about history today than you did. Yesterday you can learn more about history by following us on twitter facebook and instagram at t the I H C podcast. Thanks for joining me. On this trip through time few here and the exact same spot tomorrow for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows creature feature looks at some of the most mind blowing animal and human behaviors on the planet it tries to get inside the heads of animals and explores the world from their point of view host Katie golden studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard. She runs a popular parody account called bird rights activist at propert rights that answers the burning question what if a bird was a political political pundit each episode features a new guest comedian as they explore incredible animal and human behaviors. Some of the specific topics of discussion in this season are dodd behavior like studies that show dogs fill jealousy when another dog receives better rewards for the same tricks and weird animals that seem like they come out of science fiction like sea squirts that undergo retrogressive metamorphosis and auto cannibalized their own brains every Wednesday Katie introduces.

Nicaragua Walker New Orleans Crescent Walker Wa United States Mexico Sacramento Walker walker president Nicaragua San Francisco Kana Dot Com President Franklin Pierce Nicaragua Costa Rica El Salvad twitter apple Central America Nashville Honduras Katie golden