20 Episode results for "Baja California Mexico"

57: "The Joys of Birdwatching" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

06:32 min | Last month

57: "The Joys of Birdwatching" Week

"Hello, and welcome to feedback with ear buds the podcast arm of ear buds podcast collective. I'm Maryelle your host and the founder of ear buds. This episode covers the week of November second through sixth twenty twenty. Election. Day in the US is November third, please make a plan to vote if you have done. So already at the moment of recording and publishing of this episode, you still have time. You're buds podcast. Collective is a listening movement. We send an email every Sunday that contains a theme and five podcast episodes on that theme and each week's podcast picks are curated by a different person. Anyone, can curate list. This week's newsletter and podcast come to us from the Casual Burger podcast. We'll tell you more about that show later on. On this episode of feedback with Ear Buds, I'll share our five podcast episode recommendations of the week and some more information about the episodes. Well, then share some sponsor information as well as some extra podcasts related tidbits. I STOP OUR EAR BUDS PODCAST RECOMMENDATIONS This week's theme comes to us from Suzy Buttress of the Casual Burger podcast. Here's why Susie chose the steam she says. Hi I'm suzy buttress. And the fee my choices the joy of bird-watching. Hope these podcasts encourage people to take a look outside and watch and listen to their local birds and find joy in the natural world. Here. Are the episodes chosen by Susie for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode Monday's episode comes to us from Song burning and is called morning meadow songs. It's twenty minutes long. Here's the description. The meadows are again full of melodies. This time a mix of Field Sparrow Song Sparrow, northern cardinal tree, swallow, eastern toe, he and more. Next. Up The women burgers happy hour and the episode is called Marissa Ola scissor tailed flycatcher fifty three minutes long. Here's the description. Marissa. Olivo works in environmental education in the Rio Grande Valley. But has experienced sharing the love of the outdoors recreation and wildlife with others around the world in. The next episode comes to us from the casual or podcast and has called backyard birds in Baja California it's twenty minutes long. This episode was recorded in the garden of susie buttresses vacation rental in Baja California Mexico the Cossiga had a mature garden and thirteen bird species visited during their first full day there. The next episode comes to us from bird shit and his called uncommon facts about common birds. Corbett addition it's thirty nine minutes long. Here's the description. Every joke about corvette nineteen has already been made. So let's skip to the good stuff birds. We'll share some fascinating little known facts about one of the bird world's smartest families, but let's be honest. All birds, smart. The last episode, the week comes to us from bird curious and is called episode one Goldfinch. It's twenty three minutes long. Here's the description. While most birds are in decline. It's now easier than ever to see gold finches penny and Joe explore the surprising success of these charming birds. Those are the episodes chosen by Susie for this week's theme the joys of bird watching. You can follow along with the discussion of this week's podcast episodes by using the Hashtag Bird podcasts. Each week in our newsletter are curator gets shout out something that they love. It can be a movie that they saw a project they're working on a nonprofit, they support or anything. Here's what Susie. Wants to share. She writes. I hope these podcasts inspire you to take some time for yourself and to get outside if you can to a park a beach, a nature preserve listened to the sounds of the birds around you. I'd love to hear about your experience. You can share it with suzy on twitter at the casual burder pod. Thank you to the Casual Burger podcast for their support of this newsletter and episode listened to the Casual Burger podcast joined susie. As she takes bird walks tells you about the wild birds she sees speaks with other enthusiasts and share stories from birdwatchers around the world. Another shadow goes to another one of our sponsors. That's buzz. Sprout bus route is the best podcast hosting site in the game. If you're looking to start a podcast and who isn't these days buzzed sprout is your best bet they make it super easy to submit your show to all of the podcast platforms. You can easily create sharable soundbites and other funds, social media images. We will have a link to buzz sprout in the show notes of this episode, and if you're interested in starting a podcast and you click that link, you get an Amazon gift. Card, once you sign up. This week's podcast spotlight is on knock turn. There are twenty four hours. A day seems pretty straightforward. But what do you really know about the hours between say eleven, PM and six am From graveyard shift jobs to secret identities who we are and what we do at night is often less fully perceived by others whether by choice or by circumstance, learn more by tuning into knock turn wherever you get your podcasts. You can apply to have your podcasts spotlit by our newsletter. Ear Buds podcast collective DOT ORG. Head on over to our social media to find links to the episodes that we mentioned. We're on twitter at ear buds, pod call, and we're on instagram and facebook at ear buds podcast collective. SIGN UP TO RECEIVE PODCAST recommendation newsletter at ear buds, podcast collective dot org it goes out every single Sunday night. This show is written and produced by me on this black. It's edited mixed and designed by Daniel Turk. Our newsletter is edited by ABC Lonski and our theme music is by Sweet Oh. We'll be back next week with more podcast recommendations in between now, and then please make a plan to vote get yourself to the polling place and listen to tons of podcast. If there's a long line, you can always turn on a podcast recommendation from US happy listening and happy voting.

Susie US Suzy Buttress twitter founder Baja California Mexico Baja California Rio Grande Valley Daniel Turk ABC Lonski Olivo Corbett corvette instagram Joe Amazon facebook twenty minutes twenty three minutes
March 23, 2020: Colosio Assassinated

Today in True Crime

14:56 min | 9 months ago

March 23, 2020: Colosio Assassinated

"Today is Monday march. Twenty Third Twenty twenty on this day in Nineteen Ninety four presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio was assassinated in Tijuana Mexico. Welcome to today in. True crime podcast. Original due to the graphic nature of today's crime listener discretion is advised extreme. Caution is advised for listeners under thirteen. Today we're covering the assassination of Mexican presidential candidate. Luis Donaldo Colosio who was shot after a campaign speech in Tijuana. Let's go back to the afternoon of March Twenty Third Nineteen Ninety four just after five PM. Almost four thousand cheering supporters. Were pressed together around the battered pickup truck parked right. In the center of Lomas Tara's the city of Tijuana was one of the largest urban centers in Baja California Mexico and Lomas Serena's was one of its more impoverished neighborhoods however the citizens of Tijuana were active in politics. The campaigns were grassroots and local. In this town people paid attention to elections and participated with more than boats they held rallies and events and invited their neighbors and friends. Today's event was no exception on this sunny but cool march afternoon. Beloved presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio had drawn quite a crowd. He was the last to speak in a group of Municipal Council leaders and social service. Figureheads COLOSIO had no trouble focusing the frenetic energy of crowds with his orations whether he was speaking in a gymnasium on a theater stage or even from the back of a truck like today he was a popular candidate representing the Institutional Revolutionary Party or PRI. Pri was a centre right political machine that had been in power for over sixty years colosio. The Secretary of social development had been handpicked by outgoing president. Carlos Salinas dig or to re to be. The party's next candidate and today he seemed to be riding a wave of popular support. The thunderous applause of the crowd blended with blasting music as Colosio finished his speech at five eight. Pm as he stepped down from the pickup truck colosio was greeted by a wall of cheering supporters behind him. The local pre representatives tried to form a barrier to help their candidate make his way through the crowd and out of the area but colosio either missing the open exit or ignoring. It turned the opposite direction and headed into the crowd of over three thousand people. Not far behind him Sara Ruth Martinez. Mera's walked with her two daughters. The crowd was pressing hard against her to try and reach out to the candidate to shake his hand or even touch the ham of his blue windbreaker. The sound system was blasting the song luck who libra at a deafening volume. A few feet from her Yolanda Karate Cheo was also trying to watch colosio and having better luck she saw him and saw he was in danger. You'll want to glimpsed a man in a black jacket. Pull something out from under his coat. Then she recognized the dull chrome plating of a thirty eight special revolver. The man raised the gun to Colosio's right temple just in front his ear and pulled the trigger. The bullet shattered through the right side of Colosio skull and fractured into thousands of tiny shrapnel fragments. Colosio lifted his arm slightly towards his head and spun around towards the ground as the signals from his brain suddenly stopped blood and gray matter poured out of his nose as he fell a second gunshot rang out and another bullet embedded into the left side of his chest near his heart. The force of the second gunshot spun Colosio's body around and he landed base down in the widening pool of blood. It was five twelve PM. The crowd scattered pushing away from the fallen candidate. Cheers turned to screams as people heard the shots and saw the blood pouring from colosio's nose and mouth bright. Red Blood cascaded down the front of his white button up shirt and soaked through his tie. Pre volunteers rushed to lift COLOSIO's inert body through the crowd. An ambulance was already stationed nearby. In case of an emergency during the speech day quickly loaded Colosio into the back with Dr Garcia taxi. Laga who'd been accompanying COLOSIO's presidential campaign. Since the beginning the ambulance doors slammed shut. And the driver gunned the engine towards t one a general hospital. Meanwhile the crowd rushed the man in the black jacket taking him down to the ground. Several police officers moved in and arrested the man shoving him through the enraged crowd as stones and shouts rained down around them. The crowd chanted to kill him over and over as they shoved the suspect into the back of a chevy suburban a rock shattered one of the suburbans back windows as the police escaped the chaos around them. They quickly drove to the Federal Judicial Police Station. Where the suspect was handcuffed to a chair. The police ordered a barricade for the station to prevent an attack on the assassin. It was five. Fifty P M meanwhile at the General Hospital three neurosurgeons to cardiologists and five anesthesiologists. Were gathered around Colosio's body in an operating room a Bevy of nurses and assistance moved around the group as they performed several emergency surgeries in succession including placing temporary pacemaker and COLOSIO's chest to keep his heart beating but nothing worked. There was no sign of brain activity and his heartbeat and respiration failed repeatedly still. They tried emergency resuscitation for another hour. At seven forty five pm Luis Donaldo Colosio was declared dead. Coming up the investigation into the assassin's identity and motive as well as the lasting conspiracy theories around Colosio's violent murder listeners. I'm excited to announce that crime junkies flowers has a new podcast original series. I think you'll really enjoy. It's called supernatural with Ashley. Flowers and you can find brand new episodes every Wednesday. We all know that most mysteries can be solved by looking at the facts but sometimes the facts don't lead to a logical explanation and the truth lies somewhere in the unknown in supernatural with Ashley. Flowers Ashley takes a deep dive into the strange and surreal to explain some of the world's most bizarre true crime occurrences each week. She'll dig into a different crime or mystery where the most fitting theory isn't always the most conventional from exorcisms to unsolved murders to alien abductions. Ashley will take on. The tails challenge the unexplained and dissect the facts with a heavy helping of skepticism and rationale. So are you ready to get to the bottom of history's most peculiar events? Follow supernatural with Ashley. Flowers free on spotify. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Now back to the story at seven thirty PM on March Twenty Third Nineteen Ninety Four Federal Prosecutor has seuss Romero Magana drafted a statement in his office in Tijuana Mexico. When he finished Ma. Ganja set the document in front of twenty-three-year-old Mario Abort Oh Martinez who was still wearing his black jacket as he sat handcuffed in the waiting area. The document was a confession to assassinating presidential candidate. Luis Donaldo Colosio. Aburto read the document and nodded. Then he signed it and agreed to testify. Maganya told a Bordeaux he had the right to a lawyer but a- Bordeaux said he didn't have one Megani appointed have year Machado the head of the Bar Association in Tijuana to be aborted does defense attorney though. The confession was signed within two hours of the assassination. The investigation lasted until July. Nineteen Ninety Four. A deputy attorney general was appointed to lead the investigation team and compiled over three hundred witness. Statements Forty eight forensic and technical studies and over two thousand photographs. The investigation concluded that abort. Oh had acted alone and in a premeditated fashion aboard. Oh claimed that he had killed Colosio to draw attention to pacifism almost immediately rumors of a conspiracy spread throughout the country. Television news replayed videos of the assassination over and over and many journalists analyze the tapes on nightly news. People pointed out figures in the crowd that seemed to help. Abort Oh reach. Colosio or move colosio closer towards a Bordeaux people also claimed a was too immature and naive to have pulled off the assassination alone conspiracy theorists surmised that there had to be a mastermind however no firm evidence was produced for these theories and on October thirty first nineteen ninety. Four Mario Boorda was sentenced to forty two years in jail. In December of that same year his appeal failed and the conviction was upheld. Another three years were added to his prison sentence during his final sentencing hearing on December first or Nestos Adio Pons de Leon took office as the new president of Mexico. The same office Luis Colosio had sought but the rumors of conspiracy continued during the do's administration in response to public outcry several appointed attorneys continued investigations into Colosio assassination political theories painted Zedillo and other pre leaders as the masterminds ordering COLOSIO's murderer to ensure their own elections however Weil corruption and nepotism were discovered in the ranks of pre throughout the nineteen eighties and nineties. No investigation ever found evidence of an assassination order more specifically conspiracy theories centered around a second shooter claiming that the two bullets entered. Colosio's body at Angles. That would have made it impossible for a single gun to have fired them both. But any evidence for this theory including Colosio's clothing and the position of his fallen body was quickly undermined as the investigations continued. The final report into Louise's Donaldo Colosio is murder was released late in two thousand and concluded that all avenues of investigation that we have followed have been addressed in depth and none had proved a serious element linking to other perpetrators. One cannot hope to build on them without further evidence than speculation but even with the case closed after the final report rumors and conspiracy theories still circulate about the death of Luis Donaldo Colosio. Thanks for listening today in true crime. I'm Vanessa Richardson for more stories. Like the murder of Louise Aldo colosio. Check out the PODCAST. Original assassinations today in true crime is a podcast original. You can find more episodes of today in true crime and all other podcast originals for free on spotify. Not only does spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy. All of your favorite podcast originals. Like today in true crime for free from your phone. Desktop or smart speaker to stream today and true crime on spotify. Just open the APP and type today in true crime in the search bar at par cast. We're grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at podcast and twitter at podcast network? We'll be back with a brand new episode tomorrow in True Crime. Today in true crime was created by Max Cutler and his apar- cast studios original. It is executive produced by Max Cutler. Sound design by Karie Murphy with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden and Freddie Beckley. This episode of today and true crime was written by Andrew. Messer with writing assistance by Nora. Battelle. I'M VANESSA. Richardson high listeners. If you haven't heard it already. I highly recommend you check out the new podcast original series supernatural with Ashley Flowers every Wednesday. Take a deep dive into the strange and surreal to find the truth behind some of the world's most bizarre true crime occurrences search for supernatural with Ashley Flowers in the spotify APP and listened free today.

Luis Donaldo Colosio COLOSIO COLOSIO Louise Aldo colosio Colosio Ashley Flowers spotify Tijuana Third Twenty twenty Tijuana Mexico murder Vanessa Richardson Carlos Salinas Lomas Tara president Institutional Revolutionary Pa Lomas Serena Sara Ruth Martinez Baja California Mexico chevy
Mexico: What Travelers Can Expect During COVID-19

The World Nomads Podcast

37:13 min | 2 months ago

Mexico: What Travelers Can Expect During COVID-19

"In this episode, we really visit Mexico currently one of the most popular travel destinations with some of the easiest covid nineteen entry requirements in the world the war nomads podcast it's not your usual travel podcast. It's everything for the adventures independent traveler. Hi. It's Kim and filled with you from wherever you get your favorite pods and with Cohen still affecting the way we engage in the world. It's important to plan wisely and travel responsibly by for your own safety, and then if the places that you visit Rodman's same pain. But as we were engaged with the world, you'll luckily planning vacations not far from home. So, we'll can help by providing travel safety tapes, inspiring content. We've got some news coming up about traveling shirts designed to protect you while traveling. That's right at the time that we couldn't. It's right now it's mid September twenty twenty Mexico has become one of the most popular travel destinations with reportedly some of the easiest covid nineteen entry requirements in the world. Before we go getting into these destination, some you do need to Nari might be easy. Place make sure you to your own race. Mexico, for example, doesn't require negative covid nineteen. Or reputation for entry as an example, nate to quarantaine. But obviously, you do need to follow covid health requirements which include wearing masks in some locations and obviously washing hands regularly, and am for at least which thickens or is it thirty seconds? Thirty whatever the time it takes to sing. A minute. On you social distancing as well. We'll have a link to an article in show nights. Spells at is requirements correctly even more even more than we can do. Trustworthy actually now. We'll also have a Alvarez nine meds. Mexico travel alerts that are updated regularly. So you can click on that at any time and you get the latest. Let's get into it Phil who did it to give us an idea? Just how safe Mexico is is a local but not covered safe generally because we do hear a lot of stories don't worry about he's Mexico Saif. Horse big question people are school just watch Netflix. You caught out with Ruben from Mondo Jovan at a conference in Scotland. But that was a couple years guy. Wow I. Born and raised in Mexico so. To, give us this insight into how safe it is. I mean in this industry for fifteen years. And I. Always. Next of these story about a lease in all the time when where are you from Mexico and immediately zane euros how do you sort by black? People immediately he's like. Feeling that I'm landing Damascus probably. Every time that I get home. But he's not later. Of course there is a problem of course. Will I will be lying to you. He fight on and. Consider That we have we have a problem. We have a big drug problem probably since. I know. Since ever. Since the. Bigger and bigger and bigger in the last. Twenty. Years. or he was more obvious in the last twenty years on, it's it's really simple to understand. where? We have a big neighbour for. We'd be. Yep I. WE are big producer. So in order to six. Any conflict has to do need to have two parts YEP OUGHTA. Why couldn't be just one? I think the Mexico I speak problem. Is We. Have a terrible biard. Terry will pr condition in terms of the news. you can see the war is precedent ever history that we have is right now thank God he's he's gone this this administration. Considering so many facts considering. Corruption. Thinks that we've been. Terrible. But it's it's pretty simple. Decide that there are. Lots of places which are find, but there was some places which are not correct. So it's very like lights anyway. So he finally go to Mexico. How would I find out the information about? What other site places guy on the not safe places to avoid bore there. He's always the hot spot not in the right way I mean. Because the geographically position next to the US board there. were. Probably. You're going to get the biggest conflicts. Costs Natural. Conditions of of these people trying to get. All this. Stuff into the into the country, and then about the cities or about the destinations they're they're they're mostly man's donation, which is Mexico City Cancun or all the other. Beach destinations you're going to have these. Otherwise. The ball suitable problems. Yeah. because. All the interaction there is involve around. I mean. There are always people looking for these amount and there's always people having these offer. So if you are in bold or you're looking after this and you're. Looking after that kind of action you will get into trump we'll get into trouble. But that's something that he's going to happen in. Mexico or. Anywhere else. Are, tell me about your favorite parts of Mexico with with your what which part of your country do you love the most? I, Love My City I. Love Mexico City, then my second favorite place of Mexico. Is Ease Chapas. With cheese in the south. Yes. Saudi specs ago. They have a beautiful beautiful beautiful landscape. It's. Green, a lot of community and local community people and they have beautiful beautiful, beautiful green zones and it's a mix between jungle and. A lot of art. On a lot of traditions And all this sewn surround for me. One of the most beautiful parts of. Mexico. Next to you well, close to them, you get done for as well for me. It's my one of my favorite places and he's my grandma hometown which. Obviously put it in in the hot part of the list. Dainty. Well, Mexico City has changed a lot. The medium-term was once not a very nice place to go. So what change they were, how did it become such a great destination? How to become a hotspot? It's a lot of investment in the city in their last ten cure will say. much more efficient communication and. a lot of big brands hotels and be luxury runs. Around the city. and. developing. I mean you feel comfort when you're next to the CD or walking around the city and there are so many things to do and so many things to. To see around last last question I want you to tell me a secret spot in Mexico. City falls to visit there. Where would you say me? That's not the usual my secret spot in Mexico. Samnang. For Me Sung Kelly's. Is One of the most non. Well. At amazing neighborhoods. that perfectly shows you. How is The Real Mexico City. So get lost in San Hill. Take a look about the houses. And you're going to know exactly how is how is Mexican how he's Mexico City Dodge. Ivan is an educational travel agency aimed at all types of travellers especially, first timers. Who our God it step by step process to go abroad to study all the links in the show notes. Yeah, plus Ovarian Safety Guide to from Mexico will put that there as well. Now Cassandra runs skyping in wide offers gripped, who is I really like this because when he had the term groups Off. Plays because she does group to the people who don't do group to us. And she helps solo travelers plan their own adventures and Cassandra has spent a lot of time in Mexico. So I. started in. Baja California and I did a whale-watching road trip all along for Ninsula. Camping and stopping at different locations to see Wales and I been completed my scuba diving certification in Baja California, and then I went to vital Carmen about two years later and did my advanced scuba diving certification. So what scuba diving like in that area? Oh, it's. It's amazing. It's amazing. Say in in pinal Carmen it's one of the best places in the world you see turtles uc a large fish, you see algae UC. I saw titanic Eeo that apparently just lives in this shipwreck and I was so surprised to find him and then was told after the that he's just always there every single day waiting for divers to come down and say, hi, when you're in Baja California, you then hitchhiked with a couch surfing friends I did. So I met her actually the previous year. Anti. Tijuana, she lives in Tijuana and she wrote me and she said I go to the whales every winter would you like to go with me? So I did I flew back. To San Diego and then I crossed the border into China and we made a plan to go down the border and we actually found another couch surfer to go with us and he drove for the first couple of days which was really nice because when she went to pick up her tent, we realize that there were no. In the tense. So we would have been into or a terrible surprise where we went to go set up a ten at night. And when he had to go back to WANNA we hitchhiked. We hitchhiked the whole way down the peninsula. With a lot of Canadian retired couples who would learn vacation in Baja California Mexico every winter and there's like these massive RV camps and lots are all along the peninsula. So they would they would drive us to wherever they were going. We would spend the night and then we would find someone to take us the next stretch said jumping in with mom and dad grandma. GRANDPA seems a lot them what I was envisaging. Yeah, it was. It was very safe and we did have other offers and we will use their best judgment as to single women are there were offers from we got an offer from a truck with three men in the front and we decided they might be very nice. But we didn't think that that was the best option for us off. So we let that pass and when we had a Mexican couple of male female Arlene in their thirties that were driving on a short vacation until they gave us a ride. So one of the city's we ended up staying at their boots how? That night just because we got in too late to try to find any accommodations, we're going to chat about safety in Mexico lighter in the poll cost but generally, did you feel safe? I, yes. One hundred percent I'm in Mexico at least a dozen times I've traveled all over the country and I've always felt extremely extremely safe. There I mean there are areas I won't go to like around the border and there are pockets of violence. And that violence is real, but it's also it's in very specific places for the most part and so it can be avoided now you mentioned nasty surprises. Changle diarrhea. Why I'm so interested in this that feeling I appreciate we're going to have to do an episode on. Around the world because it's kind of one of those things that happens to everyone but no one talks about it I talk about it I I, send out a monthly adventure newsletter that has it talks about my personal adventures and upcoming group trips that I lead and travel tips and everything and one of them that I sent out was jungle diarrhea in Mexico at. What I? Like you can't use that as a title I was like Oh. Yes. I can like people want to know and if they don't like fishing subscribe to my newsletter because I. Keep a real and let them know. What's going on? It's A. It's a part of travel like mess. You're just GONNA. Stay in your house for the rest in your life. I've gotten sick at restaurants in New York City in. The country. So this particularly, also out jungle diarrhea happened when I was going on a road trip with friend of Mine Pedro who's a taxi driver in Mexico City and we drive his taxi all over the country roads shirts and we were going through San, Luis Potency and we stopped in a small town because we were tired and we went to low street fair and food was good. Am Hedera had me sample his his drink? it was a Tamarind. Sweetened tamarind water has like man this is good. I should get out and I. Like man, this is really good. I should get another. I had another and morning I woke up just sweating. Like. Isn't it hot in here and he's like, no, it's not. and. I. Sat up and I was dizzy and it was it was it was really bad but we had hiking to do that afternoon. So we went hiking. And we haven't hiking the next day through these These ancient ruins in the middle of the jungle and it was he was in the eighties and the Nineties Day it felt to me. It felt like just boiling like my blood was boiling. Hiking through these, these mountains are no bathrooms in sight. At night we were camping and we found this really cool campground with teepees. So we had this nice TV, but then I had to climb out of it and you know run to the bathroom which seemed like it was a kilometer away. I was grateful for it. So any. Any accidents or did you make it to the Louis every every time I did make it every time I'm surprised to the next campsite we went to I had to cross the river. I had to like hop over rocks to get to the other side of the campsite to get to the bathroom but I was so grateful that there were lights and there were there was toilet paper and eventually a couple of days. Later, I was able to do this waterfall jumping tour in on the way split to see Mexico with no accidents. Thank goodness we. been interesting for some under underwater gopro filming. The video viral and every travel logger in every business person wants him viral video like that would be the viral video that I would be subjected to. Tell us about this friend in Mexico has then he's a taxi driver and you drive the taxi around the country, I also met him on Couch Surfing. I met him like ten years ago and it's I talked about crowd surfing for years and I've gotten so many more questions recently about it recently hosted a guide from Iraq and I WANNA I wanNA, do some more writing about that. But I met him in Mexico City and he had responded to it was a dancing group dance salsa and so he wrote me in that group and said, Hey, I can't host you at my house but I'm a driver. If you need I, can pick you up from the airport and take you to wherever you're going to be saying. Oh that works out. Great. And so we ended up hanging out in went down there like two years later we met up again and we decided to take a day trip to Puebla, which is like two hours from Mexico City it was just going to be a quick day trip. Go there come back and on the way he says, Hey, what do you think about spending the night in Blah Blah and driving another six hours to the Haka in the morning? I thought that sounds like fun. Offer like something we should have planned for before. We left Mexico. City as we don't have our clothing or toothbrush or anything. But it sounds like fun. And when we got to Web la, we went to the Internet cafe and we posted on there and we actually bound some hosts that we're going to take a bus to walk in the next day, and so they let us stay with them. They had their bedroom and we all drove in his taxi to Oaxaca had a great time, and then we had a bunch of adventures since then in his taxi and now the taxi driver on my group tours to Mexico. and. He has a million stories it's on. Now CASSANDRA's LAWF- alone will be enough. Fa made a joint. She's great fun links in Shy Nights and to avoid jungle diarrhea. She suggests making sure the water is filtered, which makes sense but it's not often hardly not often that easy to do in small towns. Who knows? Exactly. I do know that. has a blog tiles of a backpack. Oh, she also has a. backpacking God to Mexico, which we will share in shy nights, and she's a big fan of the places of destination having spent months there. I I looked at I looked there. I didn't really have much expectations and Mexico City to be honest because. It. All. The stories that it's big and it's dangerous instead team polluted. but actually, that wasn't my experience all. I, was in a really nice area of the city, a place goal Roma. And and it's like leafy avenues as low as cool bars and restaurants, and I had a whale of a time I really didn't want to leave actually. A. Be for like a month and I just lights is so much I decided to stay as long as I could. Give me four reasons you decided to stay for four months. The food. But Mexican food is ridiculously would. The street food actually is amazing. You can buy sort of Trae Tacos for my Dala. And it's really really good. The people is they found the people really friendly kind and open and again. So it's not really. At expected from Mexico, given all those stories ahead. What else the culture I'm actually really amazed by how many museums Mexico City Harley is only Paris. Has More. Museums. Than Mexico City. So this so much to learn. In Mexico this. An. Apology easy and that's obsolete incredible. It's huge has exhibition halls of every pre-columbian civilization and in Mexico. And they have this. The Aztec Sandstone huge massive stone based like three and a half meters across and apparently ways over twenty tones. And it's. Amazing carvings. And didn't really know what it was useful but I think my calendar will for astrological purposes but I mean that was just incredible for me to see that and You know considering how long been Nestle and they'd actually design saying. Yeah I would play by. Three things what else full things? Just someone that was just it was fun. There's a square in. Mexico City Plastic Ira Baldi, and you can go there on this Mariachi bands clay and everywhere. Could Saturday Jew is an area called Shashi Milko, which is way you can go on. Like a really colorful boat around all these canals. and. If you got a week had a holiday is just massive party and all these boats filled with people drinking beers. And Sig. The Marriott, cheap boats the come alongside and like Saturday Jew and you can. Composite the house selling like tacos in the little corn on the call and. I I just looked. As if it it really really really enjoyed it. Like I said because my expectations were. Pretty. Much Day or I just totally blew me away pay a fakes but can you expand on what you do because it easing just Mexico? Yeah. No I just. I decided it was about three years ago. Now, I was working in in Spain. Is I could take his job anymore. So I decided to quit my job and go travelling. Around South America. For about ten months that was backpacking around South America And I I looked at it and when I came back after that, you know is only supposed to sort of once-in-a-lifetime trip. When I came back the soul of work in office that and it was just awful. So yeah. I decided to work a lot harder on the on the block. So. Yeah. Tells about cocker it's. Solo, female travel travel around by myself. Budget travel but still spending money on unique experiences because I think if you're GONNA travel. And the something incredible Econ Daniels in the world swift spending a little bit of. An. And I just want to. Inspire people to take the plunge and do. You know when I when I quit my job, there's so many people that sites male I wish I could see what you're doing. And Yeah? Obviously, if you've got family and mortgage and stuff, it's hard. But. I think in a life is still you should just take the plunge in if you can then just do which is great. But the big question I clear is you must have had some money in your pocket before you hit it off the the first trip that I went on this because of this ten month adventure to South America like I had some some it hired since a Mike on Parents and they passed away before was teach odds and saving could Sadat. Within. One out I was volunteering hostels and stuff like Klatten staying in staying hostels like it wasn't. I'm not spending money. And that ease. Gutu. He considering clues mission Phyllis to share with you the very best of a destination without biking breaking the bank. Good. Okay. Tim Neville is a travel writer. We featured him in previous PODCASTS. He's great to have chapped t he went kayaking in. Loretta obey Jacques Cousteau Cool Mexico's Sea of cortes the world's aquarium. Found out he said that I thought man that is just absolutely perfect You know it was my first trip to that part of Mexico and I am just dying to go back is just I just can't describe what a wonderful feeling it was to go down there especially when the weather appeared. In Oregon where I live is not so great to go down there and have just wonderful temperatures and so on. When we first arrived, of course, weather wasn't so great but but it's Mexico. It's always going to be a little that was going to be better than where you are and so lease generally speaking of it say so to jump. into. A place but just crystal clear water just spectacular scenery is very desert of then this cool refreshing waters contrast or just wonderful and then you pack all Wildlife Newsday Wow was all side rather be right now now you saw Marlon account imagine what that would be like to see a Marlon swimming when you not actually fishing one if that makes. Right exactly that's the first one I'd seen you know not mounted on a wall in a seafood restaurant. So be I couldn't believe it. I just paddling along and look down kind of a disturbed revealing when you when you. Your body can sense. There's something there before you really realized something's there. And I just said that just a little different down under the boat and all of a sudden realized that was moving and then I realized Oh my gosh, this is a giant fish of and then. Tau What it was even though it was, you know was probably maybe four feet below. That until it turned it would it turn the summit, hit it sides and then it just lit up like by Canadian spaceship of that just just blew electric light Gone so yeah that was definitely a highlight orbits is fully there's so many turtles in dog birds and things like that that you begin to get a little bit used to this let's say. To have something like a Marlon go by which was those still living whatever seeing a pretty special something, it won't forget. That's for sure. Doesn't leave up to John Cousteau, is theory that it's the world's aquarium. Well. You don't know read biologists, but it's just the average guy likes to go down there go kayaking. It is certainly one of the more spectacular places you could go. Tons and tons alive wildlife. There's great places snorkeling. We would stop off into these little coast. That's the fun thing right about kayaking that. Not. Only do get to sort of. Ride in your backpack let's say you're carrying your your your. All in your boat, but then you get to use it to go or the fun little looks and crannies that otherwise pretty difficult again too. So we can pull into this little coves. beach the guy accidents swap out for circle gear and go play around with the fish for a little while you described it it goes from these arid desert feel into this beautiful crystal clear water. But you also in the story that you talk about some champion little seaside towns had had is it'll connect you know. So it's it's definitely a mix to. Where you start off there. But there's several places you can start their retto It's just a wonderful little tender on just just that whole portion of Mexico I think I think in a Mexican so big and diverse that that particular area Mexico, Ogden's legit has this unbelievably chill vibe to it. It's like you know we've got great weather. We've got these great beaches and all these animals. Awesome food. It's like why worry? So everybody's Naturally. Kind of happy relaxed. diseasing, go hang out east of sidewalk cafes I walked restaurants, fish tacos or. Margaritas, whatever it is that you want and just just really really shed. So some of daily in stress guests that you have in your name and your life. But at the same time is it's culturally fascinating and historically so rich, you've got to remember that. These. have been set a long before. You know by Europeans obviously about before anything where I'd that where I live. So you have these old visions you have these talents, our own you have just this will. Very very colorful culture niches permeates everything. So to have both this this wonderful don't let's call it urban by at Man this wonderful natural vibe you those two together in Mattis Paradise you know it's it's right there on our doorstep and so wonderful. Fascinating, culturally as A. Food. The unique. No excuse to go the whole. It's right there. So I've had a lot more time down there for sure. Feel it's not fair to say we've left the best until last, but we cannot have an episode on Mexico and not explore the food absolutely and I think Mexican food sometimes has a bad reputation. I've heard described as pre masticated food but I think that's a west of waste inversion and I'm away that there is an entire different. Mexican. Cuisine. We're about to find that out who better to do that within kindle. He'll. He's an Australian journalist specialising travel food and people features, but he's also the author of bestselling responsible coast and it contributes to gourmet my pilgrim Spain and Mexico volumes some guessing kindle you know what you're talking about when it comes to Mexican cuisine I wouldn't. Be An accident Mexican presenting because you've made up of blog funds I. think to get across everything that's involved in. Aden quantities. Of. Book as you've been inside I'm. Thinking about Yeah Phil, same to summit up his premedicated. Let stetzer refried beans tex-mex stuff that you get in shape China outlets that sort of stuff I'm talking about he's not proper Mexican food is it? Not. Talking from an Australian mistake. We get right Mexican food. We think been a sort of a hot massive things and save studying mentioned. You inside it's not I mean means you can present is actually an analogous has. Given. Interest not laze Spanish win win win nine Bein is they brought. Pool can, and you know the sort of common Mesa where where it makes didn't have beforehand and then you had had widely been. WAITING TO IN LEBANON I But I'm. Sort of. Treasury. Antipasto costumes that. Informed the way makes 'cause aimed. At the Hampton Incredible And Mixing Chocolate comes in. Chile things, Matters Thompson leading ebeling, grading we mentioned without modern. But but there's will Michigan side to Disney's. For. Anyone makes. You saw. Sort of a MAC understanding of how much that those united site Mexico world not. At. All of the my favorite foods. Yom. Any country that gives you chocolate. Some debate now come from. The South and letting Americans but suddenly. The mayans. Transplants. PERCENT I. Drink I came to impress you him both of you probably more. So Kendall when I Cook Chili Con Con. I put chocolate in it You're not. Mall. Languages. Disciples of. Is Mexican cuisine not side takes a long time to prepare twenty hours off and often has more than city and grading that that often has chocolate means I know on the rock track. Putting at the chocolate in either down, you'd want the sun dried chillies well. Franchisees. Not Turn I came nor do use the fresh take on board that advice and he's been twenty four hours preparing. It came twelve hours. Twelve hours local got put the time in I would speaking of cod is I can't imagine what a Guacamole dip in Mexico would Thais Lot compared to what we we thought fills in that kitchen based on the recipes that we've given or even in some restraints. Is there a difference? Very. In other countries say knighted cuisines when we got there and ate them. He's got lot to do with questions and Guacamole. Next my French so leanness of busy. INTO MA in the laundry. On watercraft together. do I mean every kind of come from the joke I'm I'm one of the states makes. Advocaat is in the world so Quality Ingredients, that Ohio's from. That thousand I could be depression under. The. Grading. To the price. So they probably ten out. and. That and that say across. The beaches in Mexico with my. Thing very soon. Cool. Mentioned earlier about things and shave, and what have you been there. Uh. Mary. PAREN-. On and simony somebody giving positive changes I Making Mexico. That they too. Many ingredients I had. So I can. Travel around. And have one. Five that it will never ties Simon. You'll be. Just as experience for me when I. Went up there to things revelation. You can have. Bain. And and not get not get bored and still not basic cries and the loss of. Some of the ways and Then I mean Baynes but make some Bra. Equivalent abroad and somebody I just been. stop. It's yeah. Well. You're already covers all biases that you've written for us. We'll share that in China Kendall is it all washed down with little shot of Tequila? That was your ring. Yes. The among. You know who is guys by? Looking at production was early morning and you know had to sit. There and Not Shots Tequila. Stuff. Not many, my team I think probably got it for at the and probably lot of which is I'm here with sort of keillor's salsa around. Launches put some Shit and chillier Baptist go. To make the world. And something natural magic sauce. Conquest soy and then you put the be on top of that. Is especially hard time. This bag and cyber reysen is Sort of a little bit buddy marriage but not quite as could. Be But it's Ok that and I'll have to keeler shorts in a moderated. Find, you can fit on the table candle. Thanks so much for chatting. and. That's Mexico just one of the destinations world pushing through the pandemic and allowing people to travel. Yeah. Awesome. Now, Vietnam has done a pretty good job managing covid nineteen, and next week we made a woman who found herself stuck there I think she left. For these journey in February and as we know it was declared a pandemic in March. So she stuck the will stuck inverted commas with her family. Feel it's changed the hallway that she views travel moving forward, which is fantastic. Look forward to say up by. Nomads podcast royal boundaries.

Mexico Mexico City twenty Mexico Mexico City Cancun Mexico City Dodge Baja California Mexico Mexico City Plastic Ira Baldi China South America Netflix Phil Baja California Spain New York City Rodman Nari Alvarez Damascus Kim US
Deportation Wounds

Truth Be Told

32:36 min | 8 months ago

Deportation Wounds

"Truth be told is made possible in part by production grants from the Housing Simon's foundation and the California Wellness Foundation at. We are dedicated to providing the accurate information. You need during this couvert. Nineteen crisis and even though our routines commute and lives look very different. Katie's award-winning coverage is still the same. Ask Your Smart Speaker to play. Keady subscribe to our podcasts or download. The APP on your phone for twenty four seven livestream from K. Q. E. D. You know I was thinking the other day. What am I going to see? My people again like physically. So many of us are feeling isolated lying on zoom or facetime to see our friends and family and we don't really know how long it will be like this but for many people. This is not a new reality all. Fiv Come West is. That's Isa Mendoza on the phone with her. Dad Arnaldo Isa lives in California and her father lives in Mexico. He was deported. They're eleven years ago and since then they watched each other grow older through a screen and occasionally they see each other during the holidays but they really don't know if he'll ever be able to return to the United States. I'm Tanya Moseley dear truth be told the truth be told the truth be told I need. Your help is has been living apart from her father for so long. It's just become a normal way of life but recently she's been feeling all sorts of emotions about it. Hey Truth be told. My name is Mendoza and my question is how do I start to heal after a family member has been deported. Hey Isa how are you need? Hey Tanya I'm doing pretty good how are you? I'm doing well? So for folks out there. Isa IS OUR ENGAGEMENT PRODUCER. And she's joined us for season two and before we talk to our wise one. We wanted to tell you a little bit more about her. I want to ask you ISA. Why do you want to open up and tell us your question this week? I've always loved the show and I loved the fact that people can ask honest questions and get honest responses and I think I was grappling with something that I hadn't yet asked out loud and I felt that this was the space in the time to do it. I felt more ready than I have been in the past. I think that's also like I needed that time. And so you're from east. La and You're born and raised there with your mom your dad and your older brothers. You're the only girl in your family and when you were a junior in high school Something happened yeah when I was a junior. My Dad was deported. I was sixteen years old and I think we have different definitions of what being a father met and so for him. It was being provider and working a lot and for me that met more of being present in our lives and so I felt he wasn't as present growing up even up until I was sixteen. Yeah I mean I'm just thinking about what sixteen is like it's a mess. It is sixteen is a mess. Were you a mess? Oh Yeah I was. You know. That's really interesting. You saying you had your ideas of what a father should be. And he had an idea of what he thought his role should be and those were kind of different so he wasn't always around when you're growing up. Yeah for him. The priority was to make sure that nothing was missing from our lives that we had food that we have the clothes that we needed that we had income out with. Allow us to play sports at school or be involved with their friends. I don't think we understood the sacrifice that took. Isa's father was arrested for driving while intoxicated and this arrest began. The process of deportation is upset about his drinking so she wasn't talking to him. During this time that soon changed he was in a jail in Los Angeles. At that point. I was just like you know all of the past and whatever I had with him like this is so much bigger than that like our lives are going to change like this is. This is the moment and when I went I felt like I don't know we just had to acknowledge what situation we were in so. I just asked Mike. How are you feeling how are they treating you? And then I asked him whites the legal proceedings were what they told him an. Remember him saying that He wouldn't be able to return until he's eighty seven something you're on eighties He wouldn't be able to come back to the United States until yeah. He was eighty plus years old. Yeah that's right yeah. How did you process that? I think that felt very surreal. Like understanding what led up to didn't make any sense. Whenever I would visit or talk to him I would ask him more details about his process and I think early on. I understood what literally happened. I explained to my family that the situation is getting a little bit more complicated because he voluntarily signed to leave and that's something that a lot of people get pressured into doing because they kind of bully you're told you like. Do you really want your family to come in here in C are you really GonNa Force your family like endure this and so. He didn't tell anybody that he voluntarily signed. After Isa's father was deported. He settled into a city in Baja California Mexico. He's not from that area. He only has one family member there so he's lived alone there for the last eleven years. His time there made him. I think be a lot more honest with himself or with kind of like. It's it's definitely not the same but the closest thing I can compare to his solitary confinement you by yourself in a very small housing situation. You don't have any friends or family at all where you live for your family to visit you once a year if that And so I think he was forced to deal with his demons and his own past and his thoughts That have allowed him to be a lot more vulnerable in honest in our conversations and own up to a lot of stuff that he has done is a father and as a man. You're going to go talk to your Dad And what are the things you want to talk to him about Yeah so so we. We haven't like as a family acknowledged this. And when you say this what do you mean if you click this situation that we're in even like it's really easy for me to say to somebody else. My Dad was deported but in our house. We don't say that like we. Just don't talk about it and so I think we've all done our best in coping with the situation and getting through the day to day and so I think now I'm starting to catch. My Dad sees some things about his future or about his situation and accepting the life that he has now and we as a family haven't and I myself haven't done and so I think some of the things that I want to take this opportunity to to kind of just ask him how he feels about it. Which is like such a basic question. But I think I've never asked him. How do you feel? So you're GONNA give your data call and this is going to be an important call because you're going to try to start this conversation that you're talking about. Yeah we're GONNA do it hear from eastern her dad later in the show that conversation. She's been wanting a half or so long right now. We're going to talk to a wise one who's made it her mission to help Latin X. Men and women heal from their trauma. Joining us to take on. Isa's question is Adriana Alcohol Andrey a marriage and family therapist based in Los Angeles and founder of Latin x therapy. It's a bilingual podcast and directory and the goal of the directory and the podcast is really to break the stigma of mental health and the Latin x Community Adriana. Welcome thank you so much you know. I'm thinking a bit about the immigrant. Experience in healing is often not a part of the immigrant conversation Instead were often hearing about and seeing themes about struggle and resilience and survival. Why do you think that is? That's a great question. I think with the undocumented population does are some other pillars that help them to keep going To survive you know their day to day lives hour by hour lives. Sometimes because of the lack of resources I think healing is sometimes understandably so one of the last things that they have to think about because most immigrant communities come from collectivistic culture and they're taught to prioritize others versus themselves so they don't get to think about themselves first and doesn't come very natural And so I think. That's one of the reasons why healing gets put on the backburner this really leads into our questioned from our engagement producer. Isa Her dad was deported when she was a junior in high school and at home she says Life shifted drastically. But they never really talked about why the set the norm on how a little she actually talks about it until now. Let's listen. You know I in making this episode that I had never said that I miss my dad in all of those eleven years. It was kind of those things I if I said it didn't make things easier and it felt a little bit pointless in saying it. It's realizations like this. That made me look at the past as something that I need to go. Back and revisit. And he'll from in order to have a different future and if I want the future to feel different for me and for my family then I need to take a first up with myself. I just don't know what that first step looks like Adriana. I just want to commend and Acknowledge. Isa For being so open. I really commend her for taking that moment and really being introspective. 'cause it's not easy. It's not an I wanNA thank her for being vulnerable. Because I think when it comes to opening up about something like this. It isn't just individual healing. That's about to happen. It's also community healing because she's part of a system she's part of a unit back home so this is just the start of it. Yeah you know I hear one thing that you actually said earlier about immigrant communities in particular individuals so focused on the collective and everyone else and not necessarily themselves and so for so long. It sounds like Isa has been thinking about her father's well-being back in Mexico. Her mother her brothers even her grandmother but she's not thought about herself in this equation. How does she begin to do that? The first thing that I would want to ask ISA is if she's ready and willing to continue opening up. And what ways does that look like for. Isa Most Commonly. There's therapy rate but not everybody in this position is ready to Enter therapy and that's okay Just knowing that that's an option knowing what resources there are for therapy is important for one. They already whether it's through individual therapy or support group style. There's also self help books. There's research that she could do on her own like through podcast and just trying to understand her own feelings. and Just talking about it a little bit more with friends that can relate to what she's going through. Yeah what about her family? You know She say they've never talked about it but I think she's ready. She's ready to like have that conversation with her mother and her brothers and her father. Yeah yeah and that's really gonNA depend on her current relationship with her family because sometimes we might feel ready to speak with our families about a difficult topic. But just because we're ready doesn't mean that the family is ready or some members are ready and that could be a very invalidating and traumatizing experience. So I would say to take it member my by member and start with whoever she's closest with I and just see what kind of reaction she gets because it could be very overwhelming having like you know a family meeting bringing it up during dinner and it could just be shocking to people. Yeah I mean that makes so much sense to take it member by member because you kind of know what family members are in the space are at that level where they can actually have that kind of conversation or be open to it. One thing though that I got from Isa there's pain But there's also anger anger at the situation and it's not put together in a box and a nice bow What has happened to her family. The part of the back story where her father was always working before he was deported. So he wasn't really a part of the family in the way that Society tells US father should be in our homes and so she was kind of grappling with her relationship with her father before he was deported. So there's sort of an anger for the loss of all of that but then in anger and being in this place. Can you talk a little bit about anger? Because sometimes we feel guilty for feeling anger but I personally believe that that at some point we have to acknowledge it. You know what I mean and say. It's Okay Yeah. You're the expert though what do you think? Yeah you know. I've I've evolved so much with the therapeutic philosophy of anger and I. I went to school here at Pepperdine University for my graduate school training and I have come to learn and come to terms that I was taught in very westernized way and this was her nice way. We are taught that anger as a secondary emotion but through my clients. My clients of color specifically. I've learned that that's not true. Anger is valid. Anger has a place and we need to listen to our anger and we need to learn how to express our anger in healthier ways. So that's the that's the thing about anger is that if we don't let it out it's going to boil inside and it's going to hurt your health. It's going to hurt your mental health. It's just going to hurt physically honestly hurts but if we can learn to expel it and release it in healthy ways when we're aware of it then that becomes healthier and translates into another emotion. Eventually once you come once you start processing it. Wow that's so powerful because you're right. I mean in Western society. We are taught that anger is a secondary emotion and that ultimately it all comes down to fear is what we've been taught right right. Hey right I think it holds hands with fear with pain with confusion but it has a place and we need to stop invalidating. Our Own Anger Adrian. A you know there is a unique lived experience for children of immigrants or I Jin Americans How is this exacerbated by family separation in so many ways because there could be a lot of feelings of either abandonment or new abandonment? Right whether it's recent our old Many different triggers the system changes when someone is is taken out of the unit They are not the same anyone anymore and they have to adjust to a new rhythm. A new routine. You know how to survive without that person and that person probably had already contributed to the unit so much in some way and was keeping everybody balanced to some degree so re-balancing everybody else without that individual is difficult on a financial level on an emotional level. The body goes through changes as well when someone that we love is taken from our unit and when we're talking about immigrant rights. We often hold up a certain type of emigrant and exceptional immigrant. Or we're talking about folks who have been deported. Oftentimes the narratives are about a family unit. That's broken up in this family. Unit kind of is the is held is like the perfect American family but ISA's family did not necessarily Have those same markers and so. They're sort of anger in that in that. We're having this discussion. But we're not really acknowledging all of the other people that have been broken up from their families but don't hold those same exceptional qualities. Yeah that's really difficult. You know on a family unit overall. Because if your family has been more low key there could be a lot of confusion. Shame Anger Frustration towards the system. Not Validating your experience and not knowing how to address the community if you even want to address the community including other family members in talking to them as to why this is This is very difficult for the family. So as ISA goes through this journey as she thinks about her own healing and perhaps even the healing of her family and family members What is the overarching advice? That you'd give to her. Isa As you go through this journey and move forward it by bit. I encourage you to reach out for help and know that you're not alone if family members are not willing to talk about this. There's a community waiting for you. That's willing to hold your hand through this. You're truly not alone. Ask for help though. Because I know that we're taught to be independent to be resilient to blossom on our own but it doesn't always have to be that way there could also be appointed. Isa's journey where she says. I'm not ready to take this all the way through. This is too much for me and I'm thinking that's okay. Yeah absolutely hosing. The healing journey is very essential and I also see it in my practice with a lot of different clients huge progress when someone can vocalise and communicate with someone that they need to pause. That's very difficult to say and recognize because a lot of shame can come from it. But it's normal. It's okay to pause and important to listen to your own instincts in your own self if something within you.'. Saying you've you've reached a cap and emotional cap Just take a moment for yourself and digest this whole journey that you've been through it. It's something that I have been done personally. A couple of times And a lot more so as this whole social media boom has been going on where people talk about mental health every single day. It just gets too much sometimes. And so it's okay to pause these elements the only red flag. I'll say is to just be aware of your avoiding tendencies personally also tend to avoid sometimes and I know that's gotten in the way of my healing. Sometimes I could feel my body feels when I've gone a little bit too far out into just taking that pause. It's not a pause anymore. It's avoidance Adriana. Thank you so much. Thank you for having me. Adriana is so right. This journey ISA is on has no timetable. It actually might feel worse before it feels better but sometimes you just need someone to say. Yup I know what you're going through and every emotion you feel his okay. Okay remember Isa mentioning her plans to call her dad to talk about all of this. She took that brave step all. Fiv COMAS THE END. Right off the bat. I asked my dad how he feels about our long distance relationship. Gaumont this this. They linguist last yonkers the heat. I'll always go with this disease so I can't know see who knows asylum. I think it's a custom. Look you're gonNA say give serious even on the SORTA those Little Rita Zamin Mukasa by me as as a slot and for the first few minutes he talked about how different American culture was for children and their families. Locate your caveat out there with your gas book your day. We are mostly veto. Who men or gay person. I personally believe that he would have liked for us all to live together until we got married but no matter what he would have liked he said. Now there's no possibility for us to live together. Our way of life through screens minimal visits and missing out on important life. Events are all that we have available to us. These are only options because of his deportation. I know this he knows this but still it hurt. I was struggling to get my questions across so I took a step back and started from the basics. No sick okay. Maybe I should frame this better than yeah most on. Iv there who knows. And I couldn't keep talking. I got choked up but he sat with me in the silence we rented. He said he'd imagined us being separated either. But that the distance hasn't changed his love for us would it has done is made it clear that he's missing out and will never get that time back and that it has also made are growing up and getting older hard to ignore especially for both him and my mom army and no Ma- minimum. Saigo Cassandra Puerto Status and stunt. North is fuck thought about on me. The know that for the status. Look at locust and Stan though Sunday. Who took on the status can me my net either scintilla associate status as Lamis. Kasim get move on. You also get started at the end of a Guinness Guy via dot com. Yeah that got based Vamos job. You're not okay. Yeah physical. Eleanor Dantonio status. Meal is my guest mass authority. Oh Book Komo can't emptying book but authors and stuff I found on us about a gonNa say this and I can remember vividly over the past years when we said to each other. Hey did you notice that? My Dad's hands and JAW TREMBLE. Now or my dad meet observations about us like our height or our hair and it was like we were seeing each other for the first time. Every time we visited we were all changing and it felt really fast. I then asked him if he had emotionally processed the deportation in the other ASEAN Food Lion Shadow and I said only that said he accepted reality on the first day but eleven years later he still not used to being apart nor living in thick which is where he lives now. He doesn't go out and if he did he would go alone so he sees. There's no point in doing that And he doesn't WANNA spend money. He doesn't have or get caught up in anything that will leader impacts negatively before hanging up. I wanted to know how he imagined. normally real be on lavelle. Your school no known jail for and maybe that my future. No I see it very dark. Turano pedal. I don't see Fisher in my life. It is whatever God decides because I don't see a future I am disabled. I can't work. I can't produce what I consume. I am aware that I shouldn't be a burden for you all but I'm preventing you from saving your money for retirement or with my situation agreed inconvenience that is negatively impacting. You all upper upper status negative. I'm empty. I had accepted for many years. That my dad would see my high school college or Master's graduation that he wouldn't be there for my grandma's passing away or Cmih off at the airport. When I moved for a new job I hadn't thought about what our future looks like and even less really centered myself in all of this. You know what I feel. And what a year and four so I tried. I thought for weeks about what I want and what I need and what I still hope for my future to look like with my dad in it. And here's what icy ICS GOING BACK TO EAST LA opening the door to our home and everybody's just their. I see both of my parents sitting in the front yard under the shade of our tree and they're relaxed. They don't have any tension in their shoulders. I see US doing everyday. Things like go to the grocery story dragging him to fail the class for the first time going to a dodgers game and pulling over to eat at the Taco trucks on Whittier before we get home and having Friday night dinners Eating Mighty schools at Las Vegas. Because that's his thing. I imagine my dad getting frustrated with my mom because she hordes everything and hitting all of my friends in person. And if there's a guy whose name he doesn't recognize he pauses and he's like you Guinness and gets all protective. I imagined him scolding me for staying out too late or not taking a jacket out because it's cold. I see as taking family trips to the bay and seeing right went to college and the world's that I'm a part of and the people who've shaped I see me having property and Mahyco and traveling as a family with my kids every summer because that was my childhood. He loves boxing and a life goal of mine to be able to get tickets for him to go. See One of those huge boxing events Vegas And get them seats in the front row or however close I could afford but I also think part of the dream is just to be together doing nothing waiting a little easier because we're together and that is a privilege. I imagine laughing and honestly just not living in fear I realize what I imagine. Is US basically living together in? L. A. and that's ideal right but no matter what happens will need to spend more time together definitely bridge our lives more intentionally and I'll needs to remind myself that the situation is hard. It's Shitty but US laughing us. Having joy and a- sharing love is going to be my way of taking my own power back. You know we've been thinking and talking a lot about how we really won't be returning to the normal we knew before this pandemic and so many of us are creating a world that prioritises quality time with loved ones values. All the essential workers out there for this week. I want you to also close your eyes and imagine what kind of world you want for yourself and how you can go about doing that and how you can shape it. Email us at truth be told at K Q d Dot Org or leave a voicemail at four one five five five three two eight zero two. That's four one five five five three two eight zero two so we can include it on our next episode and share it with the rest of the truth be told family on our next episode. The relationships we have with our mothers are complex. But how do you balance loving your mom with the relationship that so toxic you feel like cutting out of your life? I WanNa know how I can honor the respect and love. I have for my mother while also acknowledging that the relationship is healthy for me. That's next time. On Truth. Be told truth be told is produced by susie Rancho Isamuddin dosa Katie mcmurray and Rod. Speight cake Ds Leadership Team Includes Erica Aguilar. Ethan Tobin Lindsey and Holly Kernan a big thanks to Kiana Mogadishu and the good people at NPR west truth be told is a production of K. Q. E. D. in San Francisco. I'm Tanya Moseley.

Arnaldo Isa ISA Los Angeles United States Isa Mendoza Tanya Moseley Adriana Alcohol Andrey Mexico PRODUCER Katie mcmurray California Simon boxing Community Adriana Las Vegas California Wellness Foundation Pepperdine University dodgers Baja California Mexico Mike
CNN10 - 8/21/20

CNN 10 (video)

10:00 min | 3 months ago

CNN10 - 8/21/20

"Friday's. And if you're new to our show, you probably hear me say that again. Zeus and this is C.. N. N. Ten, your objective explanation of world events. The Democratic National Convention wrapped up on Thursday night and former vice president. Joe. Biden is now the official presidential nominee for the Democratic Party, his running mate US Senator Kamala. Harris from California was nominated as the party's vice presidential pick on Wednesday night. During this four day event Democrats spoke out against incumbent President Donald Trump and promoted nominee joe. Biden, as the best choice for voters twenty twenty, it'll be the exact opposite next week when the Republican National Convention gets underway. These conventions are an American tradition. There were the country's major political parties, nominate their candidates to find what they stand. For it and upcoming election and try to drum up voter support for that election. This is what they normally look like. This is what they look like socially distant year with many of the speeches made truly and no roaring crowds of conventions past for the Democrats speakers included former presidents and presidential candidates, current and former political leaders. The Republican National Convention is set to begin Monday. It'll also run through Thursday. It will also be largely virtual and we'll promote president trump as the best choice for voters. The election is scheduled for Tuesday November third the debates when the presidential and vice presidential candidates face off against each other are set to begin in late. September. Ten Seconds Trivia eighties tie is a type of what coronavirus plant paper hieroglyphics or must feed them. This is a species of mosquito that can carry deadly diseases. Controversial plan is moving ahead to release Genetically Modified Mosquitos into the Florida keys more than seven, hundred, fifty, thousand of the insects are set to be introduced there why the Eighties Agip Thomas Kito can carry dangerous diseases like the Zeke of virus dengue fever, and yellow fever officials are looking for new ways to kill off these insects without using pesticides and Genetically Modified Mosquitos. This, only female mosquitoes bite people, the altern insects that are set to be released in Florida are male they've been modified so that the female offspring they produce will die before they hatch from their eggs and grow big enough to bite people and the company that developed these GMO mosquitoes says they've been very successful in controlling mosquito populations in Panama. Brazil and the Cayman Islands but they're strong opposition among people in Florida to releasing. The altered mosquitoes there one technology and food safety advocate called Jurassic Park experiment and said there's no way to know what could go wrong because government officials haven't done enough to review the risks. Environmental groups are also concerned about what could happen to the birds, mammals and other insects that eat the GMO mosquitoes. The altered insects are set to be released in the Florida keys in the years twenty, twenty, one, and twenty, twenty two. Have you ever noticed when you're out on a summer evening that some of you get bit by mosquitoes much more than others. So what's behind that with appears that it might be our DNA. Researchers in London looked at identical twins and fraternal twins fraternal twins do not have identical. DNA. And when they took the mosquitoes and they expose them to the fraternal twins, the fraternal twins were often bit in differing amounts. It wasn't exactly the same but when it came to identical twins, if one twin got bit quite a bit, then the other twin got bit quite a bit as. Well. So what's going on here while the researchers hypothesized that it has to do with how we smell so they wrapped these twins in foil. This is believe it or not how you get body odors out. So they can look at the body odors and they can measure them. Now they're going to analyze these odors and see what is it about each odor that mosquitoes like or dislike. So maybe one day in the future somebody who smells good to the Mosquitos could take a pill so they wouldn't smell so good to -squitoes. GENEVIEVE is the name of a hurricane that pass near the coast of Baja California Mexico this week at one point the storm was an intense category four hurricane but it had weakened to category one strength with winds of eighty five miles per hour when it spun off the Mexican coast still strong winds and a lot of rain were expected on the peninsula. Aside from genevieve, the eastern Pacific Ocean has been quieter than usual as far as hurricanes go this season that may not be the case in the North Atlantic it season officially started months ago but according to CNN ten contributor tyler molden its peak often coincides with the start of the school year tyler. That's right Carl. The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June first to November thirtieth, and this week is when we normally begin seeing the numbers increase. We see tippety come to a peak on average around September tenth every year forecasters at the National Oceanic and atmospheric administration also known as Noah are expecting a lot of tropical storms and hurricanes. This year they think we could have twenty five named storms. They've never forecast that many storms. There are several reasons for their forecast, one of the most important reasons as a potential. But what exactly is alanine A-. An. Order to answer that question we must. I look in the Pacific Ocean because what happens in the Pacific Ocean actually affects what happens downstream in the Atlantic Ocean everything's connected when the ocean water is cooler than it normally would be the East Pacific then Alanine has formed the Lena. The atmosphere creating a calm comfortable home over the Atlantic Ocean for hurricanes to develop. Now, hurricanes like that. Since face because the winds tend to be lighter and coming from the same direction as you go up in the air, this is the system to grow and develop hurricanes also like hot water and I mean really hot water like bathtub hotter than seventy eight degrees Fahrenheit from the coast of Africa all the way to the coast of the United States. These bright colors on your screen indicates the Atlantic Ocean is way hotter than it should be. Unfortunately, we do have both ingredients coming together. This year Noah says there is a higher the normal likelihood that Alanine could form and the Atlantic Ocean is extremely warm. All the time. Inc., and now you know the science behind this season could rewrite the record books and take the number one spot. Now Carl, in case you're wondering the year two, thousand five currently holds at top spot for the most tropical systems in a single season. Thanks, Tyler that's win. There were a record twenty seven named storms with fourteen of them. Becoming hurricanes. Hurricane forecasting is not an exact science. Each year Noah's prediction includes a range of named storms and hurricanes, and it says, these predictions are made with seventy percent confidence that the actual number will fall within that range but no does not predict the number of storms that make landfall in the US. It says those can't be predicted more than a week in advance, and after that two thousand, five record season the US are hurricane drought when twelve years passed without a single major hurricane making landfall in America. At a safe recently founded Berry New York colds a secret that no one may know for a long time. It's unknown where it came from and it included a note that says, anyone who opens it can have what's inside thing is no one's been able to do that people have used sledgehammers. They've knocked off the dials and worked on the hinges but the safe still holds its mystery and the farmer who has it hopes it'll stay that way to give people something fun to debate in troubled times. So for now, he's hidden the five hundred pound box where some place safe. Of course, there's bolted interest in people are dialed in their curiosity hinges on whatever secrets are a lot but it may take a crack team to do that southwest high school is in San. Diego California, they subscribed and commented on our latest show at Youtube Dot com slash CNN ten, and that is how to get a mention of Cora loose. In you.

Atlantic Ocean Pacific Ocean Noah Florida United States Biden President Donald Trump Carl GENEVIEVE N. N. Ten vice president Hurricane Democratic Party Joe Harris Senator Kamala California president
Allosaurus was a cannibal

I Know Dino: The Big Dinosaur Podcast

44:32 min | 6 months ago

Allosaurus was a cannibal

"We're watching the last two parts of walking with dinosaurs this Saturday June thirteenth at one PM Pacific daylight time. Join our Patriot to discuss it with US undescored. Yeah, that's at Patriot, dot, com slash I know dino. We have a new design on our merch store. It's a swimming spinosaurus for obvious reasons because the new description, it's available on masks, shirts, and a lot of other things at bit dot, l., Y. Slash I. Know Donald Store. Hello and welcome I know I know I'm Garrett and I'm Sabrina. And today in our two hundred eighty ninth episode. We have a bunch of news including Cannibal Allosaurus. theropods running and a ton of other dinosaur new stories Andrea Dinosaur of the day Lobo Kanye but really quick as always we want to thank some of our patrons who help keep the podcast running and keep our discord full of all sorts of amazing comments and good discussions about dinosaurs and this week. We'd like to thank Chris. Nicholas Trent Carbohydrate Stefan. Tia stegower, Sophie Yumi Pala Kansas Jackson Crawford Saurian Brandy. My you Dino Bo Mellow, Stereo worker source, Ceylan, Maria, Sora Daniel McGill Ultra uncanny and Turkey Tamer and ultra, uncanny and Tokyo Tamer both. Yay they so much. I recognize a lot of these names from our watch parties on weekends. We're chatting with you on Dischord, so that's been great. If you want to join in on these watch parties, then check out our PJ patriot dot com slash I, Know Dino! You may have noticed this. Is being released on a Thursday rather than our usual day of Wednesday and that's because on Wednesday June. Tenth we joined many publishers and academic institutions to Hashtag shutdown stem, which I think is an incredibly unfortunate. Hashtag because we obviously support stem, so the HASHTAG strike for black lives is probably much more accurate. Right they caused makes a lot of sense, but the wording is a little bit confusing. Yes, so it's meant to draw attention to how science has been used in the past against people and how lots of institutions. Institutions have been involved with us in Paleontology I think the most notable example is Henry Fairfield Osborn. He was a eugenicist and thereby basically a racist. There wasn't really any way to get around that. In the nineteen hundreds, and in nineteen sixteen, while President of the American Museum of natural. History, he wrote the preface for the racial basis of European history, saying that the greatest threat to America is essentially white people meeting with what called the lowest races, which has obviously horrible and his eugenic views and his views of Nordic. Being. The superior race made its way into the American Museum of Natural History in many ways and also legitimized. By purporting to present it as science, and he literally says in some documents like this isn't my opinion. I'm not a bigot. This is just science and it wasn't. But it was used to oppress people, and that's why we struck yesterday. Yes, so and Marc whitten, who's a really good in prominent Paleo artist recently published post on racism in Paleo or and called attention to many scientists who were racist and or benefited from oppression of black people. Yeah wasn't just Henry. Fairfield Osborn was very widespread. Yes, so this includes some of the big names in dinosaur paleontology, so in addition to Henry Fairfield Osborn, got. Edward Drinker Cope and cope thought that black people were degenerates, and then as Garrett mentioned Osborne. Osborne used his influence at the AM and age to spread his views, so in one example is. He directed Charles night the Pillow Artis Charles Nights views are a little unclear on all of this, but he directed night to make racist Paleo art such as the mural in the hall of man that was added am age, which is called neander flint workers, and their primitive look was not based on the fossils that were found, but instead on the features of non white people that Osborn thought were inferior compared to white Europeans. That mural was apparently considered controversial among the staff even when it was made, and then it was eventually removed in the nineteen sixties, and the fact that it lasted until the nineteen sixties along with a lot of other pieces that osborn put into. That museum shows you just how long this racist viewpoint was allowed to last ray, and it still is sometimes used for references by people who might not know the history behind it. Yeah, and so that's the other side of the problem is even though there have obviously been lots of improvements made. This history is still there, and it has its fingerprints all over a lot of modern work to which really sucks so. VP released a really good statement about how they support black lives matter that's against society of vertebrate, Paleontology Yeah and so obviously they're making efforts to improve things, but I I think it is worth taking a day to recognize that this has been a problem for a very long time, and certainly didn't end with the end of slavery. It has lasted well into the era. And it does to some extent involved dinosaurs, just definitely, which is why we're bringing it up. And if you WANNA learn more, I would recommend checking out mark whitten's blog post, which is the top Lincoln our news? So now moving onto the regular dinosaur portion of our news up first we have the cannibalistic allosaurus. Yeah. There's some really metal Paleo art that goes along with this. You might have seen it was posted in our discord chat to is by Brian Young and his shows, three allosaurus and SURATA zorras eating slash fighting over a dead allosaurus. They all look Super Gnarly, and all like red and black and intense. It's a lot. Those a tons of bugs and some terrorist hours flying erratically, so yeah, it's a very chaotic scene. The Paleo. Art is based on a recent paper by Stephanie. Drum Heller and others Polish and plus one wonder, if Stephanie Drum Heller is somehow related to the drum Heller in Alberta Canada where the royalty museums couldn't find it I think she's American, but he'll be pretty funny coincidence if she was the awesome. It's only two times. I've ever seen that name, so it seems like a weird coincidence. The researchers of this paper were studying the my gap more quarry in the my Gat. More quarry is in Western Colorado. It's about a hundred miles south of Dinosaur National Monument. Monument as you'd probably expect. It's Morrison Formation Similar Age to Dinosaur National Monument. It's from the late Jurassic about one hundred and fifty two million years old, and there are tons of fossils known from the area and teeth and bones, and all sorts of stuff in this study they looked at fossils that were bones from dinosaurs, and not the teeth or other things, but still they had two thousand, three, hundred sixty eight fossils to work with, and of those six hundred eighty four had at least one theropod bite mark on it, making that twenty nine percent of the bones. There's a lot of eating happening on these bones and a Ken. Someone was hungry. Yeah, because in order to make a tooth mark on bone is just like. If you imagine eating something today, you don't usually scrape your piece against bone. You don't. That's true Sabrina does. But even then you know unless you're really desperate. For every last little morsel, you're not gonNA, leave teeth marks on the bone. You're going to just leave a slight thin film, leftover or whatever, but if you're really going for every last little bit of nutrition, you can get off of the bounds. That's when you start to see. Tons of these tooth marks. The researchers say the quote observed bite marks include punctures, scores furrows hits and Strike Asians and quote so any way that a tooth could possibly markelle bone. It was happening. Bounce punctures is an intense one to yes. But for this paper, the most useful type of tooth mark pattern is this. An Australian is caused when the tooth scrapes along the bone rather than sort of against, so imagine you have a separated knife, and normally you'd cut it moving the nation's back and forth you know of perpendicular to what you're trying to cut. If you scraped the Sarah to blade instead along sideways rather than with the rations, you could leave these sort of scratches on something, and that's what we're seeing with the strikes and And Patterns. SORTA looks like raked sand. When you look at it up close, the big benefit to these types of tooth marks is that they leave marks with the distance in between each scratch matching the celebrations in the teeth. So then you can compare known teeth from the area and see which ones have that pattern of Saracens to match these marks on the bone, so it's pretty cool, little sort of fingerprint technology. The most common pattern that they found in the quarry, actually matched two different dinosaurs at matched both allosaurus and Surata Soros. They just had the same kind of tentacle or separation on the teeth spacing, so we can't tell for sure which one it is, and that's why obviously in Brian Art. He put both of them in there, but there's a lot more allosaurus, so I think leading towards the allosaurus. Allosaurus Surat are also both known from the site from the bones that have been found there, and they're the two largest theropods that have been found there, so I guess that's not too surprising that they were the ones that got to get the last bites in. because. Maybe they scared off some smaller things to get those last bites, but there is one exception. There's one mark that looks like a much larger Predator. than a typical allosaurus Suratis source this probably a sore fagin acts or tortoise. But. It might just be a huge allosaurus in depending on who you ask. Sore fake axe is basically a huge allosaurus, so yeah, some other huge Predator was in there. At least a little bit of the time, and it makes sense because we've seen Sarah Fagin axe and tortoise, horse, and other parts of the Morrison formation, so it wouldn't be surprising to see them there. The interesting thing about the Maga more quarry is that it looks like there was a relatively lowest sedimentation rate meaning the soil layers were laid down slowly as opposed to something like if you imagine a big flood washing in and covering a bunch of dinosaurs and a whole bunch of sediment, piling up and leaving these big bone beds a fossils in this case, it looks like that it was the exact opposite of that there wasn't very much sedimentation happening very quickly, and therefore animals would have been exposed for a really long time before eventually ending up getting buried and then fossilizing in this case. Which means that it would have been a really good place to go for scavenging because these bodies aren't getting buried. They're out there open for anything that wants to snack on 'em. Free meet. Also in support of the scavenging hypothesis is that a lot of the tooth marks are on the less meaty parts of the body, basically on the toes, the vertebrae, which are not the first place as you'd expect a Predator to go for after killing an animal starting to eat it, because there's just not a lot of nutrition in those spots, another potential hypothesis to. To sort of counterbalance, the cannibalism is that the marks on the bones could have been from combat because we know that when dinosaurs fight each other, they're likely to try to bite each other on the face, or maybe on the sides or something to scare each other off with modern animals all the time, but in this case the scrape marks on the toes. Don't exactly seem like the cut of things that would happen in a combat. You know you'd have to have one dinosaur kicking the other one in the mouse, and then that one biting it, and then in order these scrape marks on the bones would basically have to remove the flesh, and this is just not really kinda combat kind of wound, and then again with the vertebrae. It's so deep in the muscle and tissue that really the only way you get deep in near the. Centrum Ana. Vertebrae is if you're eating. It's not it doesn't really make sense as a combat wound. As a result, this is probably the first evidence of cannibalism in Allosaurus. That was kind of surprised. Because I know, it's been proposed that maybe Cleveland Lloyd was a Predator trap in all these successive Allosaurus, the seemed to keep dying in the pit might have attracted more allosaurus. If you looked as Cleveland Lloyd quarry to see if there was any cannibalism, I tried searching for it. But whenever there's a new article that comes out you get mostly those results. Maybe that's the next project. Yeah, I think it would be good to look at other quarries to see because in Cleveland low. Yeah, you have a ton of allosaurus. They're all together. There seems like one. 'cause could be that an. Animal died, and then at attracted Morales, or as to the feast theory number five. Yeah, I mean it's still Predator trap I guess. It's sort of like an asterix, maybe one of the. Existing theories and to that point, the authors did say that researchers may have overlooked other cannibalized bones, because they're not as pretty incomplete and usually when you're out in the fields, you can't bring back every bone that you find so paleontologists will prioritize bones that they think they can get a lot of information out of or would look good in amount or otherwise scientifically useful, so if they're complete, they're more useful because you can take more measurements and learn more from them, but in cases like this where you're looking for behavior. Behavior it's better to have a more complete sample from a quarry so that you can look at all the bones as a whole and see like twenty nine percent of them have these teeth marks on them, but if you're only collecting a few of the bones, you know you can't really really make statements like that. That are very useful so hopefully in the future we can collect more bones. That's always what we say. We need more fossils, but yet there's always that tension with not having enough storage space for them. Up Next as an article, all about why dinosaurs head long legs, it was written by t Alexander to Catchy and others published employs one just like the last article on turf. I mentioned that was implausible one. So traditionally, we've always said that dinosaurs had long legs because they wanted to run fast, and that's because we know that with a higher hip height that means you can take longer steps and longer strides are useful in moving quickly. Just ask some marina snarky. I always have to run to catch up to Garrett when we're walking somewhere. Yeah, especially if we're in a hurry. But Fortunately Sabrina? There are a lot of other factors in how fast you can move. It's not just about like length L. I know there's also the geometry of the leg and muscle attachments that can have a big impact on speed, and another factor is the weight of animal in living animals. The fastest peak seems to be around one hundred kilograms, two hundred and twenty pounds. We've. We've talked about that a little bit in the past. And when you go above that weight, there's a quote unquote. Mass limiting factor is how modern biologists describe it so it basically getting all that extra weight up to speed becomes really difficult as a lot of stress on joints and muscles and things like that, so getting up to forty fifty miles. An hour just becomes really impractical. So researchers found that with small to medium theropods. Longer legs did allow dinosaurs to run faster so. That hundred kilogram mark they were seeing. Yeah, as they get heavier and they get their longer legs, it helps them run faster, but other factors like muscle attachment points also had a really big impact on fast they run. Just having a long leg doesn't necessarily mean you be fast on the other hand. Once you get above one hundred kilograms or two hundred kilograms depends on where you draw the line that mass limiting factor starts to really become a problem for large dinosaurs and their added leg length didn't make them faster, but it did make them more efficient at walking. So this is especially true in Toronto swords, which we have heard, a lot of people described as very leggy. There very long legs for a theropod, especially one of that size, so it's been reported that they were probably really fast. That's one of the main schools of thought, but these researchers are saying since they're so heavy i. mean they weigh many tons? They wouldn't have actually been that fast, but they would have been more efficient, and that's really important. Because as a Tarantula Ohrid, you have to eat a lot of food for every mile or so that you walk and by increasing their infficiency, they think an individual T. Rex could reduce its meat intake by thousands of pounds a year. Wow, that's a lot. Yeah, that's like a full Sarah. Thompson or something all that meet. The way they put. It was that it would quote. Dramatically reduce the need to engage in the costly dangerous and time consuming act of hunting and quote, which I think is a pretty good summary for why. You wouldn't want to hunt all the time if you could avoid it. Yeah, well, just looking at nature shows it's a lot of energy takes, and it is dangerous. Yeah, we know that erects sparred with Sarah Thompsons like. Like triceratops once in a while, because we've seen moons on both of their faces from one another, and therefore if you could avoid that could hunt one less a year. You probably live a little longer, so that strategy makes a lot of sense, but they do caution that it's always hard to say if that's why they had long legs, because adaptation doesn't follow like a logical path, there's a lot of random stuff that happens. So it might just be that, they happen to have these more efficient legs that were used for something else like the longer legs might have also helped him be a little bit more Nimble Agile. been able to turn quicker, which could be useful and hunting, and then on top of that they got the added deficiency. In terms of modern animals, the drew an analogy to modern wolves, basically saying that they think Trans swords, and these other leggy large theropods might have gone on long hunts sort of following pack of potential prey, and then ending it with a short burst of speed to take down whatever individual they picked out of the heard. That also sounds tiring. Are you tired. I, guess I'm not built for hunting. Will. It's actually kind of interesting, because there's a tribe in Africa and the way that they hunt is basically by tiring out there, pray because being bipedal more efficient than being quadrupedal, so they follow an animal until it basically dies of exhaustion, and then they carry it back, so yeah bipedal is useful for efficiency. It's not great for high speed, though because especially, if you compare us to any quadrupedal animals where I was getting out run by everything, but we can run farther than a lot of them for longer. So we got that going. You've got the endurance. Just not the speed just like dinosaurs except dinosaurs might have been faster than US probably. Humans in general aren't really the most well adapted for life out in the wild. So okay, we learned how to make the tools. Are Saving Grace Yeah. We've got a whole bunch of short news items, so get ready. Starting with in Queensland Australia a housebuilder and building, inspector. Steve Ross had recently finished his dinosaur metal sculptures most recently three Astro Vennegoor Dinosaurs Ultra Lavin editor depending who you ask that that's how you pronounce it. He made them for Livingston. Shire Council on Commission, and he used parts from landfills as well as ps from friends and family like automotive parts Jim weights parts of tractors. He said he spent more than four hundred hours over six months building. These juveniles look pretty cool ice. In spring. Hill Florida the potter, sore, shaped building, which I didn't know existed until this news item, but anyway it's at five two nine nine commercial way. It's known as dino or maybe Dino as nominated to be listed in the National Register of historic places, and it was originally a sinclair gas station. So that explains the shape, and now it's a herald auto center. Herald her spot the building in Nineteen, seventy seven. It still needs to be formally nominated to the keeper. Keeper of the National Register in Washington DC and then they will make the final decision calling it. His sore pot shaped building a potter. Sore shape building is looking at a picture of it is kind of a building, but it almost looks more like a sculpture that goes over a building. Yeah, it didn't really look like a building to me, but if it is building, it makes sense because I think a pot. Of course was the sinclair is the Sinclair Mascots Astro? Green though it's white. Maybe it used to be green. It's true for windows in it or something would look more like building, but it's religious like a solid looking sculpture. It's definitely easy to find true. Speaking of easy to find things in drum hiller the world's largest dinosaurs, getting repaired and painted in time for its twentieth anniversary. It's GONNA cost about three hundred thousand dollars to refurbish and they they already have the funds though through multiple funds. It's GonNa take them about three weeks to repair should be done by June thirtieth happen to within a means all that repair it just every ten or so years needs refurbishing normal wear and tear. Okay, because when we were there five years ago when we went up in. It seem pretty good. That's because it had recently been repaired Oh. Yeah I guess. I was Canadian winters. Probably take a toll on it plus very large building lots of details. And it's kind of open if you think about where the judge is yeah, I was just wondering. If in the winter they close off somehow or if the inside is subject to all those winter forces to. In the UK nurseries are working together to manage social distancing using their dinosaur well a sorus, and they have dinosaur footprints to keep the kids standing apart from each other and. At the nose, wiping stations in hand washing areas, basically they're using dinosaurs to keep kids for washing their hands and staying six feet apart. Number knows wiping station before me either. That's going on in the UK. Maybe it's so that you make sure you use tissues when you're wiping your nose or something and then afterwards wash your hands or something. Yeah, interesting. Jurassic quest has turned into a drive through experience, and there's an online audio tour that leads you through their safari. The first ones happening in San Antonio. Texas and tours last between thirty minutes to an hour, so you can still get your Jurassic quest fill. And other news, the Royal Mint released the highly a source coin Garrett were missing it now. Takes Awhile to get here from the UK I paid for the cheapest shipping I'll. I didn't realize you already bought that one. Yeah, bought the set. Oh that's great, so this is the last of the dinosaur collection you've got wanted on and megalosaurus. It looks really good in the picture looks kind of like a proud highly. Yes really cool all of the coins because it's the three that were used to name the group Tennis Oria have both a really cool, and like nice modern reconstruction of the actual animal, and then on the bottom. They have the holiday type material. In other news. Maybe you saw this because the headlines were where there are now dinosaurs in space. Specifically the space x astronauts brought tremor dinosaur, which is. Being baby dinosaur. and. Trimmer is in a powder Soros. It's blue and pink with these color changing sequence. Moser Fun and they took tremor on their successful mission to the. International Space Station. On one post I saw. Someone said it was quill the ultimate dad move. So like I said. Tremors in Potter source, the toys now sold out, but it looks like there's toys in this line like Stompie, which is perfect, T rex. And both astronauts Bob Benkin and Doug Hurley have kids and their kids voted for them to bring tremor to space with them, Bob, and Doug, or married to fellow astronauts. Yeah so bob is married to Megan McArthur. And Doug is married to Karen. Nyberg and apparently, when Karen was in space in two thousand thirteen, she made a stuffed dinosaur from scraps of fabric that she found around the space station for her son Oh. That's way cooler. She gets away mark credit for actually making a dinosaur from found objects while in space. Compare was buying a beanie baby. Well still. They still brought to space. So that's something I'm glad that now they've stopped bringing fossils into space. I'm pretty sure I mentioned in a fun fact that there have been several dinosaurs taken the space. In like they're on replaceable holiday type. You quality don't do that. Bring cast, yeah, or just bring a stuffed animal. They're lightweight and it's all about weight when you're going to space, right? That's true, no need to bring real fossils space. What sounds like no one's doing that anymore? It's good. Next thanks to Douglas. Who shared this phone with us? So chompers. It's a short podcast and an APP is doing a dinosaur week theme this week. The episode really short there about two minutes long, and the whole idea is to help. Kids brush their teeth with stories and educational talks. So if you've got young kids, and you want them to learn about dinosaurs while brushing, their teeth, chompers is your APP. Thanks to Michael who shared this next one with us on discord, so discovery has a new series starting on Friday June nineteenth called Dino hunters, and that's GonNa show ranchers and cowboys who find dinosaur fossils on their land in Wyoming Montana and the DAKOTAS. And also Michael mentioned this one to us about P. B. S. that has a new series that will on June seventeenth and twenty four in July I called prehistoric road trip. Each episode is sixty minutes long and follows Emily Grassley the Chicago film museums, chief curiosity officer. That's cool title as she drives through and stops up fossil sites in the dakotas in Montana, Wyoming and Nebraska. Next thanks to Eric. Paulin Ricardo who all shared this phone with us on Patriot and discord Jurassic Park. Terror has a post called every Jurassic Park dinosaur illustration with modern science. Goes over the definition of a dinosaur dinosaur now to me, and how dinosaur hands and feet are often depicted differently in media with the pro rated hands and the elephant like feeding. Dinosaur feathers, and then it goes into the dressing park. Dinosaur profiles, which has images and descriptions of each images of the updated versions, so they've got velociraptor slash, Donna casts triceratops Stegosaurus pariser office. A whole lot more I'm guessing it's not every dinosaur now, but it's a good amount, and it's not all the most popular ones from the middle. East uncle. I last. Thanks to Dennis, who shared this one with us VR discord, so the next few Friday nights dustin grow ick, who hosts the dinosaur show on Youtube and we've interviewed him will be hosting Friday night sessions of dinosaur parties for adults, and it's going to involve drawing pillow, art and drinking. That's the adult part. There's going to be themes for each night. So like June twenty-sixth is dressing park is the theme and other themes include mass, extinction and dinosaur mating. It's an online event and tickets cost seven dollars. We WanNa take a quick moment to mention our newest spinosaurus designed. That's available emerged store like all of our designs. It's available on a million different products, maybe not literally but nearly. Including Masks, shirts, and coffee, mugs, and onesies and stickers and journals. Lots of stuff so this design is based on the latest paper about Spinosaurus, which of course talks about it's magnificent, weird tale kind of skeletal type drawing based on earlier depiction, and then with the added height of the Tail Kinda Fun. It also has a little scuba diver with it for scale and assorted depicted halfway out of the water which I like because we don't really know if it would be swimming around underwater so much, so this is. Is kind of a safe bet I think so. If you want to get your own shirt or mask, or whatever with the spinosaurus design on it, or if you just want to look at it that it's okay to just go to bit dot, l., Y. Slash I know Dino store, and there's only about five designs. Choose from, so you should see the spinosaurus up front and center again. That's bit dot, L. I slash I? Know Dino store. I WanNa take a quick break here to mention our booking your dinosaurs here, which has a hundred creative journal prompts for dinosaur enthusiasts, not really a traditional book. It's more of a activity workbook kind of thing, and I would say. Good for kids and adults. Yes, definitely, if you're looking for something to do while you're cooped up during the summer, put your mind in a happy place. Like drawing dinosaurs, and thinking about what dinosaurs were like, so the book is available on Amazon. It's a physical book, and if you want to get your own copy than all, you have to do a search for keep your dinosaurs here. There are two versions. There's one that's in white. That's selling for nine ninety nine, and then there is a color version that is more expensive in. That's just because it costs a lot more to print, which is why we made the black and white one. We realize how expensive the color one was so knowing Carina spent so much work making it look good in color, but it still looks getting black and white. Yeah, and your drawings will be colorful and add color to the book, so you don't need printed color you hopefully. You have a lot of fun trying out the activities. And now onto our dinosaur of the day Laba CANEA which was a request from Tarran King be are discordant patron, so thanks. It was a theropod that lived in the late Cretaceous in the campaign, and what is now Baja California Mexico in the lobby conroe formation. It was carnivorous, and probably medium sized about twenty feet, or six meters long agree policy made in two thousand ten than it was twenty three feet, seven meters long, and weighed one, and a half tonnes Melina. Perez and Lar Mindy estimated in two thousand sixteen that it was actually twenty seven feet or eight point two meters long and weighed two point six tons, so the estimates keep getting bigger. That's unusual all times they start out large and then shrink overtime. Lobo Kenya had a robust head, and the teeth in the jawbone were flat and gradually recurvature. The type species is low canea on Oh Malla and the genus name refers to the lab UCONN Aroha formation the red estuary. The species name means anomalous in Latin and refers to its distinctive build. It was founded in nineteen seventy during a National Geographic Society and Los Angeles County. Museum of natural. History Expedition Led by William Morris Harley James Ghorbani of volunteer on the expedition is the one who found the fossils. Fossils and it was excavated in nineteen, seventy and nineteen, seventy, one and described and named in Nineteen, seventy, four by Ralph Molnar. The holiday is fragmentary, and includes parts of the skull teeth, part of the pubis parts of the foot and Chevron. The fossils were dissertation related in mixed with Ribs from a Hadrosaur Audio Dinosaur Loukas possibly Toronto Sword, but it's hard to tell from the fragments MOLNAR assigned it as theropod in survey and Thomas Holds Junior considered it a possible Taran asteroid. There are a lot more Taranath Soro aides than I would have thought before starting this podcast, yes. And are fun. Fact of the day is that there are lots of animals that practice cannibalism, including herb of oars stunt. Don't yeah, obviously I got sent down. This erected Roma's borough by the Allosaurus, being accountable of course news item for before. Yeah, so I previously mentioned in another episode how there are very few, if any heure herb vars like for example, a cow or a deer will. will eat small bird or a squirrel or something, if it encounters that while it's grazing and just sorta of munch it up like it's of in the way. Yeah, even in the way it'll go out of its way to eat it, but it's not gonna be able to chase it down, so it's gotTa be injured or somehow completely unaware of this cow about to eat it. Easy male. Yes. On the dinosaur side of things, there's also hadrosaurs which we know eight rotting wood, full of crustaceans, probably to supplement their diet with extra calcium or something to that effect, but speaking of cannibalism. It's incredibly common in modern animals, so every combination of animals eating each other exists. You've got parents eating their young, which is called filial cannibalism or infanticide. Many animals will do this under the right circumstances. Often, it's done if the young aren't in good shape, or the parents can't raise them for other reasons and they're basically. Recycling that generation try again in a really gross way in the first episode of walking with they showed the mammal like die, sign and doing this when they're getting terrorized by some CEELO faces. They ate. They're young and they ran off to try to basically try again. There's also young eating their parents. This is known as Matra Fiji because it's almost always eating the mom. You see this in some invertebrates including. Of Your Wig that reproduces in the off season. When food is scarce, so the mom just becomes the food for the babies, and obviously it's helpful, because then they don't have to worry about as many predators, because they're not timed with when most of the predators are looking for prey. There's also parents eating each other. Usually it's the female eating the male like the black widow spider, apparently its name as a black widow spider, because the female eats the male, but I couldn't find I wanted to verify that and I was trying to figure out when the first use of black widow was as a woman, murdering her husband and I couldn't find anywhere so anyway. Just a rabbit hole that failed, but Some, species of male actually climb into the female's fangs whether or not she wants to eat him. Apparently, there's a type of fishing spider that does this, and presumably they do it so that the female can better produce the eggs, which will give his offspring, a better chance of surviving some species of spiders also eat each other if they find the mate unfit. This happens in some species with males. Males eating the females as well so if a female wanders by a male and males like that females too old to raise good young or is too small. You'll just eat. Her and female do the same thing. spiders are harsh yet. There's other species that do this, too, but I think spiders must be one of the easier ones to study and I think there's a pretty broad spectrum of. Why so many people are afraid of spiders because we know these things about. I. Don't think so. I think it's more venomous bites but yeah, it doesn't help. There's also young or eating eggs which is called Rufiji. Sometimes that term is used as intrauterine cannibalism, but I think Embryos AG is a better term for that. Because makes more sense, but birds all the time. Eat their own eggs. Sometimes, the eggs are just too tempting them if they're hungry, are for whatever reason the mood strikes. And then tiger sharks are really famous for embryo. Ag because what'll happen is one of the tiger. Shark pups while it's still in utero will eat siblings, and then obviously that one comes out fed and better prepared to. Take on the world. The last is there's individuals eating other individuals that have died which is called Necker of ag, and that fits really naturally with scavenger behavior of a lot of animals, and it's an especially good way to spread disease, because if an animal dies of disease, and then another animal eats it. It's likely to catch disease, so yeah, not really well advised one. or any of these I think so they work well for a lot of animals, but many of the strategies don't work well for mammals are offspring at tend to be large, so they're not bite size. They rely on the mother for milk. They can't eat the mom and then milk also means that they don't need to eat each other, because they all can get milk from the mom at the same time. In most cases, most of the mammal cannibalism out there is infanticide which was how depicted in walking with dinosaurs, but on the other hand dinosaurs don't have these same limitations. There's a good chance. There was a lot of these types of cannibalism happening with dinosaurs as another example showing that his Nacho spiders, even the world's friendly turtles that everybody loves are cannibals. If they get the chance, they deserve to get stopped by the sort of. The next day to go there that that's funny. The sewer pods were intervening. A turtle was about it. Campbell is another turtle sorrows like no stop to that. It could be the case. because there are photos and videos of adult turtles, baby, turtles and turtles are never so that's not too surprising, but cannibalism is very common in the water. You probably know this. If you have a fish tank, because lots of fish are carnivorous, they basically mostly in other fish and the rule of thumb. If you have a fish tank is if something fits inside officials mouth. It's probably GONNA try to eat it. We've seen this firsthand. Yes, whether it's its own babies. It's another fish if it's another of the same species its own poop. Yes, it's going to try to eat. It can fit it in his mouth. Why not? Just back to the turtles row quick. just want to mention to our listeners who might be new? This has been an ongoing debate between Garrett, and it's actually carried over into our discord is wealth. And this is not out of the blue. There have been hypotheses thrown out there. That sewer PAS were so large that they could step on and squish a tortoise or a turtle, and then eat. It's delicious gooey insides right for the protein. Yes, anyway back to your cannibalism. Fun Fact. Yeah, so another example is that hippos have been seen at least twice practicing cannibalism that must be scary. Sight was weird because hippos barely have teeth and tusks in the front of their mouth and stuff, so it's not an easy move right, but they're so aggressive. Yes, and the more recent picture has a bunch of crocodiles in the background, so they're not even messing with the hippo. Hippo so yeah, it shows you how tough the hip Lazar and then with modern dinosaurs also known as birds I mentioned Rufiji and chickens, and other birds sometimes eat their own eggs pretty frequently. There's also sometimes infighting which progresses into cannibalism. Few think about the so-called pecking order as their pecking at each other trying to establish which one is the dominant chicken or other dinosaur? Sometimes they just keep going until one of them dies and then end up eating that one. It's pretty intense. They also sometimes commit cannibalism if they're low on a nutrient which they can get by eating. Another of their same species. In dinosaurs, there's no evidence of dinosaur cannibalism yet because I think we're gonNA find it I. Just don't know how yet. I think the main reason we haven't seen it yet. Is Because rivers dinosaurs do not have good tease for making those Stri. It'd marks on bones, most of them don't have teeth and the ones that do aren't really strong enough and I don't think they would be very good at removing flesh from bones. The dental batteries. Yeah, that's GonNa, leave a totally different kind of mark, if anything, kind of just like a grinding surface so I, don't know but. But? We might be able to see it on a microscope. The main reason I think this is almost certainly happening. Is that baby dinosaurs bite-sized even for urban wars, so I'm pretty sure that a sewer pod. If it saw another sewer pod, baby would probably chop it down and I think the best chance therefore is probably finding microfossils in gut contents, or maybe in copper light from a baby of the same genus as the one that eight it interesting. Point the blame in the. We'll. There's plenty of blame to be placed already at some of the theropods, because famously Magus for Madagascar I think was the first cannonball dinosaur that was known, and then there's t rex, and now allosaurus slash Soros have been confirmed as well so lots of animals going around dynamic has faces have been suspected of cannibalism, but that's gone back and forth a little bit, so we're not totally sure if they were cannibals, probably though I just assume after reading all the stuff about animal ism, it seems like everything is accountable. Under the right circumstances yeah, one of those types of cannibalism. They might not of done it as adults to other adults, but they were probably at least on occasion eating the young, because it seems like just every animal that all the time I'm glad we have a well-stocked fridge. Humans very rarely go into cannibalism. If you make it past that early childhood, right, most mammals tone to cannibalism. Good. And that wraps up this episode of I. Know Daito. Thanks for listening and don't forget to subscribe you. Don't miss out on any new episodes. Also join our growing community unpatriotic. Patriot dot com slash dino. Thanks again and until next time. Get your copy of walking with dinosaurs, ready and watch episode, five spirits of the ice, forest and episode six death of a dynasty with us. We're watching at one PM Pacific daylight time on Saturday June thirteenth, and the starting point is right after the opening credits finish. It's about thirty seconds in the recordings, but I'm not sure about all of them, so press play exactly at one PM. Right when the main part of the show starts, and we'll all be in sync him again. Talk together on dischord. If you want to join or to Patriot dot, com slash, I, know Dino, and all of the tears included discord access, so you can chat about walking with dinosaurs with us.

Garrett Allosaurus Henry Fairfield Osborn US Dinosaur National Monument Stephanie Drum Heller UK Dino Dischord PM Pacific Surata Soros Sabrina Tremors American Museum of Natural His Toronto Cleveland Andrea Dinosaur Allosaurus Surat Charles Nights allosaurus Suratis
Danni Pomplun  How Yoga saved my Life

Vroom Vroom Veer with Jeff Smith

40:36 min | 1 year ago

Danni Pomplun How Yoga saved my Life

"Short and sweet. I'll good. So whenever you're ready. Hit it. This is Dr Josh Wagner from Dr Josh Wagner dot com and you're listening to room room here with Jeff Smith. Enjoy. Well done, sir. Thank you very much. Okay. I'm going to hit stop. I'll be right back. Are you ready to thoughtfully steer away from your revved up frenzied and far too often scripted life than welcome to room veer with Jeff Smith where he guides you down the road differently travelled by sharing? Unique experiences with guests who have managed to shift away from life stuck on cruise control and veered. Their way into a more authentic and fulfilling one in all sorts of interesting and kind of remarkable ways get ready to remove room beer with your differently traveled road. Chauffeured jefferson. Any pomp loon? I hope I got that, right. Thank you so much for being Enver embarrassed. Well, the show, how's it going? It's going really well, I cannot complain complain but I'm not going to. Whining sucks. So let's not. All right. Good to hear. Good to hear so yeah, thank you for being here and I appreciate you hanging out with me for about an hour or so maybe a little bit less. So tell me a little bit about what you're most excited about over there at Dini pump, loon dot com. Let's such a loaded question. So much happening all the time. I think probably the biggest thing that I'm really excited about right now, I've got to retreats one of them's going to be in Mexico over New Year's. Yeah, yeah. It's gonna be it's gonna it's a meditation and yoga retreats. So pretty excited about that can work on some goal setting, in some releasing of last year's bullcrap in kind of manifesting, all the things that we, we want to bring in the near it's like, always, I know we're only like halfway through the year but it's something that I look forward to because the people that, that come on this retreat, are always really excited about, you know, X handling it bullshit. Yes, exact one hundred percent. Yeah, yeah, yeah. And we breathe bullshit, all day, so we definitely need to get it out. Oh my God. We're so attached to our stories. We, we love it. We love we love rerunning the script on our heads over and over and over again. Yes, it's yeah. It's good when you can start exercising a little control over that. That's, that's why we do meditation and yoga. Yes. Yes. Yeah. Well, that sounds like a blast where in where in Mexico and one of the big it'd be down in a todos Santos, which is the southern tip of a hawk California. Beautiful. Oh, that's a pretty cool. It's a pretty cool space. I was there last year. And I just loved it. People fell in love with it. And so we're, we're pretty pretty excited. It will be home back. Sounds like right on the water, right? I know. Oh. Now say the name of that place again. So I can look it up. It's called todos Santos or all the saints total Santos, okay. Now, everybody can go look it up in a link to it in the show notes. And if you have yes for your event, let me and I'll put a link in the show notes, because it sounds amazing. Who wouldn't want to go spend? I mean, you wanna get out of town for the holidays anyway, right? Right. Yeah. So beach in Mexico doing yoga and meditation. Yeah. I sound. Sounds awful. Sounds apple. Okay. So that sounds exciting. So good for you. So this is remember veer. I don't know if you know what you signed up for a lot of don't. But what we do here is, we do a little bit of this is your life about show. So let's go back in time and talk about some of your story wherever you want to start. So let's just start with where did you grow up? I was originally born or was originally born. Ridgely born then. Was born in east LA like the song the chiefs. The song saw I do know that song. Yes. And I grew up there, so I was about sixteen in the actual about eighteen I grew up all over L air, that I lived in San Diego for about an years and the minute. San Francisco for going on five years now. Okay. All right. So San Francisco, nice, nice move. I actually lived kind of close to east LA. So if I said like to twenty-third, and Vermont, would, you know what I was talking about twenty third in Vermont timber much of San Francisco to twenty third to twenty third to twenty third? I've no idea where that's out in Vermont. No LAX ish. Because down by X is, you know, that's no not. Really? But. How else could I describe it? If you take the one ten south going towards Pedro. So, yeah. Yeah, it's right off the one ten that's where I lived. But the one two okay like once before the four oh, five. Let's see. So if you take the four zero five and the one ten you know where those meet. Yup. I'm about to exits south of that interchange. No three exit south of that interchange on the worker, go south right where I was so today's episode where everybody geography of LA. We, we, we listeners through L A's freeways. But all the people are going. I know that place. A forcible healthcare, so when whenever whenever no affordable pet care. There's like two pet clinics on the corner of Vermont, and to twenty-third. So that's what everybody knows they don't know. I live there. But that's oh you live by affordable pet care. Anyway. Sorry, everybody that never lived in LA. Yeah. So that's what part of east LA so somewhere on this new line. I would imagine. So I was born in Alhambra. Oh, wow. L umbra. That's kind of like nudie version of east LA. Back in the day, used to be terrible at WalMart Monterey. Monterey park area. Yeah, yeah. So, I was I was born Alhambra and then, you know, I ended up growing up in echo park, and again before before it was cool, and awesome to go to echo park. Okay. So I grew back in that day, it was kind of like don't goes on at night. He's out trying to it was filled with gangs all day long. Okay. Yeah. All right. So you grew up in that sort of moment, then. Yeah. I mean, it was pretty thirty everyday life. You know. I mean I didn't know any different you just kind of get it. Wow. So let's, let's get into that because I know like from your bio, you, I want to get all up in that if you want with it. Yeah, yeah. One hundred percent. Yeah. So I mean, this is this is this is like the good stuff for my show. I want to get into that. I know we're going to get to yoga don't worry about. And you've been on a million podcasts, you talk about yoga all the time. We'll, we've it in, but I really wanna get The Danny story. Okay. So you got in trouble with all sorts of stuff when you were younger. So just walk me through it. So what was it like growing up and an echo park and the bad part of LA? It was less getting into trouble and more working on survivors goes. So I had a father who was pretty absence. Right. And then I had a mother, who is. Addict, and she would always I guess she was an addict and a felon. She was always in and out of prison, most of my life. And so, you know, again, not when you're a kid, you don't know that you're just kinda that's like your everyday life. But at about sixteen I left home and pretty much started living on the streets and, you know, doing what I did to get by. So I did the did the typical like whatever you have new like, sometimes it was selling drugs stealing things, you know, other times it was just basic trying to eat, right. And. Right. That's exactly what it yeah. It's exactly what it is. And that was a part of, you know, that was a part of my life for, you know, for quite a few years until about eighteen nineteen is when I was able to really start to sustain myself as an actual like, decent human at a decent immigration. I shouldn't talk myself. Like that. But. A functional functional human being of, of society of normal society. But right, it took a little bit to get there. I didn't really have I didn't have a skill set. I didn't have a school. I dropped out of high school. I really. Don't really understand how big of a deal that is. Oh, yeah. I had a friend who was. Super smart. But had I don't know. He had, like, almost a clinical diagnosis of some sort of disorder that I forgot but it basically was like if I could be rude, I would say he was clinically an asshole. So not everybody has that excuse. Right. Right. He was really smart. But, like if somebody pissed him off he would like burn down the city. Okay. Right. In spite he was just super. And it was because of this condition that I think that, that's where that sort of stuff comes from. Maybe I don't know. Maybe it was just a bad childhood who knows. But for whatever reason he, he would go mad Queen on anything and anybody it didn't matter. He had no control over his hate when it came to like being wronged, so he was like, basically an honor student through high school, and then somebody and high school pissed them off and he quit. Totally graduated just walked away. Right. And then later any he went and got his GED thinking, it's exactly the same and it's not. Yeah. Because it's a big difference. So did you have to deal with that, too? Did you end up getting a GED or later on? I was about twenty years old. When I ended up doing that. Okay. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. That's rough right now. I mean it's, it's, it's hard, you know, it's, it's, I mean, there's a lying for a job when you don't have a high school diploma is, like people just sort of, like look at you like you're criminal. It's like, oh, okay. Well, interesting, right? Yeah. And just not having the basic skill sets in life that too. I mean, the papers one thing, but the okay, all right. Talk a little bit about that. Like what sorts of things weren't you prepared for when you before you got the twenty just like holding down a job showing up on time, those sorts of things, I'm guessing now like my survivor instincts were pretty spot on. You know, it's the stuff that affected it later on down in life. Like not having a an education, you know, writing and things like that. That, that kind of okay kind of basic stuff that you need to know that to, to get by, you know, the, the write a resume to do whatever it is. And I didn't have necessarily that. So I always had to depend on just my life skills to get by. I guess that makes sense I can I can I can understand like people's you start going and looking for job. And they're like, okay, you need a resume you need to fill out this application. You're like. Yeah. So you have to go, learn how to okay? Wow. I never even thought of that. But did you also face that situation where where you were you were like presented with this? I'm not going to get a decent job in less. I get a GED did that is that kind of what motivated you to do that. No. That never really came up. I actually just did it for myself. You know, I, I really just wanted to, you know, do do what I wanted to do for me. Okay. All right. I can see that. So talk a little bit about I know you, you kind of like you, you had your own sort of like addiction situation. Going on too. Yeah, of course. Yeah. So talk a little bit about what it was like that. What that life was like, because I to be honest with you, you know, I think we can get into this really deep. But I think everybody has a to a greater or lesser degree that I could get addicted to ex- kind of situation, and some people just happen, if it happens to you, and you have that right mix of say, like, really hard to break addiction, sort of brain chemistry, and you happen to find something like that is like amazing. So I don't know what drug of choice here. Cocaine heroine, whatever hard-drug you might want to be addicted to, you know, there's not a big difference. Say I listen to this guy on one of, I think it was Tim Ferriss podcast and he does. He works with addicts in Vancouver, and pay said he was equally addicted to buying CDs classical music CDs. He had all of the symptoms as all the other addicts. But his addiction was socially acceptable. Right. Nobody's going to bust you for, you know, binging on CDs right? Nobody. Right. Right. Right. So it's the way we treat. These things is just so weird in my mind. It's like we haven't. Gotten over our own societal BS enough to the point where we can accept that. That's just another disease. Yeah, it is. And it's it's, it's not just addiction. It's all mental illness, more or less. It's like it's the only thing that if you if you get cancer people don't go, oh, you're one of those people, you got cancer. Right. Right. Right. Right. You know, it's like this big pile of judgement. So yeah, so sorry I'm getting now. But go ahead and walk us through like what a day was like as an addict, and then maybe get into like how you got out of that situation. Yeah. I mean you know, there's a everyday is a little bit different. You know, it's just when whether we all like to realize it or not, we all have, you know, trauma in one way, shape performed from our mothers in our fathers for some time. Trauma shows up in multiple ways than it's not always, you know, a bad interaction, but too much of anything is, is, is not a good thing. And, you know, when you're younger, you know, let's say you're six seven years old, and you, you that traumatic thing happens to you. You're not equipped emotionally to hold onto any of that. You're not equipped emotionally to process, any of that. Right. So that naturally stores itself into another way of shame or whatever it is that the basic emotions that you, can you can steal his where that tends to get, you know, stored in my opinion. And you know as as for me as I got to get older in life, started to actually happen in things came up, and I had to process those things I didn't have the skill set to process those things. So. So so fascinating dealer mechanism than to. So that was okay. You're about to say it. All right. Gotcha. Go ahead. Sorry interrupted. So, you know, the easiest thing to do was to numb it, you know, in, in rather than feel and try to sit with it because I didn't have the skill set to do. So I got my hands on pretty much as much as good and you know as much cocaine as I could. And you know, that was that was pretty much my everyday life for a long time. And I started working at bars and nightclubs. And it just really started fueling the beast Amina became we talk about, you know, you, you talked about normalizing the CD, you know, impo impulsive person and just so that we're all aware. So the listener dollar most people tend to have an addiction, whether they like to realize it or not enough, not to say, like you are an added that you can act in over, intoxication in anything in anything could be in the amount of movies, you watch the amount of books that you re like you can act in over, intoxication in anything food, whatever it is. Yes. And there's no shame in any of it. There's just awareness in it. That's, that's the only thing there's no should there should be no. Than any of it, right? Dr- drugs and alcohol tend to get a bigger harder rap. But it's like it's like anything else. The more that we normalize, it the more that we have a conversation about it, the easier these, these people will will will will will feel like they're connected and be able to help themselves. You know, a tiny back in, you know, I pretty much just numbed for, for, for years because it was easier. It was easier than having to sit down and be like what is actually happening with the inside? It was it was easier to, you know, it was easier to drink the pain away versus saying, okay, I feel pain right now, whereas stemming from, oh, this is stemming from something that happened to have passed a wo-. This is something that happens to me as a kid, a wo-. I got unpack this now. Right on one. No one wants to do that. Now now. Now, now you're right. You're right. No. So basically, I think what, what happens is. And with me it was booze. Definitely booze. And food and TV those are those are sort and tobacco for a while to, and then, you know, you're right, it's slowly, but surely after I retired from the air force, I one of the biggest. Consciousness. Awareness moments for me was when I decided to do massage school of all things. I'm an accident guy. Now. Right. And I was just like I wanna do something completely different, so. Ms. Right. But oh my gosh. That was just so I got to learn all about body awareness, never knew that was even thing, right? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And then I ended up. Having a yoga community after that, too. There was a I was I'm retired air force guy. So there was a all the year, a lot of air force bases have like these free classes that you can take. So there was. Two free yoga classes once every week. And then later on one of those converted into a strength training class, which was amazing. And I totally miss all of that, that was all in LA, but anyway, so I say, all of that, just because I learned so much about what's going on in the body, and like you said, it's like we deal with all of that, you know, one of these guys the question to him when he says, like, okay, why is this person addicted or why is this person have some sort of malformed behavior for coping? It's why the pain. Right. Why is this pain there? And, and in the answer is you don't know. You just feel it and do the thing, reading the thing could be buying CDs. It could be watching TV eating too much pizza, and drinking beer, it could be heroin and booze. It could be, you know, fucking, you know, it doesn't matter what, what you do. The fact is, is like you're just trying to escape that feeling. That makes sense yet one hundred percent. Absolutely. Wow. See there look at that. Okay. So then there was this moment or day or series of moments wherein yoga saved your life. So let's get into that because that's that's amazing. I was twenty five and I had had a partner that had pasta way why, and it was the first there was it was, it was the first time I was actually aware of, you know, somewhat of myself, and, you know I didn't take it so easy. And I really went off the deep end on my addiction and brought up a lot of stuff then one hundred percent. Yeah. And you know because of that, I ended up going on a on a pretty big raider. Let's yeah, let's. Okay. Yeah. Raiders auto worse than a binge. Okay. Yeah. On a pretty big rage here. And, you know, when I came out of it, I basically had tad. I wrecked some things in the house, and I don't remember any of it, and it's smashed smashed a bunch of things and broke some things. And, you know, my roommate at the time, but was I believe, you know, to this day, she is my guardian angel she's not even like my best friend. She's like my sister at this. She's family. Okay. She basically was like you know what Danny, I, I can't live with you like this anymore. And I can't I can't be around you. If you're gonna do this, and I was like I don't even know what you expect me to do anymore. I have nothing left to live for pretty much, and she's like, do something, you know, just do something when ended up happening was, I tried committing suicide. And you know, I didn't I didn't really want to be around anymore. And I, I didn't I didn't do so, well, the suicide of towns and you know if. Because I did that too. So can you tell me about your chosen method because angels involved in this whole scenario to? Yeah. Yeah, I tried putting a plastic bag over my head, and then duct tape around bag. Yeah, it's got a lot of escape routes. So that's two good methods to choose if you wanna live. So then. So let me tell you what I did I actually attempted twice. And the first time was like with a whole too much. No. Does that doesn't work necessarily just because the dose wasn't big enough? But then my second attempt was rat poison. So I don't ever found rat poison in the store and broken up in the box. But there are these little Chewable pellets for rats. So I mixed it in ice cream and then I ate it. And so then I didn't I and I woke up and I went to work and I had a really shitty day. Okay. Horrible rat poison hangover. Don't even try it. Anyway, had I done that differently. I, I would have not been around. So thank thankfully. I'm not a chemical engineer or a chemistry student, so. Right. And, and I woke up and I had some green looking poop, and a really shitty day at work, and let me tell you, though, that I want to get back to your story. So what happened to you? How did that? How did that play out? What ended up happening was, you know, after being found I. To the emergency room. No, no. I wasn't. I wasn't area. I think I'd made too much noise. In alerted people in, you know, anyway. Yeah. You know, sitting down and talking with my roommate, I was just broken and didn't really know what else to do. Or what else you know, where to go and she was like, you know, there's yoga studio that opened up. And if you could, you know, maybe start going to the studio or something like that. And I had no money and I couldn't afford to move. And you know, I had no other really option. So I stayed and started going to yoga. And you know, I I didn't really understand it didn't really get it. I just knew that I had to go there, and I knew that if I went there often enough, I couldn't drink as much because I had something to commit to into do, so it would pull me away from, you know, have being able to go out and, and it worked for for for a bit. You know, it gave me something gave me somewhere else to go and it gave me a gave me a community to start to connect to. So let me ask you this did it did it help. Alleviate some of that pain that we were talking about at all. You think? I don't think yet it did. Give me it, yet it did. Give me courage and strength to, you know, start to connect to others. Right. And I think that, you know, like, what really gets loss in addiction, the opposite of addiction is isn't as you know, stopped the, the opposite of diction in is connection, right? You know what really gets people is, is a place to feel safe in a place to call home and a place to normalize conversations like suicide and they've spend diction issues, and these are all things that we have decided we've decided that are taboo, what we can't talk about them. So let's show them under the rug and not bring map bring them to the surface, and let's make people feel bad about it, right. No. You know, going to the studio gave me a safe space to, to talk about it to, to be myself to let people know that I was going through a hard time and not airing out, my dirty laundry. But, you know to be real to actually feel what I was feeling. Right. Which that's that later on led down to some courage to, you know, seek mental health, you know, help and that was a new concept for me. Because you don't show weakness. You don't tell people that you have, you know things going on inside and whatnot. And that's another conversation that I tried my hardest normalizes, mental, how it's, it's it should be before placing your teeth in demento agree. Yes. Is it is insane that we make it so unaccessible and so sensitive, it's, it's absolutely mind boggling to be part of your annual checkup one hundred two should be your biannual checkup or more to check. Yes, I agree. And, and you know, and it needs to get a new name. That's not doesn't have any stigma on it anymore. I don't even end it should be for everybody. Everybody needs that just a mental health checkup. I don't know how many times, but like as often as possible. Yes, I did. I did degree a bachelor's degree in psychology and actually about the only thing I learned is I didn't wanna work in psychology, just because it was all about taking people that were not well. Okay. Right. There was no discussion whatsoever to deal with everybody else, which is like a much larger percentage of the population who is has an unsatisfactory level of. Oh, Kanus in my mind. That's right. We're on the same page. Right. Okay. Not okay with me here. You know what I'm saying are right? Yes. It are. Okay is kind of crazy. You know, this is like the kind of crazy that let you hold down a nine to five job. And we're all that. Okay. And it's not. Okay. Anyway. Sorry on my soapbox a little bit. Okay. That's okay. No. Yeah. So talk a little bit about the so basically, you got you got some sort of mental help mental health treatment. How did you end up falling in love with yoga to the point where you want to become a teacher? I didn't I didn't necessarily want to become a teacher up. I, I so the way I, I started practicing yoga in a eventually ended up quitting one of my bar jobs, because it was an unhealthy situation and you didn't want I write rate. And then I went to went back to the studio. Like I can't really practices you guys anymore. I can't I don't have any money, right? Yeah. Exactly. And they were like you know, you can start scrubbing toilets for free yoga and I did. I wasn't above. They had given me community and had welcomed me and I wasn't above scrubbing toilets to get for yoga insist. Stay connected, so did that for about nine months? And then, eventually I got moved up to being the person that was in charge of the toilet. Scrubber is like to order like supplies in right little schedules. All right. Yeah. You're moving totally. Yeah. And, and then, you know kinda little fast forward. There was this teacher training program that they had. And they all vary. Kindly in very passive way. Just pushed me into doing it. They were like, hey, there's this program. You know you can't really we don't really do the toilet scrubbing thing anymore. You know, you can do this program and get for yoga for three months. And I kind of was resistant, at the start in there like, you know, we're, we're gifting this program to you. And I think that's when it kind of struck me where I was like they're doing something kind for me right now. And I'm going to step into that. And even then while I was going through the process, you know, I, I, I, I wasn't really sure what I was doing and what was happening and I just kind of was going through it. And then you know, towards the end of it. They were like, okay, so we think that you should, you know, become a teacher. And this is why they had a few key players in the mix. And I kinda just started teaching because it was a way to get free Oga in sure, still didn't underst-. I didn't understand what it was doing to me, although it was doing something to him, but say, you know, saying what I said earlier I was just started seeking. You know, the mental health component. And right. You know, I was unpacking these layers, you know, and, you know, was about two years into it, where I had decided that I was sick and tired of are tending and I it was just the first thought of, like, I knew I needed to stop bartending and a gun to a conference yoga conference, met some really cool. Teachers and I ended up taking about nine months off of drinking and drugs and things got really clear and then I, I went back to drinking again, and thanks started to get really rocky in. I just decided I needed to get out of San Diego before I kill myself, or, you know, did something stupid again in San Francisco and over. There was a big yoga scene appear in some of the people that were making it were appeared, and there was a specific teacher, who had had a very similar story. He was meth addict, who's also queer man. And, you know, he he found his way out through do yoga, and I came up to study from him in. Get to know him and you know after about a year and a half of being up here. It was routed year and a half nine months. I decided that I was going to do this yoga thing fulltime, and I knew it was gonna take a while to get there. So I was still bartending, and my drinking was in full effect in this one died woke up with the worst. Shame hangover my life and. Those. I know what you're talking about. Yep. I've decided that I was done. And I was going to get rid of the distractions until I could make this yoga thing happened. Full-time. You know, I think it was last week hearing, I'm a fulltime four years later, and this is my full on passion in almost five years of not drinking or doing the cocaine or any of that, you know, in its it's been pretty great. It's been a very, very, very challenging experience and a very rewarding experience that I'm just glad that I could get to do it every single there. I think you really nailed it there. Thanks for sharing. By the way, that was an amazing. You know, very open and raw kind of perfect for my show. Thanks, appreciate that. But we hit on a thing that I want to sort of, like touch on that sort of gets lost in this mix. Have you ever heard do me a favor when we're done? If you haven't heard of this thing, called the rat park experience or no, the rat park experiment. That, that's what I want you to Google. I'll put a link in the show notes. So this is like the scientific study where they were studying addiction and isolation loneliness at the same time. Those are the two components of the experiment. So they set up this thing they called the rat park, right? And in the first experiment, they had. Just the most boring. No stimulation kind of isolation for rat. Right. And he had. Unfettered access to heroin. Okay. And, and that little guy would just become a junkie, and just not want anything else other than that heroin button. Right. Gimme mar gimme more. Okay. And then in the other study, and then the other part of the study, they made the rat park, and that was the most social and stimulating environment. Like the best place for rats to hang out and do their thing, just right. And they still gave him the heroine. Right. And they were very much indifferent towards the heroin. They would be like me. You know, we can take it. We can, you know, it was kind of like a beer, right? Like, maybe I'll have a beer. Maybe I won't. Right. Maybe I'll have some heroin maybe I won't. So the idea there in that it, it wasn't the heroine necessarily, it was the 'isolation. Yeah. So when you take all those other components of you've got the childhood trauma, you've got the I don't know what to do with his pain. And then you add in the final component of isolation. That is the, the magic recipe that, that just makes this whole thing, so difficult to deal with and right. That was the Hama. I think we all go through these periods of isolation. And it's not like the dark. I just like quit my job and was screwing around the house, but there's nobody around, you know, I'm I'm agent appropriate retired. Right. You know, and that, and that just creates this sorta like there's not enough people around. So that's when I started getting into, you know, all I'm going to do yoga twice a week or maybe three times a week. I just any old reason to get out of the house and be around people. So if you're one of these solar preneurs types that likes to work at home and you're listening. Don't work at home. Go, go pay for co work space. Just so there's people around and you can, you can interact, or, you know, be a yoga get get a yoga family. I so miss my yoga family. Sorry, I it. I had that yoga family back in LA. It was amazing. And I have to find it here. It's been two years since I was not quite. Yeah, about two years because I did do some yoga when I first got to Las Vegas, but I haven't really found my yoga family here in Vegas yet. So I still keep shopping anyway, as we wrap up because we're getting close to the hour Mark here. Talk a little bit more about everything that you love about your practice and what you've got on offer at your website. Danny pump loon dot com. Danny foam PLA. Every time we say, we should say a new way, I agree. Yeah. So the practice, you know that I offer is very it's very simple. It's, it's all inclusive. You know. So it doesn't matter who you are where you come from what you look like we'll call you know level. Right. You can. It's all levels, you know, and it's a very, you know, there's four components that I like to put into every single class, and even so the community that create one of them is strength. You know, we're definitely we're we're signing up for yoga classes. So we're gonna work together. We're probably gonna work pretty hard. You know. And I think that there's a lot of good stuff that happens from that hard work. And then there's the, the smart park mutt. You know about component about it now. I wanted you're in a classroom setting. I want to teach something whether that's about your body or about yourself by definitely wants to communicate that there is a lesson happening. And then there's the hard part where I you know, I encourage people to connect to themselves to step away from the stories that away from the drama, step away from, you know, the future in the past, and really just be a wet right now moment perfect. And then the last part is community. That's it's the it's the thing that got me through everything in it's where I encourage people to make some friends around them, although he gets it come into this practice on our own individual Matt's. You know with this unit feeling we get to come together at that. You miss the most when you don't. Yeah. It's so try to try to keep it as open, as, as you know, as possible the and it sounds like you have, like a fun, kind of, like more fun. I mean, there there's so many different love different kinds of yoga so only done yoga once, and it was like one of those militaristic kind of yoga classes, they're not all like that. There's a lot of laughing in, in a lot of yoga play. I'm the king of dad jokes. That's great. Yeah. So there's a lot of that happening. And yeah, you know there's tons of offerings on my website. You know, there's I do trainings, and retreats and workshops and travel around a lot and teach the other system. There's some way shape form. You can catch it on my on my meditations are only in classes. But there is there is a way to dial in, if, if in run if in when you're ready to dial it sounds amazing. I if, if you don't mind, I wanna channel little bit about what I miss about, like my yoga family before we wrap her. Yeah. Sure. So, like I said it was like, I think I was the youngest and I'm fifty now. There was there was there was a group of young people that would sort of like they were the active duty people either, they're like a military themselves, or maybe a military family member like spouse or child that shows up for the class. But in core group, we were all retirees. Right. So and I was the youngest of the retirees. So the that was sort of like the family that state, you know until. But one of the guys was like in his ninety s so and his movement was so limited, he had to do most of the class in a chair. But I want to say this, if you make it to ninety right? Cannon should probably fart liberally in yoga class. Because he did. And he got away with it because he's ninety or something ninety something it was hilarious. So we would all and he was hard of hearing, too. So we're all giggling, and he's just like letting fly I mean I wouldn't want to be next to him. But it, it just added something that anybody can do yoga, if they just show up. You know, I wanted to share that because I thought it was hilarious. Yep. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you should part liberally. Sure, ninety and yoga. You can't ensure. Anyway. So thank you so much for, for hanging out with me for about an hour. This has been a blast and, and you shared a lot. I appreciate it. Absolutely. Thank you for having me on the show. All right. Hey have a good one. Thanks for taking the time to ride along with us on another episode of green dream veered for podcast. Info in show notes be sure to head over to veer dot com. That's triple double E, R dot com. Man, that's fun to say and we'll catch up with you next time here on groom. Vivere.

LA cocaine Mexico Danny heroin San Francisco Ms. Right echo park Vermont San Diego Dr Josh Wagner Jeff Smith todos Santos east LA Dini pump Enver jefferson cancer
TikTok vs. Instagram | Codename | 1

Business Wars

32:15 min | 3 d ago

TikTok vs. Instagram | Codename | 1

"June twenty nineteen hong kong central business district protesters outside a tall glass government building or chanting and shouting slogans like hong kong. Never give up and wave the law. There are million strong and they are angry. There wielding umbrellas a symbol of the pro-democracy move. Demonstrators are incensed by a new security law. That would allow china to extradite hong kong residents to mainland china activists. Fear the law would not only allow beijing to tighten its grip on hong kong but would also be used to snuff out opposition. The police have cordoned off the government building but more people crowd the street pushing against the metal barricades. It doesn't take long before all hell breaks loose. Police fire rubber bullets at protesters. An officer dressed in head to toe black riot gear runs forward and logic canister of tear gas into the crowd. Another officer yanks back the arms of a young activist and forces him into handcuffs and onlooker pulls out her phone records the arrest. Then she clicks share the footage should go live to the world on tiktok the latest hot social media app but despite talks one billion users. No one will ever see her video by dance. The company that owns the app seems to have made sure of that. Journalists alleged the company is set up monitoring pro democracy content coming out of hong kong and there allegedly yanking any content deemed controversial suspiciously few videos of hong. Kong's protest show up by dance is walking a delicate line to protect its credibility. The company has to surface some feeds from the protest. But there can't be so many that it might offend beijing where the chinese government could shut down the whole operation. Tiktok has become one of the most popular apps around the world and it was created by chinese entrepreneur. But now it's trapped in no-man's land caught between china's anti-democracy politics and a society desperately searching for an outlet for free speech but despite these constraints it poses a serious challenge to its american counterpart instagram. Hey this black friday. If you're on the hunt for men's essentials the only place you need to shop. His mac weldon. I get this pima. Long sleeved shirt from mack. Welton is so versatile and comfortable. You'd be crazy for thinking this just another long sleeve t shirt. They look good under a which makes it. Perfect for any zoom meetings or presentations. Right now. mac weldon is offering an exclusive all black pack which includes a t shirt underwear and socks for just ninety eight dollars. But it's only while supplies last visit. Macworld dot com slash vw and enter promo code bw. You'll also get twenty percent off your first order. That's mac weldon dot com slash between promo code. Bwi for twenty percent off and the all black pack for just ninety eight dollars. Everyone likes shopping online. But searching for coupon codes is kind of a bummer so make saving online a breeze with capital one shopping capital. One shopping is a free tool that instantly searches for available coupon codes and automatically applies the checkout just download capital one shopping to your computer and let it do the work for you so easy and you don't even need a capital one card to use it capital one shopping. It's kind of genius. What's in your wallet. Savings and available coupons berry from wondering i'm david brown and this is business wars In our new series we follow the battle between the social media app tiktok and instagram platforms. That change the way we live and interact where once we only photographed recorded special occasions now. Our daily existence is captured and performed from perfectly curated meals to goofy viral dances tiktok. We'll have to keep the chinese government happy to survive but a new threat is also on the horizon from silicon valley highly competitive technocrats who have no qualms about copying or acquiring their rivals in order to bury them. This is episode one a codename july. Two thousand ten todos santos in baja california mexico. The turquoise sea gently lapsed at the white sand is kevin system walks along the shore with his girlfriend. Nicole shoots at six foot. Five system tires. Overshoots the twenty six year. Old software engineer may be on a beach getaway but like many silicon valley techies. He's always working. He's pondering his startup. An app called bourbon users check in at whatever coffee shopper bar there visiting and the app updates their friends than the user can post a photo of the location lately. He's barely sleeping pouring all of his waking life into the app and yet bourbon only has one hundred users the apps not taking off and it's time to move on but system is co founder mike. Krieger have raised half a million dollars from investors. They've hardly touched that money yet. Which means they still have enough cash to pivot to a new idea. He turns to shoot. I know i'm not supposed to bring up work right now but i have to talk this new idea through with you man. You really know how to rock vacation. Don't you find. let's hear it. mike. And i have been thinking of focusing on photos. She writes looks up at her boyfriend. Squinting into the sun. I think that's a good idea. I loved the photos on bourbon. But i don't know if i'd post any why not. Well my photos. Aren't that good. Oh come on. Their great shoots laughs thank you. But they're not as good as greg's the iphone. Four camera kinda sucks. Greg is a friend of systems in another user bourbon but system knows. There's a secret to how greg gets pictures to look that way. And it's not as camera well. Greg uses a bunch of filter apps to make them look good. She pauses cocks her head to the side. Maybe you should add filters then. It's an aha moment for system. More people will share their photos that they look cool. An eye catching and if more people start photos maybe more people will start using the app back at their bed and breakfasts system head straight. Fers laptop in college system had used a whole camera which takes square film photos. Instead of rectangular this gives system brainwave kill make the pictures on his app square to stand out from the competition. But how can you make the photos. Look better system. Thanks again about the whole good camera. It often created saturated images with rich colors. Sometimes there were lightly square sunlight. Got under the film so he starts designing a filter that will mimic the same effects by the end of the day system has his first filter. He calls it ex pro. Two it ups. The contrast and saturation making pictures looked brighter and more flattering. It also adds a focus to the center of the frame by darkening. The edges of the photo krieger. His partner is already made a test app for posting photos. It's catchy codename is well codename system and schuette's walk to a taco stand. He snaps a photo of a dog. They spot along the way he applies the pro to filter and uploads to codename system. Doesn't know it yet. But he has just taken the very first instagram. What happens next will change the fate of his startup dreams and turn system from ah nobody into silicon valley's latest funder candidate october. Sixth twenty ten system. Krieger are sitting in a dimly lit warehouse and an old pier in san francisco bay at dog patch. Labs and industrial co working space. It's a little after midnight in. The desks are empty system and krieger putting the finishing touches on their new app. They've ditched bourbon altogether. Instead they're focused solely on a photo sharing platform they call it instagram. A mashup instant camera and telegram. Krieger is hunched over his laptop. Tapping away on screen. Is the control panel for the apple app store. He pushes his fingers through his dark hair and readjusts his glasses his fingers for an instant over the keyboard then he presses enter okay. It's live in the app store syndrome bins over. Krieger shouldered appeared screen in the corner taking counter. Lets them see each time. The app gets a new download. Both manner too nervous to talk. Suddenly they get a bite. There's one a few seconds pass. There's another they keep watching the downloads. Keep coming a few days ago. Krieger and system sent out one hundred download invitations to tech journalists and influential silicon valley people one of their most avid users twitter founder. Jack dorsey he's also invested in their much of instagram's for his cribbed from twitter. You can like a photo follow people and use hashtags defined similarly tagged images and. You don't need anyone's permission to follow them. Either it's an open network so you can track celebrities and friends alike dorsey. He's been posting photos from the app to drum up interest. It seems to be paying off as the downloads. Continue to climb. Krieger and system are amazed. One thousand two thousand five thousand. It's way more than the number of people they invited. Where all these people coming from. Krieger appears at a spreadsheet of the email addresses used a sign up there from germany. Hong kong cities around the globe system is ecstatic. This isn't just a san francisco thing. A few of our friends are downloading the whole world. He in krieger hug and decide to call it a night on the subway train home system sees a guy using instagram. He's amazed someone is actually using their app in the wild. The sun is well up by the time. He walked through his front door but then he gets a call from krieger. Kevin the systems down no way. Instagram is running on one database in one computer in los angeles in less than twenty four hours. It's been downloaded twenty five thousand times now. The system handling all the photos. Overloaded system puts krieger on speakerphone and opens up twitter. To see if anyone has noticed yet dammit. Their budget tweets complaining. We're just another startup that doesn't allow to scale their right. We don't but system is devastated. We built this awesome thing in completely messed it up if people can't post because the servers are down they're never gonna come back to instagram. Krieger size we need help. System hangs up and scroll through the contacts in his iphone his pauses over the name of adam to angelo former chief technology officer from facebook. He met dangelo it up. Party years ago. Figures it's worth a shot system gets lucky. Dangelo spins thirty minutes on the phone with him. He walked system through what instagram needs to do to get back up and running. Krieger and system switch to a different service. That makes it easy to buy more server space for giving users return to the platform but instagram's problems are far from over fall. Two thousand eleven instagram san francisco office triggers alarm is going off again. System looks up at krieger. The pair have alarm on their phones. That alerts them. Whenever the servers are overloaded lately the alarm goes off a lot to get to work. It's only been a year since launching. But krieger and systems app has been downloaded ten million times. They still don't have the headcount or server power to keep up system insists he only wants to hire people who really care about instagram. Which means he in. Krieger still fixing things themselves. Servers used to go down every four or five hours. Now it happens every fifteen minutes. Krieger system are exhausted. They haven't had a weekend off in months. They carry their laptops around with them wherever they go now. Systems phone is showing unknown number with a menlo park area code. He picks it up. Hello hi kevin. It's mark no last name needed. It's mark zuckerberg the founder of facebook and one of the most powerful men in silicon valley. The pair met years before when system was still at stanford but he soccer burger. Hardly friends system raises his eyebrows gestures to krieger. Krieger looks up from his laptop. Worries desperately trying to get the servers back up and running. hi mark. how are you. Kruger's eyes widen good good. I just wanted to see how things were going with. Facebook's api any issues. The api is the program that lets instagram integrate with facebook. Hardly something zuckerberg needs to be checking up on himself. System is suspicious but he keeps talking. Oh yeah everything's great with it. Thanks for asking. System is berg makes small talk and after a few minutes they hang up. Krieger grill system right away zuckerberg. What the hell did he want. I have no idea. He basically just called a chan sister in. Krieger have been getting a lot of calls from prestigious. Vc firms eager to invest in the company but no one of zuckerberg stature has been ringing yet. System is about to get a lot more casual friendly calls from zuckerberg. Meanwhile another entrepreneurs planting the seeds for an app. That will one day. Take the world by storm. Twenty twelve beijing. China zhang aiming is sitting in his apartment near beijing's tsinghua university. He's twenty nine years old with buzzed. Black hair and a half rimmed glasses. The smell of grey's ribs and rice waft through the air as he stares at his laptops black screen. It's filled with strings of code. The cursor blinks expectantly zhang's has been working as an engineer different tech companies and. He's always noticing the same thing. Customers don't know what they want. Well what if you serve them what they want before they even know they want it. It could be a news article a travel fair deal. A mean doesn't matter. The point is to keep a tight grip on their attention so he writes a program using a i to serve aggregated news articles from different publishers. He calls the company tokyo which means headlines in mandarin. The program learns what users want to read by tracking what they click on and how long they spend on each article then it customizes news for the user. It's not serving up hugh videos yet but the way the program learns what users like to feed them more of that juicy content be the foundation of tiktok jong will go on to start several more companies and each will become a building block for his blockbuster app but right now. John can't get his mind off something more immediate across the pacific. He's noticed users are fixated on instagram and full of images not news. He finds that enticing april twenty twelve. It's a thursday afternoon. Instagram san francisco office system and krieger huddled to one side whispering while they're thirteen employees. Click away at large open desks. This building used to be twitter's headquarters and twitter has just made krieger and system of very exciting proposition syndrome. Exhales five hundred million silicon valley might be the only place where they'll hand out that kind cash to dudes in their twenties. Krieger bites his lip. Where do you think we should do. Before they can even ponder this systems phone rings. he recognizes the number. mark zuckerberg speaks in his usual measured. Tone kevin. i've been thinking i wanna buy. Instagram system has been expecting this call. He takes a deep breath and listened. I'll pay double whatever you were valued at this round. Why don't you come over. System looks around. Even though he's been expecting an offer he can't believe he's in mark zuckerberg's dining room zuckerberg's been wooing instagram for the past six months calling casually out of the blue to check in and now he says exactly. What system wants to hear. If you come to us he'll get to be fully independent. We won't integrate you into facebook. You'll get to keep running at just how you want system nods. He's not ready to give up control over instagram. Unless unless prices right he cuts to the chase and shoots for the moon okay. Let's talk numbers. How about two billion soccer burger laughs. Camman kevin i said double your current valuation not quadruple. let's do one billion. Krieger and systems. App is only eighteen months old but it also has thirty million users a hefty number given how young the company is on the other hand. Instagram is just a mobile app with no desktop version and no revenue. One billion dollars is a crazy amount far above the typical silicon valley price tag but does occur bird. Instagram's fast-growth could be a lifeline for facebook. The behemoth company has seen its own user. Acquisition slow plus. Instagram has a young audience that facebook covets and zuckerberg has been eyeing another social media upstart. That's attracting young people in droves snapchat teaming up with instagram seems like a way hedge against the competition for system. It feels like a once in a lifetime opportunity. Can i have some time. I need to call. Mike of course zuckerberg retires to the living room. To watch game of thrones. Meanwhile system works the phone from the dining room. he calls krieger. Then dials his lawyers and investors a short while later. He's ready to give zuckerberg answer zuckerberg pauses the tv and looks up at system mark wherein sucker berg stands up and they shake hands. The facebook founder is taking no chances. He fast tracks the process. Getting the deal hammered out and signed over. The weekend zuckerberg thinks he's spurred facebook's momentum and outwitted snapchat but he's unaware that over the horizon another more intoxicating app is incubating its own thread. Twenty twenty has been the year of uncertainty. That's an understatement. isn't it. So how can your business plan for the unexpected going forward and operate virtually more effectively. Look i know it can be tough to keep up. With current best practices for maximizing your digital presence in finding the right talent can be time consuming frustrating and expensive but not with our sponsor fiber if you're looking to find freelance talent fibers online marketplace can connect your business with freelancers that offer hundreds of digital services like graphic design copywriting web programming film editing and more. And it's easy to find what you're looking for. Instantly you just customize your search by service deadline price seller of reviews whatever your needs are you'll know exactly what you're paying for upfront no negotiating needed and if you hit any snags fibers twenty four seven customer services there to help you along the way not that i've ever needed to contact customer service. In fact i've used five or for almost a year now when i needed an editor when needed a logo designed. I looked for samples. I love from experienced and talented sellers. I know just what to expect going. In and i know what the price will be no surprises. No going over budget and best of all no disappointments. You're gonna love five or to check out fiber dot com and get ten percent off your first order by using our special code business wars. Find all the digital services. You need in one place at fiber f. I v. e. r. dot com code business wars again that's fiber dot com code business wars this episode of business wars supported by t mystery. A podcast tells the stories of teams. Who worked together in new and unexpected ways to achieve remarkable things hosted by award winning documentary. Filmmaker gabriella copper thwaite. Each episode of team history tells a story. Full a practical lessons for your team and your business. I got a sneak preview of season. Two of team mystery. And i'm telling you it's really great. I love the sound design and the interview audio. That just sucks you. In the way the host weaves everything together every episode. I listened to. I feel like i have some sort of allah mount. Now it's your turn season. Two of team mystery is out. Search for team mystery anywhere. You listen to podcasts. My thanks to t- mystery for their support. December twenty twelve menlo park california system and. Krieger are in their office on facebook's campus. It's a giant room with a large glass garage door. They've been here for three months but they're still settling in system has two different monitors in front of him. One opened a twitter. He spots a tweet from an instagram user or rather a former instagram user. It reads. i'm deleting instagram. they now own your photos. Hashtag read the terms of service. He mutters under his breath. Why are they talking about system quickly. Scans the photo attached the tweet. It's a screenshot of instagram's recently updated terms of service and it says people's photos could be used in advertisements. The text makes it sound like instagram and its parent company. Facebook have the right to license. People's photos royalty free and without telling them it's a detailed system breezed over when he approved the amended of service. Facebook insisted instagram update their terms to better match those of their new parent company but now users are protesting another tweet calls the new terms instagram's suicide note system shouts for krieger. Mike we've got a problem. He explained the dilemma as krieger. Listens with a furrowed brow. Krieger starts pulling up. Data on appalachians. People are deleting it fast really. Fast systems squint. The graph which shows deletion skyrocketing. Krieger looks at him worried. What do we do system. Thinks for a second we apologize. He takes a deep breath and sits down his laptop. He opens up a new tab to instagram's company blog and pleads for forgiveness for the oversight soon after instagram reverts to its old terms of service but syndrome will not quickly forget how facebook encouraged him to make a change that infuriated his users. He and krieger will need to pay closer attention by now. Instagram has more than one hundred fifty million monthly users and many of them are young people. It's one of the most popular apps in the world but just as its asserting. Its dominance a quirkier app is gaining traction vine rather than just the still photos. Instagram specializes in vine loops. Six second videos it's full of jackass style. Goofy pranks in quick cuts teenagers. Having a good time in other words the complete opposite of the polish filtered aesthetics on instagram incoming competition from snapchat where people send direct messages back and forth to each other instagram response by adding their own fifteen second videos they follow that up by introducing direct messages but instagram is not the only one paying attention to the essential video spring. Twenty fourteen california. A chinese developer named alex shoes sitting on a train. He's traveling from san francisco to mountain view. California at thirty five. He's way older than the high school students who fill the car. Shoe is currently working at a software company. But he's been trying his hand at his own education startup. It's not going anywhere. He's looking for something new. You watches the teenagers with interest. Some of them are listening to music. Some are taking selfies. Some are on snapchat and vine then it hits him what if he could combine the selfie and music with social media and roll it all into one. Is you likes vine. But he thinks it's videos are to brief at six seconds. They're just too short for advertising sponsored content to stick. You opens up his laptop he starts writing the code for a fifteen second video app featuring clips that loop and can be set to songs in april two thousand fourteen launches. It's the precursor to tiktok and it will become one of the fastest spreading apps of all time on the next episode. We go back to system in kruger's fateful meeting on stanford's campus and the move that earns them both millions at the same time. Tiktok founder launches software that gets his chinese customers clicking from wondering this is episode one of tiktok versus instagram. for business wars. you like our show. Please give us a five star rating a review and be sure to tell. Your friends. subscribe on apple. Podcasts spotify the wondering app or wherever. You're listening right now and to listen to episodes one week early joined wondering plus you'll also find some links in offers mar sponsors in the episode notes. Supporting them helps us. Keep offering our shows for free another way. You can support the shows by filling out a small survey at wonder dot com slash survey. And tell us which business stories you'd like to hear a quick note about re-creations you've been hearing in most cases we can't know exactly what was said though caesar dramatization but they are based on historical research. I'm your host david brown natalie. A med wrote this story. Karen low is our senior producer and editor edited and produced by. Emily frost. sound design by. Kyle randall kate. Young our associate producer. Our executive producers are jenny lower beckmann and marshal louis created by earn on lopez for wondering these days. Were spending more time at home than ever before. Other than listening to your favorite podcasts. You probably also reading a ton but sometimes it can be hard to decide what book you should pick up next. What should i read next. Has the answer for you every week on. What should i read next author and blogger and bogle chats with a different guest about their favorite books as they do a little literary matchmaking episodes feature recommendations from all sorts of people with all sorts of backgrounds from farmers to iberians event planners to nurses listen to what should i read next to discover books that will enrich your life. Keep you entertained and help you learn something. Along the way. Subscribe to watch that. I read next on apple podcasts. Or spotify join one in the wondering how to listen at free.

Krieger instagram krieger mac weldon hong kong zuckerberg ninety eight dollars chinese government facebook beijing Tiktok twenty percent china twitter twenty six year mark zuckerberg schuette kevin san francisco Dangelo
4 - Thou Shalt Keep Holy The High And Low

Everywhere

43:24 min | 1 year ago

4 - Thou Shalt Keep Holy The High And Low

"Go further than ever with the discover it miles conned. They automatically matched the miles you own at the end of your first year so your thirty five thousand miles could become seventy thousand discover it miles limitations apply discover match for new card members NBA's only learn more discover dot com slash travel welcome to everywhere a production of iheartradio Hi. I'm Daniel Shuffler and I have some strong feelings about travel. This is everywhere the weekly he'll talk about the travel commandments and as much as Camman and sound like a religious thing in my context they are not they are however laced with ethics and a splash of moral imperative but please take these with the launch intial salt and then throw it over the wing of the plane wherever what they really are intended to do is to offer up a suggestion so feel free to use them Anthony Travel Life me they've done wonders you'll also notice my commandments on the positive bow sean opposed to the usual negative so by all means go forth and Shelter Way and let's see what happens this week. Perhaps APPs Thou shall keep holy the high in lieu of travel. I hear the would luxury much too often in the travel luxury experiences luxury hotel towns luxury linens luxury beaches luxury this luxury the best the finest the most the most is to me somewhere between common sense in Lunacy Z.. We misappropriated this word luxury and we now use it as a dome stuff for pretty much. Everything luxury has lost its luster and it's very much all of our fault. The word luxury originates from the woods lust and interestingly enough lecherous but it's now used to describe anything that vaguely resembles wealth all perceive affluence or even to something that seems Nice but but most people don't realize that would is laden with so much more than just a new development of overly Shiny condos in Mexico Will Florida back in twenty eleven the B._B._C. premade a mini series on the history of luxury three and it's ambiguous meaning Cambridge University academic and host of the show Michael Scott said luxury isn't just a question of expensive and beautiful things for the rich and powerful it feeds into ideas about democracy patriotism and social hominy as well as our values and our relationships with the divine. I'm taking divine as Britishness and much less of a Christian theme that the problem is luxury is just not special anymore. Unreal luxury isn't what the travel industry has forced fed US three electorates personal. It's actually something truly special. It's understanding Space Time in freedom actually stop listen to those three words role of my tongue space time freedom. What does it mean to you if you can find that somewhere in your deepest caverns you've touched is luxury? Something money couldn't assist with and concrete by we travel for those three things not to be an opulence or splendor because in the end that's immaterial to the full I dunno human experience beans so yeah like a hotel for instance the Illinois in Vietnam upon these beautiful pink cliffs overlooking the East Sea would never have been built if it wasn't for a giant monetary the investment to get roads to this place and yes it takes an iconic hotel group withdrew imagination to show his to find this space time and freedom and then no tau cautious those starry-eyed leaders of the wood would luxury yet again few understand the power of this would and the ones who do use it very wisely so basically I want to reclaim the would I want to use it when it's truly a thing of I dunno Great Comfort Grandia. Maybe the luxury police could come and check out its overuse and gently tap the knuckles of the over uses because that hotel and that experience and that's spa like it is in luxury. It's just a room or a car ride or Maciej table with bad background music without the consciousness that people actually deserve more of course luxury is personal. It's a feeling and you can anoint anything anything you'd like with it the wood organic and autism they've stumped meaning anything at all and calling on you Brooklyn and that's my travel is better when you take it from high end low. If you always do it on the high you missing the real moments from the Ivory Tower of your hotel and your Black Limo. You can't see the beauty that's right in front of you but I'm not saying that you shouldn't stay at hotels because I love a gorgeous hotel but then come eat on the street or stay on the street I don't know at an abbey or a tiny in run by locals and book one meal at Bet Incredible Michelin Star Chefs restaurant. If we all use the word luxury less paps them will be able to reclaim it as I suggested an only unto the word when things are really and in truly luxurious for you like when you're on the road and that feeling of magic washes Oh view you not remembering the luxury you're remembering the lessons the stories the people you've meant because as it stands now the would means nothing and that's where the country of Estonia fits the bill perfectly Estonia's this land of odd Sagas and dizzying fables some sultry tree and some truly tragic the most northern of the less explored Celtics and one of the least populous countries in Europe is the continent's most -serily underrated. I think in Paris I meant merit put a forest born beautifully Stony Nymph who single-handedly stumped all the traffic around the OCTA triomphe. I've seen it again and again. She told me these enchanting stories about our home country and I was mesmerized. Raced for our country that's the most tech in all of Europe mythology and sharing a folk histories what locals just do instead of watching banned television of fixating on their smartphones eldest Shan stories like the child who came from an egg or the classic the young man who would have liked to have his eyes opened the real housewives have nothing on these stories in fact Estonian mythology dates back to pre Christian times and it's largely daunted incident travelers account so told you by your great grandmother of course in some runic song picture this a viking singing about giants and animistic beliefs the world of Lord of the Rings Feel So tame and indulge after you spend some time with Estonian blood luckily the old world prevails and it brings about it great touch of supernatural and that's what I was seeking out determined to see the entire country Rian how its inhabitants differ from the rest of the world. I decided to drive from north to south from east to west and everywhere else I could possibly squeeze at tiny Kong through the roads lapped me right up with the post recession glow Estonia Estonia has managed to pull itself up by its proverbial bootstraps and renew the country's appeal through infrastructure updates and new entrepreneurial visa program and keeping it all under wraps for the die Hans willing to venture beyond stuffy Paris and already seen Budapest and really just being the final frontier of unexplored Europe. It has its advantages. The country is easily crisscrossed this crossed and as it's mostly flat in the good sense the Lia lies not in the avante scenery from the freeways but it's revealed at every little town donning little steeples coupled streets and they soft surrounding meadows. It's understandable if you WANNA just jump out of the car and go lion these fields with the farm animals around you napping escaping if you will it's that kind of place your weirdness and firm attachment to nature. We'll make you fit right in Tolin. The country's capital is when I commenced my explorations after plus night of deep sleep at this gorgeous hotel a former wartime post office I contemplated Estonia's resistance during World War One and the second independence after the wreckage of the Soviet Union and today Russia's waiting on the doorstep I wanted nabokov would say about this little tryst so it makes sense to me that the country that invented skype seats communication and the Internet as the ultimate delivery of the independence in fact they often commended for being one of the most wyant countries in Europe. Take that Russia mm-hmm Okay but enough of this the open road calmed Q.. The opening scene from cruel intentions driving along the northern coast lines of Estonia with Finland. Just in the distance is across the sea at bottomless forests consumed me locals call these forests traveling forests as they believed that when people on cruel in someplace the forest will leave the area the smell lift Brian Ocean mixed with deep sense from pine trees so unique and built it into my car and right into my mind it should have probably been bundled by some chic French perfume if they haven't already done that because because in a world of stereotypical smells this one felt worth spraying behind my knees and my ears I very seldom so people along the roads walking by and only in the many petit towns stopping for a Rhubarb Pie uh-huh Swig of cancer which they call p.m some smiling. Shy residents appeared the compound this comfortable pace as I headed with no agenda through villages in villages it could easily Khampool that eh entire population radio love traditional music for some reason and so this tribal fantasia overtook the airwaves I was in trance that was magic Estonians AB- useful and big eyes wide only people and as I got out in these small villages call them hamlets deep inside the forest like the Hula I saw how people lived here comfortably with fresh produce picked from the forests and the family all around for connecting all the time most homes have a sonal and nearby neighbor told me and we started to chat about Estonia and all its many secrets I of course love secrets so I was eagerly leaning in to hear it all. I've decided to hold some of these to keep you at the end of your seat for now. The holder of secrets guided me to nearby bog called robber which is a Maya that accumulates pete in Moss and creates this incredible ecosystem like like nothing on the planet how appropriate of constant Estonia creatures of the Yawn it's forest seem to watch from the trees as I explored the strange mosh like Walter leaker of it's a Bastogne in healing Elf off of the springs or Savannah. The Estonian Guardian spirit of the wetlands might be on Sun Lounges nearby Estonia's just like that just when you don't expect it a strange ecosystem mythical creature or abandoned Manor House or sometimes sort of operational lighthouse wing Ka too and nowhere and nobody has mentioned the word luxury to me. The custom has to stump for coffee and fishing with big signs on every road indicating with this can be best done. It did take me a while to figure out what these signs meant fish with coffee has never been. I my sort of palate a fancy. I decided to venture vo the south to explore the set to my district and on route I found locals happily sitting at a restaurant with a hot drink in hand the APPs hoping for the catch of the day come on you cannot possibly slow down more than this and if you need of Malva substantial restaurant Estonia has this culture of courts overhauls that are located every couple of miles locals meet here from all over the country on their way somewhere to laugh and Shan Chan local delicacies lake smoked pickled herring and a potato salad with of course dear sausages a few respites and you can get totally drunk overly fend and with a collection of new friends from all over the country. Sets a mom is inhabited by the center people in an area in the southeastern part of the country hair. Loca vol and handmade is original and not manufactured as in shortage in Brooklyn asides they protected culture. They also have their own kingdom and appointed a new king a few years ago who happily rules this odd little patch of the world with utmost Chum. I tried to get as council but he was busy. Milking goats with no time for a New Yorker settles listed by UNESCO's part of the world's intangible cultural heritage live without the rest of the world for the most part they have carved out their own vision here live out of the dreams of their ethnic and linguistic minority as they should an automatic we hate the world let's wear white sheets of our heads and only allow white people away it's respectful and inclusive and beautiful and their language which is part of the relic languages sounded less Russian less finish and definitely less Estonian to me the generous Ariston fascinating woman dressed in red embroidered long dresses everywhere and overly friendly just about to enjoy a feast with anyone so please bring your happiest Self Han ready for anything there I was nationally invited to sit down at a long wooden table and indulge as much as possible and several pies stuffed with pretty much anything the land produces and enough potatoes to defeat a small colony of Lima's. I think I may be still recovering from this meal. Of course there's no fancy hotel here you stay in a little cottage in a family's garden or you rent a tiny house on the lake. ooh All decked out in everything you may meet in a loving family providing home cooked meals. This is luxury sitting cross legged with some locals around a fire. I silently listened to their local language language. I wasn't understanding anything except that I think there was a meal being lovingly prepared another meal. The most maternal the Group A beautiful all the woman who had lived a whole life instead Tamar took my hand and started telling me a fabled in her native language she looked me in my eyes and said you either with nature or against nature knife is that simple the translation came from someone sitting next to me he and I sat quietly mesmerized by the country's love for a simple life of pure sharing the fable as they do to me again to see the little magic in the simplest things into he'd wisdom when it comes to your room if the world could only see that religion won't help them only nature Ken and Sean and that I think is real luxury. I'm going to pull us right hand for a moment for sponsors to weigh in but do come back to him more about well. I've been skirting around this week with the discover it miles con- you can go further than you've ever gone. Befall all like stunning your facebook in your hand kids playing in the sand further because the discovery at miles card offers unlimited one point five miles on every punches. They'll automatically match all miles you own at the end of your first year so you're thirty five thousand miles could become seventy thousand. It's just that easy. Get out there with your discover. It miles con today. Limitations apply discover match for new card members only learn more at discover dot com slash travel. You've been somewhere what's say we go everywhere. Let's dive right in with me. Today is wholly a real connoisseur of luxury. I don't know if that's the case I don't think of myself has particularly luxury human right. I mean I'm pretty like relaxed Groupie. I don't eat fancy things but that's the whole point you <music> celebrate luxury in a way that's not the conventional way I think of you the way that you luxuriate your life by sewing and making a home beautiful in ways that I think is very luxurious. It's very self-indulgent which I think is luxurious and way like my husband and I always say that like weird grownups and were defining what that is so if we want to have a house that looks like a giant cartoon that's fine in its US and to us that feels very luxuriance but that's about reclaiming luxury writes about being like for instance. I think all travel is luxurious the very idea that you could travel and get on an airplane or a boat or mechanism that gets you from hey to be that's luxurious yeah that well. It's interesting because you get into a place very quickly of comparative luxury right like if you traveled back to seventeen sixty and you told someone how much you travel in a year they would think you were a sorcerer whereas now technology and in some places not everywhere prosperity has led to a point where things that we once thought luxurious like traveling all over the world are now much more accessible to a lot more people right so a lot of these experts luxury and I have to use the air quotes there because that gets into a weird thing of Lake how you become an expert on luxury and what does that mean right the meaning shifts. A lot of their kind of predictions is that luxury luxury has stopped being about acquiring a lot of things. It's much more about a bespoke experience that is yours and yours alone which is interesting because I think that's kind of more in line with what you want to reclaim but I also know it will get commercialized great well now. Everybody wants to have that experience so it's a reproduction of that thing right whereas I have this theory that what you need to do is you need to fall in love with life and the luxury for yourself will come from that like I'll give you a perfect example Michael and I went to La Paz was a good. There's this incredible little place. <hes> north of Crazy Baja California Mexico and the beauty of the whole thing was you could go down to the Honda get abode foggy any money and head out into the open Gulf basically and see whales shocks and park off at a deserted island rarely which is a remote nature reserve park off barbecue on the beach fresh seafood which you just called yourself. With no one around yeah so that ties in with my whole thing about time space and freedom it was giving me all these things and it ties into your thing about experiential like that is the experience no one should want to replicate kate that they should only want to go have they own version of that and that's what makes it special because then you're in love with your life. That's the thing to that robs. What could be luxury travel of its luxuriousness? Is it becomes a little bit performance right. I have these little things that I always tell people that that make travel more luxurious in a very personal way for instance. You've been to many of my hotel rooms. I always bring my own little coffee setup grinder at little packet of beans and a V. Sixty so I can make coffee as if I'm at home I can make any hotel room like that Ray. If I'm staying at a bad hotel I take little L.. Spa Goodies with me right and it sounds silly but if I have a stick of incense which I got from India from the Ashram and maybe a candle and maybe some essential oils suddenly my room becomes the essence of healing and wellness and that's where luxury needs to be reclaimed from those things all luxuries like I've seen what you travel with you you make home in nest ideas messy so it spreads out in like twelve seconds when I walk through it so it looks nasty instable. I also traveled with a key Koi. K. coys this thing from Africa it comes from the Indian slash African tradition of having a cloth breath which is big you can wear the Indians where it like a Lunde around their waste in the south of India but in Kenya Kiko Azzam liquid African woman would wear around their bodies. It's basically a town a has ascott off a next gov a little Baz make it into a tote and I always traveled one. Sometimes I have it so ella has something to lie on. I put it on the plane to sit on so the key coin becomes this this luxurious items from home than item brings me home anywhere on the road. I am thinking about you. You caused me to reflect on what the most luxurious experience I have had is is and what keeps coming to mind is kind of surprising even to myself like it's not a thing where I would be like this is a luxury experience. You have to have <hes>. Have you ever been to the Dali Museum in Saint Petersburg Florida. I have none so I and went last year with two of my best friends we just ran down there. The Museum of art there was doing an exhibit that we wanted to see about star wars costumes but we also wanted to hit the Dali museum and that museum is fascinating waiting for many reasons. It's a wonderfully strange architectural achievement but also whether or not you love Salvador Dali and his work. It's a very interesting space and in terms of how the docents since tell his life story as their leading people through the galleries. It's really lovely but for me. The moment that keeps bringing to my mind is when I first turned around this edge and saw in person for the first time the Hallucinogenic toreador which is a painting a painting that will rock you back one. It is massive and there's always like just the very nuts and bolts kind of wonder if like how does anyone work at this scale but to I mean that's just a painting that I really I love anyway and I had seen it reproduced many many times you know it's got a lot of interesting visual things going on where things are not quite what they look like at first glance and when you look deeper you see multiple different things in their faces hidden in them and and but what what keeps jumping in my mind that felt luxurious about it is that I was very taken with it and this I am not what I would call a snooty art person. I don't need to know who painted it. I mean I eventually want to find out but if I see a piece of art that I connect you. It usually has nothing to do with knowing its history like it's just this real. It's like falling in love and standing before this painting which is like immense. It's the size of a room it's huge just almost frozen on the spot in the greatest thing to me what made it feel as I'm mayor and Gawking and I'm drinking it with my eyes. The docents that are leading tours around just keep like making sure that they lead their people and leave me a little space like they're not moving me. They're not they're just letting me be with that painting for like way longer than most people are gonNA stand there and look at it and to me I was like this. It felt very luxurious because like I was just being allowed even in a space with a lot of other people to just have my personal interaction with this thing that I was shocked shocked at how deeply it moved me to me. That's like a moment of deep luxury and it's not a particularly expensive trip. Even if you put all the pieces of like your travel down they're staying at a hotel for a couple of days as trips go. I doubt people are like this is my apex luxury trip but to me it was a very luxurious. I love that Hawley hour of my life will that's the whole point it's about finding ways to reclaim that you'll self which is exactly what you did the and you didn't plan but in the moment you were able to just accept that beauty right I think that ties into this high and low thing that I've been thinking about in travel and talking about if you live in the high I understand that some people can only live in the low right because you travel and you'd like to travel and you don't have money to do things that may cost extra money but you can make that amazing and as a travel I feel like I wanNA experience experienced old. Why must they only stay at the five stall who only stay at the Ambien be? I think part of why I never quite feel completely at ease in like a fancy pants Unicorn accommodation is there's always like the voice voice my father in the back of my head going. This is very wasteful. I known have then I just travel instead of feeling guilty. I just travel my parents and still dead in me. There's nothing that inspires me more than just to travel and it's on and I get teased about loving beautiful hotels and fun things but it's the people it's everything moving about the world and existing there that inspires me and that's high and low. That's all the highs and all old lows yeah. I'm using high and low in an example of the hotel versus the eating on the street but it's the high lows of the entire experience. They'll be beautiful highs where you standing watching turtles lay their eggs. Eggs on a beach somewhere so remote in Costa Rica and then they'll be the low of driving through Cape Town to downtown and seeing the squatter camps right but they pot of travel youth those highs and lows need to to exist for you in order for you to be able to understand the world right like if you only went to the high and you flew private and you only stayed at the fancy hotels behind the high walls have you rarely daily traveled. No Oh if you only went to the slums of Brazil and hung out there. Could you really tell me that you understand Brazil. I mean that's the thing right like you can lead an insulated life of highs in which case you probably never appreciate the highs is your having or you can lead a life where you do both of these spaces and all of the myriad in between but you also see that again I mean I'm kind of a hippy. Can you tell the fundamentally those wearing a pantsuit with with flowers on them daisies but yeah E. those people living in less fortunate circumstances are still just humans and you can see that if you travel in all of these places look I think that's it right like you see the the united nature of humanity and you appreciate the gifts and the privileges you live with an experience but in a way that also makes you appreciate the world in its entirety. Will I have had this experience in India where yeah I was driving by and I saw a woman on a street corner with her two kids literally sitting in the dirt with a cow next to them and with my west and I I looked at them mm-hmm and thought that must be difficult and then she lifted her hand and she was holding an ice cream that she was sharing with her kids and she was beaming she was smiling and the kids leads with laughing and that for them was luxurious they was sharing like a ice cream cone that cost a penny and they've turned it into something so magical and they were happier he then would I was and I could see it. I looked at them and I laid on all my privilege and they looked happy and I'm not suggesting that that is inherent hardship to it I understand but in that moment in that one on exact moment she had more happiness than I had had now for a slight respect and I'll be right back with everywhere afterward from UH sponsors. This episode is brought to you by care care of make health and wellness. Your priority care offers a subscription service that delivers vitamins and supplements customized for your specific health needs. I travel every week so health and wellness is a priority for me career of makes it easy to upgrade my health routine. I did this fun online quiz that asked me all about my diet health goals and lifestyle choices it only took five minutes and now I have a personal scientifically backed vitamin and supplement recommendation care of daily vitamin and supplement packs all customized so I can take only what I really need care of has vegan and vegetarian supplement options for someone like me available to match my dietary needs and to ensure. I'm getting all my nutrition care of make sure that what you putting into your body comes from the best sources backed by honest guidance and transparency all available to you on their website for twenty five percent off your first care of order go to take care of dot com and enter everywhere. That's T. A. K. E. C.. A. R. E. O.. F. Dot Com and enter everywhere welcome once again to everywhere. Let's hop back to it. Hello again. I'm with Emily Davis from counter culture coffee. If you tired of listening to me talk about coffee well too bad. Emily Davis the coffee teacher. We only thanks for coming into studio with us today in Atlanta Emily's pouring little coffee do tell us we are bring up. Honey processed coffee from Kenya yeah. Honey process is a really interesting process so I would say probably ninety nine point nine percent of the coffee you had in your life is going to wash process. which is when you remove the cherry skinny from the seeds coffee beans? That's a misnomer. It's actually a seed. It's not really being so your move the Cherry as quickly as you can and then you wash off all the M- usage let that dry and that's your typical wash coffee what we're doing with this is instead of washing all that Musa Jawf. We're letting it stay in for mental a bit longer longer so you're going to get some more honey characteristics more fruit characteristics than you would in a normal wash process. This is the thing that I do when I travel before I go to a city I type in the woods poor of coffee and an end to city now but that's usually my way of finding like minded people that I would probably want to spend time with it's like an easy way into a city. Some people do Irish pubs right. They go all over the world. I find an Irish pub. This is my version of that. I find the poor over coffee and enter into a world which I think could be familiar. Tell me how counterculture fits into that fluffy. Yeah you're looking for that because you're looking for people who are paying a little a bit more attention. They're spending a little bit more time. They care a little bit more than just pushing a button and getting a product so counterculture goes above and beyond in many ways much to the Chagrin of even our importers. Our standards are very high meticulous about how we source sorry coffee and how it's processed and the way that it scores and the way that approves and roasts and putting all that attention to every little detail I think makes us a good match for often in cafes that are spending more time brewing their coffee than just hitting a button in just trying to serve as people in and out but also trying to offer them an experience that translates it translates to the cup. It really does so in Milan. One of the interesting things that I found when I typed in the woods poor of a coffee was a tiny little shop in the southwestern pot of Milan which is not a touristy section of the city and it was false sisters that broken from one of the most famous Italian coffee families from the south of Italy and started this independent third wave coffee company where they promote the idea of better coffee. I always talk about how bad the coffee is in Italy and how I'm such an advocate full getting the Italians to do better coffee. Italians think that it's okay to pay eighty cents or one euro for a cup of coffee and the compensation they having is if you paying so little for coffee. How much is the thinker the farmer actually receiving how is it possible that you getting a quality product at a price like that I love? The culture of Italian coffee because it's communal and it's only in Europe where the Sidewalk Cafe Chaz face outwards right so the idea is that you taking in people in the landscape weapon what's happening on the streets so why is the coffee so bad in both Italy and France oh there could be numerous reasons for that but to speak a little bit to what you're saying about paying a dollar and <music> asking yourself like well. How much does the person makes it? Get you know when you're in Italy and France. You're typically paying ninety cents Per Cup of coffee which you can find out here too but it is. It's an important question to ask an it's very near to counter cultures ethos those steep price the market price or coffee and how it's dipped below a dollar recently and that is a very tragic thing because you know that the producers are not making a living wage counterculture has kind of we've been doing this for twenty five years and we've kind of set the bar for sourcing transparently insourcing fairly to where people are actually not you know everybody on the supply chain is being taken care of they are living wage that is paramount value of ours <music> so I think I think people love the pomp and circumstance of going to get a poor of her because the Baristas extending themselves to you they are part of what you're getting. They're not just delivering a cup of coffee to you but they're extending a service. They're engaged in what they're doing and I think that that's part of what when you're traveling getting to slow down and watch somebody engage in what it is that they're making you. I think there's something beautiful about that. It is artistic. It's I call it my son zone when I'm making a poor over just getting really involved in focusing on this thing that I know I'm GonNa thoroughly enjoy and you can pay four or five dollars for an incredible coffee at a cafe and get a pour over. That's brewed specifically just for you. It hasn't been sitting in an urn for who got knows how long it's brewed specifically for you less than a glass of wine and you're still having this incredible experience that you can sit down and enjoy an rest engage. Maybe with somebody or maybe just by yourself and soaking him what it is. You're there to see him. Whatever city that you're in and I'm GonNa get anywhere Nice so the idea of keep holy the high end lobe the travel commandment Israeli abound Biz Michelin Star restaurants and then as eating on the street and they equally amazing? Yes let's talk about how coffee into both those things coffee is both high and low so the origin of when you think about the origin of coffee culture is Ethiopia Ethiopian coffee ceremonies. That's how coffee culture began and I love talking about this civically because in Ethiopian copy ceremonies it was always the woman of the village who made the coffee for everyone it was her job. It was her honor to get to do that for everyone and it really involved taking green coffee seeds in roasting <music> over fire all in one sitting and then crushing them up with the mortar and Pestle whoring boiling water on it and then just pouring the cups for everyone in Jovana Out of China and redoing the same ground so that sounds horrible able to people who like us who are like I want my you know filter coffee pour over I would prefer chem eggs blah blah blah but you think about that and it's still such a beautiful experience because everything is handcrafted. Everything is paid attention to by somebody who feels. It's an honor to do this for you to host this for you and so when you think about that being how coffee drinking began like that's the culture of coffee. It's still to this day. People want to sit down and drink coffee together and however you do it whether it's in a French press or you know roasting it on a fire with this tiny little to sip beverage that you're considering coffee. That's really strong or espresso. You're in Italy and it's just fast like a train. Stop all of those different experiences originate from that culture of like sitting down. It's an honor for me to do this for you. And it's just beautiful beautiful I love that when I met my husband we had off <hes> sleepover and it was at his apartment Hochman in your quill which he called the nose bleed of Manhattan and I remember Waking Up. I'm an early riser at six or something o'clock in the morning and it was a Saturday morning and he was clearly going to sleep in and I didn't no his behavior morning behaviors yet so I sneak to his kitchen and I started opening up some cupboards and I find a giant tin of already ground coffee from the supermarket it next to that I found the standard mister coffee coffee machine and a pack of five hundred thousand filters and I looked at the situation and I thought by myself I could still run still have the opportunity to get out because I don't think I could date someone who doesn't care about coffee so I had this moment west stood in the kitchen and I looked at these items with such judgment and then I don't know Daniel. You don't WanNa be that judgmental Hussin. It's not who you really are so I sneaked down. It's now maybe seven o'clock in the morning I was trolling the streets of the upper east side and I found a small coffee shop. I thought that was setting up for the day and I bought a harrow Japanese hand grinder at Tiny V. Sixty ceramic poor ova and some filters and I both beans and I went back to his apartment Hartman and when he woke up I sent to him so if this is going to work this is how you're going to have to drink coffee any laughed at me and I told him how and he changed the way he so coffee for the first time so he was a good New Jersey Italian boy whose mother would go to the big box grocery store and stock him up with coffee for the month. This was his introduction to coffee nothing so I have a plane to catch put if you'd still like to reach us go to everyone podcast on instagram everywhere pond twitter all the website and every dot dot com. Thanks hanging out. I'm Daniel Shetler and I'll see you everywhere.

Estonia Europe Italy mister coffee Brooklyn India Anthony Travel Life Michael Scott NBA Kenya Daniel Shuffler Michelin Star Chefs East Sea Maciej Russia Cambridge University Ivory Tower Illinois US
Girls Trips, Moms Nights Out, Female Friendships

Mouse and Weens

55:28 min | 1 year ago

Girls Trips, Moms Nights Out, Female Friendships

"Range here. We go doing her thing and now this weekend would you do it was was your big whip oh rookie yes one of ours put in and what's going on some good storylines no now I wanna know something it's just really hot overheated so tell me we're no okay you're being so weird she threw out there that maybe we could all do this wine tasting chip because there's this new region of Baja California that's getting well-known for wine tasting and you you can tell you I'll tell you why you need as well I'm fine we had a nice weekend some friends and I we did a lot of sitting around chatting in the lovely atwater village area can take tours and her friend runs tour so you can it's like your tour bus years sting tour bus where we crossed the border we have to get off the bus watch it anyway how's it going what have you been up to issue I know I miss you too I feel like I wanna find out more about your world I have been working on the hit show that into Mexico so if you look at Mexico there's little finger thing in that's Baja California so there is a tour it was my friend's birthday and go across the Mexican border get back on the bus and continuing and we went to three wineries and then out to dinner and then came home so the whole day yesterday me how was your Mexico trip what happened yes this weekend I went to California which is just south of San Diego what's the bled whatever with you lucky we wait for real got some nice friends yes what about a year what are you telling me date the nodding your head like that well I just posted all of your your season two trailer which was attention ladies and gentlemen that's right at one zero seven that's right see the hit weans on the hit show the rookie yeah and we had so much fun last weekend in La Hey this just happened we had a blast it was really fun and it got me thinking about girls trips and how important they are but I've been feeling a little bit of mom guilt to on the podcast only we have a video option that we're doing too so go to youtube and or website Masson weans dot com it's tries to get my voice how are you I'm good how are you good for those of you that are listening or just go does not remind guilt but that I've been gone each of these past weekends because I did the conference in La with you last week again and the weekend before that was not when I went up to La to party with you in that whole thing too so it's been three weekends in a row that I've really unlike why will you tell me later yes oh okay come on carry on I'm really hot can I take this trying to look presentable I've been home which is odd for me as a stay at home mom and so used to always being there right but with kids that are fourteen twelve and eight independent Dave is happy to take care of them or so he says and I don't know I think about almost fifteen but every weekend in a row I'm feeling like three weekends in arose little match or is that good is this what like working mums go through when they leave there isn't parenting that you've been a sole parent or I would say or the main go to person for the main amount of our just the summer that dad went away for stunt work is that what you're thinking to that was the only time I remember that and they went to Hawaii for trips there's conferences and they travel every week and and it's just normal mice growing up my kids are they going to remember this is the time that mom was being selfish or is it there's a day now I would who am I to tell you except that it sounds healthy to have that balance of getting away here and there and things like that we wanna deceit grandma's boobs God Old Lady boobs look like head underneath is he just saying that is there a little bit of a guilt trip he's trying to throw in there or is he just teasing me because he would say things like oh welcome back mum we we it are you getting blowback from your heavy no I'm not well no I'm not I couldn't read between the lines I really was like yeah see my mom had been there I wouldn't have done that so see screwed up for life all right I don't think there's anything to worry about got in the bathtub and shut the door and then I ran to my room crazy I think our ten come on you're curious normal curiosity my feelings I think you guys probably need and deserve it and you should have as many of them as you can tolerate and by the way we had brunch and not a breakfast because you had to sleep until we don't have to divulge too much you look at you don't we're podcast you just lay down in her bed folks and she's a Do you ever get resentful is it hard or what are you what are your feelings on that for real from your heart real no honestly it's holds a little childhood since it's all we have related reference sue anyone leaving and you being messed up over I love you honey it's so great knowing that I can just go freely and I have your full support one hundred percent support right right so Z. because we already have a routine established so this is your return on your investment of creating that routine Ceesay uh it was fun wine tasting we'll just say that but now you when you take care of the kids and you're doing all the house stuff when I'm gone he really is okay with it and wants me to finally enjoy my time he does recognize all the time I put in back in the day and still do I guess nightstand that has a little shell in there so she could get a peek at grandma boobs I was just curious about the yeah some of the things that they say about female friendships well first of all tell me about your friendship stroke because you were it's true that boobs droop so I snuck in while Graham was changing to get into the bathtub but I was so afraid to move that I just stayed behind the nightstand the whole and with my husband this is Dave I hi I just got back from this girl's trip wine tasting and talking about this a little bit recently to offline I think that I have my handful I've always had a few good friends you can count on one hand and have had them for twenty something years Oh you look like you know and so I'm sensitive to it so for me I was like the heat me he's mad at me but I did I so that's good but why mom guilt exists it's a real big thing why didn't you okay let's validation from everybody to tell me that it's okay looking down beauty of hair spread everywhere all right so when I was looking up all the staff trying to make myself feel better I found a lot of studies do you want to hear the classroom WanNa blow their identity and Willia- but and then you know both of you that was that did you catch all that that was so cute so it's all good feels pretty genuinely is a in this crew this weekend we have one that she's always the one that keeps us on the calendar and keeps US scheduled and Stephanie the next morning we have branch and I just wanted to hear Dave you're Feelings on girls trips and girls night outs in that kind of thing time the little fabric circular nightstand table and I knew WANNA put my little years up from behind to see what she was doing so I just hid there until she there's no like they know your history there's no judgment it feels like it's just kind of boil down to those core people next weekend I'm going to be gone the weekend after that you cool I'm totally fine with that I don't think your mom guilt will allow for that but yeah and how important that is but I feel pretty lucky that this is having because I think it is tough to see get through a lot of the stuff in female relationships right past all the immature staff and jealousy and insecurity and it's GonNa be since forever but but yeah my girl groups to I have kind of different little clusters sounds like you do too where it's like you know elementary school really being able to be out there with them in fact okay do you want to hear now we did a little recording while we were there because they knew I wanted to talk about this with them so so Dana Judy and a new friend Sandra Pompton last outing those girls are always fun all right I'm GonNa do this one okay here we go ready I am in Guadalupe Baja California Mexico and I'm here with my girlfriend and demaim fence and that's been the most recent the current one you know and but it's fun because those groups you can always fall back into and she's my Seal Beach Pal and I can call her with anything to noon that group of girls so it's Jannine Debbie and Brenda and we are on a girl's trip it's one of our friend's birthdays so I was just talking to them we're talking about monce trips and how important is she and then the Lake F. and little initials behind their name Jennifer be from New York I have Rachel see his gallivanting around the US for a crescent city heated. I'm sorry I just said Snug I've known her since our kids were what two years old time twelve stay at home moms where our sole job was nursing these babies feeding these babies making sure there and now we're at the age where they're more sneeze here too I've known her the exact same amount of time and she likes me more than Stephanie has been our organizers so tell me what your guys I've got more but those are probably people that call for stuff steph could tell them anything and then I have you know interviewed him today I got him to say it into my little phone you WanNa hear it shot and see what he says okay I'm GonNa pull it up real quick ends then there's college friends than work but club that kind of started from work so that's Kinda conglomerate it and then L. A. Friends are probably more recent but wonderful and owed Jennifer Martin too I forgot about Jennifer I'm sorry to forget about her tenants usually gems the glue that holds all that together where she always has a vincent things have we all shopped you see the party planner one that is a huge win that was when you were pregnant with Elliot that's right no we can say names and it's been forever but we have gone through evolution as MOMS Madman for all of us to stay connected number two we've had one person Stephanie Who's committed to meet a scheduler and gets out there and says really to have other moms to talk to well I think we are also all sociable people that were needing to get out and we were first time moms so we didn't Taylor as mothers and then take that home and feel good when we're with our kids and with our husbands and I was just talking to Cari how have any other friends so we had to find some Utah and so and we were all stay at home moms to which meant that we felt like we deserve to take it out this one's fourteen now so what is what is led us us five to still all be together and I think it's a couple of things first of all it's a super big man was very organic very like we we join this to cope with other moms and have something to do but the way we met was not and of course in the beginning only because it was like an organized thing but then as we hung out and a huge group we all found our people right like we kind of found each other because yeah and we can finally go out. Tell me your philosophy on mom's nights out mom's outings and Stephanie mistakes go have a cocktail and I think that was something they're women Cari that have cocktail everybody that's our on MOMS MOMS night outs MOMS trips mums outer vitally important to our well-being and how we relate be and it was it was natural we were able to be vulnerable and talk about that life is hard hard vulnerability is the key to doc once a month or twice a month and I think what's made us last over time no 'cause that's the difference I don't have a couple of nights but are her and our kids have gone to different schools and we still trust in different we all have different friends and that's okay but we've just special bond that no and you know and like this is the perfect example this weekend where we're in this country where I was here three weeks ago but then it was suggested we come here and I thought well I was just here but I don't necessarily I was just happened and warm this wonderful friendship that we've gone so many moms trick moms outings we we found each other through a playgroup so it was this girl's time it's it's vital it is vital it is what keeps me keeps going it's all a balanced so I love girls I love Yukari I love you too offense and get it out and then put back together by our tribe and dad were like anything I tell you guys I feel so comfortable that I'm going to be accepted actually having a good time or this is really our kid right now or I don't like my husband or I'm having a tough times God it's good and we know that will do anything for each other and we'd love when we can get together on a priority to all of us to make it happen not going to happen it's not gonNA happen each other's little sister wives we can all help each other's kids out we bounce parenting ideas off each other and go through situation the parents of the same what would you say or wanted something to do the stroller strides thing was an exercise thing and getting together have your kids integrate and guilty why is important things like that but there are some studies about female friendships oxytocin I read one of them yeah switching teams we'll get to that in other Okra said but these are rancor all I love him dearly and I can't say enough about ends and we really do lean on each other so anyway yeah so it was good we had a fun time I did look up some stats because I was feeling like about gotten a full sentence out honestly never they're like I I always joke that my son has an ear in my pocket because he is I love you and that was a ladder girl talk but that's so sweet so what do you think is different about us in Mike how did other people fall away how do we find what's different I think it's I love that it's what a great group offends you have yeah it really is real I mean we really do it's our tribe I love when Cari said that we are Tad Light Sir can't pass is we've had parents pass away I've had is with children I guess Dan miscarry this just say one thing my mind Joe you got a crowd connects and I don't know talk without our kids interrupting us without when was the last time around our kids or me life I am telling you it's true it's so true if we could all just like own our shit and say what our problems are and other and just say I'm not hey when are we getting together next and then I think we all generally have a really fun time together and we report a spouse is also we really genuinely care for each other and love each other let's I'm GonNa play that earned our K.. So estimate was too loud you ready Oh thank you you too all right parenting styles I would say styles socio economic can help having ask that we all just generally light to go out and have fun and we all like to the issues where sometimes we just WanNa like dish it out and get somebody else to acknowledge what we've gone yeah valid would it hurt let's okay I also had my friend Daphne whose birthday it was she gave us a little soundbite as well as Carla do we were GonNa play those real quick you want to go back but I'm not gonNA miss the chance that all five of us can be together now song came but it has to be a commitment it has to be in some times we that's like a small small percentage for sure bashing it's really just ending it's understanding where we all come from we all have like as parents and his mom like we have another part of us that we're not we always privy to share and we get a chance to share it with each other and and the thing you were at last night I was having cocktails are your best friends with those I can only be friends with some many right and I we found that we liked I do think it's so important to have MOMS night outs girls night out girls weekends girls trips well we okay whatever it is because all of US support each other's families right and I think that's what it comes down for sweeping through rely we've had divorces I moved my space too it's two hundred eas via Rancho Parkway and can beat out it's right by the North county all right so here's Carla yes you are one of my best best best town and we start a lot I don't know I mean in this world of social media and being perfect mom perfect volunteers all you have to stop a lot you really are are y'all can be honest and real and now so dave is always I do you guys decide go out and bash guys and I mean under six months later you start a germ line when I finally made it happened it was so cool is such a huge part of my sanity just like keeping it balanced otherwise I get lost in being a mom in being on on duty and this Ed's and we the time to be genuine and be silly yeah spirit to real girlfriends two we have right that's Carla she's my betty that's so cool I love she thought of that and he goes encourage the knee year's resolution thing that is that what you mean yeah yeah she's cute we we do that we will sit down sometimes we are kind of Dorks but will do these big trips you're like wait what did you say family we call it figures I'm like I can't talk big ears listening right might be a couple of rooms away and he's always like Because she gave quote I I tried to interview her but she got tired and she slept through one of the wineries the nurse on the backside on the backside and you walk right in you just find your way into my studio and it's great it's it's a big space a fun outside of being moms and it wasn't just about motherhood commonality and be wives and being who are we before and who are we going to of your bet she did this for me today she sent this to me so let's hear her thing whoops hold please took a nap on the bus which was great for her I couldn't believe she could sleep through all that noise but she did an woke up all refreshed and ready to go to the next one and I didn't get to in as women in general you know we're always second guessing to have whole group of people giving you encouragement yeah so it sounds like such a great group of friends awesome awesome we love her much in I can't imagine our friend little girls without you we have so many stories that were just so honest and so real and every time afterwards I might cracking up but it's it's free began we just we know that how the stress levels are reduced by friendship and especially for women that it's different in women versus men here we go the tend and befriend notion developed by Doctors Klein and Taylor may explain why women consistently outlive maybe once a year and we do what we call the compliment circle and we all sit there and go round the table and we give you the complimented so there was all these studies done and it was in men just traditionally were the subjects and they showed that ah under stress there's the fight or flight response but with the women they finally realized that there's a different response because they see I'm GonNa find it when women feel close to someone levels of progesterone a hormone that helps reduce stress the person so they believe that it played a role in establishing social bonds over the course of evolution they to mouse in Weans I'm mouse I'm Joel down in San Diego things eighty go up on this is from a University of Michigan Study and the surge also linked to a willingness to risk one's life for the Out Says Dr Klein that friends are helping us live longer okay so that was one thing that kept coming up all these studies I would look up was we have this to say and it's like as you're always in my flipping pocket your pocket no it's true is true well I have to say that you are the right word but for the most part it's just like we want to talk about things in our lives that are relevant that are important that are there like past like little things of why we love him and what they're good at and I don't know it's just so I think as moms you don't hear that an ally enough or just and I mean there's not many skeletons in the closet I mean not at all over all these trips and all these weekends and all these night-out no all right man study after study has found that social ties reduce our risk of disease by lowering blood pressure heart rate and cholesterol there's no the job they're good anyway there was all this science about it do we have time do you want yeah the science of it okay I mean play Daphne real quick she was the birthday girl the am with with the color. Can I say Whiz is that I mean don't go to the bathroom and say with and I it's a to it we're like do it you got it you did it you did it yeah okay Carla just opened a new hairstyle and you want to say the name a copy here studio and yeah I hope you all find a sister wife in life because it's super important we all make many sister right my family that's my sister sinead and if we remember to remember that one mom signed out where we all sat down and we said what are dreams were and one of yours was starting your own hair Salon Ali urging you and you're like I don't know I don't know how many years lower yeah like later not that far later asked me to be a woman it's true right we need to every connection are who we are sure we need this time or getaway in gone girl trips there superbowl that's right that's right and we call each other sister wives out to we give when they're together the oxytocin comes in and decreases that fighter flight feeling and lets you kind of hunker down with your kids and with your female when stress levels go down decreases risk of heart disease obesity depression no but there was something else about how it's fight or flight yet in women girlfriends or I mean I guess if you were lesbian would be different except they're the way that I see it is here's the it's important those good friends that will lift you up raise you up and I think there's something to just having no incentives with Oh Ucla School of medicine study about the OXYTOCIN and another study this one was cute prayer evils goal is scammell mole thing it's a monogamous rodent so they mate for life when researchers let me start that over when researchers asked more than ninety thousand women between fifty and seventy nine don't however women with strong female social ties girlfriends live longer than those without them okay so this is good friendship pretty reliable because it was out of such a large group so it's less likely to be coincident says Nancy freeborn Dr p h adjunct professor of Health Administration and policy boy that was anticlimactic. Maybe we cut this Roy up it's important for our health to have these friendships you guys this the bottom line self esteem what other letters there's all sorts of studies married men live longer than single men yet women who marry have the same life expectancy as those who so we're highly influenced by our girlfriends important for girls to not just women but we need to know this for those of us who have daughter the friends can help you live long I think it was just it was in this supervisors already being Hetero that there is no incentive from curls when you're just solid solid tiny just listens tells the good here it is okay this is that I think Daphne said it the tend and befriend instinct we weren't now Friends can motivate you to be healthier close friends doing exercise saving money volunteering good behaviors friends teach you about yourself I'm GonNa go get yourself all dolled up you're not going to try to put on airs or be something you're not because you're not trying to like meet with them or attract them or something like that if your friends in the workplace they help you with promotions networking mentoring opportunities career development advancement and how much social support they had those who said they had more support were likely to still be living in the follow up years later the difference was slight but the data is love soap and they had that big they indicated that seventy percent of women feel prettier because of their relationships with female friends is keep you razor-sharp so something about a memory function friends can help you live longer friends can boost your career yeah good okay here's some quick points I'm going to do a quick list ready friends lower stress free they were raised with Oh gee that with I think it was the oxytocin receptors on a certain part of the brain the whole thing there so they conducted a survey and two thousand American women mothers were surveyed and they had kids between ages five and twelve years old they started the day okay okay good you found it friends lower stress when women feel close to someone levels of progesterone the same thing drew than this net versus wants to talk so saying incentive meaning like you're not is that what you mean just that you have because there's not sexual energy in my case from the Women Exchange Yell at your and so because I kind of made that promise I feel indebted to that a little bit like I owe that and so this evolution as the kids get older and I'm finding more anybody be healthy are you mentally healthy to be able to let me ask you this on a personal note do you feel more refer tend to our young and be with our friends versus the men who are fighter flight so all in one study there's also I have when a male vol- is put in a stressful situation he runs who's female partner and females been stressed immediately rent to the female per week and they put in the equivalent to two and a half fulltime jobs so that's really only just nine point seven hours a day it just helps you see yourself in your friendships friends help you feel better I'm a lack of friendships and social support increases the risk of developing about myself again and looking into my own interests. I guess it's just the self-imposed guilt and a need to drop that this is where I need to keep them Ashton available for your kids were excited to be with them after you've taken this weekend show okay yeah so isn't it healthier for your kids to have a better mom I myself this is my block is feeling guilty feeling like I have to be the one doing the parenting and being in control and I don't know I think there was innings diety or depressive disorder Oh yeah and then how much do moms really work this was crazy I saw the study it was a news source in two thousand seventeen not putting on airs or just seeing some looks good to try to woo them or get them through something or get them in the sack whatever honest feedback yeah off glasses friends don't make fun of you in your eyesight goes yes people strive to present themselves as positive Dan do all one thing all the time so a little bit of this a little bit of that I put the question out there I'm just the young dumb newly married me kind of made a promise with Dave I remember having this conversation like hey if I had become a state Mesa this stuff in hearing from friends here from you and just retrain my brain that way so just remember that one hundred hours a week how could this is yours we're all just trying to build each other up there at least I felt that way made some really good friends there too it needed to still very cool okay at six twenty three a m and they clocked out at eight thirty one PM which I can relate to that's like my schedule they work fourteen hours a day and one hundred hours aw healthy it was healthy when mom and dad went away which they didn't very often but and they went on a week vacation and were hanging out grandma knows very important time it was good or their partner or they'd prefer to be alone that they don't prioritize I guess going out with girlfriends or they're gonNA die earlier saying that mom's night outs and things like that were a little bit overrated overweight just that they'd prefer to be with their spouse why I don't want a mom's night out but she says when she does get alone time she likes to spend alone she doesn't want to opted people and I've found that as people talk about their friends they are often talking about their current or the stuff they'd like to become so I guess or healthy available parent helping out I know when you hear statistics like that because you know that's true I know that's true about you yeah this is the stuff I need to keep to get a job like I'm leaving more often and I'm going and doing my thing so it's it I think shows them that balance good right you at home mom I will cook clean I will raise the babies I will make the food I work out I just put myself into this really traditional role I mean yeah it's all like choices and it's fine but and then I found this blogger who said the same thing her article was titled Aldrin or something or maybe her mom friends aren't at that level rate maybe they're more like superficial 'cause then she says something else which the idea of a break from my kids is taking a shower without them in the bathroom for fifteen minutes not an entire evening of leaving my husband with the kids while I go out with was surprising she said everybody says you need girl time she goes I get that girl time when the kids have plates or get togethers it's just a bunch of MOMS there with anybody watch her kids like she's picky about who watches her kids she feels like she'd rather be enjoying a good book or spending quality time with her husband okay your sleep meals personal care and mental breaks so all combined would you ever feel guilty about taking a girl's trip when you have another other moms it's just not my thing I was like okay girl you I just can't see that fifteen minutes in a shower that's enough time the other thing is healthy I think for them to be away from you and for them to bond with Dave and all of that is all good they can't I think there's something unhealthy about having your mom available the time they need to know yeah I mean really I'm not just saying that to make you feel better kids when I take the kids dance class or soccer or church or it's it's nothing but girl time she goes it's all the same conversations take that to the bank okay suck it Well I get I just hear stories like the so much and I don't that's what leads me to believe that she doesn't have that deep real friendship where she can talk candidly it must just be all surface level MOMS night out you know where they talk about the kids amy because they don't have my own kids than guilt that comes with it but there's so many people that write about like stop you're kind of driving yourself into the ground and kind of healthy let's see this lady also says you need a break from your husband and she's my word do you people marry men you do not is me up in that I'm passionate about and they appreciate more when I'm home I think in you know it is kind of like stay at home mom goes she's true right don't you remember working at Nerkin and the female friendships and we all can lift each other up and now I don't know there was none of the kind of cutthroat this is them so she's coming crazy but I'm raising little people I enjoy being around and socializing with do get tired of parenting somedays absolutely but my yeah because then I'm really like wanting to bonding let's sit down let's play this you know look the I looked them in the eye it's yeah you need a break from your kids and she says no I don't need a break for my kids she says I'm starting to think that other parents just don't like their kids as often as they want breaks for okay so you're really needing that person to feel good about yourself

Stephanie Who Cari Baja California Jennifer Martin oxytocin Roy Ashton heart disease scammell Utah Oh Ucla School of medicine steph Carla Elliot vincent L. A. Taylor professor of Health Administra sinead Salon Ali
The World Nomads Podcast: Road-tripping Post COVID-19

The World Nomads Podcast

39:20 min | 6 months ago

The World Nomads Podcast: Road-tripping Post COVID-19

"Packed and ready to go in this episode hitting the road pice lockdown social distancing in our parks and campsites and the planning APP that should be on every road. Trip is devised welcome to the war. No matter podcast. We'll be keeping you up-to-date. Trouble alerts information about coronavirus answering some uplifting news can use to inspire you and smiling. I Love Jones Boys Hi. It's Kim and fill with you a huge thanks for joining into a spatial episode exploring road tripping, and in this episode we discuss specific routes necessarily, but rather tuning to four experts, discussing the rise of road travel as broad as open and travel restrictions begins, as it made covid nineteen, and it is worth. Noting as the US started opening up their economies covid cases began to spike again in some areas by as much as twenty five percent, according to Alfred Christina Tunnel hit of World Medicine for the Americas. Then, Spain the has to be some sort of consideration in how people do a rug trip to minimize further spread. Well, that's what's attractive about Roger Christina's places with campsites and inherits social, distancing like national and state parks will be the preferred destinations. She also says many are allowing people in only by strict daily caps and reservations in some filler, even denying entry to out of state visit you normal, isn't it? Yeah, our first chat is with Joe from harvest hosts which will explain about shortly, but we should put it out there as it pops up during this episode. Commute a huge fan of Roger. I am indeed now we converted, and they'll DVD. G Ten diesel delivery van. And sadly it was just before the pandemic, so emmy use it, but since managed one road trip is restrictions lifted here in New South Wales in Australia. We went to cattle. Farm near applies cold Mudgee, which is nine for its produce in its wine now set up. Is The lady image on the website for these episode by the way, so you can have a look, but they had social distancing rules in place, Ville especially around the drop toilets, where everything had to be wiped down after used it with sanitizer, and if you were lining up for the lose your head to maintain that one point five major distance, but as for the site itself, it's a cattle farm. It was huge. It was so big. It was easy to Cape Away from his. Anyway. That's my story. We kicked up asking Joe. It's not about me if twenty twenty is a banner year for ride travel. Yes hard stop interviews over. Rarely is their question was such an easy answer? I think it was very speculative back in March. It was a lot of up in the air like Whoa. What's going to happen? Never win. Kinda paused. We saw memberships. New memberships really dropped off a cliff. Everyone was kind of nervous about the unknown. What we're seeing now. Is that everything's exploding in the RV world, so our business is up four hundred percent, or versus this time last year we're seeing rental companies like outdoorsy and RV share also up four hundred percent. So I think people are number one. They're ready to get back to traveling and number two. Are Beings a very safe way to do it. Even amidst this Cova crisis. What is safe for them being in your own RV in a spacious area. You know without crowds, so yes, I think this is the year I think this is the year, and I hope it lasts because you and I probably agree are pretty wonderful thing to do. Schori's in fact as offset. Every month during this covered lockdown I want to avoid anything that's hectic and I want to avoid expectation so jumping in the van for me, and just disappearing somewhere is is what I'm GonNa do the racist of the and moving forward. If I can be convinced, my husband to leave, he's job. Man That's so funny. We're about the same I I'm trying to convince my wife to leave her job for the same reasons, unlike this is our opportunity, just like be nomads and and travel right so. I wish you best of luck and. Thanks for that otherwise we could meet halfway. Just travel buddies so. You. You've done it for years just for those that haven't an dabbling NATO's in this world vein. What is the attraction freedom I? Mean again like it's a one word answer, but I think it really captures it for us from my wife and I. We got into are being. Like six years ago and the concept when our heads were like well, wouldn't it be nice to a road trip? It seems so freeing and like open an exciting. When we did it, we fell in love with it. I mean it really is like true unbridled freedom. You make a decision every day about whether you want goanywhere or not, where you WanNa go do you WanNa? Go East West North South. It's great right and for people like US I love traveling, but I don't like sticking to strict plans, Riley. I feel like travels most exciting where you let it take you at once and air travel doesn't do that hotel travel doesn't do that. You have to be very structured about where you're going to be in win, and in the RV like you wake up every morning and make your destiny I think that's super cool. There's so many unknowns and to me. The unknowns lead to interesting stories, and so that's what I love like when I find myself talking about stories that happened from travel. More often not. It's an RV story. Because these wild unexpected things happen, you mentioned you'll business office. Tell us how it works because. I, neither and I think it's a great model. Yeah, thank you so it's very simple. It's a membership organization for our viewers, so if you own an RV, that self contained with the bathroom on board. You can join harvest hosts for low fee. It's about seventy nine dollars bird entire year, and that gives you unlimited access to stay overnight at over thousand wineries, breweries, farms, distilleries golf courses. Really unique places. and. You don't pay anything per night. There's no per night fee to to stay anywhere, but we do suggest that you support the local businesses that you're visiting, so if you go to a farm, you can buy some of the produce and we've gotten such nice fresh produce. If you go winery, obviously, you can enjoy the air. Enjoy a few bottles and not have to drive anywhere. Anywhere, which is one of our favorite things? My wife and I both enjoy wine and before her hosts, only one of US could go casing right because other had to drive the rig now will pull up on a beautiful scenic winery somewhere. Enjoy maybe a little too much wine, and then crawl back to the RV for a nice sunset and sleep, so it's it's a fun program. It's all over the United States, so it's an all lower forty eight states and Alaska, where in every Canadian province and we're in, Baja. California Mexico not yet in Australia, but I do I I know. The caravanning is super popular there. So maybe one day we can try to expand into other places and the Van Life Movement which has been going from the seventies really, but has that you know it's no longer grow mets that getting to RV's or caravans and I do a lap of Australia euro whatever they would take in America. It's young people wanting to live off the grid and using that increase increasingly in America. Yes, yes, it's. It is. Our has become a cross section of the entire culture where we have. Lots of young people in their twenties, even as twenties who are giving up with a call here, giving up the sticks and bricks. Instead, for a van, life experience, and sometimes that's. Year a couple years full-time on the road some longer, but. Yes young people are really. They seem to be enthralled with road tripping because of the freedom. We talked about earlier. It's less expensive obviously. I think people especially younger generation. Today is really. They're prioritizing experiences over goods, and so instead of having a house full of a ton of things. They do van life with a very simple lifestyle full of experiences. So yeah, so we're seeing that on both ends actually so we've got the young people, but we also have as you call them. The grey nomads L. that. Lot of our parents generation retiring and they're also excited to finally get on the road and start traveling, so we're seeing growing at both sides. Yeah, and look place these more. The tiny house movement in Australia is huge as well. I'm not sure what it's like in America. You know that idea that you don't need to have full bedrooms and three bathrooms, two living areas and Seventeen different types of dining sittings. It sounded just paid back lifestyle and went the van. Life is how much do you think is influenced by Instagram? Ooh, good question. Instagram certainly has a huge impact. I think all social media. Does I think that social media was a pretty big driving force for Van Life? Because it opened people's eyes to what was possible. And when you get on Instagram, or you get on facebook, or whatever snapchat and you see your friends. In a really cool van with the back open, looking over the Grand Canyon. How how do you not get? Addicted to that right, so yes, I think I think. Social media of all types has driven this movement now you also unique places to stay but pre-congress. Sixty thousand you trailer camping spots on. That was supposed to come big that becoming available in the US. So you guys are really set out with the infrastructure. Yes, we have right, so we have total. I'm look at my list. one, thousand, one, hundred and fourteen, sorry, one, thousand, four hundred and fourteen locations, and we have a team dedicated to adding new locations every day, and so our goal is to have that infrastructure is to have. Have a network of hosts everywhere, so that no matter where in the country you are really anywhere. North America you can find a place to stay, and it's interesting with you know. The campgrounds were getting pretty full here in the US last year. Now there's always new RV or setting the roads. We might see a little bit of bursting at the seams so so we're working as fast as possible to add more and more hosts so that. There's always a place for people to stay and also in national parks, state and national parks. There's enough infrastructure there for people to pull in and staife a couple nights. Yes No, the infrastructure is good. The if you can get them, the camera spots are great. I think people are going to have a hard time finding spots this summer. And, we're seeing that already like arches National Park Open recently here in the close it within like three hours, because so many people went to the park, not just our viewers, but they were run, because everyone's so excited to get back to the national parks, so. So the answer's Yes. We've stayed at lots of national parks. You just have to book pretty far ahead of time. or go for the last minute cancellations, and so I'm as we talked about I'm not a I. Don't plan months ahead. you know in some of these? Books Book six months ahead of time in order to get a spot. We have stayed places like Grand Canyon where we'll show up and all go and ask the Park Ranger, Hey did anybody not show up today? And oftentimes there are no shows, and you can grab their spots. Say you'll year of traveling pop from the Grand, Canyon way you've mentioned used I'd give give biggest highlight. Yeah, let's see so every year. We spend a few months on the road where we are. homebase is in Colorado Vail Colorado, so we typically head East. Will kind of go south around and come back around, so we'll do big circles around the US and try new states and new locations. Every time last year was pretty interesting, so one of the most unique events we attended was the Formula One race in Austin Texas, and our viewers can go boondock, and so we stayed in this big parking lot with like a thousand other. Our viewers know so much fun. Everyone's partying going to the car races and coming home and plan cornhole and drinking games. That was really quite a good time. We've been headed to Florida. Which is always a a nice place. When when it starts getting cold, stated a couple of associations on golf courses, which are always pretty and then man the number of wineries. We Love wineries, so I think two thousand eighteen. We hit a whole bunch of wineries, and they're all so different and so unique. We stated a winery in Canyon City Colorado. That was built in the eighteen hundreds by monks, and so as monastery it is no longer a monastery, but it's still an active winery, and so it's this beautiful like eighteen hundreds monk minus monastery building, where you can go park among the vines as a harvest member and enjoy wine, so that most recently that was my most unique trip. Perfect links to harvest host in shy nights and fill out I really WANNA. Quit my job and hit the royal. I have recorded interviews and the fan before before it was converted Sony's possible. You need that sort of Ripley Acoustic on the inside of it. Yeah. I can't let's move on paid. A book runs travelers also bond. They rent a camp events, and while Joel was enthusiastic, about right travel being. has a slightly different type. Going to be tough for anything, the question really is what's he gonNA, be like probably travel I think the answer is it's GonNa get a little bit of Chris because. AIDS does sound like a good idea to unite everyone who's been locked up and it's one of the very few things that you can do post lockdown in postal, and you can still remain isolated, so it's getting press. just because the person got it and they talking about it, that could generate quite a bit of interest in it, but I chicken egg on non whether you know. Someone mentioned it in story in another journalist picked it up another one annotating station, and then running with. One of the few. Things, but Look. At the New Zealand Marketing Strategy Market at MD domestic From. Everyone being locked down and with no other choice, but to say their back backyard on this big a deal here in Australia and New Zealand because. Nearly. Everyone has their own car It's probably a big bigger deal in the US. The US is definitely saying a little bit of an uptake. They haven't they haven't taken to the. Relation and the rule. Be. They've had the base paid a sales of as since nineteen seventy two, so obviously, it's more than just a story in America. People are actually acting on the idea. Where you step from because pre covid. Apollo and T. H. L. emit financial reports were reporting. Part of the reason, their whole share prices down is because of the House of Vase. So it could be a surge, and they're. They probably definitely is so g styles right now. And if we're talking, talent is twenty twenty it could be the best year but it has to be a light surge. Not I'm have those. Numbers Puff. The other side to that sewage could be The revealed is just not. Selling to generate cash flow, they probably could be good deals and good office on, and obviously say an increasing in south as well now, obviously poverty effect. It's having on your particular company. And notwithstanding the lack of obedience to rules in the United States. Do you think? Do you think you gotTa say more Pipeline Pricing at night I? Don't care whether the. He the media Whether, there's any real trish or any united huge numbers on the positive news about Ivy's at the moment. thought. I. It really doesn't matter because detections reality and and at the moment that he's a hot topic so I think coming out of it all publicity is going to be publish Amos strong publicity so I think. There is one of the issues we had in. The states is that we've introduced camping's not avi. Even. Our the everyone thinks ave runnings might. Introduce contraband so. There's a little bit of Education required in that market over there. Going to be honest with you. That just seems to be little Canada and companies popping up everywhere in the states so again. I suppose it's the GIS. A good copy, the style it will spread everyone will enjoy a lot. Hey, you may actually ever maritime todd is. The Fist in New York. Salsa. That salt flat water also. Jira completed. That's come onto driven by the van. Laugh Generation, I. Put Them. Luckily, Graham I'M GONNA say. Yeah Yeah. That is ready to really really big Maka, and it's very good for us a slightly different in that the true ban life is living after the van not to shrink. All and aside who really wants to live in that long, so a lot of people that are gonna live the ide- all living in van for short while, but not forever so I think we I think we benefit from the Hashtag Bam lasting immensely we love the imagery now, but you joining with that imagery and the message. That came from but I love. You started back in ninety three and the hall a backpack. industry has changed since then. But do you still come across? Some resistance from the camp? Events is still associated with. Less desirable top of traveling. Emma hand that section of our customers is being less desirable. I honestly believe that back then and even today out try blues. Travelers they get in the cow, and we've got a big old palette sign up, but were hand painted. Attitude is the difference between deal and. Album is go out there and they take a lifetime may take turn. They get lost straight breakdown. They run out of stuff. They have seen the car. They discover places they didn't know about. they picked up new friends along the way and they're. They're actually emotional themselves in in the destination. Either all started living Matt. It's not about this. Journey I think out. Travelers the only real travelers lifting the wool. Everyone else's commodity times been packaged, and and they felt something in the, and then they graduate who cruise ship. Now Phil did pay just condescend may up. Yes look on I have mine Hashtag Edmund. By. Are Really committed just before. covid heat segue haven't had a real world campus before, but we've got the van. One thing that we do is play lift rise, and we generally do straight. We've put plighted in in Europe. It's way always had i. not now last night planned and inbetween. It's like which Whitey Guy Quick is going to be less. Exactly Hysteria unpack what we're talking about. And implying that game on the way back from a trip to Mudgee, have you heard of a place or a little town called Sofala have actually, but on know why the name rings a bell going well. It's an eight hundred fifty one goal bonding town eighties, jaw-dropping Lee historic could've been a movie set. In fact, it has been featured in a number of films including. On Australian film paid a Whiz, the cows Paris okay. And it was featured in the another Australian film sirens. That's about his the pioneers Lindsey. Yeah, not normally normally. Lindsey. We'll find out for input insurance. Anyway we were able to, and this is the beauty of a road travel. You can just make decisions on the spot, so we stay there and not for the night we check it out. Did a walk around the town pulled out the kitchen by the river might egg and Bacon rolls and then he wrote. A So I didn't do it on Iraq so-called, a guy looked still to come the company offering listeners a deal on a great road trip, planning APP, but let's head to the UK and catch up with Joe from Campo holidays. So Kampala Day is born of really nothing short. Love admiration of things V. Camper, vans relay. We created camp holiday because whenever we go somewhere in a van in everybody wants to stop look. Vanna been themes eat done, and it kind of is amazing. How many people Oh, which we in our? We'd love to do that and you get all. These kinds of responses and I guess camp holidays. Will about taking away. We're about making it easy for people. said the vans. They're modern vans rather than the the old style split screens. So. They come with a degree of rehabilitate. I have a friend who has a lovely sped screen, and I swear to. God was Hackney's needs sticking out the. And and we make it easy because we also help people to plan routes, we figure out some Nice. Campsites fooling. What we will with helping people go from that whole while we today that team. Well I have someone with me. He's Donna. Cake Dot the managing editor also from England. Now, Joe, what you're trying to do is help. Brits plan a safe getaway on four wheels this summer kite. What's it like to do a road trip in England I? It's. The much statistics, landscaping Britain and because. I do find myself getting quite defensive and argument team because out of Ozzy travelers, an Antipasto and travelers tend to go to Europe. I might fly into London and then they immediately guys, the continent and I don't think they understand. That Britain has ma'am teens, Lake regions, an incredible coastline and so diverse and interesting, and and yes, the weather can be unpredictable, but I mean I. Think something like seventy percent of Britain is. Covered in open fields and Moorlands is national parks cipher may it's just a no brainer the? Guy From the tip of coal, the White Scotland just say completely different landscapes. By what do you think some of those misconceptions might be? Number One I. Think is is the weather and. We have dogs and I can count on hand to the number of times again. I get woken the dog yet. We do have rain, but it just rained all day every day. In the beauty of Camper Van is that if you follow the Sun Right, so if you WANNA had Scotland in the weather, let's at there on the east coast, and it doesn the West Coast and head up these streets right, and that's the beach you know. Get fixated on the destination. Get fixated on where YOU'RE GONNA GET! The best experience is kind of my take on the first misconception is the weather, I, second misconception I think you're absolutely right, could people outside of the UK is all about London I love London lived in London. are a big fan of the tourist attractions you can see in London, but his hectic, and it's stressing in the current environment it's it's pretty tough to social descendants on the UK's so-so much than than than London It is all the things that you just described have amazing mountains. We have amazing. Lakes of the beaches are just some of the best in the world in my. An an an outside outside London. There are other amazing city, so one of the city's. To today, Chester very similar to you'll contemporary appearance totally different to dead? So if you're experiencing UKASES, London and I think it's really experienced London. There is much more than has to offer them. Night taste is quite low of the roots, the East Jest. You'll customers are in the northwest. Which? Again doesn't always have the best weather compared to other parts of Britain. Do you have plans to might be extended rapes? Yes, very conscious at the moment that with everything that's going on there is that. That desire to stay local and we've still got some Welsh roots on that. I held. And, but with leads by the Welsh rates, which may not posting because we want to be saying being people to cross the border when when old Welsh police to try and discourage that, said we all quite consciously trying to keep the rights where it's quite local to divine a emolument and bud in the background. We've got no five hundred around rhinos tip of Scotland in the making, but some fabulous photos that have been provided by one of our photos. You did last year and they are just mindblowing and we've got a Renault foot with coast deafening own roll 'em literally loads Wales. We've got bookings in August people. Really want to go to wiles owning roots for them with just not publishing think it gives the wrong message and his counter to the to the masses while government. I give Aig so it the moment that is very much a local emphasis, it also means that it can people the opportunity to stay a- daybreak in the van because we are allowed to do that, ECON day on from where relocated you conduit daybreak to Norfolk from where we located. At the moment I think what you're saying on. The website is more a reflection of circumstances, and as time goes on yet. WE'RE GONNA launch rates further failed in the UK. Feather failed in Europe and we're absolutely going to put some US in San Jose. In some way rates on that because it's about inspiring April about what they could see if they think are holidays, different way. Okay firstly I've got a couple of questions are I'm just GonNa? Kinda challenge you. Buy these because some of the base. Sorry to laugh. You've got some of the speeches in. Kate, and this is new to me joy well, this is what. I think might be. We not really came. That was definitely tongue-in-cheek. I'm Jerry Cans holiday. Has It affected by coded positively? Really? Yes, it. It would have been quiet, so we had Easter bookings. We had to defend. And, but they've been defied, and we've made that really easy for people that hasn't been a financial penalty for people. We would have liked to have been super busy in in. May June an obvious, it has not happened in June. I. Think we will do more. Day Highest. which creates some logistical complications because we're cleaning the van, we're also trying to use UV in ozone to sanitize van between Honda et Cetera either we've had to kind of pivot and change and adapt And that really you know people are desperate and eager to be out bowed in July and August in September and going on holiday, and actually satloff people when I give that children some of the experiences. They remember children. And longtime bookings over the Winter Sun, still loads of interesting knows I think they kind of the January to March period. The other thing that thing will be of Britain realizes there's a really massive festival culture. And to ended some amount thousands of people there's a festival on every weekend and everybody is in camps and really well organized camping facilities, not just Glastonbury, but all either written and that that's a big part of the campaign cultures net. And I think is a festival for everybody and their arts and crafts. Festival, there are food festivals. There are family orientated festivals with kids activities that. People are sniffing around. You have the infrastructure to support increased increase is on the road or the Hawks I think there's lots of different answers that question yesterday. Thing got the Infrastructure William. Will the capacity be reduced because social distancing? I don't know that we're still waiting for guidance on that came so I go into effect that will have is what we are doing is a one way. Our booking planning routes accustomed says we are advised in a book least nights in advance, and we are trying to get that bookings with sites in place if the going. Going in just in a stay in Seiichiro, eight one campsite, trying to get at booking eventful phantom sooner rather than later because I do think has to say will be reduced and in order to achieve social distancing jarring closing. Is there anything that you wanted to share with people? Shooting into this particular episode? Who might not have had a camper van before I would just be open, minded and give it a guy, even if not tried it before giant before you got I want to Shyla came, so I'm just gonNA share my screen, so we can show came received. Resilient This. Beautiful MOMS ashes scattered on the hill above. What am I, GonNa. Say to that seriously. Many. Pages. You're absolutely right ladies. Thank you so much for. Joining the conversation. Stick in your pocket to keep in touch. I did have to take it back. Fill the beaches. They showed me worse stunning and thanks to fight for her insight in that chat now, Togo, it's a time-saving ave up that helps. Keep track of service maintenance be cleaned, fired trip checklists, but they also have a second APP. It's called road trip is it's the one that I use and love and Stephanie's tell us more about boyd. Togo v is an APP built just not too long ago. Essentially to help streamline the user experience of being. There's a lot of complex. Complex things in our being these days from complicated vehicles to finding places to stay to. And maintaining your vehicle and checklists and we've tried to create an APP that kind of boils down into something really simple to take a little bit of the stress and anxiety out of that camping trip. Okay, we'll live downloaded. The Roy trip is APP saw I'll be able to give first hand experience of what that is like. But how is it different to the tug? O, Avi App road trip specifically about trip. Planning Point to point. And Mapping. Where you're going and finding a discovering all the little places along the way that are interesting. Togo V is is really a super set of of that experience. Filtering it for our V. destinations right so we takeaway things like hotels out of the experience, and we re put in campgrounds instead we also focus on a few features that are important are fierce like like checklists. Out there are things about arriving at a campground departing from campground, getting vehicle ready to. Go out on a trip for the first time in a season. We we build these checklists for users. Allow them to customize them. with integrated added the Toga. RV APP is well to kind of create this combination of stress, reducer and exploration in RB content, discovery all in one simple APP. Okay, we'll will die meds. They traveled podcast. As we know it is, destination focused and then every second week we highlight. An amazing I met someone that's demonstrating. Things love FIA connection discovery travel. Obviously, we have been able to travel because of the pandemic, but now starting to say what travel is looking like post, covid and of ING is definitely at the top of the list. Do you see twenty twenty as a as a banner year for hitting the road? Yeah, we absolutely do. I. Mean I've Seen It. I've seen it listed several ways. The summer of the RV or the summer of the road trip and I think that's absolutely true I think. We want more control over our environment when we travel right now. And RV's are almost this this lifeline to that where you have ultimate control over your microwave environment, and you can move it to whatever test the nation. You like to go to so. Are being seems like a solution to a problem that we're experiencing globally and. I'm excited for that. it comes with a lot of other responsibilities to mean. We can't say that without also saying like there are. Things you WANNA do to protect yourself and to protect others so the. You're not being responsible out there there's. We've published some articles on that. Both on road trippers DOT COM as well as Togo be dot com with the guides including a state by state guide in the US for. The individual closures and restrictions on at all the major camping facilities so. It's not. It's not a free for all this summer, but it surely does look like a summer that that is good for Arby's and there there is a bit of Americana to it right like we've all dreamt of you know the big epic trip and that is a little bit baked into our American travel story. If you will even going back to route sixty six, and then the founding of the interstate system you know made road travel a lot easier this country so. It, it's definitely. It's definitely there's a lot of activity around a RV. Repurchases for sure and I think we're just seeing the beginning of it I. Think it'll. It'll stay hot through the course of the summer. How many downloads of both severe same? It's been really interesting to watch our APP downloads over the course of covid. We were you know seeing record APP downloads with road trippers APP prior to the pandemic, really hitting states, and what happened was as we dropped about seventy, almost almost eighty percent in volume towards the end of March and early April. The idea of travel just disappeared. It. was quite remarkable. How quickly downloads and Trips planned by users dropped off. That's not only recovered to. BE ON PACE with last year. We've actually seen a a super set of our users using road trippers. That's actually really added. Faster on it's come back at a much faster rate than. Than car travelers has so that's been really interesting to follow. So Weird, not only encourage people to like camp close to home. Discover a tourist in your own state or you're on region. And discover what's what's nearby, but take advantage of some things. One thing we call here, Mooch docking, which is basically camping in a friend's driveway. And those are the things that. We, sometimes take for granted and I think those are great opportunities to get out right now in a restricted environment. Sorry True Stephen any few download. The road trip is Apple. Just go to the sought links in China. It's use the card. Would World Nymex want one word and they'll give you a discount. If you upgrade to the pro version, you can get a free version, but like anything provision. Give you those extra. Spread offense. Yeah, we'll put the Lincoln shots right. Thanks very much for that off of a nice guys. That's wonderful. Look, we're better. Wrap up, but we moved share a few articles in show notes on why? Are More likely pies pandemic, including expert advice for Saif trip, plus what to know about the reopening of the US national parks? The National Park Service also advises visitors to check NPS. Dot Gov to find a specific parks current conditions. Look if you've got anything that you'd like to add or share with us that we can pass on getting touched by ailing Paul, cast at World No mets dot com. Just one other thing we share in the show night says well is a link to an episode that we did on Van Life said check that one out yet. Next time we these a couple of we featured as amazing mets, who were or are traveling the world in a Catamaran remember. The widens hip gone with the wind. Goma, twins bought with borders and ports closed. They stuck in fe Jay. They have been for months and they beloved floating home is an hour away in. Oh! coed hit that one. By. August royal boundaries.

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Mexico - The Whole Enchilada

The World Nomads Podcast

46:08 min | 1 year ago

Mexico - The Whole Enchilada

"Welcome to the war. No muss podcast delivered by wore Norma's, the trouble lifestyle and insurance brand is not your usual. Trouble podcast. It's everything. For the adventurous, independent traveler. Yes. Mariuchi music film, sound of Mexico. Couldn't do it without that the distance way featuring in this episode of the world nomads podcast, and it celebrates the launch of the world, and I met Mexico guy from lounging partying on it's beautiful beaches to exploring ancient Mayan ruins Mexico's differently in the luring destination. And it is also hugely popular outside the Carribean. It's the second most popular destination for Americans to visit top notch food the music sandson Z mariuchi bans, what's not to love. We'll explore the sea of Cortez in this episode known as the aquarium of the world, the cuisine and a dose of jungle diarrhea, which is not a great too. For ALPHA's Chet without boss about the gun came out Mexico. God look we've actually done a bit of a change in direction where we've got this is our twenty second or twenty third travel. God that will name it his has published, but we've taken a bit of a new direction because the which wanted to do something a little bit different with willed nine minutes. I we people love what we do try to do it better. But I thought we'd find out about why we tried to do this. An exactly what we're trying to do. But speaking dwell boss general manager, Chris able get I. Bill. Hello. And welcome to the podcast. This is going to say pumping. You're cherry. This is the first time joining is. I know I have complained for several my my daughter tons of yet to be recorded on. I'm very glad that fun. I get a chance to out to Jesse gone just taught to his are up because we've had a bit of a change in direction. So now, we're all this new guide and looks fantastic. And it reads beautifully because it's we've switched to the first person with to him. You know, we've got people who are good travel. Rod, isn't it? They explaining a destination through their own experiences. But just tell me why we're doing that. What's the philosophy behind that? Yeah. Look up thinking things over the years that but has a traveler, and I think that's the thing about what nine at that. You know, we are. We all wilt, my mentioned and pretty much everything I think we've produced with these is being done through the lens of you know, downton help off doesn't support us individually as travels as well. And I think for many years when you look at an pen tacit travel writing out and wonderful publications, and I give you fantastic kitsch and Hinch on where to go, and what to say, and I think from mantras that you've been on. And I might be just make getting getting all the, but on generally get moved by understanding what a traveler onto fells when wearing applied what motivated them what what would the experiences by hadn't had I reflect upon them. And it's always been that talk of running that that that are not a lot of within the business of love as well. So yes, she can't get those rights. You know, when you need to go, and what you need to. And and I think that, you know, the certainly element of that white into it. But I was really came in on a team is very keen to understand. What what did that person feel at the time? Why was it such an amazing experience? What did they get from it? I'm wanted Maine to them as an individual because I think as travelers we all have completely different motivations when we Mike decision to travel to a place, and it's not always just about being able to stand in front of something and pull a Sophie and go I was here for a lot of us. I think it's very much. You know, shaking something we're looking to understand applies to understand ourselves at the same time. So I thought this and the tank this would be better off which indeed trying explore some of those those things and see whether we could get under the skin of applies through that that individual through that Rodman really understand. What did I feel when going through it? And that's something that I can connect to something that I'm on searching peak to gripe destination to do it. With Mexico nomad sky. Yeah, there's this probably few countries in the world that that possibly misunderstood as is Mexico, as as you know, it's coupla bad press over the years. But it really is an amazing question. It's an amazing dish the nation. I think one of the other things that came to the price of trying to take his I personally for me very much wine, which the way that I travel now has changed in that. I can't those people on the ground. I seek out local people to really give me bit understanding in a bit of same sports guy on and not just type that sort of that third person view of applies that you sort of wondering too, and you get a perception. But really, I think we all I spend tastic troops trips that you have your member that you speak with you the years a generally around experiences that you shaved now. Now, whether that's you know, someone or friend or a loved one, but a lot of the time. It's it's when you share that experience with some that I did something. Ground and can really give you an insight into their culture and their wide law that you you just can't in on through necessarily God Vogel. You know, by by just sort of standing on the outside. And I think that sell to me what, you know, this new approach tries to do is to to, you know, get out. Rod is connected to pay on the ground, and really such people sort of an inside out the u s tonight. And so as pregnancy abused, but you haven't any stereotypes of of Christ sort of wash away when you really get to get to the heart of and understand why these that the paper said Pratt's, leaving Mexico. So proud of the culture and the history. It just keeps you that. So the desire to want to go and experience that not an and that he's made his beauty is getting on the ground, and and mating paper and really understanding that this dimension your one last question it leading question everything that you've just said go to Joe for twenty Kate. My. It's the lady quest you'll know where all those things that you've just described that you can do as a will. No. That's not something that you can normally do with lots of other brands. There are amazing brands that door amazing things in the world. But you know, as our cited to pay within the tape. You can't live and die that where you can't even die. Read. Obi handle even Bob wilt, I met that's cool to who. We are just part of our fabric pot about the United. And and we love the fact that so many other people in the world so shit at vision and purpose. So it's a great white rod, and and low might in you agree that titling it's another teddy. Will you feel you count we envelope? It. You can dial world I met his thing. Frankie gone over there. She's chris. Well, let's kick off by dressing the elephant in the room, filling out something you're really passionate about safety in Mexico. You get quite frustrated when people say, it's not safe. No, yes. I do get very very frustrated, and it's it is generally a pretty scientists nation. Well, we have already about the gang and drug related violence infects when you tune into net flicks, all the shows will pretty much all the shows on Netflix or about that. Yeah. Well, that nocco series is a lot to blame for that sort of energy that people have you grind save come to the defensive Mexico. Well, who better to give us an idea of just how scf Mexico? He's but a local and you caught up with Ruben from Monday Jovan yet Monday Jovan at a conference in Scotland last year was raised in morning, Mexico thirty three years ago, and I've been traveling around the world, I mean in this industry for fifteen years, and I've been always. Next to this story about an lease in in all the time. When when where are you from Mexico and immediately is in euros. How do you sort by like, and I don't know people immediately. He's like feeling that I'm landing Damascus probably every time that I get home. But he's not later. Of course, there is a problem. Of course, will I will be lying to you. He fight on consider that we have we have a problem. We have a big drug problem. Probably since I dunno since ever since. An bigger and bigger and bigger in the last twenty years, or he was more obvious in the last twenty years on it's it's really simple to understand where we have. Beak neighbor. We'd be demand. Yup. I we are big producer. So in order to six any conflict has to you need to have two parts. Oughta wise couldn't be just one. I think the Mexico. I speak problem is we have a terrible Biard Terry will PR condition in terms of the news. You can see the wars precedent ever history. That we have is right now. Thank God is he's gone. This administration considering so many facts considering corruption thinks that we've been involved. Attorney will turn it's. But it's it's pretty simple decide that there are lots of places, which are fine. But there was some places which are not correct. So it's very localized in a way. So he finally was to go to Mexico. How would I find out the information about we all what other side places to go and the and the not safe places to avoid board there? He's always the hot spot. Not in the right way. I mean. Because the your graphically position next to the US border is where probably you're going to get the biggest conflicts. Yep. Costs natural conditions of of these people trying to get he'll all these tough into into the country, and then about the cities or about this donations. They're the most mantis donation, which is Mexico City Cancun or all the other beach destinations. You're going to have these. How do I say? Both people problems. Yep. Because all the interaction there is involve around. I mean, there's always people looking for these amount. And there's always people having these offer. So if you are in bold, or you're looking after this, and you're looking after that kind of action you will get into trouble. We'll get into trouble. But that's something that is going to happen in Mexico or anywhere else. All right. Tell me about your favorite parts of Mexico with with your what which part of your country. Do you love the most? I love my city. I love Mexico City, then my second favorite place of Mexico. He's he's Chapas with which is a in the south is Saudi specs ago. They have a beautiful beautiful beautiful landscape. It's green a lot of community and local community people and they have beautiful beautiful beautiful green zones, and it's a mix between John goal and a lot of art on a lot of traditions and all this sewn surround for me one of the most beautiful parts of Mexico next to you get well close to you you done for as well for me. It's my one of my favorite places, and it's my grandma hometown. Which obviously put it in in the hot part of the list day in day. Well, Mexico City has changed a lot. The medium-term. It was once not a very nice place to what to change. They were. How did it become such a great dissertation? How to become a hotspot? It's been a lot of investment in the city in the last ten years, I will say much more efficient, communication and PR. A lot of big brands hotels and be luxury runs around the city, and developing I mean, you feel comfort when you're next to the city or walking around the city, and there's so many things to do. And so many things to to see around last last question, I want you to tell me a secret spot in Mexico City falls to visit there where would you say me, that's not the usual. My secret spot in Mexico. Sundown kill for me. It's an Kelly's. Is one of the most non well. At a may seem neighborhoods that perfectly shows you how is used to be the real Mexico City. So get lost in San hill. Take a look about the houses. And and you're gonna know exactly how is how is Mexico on. How is Mexico City? Mudaj Ivan is an educational travel agency aimed at all types of travellers, especially first timers who God it step by step in that process to go abroad to study all the links in the Shino, plus ovarian safety gone to Mexico. We'll put that there as well. Now Cassandra runs escaping in wide office group who is I really like this. Because when you hear the term groups turned off. Title nine died plays because she does group to is the people who don't do group to us, and she helps solo travelers plan their own adventures and Cassandra has spent a lot of time in Mexico. So I started in Baja California, and I did a whale-watching road trip all along that peninsula camping and stopping at different locations to see Wales. And I then completed my scuba diving certification in Baja California, and then I went to buydell Carmen about two years later, and did my advanced suid I having certification there. So what's scuba diving like in that area? Oh, it's it's amazing. It's amazing. I'll say in implantable Carmen, it's one of the best places in the world. You sea turtles UC large fish? You see algae UC I saw gigantic ill that apparently just lives in this ship rank, and I was so. Surprised to find him? And then was told after the dive that he's just always there every single day waiting for divers to come down and say, hi when you're in Baja California, then hitchhiked with a couch, surfing friend. I did. So I met her actually the previous year in chronic. She lives in Tijuana, and she wrote me, and she said, I go to see the whales every winter. Would you like to go with me? And so I did I flew back to San Diego. And then I crossed the border into chief wanna and we made a plan to go down the border, and we actually found another concert for to go with us. And he drove for the first couple of days, which was really nice because when she went to pick up her tent, we realized that there were no holes in the tent, so we would have been into for a terrible surprise where we went to set up a ten at night. And when he has to go back up the wanna we hitchhiked we hitchhiked the whole way down the peninsula with a lot of Canadian retired couples who I would learn vacation in Baja California, Mexico every winter, and there's like these massive RV. Camps and lots along the peninsula. So they would they would drive us to wherever they were going. We would spend the night. And then we would find someone to take us the next stretch. So jumping in with mom and dad, grandma and grandpa seems a lot cypher the motor envisaging. Yeah. It was it was very safe. And we did have other offers and we will use their best judgment as to single women. Are there were offers from we got an offer from a truck with three men in the front, and we decided they might be very nice. But we didn't think that was the best option for us off. So we looked at pass and one point we had a Mexican couple of male and female Arlene in their thirties that were driving on a short vacation they took in. So they gave us a ride to one of the city's is what we ended up staying at their how that night just because we got into late to try to find any accommodations. We're gonna chat about safety in Mexico lighter in the house. But generally, did you feel safe? I yes. Hundred percent, I'm gonna Mexico. At least a dozen times. I've traveled all over the country. And I've always felt extremely extremely safe there. I mean, there are areas I won't go to like around the border, and there are pockets of violence in that Marlins is real, but it's also it's in very specific places for the most part. And so it can be avoided. Now, you mentioned nasty surprises Jong diarrhea. Wow. Why I'm so interested in this that feeling I appreciate it. We're going to have to do an episode on paying around the world because it's kind of one of those things that happens to everyone. But no one talks about it. Oh, I talk about it. I I send out a monthly adventure newsletter that talks about my personal adventures and upcoming group trips that I lead and travel tips and everything one of them that I sent out was Joan diarrhea in Mexico and. What am I mentioned was like you can't use that as a title? I was like oh, yes. I can like people want to know. And if they don't like fishing subscribe to my newsletter because, you know, want making for real and let them know what's going on. It's a travel. It's a part of travel like a most you're just gonna stay in your house for the rest of your life. You I've gotten sick restaurants in New York City across the countries. So this particularly also out of the jungle diarrhea happened when I was going on a road trip with friend of mine Pedro who a taxi driver in Mexico City, and we drive his taxi all over the country on road trips, and we were going through San Luis Potosi, and we stopped in a small town because we were tired, and we went to low street fair and food is good 'em hedgerow had me sample his his drink. It was a tamarind sweetened tamarind water has like, man. This is good. I should get my own. And I did like man this is really good. I should get another. And I had enough. Other and morning. I woke up just sweating like, isn't it hot in here? And he's like, no, it's not and I sat up, and I was dizzy, and it was it was it was really bad, but we had hiking to do that afternoon. So we went hiking, and we haven't hiking the next day through these these ancient ruins in the middle of the jungle in it was he goes in the eighties of the nineties that day felt to me it felt like just boiling like my blood was boiling, hiking through these these mountains, no bathrooms in sight at night. We were camping, and we found this really cool campground with teepees. So we had this. Nice TV. But then I had to like crime out of it. And you know, run to the bathroom, which seemed like it was a collaborator away. I was grateful for it. So any any accidents? Or did you make it to the Lou every every time I did make it every time. I'm surprised that the next camp. We went to I had to cross a river had to like have over rocks to get to the other side of the camps. Thanks again to the bathroom. But I was so grateful that there were lights and there were there was toilet paper. And eventually a couple days later. I was able to do this waterfall jumping tour in San Luis let the Mexico with no accidents. Thank goodness. That would have been interesting for some under underwater, gopro, filming. The video to go viral, and like every travel logger in every business person wants viral video like that would be the viral video that I would be subjected to. So tell us about this friend in Mexico that has the the knees attacks driver, and you drive the taxi around the country. I also met him on couch surfing. I'm at him like ten years ago. And it's I talked about surfing for years, and I've gotten so many more questions recently about it. I recently hosted a guide from Iraq. And I wanna I wanna do some more writing about that. But I met him in Mexico City, and he had responded to it was a dancing group. Also. So he wrote me in that group and said, hey, I can't host you at my house. But I'm driver if you need I can pick you up from the airport and take you to wherever you're going to be saying, oh that works out. Great. And so we ended up hanging out in a went down there. Two years later, we met up again, and we decided to take a day trip to Puebla which is like two hours from Mexico City. It was just going to be a quick day trip. Go their comeback. And on the way, he says, hey, what do you think about spending the night in bud blah and enjoy having another six hours to Hakka in the morning. I thought that sounds like fun it offer like something. We should have planned for before we left Mexico City 'cause we don't have our clothing or toothbrush or anything. But it sounds like fun. And when we got to web, LA we went to the internet cafe and we posted on there. And we actually found some hosts that we're going to take a bus to Oaxacan the next day. And so they let us stay with them. They had their bedroom. And we all drove in his taxi to Oaxaca had a great time. And then we've had a bunch of adventures since then in his taxi, and now he's the taxi driver on my group tours to Mexico, and he has a million stories that someone is now Cassandra's Lafon line will be enough for me to join. She's great fun links in China and to avoid jungle diarrhea she suggests making sure the water is filtered, which makes sense, but it's not often. Hardly. It's not often that in small towns. Yeah. So she carries a water bottle with a filter, and the brand that she recommends is is great and what's travel news? Okay. Well, it looks like one of Europe's longest running parties is about to come to an end city of Prague. Where would you be as cheaper than water there of Baynton progress? And I drank Slivovitz not gone how the hangover. That suffer. But look at drug position. He's on the misdemeanor improv as well. So be it makes it the ultimate party town. But locals have got sick of waking up with a hangover and having to clean up after the twenty million guests who come there every year? So after years of complaints about noise and disturbance there, isn't it? So the old city up being hood laws. This the city has appointed a Knight man to address their concerns Peres dinner as well New York's done moving on. I think we've discussed the if a heck Niners hidden city tickets before you book a flight to a less popular destination, which is for cheaper ticket, but you get off on a stopover at the more popular destination. But the airlines are cracking down on this because they claim it deprives them of thousands of dollars. Left-hander is the latest on to take a stand. And this sewing passenger who booked to Seattle to Oslo flight, but got off at the stopover in Frankfurt and then bought a separate airline ticket to his home in the. City of Berlin. He saved a little over two thousand you roads by doing that. That's exactly how much lift answer again assume for. They how could that be successful suing? Well, that's the whole on those grounds. Obviously someone's paying a bit clever. Yeah. But now the, but there's a site the we'll find these tickets for your called skip blanked on. So they're going now, it's 'institutionalise. It used to be a few people knew about it. And it was a small hole in a big bucket in the didn't worry about it. But now, it's like, you know, gaping hole in a dam wall. This many people taking advantage of it. Whether they are actually I mean, they claim what they claim that you've actually broken the the conditions that you've agree to on your ticket. And you're also depriving another passenger of seat because an empty seat goes on. Okay. One lots where we got time for one not. So one guy for a company that helped you repeating travelers exit compensation for delight flights. He's predicting twenty nine thousand nine we'll be a horror year, especially for UK travelers. Help is predicting that infrastructure problems and breaks it could cause as many as. A quarter of a million flight departure disruptions threat twenty nineteen Miceli for the Brits. They calling on airlines and airports to get it together on infrastructure and on the what they're gonna do about post Brexit and do more to protect passengers rights size standby for visit disruption. If Brexit guys a hit. Who knows? Exactly do know that classes has a blog si-. Thanks for the news show right here every week. She has a blog tiles of a backpacker. She also has very own backpacking guard to Mexico, which we will share in showing its and she's a big fan of the places a distant ocean. Having spent months there. I looked it. I looked at a hud's I didn't really have much expectations in Mexico City to be on this because you know, it all the stories that is big and it's dangerous instead team polluted. But actually that wasn't my experience are all I was in a really nice area of the city of a place coal Roma. And the leafy avenues as low as cool bars and restaurants, and I time I really didn't want to leave. I chile. Originally only con to be there for like a month. And I just like to so much. I decided to stay as long as I could. So give me four reasons you decided to stay for four months, the food, but Mexican food is ridiculously could the street food, actually is amazing. You can buy sort of three tacos for a dollar. And this really really good the people I actually find the people really friendly kind and open again. So of not really what at expected from Mexico. Given a list stories at Ted. What else did the culture? Actually, really amazed by how many museums throwing Mexico City. Partly sunny, Paris that has more museums. Than Mexico City. So this so much to learn in Mexico. This this on. An apology museum. That's absolutely incredible. It's huge, and it has exhibition halls of every pre-columbian civilization in in Mexico. And they have this. They call it the Aztec sun stone, this huge massive stone that's been like three and a half inches across and apparently ways over twenty tones, and it's amazing carvings on it. And they didn't really know what it was useful. But I think my thing like a calendar will for astrological purposes. But I mean that was just incredible for me to see, and, you know, considering how long been full, and they'd actually design the thing. Yeah. I would just blown away by it. Three things. What else full things do just be someone? That was just it was just fun. You know this. There's a square in Mexico cynical, plus a Garibaldi, and you can go there on this Marietta. Cheekbones play and everywhere that could Saturday Jew does an area code Shashi Milko, which is where you can go on boat, like a really cool full boat around all these canals. And if you go to week had or on a holiday is just a massive party in all these boats are filled with people drinking biz and sig mariachi boats, the KOMO alongside Saturday Jew, and you can there's a little boats that composite the house they're selling like tacos in the little corn on the call. Then. Oh god. I just loved it advocate involved. It really I just really really enjoyed it. And like I said because my expectations were pretty much day. I I just totally blew me away pay faked. But can you expand on what you do because it isn't just Mexico. Yeah. No. I saw it just makes. I decided is what three years ago now I was working in in spe as I could take an office job anymore. So I decided to quit my job and go traveling. And I went around South America for about ten months that was poking around South America. And I I lift it and wanna came back after that. It was only supposed to be sort of once in a lifetime trip when it came back the soul of where could get an office. That was just awful. So yeah, I decided to work a lot harder on the on the blog. So yeah, tells if about pucker it's solo female travel travel around by myself. Budget travel, but still spending money on unique experiences because I think if you're gonna travel in the something incredible Ekondo anywhere else in the world. That's worth spending a little bit of money on if you. And I just want to sort of inspire people to to take the plunge and do it. You know, when I when I quit my job. There's so many people that sets me, oh, I wish I could do what you're doing. And obviously if you've got family in mortgage and stuff, it's a lot harder. But I think in a life is show you should just take the plunge. And if you can then just do it, which is great. But the big question, I clear is you must have had some money in your pocket before you hit it off the first trip that are went on this because of this ten month adventure to South America. Like, I actually had some some inheritance from my grandparents, and they passed away before I was working jobs, and so saving up everything cook for that within one is out there. I was volunteering hostels and stuff like that. And staying in staying in hostels like it wasn't. I'm not spending very much money. And that is good to hit considering clues mission Phyllis to share with you the very best of a distant action without bike breaking the Bank. Okay. Tim Neville as a travel writer and we featured him in previous podcasts. He's a great place to have a chip t he went kayaking in Bahamas Loretto bay, Jacques Cousteau called Mexico. Sea of Cortes, the world's aquarium. He said that I thought man that is just absolutely perfect. You know, it was my first trip to that part of Mexico. And I am just dying to go back is just I I just can't describe just what a wonderful feeling. It was to go down there, especially when the weather appeared in, you know, in Oregon where I live is not so great to go down there and have just wonderful temperatures in so on when we first arrived. Of course, the weather wasn't so great. But but it's Mexico. It's always going to be, you know, little it's always going to be better than where you are. And so at least generally speaking of it say so to jump into a place with just crystal clear water, just spectacular scenery is very desert, very arid of in this cool, refreshing waters of the contrast or just wonderful, then you pack in all this wildlife. New think. Wow. There's no place all side rather be right now. Now, you saw Marlon account imagine. In what that would be like to see a Mylan swimming. When you're not actually, you know fishing for one if that makes. Right. Exactly. That's the first one. I had seen, you know, not mounted on a wall in a seafood restaurant. So be I couldn't believe it. I just paddling along and look down. It's kind of a disturbing feeling when you when you this like your body can sense. There's something there before you really realize something's there. And I just said that just looked a little different down underneath the boat in all of a sudden, I realized it was moving and then I realized oh my gosh. This is a giant fish of. And then I really could tell what it was even though it was it was you know, it was probably maybe four feet below may something like that. Until it turned it when it turn the summit, hit it sides admit it just lit up like like an alien spaceship or something just just blew electric light. And it was gone. So yeah, that was definitely a highlight for me as flooding. There's so many turtles in. Of birds and things like that that that you begin to get a little bit used to it. But say sued have something like a Marlin go by which was those still building. Whatever seeing a pretty special something that won't forget, that's for sure doesn't leave up to John Cousteau is theory that it's the world's aquarium. Well, you don't know read biologists. But it's just the average guy likes to go down there. Go kayaking. I it is certainly one of the more spectacular places. You can go tons and tons light wildlife. There's great places go snorkeling. We would stop off into these little coast. That's the fun thing. Right about kayaking is that you did not only do get the sort of, you know, ride in your backpack. Let's say so you act to carry anything that you're tall. You're a you're is all in your bowed. But then you get to use it to go explore these fun little looks and crannies that or otherwise pretty difficult again to so we could pull into these little coves in beach, the kayaks. Swap out for snorkel gear and go play around with the fish for a little while you described and it goes from, you know, these our visit feel into these beautiful crystal clear water, but you also in the story that you right talk about some charming little seaside towns. How how does it all connect, you know? So it's it's definitely a mix of the two in you know, when you start off there what you there several places you can start, but they're Loretto. It's just a wonderful little ten just just then whole portion of Mexico. I think I think all Mexican so big diverse than that particular area Mexico. Bob, peninsula, just has this unbelievably chill vibe to it. It's like, you know, we've got this. Great weather. We've got these great beaches in all these animals. Awesome food is why worry so everybody's just deceived naturally kinda happy and relaxed in. So you can go hang out in these sidewalk cafes. I walked a restaurant fish tacos, or you know, Margaritas whenever it is that you want and just just really really shed some some of daily in stress, and guess that you have in your name and your role life. But at the same time is it's culturally fascinating in historically. So rich, you gotta remember that these areas have. Set a long before you know, by Europeans, obviously is about unit before anything where I'd that where I live. So you have these old missions, you have these these towns were all you have just this cruel. This is very very colorful culture, and it just permeates everything. So they have both this this wonderful. You know, let's call it urban by Edmund this wonderful natural vibe, you put those two together in Madison paradise. You know, it's just it's right there on our doorstep. It's so wonderful fascinating culturally. It's you know, the food the UNIDO excuse to go. It's right there. So you'll have to spend a lot more time down there for sure. It's not feed inside. We've lived the based on two last, but we cannot have an episode on Mexico and not explore the food. Absolutely. And I think Mexican food sometimes has a bed reputation. I've heard it described as premedicated food, but I think that's a waste of waste inversion. And I'm away that there is an entire different Mexican cuisine. We're about to find that out who bit into do that. We've been kindle he'll he's an Australian journalists. He specializes in travel food and people features. But he's also the author of bestselling receivable coast, and it contributes to gourmet pilgrims Spain and Mexico volumes. So I'm guessing kindle, you know, what you're talking about. When it comes to Mexican cuisine. I wouldn't have to be an expert in Mexican cuisine because you've made up of log funds. I think to get across everything that's involved but eight quite a bit. But abuse of. For their children book as you inside. I know something about yeah. Phil same to summit up as premedicated one. That's that sort of refried beans Tex-Mex stuff that you get in shape. China outlets that sort of stuff I'm talking about. He's not proper Mexican food. Is it no not talking from strangers big? We don't get right. Mexican food. We think of sort of a hot massive things and save, but in mentioned because you so, you know, so it's not a means. You can present is actually an amalgam from two different influences. Not lays the Spanish win win win. They invited. I brought growth pool, and you know, the sort of common Mesa where where it makes heavy forehead. And then you had had why then? Quitting her way in Lebanon night ordering on insulin. But I'm containing that. Sort of treasury is answers to costumes that informed. The why the why makes Hussein from hand in the way those they say him to my incredible ingredients. And makes you Evan cod. Come their chocolate comes from bit chilly, things matters, pumpkin. Or leading labeling great into we. We imagine living without matters. But, but there's will Michigan side to this means that for anyone news makes today, so I've sort of and lack of understanding of how much that that those you not incites Mexico broke the world, you know, sends food outfits, Richard. I think you just nine to all of my favorite foods informed. Yum any country that gets you chocolate gonna be there. There's some by now might have come from sort of says it south and letting merica, but certainly beyond the Mayans were one of transplants to be able to send these things into something. Delicious drink I came nine to impress him. But probably more so KENDALL when I cook a chili con con. I put chocolate in it. Chris that sound. That sounds Molly which is sort of disciples sort of source is hyme Mexican cuisine outside because it takes a long time to prepare twenty four hours or more and from has more than city ingredients that that often has chocolate in. So I know on the right track three months, and thank you putting a big of chocolate in either down you'd want the sun dried chillies, franchising, sort of the most multi flavor to I came. No, I do use the fresh take on bulled that advice and he's been twenty four hours. Preparing it came like, twelve oaks sloyal votes. I still twelve hours like hookah put the timing. I would speaking of Advocaat is I can't imagine what guacamole dip in Mexico would Thais lot. Compared to what we we thought ourselves in that kitchen based on the recipes that we given or even in some of the restaurants is there a difference? I think very fine way. That is a different in Nevada countries with that night and cruise anes when we got there and ate them. He's gonna love to do questions. And you know, what the Molly never played the paint makes us away my fresh. So. Leanness of this onion and tomato in the lawn and the water together or main do I mean, never kind of come from within the job on one of the sites and make database Advocaat is in the world side that quality of ingredients that all hios from these flies. So that does I do since depression. Thank can grading tower and damage to the play. So they probably turn out that there's maybe anywhere else that and that you say across also divisions in Mexico with my saying, very simple, he mentioned earlier about things and save, and what have you been there, a myriad different wise, if appearing things on and finally somebody you can talk to change as they they making Mexico that and they to that the many ingredients I had so you can you can travel around makes and we would have one place, but it will never taste Simon. You'll be you know, it's it's just for me when I went up in their sustainable series of revelation. You can have they in everyday, and and not get not get brought up and feel you know, base apprise the loss of some of the ways was into them in Baynes. But makes. Bra it is equivalent abroad and somebody's eyes and coach because there's people stuff. Will you Ali covers all by says that you've written for us? We'll share that in shine I'ts. But kindle is it all washed down with a little shot of tequila? That was your. Yes. Now, you know, these guys by looking at Keillor production was early morning, and you know, had the stand there and do not shots at the Quila tie with and stuff. It's not really my thing. I think probably got it for the and probably mentioned Lada, which is here with sort of kilos Donald salsa around the launches that. They've put some moves the sheer and chillier Bennett go. Yeah. It's been good to work to shoot the basket. And something that called magic sauce, which is kind of close to soy. I mean, he put the beer on top of that up on the ice. Especially hard time is back on his racing is con- of sort of a little bit bloody Marys, but not what. 'cause like be. But it's all right. I'll guy that and I'll have to tequila show, a moderate it said you can fit on the table Canedo. Thanks so much for chatting. All player. Sticking with Mexico theme. It may not to listen to our amazing nomads episode. We clear antennae who hiked the length of the US Mexico border, taking six months to walk two thousand miles. We were really nervous. He had heard a lot of mostly from people who had been there some selves. There's a lot of myths about what's down there and get a lot of fear going in. But we kind of we had to trust that people are kind of the same no matter where they are. And that maybe wasn't as bad as people made it out to be. And that's overwhelmingly what we found. We really had. No instance, that were even remotely dangerous or scary or anything like that. That was a bump episode celebrating Mexico travel garden, we'll share link in show notes. So you can download it mixed week. We're going rogue with a special episode on been exploration. It'd be until then you can get the world nomads podcast on itunes or download the Google podcast app. Make sure you subscribe. And if you have any feedback, it's always welcome suggestions, the guests. For this at focused at world, nomads dot com. See, yeah. The word enormous podcast. Royal boundaries.

Mexico Mexico City Mexico Mexico Mexico City Cancun diarrhea Mexico City Rod Carribean US China Cassandra Chris kindle John Cousteau Norma Jesse New York City Rodman
'14 Miles': A Look At The U.S.-Mexico Border, And The Lives Defined By It

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

48:27 min | 2 months ago

'14 Miles': A Look At The U.S.-Mexico Border, And The Lives Defined By It

"Support for on point and the following message come from MIT system design and management offering on campus hybrid and Distance Education for over twenty years earn a master's degree in engineering and management join a virtual info session on Wednesday September sixteenth from nine to ten a m s D. M. Dot Mit. Dot Edu. From NPR and WBZ Boston Anthony Brooks, and this is on point borders are porous. That's especially true in a world that's increasingly interconnective that includes the US Mexico border though the pandemic has closed it and president trump continues to promise a two thousand mile wall goods, people pollution, as well as dreams and memories still flow back and forth they always have. They always will my guest today. Dwi Gibson has a new book about a fourteen mile stretch the southern border that explores how the landscape and the people who live there are defined by the border. It's permanence and permeability this hour on point the US Mexico border what it keeps out and what it can't keep out. With us from Blue Hawaii is Dwi Gibson. His new book is fourteen miles building the border wall his previous books include the edge becomes the center and not working and D W Gibson great to have you. Thank you for joining us and thank you for this lovely book. It was just a pleasure to read it. Thanks for having me on the show Anthony. Yeah I'm really looking forward to this conversation and I wanna begin at the beginning where you look. At trump's president trump's proposed wall specifically at a series of thirty foot tall prototypes for the wall being built on the border. And there are some so many absurd ironies about the scene that I want to get into but tell me about these prototypes and why you chose them as the opening scene in the book. Right. So I was looking at the entirety of the two thousand, nearly two thousand mile long border between Mexico in US and it was in San Diego County that I felt like we had the most dynamic landscape. You know you have a big city in San. Diego but you move just ten fifteen miles east of that in your into the desert and it's an entirely different. Landscape entirely different demographics. So I felt like San Diego County in particular. gave me this landscape to look at America in miniature, and of course, the prototypes going up though tie Mesa desert in east county there in San Diego County were just a the the prime reason for doing this because that exercise of, as you said, eight prototypes, each thirty feet high thirty feet wide. Lined up sort of. Pageant contestants. There in the desert was something to behold in all that activity around the construction of the prototypes I felt would be a good epicenter to use for the book. Yeah I mean one of the ironies here is so here, these prototypes of this wall of trump's magnificent beautiful wall that's going to be built, and it's in a part of the border where. Am I right there actually opening up a new border crossing, right? Right I mean. So this is I think the prime irony of this exercise of the prototypes they in the spot where they built on they ended up tearing them down in early two, thousand, nineteen rather abruptly, and once they did that in the exact spot where they built them they've now started work on a commercial crossing and the Otani Mesa desert and think it's really important to note that it's a commercial crossing going to be designed for eighteen wheelers that are moving products back and forth between the American factories in Mexico the Makila. And you know the the the shelves throughout. American, stories. Throughout the country so this this fact that we sort went from these eight prototypes to crossing really does. To. Some of the tension at the border and some of the irony of the border right speaking of which show a little more irony. One of the things you do. So well as we meet a whole host of characters who are affected by this border, whether they're a border control agents whether they're migrants or people who live on either side of the borders and we're going to be hearing from some of them directly during this hour. But early in the opening chapter, we meet Arabia of villa watches the prototypes being built from her home just two hundred miles away may two hundred. Yards away. Basically, she lives in Mexico very close to the border. She can't really understand why trump wants another wall tell us her story and what you learn from her. So really Yeah. She lives even just a few hundred feet I mean quite literally in the shadow of these prototypes that were going up and. Another important factor in terms of a really I, and the the landscape is that there were already two fences between her home and the prototypes one was made of corrugated metal, and then another steel fence two fences already this the prototypes sort of represented a third barrier going up a really Oh, was born in Ventura. California. To Mexican parents was deported when she was quite young her mother tried to make a Govan. States for a while but just really couldn't make ends meet on her own with a young child and so they ended up following a dad back Mexico and and that's where it really was raised and you know she's a US citizen. She has her social security card. The whether she has her burst of I should say, but not all of the documentation she needs to prove her citizenship and so there she is in Mexico and not able to reenter the the country where she's a citizen and where she was born and it's such a stark contrast because since Nafta and and and in the years that followed, there's you give the sense of this enormous amount of business that is rolling back and forth across the border with ease the molecular doors are set up on the Mexican side. The US is taking advantage of cheap Mexican labor, and so the in that sense, the border is very, very porous but here's a woman who is an American citizen. WHO's living feet from the border watching a third border border wall essentially go up. I mean. It's just such a stark contrast of purpose and effect of this border I was really struck by that. It is and I think that's why it's important to note that crossing that's being built now as a commercial crossing because the thing that really stood out to make came up again and again, and all of these conversations I had with so many people is the fact that products move. So freely across the border and people don't. Maybe, more to the point you know workers don't you know and so I think this goes back to the idea of how we've how inter. Connected we've capitalistic systems right we've. We've this phase of globalised capitalism and I think that works very well for the companies that are producing goods. For American consumers it helps price points at which America. Which American consumers purchase things, but it hurts the workers who who make all these items and people who don't actually enjoy. Free movement. As they're supposed to as capitalism promises they they'll have an open an open market I want to ask you about the chapter about Friendship Park I just love this this chapter and for people who don't know actually I didn't know much about Friendship Park this park that sits right on the border south of San Diego where people from both sides. Of the border used to come together for visits and you write quote before the wall before the secondary fence in the primary fence, there were no barriers along the Mexico us border some tell us about Friendship Park. What it was like before it became impossible to just walk across the border who went there why did they go there? What was it like? Yes, sir, you know the the border is has been marked several times throughout history and I. Know We're GonNa have standard Rigas later and he's going to speak well to this but. After the Mexican American war was one of the first chances for the US to mark this this line and we've marked it several times since then and there's been variations in that process along the way each time marked by monuments along the way he never released would've idea fencer a barrier, and that really only started to come into play and small measure and urban areas in the nineteen seventies, and that's when Friendship Park came into existence, and it was really just barbed wire couple of posts. In the sand, it's on a beautiful bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean Pat Nixon was there when they opened Friendship Park and she she lamented the fact that there was a fence at all. They're even just the barbed wire. She's stepped over it to go into Mexico to shake hands with people, and over time it's become more and more built up and this. was in the seventies eighties and Nineties San Diego County was where we saw all the vast majority of apprehensions at the southern border. So over time, we got one fence a friendship park at the bluff overlooking the ocean. We've got two fences, and at present there actually three different fences friendship park, and for a few hours, every weekend people are allowed to go. Past the first fences to the to the very first pro called primary fence stand there and it's a it's huge steel Ballard's with Wire Mesh between them. You can barely make out sort of the imagery the other side of the fence, but people gather there on Saturdays and Sundays to see loved ones to say hello and two ministers put together a bilingual church service on most Sundays This is a really important people a place for people who want to connect with family members on the on the south side of the border. There are a lot of deported veterans there every weekend, but it's also a place of tension. You Know Border Patrol monitors at very closely There's been a lot of incidents there that. Make, border patrol. Uncomfortable with the situation and they've you know we're constantly sort of pulling back on access to the space and the people who've organized the Parker constantly fighting from where access to the park you mentioned the communion service that happens there every week and you tell the story of John Methodist Minister, who actually conducts this cross-border communion ceremony with a brother on the Mexican side Tell me a little bit about him. I was such a lovely story about what he's trying to do there and what he's trying to keep going. Yes John has been doing this church service for many years. Now, with Guillermo and the on this house side of the border there and you know he shows up every Sunday I hiked up to the bluff with him. He's got a backpack with some bread and some some grape juice and and a Bible unfurled all of this a microphone connected to a wireless speaker on the south side of the border and. And they do this church service, which last you know just about twenty minutes or so. I think what are the more sort of affecting moments I experienced while while sort of seeing all of this was the fact that you know they can't share communion or anything like this even even you know the. It's trance substantiated blood of Christ camp passed between the the wire Mesh. Show border patrol wouldn't allow it. Nothing can pass only the only sort of the music coming from the south but everyone has moments throughout the ceremony where they. Stick pinkie up to the wire Mesh. That's about all. You can really get through those small openings in the wire and they sort of touch a pinky pinky and and sort of try to connect that way and I think that that that sort of image in that moment really speaks to to to several things one sort of the human desire to connect of this place but also the difficulty doing. So difficulty that wasn't always there of course because it was. Basically open and I want to talk about some of the forces including nine eleven and operation gatekeeper and a whole bunch of reasons why the border has sort of closed down over over the generations but but just sticking with his friendship park what our border control agents actually worried about I mean was there were drugs passing across that? Is that why the Wire Mesh went up and people can no longer reach out and shake hands and kiss and so on and so forth. That was what Border Patrol said was the reason for having to put up all these barriers. Yeah. That's something John Pushes back on. But that certainly the reason they were giving well, we're talking about D W, Gibson's new book fourteen miles building the border wall. It's a fascinating examination of the US Mexico border and a really a real really interesting sort of meditation on what it is, what a border is, what it keeps out what it let's in what are we lose one? We shut borders down what could we game if we could figure out a way to open them up again, stay with US I'm Anthony, Brooks this is on point. Support for on point and the following message come from MIT, system design and management jointly offered by Mit School of Engineering, and the MIT's Sloan School of management earn a Master's in engineering and management stm educates mid career professionals to solve complex challenges at the intersection of business and technology with over twenty years of on campus and distance education experience. Join a virtual info session on Wednesday September sixteenth from nine to ten am. D. M. DOT MIT DOT Edu. This is on point I'm Anthony. Brooks and I'm here with DWI Gibson his new book fourteen miles building the border wall. We're discussing that it's about his two year investigation of a fourteen mile stretch of the US Mexico a border. Dwi One. Just, one more question about Friendship Park which are talking about before the break you talk about how the sort of openness of that park began to to really changed dramatically after nine eleven you say after the terrorist attack everything became about national security. Yeah this is the point that John who runs the church service really drove home for me because he's been involved with trying to get this, keep this park open for so many years and been living in the area and I think two major marks sort of define the idea of the border security zone. One was right after Nafta we had an operation gatekeeper which was after put in place away for capitalism to sort of still accessible bligh's workforce security measures so that workers couldn't cross the border as easily and then yeah. After nine eleven when everything gets folded into this new agency, the Department of Homeland Security and everything is viewed. Through the Lens everything the border is used viewed through the lens of security and national security. Even though John Aptly points out in the book, there's really no connection whatsoever nor has there ever been a between the the southern border and any of the people that were involved in nine eleven or other terrorist accidents then I think that's one of the places where we really see the idea of xenophobia. Pop into the pop into the picture. Yeah. In fact, some of those hijackers got into the United States through Canada So there's a really sort of unfortunate irony there that all of the focus on security was focused on the southern border when there was no connection to nine eleven Really really interesting and and DWI w make a great point about Operation Gatekeeper which you said was launched after Nafta, and the idea here is to lockdown urban crossings essentially focused on urban crossings. What was the effect of efforts like this to slow the passage of people across urban crossings? What happened? How would they didn't get the effect that they wanted in other words? No. So this is where you see your. Operation Gatekeeper was really meant to fortify the southern border writ large, but most of the resources went into San Diego County and so they started putting up the fencing in in in the heart of downtown Tijuana and San. Isidro there on the north side and you know this is where we see what barriers of the border. Walls barriers, they never ever stop traffic they only diverse. So what you see in the nineties particularly mid late nineties wants all of this is implemented. You see traffic foot traffic people crossing the border all of that being pushed out to the eastern part of the county where it's more desert more rule and much more severe conditions. So this is when we start to see a known deaths at the border those migrants trying to cross. Deaths rising significantly and again I just known it's really hard to measure how many people die in this exercise. But those we know that's when we really start to see those numbers go up. Yeah. So people are determined if people are determined to make the crossing, they're gonNa make it anyway but because it's so difficult, you point out that then they're less likely to go back and more likely to bring their families. So it has the exact reverse effect. Exactly exactly and several people talked about this. In the book you know it was migratory patterns people would come for seasonal work. We had the birth Cerro Program back in the forties and fifties and sixties for agricultural workers, right. So people would come for seasonal work and go back home. It's only when you get operation gatekeeper when you get this sort of post nine eleven world the you start to see these large Mexican populations grow up in big cities around the country because people it was unsafe to keep crossing anymore. Well as promised. He W we're going to hear from some of the people that you talk to in your book someone introduced surge to Dina. He's the mayor of Imperial Beach California. He's also the Executive Director of Wild Coast and nonprofit focused on conserving wildlife and coastal marine ecosystems and an author. His Latest Book is surfing the border and mayor surge to Dina, welcomed on thanks joining us. Great to hear you Anthony Talk You. Yeah. It's good to have you. So I love reading about you and DWI's book. But tell me a little bit how the border has changed since you're KIP. Yeah, I. was a kid and you know I think of stranger things. You know a bunch of longhaired little Surf Rats and Imperial Beach California the last town, the California coast actually riding our bikes friendship park, which is border field state park and throwing our bikes over our Schwinn stingrays over the cable, and then freely riding around Guana a beach suburb in Quanta arrived in buying on. So there was no border patrol there was no barrier there's just a cable or or bleier. Pat Nixon is w talked about Stepdauger at one point that was in the late seventies now, of course, if I. go down to surf that area and it's incredibly beautiful friendship park overlooks the Pacific Ocean. You can see Dolphins Pods of dolphins surfing the ocean it's. National Wildlife. Refuge the north we have a a a two one s trae where the Tijuana River empties out and then actually the Coronado islands off applies to. Our Mexican. National Parks. So incredibly physically beautiful. But now, with this giant border, multi-tiered border various, what's a very different place because of that barrier but still a very beautiful place but very different changes. But what I was a kid right and what did we lose what we lose with that wall going up and the kind of experience you had as as you said, a long hair did you call yourself a surf rat. What what are, what are we lose losing that ability to just step across the border whether Schwinn bikes and move around? Well what we've lost in the border area is really discussion of what it takes to have a secure border, and so ironically what we have giant metal barriers and people are tunneling under. In the meantime. Mesa area east of you're probably like ten miles east of other beach in our town extensive they right to the border. And then people torching their way through it and more importantly by people happening is that now people are taking Ponga's fiberglass gifts controlled by the cartels out in the ocean, and you can see those those skiffs filled with people arriving in Santa Barbara the, beach, La Hoya some of the wealthiest suburbs communities on the planet are now receiving the people that are bypassing this giant border barrier on. Of course, that's of concern to the Coast Guard, and others who are chasing these folks using radar dish radars on the coast, the track these fiberglass stiffs escaping this massive multi-billion dollar Ma barrier that allows toxic waste and sewage actually be dumped through it are. So that's that's a big concern of us because we're being hammered by. Toxic Pollution Tijuana everyday barrier as a spent more and more money in the border area. They spent less and less attention on the sewage and pollution problem that permeates both land and water I know that this issue around pollution is a big concern of yours. How do you? What's the solution to this problem? What? What are you advocating for? Just to be clear to the city of two million people and so while the US government over the last three years has prioritize massive wall are barrier construction. The fact the that the sewer system of wants collapsed we've advocated a whole series of infrastructure. Between Tijuana Mexico to capture those flows intrigue. And Work Practically where obviously the next government to address. But Ironically, the people love impacted by this position been really sort of neglected here are are the US government's own border patrol agents in Navy seals the border patrol agents were patrolling the border and getting sick in the navy seals who have new have now One billion dollars still training base just north edge of our city and they're getting sick as well as well as resident. So we've advocated for infrastructure be belt, but it's a little hard to have that conversation happened with D. H.. A. For example, in the Navy, when the only priority is to build a border wall, luckily it through the US MCA process, our congressional delegation negotiated with the White House. To get the money appropriated for that. That's taking a long time. In the meantime they're actually planning on building a hundred and fifty million dollar. Lol. Through the Tijuana. River right now, the river channels open ended I was on a tour. Where Senator Feinstein's actually chief-of-staff recently, and we were flabbergasted to learn this wall will be underway where they told us. They will be monitoring the weather on the Internet, and then when it starts running open, the floodgates that didn't seem to be a very science or engineering driven solution to me but that's really right now the priority instead of fixing these gaping issues in the border that impact security for us. Well surged Edina mayor of Imperial Beach. California thank you so much for joining us today. I'm really grateful to have heard from you. Thank you so much and surged. Edina is someone who shows up in w Gibson's new book fourteen miles building the border wall and. W just to bring you back into the conversation listening to surge Dina. One of the things I take away from that brief interview is that the wall sucks up so much energy so much focus so much money from other issues that really affect people on both sides of the border pollution. But that was heard it there. That was one of the reasons I was so excited to have surge in the book because he's so good it saying, okay. Look. If we're GONNA make the border all about security let's think about the idea of security in a more expansive way. It's not just militarizing this area. It's how did the people who live around here feel secure in where they live and where they work they feel safe in the environment there and living in and. I think that's essential and he also looks at the border not as a place where we divide things but serge talk. So well, in the book about the border, a magnet is a force that draws people together to solve problems and I think you see him trying to do that with Tijuana River estuary and all the pollution, and he mentioned sort of lifting those the proposal to lift gates when the weather changes I walk through that sewage water with border patrol agents. Who pointed out that on sunny days blue skies overhead you still have water coming through the gates that they're there now and that just indicates to you it's not always rain water sewage water and a lot of that's coming from the American mckeon Ras the factories in Mexico one of the people we hear from in your book is Lance Lynn Warr he's a self proclaimed tunnel. Rat that's a border patrol agent charged with finding mapping and destroying a drug smuggling tunnels across the border you interviewed him for your book and we have a little bit of tape that we wanna play from that Lenoir says, he says that he's adamant that most of the tunnels aren't sophisticated or any great feats of engineering, but he does find something to admire in them. If anything is to admired. By our adversary or the result of these tunnels in there is persistence and audacity. Those. Are the two things constantly amazed of the fact that somebody can. Subsist underground in a confined space this big that whatever the case may be limited oxygen because I mean, let's put it this way. They're ventilated these things with leaf blowers and four dryers my guys that's Lance Lynn Warr self-proclaimed proclaimed tunnel rat, a border patrol agent who's charged with finding mapping and destroying drug smuggling tunnels across the Border Dwi. What else did you learn from Lenoir and other folks whose job it is to enforce that border? Yes, two things really stand out with Lance one is you know getting, he's found tunnels ninety feet deep into the earth So the footing for most fencing goes at most six feet into the earth. So it just shows that the barriers are never going to completely cut off. You know whatever the US government wants them to cut off and yeah this fact about human ingenuity you know that that people will will do what they need to do to get across the border. The thing that really really really stood out to me though about what land said was that if you have a successful tunnel going across the this international line, it means you. Have, cooperation on the Mexican side and the US side, it is a national effort and I think this gets at the heart of what we Americans often lose in the discussion that we bear much of the responsibility for for whatever crime is being interdicted at the border. We supply the the the drug market for the goods that are going across the border, and we supply the firearms, the guns, there's One gun store in Mexico, it's incredibly difficult to buy guns, but it's very easy to buy guns and places like Arizona and Texas and bring them back across the border, and so we need to to reckon with the fact that this is. These are things that this country contributes to the issues at the border and lances work really really gets the heart of that I want to touchdown on the other side of the Border Nicole Ramos joins us from Tijuana Mexico. She's the director of the border right project. Ultra Lada which works with asylum seekers preparing to present themselves to US authorities and Nicole Ramos. Thanks for joining us. Today. Hi thank you for having me. I should stress obviously Nicole we learned about you because you are also a character in w Gibson's book, but give us a sense how the pandemic has affected the community where you work your the folks who are hoping to seek asylum. What the border is essentially close to them. They're not able to present themselves to US authorities to seek asylum. So our work instead of helping people to present themselves involves helping people to hide themselves from persecutors that may be pursuing them shifting legal services to providing humanitarian aid sanitation stations for shelters, medications, and food, and we're not seeing any clients in the office in order to keep people safe. So all of our staff. And volunteers that come from all over the country that would be in Tijuana normally are working with asylum seekers in. Tijuana. The telephone I see I see and is there while the border is closed and and the effort during the pandemic for people to seek asylum essentially shutdown. What does that mean are? Is there a bigger and bigger population on the Mexican side of the border of folks waiting hoping to get into the US? The population continues to grow up people keep trying to enter without inspection because the ports of entry are closed but border officials repeatedly turn them back in violation of international law, which prevents the return of refugees to territory where they fear persecution. What is interesting about this is that US citizens can come and leave Mexico without any problem. So they can come for pleasure trips to the beach to visit the Red Light district but asylum seekers who are fleeing for their lives cannot enter so that clearly I was going to ask you what inconsistencies you see regarding, who can cross the border and who can't I guess that would be top of the list. Absolutely because the US citizens that are re entering the United States, they're not being subject to any health screenings, and if the purpose of the border closure is to prevent the entry of persons on the territory where there's high rates of covid nineteen, one would think that would extend to some sort of health inspection, of US citizens and yet it doesn't So what are your hopes regarding the population that you represent in in the months ahead? What what, what would you like to see change that would provide some help and essentially allow them to at least get close to an immigration officer and plead their case for asylum. The US government is one of the most powerful and one of the most wealthiest governments in the world, and it is simply not credible that with all the expertise that we have that we cannot figure out a way to safely process refugees who are quite literally fleeing for their lives. So would I would hope is that the border open to allow for the processing of these claims in an orderly fashion, which is completely possible however, the president and Stephen Miller and others in administration are making very clear their. With regard to asylum through this border closure and the new proposed changes to the asylum role, and that intent is to stop immigration because it threatens their nationalist white supremacy OWL's and ideology pouring. Nicole Ramos Director of the Border Rights Project low to allow don't in Tijuana. Nicole. Ramos thank you so much for joining. US are very grateful. Thank you so much for having me on Dwi Gibson standby we're discussing. New Book Fourteen Miles building the border wall. We're going to take a break. We'll be right back. I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point. Term. This is on point I'm Anthony Brooks we're talking about some of the challenges facing the country, and as always we are looking for solutions to those challenges. So we want to know what you are seeing in the city or town where you live, what are your family and friends sharing with you tell us your story or leave us your question at six, one, seven, three, five, three, zero, six, eight, three again that six, one, seven, three, five, three, zero, six, eight, three. You can also reach US via twitter or facebook at on point radio and you can always continue the conversation and get the on point podcast at on point radio, dot? Org. This hour we're talking to w Gibson. He's author of fourteen miles building the border wall, which is the result of a two year investigation reporting project that he did along fourteen miles of the US Mexico Border Dwi I wanted to get you to sort of follow up on what we heard from Nicole Ramos before the break obviously in a sort of an impassioned plea to make it possible for the people that she represents to plead their cases for asylum. What's your view on sort of you know immigration reform, and what has to happen to make the system work better that has taken up so much oxygen in Washington with very little results over the years. You know I I think it actually an interesting way mirrors the conversation we're having about policing. Now I mean because if you look at the history of US immigration policy, we essentially wind our first one hundred years is a nation without any immigration laws. We had laws of potatoes citizen, but no laws pertaining to who could into the country until eighteen seventy five when we get the page act which keeps Chinese women out of the country, and then a few years after that the Chinese Exclusion Act which keeps Chinese workers entirely out of the country, and this was driven by senators in the west who were feeling threatened. By the growth in the population out there they aligned with senators from the south who were hoping in the future to to quell the rights of the recently released people who had been enslaved and and so you see that and there's an unbroken line all the way up into the twentieth century when we start to get a lot of immigration laws in the nineteen twenties around World War One, a lot of those were fanned by Eugenicist Jenex, we have to remember got its start in in the US and we exported out into the world as well, and so this idea of maintaining America as a predominantly western European country. Is the thing that we've been wrestling with in our immigration policy over the course of our history and I think that's the thing that we're confronting right now in the issue, we're trying to correct that and the the idea of you know how capitalism has really just taken over the system I I I don't think that we understand quite how much we reckoned with how much the nation state our country has. Already surrendered to capitalism, I think that we need to sort of confront that and and deal with it accordingly in terms of protecting workers and by surrendering to capitalism I mean in a sense, and this gets to sort of one of the central ironies which I think we touched on the beginning of the show. But by surrendering to capitalism, we have essentially surrendered to the idea that borders are somewhat meaningless, right? Well this is the thing we speak out both sides of our mouth. So so we regard to moving products. Yes. Meaningless. Let's do it. Let's get stuff mood around the globe so we can sell it but in terms of letting people move freely you know we try to put up all kinds of barriers. One really quick example that I think really puts. This into focus is there's a huge Haitian population tijuana and in San Diego. As well, they had a massive earthquake as we all know in two, thousand, ten in Haiti But those those Haitians at arrived in Tijuana they didn't arrive in two thousand ten. When do they arrive? They arrived over twenty thousand of them in two, thousand sixteen and that's because. Brazil had just handed out forty-three thousand work visas to build the Olympic facilities and the Haitians flock there after the earthquake and they were a lot of them were already migrating looking for stability in their lives, and so they've found refuge in Brazil for a little while. So they could do the work that was needed. There was that work was completed. Brazil. Didn't renew those visas and they had to leave and find a new place just shows you how work drives. So much of the migration that we see around the world. Well d-w standby because I want to go to stand Rodriguez. Now, who shows up in your book fascinating character he's a member of the Coom Kootenai nation, and he's the director of Kuria Community College and he joins us from San Diego Stan Rodriguez thanks so much for joining us. Okay. Hello everybody. It's really good to have you. So just for our listeners who who don't know I wanNA talk a little bit about the Kumiai tribe whose settlements. Back some twelve thousand years on both sides of what is now the US Mexican border. So Stan, give us a sense of what the border has done to this tribe. But thank you for letting me speak to this. For our people, we say we've been in this area San Diego, northern Bas since time immemorial. We remember when? We have village sites that are under the Pacific Ocean right now just right off the coast and we have A. On the the desert again period county, we have fish sites that were were were made with stones with desert out. So this speaks to how long we've been in this area. Well. When encroachment came first with the Spanish way. Then with the Mexican. Waves then with the American wave, it it. It wrecked havoc upon our people and wants the Mexican. American war was was completed the international border with place. Well, it went. Right through Kootenai territory cut basically our our our traditional lands in half. Now. As. What said earlier the the border. Prior was fairly course go back and forth but as More, the United States wanted more structure and it seemed like it was do 'cause then phobia they you know the Customs and it became more and more difficult to cross and recross. Now, the problem with that for our people is because. For for for the Kumiai people this land here northern Baja in San Diego County. This is our holy land in creation story at talks about the different mountains, different places that we go, and there's there's there's places where we go to grade, there's places where we go to. San Diego has more Kunai reservations are more reservations than any other county in the country. There's over eighteen reservations here in San Diego and there's another six reservations in Baja, California Mexico. So To be able to to cross and recross is is is very important for us and and stand. That's gotten a lot harder I. Imagine this important. Thing that this important trip that members of the KU nation make from one side of the border to the other has gotten a lot more difficult, right? Exactly. Because an example with me when somebody pats wave singers will come and sing all night for that person things will be done. We support each other but then with the border, it makes it more difficult to coors in. It's very difficult for them to come across they need to get either alleged visa or or or a pass. Or like to five days so that we can do cultural cultural things, but it's it's becoming more and more problematic. Another thing that happened to is in Baja, which is in Mexico they speak. Spanish Spanish is is the main language spoken here in the United States English as the main language now. Prior to the waves of encroachment, there were over fifty thousand is on both sides of the border. Around nineteen hundred nineteen o one, there were listed as one thousand, listen thousand almost all all the people were gone. We built up our numbers we have approximately four, thousand, six, hundred, and twenty three Kumi is on both sides of the border now with that said. Of that number, there's approximately forty one people who still speak the language and in order for a language to to be vibrant it needs to be used if becomes more and more problematic if you have a coup on the Mexican side of the border sticks and has nobody is speak to. Somebody on the United States it gets difficult for that for the for the cultural connections to take. Nicer. So another another. Essentially another way that the culture is being threatened in is at risk of being erased essentially Stand I want to ask you one last thought though, and I know this cuddles up in Dwi's book and that is. The. People have been around for some twelve thousand years the US border not nearly as long. Can you talk a little bit about that in terms of how that creates a certain perspective that you have on this border? Sure you know for for our people we say. Twelve thousand years it's been documented twelve thousand. We say it goes back even farther. With. That said the board that that's been that's been put here it's making our own people Illegal aliens or Abyan in our own land. When they come. From. Baja. Come across staying within our territory. They're basically classified as aliens and when we go across the Bah we are you know where? This is our territory. And to Put It in in context have you ever heard the name Qana Oh? Yes. It's a cool me I work. Not I didn't know. By. The Ocean. Have you ever of the have you ever heard of the well, the Beer Takata you. have. Well it's talks about the Italian pigs. In coup means it's old man who chops wood, but there's a Lotta, Kunia and that's on both sides of the border. So it it speaks to the third to our our our our cultural roots within the area and the difficulty that we have and and and and keeping our our cultural live, our language, alive and Our our people intact right we'll stand Rodriguez he's a member of the Ku- nation and he's director of Kumi. Community College he joined us today from San Diego Stan Rodriguez. Thank you so much for joining us. We really appreciated hearing from you. Many. Thanks. Let me get on. Yeah, it was great. So Dwi, I'd love to sort of get more from you on a on what you heard in stands talk it's it's very moving this idea of a culture that's thousands of years old sort of being bisected by this border. Yeah I I think it should be humbling for all of us right because we Americans tend to really think about the border as this this this thing that's been around forever. So permanent I mean that's what a thirty foot barriers supposed to tell us right. But but stand more than anyone I talked to I. Think Really Changed. My Perspective on borders are affected at are made my imagination grow because he he really pointed out to me that the border is not static it's moved so many times over history even after the US established it and I think we need to really hold that are Magic Asians and. And and track that point in. So many ways your reporting on the wall brings to light sort of the same kind of contradiction again and again and again, and again that the wall doesn't really respond to reflect the real world or the real challenges. It's a wall that seeks to keep people out when people always find a way to get through a wall that creates a border when business and technology are essentially borderless it's a wall that would. Go, just a few feet into the earth, but we already heard that people know how to tunnel nine hundred feet down underneath it. So again and again, and again, you come up with these wonderful observations about this wall just seems to be completely disconnected from the kind of reality that we're all living. Absolutely, and you know I think it's captured in the word wall I mean think about it, and this is something that that occurred to me. Several Times as I was working on this I saw so many barriers at at the border but none of them actually resembled a wall right and I think that idea of a wall really taps into the mythology behold as Americans in our mind. Again of sort of our, our place in the world are importance in the world are permanence in. The world and I think an even our sense of responsibility I mean think about how do we define what we call the American dream the American dream when get down to it is a white picket fence. It's private property right and that white picket fence just like the idea of a border wall, it establishes our achievement and establishes our sense of responsibility. Right our sense of responsibility Americans has always been a focus on ourselves, not necessarily on how we might contribute to a community. But how we might survive in that community on our own terms, pull yourself up by your bootstraps right and so the idea of offense, a white picket fence who are wall the border helps us to find that very limited sense of responsibility and and Standard Rigas is so good at making us think about responsibility in a more expansive way an idea of building community and building a civil society. So Dwi, we've got some comments on facebook from our listeners hector us a veto rights the wall. Does nothing to improve conditions in Mexico or Central, America that compel people to risk everything to come here too stupid idea that is a massive waste of money and a great harm to the ecology and wildlife. On the other hand we have Michael Richards here who wrote, we are not an open borders lawless nation. In fact, every time citizens have had the opportunity to vote on any part of the issue they voted against Amnesty or permanent residency we want enforcement. So Dwi respond to that concern. That there are folks out there. who say we gotTa have that wall because otherwise if you have open borders, we just lose control of our country. Yes. I think it's about creating ways for people to come through legally and an orderly fashion when you talk to people in law enforcement particularly customs and border. Protection you know. Let's not forget that the vast majority of crying that has interdicted at the border is interdicted at ports of entry by customs officers, not by border patrol agents. So we need more crossings in fact, commercial crossings but. Crossings that are available to citizens to us to make family visits to make cultural exchanges to to to move about freely. In the more, we can organize those crossings and create A policies allow people to move more freely. people will be able to do. So legally in an orderly fashion DWI, you grew up in San Diego how did the proximity to the border affect the way you thought about it? Growing up. I actually grew up just north of San Diego. County Orange County, but it's it's an interesting. It's interesting because I think. The Way Southern California works for large is is really largely divorced from the border I. Mean I fixated on one of the freeways in San Diego County call the eight freeway which runs parallel to the border, just about fifteen miles north, and I say rather bluntly, that I think that that fifteen miles between the border and the freeway is really worked as sort of a buffer zone US controlled buffer zone because the population south freeway is is largely lat next and and dynamic and people from all around the world but north of the freeway. The population becomes much more white, much more affluent and people live their lives as though they weren't that close to the border. Easy time being being agnostic to the border and I think that the more we can interact with it and interact with people who had affects the more will understand. Well, your book helps us do that in a big way Dwi Gibson, he's author of fourteen miles building the border wall Dwi. Thanks so much. It was such a pleasure talking to you. Thank you Anthony Listeners you can continue the conversation. You can get the on point podcast at our website on point radio dot org and you can follow us on twitter. Find US on facebook at on point radio I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point.

US Mexico Border Patrol San Diego County San Diego Anthony Brooks w Gibson Tijuana Mexico California Border Dwi Friendship Park America Border Rights Project San Tijuana Mexico Nicole Ramos director Pat Nixon president
Democracy Now! 2020-04-01 Wednesday

Democracy Now! Audio

59:01 min | 8 months ago

Democracy Now! 2020-04-01 Wednesday

"From New York the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States this is democracy now one hundred thousand to a quarter of a million that's the US death toll. The White House is now predicting. I'm going to my hope. I'm Michael L. As well he should be properly always should be working in. Prime meant to get good from after Amazon warehouse worker. Chris Small's helped organize a strike to protest unsafe working conditions. He was fire. We'll get his response and three workers at a large. Ups facility near Boston. Tested positive. Two dozen or porn tape details about the infections were only shared by the Workers Union. We'll speak with a twenty year. Ups worker an organizer with teamsters for a Democratic Union then today is April first millions across the country. Don't have the money to pay rent to reduce our rent by minimum fifty percent beginning April first this Wednesday with the possibility up to one hundred percent reduction or forgiveness for those who have lost all forms of income and won't be able to pay. Finally we speak with a woman who says I'm nine months pregnant and I'm bringing my baby into a world. I no longer understand. We failed to factor in you know plans or global pandemic threatening to shut down the system just a few weeks before my due date all that and more coming up. Welcome to democracy now democracy now dot org the warrant piece report. I'm Amy Goodman the White House. Corona Virus Task Force projected Tuesday between one hundred thousand and two hundred forty thousand people will die of covert nineteen in the United States but only if the quarantine measures are kept in place President Donald Trump this week extended social distancing guidelines through the end of April said. The worst is yet to come. We're going to go through a very tough two weeks and then hopefully as the experts are predicting as I think. A lot of predicting having studied it so hard. You're GONNA start seeing some real light at the end of the tunnel but this is going to be a very painful very very painful two weeks. President trump said without efforts to mitigate the spread of the corona virus. Up to two point two million Americans could die of Kovic. Nineteen the grim assessment stood in stark contrast to trump's repeated claims in recent weeks that the virus is under control and that it would miraculously go away by April as of today April first the United States has the highest number of cove in nineteen cases in the world with over one hundred eighty eight thousand infected. Of course the numbers are expected to be. How far higher because of the lack of access to tests and over four thousand dead and the true rate of infection is not known here in New York City the at the center of the US crisis the death toll from cove. It is nearly eleven hundred and continuing to CLIMB FEMA the Federal Emergency Management Agency is dispatching more than two hundred fifty ambulances eighty-five refrigerated trucks to New York to serve as temporary morgues the intercept reports prisoners at rikers island. Jail are being offered six dollars an hour and personal protective equipment if they agree to dig mass graves at a public cemetery on hard island. The Corona virus continues to spread rapidly at rikers or at least one hundred sixty seven prisoners and one hundred thirty seven staff members have tested positive in central park and emergency field. Hospital began operations Tuesday treating spillover patients from nearby Mount Sinai Hospital. The effort is led by the Christian fundamentalists groups. Samaritan's purse whose leader Franklin Graham has variously as Islamic phonebook anti choice anti lgbtq preacher and has kept his university open New York Mayor Bill De Blasio has promised to send aides to monitor the group to prevent discrimination against patients nationwide. The United States has confirmed over one hundred eighty eight thousand cases of Cova Nineteen and over four thousand deaths. California hospitalizations have doubled over the past four days with intensive care cases. Tripling in that time. California health officials predict the state's peak of cove in nineteen cases will be lower than new. York's because stringent social distancing policies were adopted. Sooner in Las Vegas five hundred on House. People were displaced from a Catholic charities homeless shelter after a resident tested positive for covert Nineteen City and county officials have since set up an open air encampment painting lines on the pavement of the CASHMAN center. Parking lot to keep in house people six feet apart. Meanwhile thousands of Las Vegas Hotel rooms remain empty during the lockdown in Chicago. A COVERT ONE THOUSAND. Nine unit nurse said she resigned. Monday after hospital. Administrators barred her from wearing an n ninety five protective mask. She brought with her to work. The nurse Marris Vera. Posted this video on social media in five mask. It's hold my manager. I understand. We're short on supplies. Let me protect myself. Let me feel safe whole to and the way things are looking. This isn't GonNa get any better prepared nurses in Austin Texas. Twenty eight young adults tested positive after spring break trip to southern Baja California Mexico with dozens more under public health investigation. Meanwhile Russia has promised to deliver a planeload of personal protective equipment and other medical supplies after president trump placed a call to Amir Putin on Monday. Federal Reserve Economists Are Warning. The Corona virus pandemic could push the US unemployment rate above thirty two percent by the end of June higher than the peak jobless rate of twenty five percent during the Great Depression. The news comes thousands of tents around the country. Calling for immediate rent cancellation later in the broadcast. We'll hear from an organizer of today's April. I Rent Strike and we'll hear from. Ups Drivers and Amazon Workers Organizing for safer working conditions. It's the pandemic. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus has joined thousands of medical professionals and immigrant rights groups and demanding immigration and customs enforcement. That's ice release all prisoners from immigration. Jails at least four asylum seekers and five ice agents have tested positive for Cova nineteen raising fears for the more than thirty seven thousand immigrants jailed and crowded facilities across the United States in Louisiana the intercept reports women jailed at the privately owned South Louisiana Ice Processing Center terrified. They've been exposed to a person ill with corona virus. The women flashed handmade signs to a video visitation camera describing an Ecuadoran woman who worked in the kitchen who was given oxygen and carried away on a Gurney after presenting symptoms consistent with Cova nineteen meanwhile more than eighty immigrant prisoners at the northwest detention center in Tacoma Washington. Continue their hunger. Strike to protest conditions inside the privately-owned jail demanding their immediate release reunification with their families and temporary humanitarian visas on Tuesday. Supporters surrounded the Immigration Jail in a caravan of cars honking their horns in support of the hunger strikers buzzfeed reports. California plans to release thirty five hundred nonviolent prisoners on parole in the next sixty days to try to reduce prison overcrowding over California's total prison population is about one hundred. Twenty two thousand. This would be still the largest mass release of US prisoners since the pandemic began on the captain of the USS Theodore. Roosevelt pleaded with US Navy officials to allow thousands of sailors to disembark to prevent the spread of the corona virus aboard the nuclear powered aircraft carrier. We're more than a hundred. Us sailors have tested positive. Captain Brett Cruiser warned in a letter to the Navy's Pacific fleet quote. We are not at war sailors. Do not need to die if we do not act now. We are failing to properly take care of our most trusted asset our sailors said CNN reports sailors aboard a second aircraft carrier the USS. Ronald Reagan have also tested positive. Meanwhile in Florida Republican Governor Rhonda Santa's has warned the operators of a pair of stricken cruise ships not to seek refuge in his state telling Fox News. He doesn't want to quote see people dumped in southern Florida right now. Four people have died on board one of the cruise ships. Dozens more have reported flu like symptoms. This comes as Florida governor. Just Santa's has defied calls to order. Oh residents to remain at home. Even though Florida is home to one of the nation's largest populations of people sixty five and older in Italy cities nationwide observed a minute of silence at noon Tuesday to remember victims of the corona virus. Pandemic Italy has reported the world's highest death toll from the disease with eight hundred. Thirty seven deaths in the last twenty four hours alone bringing the total to over twelve thousand with. Italy's hospitals completely overwhelmed. Germany has continued to receive corona virus. Patients Spain is reported. Its highest daily Corona virus toll with eight hundred forty nine new deaths over the last twenty four hours one nurse in Madrid posting on social media said the official number of confirm Cova nineteen cases. Now over one hundred thousand is far lower than the true toll. Coming to that point we are completely over slowed us. Health workers are exhausted physically and emotionally. Because this is awful. This is an infernal. The numbers that I'm seeing on television are false. Loose balls are not testing people in Greece in asylum seeker tested positive for. Cova nineteen after stay in a crowded refugee camp north of Athens. That's home to twenty five hundred people in Russia. A doctor who gave President Vladimir Putin a tour of Moscow's Corona Virus Hospital unit last week has himself tested positive. Putin's says he'll begin. Holding government meetings by video conference in Brazil authorities have set up field hospitals for cove in nineteen patients and some of the world's most storied soccer stadiums residents of high rise apartment buildings in cities like Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro continued to hold nightly protests from their windows and balconies banging pots and pans and calling for the resignation of the far right president. You're both Sinato. Who has repeatedly dismissed cove in nineteen as a little flu and urged Brazilians to get back to work in. Nigeria Africa's largest city. Lagos home to twenty one million people fell quiet Tuesday as a stay at home. Order went into effect. Many residents say. They're more worried about starving than they are. Contracting Cova. Nineteen so don't buy food is always talk last two weeks. We have keeps our glamour. That's living with us so it's not easy because the monitor us to buy it we don't have is no in Uganda. Police arrested at least three Catholic priest. After they celebrated mass Sunday in violation of a ban. On religious gatherings during the pandemic on the outskirts of the capital Kampala police raided a shelter for homeless. Lgbtq youths arresting twenty people for allegedly violating quarantine. Those arrested were reportedly beaten and forced to take a walk of shame through the village Uganda. Lgbtq campaigners say they were targeted because of their sexual orientation authorities in Indonesia's second largest city Surabaya have deployed drones to spray clouds of disinfectant and residential neighborhoods. Even though health officials warned the chemicals are likely to cause irritation and respiratory problems in media news vanity fair reports it executives at Fox. News are worried they could face lawsuits from viewers over the far right cable. Networks misleading coverage of the corona virus pandemic for weeks the virus spread Fox News host portrayed the pandemic as a hoax designed to damage president. Trump's reelection prospects meanwhile CNN's primetime host. Chris Cuomo has tested positive for Cova nineteen on Tuesday cuomo broadcast from his home basement. Where he says he'll remain in isolation until he recovers his brother. The New York Governor Andrew. Cuomo wishes him well. Texas will be allowed to enforce its abortion ban during the corona virus outbreak. After an appeals court judge overturned the ruling of a federal judge who put a temporary hold on the abortion ban just hours before Texas's abortion ban was put in place last week as part of the states plan to stem the spread of the corona virus claiming abortions are quote nonessential procedures in environmental news. The trump administration's finalized its rollback of Obama era fuel efficiency standards for new. Us vehicles and a massive blow against efforts to mitigate the worst effects of the climate crisis the rollbacks will allow US vehicles to admit some one billion more tons of carbon dioxide than previously allowed equivalent to at least a fifth of annual US emissions and secretary of state. Mike pompeo Tuesday proposed a gradual lifting of economic sanctions and Venezuela if opposition leaders and some members of President Nicolas Madura political party form an interim government thinking it would put the elected members of the National Assembly representing both sides would create a an acceptable council of state to serve as the transitional government until presidential and National Assembly elections could be held. We hope within six to twelve months the proposal would require both Venezuelan President Maduro and the Venezuelan Opposition Leader Guido. To step aside a similar strategy was used in one thousand nine hundred nine ahead of the US invasion of Panama Venezuela's Foreign Ministry called the proposal. Quote an effort to win geopolitical advantage in the midst of a frightening. Global Pandemic Unquote. The move comes less than a week. After the trump administration indicted Madero and charges narcoterrorism an international cocaine trafficking and those are some of the headlines. This is democracy now democracy now dot org the warrant piece report. I'm Amy Goodman. We're broadcasting from the epicenter of pandemic here in the United States. Right here in New York City joined by my co host one Gonzales from his home in New Brunswick New Jersey. The state with the second most documented infections in the United States wanted so good to see you. Although I wish you a right here next to me. In these times of the pan-demic it's so critical that we stay apart To protect ourselves our community and the community at large the same in good day to you and welcome to all of our listeners and viewers across the country and around the world. Well the White House is now estimating that between one hundred thousand and a quarter of a million people could die from the Corona Virus Pandemic. Some of those most concerned about exposure to the highly infectious virus are workers on the front lines of grocery stores and delivery services. This is in addition to all the attention to the doctors and nurses and the staffs of hospitals across the country on Monday. Workers who fulfill orders for instance card staged a protest to demand better working protections and hazard pay also Monday Amazon Warehouse. Workers Stanton Island walked off the job Amazon. Fired one of them in response and we'll get his response. Later in the broadcast Amazon. Says they fired him? Because he wasn't doing social distancing he tells a different story on Tuesday wholefoods workers organized a national sickout protests demanding double normal wages for workers hazard pay for working on the front lines during a pandemic. This comes as three workers large. Us UPS facility near Boston. Have tested positive. And two dozen more have been quarantined for more. We're joined from his home in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania by Richard Hooker Secretary Treasurer of the Philadelphia. Teamsters local six twenty three the first African American to ever lead the hundred one year old union after being elected secretary treasurer in November Richard Hooker as worked at ups for twenty years. We welcome you Richard to democracy. Now can you describe what was happening? Where you worked. What kind of access do you have to protective gear to washing? Your hands described the scenario will in the beginning of it all. There was no access to being cleaned. Bathrooms some bathrooms had running water. No hot water. Where do you work at the airport facility in Philadelphia keep going and describing? What was happening there so what was happening was like I said. The bathrooms were was not cleaned No running water third everywhere facilities. Were a mess. Trash everywhere dirt everywhere We took pictures. We sent it to the company. Let them know. Hey this is. This is an issue that we're having here and we need some help and all the response that we will get was that the the the government deemed ups essential and we would keep working so we kept going. We filed grievances on under contract. You know sanitation as safety are big issue so we filed against the company with that still no response on new communication. We sent letters to our governor hand Pennsylvania to get some help. says we are deemed essential. We need to make sure that our people are protected during this pandemic. That wasn't happening. So that's why I'll be sent letters to the to to the governor. Still no no response from the company. Same Old same old business as usual and so we did a interview on a National News Network. He got a little traction but still the company refused communicate but what they were doing and the members were very very upset anxious concerned because we are so essential day. We need to make should it out. People are protected and now filled with disposable so We did a another national news broadcast and we laid it all out in the live. We told me this what was going on the bathrooms pictures video of the water. Not even being able to be turned on trash everywhere to Priscilla's not being cleaned. We kept doing that. We talked about it on live. Tv everywhere then all of a sudden now. The company wanted to sit down and talk and come up with some ideas and plans so this past Monday just Monday. We had a sit down meeting with the president of our district Mrs Kim and she gave us her commitment in the company's commitment that they would communicate with us every everything they were doing Cleaning the bathrooms will be a priority making sure. There was going to be social distancing making sure the water was run. Make sure there was multiple cleaning crews coming in the cleaner facilities constantly Unfortunately even though there's been some progress is not enough on still no social distancing. Some members not getting supplies that they need. The communication has gotten better. I'm so I'll be relaying some more information to power that be to keep this. Keep this thing going but again. There's still a big disconnect between what they're saying and then what's really going on operation members risky just Richard Hooker given the the fact that so many billions of Americans are forced to stay home. I would assume that there has been a huge increase in the work that ups and other delivery companies have. What did you notice any change from the time that most Americans were told to stay in place and stay at home and how the company dealt with the workers before and after the pandemic exploded the there has been an increase in residential deliveries. Not so much in the business because a lot of businesses you guys know close but when people sit at home do a lot more ordering sold. The residential part has really skyrocketed now. There hasn't been a a big difference. In what the company has done before this pandemic or during it is still business as usual is is not a lot of less charter to get our members supplies they need. It's not been a really. There's not been a concern on their part. Even Donald come out on his head and they tried to downplay. What's really going on on from our standpoint. It hasn't been enough and to our members is definitely not enough because like you guys mentioned. There's been three confirmed cases up in Boston. But we have two confirmed cases here in Philadelphia one in Organ Avenue Building and one in the Gel and again find information before they wouldn't tell us anything and so we had to keep fighting fighting fighting pushing pushing pushing just to get the information super Our members know what's going on so it's still been saying they're going to keep doing what they're doing it it. It seems it always has been traffic over people profit over people but us as a union. We're not profit based MEMBERSHIP BASE CAMP ON MEMBERS. And that's what this is all about our members reach your thank you so much for being with us. We're going to continue this discussion on the other side of the break. As well with David Levin Richard Hooker as Secretary Treasurer The Philadelphia. Teamsters local. Six twenty three has worked. Ups for twenty years when we come back David Levin lead organizer with teamsters for a Democratic Union and coordinator the UPS teamsters United Campaign. Stay with US and stay safe. Richard alone together by Jazz trumpeter and composer Wallace Roney who died March thirty first of cove. Nineteen he was fifty. Nine years old. This is democracy now. I mean me Goodman in New York. Juan Gonzalez is in New Jersey. And as we've reported at least three workers at the large ups facility near Boston tested positive. Two dozen more have been quarantined details about the infections were shared by the workers. Union teamsters local twenty-five Union President Sean. O'brien said in a statement. Ups was quote refusing to provide critical information to its workers regarding positive and presumptive positive Cova nineteen cases in that facility for more. We continue to look at organizing efforts by workers on the front lines. We're joined from his home in Philadelphia. By David Levine lead organizer with teamsters for a Democratic Union coordinator of the UPS teamsters United Campaign. I'm David we just have a few minutes. And we'd like you to link what's going on with. Ups and the Union negotiations with United Postal Service with them rather without with ups with what's going on at Amazon and INSTA- car the people who are protesting outside demanding that they have to have a safe workplace too. Well thanks for having me so much You know Amazon workers raising the exact same worker. The same issues that Richard was just talking about net. Ups workers across the country are raising a lack of personal protective equipment. Unsanitary conditions not being informed When when a CO worker tests positive the workplace not being sanitized properly these after someone test positive these are all CDC and Osha guidelines They're not being followed. And we need to hold these corporations accountable you know. Ups and Amazon are competitors but ups workers an Amazon workers are not. We share the same concerns. We have the same corporations that we have to hold accountable so one of the things that we did this teamsters for a Democratic Union in our ups teamsters United Campaign last night we launched a national petition specifically reaching out to ups teamsters around the country to call for the reinstatement of Chris Malls who I guess you have coming up on on the show later was fired for organizing protests around these issues at Amazon We're all in this together. We're demanding for a public health and safety issues to be addressed both at ups. Amazon for all workers gave it very quickly. What are you saying What do you say to Amazon? Wrote to US last night and said he wasn't fired for organizing but for not maintaining social distance and not going home and quarantining since he wished near someone who tested positive. Yeah well the the the next time. The corporation admits that someone was fired for organizing will be the next time that democracy now gets a million dollar donation from Amazon. It's not gonNA happen. Everyone who knows what happened. The difference in the situation is that if you're a union worker you have more protections to organizing and taking action a Lotta. Teamsters are doing that When their unions aren't when their local union isn't helping Teamsters for a Democratic Union and UPS? Teamsters UNITED DOT. Org were. Here people can reach out to be a resource and we need to be. This is a time when union workers teamsters and Amazon workers need to be making connections. Because over the long haul not just in this crisis we need to be working together to hold corporations accountable and David Levin I wanted to ask you this about over the long haul because really this pandemic is really creating a major shift in the way that goods are are distributed in our society is increasingly. People are being forced to go online and therefore to have packages delivered by companies like ups and Amazon and others. I'm wondering do you sense that. The Labor movement is prepared organized. Labor is prepared for what is essentially a a radical shift that For instance macy's just announced they're laying off or furlough in one hundred thousand workers at the brick and mortar stores are really at an enormous disadvantage right. Now and these delivery companies now are going to have a much greater share of the market in America. I'm wondering how you feel if the Labor movement is prepared for this shift in distribution of goods in this aside well one thing I want to say about. Ups This is a company that makes six billion dollars a year. They can track a package at any moment anywhere around the globe. They track their workers movements everywhere. They are at all times and they can't seem to track down or don't won't track down personal protective equipment. Mask gloves hand sanitizers. That workers need. That's why people are organizing to demand. That the teamsters union is a Logistics Workers Union where Transportation Union. Where a package union? Were Grocery and Food Delivery Union. Where the logical hub to be Organizing and uniting and bringing workers together We're doing that at the grassroots level a teamsters for a Democratic Union. You see some aggressive local union leaders pushing for that and we need a transformation we believe in the teamsters union in the top leadership which has largely been missing in action through this crisis. If we're going to meet the kinds of challenges that you were just laying out David Levine. We WanNa thank you so much for being with US lead organizer with teamsters for a Democratic Union and the coordinator of the UPS teamsters United Campaign. This is democracy now democracy now DOT ORG the Warren Peace Report. I mean he goodman in New York with co-host Gonzales speaking to us from his home in New Brunswick New Jersey. And now we're going to talk about a different kind of delivery. I'm nine months pregnant and I'm bringing my baby into a world. I no longer understand. I have to remain hopeful anyway. Rights Journalists Littlefield in a new piece for insider. Her baby is due Sunday. Amy Littlefield recently joined us from her home in Boston. Massachusetts and I spoke to her before governor. Andrew Cuomo here in New York released an executive order. Saturday saying hospitals could not force pregnant people to give birth without a chosen support person. The order coming in response to a move by both New York Presbyterian and the Mount Sinai hospital systems to bar partners from labor and delivery rooms causing widespread outrage. Even in this pandemic a petition opposing. The band gathered over six hundred thousand signatures. So this was the context in which we spoke. And Amy Littlefield is a part of the democracy. Now family a former democracy now producer again. Her baby is due on Sunday. I asked her about the reality. She's confronting now at the end of her pregnancy. Percival giving birth in the United States. Just say it can be a terrifying experience in the best of times I mean. We have the highest maternal mortality rate among wealthy nations. And we even with insurance people often on average end up paying more than forty five hundred dollars out of pocket for their delivery. These were predictable failures that my partner and I have thought about before. We decided to have our first child. And because I'm a journalist who reports on reproductive health care. I have thought a lot about these issues. But of course we failed to factor in plans for a global pandemic threatening to shut down the healthcare system. Just a few weeks before my date. All your plans take us through. Just I mean you plan this so carefully and all your hopes your dreams your birth plan what you were going to do and how. You've been forced to cope at this point. I mean we had I had controlled anxiety around the you know the unpredictability that's built into Earth by planning every single aspect of it that I could We were touring hospitals. Before I was even pregnant I was interrogating the tour guides about whether they had nitrous oxide machines. And how many birth tubs did they have and And the people who are actually pregnant just like where do I park my car. And so we read all the books we hired to do a little. Because we know that the evidence shows having a Dula really increases people's you know decreases chances of having interventions like c sections and creates a more positive experience for people giving birth. So we were so colleen. What Dulas Amy Dulas? Somebody who is an emotional support person? Who's an expert in things like helping you find? Comfortable positions in massage in advocating for people among healthcare providers. Helping people make informed decisions. They're really there to provide the the emotional support as well as the expertise sooner during Labor. And there's just a huge body of evidence showing that they increase positive outcomes and decrease the need birth interventions and so we felt that was a crucial part of our care and we were privileged to be able to afford that as as little as two weeks ago our midwife who still assuring us that are could be with us during our birds and a few days later that had changed and like so many people in my situation around the country right now. We were told that are couldn't be with us. The hospital was restricting visitors. To only one which meant only my partner would be there My family wouldn't be able to visit and Now seeing what's happening with New York Battalion. Of course we're afraid that my partner who might not even be allowed into the delivery room and we're having to think about what that quake even before talking about how you stayed fit and healthy going to going to yoga. How did those yoga classes changed with pregnant people? Well I think like so many people. There's so many of us over the last few weeks. Things are changing so quickly. And there's a moment when you realize the world is different and for me that came just under two weeks ago. I guess when I went to my regular prenatal yoga class that I relied on to deal with those. You know crazy aches and pains that can come with pregnancy and usually it's packed and I walked in and there was one other person there and then one other person joined us and as trivial as it might seem. That was sort of the moment that I knew that the world was changing. And that's something that had felt like sort of this distant threat was now about to disrupt our lives in a big way and pretty soon after that my partner and I made a decision to stop leaving the House and Except to walk our dog because we really didn't want either of us to get sick before delivery but you did have some friends in about a week ago not the Friday the thirteenth. So not this most recent Friday but the one before we had friends over to bring us some groceries and let them into the house. I felt so um bullied by their visit and happy to see them. We kept several feet away and several hours later. The one of the friends texted me to say they were running a fever and body and we just panicked. Rub Down Everything we thought they had touched with. Leach and jumped in. The shower dragged our dog with us. Washed her to which she was. This pretty baffled by and I just remember standing there thinking. Please give me more time. I'm I'm not ready to give birth and smelling. I don't even understand what's happening and you then talk about losing your Dula because she won't be able to be in the delivery room and now the question of whether your partner will be able to join you. You're about about a week or two behind New York and New York. The New York Presbyterian has apparently made this decision announcing on Sunday would no longer allow visitors for patients giving birth including allowing partners to be present during childbirth even though the World Health Organization has said that all pregnant people including those with confirmed or suspected cove at one thousand nine infections should have the right to have chosen companion present during Labor. So what does this bring up for you? What are you thinking now in these last weeks before you give birth or could be hours? Of course 'cause you're at thirty eight could be good happened right now I mean it's the idea of giving birth without my partner there to comfort me to advocate for me to share. What should be the happiest moment of our lives? is kind of unfathomable to me and I my heart breaks for the people who are going through that right now at New York Presbyterian and who are having to give birth without a partner any family member any support person there with just totally alone. I mean what can be a terrifying experience if if it feels like it's out of your control has prompted us to think about switching to a home birth at the last minute which legions of people are doing right now. I mean. Apparently the home birth midwives are just getting inundated with requests last minute. Requests from people like me who are two weeks away from their duty and afraid to contemplate going into a hospital free all their autonomy will be taken away or that. The hospitals would be so inundated that it won't be safe to give birth there and you know I spoke with yesterday about the possibility of a home birth and she said look. This is really something that you shouldn't do out of fear because you'll open the door to trauma you should do it out of confidence that it's it's something that you want and it's the right decision for you and I just When I got up the phone with her just burst into tears because how I mean how can any of us who were facing this decision thinking about making it out of fear in this moment. I mean the fear of being separated from our partners. In that moment it's absolutely what's driving this. Oh and what does it mean home? What would that involve? I mean it's a whole different trajectory. Of course you are doing this and people plan for this for a long time. You're doing this and a few days. If you were to do it right right. I mean first of all I cost thousands of dollars. It's just not an option for many people because it's generally not covered by insurance so that's not something we had planned for. Secondly you have to think about turning your home into an impromptu delivery room you have to think about meeting a care provider that you've never met before that you would have to build trust with very quickly and. I don't think that with so little time to plan that it's actually. I don't know whether it's less scary or more scary to do that than to think about going into a hospital which is a complete unknown at this point. We just don't know what the medical system in Boston will look like two weeks from. Now you talk about in your piece. How your grandmother is in failing health but was so excited that one hundred years old to be able to hold her little grandchild. Yeah and that's what's been keeping her going. She's told me that so her nursing home is basically shut down to visitors which is right and they should do that and I would not contemplate paying her right now but I don't know how long it will be. And whether she has not much time to be able to meet her grandchildren and so many people. I know are in my position and facing these very same choices. Painful choices you write in your piece about your parents and you have since everything was so perfectly planned your thoughts about them coming into the hospital and what you would reveal to them. Yes we've been keeping the name and the baby's presumed sex secret to the whole pregnancy. We've worked very hard to guard. That and I just really look forward to that moment in the hospital room. When they would get to meet their their grandchild and swim. We would reveal that information to them and it's not going to happen that way. I don't know when it will happen. So they catch them into the hospital. You know you don't know if you are we'll be able to join you. But then afterwards given all of the issues of social distance who an it's I mean it's heartbreaking hearing in online communities and I've heard from so many other people who are pregnant about the very painful decision making of pushing family away for safety in a moment where you expected to hold them close and to be with them and to just treasure the moments you never get back. The first moments of of a child's life It's it's really tough and we're we're trying not. We haven't made any final decisions about that yet because everything is changing day to day. We just don't know what the world will look like in a few weeks. Well Amy as you always do. During the most difficult circumstances you always manage to find rays of hope. And I'm wondering what is sustaining. You right now and what you're seeing outside and inside since you are itself isolating what is giving you the most hope right now. I mean it takes a tremendous amount of energy to give birth right or so. I've been told I'm trying to summon that energy and not thinking to this fair which is difficult because you know. How do you contemplate the fact that we are facing a situation? Where as many as one point seven million people could die in this country and it could have. Many of those deaths could have been prevented if our government had acted fast than the. How do you contemplate? What's about to happen in the prisons and the immigrant detention centers and among the homeless population as the virus spreads. How do you I mean for me? It's how how do I think about having to explain this to a child and I think it's very easy to sink into despair and and feel like the world's is terrifying place and what's been pulling me back from that and just seeing all of these beautiful examples of mutual support. That's Amy Littlefield. Independent journalist former democracy now producer. Now documenting her own journey giving birth will enter article. I'm nine months pregnant and bringing my baby into a world I no longer understand. I have to remain hopeful. Anyway Shortly after amy spoke to she got a call from our health providers saying her partner could not attend her prenatal. Visit at thirty eight weeks in the midst of the pandemic joined the appointment by phone and this news today. Her little sister is in the hospital in the very beginning of labor. Their parents about their first two grandchildren. They won't be able to go to the hospital for each to meet them when we come back. Well let's April first tenants are calling for. Rent to be cancelled. Stay with us Uh-huh to be young gifted and black. By Bob Andy and Marcia Griffiths Jamaican singer and songwriter. Bob Andy died of cancer last week. At the age of seventy five this is democracy. Now I mean he goodman in New York Gonzalez is in New Brunswick New Jersey. Today is April first millions across the country. Do not have money to pay rent to in the midst of this pandemic but despite eviction moratoriums and relief on mortgage payments and hard hit states like California Washington and New York. No rent freeze has been ordered in response. Tenants around the country are calling for immediate rent. Cancellation summer planning to rent strike. This is crystal Stella bursary a tenant in Brooklyn speaking. Pix News asking them to reduce rent by a minimum of fifty percents beginning April first so this Wednesday with possibility up to one hundred percent reduction of forgiveness for those tenants who have completely lost all forms of income and will be able to pay for standing in solidarity with those. Who can't because we know that if three people in a building of thirty six can't pay rent those people will be taken to court and being elected but we stand in solidarity with them. The chances of that happening dement are reduced. That's crystal stellar bursary. Lieutenant in Brooklyn speaking to picks news according to one estimate forty percent of renters in New York City may not be able to make rent this month and while a record three million people in the. Us applied for unemployment last week. Many workers who lost their livelihood still have not even been able to file for unemployment. Nearly eight million people call the New York State Labor Department hotline last week compared to an average fifty thousand weekly calls for more we're joined by C. A. Weaver Campaign Coordinator for Housing Justice for all which is organizing to cancel rent during the corona virus pandemic. She's here in New York As one Gonzalez is also in New Jersey. See a talk about what you are calling for on this first day of the month. Yes no one is talking about April. Fools in the midst of this pandemic but clearly. No one is cancelling rent right now at a mass level. Yeah so if you're absolutely right. It's April Burston. Millions of New Yorkers are going to be unable to pay the rent today While the victim moratorium is a step in the right direction It does nothing to prepare for. When we emerge from this crisis and so we are calling for full universal cancellation of all right. That is a crew during the crisis. So that means you can't pay if you can't pay now you don't have to pay and you won't be taken to court credited leader and how do you respond to folks like a governor Cuomo. Who has said he's all four a mortgage and rent moratorium but not for cancellations per se. So criminal actually not called for a rent moratorium. He's called for a mortgage moratorium For property owners. And you know I think that governor Cuomo is complete just ignoring the fact that more than half of the statement their home he has repeatedly said that The the closure of housing courts. The bitching moratorium is taking care of the red issue I think that he's gotta be kidding himself if he thinks that that's true and I know he can't truly think that that's the factor All that that is just the very definition kicking the can down the road. I WANNA turn to Governor Cuomo speaking about the eviction moratorium. They just press conference Tuesday. He's then asked about what renters should do. When that moratorium ends you cannot be for non-payment of rent residential or commercial for three months. Again we pick these into roles and you can say they're somewhat random but when is it going to win? Nobody knows pick an interval so we said three months you can't be evicted residential or commercial for non-payment of rent for ninety days on that basis. My daughters have stopped paying me rent. I'm not even sure that their finances have dropped significantly. But I think that just taking advantage of the non fiction order that I myself posted and I resent governor. What do you I love when they lied? Renters should do once you were ninety day moratorium on fictions ends and they likely Oh. Several months of employment is obviously at that when we get to it. So that's governor Cuomo's Daily News conference from yesterday. See a weaver if you could respond to what he said and governor Cuomo. Who's now being talked about? An all sorts of circles possible presidential candidate a broker convention etc. What is history has been on housing here in New York has a long history Industry not standing with dependent He's got a long history of with real estate overseas public housing. He has worked in housing his whole career and the entire time he has been on the side of the real estate industry Who It's not surprising to hear that he's not really taking seriously the right preventers during this time and the fear that renters me you'll about being unable to pay the rent on On May first on June first and not really having a plan to move forward It it's a surprising but it is Terrifying and we need the governor could take urgent action here. How do you have any sense weather across the country? The Movement is spreading of of people. Saying they just won't pay rental to their landlords. Absolutely there are more people who are waking up to the housing crisis today than ever before. And that's the thing that is giving me hope and making me feel like we're GonNa win this thing The housing this move has been paying for a long time that everyone is just one of major life events away from an infection. We say that we say that a lot. We say you know if your mother gets sick or if you lose a job or if you have to if you if you have a medical emergency yourself that you that you may be just you know one paycheck away from an addiction. What's happening right now? Is that there that is happening to hundreds of thousands of people millions of people all at once in our society and so all of those people are turning the housing ductless move insane. Wow I was living that precariously sort of a a moment. It's a moment where everybody is realizing. Just how the housing market is not working for renters and coming together to take political action and get. Can I get your comment? Tomato de Blasio calling for a rent freeze for the two point. Three million tenants in nearly a million rent stabilized units across New York. The city saying the work with the state to sip suspend rent guidelines board process for the upcoming year. The Blouse you saying. We're in the midst of a crisis only comparable to the Great Depression. The people of our city are struggling and a rent. Freeze is a lifeline. So many will need this year to stay above water. Sia Yeah so I think you said it yourself the buck stock that governor unfortunately and it's Great Basel is taking a step but we need to take action just a scenario that we're in right now And then I think it's incredibly important to not forget the millions of other renters who are not rent stabilized who are living precariously Without the right to renew a lease in unregulated apartment who have also lost income who also need immediate relief. Now well see weaver. We want to thank you so much for being with US campaign coordinator for Housing Justice for all organizing to cancel rent during the pandemic and as we wrap up the show. Want this latest news. That has just come out. of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus joining with many others Three thousand medical professionals As well as many Immigration rights groups to for ice to immediately. Release all thirty. Seven thousand detainees in ice custody. One well amy. It's clear that given the huge number of of Of of people in detention and immigration detention overwhelmingly. Most of them have not been committed. Not been convicted of any crime. They're being detained while their status is adjudicated. And it seems a poss- positively mind boggling at the federal government doesn't realize especially in the crowded conditions. That many of the detainees are in that it would be the proper humanitarian of policy to release them. Release them now to prevent the spread of covert nineteen and they their their status can be Judicata after this crisis over. We are have to come to the end of the show. We tried to reach Chris. Smalls who organized the Amazon Protest And was fired Amazon said because he wasn't keeping social distancing rules or quarantining and Chris Malls alleges because he organized the protest at Amazon to keep workers safe but we will certainly continue to follow this issue and a little correction earlier in the headlines. I talked about Franklin grand the President of the Christian Relief Organization Samaritan's purse. Who's helped to organize a hospital outside of Mount Sinai here in New York in the middle of Central Park? I mentioned he was university president. He isn't that's Jerry. Falwell who kept Liberty University open despite the concern of many staff Teachers and students that does it for our show by the way whether or not we have access to medical masks using a scar is a great idea when you go outside. We must protect ourselves to protect the community. All safety to everyone on. Thanks so much for joining us. Democracy now produced by a remarkable team might Berkman Phelps for Dina Gusto. Nermeen shake Carla. Wills Tammy Libby Rainy semo cough John. Hamilton Rub Karen. Honey Masud Dennis Mine Henry Net Dura Teymuraz Diedhiou Adriana control special. Thanks to Julie Crosby Goodman with Juan Gonzalez. Be Safe All.

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'14 Miles': A Look At The U.S.-Mexico Border, And The Lives Defined By It

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

47:10 min | 5 months ago

'14 Miles': A Look At The U.S.-Mexico Border, And The Lives Defined By It

"From NPR and WB WBU ARE BOSTON I'm Anthony Brooks, and this is on point. Borders are porous. That's especially true in a world that's increasingly interconnective. That includes the US Mexico border though the pandemic has closed it and president trump continues to promise a two thousand, mile, wall goods people pollution as well as dreams and memories still flow back and forth. They always have they always. Will my guest today Dwi Gibson has a new book about a fourteen mile stretch of the southern border that explores how the landscape and the people who live there are defined by the border. It's impermanent and permeability this hour on point, the US Mexico. Border what it keeps out and what it can't keep out. With us from KYLA HAWAII IS DWI Gibson. His new book is fourteen, MILES The border wall his previous books include the edge, becomes the center and not working and d. w gibson great to have you. Thank you for joining us and thank you for. This book was just a pleasure to read it over the weekend. Thanks for having me on the show Anthony. Yeah, I'm really looking forward to this conversation and I want to begin at the beginning where you look. At trump's president, trump's proposed wall specifically at a series of thirty foot, tall prototypes for the wall, being built on the border. And there's some so many absurd ironies about the scene that I want to get into, but tell me about these prototypes and why you chose them as the opening scene in the book. Right so I was looking at the entirety of the two thousand, nearly two thousand mile long border between, Mexico and US and it was in San Diego County that I felt like we had the most dynamic Lens Cape You know you have a big city in San Diego, but you move just ten fifteen miles east of that in your into the desert, and it's entirely different landscape, entirely different demographics so I felt like San Diego County in particular, gave me this landscape to look at America miniature, and of course the prototypes going up in though tie Mesa desert in East county there in. In San. Diego County were just the the the prime reason for doing this, because that that exercise of as you said eight prototypes, each thirty feet, high thirty feet wide, lined up sort of beauty pageant. Contestants there in the desert. was something to behold, and all that activity around the construction of the prototypes I've felt would be a good epicenter to use for the book. Yeah, I mean one of the ironies here is so here are these prototypes of this wall of trump's magnificent beautiful wall that's going to be built, and it's a part of the border where. Am I right, and they're actually opening up a new border crossing right. Right I mean so. This is I think the prime irony of this exercise of prototypes they in the spot where they built on, they ended up tearing them down in early, two thousand and nineteen abruptly, and once they did at the exact spot where they built them. They've now started work on a commercial crossing in the Ot Mesa desert, and it's really important to note that it's a commercial crossing. It's going to be designed for eighteen wheelers that are moving products back and forth between the American factories in Mexico the Mickey doors and You know the the shelves throughout American stories. Throughout the country, so I think this this fact that we sort of went from these eight prototypes to crossing really does tap into some of the tension at the border and some of the irony of the border. Speaking of which a little more irony, one of the things you do so well as we meet a whole host of characters who are affected by this border whether they're of a border control agents whether they're migrants or people who live on either side of the borders, and we're going to be hearing from some of them directly during this hour, but early in the opening chapter we meet a Arabia, Avila who watches the prototypes being built from her home, just two hundred miles away, two hundred. Yards away basically, she lives in Mexico very close to the border. She can't really understand why. Trump wants another wall. Tell us her story and what you learn from her. So really Yeah, she lives even just a few hundred feet i. mean quite literally in the shadow of these prototypes that were going up and another important factor in terms of a really and the the landscape is that there were already a two fences between her home, and the prototypes was made of corrugated metal in another steel fence, two fences already to this the prototypes sort of represented a barrier going up really. Really Oh is a born in Ventura California to Mexican parents. Her father was deported when she was quite young. her mother tried to make a and the states for a while, but just really couldn't make ends meet on her own with a young child, and so they ended up following dad back to Mexico, and and that's where it really was was raised, and you know she's a US citizen. She Hazar social security. The whether she has her birth certificate I should say but not all of the documentation. She needs to prove her citizenship and so there she is in Mexico and not able to reenter the the country where she's a citizen where she was born, and it's such a stark contrast because since Nafta and and in the years that followed. There's you give the sense of this enormous amount of business that is rolling back and forth across the border with ease. The muscular doors are set up on the Mexican side. The US is taking advantage of cheap Mexican labor and so. In that sense, the border is very very porous, but here's a woman who is an American citizen. WHO's living feet from the border watching? A border wall essentially go up I. Mean it's just such A. Stark contrast of purpose and effect of this border. I was really struck by that. It is, and I think that's why it's important to note to fact crossing that's being built now as commercial crossing, because the thing that really stood out to me, came up again and again, and all of these conversations I had with so many people is the fact that products move so freely across the border and people don't. Maybe more to the point, you know workers, don't you know, and so I think this goes back to the idea of how we've how how inner? connected. We've capitalistic systems right we've we've entered this phase of globalised capitalism, and I think that that works very well for the companies that are producing goods for American consumers. It helps price points at which. A which American consumers purchase things, but it hurts the workers who who make all these items and people who don't actually enjoy. Free movement. As they're supposed to as sort of capitalism promises they, they'll have an open an open market. I WANNA. Ask You about the chapter about Friendship Park I just love this this chapter and for people who don't know. Actually I didn't know much about friendship. Park this park that sits right on the border south of San Diego where people from both sides of the border used to come together for visits, and you write quote before the wall before the secondary fence and the primary fence, there were no barriers along the Mexico us border, so tell us about Friendship Park. What it was like before it became impossible to just walk across the border. Who went there? Why did they go there? What was it like? Yes. You know the the border is. has been marked several times throughout history and I know we're GONNA. Have Standard Regan's on later, and he's going to speak well to this, but. After the Mexican American war was one of the first chances for the US to mark this this line and we've marked it several times since then, and there's been variations in that process along the way each time only marked by monuments along the way he never released would've idea fencer barrier, and that really only started to come into play in small measure in urban areas in the nineteen seventies, and that's when Friendship Park came into existence, and it was really just barbed wire couple of posts. In the sand on a beautiful bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean Patent. Nixon was there when they opened Friendship Park and she. She lamented the fact that there was a fence at all. They're even just the barbed wire, and she's stepped over it to go into Mexico to to shake hands with people, and over time it's become more and more built up and this was you. You know in the seventies and eighties and nineties San. Diego, county was where we saw the vast majority of apprehensions at the southern border. So over time we got one fence at friendship. Park at the bluff, overlooking the ocean. We've got fences, and at present there actually three different fences, Friendship Park, and for a few hours every weekend. People are allowed to go. Past the first two fences to the to the very first protocol primary fence. Stand there, and it's. It's huge steel Ballard's with wire. Mesh between them. You can barely make out sort of the imagery, the other side of the fence but people gather there on Saturdays and Sundays to see loved ones to say hello in two ministers put together a bilingual Church Service on most Sundays. This is a really important people. A place for people who want connect with family members on the on the south side of the border. There are a lot of deported veterans there every weekend, but it's also a place of tension you know. Border Patrol monitors it very closely There've been a lot of incidents there that. make border patrol uncomfortable with the situation and they've you know we're constantly sort of pulling back on access to the space and the people who organized the park are constantly fighting for more access to the park. You mentioned the the communion service that happens there every week, and you tell the story of John Methodist Minister, who actually conducts this cross-border communion ceremony with a brother on the Mexican side Tell me a little bit about him I was such a lovely story about what he's trying to do there and what he's trying to keep going. Yes a Johnny has been doing this church service for many years now with Guillermo and the on the house side of the border there and you know. He shows up every Sunday. I hiked up to the bluff with him. He's got a backpack with some bread, and some some grape juice, and a bible unfurled all of this a microphone connected to a wireless. Of the border and and they do this church service, which last you know just about twenty minutes or so I think one of the more sort of affecting moments. I experienced while while sort of seeing. All of this was the fact that you know they can't share communion or anything like this, even even the Trans. Trans substantiated blood of Christ. Camp passed between the The Wire Mesh show border patrol wouldn't allow it. Nothing can pass only the only sort of music coming from the South but everyone has moments throughout the ceremony where they. Stick a pinkie up to the wire Mesh. It's about all you can really get through those small openings in the wire, and they sort of touch, a Pinky, pinky and sort of try to connect that way, and I think that that that sort of image that moment really speaks to to to of several things, one sort of the human desire to connect to this place, but also the difficulty doing so difficulty that wasn't always there of course, because it was basically open, and I want to talk about some of the forces, including nine eleven, operation, gatekeeper, and a whole bunch of. Reasons why the border has sort of closed down over over the generations. But just sticking with his Friendship Park. What our border control agents actually worried about I, mean was there were drugs passing across that? Is that why the Wire Mesh went up and people can no longer reach out and shake hands and kiss, and so on and so forth. That was what Border Patrol said was the reason for having to put up all these barriers. Yeah, that's something that John Pushes back on, but that's certainly the reason they were. They were giving well. We're talking about DWI Gibson's new book fourteen miles building the border wall. It's a fascinating examination of the US Mexico border, and really a real, really interesting sort of meditation on what it is what a border is! What keeps out what it let's in? WHAT DO WE LOSE ONE? We shut borders down. What could we gain if we could figure out a way to open them up again? Stay with US I'm Anthony. Brooks this is on point. This is on point I'm Anthony Brooks and I'm here with Dwi Gibson, his new book, Fourteen Miles building the border wall. We're discussing that it's about his two year investigation of a fourteen mile stretch of the US Mexico. Border. Dwi, a just one more question about Friendship Park which you were talking about. Before the break you talk about how the sort of openness of that park began to to really changed dramatically after nine eleven. You say after the terrorist attack. Everything became about national security. Yeah. This is the point that John who runs the church service really drove home for me because he's been involved with trying to get this. Keep this park open for so many years and been living in the area and I think two major marks sort of define the idea. The border security zone one was right after NAFTA. We had a operation gatekeeper. was after put in place away for capitalism to sort of still access to globalize workforce security measures, so that workers could cross the border as easily and then yeah, after nine eleven when everything gets folded into this new agency, the Department of Homeland Security and everything is viewed. Through the Lens, everything at the border is used viewed through the lens of security and National Security, even though as John Aptly points out in the book, there's really no connection whatsoever, nor is there ever been a between the southern border and any of the people that were involved in nine eleven or other terrorist accents than? I think that's one of the places where we really see the ideas in a phobia pop into the pop into the picture. Yeah, in fact, some of those hijackers got into the United. States through Canada so There's a really sort of unfortunate irony there that all of the focus on security was focused on the southern border when there was no connection to nine eleven really really really interesting and and d-w. You make a great point about Operation Gatekeeper which you said was launched after Nafta and the idea here is to lockdown. Urban Crossings essentially focused on urban crossings was the effect of efforts like this to slow the passage of people across urban crossings. What happened how they didn't get the effect that they wanted in other words? No so this is where you see your operation gatekeeper was really meant to fortify the southern border writ large, but it. Most of the resources went into San Diego County and so they started putting up the fencing in in in the heart of Darkness Tijuana in Tennessee Isidro there on the on the north side, and you know this is where we see what barriers of the border actually do because walls barriers. They never ever stop traffic. They only diverse so what you see in the ninety s particularly mid late nineties. Once all of this is implemented. You see traffic foot traffic people crossing the border all that being pushed out to the eastern part. Part of the county where it's more desert, more rule, and much more severe conditions. So this is when we start to see known deaths at the border, those migrants trying to cross deaths rising assumed efficiently and again you know just known. It's really hard to measure how many people die in this exercise? But those we know that's when we really start to see those numbers go up. Yeah, so people are determined if people are determined to make the crossing, they're gonNA. Make it anyway, but because it's so difficult, you point out that then they're less likely to go back and more likely to bring their families, so it has the exact reverse effect. Exactly exactly in several people talked about this in the book. You know it was migratory patterns. You know people would come for seasonal work. We had the Cerro Program back in the forties and fifties and sixties for agricultural workers right so people would come for seasonal work and go back home, It's only when you get operation gatekeeper when you this sort of post, nine eleven world the. The you start to see these large Mexican populations grow up in big cities around the country because people. It was unsafe to keep crossing anymore well as promised he w. we're GonNa hear from some of the people that you talked to in your book, so I'm going to introduce surged Edina. He's the mayor of Imperial Beach California. He's also the Executive Director of Wild Coast nonprofit. Focused on conserving wildlife and coastal marine ecosystems and an author, his latest book is surfing the border and mayor. Serge Dina welcomed on point. Thanks for joining us. Great to hear you. Anthony Talk you yeah. It's good to have you so I loved reading about you and Dwi book, but tell me a little bit how the border has changed since you were a kid. You know I was a kid. And you know think of stranger things, a bunch of longhaired little Surf Rats, and Imperial Beach California the last count of California coast, actually riding our bikes to Friendship Park, which is border, field, state, Park, and thrilling our bikes over our Schwinn stingrays over the cable, and then freely riding around Playa Static Wanna a beach suburb in decline. Right Buying Cheech I. I donate so there was no There was no barrier. There's just a cable or are bleier that Pat Nixon is w talked about Stepdauger. At one point that was in the late seventies, and now of course if I go down to surf that area and it's incredibly beautiful. Friendship Park overlooks the Pacific Ocean. You can see Dolphins Pods of dolphins surfing in the ocean. It's up. National Wildlife Refuge just to the north. We have a the S dry. where the Tijuana River empties out, and actually the Coronado islands just off applies to WanNa are a Mexican national parks, so incredibly physically beautiful area up now with this giant border multi-tiered border barriers, so it's a very different place because of that barrier, still very beautiful place, but yeah, very great different changes, but what I was a kid right? And what did we lose? I mean. What are we lose with that wall going up and the kind of experience you had as a as you said a a long hair. Did you off Frat? What what what are we lose losing that ability to step across the border with our Schwinn bikes and move around. Well you know what we've lost the border barrier Israeli. Discussion of what it takes to secure and safe border, and so ironically what we have. These giant metal barriers and people are tunneling under in the time. Mesa, area east of your, probably like ten miles east of other beach in our town extensive they right to the the border on, and then people have torching their way through it and more importantly people. What's happening is now. People are taking Ponga's or fiberglass. Fiberglass gifts controlled by the cartels out in the ocean and you can see those cart. Those gifts filled with people. May Santa Barbara The beach la? Hoya some of the wealthiest suburbs or communities on the planet are now receiving the people that are bypassing this giant border barrier, and of course that's concerned to the coast guard and others who are chasing these folks using radar dish radars on the coast, the track these fiberglass stiffs escaping this this massive multi billion dollar. Vary that allows toxic waste and sewage actually be dumped through. It are under so that's a big concern of us because we're being hammered by a toxic pollution, WANNA everyday barrier as expect more and more money on the border area, they spent less and less attention on the sewage and pollution problem that permeates both land and water. I know that this issue around pollution is a big concern of yours. How do you? What's the solution to this problem? What are you advocating for? Well you know just cleared the city of two million people on, and so while the US government over the last three years is prioritize. Massive wall barrier construction ignored the fact that the that the sewer system of wants collapse, so we've advocated a whole series of infrastructure. Between Mexico to capture those flowers intrigued outflows and work proactively with obviously the government to address this, but ironically the people most impacted by this position been really sort of neglected. Here are the US government's own border patrol agents. Navy seals the border patrol agents were patrolling, the border and getting sick and the Navy seals who have knew have now have a one billion dollars training base just the north edge of our city. And they're getting sick as well as well as so we've advocated for infrastructure. Be Belt, but it's a little hard to have that conversation happened. With the. For example, the Navy when the only priority is to build the border wall, Luckily through the US MCA process, our congressional delegation negotiated where the White House to get some money appropriated for that. That's taking a long time in the meantime they're actually planning on building a hundred and fifty million dollar law through the Tijuana River right now. The river channels open and I was on a tour where the Senator Feinstein's actually chief-of-staff recently, and we were flabbergasted to learn this wall will be. Be Underway. Would they told us they will be monitoring the weather on the Internet, and then when it starts running open the floodgates that didn't seem to be very science or engineering solution to me, but that's really right now. The priority instead of sort of sixteen, these gaping issues in the border that impact security for all of us, well surged in a mayor of imperial. Beach California. Thank you so much for joining us today. I'm really grateful to have heard from you. Thank you so much and surged Dina is someone who shows up in Dwi Gibson's new book, Fourteen Miles building the border wall and W just to bring you back into the conversation. You're listening to surge Dina. I mean one of the things I take away from that brief interview is that the wall sucks up so much energy so much focus so much money from other issues that really affect people on both sides of the border like pollution. That was heard it there. That was one of the reasons I was so excited to have surged in the book because he's so good at saying okay look. If we're GONNA, make the border all about security. Let's think about the idea of security more expansive way. It's not just militarizing this area it's how do the people who live around here feel secure in where they live and where they work. They feel safe in the. The environment there swimming and living in, and I think that's essential, and he also looks at the border not is a place where we divide things, but serge talk so well in the book about the border is a magnet is force that draws people together to solve problems and I think you see him trying to do that with the Tijuana River estuary, and all the pollution, and he mentioned sort of lifting those the. The proposal to lift gates when the weather changes I walked through that sewage water with border patrol agents who pointed out that on sunny days blue skies overhead. You still have water coming through the gates that they're there now, and that just indicates to you. It's not always rain, water and sewage water, and a lot of that's coming from the American Makila the factories in Mexico one of the people we hear from in your. Your book is Lance Lenoir. He's a self proclaimed tunnel rat. That's a border patrol agent charged with finding mapping and destroying a drug smuggling tunnels across the border. You interviewed him for your book, and we have a little bit of tape that we wanna play from that Lenoir says he says that he's adamant that most of the tunnels aren't sophisticated or any great feats of engineering, but he does find something to admire them. IF ANYTHING IS TO BE ADMIRED By our adversary or the result of these titles in there is persistence and audacity. Those are the two things I'm constantly amazed of the fact that somebody can. Subsist underground in a confined space this big that whatever the case may be in limited oxygen because I mean. Let's put it this way. They're ventilated these things with leaf blowers and four dryers. My guys though that's landslide. Anwar, self proclaimed tunnel rat, a border patrol agent who's charged with finding mapping in destroying drug smuggling tunnels across the Border Dwi. What else did you learn from Lenoir? In other folks whose job it is to enforce that border? Yes, at two things really stand out with lads. One is you know getting? He's found tunnels ninety feet deep into the earth. So the footing most fencing goes at most six feet into the earth, so it just shows that the barriers are never going to completely cut off. You know whatever the US government wants them to cut off and yeah this fact about human ingenuity. You know that that people will will do what they need to do to get across the border. The thing that really really really stood out to me though about what Leeann said was that. If you have a successful tunnel going across the this international line, it means you have cooperation on the Mexican side and the side. IT IS A. A national effort and I think this gets at the heart of what we as Americans often losing the discussion that we bear much of the responsibility for for whatever crime is being interdicted at the border. We supply the The the drug market for the goods that are going across the border, and we supply the firearms the guns. There's One gun store in Mexico, it's incredibly difficult to buy guns, but it's very easy to buy guns and places like Arizona and Texas and bring them back across the border, and so we need to to reckon with the fact that this is. These are two things that this country contributes to the issues at the border and lances work really really gets to the heart of that I want to touchdown on the other side of the Border Nicole Ramos joins us from Tijuana Mexico. She's the director of the Border Right Project ALTRO Lardo which works with asylum seekers, preparing to present themselves to US authorities and Nicole. Ramos, thanks for joining us today. Hi Thank you for having me and I should stress obviously Nicole. We learned about you because you are also our character in Dwi, Gibson's book, but give us a sense how the pandemic has affected the community where you work your the the folks who are hoping to seek asylum. What the border is essentially close to them. They're not able to present themselves to US authorities to seek asylum so our work, instead of helping people to present themselves involves helping people to hide themselves from persecutors that may be pursuing them shifting legal services to providing humanitarian aid. sanitation stations for shelters medications on food I'm we're not seeing any clients in the office in order to keep people safe, so all of our staff and volunteers that come from all over the country. That would be in Tijuana. Normally are working with asylum seekers in Tijuana the other telephone. I see and is there while the border is closed and and the effort during the pandemic for people to seek asylum is essentially shutdown. What does that mean are? Is there a bigger and bigger population on the Mexican side of the border of folks waiting to come hoping to get into the US. The population continues to grow up. People keep trying to enter without inspection because the ports of entry are closed, but border officials repeatedly turn them back in violation of international law, which prevents the return of refugees to a territory where they fear persecution. What is interesting about this? Is that US citizens can come in leave Mexico without any problem, so they can come for pleasure trips to the beach to visit the Red Light district, but asylum seekers who are fleeing for their lives cannot enter. So that clearly I was going to ask you. What inconsistencies you see regarding who can cross the border and who can't. I guess that would be top of the list. Absolutely absolutely because the US citizens that are re entering the United States, they're not being subject to any health screenings, and if the purpose of the border closures to prevent the entry of persons from a territory where there's high rates of covid nineteen, one would think that would extend to some sort of health inspection of US citizens, and yet it doesn't so, what are your hopes regarding the population that you represent in in in the months ahead, what do you? What would you like to see change that would provide some help and essentially allow them to at least get close to an immigration officer and plead their case for asylum. The US. Government is one of the most powerful and one of the most wealthiest governments in the world, and it is simply not credible that with all of expertise that we have that we cannot figure out a way to safely process refugees who are quite literally fleeing for their lives. So why would I would hope? Is that the border open to allow for? For the processing of these claims in an orderly fashion, which is completely possible, however, the president and Stephen Miller and others in administration are making very clear their intent with regard to asylum through this border closure, and the new proposed changes to the asylum role, and that intent is to stop immigration, because it threatens their nationalist and white supremacy, goals and ideology. Horrible that's Nicole Ramos Director of the border. Rights Project Aloe Tola in Tijuana Nicole Ramos. Thank you so much for joining us for very grateful. Thank you so much for having me and Dwi Gibson standby. We're discussing W's new book fourteen miles building the border wall. We're gonNA take a break. We'll be right back. I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point. This is on point. I'm Anthony. Brooks and I'm talking to D W Gibson. He's author of fourteen miles building the board border wall, which is the result of a two year investigation reporting project that he did along fourteen miles of the US Mexico border tomorrow. We're GONNA. Be Talking about the possibility of another financial sector crash. Are you a business owner who was? was worried about defaulting on loans listeners. Were you affected by the housing crash in two thousand eight? How did it change the way you use or think about the big banks? Tell us your story at six, one, seven, three, five, three, zero, six, eight, three, again that six, one, seven, three, five, three, zero, six, eight, three. We'll be talking about that tomorrow. d-w you know I wanted to get you to sort of follow up on what we heard from Nicole raw most before the break obviously in sort of an impassioned plea to make it possible for the people that she represents to plead their cases for asylum. What's your view on sort of You know immigration reform, and what has to happen to make the system work better that has taken up so much oxygen in Washington with very little results over the years. You Know I. Think it actually an interesting way mirrors the conversation. We're having about policing now. Because if you look at the history of US immigration policy, we essentially wind our first one hundred years is a nation without any immigration laws. We had laws of potatoes citizen, but no laws pertaining to who could into the country until eighteen seventy five. When we get the page act, which keeps Chinese women out of the country, and then a few years after that the Chinese Exclusion Act which keeps Chinese workers entirely out of the country, and this was driven by senators in the west who were feeling threatened by the growth. Growth in the population out there they aligned with senators from the south, who were hoping in the future to to quell the rights of the recently released people who had been enslaved and and so you see that, and there's an unbroken line all the way up into the twentieth century when we start to get a lot of immigration laws in the nineteen twenties around World War One. A lot of those were fanned by Eugenicist eugenics. We have to remember got it start in the US and we export out into the world as well and so this idea of maintaining America as a predominantly western European country. Is the thing that we've been wrestling with in our immigration policy over the course of our history and I think that's the thing that we're confronting right now. In the issue, we're trying to correct that and the the idea of you know how capitalism has really just taken over the system I I. I don't think that we understand quite how much women reckoned with how much the nation state our country has? has already surrendered to capitalism. I think that we need to sort of confront that and deal with it accordingly in terms of protecting workers, and by surrendering to capitalism in in a sense, and this gets to sort of one of the central ironies which I think, we touched on at the beginning of the show, but by surrendering to capitalism, we have essentially surrendered to the idea that borders are somewhat meaningless. Well. This is the thing right. We speak out both sides of mouths, so so we regard to moving products. Yes, meaningless, let's do it. Let's get this stuff mood around the globe, so we can sell it, but in terms of letting people move freely, you know we try to put up all kinds of barriers. One really quick example that I think really puts this into focus is there's a huge Haitian population tijuana and in San Diego as well. They had a massive earthquake as we all know in two thousand ten in Haiti but those those Haitians at arrived in Tijuana. They didn't arrive in two thousand ten, do they? They arrive. They arrived over twenty thousand of them in two thousand sixteen, and that's because of Brazil had just handed out forty three thousand workers to build the Olympic facilities, and the Haitians flock there after the earthquake, and they were a lot of them were already migrating looking for stability in their lives, and so they've found refuge in Brazil for a little while, so they could do the work that was needed there once work was completed. Brazil didn't for new those visas and they had to leave and find a new place I just shows you how work drives so much of the migration that we see around the world. Well Dwi standby because I want to go to stand Rodriguez now. Who shows up in your book fascinating character? He's a member of the. Kumi nation and he's the director of Kumi Community College and he joins us from San. Diego Stan Rodriguez. Thanks so much for joining us. Okay. Hello, everybody! It's really good to have you so just for our listeners who who don't know I wanNA talk a little bit about the Kunai tribe whose settlements date back some twelve thousand years on both sides of what is now the US Mexican border, so stand give us a sense of what the border has done to this tribe. Look, thank you for letting me speak to this. Our people. We say we've been in this area. San Diego Northern Bas since time immemorial We remember when. We have village sites that are under the Pacific Ocean right now just right off the coast and we have A. On the desert tug imperial, county. Have Fish. that. Were were made with stones with. There's desert out, so this speaks to how long we been in this area. Well. When encroachment came first with the Spanish way, then with the Mexican with then with the American wave, it IT! It wrecked havoc upon our people, and once the Mexican American war was was completed the international border with place. Well, it went. Right through Kootenai territory it. Basically on our our traditional lands in half. Now. As we said earlier. The, border. Prior was fairly course. People would go back and forth but as. More the United States wanted more structure and it seemed like it was do 'cause then phobia, they you know the you know accustomed to. It became more and more difficult to cross and recross now the problem with that for our people because. For for for the Kuria, people this land here northern. Baja in San Diego County. This is our holy land in our creation story at talks about the different mountains at different places that we go and there's there's there's places where we go to great places where we go to. San Diego Has More Kunai reservations where more reservations than any other county in the country? There's over eighteen reservations here in San. Diego and there's another six reservations in Baja California, Mexico so. To be able to cross in required, his is very important for us and and stand. That's gotten a lot harder I imagine this important. Thing that this important trip that members of the KU nation make from one side of the border to the other has gotten a lot more difficult, right? Exactly because an example would be when somebody passes away, singers will come and seeing all night for that person, things will be done. We support each other, but then with the border it makes it more difficult to cool is in Baja. Very difficult for them to come across, they need to get either alleged visa or or or or a pass. Or like two days so that we can do cultural things, but it's it's becoming more and more problematic. Another thing that happened to is in Zimbabwe which is in Mexico. They speak Spanish. Spanish is the main language spoken here in the United. States English as the main language now. Prior to the of encroachment, there were over fifty thousand Kumi is on both sides of the border. Around nineteen hundred and nineteen o one, they were listed as one thousand lesson thousand. Almost all all the people were gone. We built up our numbers. We have approximately four thousand, six, hundred and twenty three life on both sides of the border now with that said. Of that number, there's approximately forty one people who still speak language and in order for a language to to be vibrant. It needs to be used if becomes more and more problematic if you have a on the Mexican side of the border sticks in his nobody's speak to. Somebody on the United States. It gets difficult for that for the for the cultural connections to take ninety so another another. Essentially, another way that the culture is being threatened in is at risk of being erased essentially Stan I WANNA. Ask You one last thought though, and I know this is up in Dwi's book and that is. The People have been around for some twelve thousand years the US border. Not Nearly as long. Can you talk a little bit about that? In terms of how that creates a certain perspective that you have on this border? Sure. You know for for our people. We say even longer than twelve thousand years. It's been documented twelve thousand. We say it goes back even farther. Now with that, said the border that that's been. That's been put here it's making our own people Illegal aliens or Abyan in our own land. When they come when the Kubiak from Baja come across staying within our territory, they're basically classified as aliens and when we go across the Bah we are, you know where? To! This is our territory. And to PUT IT IN A. In context. Have you ever heard the name you WanNa Oh yes. It's a cool me, I work. I didn't. By the ocean. Have you ever heard of the? Have you ever heard of the well? They're Takata you. have. Well? It's talks about the Taty pick and which? means. It's old man who chops wood, but there's a lot of I and that's on both sides of the border so it it speaks to the. To our our our our cultural roots within the area, and the difficulty that we have and and and and keeping on a cultural live, our language life and. Our our people intact right, we'll stand Rodriguez. He's a member of the KU nation and he's director of Kumi Community College. He joined us today from San. Diego Stan Rodriguez thank you so much for joining us. We really appreciated hearing from your. Many. Let me. Get on, yeah, it was great, so dwi love to get more from you on on what you heard in stands talk, it's it's very moving this idea of a culture that's thousands of years old sort of being bisected by this border. Yeah I, I think it should be humbling for all of us right because we you know. Americans tend to really think about the border as this This this thing that's been around forever. That's so permanent. I mean that's what a thirty foot barriers supposed to tell us right, but but stand more than anyone I talked to. I think really changed. My Perspective on borders are affected at are made my imagination grow because he, he pointed out to me that the border is not static. It's moved so many times over history even after the US established it and I. Think we need to really hold. That are magic nations and. And See and track that point in so many ways. Your reporting on the wall brings to light sort of the same kind of contradiction again and again and again, and again that the wall doesn't really respond to reflect the real world the real challenges it's a wall that seeks to keep people out when people always find a way to get through a wall that creates a border. Border when business and technology are essentially borderless, it's a wall. That would you know? Go just a few feet into the earth, but we already heard that people know how to tunnel ninety feet down underneath it so again and again and again you come up with these wonderful observations about this wall just seems to be completely disconnected from the kind of reality that we're all living. Absolutely and you know I think it's captured in the Word Wall I. mean think about it, and this is something that occurred to me several times as I was working on this I saw so many barriers at at the border but none of them actually resembled a wall right, and I think that idea of a wall really taps into the mythology we hold as Americans in our mind, again of sort of our our place in the world are importance in the world are permanence in the world, and I think an even our sense of responsibility I mean think about. How do we define what we call the American dream, the American dream when. To It is a white picket fence. It's private property rights, and that white picket fence just like the idea of a border wall it establishes it our achievement, and establishes our sense of responsibility right our sense of responsibility, as Americans has always been a focus on ourselves, not necessarily on how we might contribute to a community, but how we might survive in that community on our own terms. Pull yourself up by your bootstraps right, and so the idea of offense, a white picket fence or a wall. The border helps us to find that very limited sense of responsibility and and standard. Rigas is so good at making us think about responsibility in a more. More expansive way in an idea of building community and building a civil society so W. we've got some comments on facebook from our listeners. Hector US veto rights. The Wall does nothing to improve conditions in Mexico or Central America that compel people to risk everything to come here too stupid idea that is a massive waste of money and a great harm to the ecology and wildlife on the other hand. We have Michael Richards here who wrote we are not an open borders lawless nation fact, every time citizens have had the opportunity to vote on any part of the issue. They voted against Amnesty or permanent residency. We want enforcement so dwi respond to that concern. that there are folks out there. who say we gotTa have that wall because otherwise if you have open borders, we lose control of our country. He has I think it's about creating ways for people to come through legally and an orderly fashion when you talk to people in in law, enforcement, particularly customs and Border Protection in. Let's not forget that the vast majority of crying that is interdicted at the border isn't addicted at ports of entry, but customs officers not by border patrol agents, so we need more crossings in fact and not commercial crossings, but. Crossings that are available to citizens to us to family visits to make cultural exchanges to to to move about freely in the more we can organize those crossings and create policies allow people to move more freely. people will be able to do so legally in an orderly fashion DWI. You grew up in San Diego. How did the proximity to the border affect the way you thought about it? Growing up, yeah, you know I actually grew up. Just north of San. Diego County and Orange County, but it's it's an interesting. It's interesting because I think that the way. Southern California works at large is is really largely divorced from the border I mean I fixated on one of the freeways in San Diego County call the eight freeway which runs parallel to the border just about fifteen miles north, and I say rather bluntly that I think that that fifteen miles between the border and the freeway is really worked as sort of a buffer zone us, controlled buffer zone because the population south freeway is is largely. Largely Lat next, and and dynamic and people from all around the world, but north of the freeway, the population becomes much more white, much more affluent and people live their lives as though they weren't that close to the border. We we have a very easy time being being agnostic to the border, and I think that the more we can interact with it and interact with people who had affects the more will understand it well. Your book helps us do that in a big way Dwi Gibson. He's author of fourteen miles building the border wall. Dwi thanks so much. It was such a pleasure talking to you. Thank you Anthony. Listeners can continue the conversation. You can get the on point podcast at our website on point radio dot org and you can follow us on twitter. Find US on facebook at on point radio I'm Anthony Brooks. This is on point to. Ask.

US Mexico Border Patrol W Gibson Anthony Brooks San Diego San Diego County San Friendship Park Border Dwi Tijuana California Diego Stan Rodriguez Nafta Tijuana River director Nicole Ramos Diego County Pat Nixon
#AskGaryVee 293 with Michael Ovitz

The GaryVee Audio Experience

44:02 min | 2 years ago

#AskGaryVee 293 with Michael Ovitz

"On this episode. The legend. I'm not saying that lately. The legend. Michael Ovitz is in the building. This is the Gary v audio experience. Chromebook. Ages. Hey, everybody. This is Gary bay, nurturing, and this is episode to ninety. Three of the ask Gary be show, and this is going to be one that I will watch probably for the rest of my life every tooth, four, five, seven years because I'm going to think of it very fondly. I don't throw this around very easily, but an absolute legend has walked in the title of this book cover. I'm sure you're seeing it for people listening on the podcast, Google it who is Michael Ovitz is something that we're going to answer here. Please. Facebook. I know you're watching right now. Please put in your phone numbers. This is a rare opportunity. Michael is such an icon in mogul of the culture, which is what I appreciate. I'll go into that in a minute, but the at this point of his career and all the things he's focused on the ability to ask, actually ask him a question as foreign feud between some excited that our format is going to Lau two or three of you to ask him a question, and as you list, if you know who he is, I'm sure you've got seven or eight questions lined up, but for some that don't as you as we start putting down the blocks in this. Episode, I think you're going to get really excited Michael. Thank you so much for being here. Thanks for having me up four for the people that are watching right now that don't know who you are. What is the kind of two to three minute cliff notes of who you are professionally? Personally, wherever you wanna take it. I'm someone who started out in the mail room at a large agency and when off with some partners to start our own company and started what I think to this day forty plus years later as the definitive Artists Agency in the world and that is Creative Artists Agency. So for everybody who's not from the Hollywood world or the business world, and you're playing in your own silo. CIA is a global leader today, Michael and his partners left William Morris, which is also a major player. Now within merger, w EMMY in in Hollywood land. This is royalty, you know, in every industry I came more from the liquor business first and then Silicon Valley culture which you've put a big flag in and we'll get into that later. But if. You if you're aware of the l. a. business senior, no bigger businesses that have been built and in the talent representation agency world, see as at the top. And Michael is really, you know, I have so many friends who are agents in in LA and New York and other parts of the world. And when I first because of my wine show on YouTube started having interest in that world, the amount of times I heard, you know, in the wine world, not as much Michael has a nice collection of wine. But as soon as I even sniffed into anything that looked like representation of talent in the world, the name Michael Ovitz got thrown around so many times I was superintendent so many people that I admire my contemporaries. You know, really, unbelievably look up to you. You really, I don't know where you how you'll answer to this, but like you absolutely changed the paradigm of what a talent agent is and was and. To this day, looked upon. I mean, I'm not sure if it's really been replicated. Is that something that you think is great? Is that something that you think is fabricated by the market? Is that over? You know, obviously somebody who's an agent always wants to find that balance between the talent being at the forefront, but you became very well known in a mogul ended incredible things. How do you, how do you reconcile being in a place in your life right now where you can write a book called, who is Michael Ovitz and having on the cover and just have so many people know who you are in the impact you've had to such a big part. I mean, I think Hollywood Michael real quick and I'll stop talking to. I think Hollywood is the great machine of America. I think America's brand in the world is actually driven by the machine that Hollywood was in a lot of ways. Silicon Valley in social media's now playing a little bit of that role, but it's kind of unbelievable that you were top dog of the machine that probably allows America to be top dog in the world. Do you ever take a step back and say, holy crap. You know, there's there's no time to take a step back and think about that. When I decided to write the book, it was more about trying to have some record of all the stories and all the different things that we did, but to get right to the heart of your question about what we did when we started in the agency business agents basically would field offers for clients. They would look. It would pick up the phone, pick up the phone and someone would call and say as Gary available for such and such a day to do such and such a project. And it was pretty much a a business that moved to a pretty slow clock. And we made a decision while we're William Morris and watched this company, which was terrific, a great company, but suffering from a disease that all companies do, which is lack of transition to younger people with younger and fresher ideas, and the more senior people were running the company and it was basically stalling. Out and we came up with this idea that it was really important for the talent to be in the driver's seat. How do you do that? How do you get the talent from being in second position to being I position and it was the financers, the buyers, the studios, the networks, the publishing houses, record companies, all of whom were in the driver's seat, and we decided what we can do is we would start to encourage our clients to meet with each other, meet with other creative people and pretty much keep all of their ideas to themselves in their group until we could take them out completely package as a package. And by doing that over a period of years and within a very short period of time, what period of time just for. So we started in late seventy, December seventy, four officially January seventy five. And it took us probably I'd say the true some like I've done enough homework and there's been other books. And Google articles and documentaries. You guys were planning to start a little bit later, but then word within w. William Morris was heard in this way you guys had to move quicker. Yeah. Well, what happened was I went to the city national Bank which was a local Bank. For a one hundred thousand dollar loan. Yes, for us to get started. And I didn't think that they would call the treasurer of William Morris in New York, and he called the CFO in LA and he called the president. They called us and got you. Guys can leave which was moved our plan on a little fast. Yes. We expect the December January seventy four seventy five. Early eighties. We were in the position where we were selling packaged material with all of our clients and for everybody who you know, I have a lot of people who aren't probably don't know all the Hollywood terminology package would be like a big star with a big director like like, what? What are the pieces of a package in the way that you guys created it to also package was anything that was built around what we call the motor. So you needed one client who is a motor, and let's just take an example. He's an example taking story, so they real package will. Real package would have been. Real package would have been. Let's just take a simple on Ghostbusters. Okay. So Dan ackroyd is not just a brilliant performer. He's a writer, and he came up with this idea about three Saturday Night. Live type guys running around New York City chasing goes, and the one line. Just what you just did. You have to laugh at one line gave the project to symbol Tena sleepy to Bill Murray and to Ivan Reitman. Ivan, who was great producer director, Ivan had done stripes with Bill Murray and meatballs. He produced animal house, which was one of the great comedies of all time and Bill. Nobody funnier than Bill Murray. I mean, that sense of humor is beyond of all time. I mean, beyond extraordinary so Bill and Danny and Ivan met, and they decided on a Herrell Ramos may rest in peace. It was from Chicago. Second city as a co writer and the third ghostbuster and that put together a complete film right there. We had three stars. We had three writers and we had a director, and then you go to studio, then we went, you versed the leverage to the package which made bids instead of going and giving the IP right. Normally, the studio would come to us and say, we have this script called Ghostbusters, and we want your story want this. Hey, well, let's say we want this director. We want this writer and they'd come one step at a time. We came with the whole thing completely put together for them all they had to say yes or no, that's right. And we did not give them much time to say, no. How quickly did the rest of the market? So this packaging which gave you guys a competitive advantage of a new formula to go to market, did the other agencies quickly jump on board and start doing it themselves or do they kind of sit and push against it for a while? And then. Later succumb to it and do as well. Well, fortunately for us, the competition was slow to react and while they in their inability to move quickly, we started silence what's happening to being her media right now in the moments of their audacity while they scrutinize it. Landgraf. All I know is in the two weeks since I've been up here, it looks like you have double. And so in their slowness in their slowness, we started assign sign other clients. And once we hit critical mass of a majority of that was it was over because you can't package without the elements, and we had three quarters of the elements. So there was no competition and it was the same problem for the studios. They had absolutely the ability to make contracts, but we have the creative people. So what we were trying to do was keep the creative people working together and hold their ideas until we could put them together. Completely Facebook. If you're watching live now, I know a lot of you listening to the podcast watching film, but if you're watching now, please put your phone number. It's a meaning opportunity to get a question into one of the legends of culture in my opinion, obviously, because as we keep going through this will Michael was able to do and disrupt not only in Hollywood. He, you know, I'm I'm doing a little talking blood in by doing some incredible work for Coca Cola and other things and started to destroy Madison Avenue. And now in these days, and we've spent less time talking about this. So I don't know as much as spending enormous amount of times in SF than with a contemporaries in Silicon Valley. So if you're a in my opinion too, because I've context of both the audience and Michael's career and what he's up to if you were a creator and you want to ask a question a macro and an often if you're listening to watching, you know how much talk about history tells you the future. I think there's no better time to call now putting your phone numbers, give Andy kind of your questions and he's looking right now. So what happens next, Michael late, you know, mid seventies, you started this company with two other morning that five live later across the way it became kind of more core like court, three right after right for different reasons. One of the guys retired, one of the guys kind of took a little bit of a backseat but stayed with us, but it was really Ron Meyer and Bill Haberman myself. And you guys had a core run for quite we had a good run. We had a good run. It's it's really incredible, isn't it? Well, what was the biggest challenge of running three headed monster? You know, that's I always say to cooks in the kitchen is already difficult. Well, I was really lucky. I had really good partners and we all split things up in a really interesting way. So Ron was fantastic with people inside the company and also was great with handling actors and actresses and Bill one better at putting television shows together. I mean, the guy had this extraordinary ability to read material and ideas and be like, and just instantaneously figure out if he could sell them as TV shows. And that left me an extraordinarily wide open field to run. So no one really stopped me from doing anything. And we had a different idea every week of what to do a different idea. And these guys supported. As a matter of fact, when we came up with the idea of working for Coca Cola and handling. All their advertising worldwide ad budget over six hundred million dollars and their prior agency was mccann-erickson. They had three hundred sixty five account executives. We came up with this idea that we could do this and do it better, and we could do it for less money and we could do it with six people. And Bill Haber came in as one of those six people and we produced over thirty five commercials a year for ten years, including the polar bears, which still run to this day and we did it with something that is known well today. But in those days didn't exist. It's called outsourcing and go figure get it. What can I tell you? We were outsourcing animation. We didn't have to own all the animators where outsourcing all of the production, but our clients basically directed these spots and we were doing thirty five spots for the cost of seven. That's right. We're being done by the large agency. And it was incredibly well coordinated and Bill spent an enormous amount of time on my collection for the book for a second. When is the book out tomorrow? Amazing. So out here today, right? I'm very excited about the son sun flip this real quick on the internet for margin because people have so rose with your Jaksic. Exactly. Michael. What's the one story in here? That is either a clarification. I mean you've such. I mean, guys, I'm telling you when you Google, whether it's Steven Seagal, whether there's it's incredible that breath, you know what's amazing about what Michael has done. A lot of us have careers but were known within our industry, what's amazing about being pioneer and at the tippy top, and I'm talking number one of Hollywood is like Ghostbusters. Everyone's like, oh, like my favorite stories of the old days is like which act or almost was who right? I think you're Ron, Ron managed. So Besser Sologne. Is that correct? So I remember in some somewhere, I heard that Silvester. Salone was almost Beverly Hills cop. Do you know about this or is this. I don't know what you listen. There's a lot of things that go on. I don't know. I'm asking you like there's truth to that, right? There's so many movies, but tell me that one because when you think Eddie as Beverley hookups, and now you're telling me, wait sly was strategically Iran or you or whoever was saying this would be good for your career because you're so rambled and rocky doubt. This can show different side of you. Just the thought that it was this close to select Stallone being Beverly Hills, cop, I think is fascinating. It is true, but you have to realize that these things there are so many films that had different elements attached to them and the elements changed. I get it and they changed me another one like 'cause I, this is what I could sit for. Give me one because to me, that's what everybody hold people like literally in the comments. Now, holy shit sly was almost like what's another one in the eleventh hour that the actor changed out or somebody said no, and they regretted one on the book. Tell me Schindler's List and Cape fear where Spielberg Scorsese traded films. That's. The morning, Marty develop Schindler's List and Stephen develop Cape fear and Stephen wanted to do Schindler's List for a whole series. Of course, mostly personal, Marty, who is one of the two of the greatest filmmakers in the history of the universe. Both doing projects that they basically decided would be better if they switch project. Yeah, let's just looking at all your faces and I'm sure it's going to me so. So what storing here, because there's so many stories. What did you either clarify and or what's a story in here that nobody's heard before? I couldn't even answer that Gary, there's there's. There are so many stories in this book that happened. The book basically was designed originally as ten deals was the name of the book. And that was ten years ago and you felt that you could wartime, and that was ten years ten years ago. So you thought through a series of telling stories about ten specific deals that you could help all the entrepreneurs and executives of like take the nuances from these ten separate deals. Here's a complete package in a blueprint for you to navigate. And what happened while I was doing it as the publisher kept asking for more information, and as I was working up in the valley, the brilliant young people that I work with the men and women. They were asking questions about, why did this work? Why did. This not work. They were as interested in the mistakes as they were in the successes. So I started to write more and more and more and the stories went beyond the deals. They went into actual stories of the creative process. You know, it's really fascinating and you of all people appreciate this. How do you define creativity? I will never forget an. It's in the book sitting in Japan. I had flown in been on a thirteen hour flight went to the hotel, took a shower, got ready, went to dinner, which is the middle of the night in LA went to dinner in Japan with the head of Matsushita Electric and five of his associates. I was with four of mine societas from CA and McCoy of me. Literally having the most extraordinary time staying awake. I get asked this question by the senior Matsushita official. What is creativity. Now, that question is almost impossible to answer, but in a strange way, tried to answer it or show some peaks of it in the book. How does a film like rain manner Tootsie or Ghostbusters drastic park or goodfellas? How do these movies get put together from a one line idea? That's right. So it's one line that's verbal and you look down the road in three years later, you're watching it in a movie theater. I will never till the day. I disappear off the planet ever lose sight of what an extraordinary privilege it has been to be involved in that process. Learn the process, be involved with people that understand the process, and it can actually transform an idea into something you can read see or hear in hindsight, Michael, that's that's amazing. In hindsight. I really wanted to ask this question and you're gonna, you're gonna play it off and be humble, but I really white answer. It's a please do this for me. What now that you can look back on it? You know, I think about people. I hate like Michael Jordan and Tom Brady, but this is more business. I like, there's there's, this is what this is the life of a two year old New York fan. We just happen to luckily be in the prime eras of like these players that are our competitors. What in hindsight, what did it feel like to truly be at the top of the game of a game of that size in those however, you? I'm sure everybody could define it differently. Some may say was an eleven year run a three run a four day run. You know, I'm not going to allow you to dodge it and say, Gary. I didn't never looked at it that way. It's inconceivable that you didn't understand at some point, holy cow or I'm so glad I did. It is what I set out to do that. You had an era where you were disproportionately the most powerful guy in Hollywood. How does it do you feel like now that you look back on it? Did it just did not realize it that it feel like it was an over pressure? Like what does it feel like to be in that in the eye of the storm? In the white heat moment for a prolonged period of time of a game, that's so visual. So first of all, you do feel it and you understand it. The question is, do you believe it? And I never believed it. I feel understood it. I understood it. I on. I'll tell you why understood it, because it's really a good question. I understood it because we had the ability to get things done that no one else could do. Right. So when you have that kind of Midas touch and you're what I on what I call a positive role, which is that everything that you're touching is working? Yes. The amount of films and TV show. Does that we put together? Yes, we had a fifteen year run that was unheard of and I don't think I'll ever be duplicated dance, right? We package close to three hundred movies, probably an equal number of television shows and you seen the list of the films there I- ACC now, does that mean that you let all that go to your head? We tried to basically handle it as best we could, but there are others around you that make that are affected, and there are people that write about you or people that are jealous or people that have been burned in the wake of the power curve. There's there's frankly a lot of negatives that get rolled into that great, big positive. So for me, I used to try to say to the staff, we have this giant club don't ever ever touch it, don't even reach for it. It's gonna call. Everybody knows that you have. We have this power to be able to get things made when we got. Marty Scorsese's. Last temptation of Christ made yes, which no one could touch or get done. Remember that was the that an we got Rainman made it. It was a movie that languished was put into turnaround by Warner Brothers, which means they basically rejected and said anyone that wants. I could have it when went through four directors and ended up getting a maiden at one six Academy Awards. These kinds of things prove that you have the ability. The issue is there are people in the wake of it short, the collateral that's collateral damage of San. I must say it. The collateral damage was bigger than I ever. The collateral is multifaceted because it's not just professional, it's personal, no, it's everything. I think people don't realize right. Not only your employees or competitor is it is your spouses and children, and they're just there's there's so much collateral with that kind of white heat. It's a sea of collateral damage, and there's not much you can do about it. I don't know anyone that's experienced the kind of run that we did that didn't have the collateral damage. And one of the reasons I wrote the book is that I came to the realization that it wasn't so good that we had all this collateral damage, and I often ask myself, could we have done it differently? And what do you come up within your own head nowadays? You know, this is going to be a not a popular answer but could have done it a little differently, but not a lot it because I think I, I apologize for jumping in. I'm going to understand that because as a creative businessman like, look, the reality is I am who I am like like, like I'm aware that I'm going to be in a similar realization. I already about things that would be what you don't realize is that your. It's like throwing a stone into a still water, and you have a series of concentric circles. You don't realize that you're the stone. Yeah. So it's not the first concentric circle that's an issue or the second or the third. It's the one way out there that you don't know exists, and there are people that work for you and they're all out here. They're speaking for you hundred percent. They don't also the right thing. I default the other way. I'm really. I mean, I think the only the way I tried to thoughtfully think about it over time as I fault in to when they are saying the right thing, you just can't control certain. So we tried hard to control. Yes, and that's why we reviewed as controlling, and we were viewed as having stepford as having stepford agents. Hello, Nicki. It's Gary banner, Shuki your arm. The Ascari be show with Michael Ovitz. Wow. Hello. What's your question? Thank you. So I got my question. Yeah, that's a good idea. Basically, I just wanted to ask with being with Creative Artists Agency. What something that when you work with a lot of other people kind of high profile that you don't want them to do that, you're like, oh, this is a mistake they made. They could have had. Been my client, but. Yeah, you'd be something you that you don't want them to do like what's a mistake that when you have artists who want to be your client, something that they do that prevents you from saying yes to them. Oh, you mean you mean the other way, where when you're at the at the top, like a CIA, what would emerging actor actress, director athletes, say that could actually turn off CA from saying, you know what? You're not the right client for us. Is that the question? Correct. Interesting. I've never had always. Yes, we want us normally ignobly. I've never thought, you know what's funny. I think about the twenty that both you and I reacted that way. A lot of people talk about be thoughtful about what my team very senior people. Lots of great people. We have to be thoughtful about who we bring in. They need to be the right kind of client. I'm like, yes, yes, yes. You know, it's funny that we both. Acted that way. So have you had a meeting where you were court? Let's go this way because I'd love to hear it a play on that question. Did you ever court somebody 'cause you're like, oh my God, that would be a crown jewel or that'd be a big get for the firm. And I know you went whale hunting. Was there ever as you were whale hunting through the years when you actually got closer to it, you said, oh shit. She or he is such a headache or they have this Boehner ability or or somebody in our stable has emerged as a direct competitor, and we don't have the band with. Was there ever to her to her point? Was there ever any that we had one situation which was really difficult for us, which is we as you've already mentioned, we handled so our Salone and he was very competitive with Arnold Schwarzenegger and on with somebody that I really wanted to be as he was. He's first of all, he's the most terrific guy. He's really smart and he really understood the paradigm of the action movie. It's better than anybody. If you look back at his body of work, that's pretty amazing. Thing, and I went after Arnold and wanted him and it got back to sly and he wasn't particularly. And that's not that was not. Is there? Is there a reason you're asking that question, or are you going through a path or anything like you're trying to navigate? Well, the reason why I ask is because I feel like as someone who's in Los Angeles and is, you know, along with a thousand hundreds of thousands of other people, what is it? People always ask, oh, what should I do to get into the door? And so I was like, there's something that I shouldn't do too when I'm trying to get into the door because like everybody has an answer for how to get into the door, but not like, hey, make sure you don't do this short of anything building. I think anything short of illegal or immoral. You should do whatever you feel you have to do to move your career ahead. We didn't. We were lucky. We went after talented people, and at the end of the day, talent wins out. And I think it's, it's when you're young, you have to look for breaks. You really have to look for breaks and they may be social. They may be business. They may be because you've got an idea. Let's not forget. We spoke about Stallone. This guy wrote a script call rocky back on spec on his own dime and sold his damn dog. Everybody wanted to buy that script and move him out of it and to his credit. He said, no me no script. And that's hard. When you're started stats really hard. We bought up a lot of guts to do that because he was offered a lot of money for that script. The thing that's different today than some of those years pass for sly or when you're at CA is people can now go direct to consumer. You can now produce content and used the distribution of an Instagram or YouTube or podcast to absolutely give you leverage to be courted in a very interesting way in the way that you created packaging with leveraging to studios the human can now create content to build leverage, tap people, bid for them. Absolutely. That's what happened to me. By the way real quick. My little quick CA stories. I started wind show on YouTube in two thousand six and July two thousand seven after showing up on Conan on late night because the producers reached out to me because they were watching it on YouTube. The next morning I had an Email from endeavor before the merger, William Morris, others everybody by Ronnie siklie. But a CIA then said on my show that I was going to Hollywood ca, find an agent. It was like this funny joke because I thought it was crazy. And then I got an Email from some people that work that way. They were having a fantasy football draft that day and they and they said, why don't you come and hang out with us? I didn't. I said, yes, but they didn't say they were from CA. They said, what are you doing here? I said, I'm going to see these Hollywood agents. They said, are you going to see? I said no, and they made it happen. And that's why I ended up signing with that was all based on me producing a wine show in a store in Springfield, New Jersey. There was no moving to l. a. and waiting on tables and going to auditions. We have an incredible world. We live in now where you can create the leverage for. Are you on the back of the internet, different different time completely different. In our day, there were roughly twenty five companies that controlled the complete gate. In other words, the barrier to entry it was severe. You had seven studios. He had four networks. You had five publishing houses. You had five record companies and probably you know, ten companies in Europe that controlled everything that you would read, see and hear. Our company had relationships with all these companies the end. If you were a client, you got in the door. If you warned on a client you, you had trouble getting in the door today. This person that called in if they could make something three minutes long using their iphone or a small Sony camera, they could put it up and if it went viral good God, who do you love me the dance. He's in Drake, Shaggy's in Drake's video four months later one video and interim it goes. I mean, just incredible time. It's the. Only song, my three year old grandson wants to hear. Mm. Go back a little bit into the buck. Brad, this Gary shuck, and you're in the ass. Gary v show with Michael Ovitz. Oh my gosh. And having an out of experience. That is a very good thing. Thank you for taking my call. No worries. What is your question? My friend. Well, I know that mister Ovitz you had a tough slog with Disney that ended poorly. Just wanted to get your comments on what lessons you took from that. That session don't go to Disney. Now that doesn't include the theme parks. I happen to like them was, as I said in the book, it's the biggest career mistake I ever made. I completely misjudged it and it's a, it's a really good example of how and why not to be your own counsel. And it's funny you brought that up once when we first met about not being your own council and the value of y were Cindy other for everybody at home. Just give him the one to two minute. Cliff notes, three of us know what we're talking about, but I think it'd be fascinating for everybody at home. What is the Disney chapter? The Disney chapter is about starts with my set of meetings with Michael Eisner. It goes through the time when he had a heart attack, and I stayed in the hospital with them for five to six days. And he asked me to come on board to originally be the co CEO, and then that went back down to being the president COO and then went to be the president, and then. I showed up at his house for first meeting prior to starting all the people were supposed to report to me, he decided weren't going to report to me. So it was kind of over before it started yet. And did he know that at that point I end line new at the minute that point you knew it when I was sitting in his living room at his house when the when he had the CFO the chief legal officer there, he, they said, they weren't going to report to me and he didn't do anything about it said, okay. I mean, if he was the CEO that really wanted this to get it and he wanted a partner. I mean, what we were trying to do is set up a partnership the way Bob Daly and Terry Semel had or Don Keough and Roberto goes at Coca-Cola or Tom Murphy and Dan Burke at ABC cap cities were powerful partnerships. These were big companies. Disney was about the by, say, it was going to be a behemoth company more than one person could run. So the concept was to create a dynamic partnership. Understand, thanks for the call brother. Hey, thanks, Gary quick. Quick question. What do you know about Okeanov and wines? I know that the peon award from that region super treat me like right before I made the transition to Silicon Valley from the wine world. I thought that the that British Columbia and Vancouver was an Okinawan region specifically was make were making wines that I thought were world class, but nobody knew how to market them in the same way that I look at Baja, California Mexico. I think the two best wines in the world that nobody knows anything about our Okinawan Pinot noirs and Baja California cabernet from Mexico, because if you roll up on anybody and talk about wine Mexico and Vancouver or not coming out of their mouth. So what I know about them is they're obnoxiously high quality with absolutely no brand awareness. Antastic. Got it. And I thought Okinawa's in Japan, I. I know. No, you're, you know you, you love Japan. Our love Japan. That's like you still. Do you go there often? I haven't recently, but I used to go once a month once a month once a month. Oh, man. That's hard core. We're gonna leave it off here. I want to use the final time for Michael. I've so many entrepreneurs. Young entrepreneurs were all ages, but I know the base who's listening to this show lot of fifteen to thirty five with plenty older, but like what's at this point as somebody who spent the last decade plus in Silicon Valley culture and all those leaders obviously l. a. just, you know, man of the world would Japan in New York. It just you've played it. You've played it at the highest levels for three or four, five decades. Like what? What do you think is the universal things that people should be thinking about regardless of the internet? Not internet regardless of the time, no networks unlimited networks with the internet. What are the traits or the characteristics when you know what you've had is a really amazing. I. I view into both creative and business titans that have been able to be successful. It's not just that's what's so beautiful about the business. You had much what I like about bainer. It's an I get other views into the world. You've had that at the highest levels. Are there theme or two of individuals that are able to succeed, or is there anything that stands out? So great question. Nothing has changed for me from the day. I started in the entertainment business through today. When I work up in the valley between San Francisco and San Jose, it is all about the person hundred percents all about the person. Nothing else matters to me. They could have an idea that you think is good if the person's great invest in the person, maybe their second or third ideal be better than their first, but it's all about giving me a historic story in pop culture that I think we don't enjoy that. You so believed in the person where their first idea wasn't as strong in the second one was they made. I dunno transformers what? Whatever where you can fr-. Likely looked almost any director early work, you know, but you you look at their early work. It doesn't look anything like their mature work, where you look at some of the actors at started out. I mean, Sydney Pollack who's a great director who was very important to see a started out as an actor and frankly, he wasn't a great started out. He started out with Redford and Redford turned out to be a better actor and Sydney turned out to be an extraordinary director who then became a great actor. And if you remember his role in Tootsie where he played the agent, which I thought was really kind of fun since I got to coach them and everyone starts out slow and the careers that to me are the best are like trains coming out of a station momentum. I am not big on instantaneous stardom. I don't think they get the vulnerability. I think it's a huge phone. 'cause there's nowhere to go, but down. Who can you think of an example of somebody who's able to calibrate instant. Fame and build on top of that overtime is anything come to mind. Nice. I mean, I think of like, I don't wanna comment on anybody's career per se, but I will say that in the music business, it's a big one hit. Wonder is the first song. Yeah, it's it's, it's really gonna happen. So fast. It happens fast. They come and go, and it's really unfortunate. You know, we were in the business of building career scary. We were in the business Americans. Well, we we were in for the long run. Yeah, you know, when you meet Tom Cruise at nineteen, you wanna make sure that it lasts, especially when you believe in the person, you don't want to have somebody flame out quickly. And by the way with bringing up the point that you raised when you look at today's world with instantaneous medication and five g. around the corner. Oh my God, it's just too easy to flame out. You know what I love about you that I have so many people I interact with the fact that I believe that five g. is one of the most outrageous technologies that are here. This is not like wait to what have you, and the fact that so few people are bringing up the fact that you drop that subtly in this interview is like a, I personally enjoy that. I tend to do things like that. Make reference. Nces think like, do you believe that anybody are you stunned by how few people understand how big of technology change? Five g. is going to be over the next couple years. What I'm stunned by his, how few people in the world really have grasps the changes the technology are bringing right now beyond what they think they think they're big, but they're humongous. And when they start looking at what's happening coming down the road five g. is that tip of the iceberg. Let's get into. It's a whole different game hundred percent. I mean, the applications for this are beyond comprehension, particularly to businesses that are stratified businesses, these businesses, these big businesses, the fortune five hundred companies. This has got to be at the very top of their agenda priorities, but it's not because everything's Wall Street dynamics and they're trying to maximize margin. One of the things I learned early on is don't think in quarters, and I learned that by traveling to Asian the eighties, don't think in quarter start thinking long term, watching how different cultures react to different things. The other thing I learned in Asia, which was great as have some respect for your elders, and now that I'm an elder, you like that much. Like what? What parting shots? What? What did we not cover in this session that you'd like to talk about or anything that's on your mind or things that you'd like people to think about? No, I don't think you've covered pretty much everything. I mean, there's a zillion stories in the naked city. It's right now, and I've got a lot of stories. Let me ask one thing this, the Ford seven to eleven people that you gave this book to ready that have read it. These clearly people that have been your friends for thirty years or family member. What is what's been the feedback you've gotten from this book that either feels best and door is most surprising that you didn't see, but three people have commented on that ready? Well, the person that I gave the book to through the whole writing the book is the person I live with and. And tomorrow melon. And she's the one who had say to me, you're. This really thanks. This is awful. This is the person who I trust. She's been pretty positive on the end result. And has it feel the day before the book are excited? I mean, you were, you know. You know, my correct like you you not explore you. You had some like you were very interested in the publishing game back in the day. Like you saw a lot of opportunity in that space that other people didn't see. I, we represented usually half the New York Times bestseller list on a weekly basis. Somebody who sat on the other size has been the most bizarre starting with when I started talking to. Yep. I told you that when we talked, this is insane. I planned the publicity trips. I planned all of the different shows that people would do. I would supervise anything that the big authors would do, and I would sometimes sit in when they did some of the interviews. I find this to be absolutely hysterical that I'm on this side of the table. I can't believe it. If you're watching, I highly recommend you pick this up on Amazon or local bookstore. I have a very funny. Listen, lot of, you know, my spiel. I'm unbelievably passionate about history telling you the future. And when you get to see players play. At the highest level and articulate specially in storytelling form. I know that this audience specially how reacts to me picks up on those nuances. I think this will be extremely beneficial to a lot of you whether you know Michael deeply or Dono him at all. I, I have a funny feeling a lot of you'll appreciate it. So pick it up support this man and Michael appreciate you being on. Thank you so much. Now question of the day question of Zara thing for every. Yes, you get to ask the question. What is your question to the banner nation? My question is pretty simple. We have. We are in the middle right now of audience viewership change. Yes. And it is dead center in the middle of it. We come from a world at least I do where we watch things day and date, and now we're in a world where everything is streamed on demand present, and I want to know what the audience thinks of this new change and what it's done also to the unique film. The uniqueness of the. Film business with television and the on demand world has kind of taken the spark on of the film business. Yeah, that's right, Michael. Thank you so much. My friend health. You keep asking questions will keep answering them.

Michael Hollywood Michael Ovitz Gary New York director William Morris Google Silicon Valley Los Angeles CIA Facebook Japan Creative Artists Agency YouTube Coca Cola Bill partner EMMY Bill Murray
134 Wisdom At Work w/ Chip Conley

Christopher Lochhead Follow Your Different™

58:29 min | 10 months ago

134 Wisdom At Work w/ Chip Conley

"Thanks for pressing play. This is Christopher lockhead. Follow your different. The number one odd cast for people who appreciate real different conversations shins about business marketing and life on this episode a super powerful conversation about life design and particularly midlife midlife design. And you know frankly wherever you are in life. I think you're gonNA find this a powerful fascinating conversation because we continue our run of legendary authors auto owners on this episode ship Conley. He was the founder of Joie de Vivre hospitality which is the second largest operator of Boutique. Hotels tells the United States. He started the company at Twenty six years of age back in nineteen eighty seven and he held the CEO position for nearly twenty four years until until Until he sold the company and then Interestingly enough after that you know what do you do as a second act. If you're a hugely successful hotel honor Berm. He ended up joining. What at the time was a pretty unknown? Startup called AIRBNB to help the young founders of AIRBNB navigate the gate their growth and create a whole new travel category. And of course that's what they were able to do on this episode. We talk about why chip thinks that people need a midlife reset. Listen especially for. What ship calls his emotional equation? And there's a ton more here based on chips new book the wisdom at work that I think you're gonNA love go to lockhead dot com. Check out the show notes and key takeaways for this episode and I also want to say a special. Thank you to my my friend. Sybil Klein Michael for connecting chip. And I- thanks so much symbol now. In Japan athletic brand a-6 needed ERP software system system to help drive growth throughout Asia. And that's why they turned to my friends at nets. We'd from Oracle you see six needed to move quickly to create a complete business system system for their sales operations in India in Singapore and they needed. ERP An earpiece suite that could be managed without the help of an IT department and an earpiece wheat was flexible enough to integrate with its corporate on premise financial software. And that's why they chose net sweet from Oracle Michael because net sweet is the number one cloud this business system. And that's we'd offers you a full picture of all of your finances in one place in real time right from your phone or your desktop to schedule your free demo right now and to receive your free guide the seven key strategies to grow your profits checkout net sweet dot com slash different. That's net sweet dot com slash different for your free guide today now speaking of careers. Are you looking to start or restart your career. My friends at crash are here to help checkout crash dot co slash different. That's crash dot dot co slash different. Where you can learn how to win your next job hunt in the most unpredictable creative and innovative ways crash dot Bacau slash different as well if you're a regular listener And in particular if you've listened to lockhead on marketing. You've heard Eddie. Union talk about the power of a data flywheel and I think we're getting to a point where data is actually more valuable than cash. And that's why I love my friends at spunk. You see spunk. Is the leader in data to everything. Spunk helps you bring data every question every decision and every action in real time checkout checkout spunk dot com slash D to e and you can learn how to turn data into doing that's spunk dot com slash D to e As in data to everything now heyhoe let's go hip. It's great to meet you. Christopher I'm honored and I wish I was Santa Cruz with you right now. Where are you right now? I'm actually at the beach as well as Surfer Beach An hour north of Kabul Lucas in Baja California Mexico. It's an area called PESCHIERA and L.. Peschiera it's right right next to us. Yeah no I know exactly where you are. That's cool. I assume you're down there on a pleasure or actually given what you do could be multiple reasons. What are you doing down on Youtube? I'M WE HAVE OUR MODERN ELDER Academy here which I'm sure we'll talk about and the world's first midlife wisdom school so we've got a four Acre campus us right on the beach and you said it's the world's first midlife wisdom school why I like the category design their chip very thoughtful. Ah Let's talk about it and you can tell you you to give me feedback. I I I like it on the other hand. I'm not sure what you think of modern elder which is another other brand. I came up with but so I look this is great. I just love the fact that you are going to be able to talk Turkey today. Yeah I I. I'm so glad our friends who will put us together. I You know look some people criticize me about this but I don't give a shit. I admire the hell cloudy. I think you're fucking awesome. Thank you well why they give you the ship for because you say that to your guests are okay. Okay will I mean I. I guess I wouldn't be guest if you didn't like me. It's not it's your choice not by. I mean you know the fact that you you've asked me We've decided we're GONNA do this together. It's great I love. Yeah and so You know way to go on the career and the life. Yeah I mean honestly asleep. I think we're all role models strode other one of the long ago after I started my hotel company one of the things I learned. was that calling someone. A manager or leader didn't quite a role model for a whole month. We said all of our managers leaders in the hotel company. You're not going to be a manager manager leader this month. You're a role model and fact anytime you're used. Were manager leader. You can't use it you have to use Walmart and it was fascinating and I say this from the perspective that we are all role models reach other in life especially in the workplace. Yeah when you realize your role model it steps up your game a little bit. You know how you hire accountable to not just yourself. It's so interesting you say that because I'm reminded of a buddy of mine. J Larsen who's a software. CEO Grain Executive. He and I were having a conversation on the podcast about mentoring. And people ask them all the time you know would you be my mentor or Nissen that and so forth and so on. And he shared a story about Ray Lane when ray was the The president of Oracle and he said look. Here's the Best S.. Mentoring I can give you me being fucking great at my job and so it's a little bit like that isn't it. There's no doubt yeah I mean. Hopefully there's a little bit more instruction than that this model stuff down. Yeah I I don't know I think think what's interesting to me. In the era we live in today is especially in the workplace. It's not about mentorship as much as it's more about Mitchell mentorship. How do we learn from each other? And the last seven years I've been involved with the three founders of AIRBNB for years as the in House Mentor tobriand the CEO and head of global hospitality strategy. And then three years isn't advisor but the truth is that I was brought in as the old guy to help them. Who is my hospitality in leadership entrepreneurship experience? But they taught me as much as I taught them truthfully. And that's the that's the era we live in The hierarchy not of wisdom and physics of Wisden doesn't just move in one direction from old young. It actually moves in both directions what I see though unfortunately for a lot a lot of people in Midlife and later is not open to being curious and being that beginner's mind they don't WanNa look like an idiot at age forty five or shifty and so they're not actually that open to learning someone younger than them and yet Christopher forty percent of Americans today have a boss that's younger than them and by the year. Twenty twenty five the majority of Americans will have a bias young and we have no history in the organization world like this so I think it's an interesting era where we have to learn from you. Know from generation can learn from each other well and the other the sort of cool thing about you saying that that is I gotta believe given a how old you are when you founded joint. Vive or were you. You're in your twenties where you know I was twenty six. Yeah so you were the younger anger boss for a very long time now And you know I had some of that a little bit my career as well and it is a weird thing when you start hurt you know twenty eight years old thirty years old and there's a forty five year old reporting right. It's it's it's weird on both sides at least in the beginning it is weird on both sides for sure but the in the past twenty years ago it wasn't very very frequent or wasn't something you'd see much today. You see it a lot and it's partly because we live in an era era. Where Digital Intelligence de Chu is prized? And there's an impression and it's probably a generalization that has some accuracy to it which is that younger people are digital natives. There they have more fluency an ability to learn in the digital world and so what you still has companies not just tech companies. There's just limited to silicon valley all a Silicon Valley engineer shows. Like he's a he or she is a Rehill at age thirty five. That is true in a lot of canal. But what's happened is because seven of the ten most valuable companies in the world. Today are tech them. It's almost like all companies look like tech companies and therefore this this this need for digital intelligence or D Q is true in the advertising industry and Financial Services Retail and so you see more and more companies hiring people at very young ages to have three senior positions. I think it's great. And I think what we have to recognize is is expecting young digital leaders to miraculously embody the relationship wisdom's and emotional intelligence. That those of us been around a little a bit longer have built over. Decades is an unrealistic expectation. And you know whether it's we work or UBER or Theranos US or I can list a bunch of companies. That could've used what I call a modern elder by the side of the CEO. Yeah it is a fascinating insight and and I didn't realize that forty percent of Americans already have a younger vase. That's right the other interesting thing and this may be tangential. But maybe we'll chat. You'll you'll help you'll you'll chase them. Zebras down some Unicorn holes with me but it also strikes me. Maybe this is more so in the tech world That I grew grew up in. But you'll tell me that if by age forty five ish plus or minus you aren't acknowledged as has use whatever words you want leader expert. Send say subject matter expert craftsmen or woman etcetera etcetera that if generally by your peers by plus or minus forty five. They don't view you as competent effective reliable at some level of mastery. You're Kinda fucked. That's that's the other thing that's going on here in my mind is if you're going to be respected like I think about myself in the context of the young people that you describe and I worked with lots of that right and and I think part of why they don't blow me off as the old guy is because like. Hey you know what I kind of am the old master sent say. And you have done that right you. You have made the transition from up and coming contender to heavyweight champion of the world to retire champion now coach of the next champions Champions e you did that someone wants to chip went from being boy. Wonder it's a modern elder pretty quickly. Yeah I you know when you're founder of a company at Twenty six growing into the second largest boutique up in the world but I did that over twenty four years so what is very true about the past and the past being twenty five years ago maybe is generally speaking. We didn't see companies blow up to the size. They do as quickly as they do today. And especially if you're in the bricks and mortar world world like I was so it took took me to grow from one person to thirty five hundred people over twenty four years fifty two hotels but I had in an awful lot of iteration along the way in my skills and my wisdom and how a metabolize D- my experiences uh-huh and so by the time I got to you know the timer selling it was a different a whole different story. I the thing that you said that I want to come back to. which which is there is an element? This is A. This is part of the reason why the U. Curve of happiness which is one of the most interesting social science discoveries coverage in the last ten years which shows is that people generally have a reduction in happiness from age twenty five to forty five and then at forty two hundred fifty. It bottoms out sometimes insert early fifties depending upon the country in the world. The graph looks like a smile. Yes it looks like smell like they exactly the Amazon smile except for at the bottom of the fucking I can smile. You're at forty five to fifty and that's when you hit your bottom and this varies your your mileage. May there you so this big depending on where you are on this but what. What's absolutely true? Is that part of that has to do with this disappointment. He was expectations menaced. It is reality emotional equation. I like which is we. We grow up with these expectations. And then it's when do you hit that point where disappointment starts to kick in in a major way and you sort of spoke to at age forty five. It's when you actually realize that the the perfect soulmate that you thought your spouse was maybe not your spouse or that the kids that you're going to have going to all be present. The United States are are now in prison or that opportunity to become a CEO. Someday Yeah you could go and get a franchise of mailbox mailboxes. EXCETERA and set it up but you know you're not going to be running a Silicon Valley company and life gets horrible right and one of your parents get cancer. Answer something and there's the body starts to deteriorate and and what happens in mid lies in middle ages really squarely at forty thirty five to sixty s about you know sort of slightly early midlife. MIDLIFE has been considered historically forty five to sixty five. I now call it. Thirty five seventy five because people irrelevant the earlier and they're going to work longer says it used to be a crisis now. It's just a marathon so I think what's interesting is there is a hold on. Did you say it. It used to be a crisis and now it's a marathon or did I did that blow by me wrong so say again. What do you mean by that? That term midlife crisis is fifty four years it was created in one thousand nine hundred sixty five and let's just be honest. We've done zero as a society who actually tackled this crisis question. There's some evidence. Is that okay. MIDLIFE crisis doesn't exist exactly except lobster showed his people hit a bottom around forty five to fifty. It just happens. Social Science is pretty clear now across all cultures it became a marathon because people start doing irrelevant earlier in a lot of industries. And then it it's a marathon on the other end because if you're gonNA live to ninety five or hunters you may work to your seventy five still midlife sort of ends at the end of your career. That's historically how we thought love it and the Social Science World and we certainly have an identity crisis because so much of our identities been tied up in our career and if we're not career Joie Aviv anymore than who are we right exactly. And so one of the reasons that I created the damn modern elder academy which has been going on now for two years here in Baja is because I was writing my book wisdom at work making a modern elder after my depicting experience Airbnb and the fact that if we're living in a world where people are living longer powers the younger and the world is changing faster. Those three variables are completely critic in the irrelevancy gap for people in Midlife. Were they feel irrelevant at a younger age and for longer so and the suicide rate in the United States for people forty five to sixty four. His spikes I got up twenty percents in the last twenty years so what I decided to do is create this modern elder academy. Because I believe there's a the need for us to create a place where people can do a reset. The idea that you're GONNA go learn in your high school your college graduate school years if you go to graduate school then you're GonNa use all that knowledge out for the rest of your life is imagining that you're driving across the you know the United States on one tank of gas. That's a long journey and you need more than one. Thank you guess you need to eat a pit stop occasionally and yet. We don't have anything in the way of pit stops people in my had life to ask themselves the question. What mastery have I mind? What wisdom have I cultivated? In how can I harvest it. How could I re purpose visit? And frankly what is it. I Really WanNa do with my life because I just frankly been living the life that my parents wanted me to live and I'm in a career. That wasn't the thing I really wanted to do at age. Twenty twenty two but enough forty six and I'm I'm desperately unhappy and I know I am not going to be ill company and I'm not GonNa be any more likely succeed off and unhappy so people are saying how do I press the reset button. So that is a lot of us. Didn't realize there's a very good chance we're we're GONNA multiple careers that all this. I may or may be connected right. Yeah I'm going to have a portfolio life and I'm certainly in terms of identity I think if you're if you're hopefully having a a a a life that you're proactively designing let me say it that way you're going to have All kinds of identities right. You're going to be a son. You're going to be a husband. Maybe you're been maybe you're going to be a father and you're going to be friends and you and I should talk about learning surfing later. Live 'cause one now we're in a surfer and then our surfers and watch during your investor and you're an allow a lot of us if you're sort of going for it there's a lot of use cases of you absolutely and frankly I think the time when we're most confused by all of those identities is around forty five to fifty and so we created something called the Great Midlife Edit at the academy and it's really within the first twenty four hours. It's a week long program for twenty four hours. We do this great midlife Ed. It's a pretty intense process is eighteen of us. Eighteen people if in the cohort no word each week and but you go through the process of say what is it. It's not serving me anymore whether it's a mindset whether it's historical knowledge whether it's an identity that I ah been holding onto that really doesn't define me anymore whether it's relationships that will really serve me anymore and in one day you can't just say okay. It's all changed. That's why it's a week long program but that's why we do the hard part at the start and in my book. There's four lessons in the book. In a lesser ones evolved lesson listen to learn threes collaborate for his council and to the first lesson evolve is really in essence saying in order to evolve. You have to edit some things you have to be willing need to let go of some things that are are really meant to they. Carl young two psychologists said long ago. You can't live the afternoon of your life. Based upon the the rules of the morning and this morning is pre pre forty forty five afternoon is maybe forty five to sixty five and then the leave your lady. Yeah I met fifty nine sort of the thing. That's interesting is actually. This is where the midlife marathon the evening of your life. Maybe has just moved from sixty five to seventy five because you're gonNA live ten years longer potentially and if that is true. What do you do with this era of life? Where your your sort of young old you might have been the old young at one place and then at some point it's flips and I'd probably probably flips around forty five or fifty again damn that forty five and fifty? Why isn't there a book that comes out just says? Beware of forty-five speed limit. Forty five. Something something sneaks to like beware. There's there's a I don't know about you because I grew up with the game of life. Remember that board game. Yeah of course negate the game of life you it had it had one past. There was a singular path. And if you get to the end of the game of life you had one path bullshit that is not. It's not how it works anymore. No and yet we sort of have a bunch of people sir living their lives as if they're still on that road map and no-one said slippery when in wet or you know there's a u-turn ahead or whatever well and look I think it's I think it's still a radical idea that you can design in your life that you can make choices and take a set of actions that materially change the outcome of whatever trajectory. Your life is on. Can you can could do that intentionally. Right and then the other thing of course we get to do is sometimes life profoundly only fucking stocks. His something truly horrible happens right and we get tested and then again we have a choice. Who are going to be right? who going to be when it's fucking horrible? And so the interesting thing to me about it. Is I think for a lot of people. It's a radical rely dea that we are more than just a reaction to something coming at us a beautiful quote from Victor Franklin and his famous Amos booked mansard for meaning best. When less profound books? I'm in between stimulus and response. There is a space in that space. Is Your power to choose your response and India Response Laser growth and your freedom why we are not issued a the book upon turning eighteen. Although let's start by it's a pretty depressing book it's a it's a psychologist in a concentration camp. How in Germany or offshoots? Maybe he's in Portland on it. You know he's basically a Jew amongst the Nazis and he's seeing what's happening in a concentration camp we saw on the you know with what the first half of the books are read. Because unless you frankly if you're going through a bad person of your life we've read the first half of that book you say Wow God concentration camp. I haven't had that experience. My life is bad but it's not that bad it's it makes you really realise how much pain humans can withstand and still live. And that's really what he learned was the fuel for people in concentration camp wasn't how much they're eating. It was how much they used meaning or hope as fuel on meaning even more so than hope Because meaning actually has this something more some something deeper hope coat could a little kid can be hopeful. But I'm not sure four year old necessarily understands meaning and meaning is weaving your life experience year. Some element of may be innocent spirituality. Run something bigger bigger than yourself and the sense of wanting to serve and y you know at the end of this time is terrible time. You're going through. There may be awesome beautiful guests that you're able to give people because of what you have experienced. And what what wisdom. The wealth of wisdom that came from so that you could gain meaning from severe pain. is at least somewhat of comfort comfort while experiencing the severe pain. He asked somehow being tested. And I'M GONNA come out the other side of this thing a better person and fucking right. The the the biology lesson that we learned from when we were kids was the idea of the the Caterpillar to butterfly and imagine if what if our life was the Caterpillar to butterfly transformation. Any such that you know in their twenties and thirties were. We're that Caterpillar. On the leaf eating the leaf booking up getting plumbed and then around forty to forty five miraculously or strangely we just basically start spinning a Chrysalis and turn ourselves upside down and go into this cocoon. It's dark and Gooey. That feels. It's a really scary. And you know what's on the other side and that is forty five to fifty or Midlife to some of your early midlife and then on the other side ride. There is a butterfly now. Our societal narrative on aging is not biology lesson but euchre happiness happiness actually shows that it's true and there's a bunch of evidence now that starting to show frankly there's a there's a lot of unexpected pleasures of aging. How liberalism a bit? Let me a couple examples here. The thing that everybody knows is that as the brain ages it is not as good at memory or or as quick as it used to be the biology the brain speaking of job I'm sorry what's your name again. I couldn't help L. Myself. The voice inside my head got loose. That's okay that's okay now so so we know that we so yes. There's an element of aging brain has has applause one of the things. That's true about the brains actually shrink slowed at the time and winnings is starting to be proven. Is that what the brain gets better at at with. Time is the left brain right rain tango but I mean by that I mean the following. Is that you as someone who is listening to something or hearing something. We're just you're able to more easily and adeptly moved from your lyrical sides your logical side you can synthetically think a little bit more which basically means that you're able to connect the dots and think holistically so as you get older. Your intuition gets better as you get older older. You're able to be a better advisor at externally because you can move up thirty thousand feet in the air to see something everybody else can't see and so this is another unexpected pleasure Beijing Also emotional intelligence actually tends to grow with age. IQ does not. It's it's relatively fixed in a lifetime And that's true for you to Christopher At but for for each do you can cultivate and harvest your issue. A relies time then so I just said okay. Gosh the EUCHRE happiness people get happier. They actually don't even get happier more content contents which isn't even a different state that in your twenties. You don't even know what that means if you see you see the word content in your twenties. You think you've talked about contents so there's like no it's not content content. What are we talking about yes as you get older? You get work intense as you get older you improve your response as you get older. You have better intuition and wisdom if you cultivated. That doesn't mean that all older people are wiser than younger. People know that is not a case. No one of my favorite favored expressions about that. Yes there's a difference between ten years of experience and one year experienced ten times over again exactly instead. I mean there's a lot of stupid older people. Yeah I'm not even going to start naming names but we know S- of some of them and and I made a business this discussion with one right now and. Wow this guy has the I q of maybe his shoe size. Yeah yeah well that's probably yeah I mean what are you GonNa do. So how are you going to get through that with Christopher. Well we'll see we're right in the middle of it but he's he's been banging and prancing around like he's the tough guy and all his stuff and he doesn't realize it but he's negotiated himself into a corner corner. We're going to let them know that he's in the corner with a two by four to the head and turn the tables on them and he set the whole thing up but he's so stupid he didn't play three moves out and we did go through. Your Middle Name is checkmate interesting. Checkmate lockhead its stock. When he under he C- he thinks he's got the upper hand and he absolutely doesn't and we're about to tell them and he's GonNa lose his fucking mine? Yeah well you know unfortunately bitty it's not being professional. He's this guy is completely unprofessional. Yeah let's let's let's use this as an example. Just you say you know. Life doesn't have to be fully adversary of all the time and it feels like it is based on the nature in discourse in the United States at times but the but the truth is that there's ways to create collaborative relationships with people who you are at odds with and who are in different generations We have I five generations in the workplace for the very first time now and You know this whole thing okay. boomer and okay millennials like you know. The truth is boomers millennials when he gen xers Gen Z.. And the sound generation all have something to bring to the table it's like an intergenerational potluck and the question is like how do you create organizations that know how to create a damn good potluck so people are able to to bring to the table what they do best and learn from each other so I think yeah I. I'm I'm cautiously optimistic about it because my experience not just an Airbnb but in a bunch of other organizations In the last few years has has been such that. I am seeing growing sense of people in midlife realizing the only way they're going to actually be relevant is to actually be open to changing an open to learning again The problem we have as a society though Is So the word. Adolescence is one hundred fifteen fifteen years old. The the whole premise of adolescence didn't exist before that. It did exist people who were adolescents. But we didn't have a word or a way to describe what was in essence security and the preparation for adulthood and once adolescence as concept got introduced in nineteen ninety four. We created public junior high schools and high squirrels as as way for people to prepare for adulthood. Will I think it's time we do the same in Midlife. It's time just realize that there's an era that's now called middle essence adolescence middle lessons adolescents. Happens are you know in your early teens to mid doing chip keep going. I love so middle essence. And I'm not the one who came up with this gerontologist and and the social scientists came up and it's not been popularized I'm the popular as it. Middle Essence is a similar similar era of life where you're going to psychological physical hormonal changes on between often between age forty five and sixty and during that time time You are shifting out of the operating system of the ego into the operating of something deeper. I'll call it the soul. This is this. Is this the day you look in the mirror and you go. Hey out. Who put the picture of Dennis Hopper in the bathroom that you're talking about you know what I don't know if we you see the mirror but we certainly see it on facebook with takes a picture of you know like oh or the worst as you go to your reunion getting your high school reunion in your forties or fifties? And you're like Oh my God God do I look like this people. Yes you do actually the funnest thing about that is i. Don't know if you had this experience but people either look the same plus or minus to me or I don't recognize there seems to be very little in between. Yeah let's be honest. It's meant and to actually not age age as well as the man on average I was at this event the other day chip and there was this guy there who I hadn't seen in I don't know maybe fifteen years and A former colleague and he came up to me and started talking to me and he's talking to me in a very familiar your way like he knows me and so I'm responding but I don't know who the fuck he is. The name tags her for her. I think everybody should wear name tags all the time in life and anyway so I'm having this sort of fake it till I make it because this person either thinks they know me or does know anyway you know within sort of the first three minutes I realized who this is and my head explode. He looks terrible now. I mean it's the long subject we can go into their because well it. Yeah I think what's interesting to me on. This is that we don't have the twentieth century we had three new era's egg Created one was adolescence as I said that was a nineteen Oh for creation and help people understand that you know there's a there's a what we call limited period a transitional period between childhood and adulthood. And that's adolescence adolescence. The other Second period of time to actually got defined in the twentieth century was retirement. Retirement didn't really exist in the nineteenth century So retirement was something that was a twentieth century Christian. Do both of these. I two things got a ton of money and societal attention etc excetera in the twentieth century. A lot of government especially what has midlife gotten real. Life is the third one isn't it. Goes Take care of your own ass by Midlife. That's exactly right. I love this. I love this one. We should spend the next three hours. But we're not going to because the great midlife edit. I can only talk so long. So the thing is yes. It's such a great comment because there's an element of young people will. They're not ready to to be adults yet and older people there at the later stage of their life. MIDLIFE wallets the new era because in the year nineteen hundred long Jimmy and the US is forty seven seventy seven year two thousand. We added thirty years of longevity in one century so midlife is a new creation. Yes the premise. Is your supposed to have of your shit together in Midlife and hamlet and that's true and I think there's an element. The midlife crisis came up in nineteen sixty five was coined because not everybody has their shit together and maybe there's some fallacy to that but then take that a few decades later when in fact being in Midlife is not the the era takes you into in the working world your hierarchy. Where on the org chart you have just paid your dues and now you're running the show and you only have to work four to six hours a day and you go out and play golf? I mean this is obviously was when describing here is generally white men of privilege the older who were able to do that. Not Everybody who fit that profile. But let's just acknowledge that forty or fifty years later after midlife crisis racist got people in their life are like forgotten you know. They're going out to pasture earlier feeling irrelevant earlier. And so the idea of the crisis or the idea that people need to sort of figure it out. Well guess what would a lot of people are using to figure it out is saying I'm GONNA kill myself. You know sixty percent growth in female suicides in the United States between forty five and sixty four between two thousand and today and thirty. Seven percent growth for men Almost fifty percent between the two and the reason men's is lower just because women then had to hire started the higher level. The men are five times as of the two thousand worst five times as likely to commit suicide as women so let's just realize yes everybody. It feels like you're supposed to have it together and mid life and everybody feels like oh it's supposed to be my good period in my life. It's like well now. There's a lot of ship. It happens a lot transitional things that go on and yes society in some ways it's conspired against you actually make you less relevant and less powerful in this era than it would have been fifty years ago and so why. Why is it that we need midlife wisdom schools and schools in tools to help people midlife because of all the things I've said so Suck it up. buttercup is the inappropriate response. It's very funny. You say that because we've had now thirty nine cohorts each a week or two weeks long here and and one of the names themselves and one of the courts a couple of weeks ago said. We're GONNA cars buttercup and I was like. Why are you going to call your buttercup eighteen percent is because second buttercup markup. Yeah so hey fuck figure it out is not the appropriate response. Because you're telling us there's a crisis now I gotta ask askew sort of paint a picture of contrast for me between jawed. Vive an AIRBNB. Yeah well Was something I started at age. Twenty six AIRBNB was something I joined aged fifty two and the founders were twenty six or started their company. Do you want to Arosa Boutique Hotel Cup. Into innovated and really fundamentally as a boutique hotel company helped innovate the hospitality industry AIRBNB. He disrupted the hospitality industry the difference between innovation and destruction is technology. And so you know disruption happens faster allows is it to grow bigger And so what I would say. Is that In looking back at my career we were in slow motion at the time. It didn't feel like slow motion but today it would have felt like slow-motion even though we grew from one hotel to fifty two hotels but It airbnb it was like Whoa and by the way I gotTa tell you as a long time traveler customer you had great hotels. Thank you thank you on. This company still exists. I sold at nine years ago bureau nine and a half years ago. It's now a high company joy it you they used to in your in your backyard used to we used to have the dream in did the full renovation nation of the dream in a fun yeah frigging fun. It was a very tacky motel. We made it really nice. And but you know when I landed authentic to Santa Cruz to write. Didn't like you didn't turn it into some generic thing that could have been right to do that is it. I mean it was hard urge create fifty two different brands. Every single one of the hotels had its own name brand. So the hotel tally in San Francisco was one of that hotel. Tell great service to Eglin Hotel and then the Phoenix. My First Hotel. It just a crazy Zeev. No Tell Motel in the tender line where all the rock and roll bands or staying. And I'm so every single one had its own identity long story short. Is I think the big difference between AIRBNB and John Aviv there so many beyond the innovation disruption thing had a lot to do with the fact that my identity back to the identity question. My Identity Drought Aviv. I was like the little mini mini mini mini version of Richard Branson. I was the founder. CEO CEO's are bigger than life personality. A lot of press and my whole identity was frank wrapped up in in that my whole sense of who were the man right. Who is is the man and then we went up and down like so we had the dotcom bust and then we had the great recession? And and so I got you know was very cyclical business and I got sick with colds of my stomach so good. I liked that too I so I just got to a place whereas like like wow am I open and willing to tear the band aid off knowing that the identity was going to strip away so my I sense of self esteem but I was because I really knew I needed to do something new. It was two years later that the founders asked me to join them and the one big difference with this is my identity was the founder of airbnb or the CEO. Yes I was the CEO Whisper. I was the in house mentor to the see. You Know Brian who is twenty. One years younger is reporting tonight. Twenty one years but I was also is mentor So what was interesting is I didn't taking also personally. Maybe that was because I was at a place in my life where I didn't take things as personally. which is I think? True as you get older but I think it's also true that the baby ab that I created versus the the thing I've been asked to come in and help with and it was a fulltime job in the seventy hours a week for for four years but it wasn't mine right. It was I was there to be the not the sage on the stage but I was the guide on the side. I was the one that you helped these guys into really almost it must be you. Have you have somebody who writes that Shit for you or do you come up with all that shit on your own very good shit there. I have a bumper sticker company. uh-huh I'm writing all shit down. GotTa get this should transcribe because there's like fifteen t shirts in this conversation. I it should run for president because you know I can. I can get the one liners down or maybe I should have. You know an and I love. I love to deliberate to you like you. Just lay them down like it was is the first time you ever said 'em very did it Bam and he did another one on the back of it. Aren't you the new on this one but yes most of these. I've said before I'm I don't know at the end of the day Mike Spinster. AIRBNB allowed me to be in service to someone else to to you know I think as we get older one of the things that happens is you. You feel that since a legacy you feel it was your kids if you have kids you fill it with How you getting back to the planet or you get more active active in your community in certain ways you WanNa you wanna give back and so for me it? Was You know at age fifty to fifty nine now so for seven years. Most of my fifties. I haven't been in this place where I've been giving back now. It hasn't been without its controversy. it's like to be a hotelier to join AIRBNB. Be Seven years ago my hotel. You're looking at me like that. Companies never going anywhere. Why would you ever want to join them? And then two years later I was getting all these resumes from his hotel. You're saying dear hotel you're on tap but it was. Obviously you know airbnb as a disruptor is all kinds of ways so part of my role in the company was to help the founders who are really I would not have joined if it had a ton of respect and admiration for these three young guys who are twenty one twenty three years younger than me but what I really had to help me see. It was like wow. You're going to be a hospitality. DISRUPTOR that sounds like an oxymoron. You better be you better be friendly and gracious and focused on how to build a better community in the process. Unlike some other sharing economy that actually took the Hubris of how they raise their money in Silicon Valley and Pride Hubris now. They ran the company. And I won't say who that was but you know the kind of people I'm talking about and and and I think you know Airbnb can be faulted for all kinds of things but I would say you know for a company that has been a disruptor has been challenging has had its share of bad news in headlines. You know it's a company that I can come up with about five or six different bullet points that have it stand apart from a lot of the other sure sure younger companies out there and I think partly because the founders are just miraculous. They're still working together. Eleven years until it which I think a record for a company that has the kind of valuation Multi Billion Dollar Evaluation Has But I think also it does speak a little bit to the fact that we had monitors we have people like me and I was sort of the lead modern elder in the company who were a little older and compare ourselves with these younger leaders who are often our bosses and not be at odds with each other in this sort of boomer millennial gen-x millennial genetics boomer Kinda way where everybody's at odds with each other because of our ages instead is we're like what can I learn well and it's interesting in this whole diversity conversation. You don't hear much about `bout age diversity. It's it's just so crazy here. It's not like the age demography. It's going on right now. SNUCK UP ON US like a scenario. You know we can. Basically demographics are pretty predictable in the sense especially when it comes to age. You know what's going to happen like the actuarial oriole's tables for insurance companies have figured out a long time ago and yet when it comes to diversity you know you've got Gender race can you got sexual orientation and a few others and way down. The list is age and now why is that. It's partly because in some ways an old school companies. The age diversity issue is really an issue of really younger. People have some power and savoys but in in Silicon Valley and in a growing number of other companies especially if forty percent of buses younger than in a growing number of companies the age diversity issue is how do we make sure are. We still value wisdom as much as we disruption. And how do we Look at our modern elders. The people who are curious as they are wise is and have something to bring to the table and integrate them in a way that allows their wisdom to have value way beyond themselves so You know only eight percent of companies that have a diversity and inclusion program have have expanded that program to include ages just some as important of a metric as race gender and sexual orientation. And what's curious about that is. There's a bunch of studies that have come out that have shown that the number one Variable for diversity the The number one effective this variable for diversity on teams meaning what are the Democrats the demographic that most will create a great team is age. I'm more so than having gender or racial official or sexual orientation diversity on the age but partly because there's more cognitive diversity. Older people look at things differently than younger people. You put him on in together other and at either is gonNA blow up into a mess or more often. What's GonNa Happen is You Know One plus one equals three and so I think I think we're in the early stages stages of this happening because there's a grow people now realize gosh people are GonNa work past age sixty five and so we have to figure out what we're going to do with these people not not just as a social you know policy of you know compassion but frankly as a means of actually being effective. Yeah I couldn't agree more and the other thing. I'm sort of interested to check in with you about this. Whole SORTA journey from up and coming Rock Star entrepreneur to been there? Done that guy you know from from the the player who has a hall of fame career goes to the hall of fame in his now. The coach right that that that journey the how how for me was during my player days I never thought about anything other than being a player and now when I look back act on it I go. Oh all of that. This is the reward for that has now you know what I am Nolde. masterson say I've been into the fucking show and I love nothing more than doing exactly what you described which is learning from the next generation and hopefully contributing adding to the next generation. It's a blast and it's something I never thought of until I got here. Yeah no I totally agree I. It's one of those unexpected pleasures of aging. This sense that not only are you. Some some time surprised surprised by the intuitive wisdom that just floated out of your mouth to the younger person. You're talking to but the fact that the younger person you're talking to you says you're my FM remain calm your FM. You're my future me. You know I back to what we said at the very start of this conversation. The idea. You're my role. Oh model and so what I say this is not like. You're my role model. I worship You I wanNA have executive same life. You did or do but more like you're helping guide me and helping me to see what my options are for how I get older and I actually actually think one of the things is interesting. As we are scared of getting older in the society. Partly because our body deteriorates we see our parents deteriorate. Society is is not very focused on giving wisdom folks wisdom There's an element that as you get older. You start to realize yes pattern. Recognition and that pattern recognition serves you in so many ways Everything from like who. You don't want to listen to any more to what it is. You WanNa spend your Saturday afternoon doing And and you don't ask anymore. There's like no fear of missing out. You know your Jenner in fact. I'm very happy to miss out. You guys go. I'll do that. Yeah exactly so. I think there's an element of when you settle into who you were always meant to be and you know it. It took a long time sometimes to get there. It did take a very long time but it The reward is being here now. That's for sure you and Ramdas here. Now he's sneaking in that religious contents. Thank you Jesus Anything else you want to touch on before. He wrapped up. Now I think this has been great Pursuit should That we were both near the beach and someday maybe we'll even search together other for me to call myself. A surfer is doing doing one of the worst things you could ever do. which is you can't be the now if you don't do the verb and so I need any the surf more but our two tasers to suck so we can go surfing together for sure and you're welcome back anytime you're awesome? You've had an incredible career. Love what you're doing you and now and thank you for being so generous. Perfect great to be with Christopher there is the legendary chip. Conley was not a fun. Isn't he a cool guy. And if you enjoyed this episode so I think you probably also really enjoy episode ninety four of follow your different with Jules P- Pieri. She's the founder of legendary product launch. Orange Company called the gromit and we have a fantastic conversation about how to create new products today. And if you WANNA send us email email you must send email to black hole at lockhead dot com. And I'll tell you the inbound lately has been going mental Candy Dandy and I are doing our best to follow up if by chance you have sent us email or a tweet or a linked in or something and we haven't got back to you Feel free to whack at US again. We're doing our best to keep up but a please know that we appreciate every email every tweet and most importantly every social share all right we would like to thank the legendary chip Conley and his new book. Check get out wherever you get books. It's called wisdom at work. The making of a modern elder. That's wisdom at work. The making of a modern elder my friends at one life fully live dot. Org Want to help you dream plan and live your best life. Check them out. This is the nonprofit. That's helping you take your life to a whole new place. The number one life fully lived dot org grow wired dot com. It's what growth oriented entrepreneurially oriented. People are reading on the Internet today. Check it out grow wire dot COM com in my friends at bottleneck virtual assistance. WanNa help you scale the power of you With the power of virtual assistant check him out today at Bottleneck Dot dot online. That's bottleneck dot online now. Are you in Silicon Valley. Are you a leader. BB Company. If you are my friends at Audran I wanNA help you build a world class website that will communicate the value and power of your company like your best sales people and your best spokespeople. Checkout Checkout A. T. R. E. DOT net today that's Auto Trinet Autrey Dot net today and the folks worldwildlife are helping to make a giant difference around the world and in particular with these horrible tragedy Tragic fires in Australia Checkout Worldwildlife Dot. Org that's world hold wildlife dot org. All right I need to remind you that this odd cast is a sole property of the lockhead cast network all rights do remain perturbed and of course as always. We need to warn you that this August does get created in the studio that contains nuts. I WANNA say a big. Thank you to Chris Guest for having me on the lean startup podcast. Ah recently and love. podcast check out the lean startup podcast and the episode. I'm on is titled Name. The category owned the market Don't forget to teach entrepreneurship. I don't feel tardy. Don't be lame. Get Out of the passing lane. Don't forget to listen to Blue Rodeo. Thank you Candy Dandy. I Love Your Mom and Dad ad and Hey Colin this odd cast really ties. The Room together doesn't it today. Our policies goes out to a goes out to Elizabeth homes CEO Theranos Renaud's sorry lizzy. We just ran out of time for you. That's it my friends. Thank you so much. I deeply appreciate you. Investing part of your life with me. Please stay legendary and of of course untoward together again. Follow your different take. Yeah Yeah

AIRBNB Midlife United States founder midlife CEO chip Conley Oracle ELDER Academy Santa Cruz Silicon Valley Christopher I Youtube Turkey advisor Christopher hotel honor Berm Asia Japan
"We Want a Better Life for the Kids

Immigrantly

49:34 min | 11 months ago

"We Want a Better Life for the Kids

"We all have an idea of what you make in dreamers. But how would you define an American nightmare. Johnny and her family encountered every obstacle that an immigrant family can run into in America. I remember as a teenager. Michael Professionally was to become a prosecutor one day and I was devastated ashamed. It's an angry and thinking what did you do. I mean I felt very very distrustful of him. An ESA case went down as it unfolded. What became became clear? Was that actually. My Dad and uncle were the fall guys in a botched drug war investigation. She is the the author of a memoir. Here we are making dreams making nightmares. Odyssey's what has always been personal. She went from being a community entity organizer with a bullhorn defending the rights of immigrants to now speaking to millions as silicon valley correspondent for NPR. National Public Radio. I became professionally. I became a journalist that business reporter for National Public Radio. NPR covering silicon valley covering big attack. And a lot of ways. You know what I did and moving from activism for my father and for other immigrants in New York City and pivoting to business journalism with and that was just me looking for I needed to recover from some really hard work had activism wealthed before joining. NPR's was honored by the Union Square and legally society. She received her masters from the Harvard. Kennedy School of Government and she she was also a fellow at Columbia University. We will talk about. RT's journey have family and a force memoir. Welcome Artsy. I'm so excited to have you on my podcast Be here thank you. So let's start with the title of Your Book and I am Reading Your Book and first of all I want to say I love it. It is a wonderful book and I hope everyone reads it. The title itself hit we are making dreams making nightmares. It just instantly debunks the myth off off the American dream or the warped notion of what the American dream really is. was that the intention. Well Yeah I mean I think at the the subheading in particular American dreams American nightmares. It is in a nutshell might thesis about this country. which is that in America? You can have the dream which is really I think to walk through doors. You never even knew existed Ed to leap further than you could have ever imagined to go to places that your family could never have entered. I mean it's it's not like that in other parts. Parts of the World America's incredibly unique and that ability to climb mobility that kind of thing American nightmare so is when it goes wrong. It goes really really wrong. And the punitive -ness of our culture. It's deep it doesn't leave you and I would say that my father and I you know that this book that I've written here we are. It is a father daughter story. My father and I each lived this contrast you know I would say. I thoroughly lived the dream. He thoroughly lived the nightmare. We were both very hard working driven. You could say brainy disciplined people. I believe that I get my work ethic and the way that operate in this world very much for my father but our fates were very different and I got to leap and climb inexperienced the inside treatment. He who was the backbone of my family was utterly denigrated turned into a quote unquote criminal alien at made to pay multiple times in a way that was totally unforgiving and so I'm trying to capture. I think that contrast too often. Listen it's easy to describe this country as being just one or the other. We have a tendency to oversimplify to say. Oh it's all dreams are. Oh it's all nightmares and it's like get real. It's not all the other. It's the both and the uniquely. American quality is that they co exist within a single family over and over and over again again. That contrast that I'm experiencing that I write about has spoken to many readers and I've gotten notes for many readers about how their own families. The extreme highs in the extreme lows have played out. So let's let's talk about your family story Can you share it briefly with us especially for those listeners. Who Haven't read the book sure? Yeah so in a nutshell in here we are. I recount the Shahani Family Journey through America. We came here in nineteen eighty one shortly. After I was born in Morocco we overstayed tourist visas. And we Ryan documented for awhile. We got our papers through a sibling petition. A process that has now derided as chain migration having your family member petition for you is exactly how we got our papers an Auntie of mine. My Mom's little Oh sister petition for us we got green cards and then we thought okay. We are on the path to just a straight shot to the American dream. You know it's it's going to be awesome and what ends up happening is I become in now that I have papers and legal and whatnot. I become a scholarship kid. Ed at a very fancy private school on the Upper East side of Manhattan and I am stepping into a world where parents you know you could say. They don't belong. Were not invited. or it's basically hyper lead. I mean my classmates. Mate's DADS are CEOS of fortune five hundred companies or tenured professors at Ivy League universities. The tuition for my school in today's terms is a tesla year to attend. My parents jointly. Never made that much money at a year but that was tuition for the school and while I was pursuing my precocious uppity climb through the American school system. My father he started history he started started an electronic shop on the exact same block where he used to shovel snow for four and five dollars an hour and so he sold electronics. Ex- Casio watches sharp calculators. This is before the era of Amazon before the era of big box retail. It seemed to be going really well. I mean it was going doing so well. That might dad came home. One day in he announced family. We are moving to New Jersey and I was raised in flushing Queens in New York City city and the idea of moving to New Jersey was horrible to me branch prices. I'm not I'm not a Jersey Girl New Yorker. What are you talking about that? But for him it was like a middle aged man. Wants to be able to move his family to New Jersey. It's appointed ride and basically we bought a home suburbia until we finally live in a space. Where there was more than one bathroom and we all have to share a one bedroom? It was five five of us. My siblings two siblings myself parents Studying for my are crammed Roach then of an apartment in flushing Queens over to who multi bedroom bathroom home. I think it was three and a half bathrooms which is nearly one for each of us. You know four toilets and five people total luxury. Everyone seems to be on grade until that is one day we got a call at my father has been arrested. And according to New York state he is money laundering for the Cali drug cartel of Colombia. My my dad and his little brother. My uncle who's also running the shop with my father were taken to rikers island. Jail in a tortoiseshell in New York City and what commenced from there was. This is what. I'm really unpacking in the memoir. Here we are is my dad and uncle were brought into Horrid and given what sounded like a terrifying criminal charges sounded like according to the state. My family business was just a front for a drug cartel I remember or as a teenager Michael Professionally was to become a prosecutor one day and I was devastated ashamed and angry angry and thinking that what did you do. I felt very very distrustful of him. NSF case went down as it unfolded. What became clear clear? Was that actually. My Dad and uncle were the fall is in a botched drug. Were investigation the state as well as the fads were constantly in the search for real cartel came leaders at constantly failed to find a nail real king leader Bring leaders excuse me and so they ended up getting prosecutions of shopkeepers and family. Family guys like my my dad and uncle so a long story short my family was offered a plea deal. Basically you can each serve eight months inside and put the matter behind. Find you or you can go to trial and risk. What's called the trial penalty? Very bill out of people are not aware of this. But if you exercise your constitutional right to trial trial. You're actually punished for you. Face a penalty for it so that for example if I take the plea bargain emphasis onward bargain. I do eight months and if I go to trial and convicted that I could face eight to ten years. Okay it's a huge gamble with support. I'm really trying to make clear we're in here. We are is the criminal justice system. It's not about innocence and guilt. It's about risk and reward. Okay how much of a risk are you able to take. How hard can you push for a better bargain emphasis on bargain And we didn't didn't push very hard. We didn't know how we didn't have the resources to in. If you've ever been pulled over for by a traffic cop for example you can feel how terrified you might be back moments when you're facing for example a ticket of maybe a hundred dollars while imagine how terrified you are when you're physically brought into court and described as is the enabler of the most notorious drug ring in the country or the city is terrifying so anyway my dad and uncle did what everyone would do in that situation. Statistically certainly speaking they took the guilty plea and we thought that was it. We thought the matter would be put behind them. But then what happened is a a second surprise punishments my dad and uncle each after serving their time even though they were green card holders lawful permanent residents even though they had family members who were American citizens by then they were each taken for deportation as a second surprise punishments so they face life exile. My uncle was promptly expelled from the US to India that was our original country origen He hadn't lived in essence the fifties but no matter. He was expelled to their that. My father face the same legal system. And that's why I'm I was. You could say in a way activated or the real turning point for me is up until that moment I was trying to be arm's was linked with my family crisis. I didn't WanNA think about it. I just wanted to be a good student and do while at school and achieve for myself and I wanted to push aside. Whatever ever might be happening at home but once my father was threatened with life exile? Something was really activated in me a sense of indignation a sense offensive rage. I went from you. Know other shame to utter rage and I thought how much are you going to keep punishing one man and one family for case you Mr Prosecutor in St believed required. No more than eight months in jail. I don't understand it. How much do we have to keep paying for the same mistake? Your book is also as you mentioned. It's it's a critique critique of the Immigration and Criminal Justice System in America right for instance. Your story is in A. We proved that these two are interwoven. In how America's criminal justice system disproportionately is against pool and against immigrants. Yeah when I was reading your book. Accu- partly blamed the judge. Who presided over Your Dad's case for what happened to Your Dad? You also blame. The prosecutor fought chorusing racing. Your Dad into a plea bargain. How did that impact your struggle to get justice for your dad because you had do work with the with the judge and it system? Why being so skeptical end so wary off that system? Once I realized is what was happening. And the deportation case that would ensue. I was activated. I launched myself into action. I was about nineteen or twenty years years old and I decided no. I'm going to take time. And it became the greatest educational experience of my entire life. It was very painful but it was deeply educational L. A.. And what I learned. Is that the justice system whether you're talking about the criminal justice for being migration system. It's a game of information a cemetry maitree. I know certain things. You may not know those things and you not knowing those things helps me to get what I want. It's it's lesson power. How power works okay? Whatever the context is the way power works is to keep one side blind hand anti on uninformed exactly? That's actually in the very nature of the exploitation of power. And that's what played out my own family. You mentioned the judge and the prosecutor. I WanNA explain two things. I don't believe that Prosecutor Co worse to my family into taking a plea. I believe the system is designed to coerced. I people into please and it doesn't. It's not the individual actor who's pushing it. The system is designed that way so it's not that he himself was like gun to the head. You GotTa do you this. It's more the criminal. Justice System pisses your back against a wall as like. You'd be crazy not to do this so you know. I don't. I just want to emphasize emphasize that I believe what I'm tracing in my memoir here. Er is not some. It's not an exceptional case. He's about an innocent man being forced into a plea deal. That was utterly unfair. I think what I'm tracking here. We are is a far more mundane example of how the system takes someone who spun to mentally a good and hard working person and recast them as some horrific hit villain to extract a plea that serves nobody including society. And why do you think that is the case. Why do you think that happened to your dad? Well it happens to millions of people year the criminal. Justice system is America's cancer. It's I mean it's a protracted a problem that I think in fact many citizens in America African American and Latino citizens have reflected on the way it works how how it takes good people and criminalizes them for life. It's never that you're just doing time for specific wrongdoing or alleged wrongdoing. It's that the consequences continue while after that plea deal is done and only more recently immigrants newcomers people who we want the nature of immigrants is we want so badly to believe in that dream because our families bet on on it we. Of course you want to believe that you bet on it and it's a new back right at what my family learned very early on in Indus new bed is oh it's it. It doesn't actually exist a lot of people so you know you'd mentioned the immigration system as something something to talk about extensively in the book what I do in the book is I track how the criminal system has expanded and how the tentacles of that system now punish you. Additionally for immigration status so previously you could say like in the eighties or prior to the nineteen eighties eighties. A man like my father would have been arrested having a green card having American citizen. Family having the suburban home in New Jersey he would have done this time and then he would have been allowed to resume his life but because America has changed the legal oh system. Deportation is now a second mandatory punishments after pretty much any encounter with the criminal system. So we've heard of mass incarceration mass incarceration a term that many people think are familiar with. We've seen documentaries about in movies. He's about it. Mass deportation. I think is less familiar to people and what we don't realize now I'm a journalist and many of my friends are journalists where we are the front lines of history. We are writing the changes as they happen. Doing the first pass right. The first take many of my friends are not aware abyss but America has since the nineteen nineties steadily created a mass deportation system. That is tagging and pulling out millions upon millions of people in a very steady churn earn without any consideration for their American citizen family members. Absolutely yeah many. Americans may sink that deportation is limited to undocumented. Individuals are people who are out of status but that is not the case your dad was greencard holder and he was at the re at risk of being deported as well. So it's it's a very ironic and warped system That we see until you have citizenship. You cannot basically be comfortable in this country in terms of your legal status while you know it's interesting what you're pointing to. Its many of us. Want to believe that the system Miss Fair and that all I've gotTa do is put my head down at work like a busy worker bee and everything's going to be all right. That was my father's philosophy. That's how he lived his life and then the real world hits you and you learn. Oh it's not fair await. There's discrimination then await there's structural racism even in this country. Even you know what we believe is the greatest country on earth these things exist and so part of what I'm trying to do in my memoir is show. How a man who was really just trying to support his family family got tossed into a system that is relatively new but with dynamics that are relatively old while warned born in the US which is punishing people of Color through the legal system happens a lot in America? We often don't WanNa see it but you know what if you WanNa WanNa more fair and just society you have to see it because that's the only way to fix said see what you going when it seemed like everything he was walking against you right what what kept you going. This is a key point to me is that I believe American. Law is increasingly and fundamentally misguided racist restrictions against migrants against immigrants the very nation that is supposed to be the nation of immigrants. It's supposed to give newcomer. That opportunity has made it increasingly impossible for newcomers to come and settle. That's that's one thing that's going on and my father's life illustrates that abundantly unfortunately. Now here's the flip. How is it that a teenager who wasn't even born in this country? Okay I come from Indian parents born in Morocco in Casablanca a raised in flushing Queens. How did that child that first generation immigrants daughter feel such indignation when she learned her father was going to be tossed out of America? Where did that come from? Where did that indignation fat like fighter spirit come from? It's not just or even primarily early her DNA it's a culture telling her our fee. The Shahani's belong doesn't matter what the laws say you know in your heart and we know in our hearts that your family as part of this country so while the law was restriction EST is restriction -struction EST and pushes people out. The culture is fundamentally open and absorbent and told me by way of my teachers. Shire's might neighbors my friends the media. It told me you can fight and you can win. And that's what justice looks like such kept me going now. The as I as I trace in the book I had no idea Saadia. I had no idea when I began this fight for my father when I was about about twenty years old. That would be fighting for a decade of my life. I had no idea I thought it was six months eight months nine months but no it took ten the earth ten years to keep my father in America and part of what I'm doing in here we are is. I'm asking myself the question that so many immigrants ask ourselves ourselves. Was it worth it. So was it with it. I mean what do you think from how I've written I'll tell you I think my answer is but for you've you've you've read the book you've read my take on it. Does it seem like it was worth out. I do I do. And what what you're seeing is believing in the the fact that we all belong here. I think that is the biggest trigger for all of us to fight for any cause that we dig on whether it's pursuit of social social justice or otherwise because as immigrants we've always believed in America being a nation of immigrants and I think that's what sets America apart from other countries. But my question to you is Odyssey. Did I see this calm. Lake continued and consistent it ratio off America being a nation of immigrants. That's happening currently. I was reading this article which was a couple of years ago but I just recently. He came across it that. US citizen ship and Immigration Services Rewrote their mission statement and they took out the freeze nation of Immigrants Prince. Do you think that's like something that we should be aware of or people are not paying as much attention and these subtle changes are going to go on to something bigger. Well I actually have a different view. which is that? I think that we are hyper aware of what's broken again. And what's not working Were hyper aware. The racist attacks against emigrants at this moments. And why why hyper. It's that we can be in danger of not seeing this country clearly because we're so afraid of temporary changes in leadership that don't get what America's about so here's my take my take is that this country is long overdue for a massive legal. Embrace of Immigrants Legal Oakland brace. It's been decades since people have been given green cards and mass through a legalization process. It's been a couple of a few decades now. The we've had add a mass deportations them that tosses people out irrespective of who they are. Who are families are we need a total revamp? But here's what I observe serve is that political leaders are now recognizing that so yes on the one hand you have the immigration authorities rewriting certain rhetoric and maybe pandering to a certain base for political support. But you also have for example all on the on the Democratic presidential candidate side. I mean there are a lot of candidates fewer now but a lot of candidates going look immigration platforms they are making proposals puzzles to stop criminally prosecuting people who come here. In search of the American dream they are making proposals to grant green cards to millions upon millions of newcomers by newcomers. I mean at this point you know twenty thirty thirty five years in the country you see actually the Pendulum Angeles swinging again. And so. I think that's something we have to keep mindset throughout American history. The new cover has had to fight for acceptance. I mean what my family went through this specific details. Specific facts are specific to us but the dynamic of being newcomers in this enormous place. Yes that is constantly ambivalent about the new comer and on the one hand knows that we have to accept that person on the other hand resists it. That's a you know that's an ongoing dynamic. In America we look down others will love it but I feel I mean I just fundamentally feel optimistic back fat the Pendulum Sphinx. So Talking About Your Dad's keys you only fought his case but then you took on other people's cases as as well. Yeah like and when I think about it I was like as you mentioned. It took a decade to work on Your Dad's keys and then by thin wouldn't you like exhausted. And why did you decide to take the cases and what was some of the challenges. Along the week. I was totally exhausted. And I. I think it's Kinda funny. I mean you know I became professionally. I became a journalist a business reporter for National Public Radio. NPR covering Silicon Valley. Allie covering big tech. And a lot of ways you know what I did and moving from activism for my father in for other immigrants in New York City in pivoting to business business journalism. That was just me looking for added to recover from some really hard work. I needed. I needed to fix my credit score your credit score. I've been really nice. School to my credit score was terrifying but again in what other country does does a working class immigrant daughter. Who'd spent her twenties imprisons and fighting to keep her dad here and one other country does she? Then pit it within two or three three years into business journalism and get a job as a correspondent in one of the largest media companies in the country on the one hand you are fighting against the flaws in criminal justice system in America and then use they go to Silicon Valley. You start interviewing these tech. Titans did did you see the dichotomy of how American dream manifests itself in different ways. For instance I mean if you're wealthy at at most if you commit a crime you face civil penalties worsens criminal penalties. Did you see the irony off it. And how did you feel about bat again. I I feel that and again I am reflecting this in my book and here we are American dreams American nightmares. It's how power works. Take for example one of the companies. I ended up covering when I became a business journalist. Uber Okay. Uber is a brand ran. That you might have the APP installed on your phone. You know use it you. You might be calling an Uber from your studio after this interview to go. Wherever you're going you no I have uninstalled and install it so many times I sometimes I want to take this model Stein and I'm like Oh game on installing it and I would install left and I go back to Uber? Yeah it's it's it's a struggle. You're you're you're recurring delete over. There are many like you. Okay uh-huh before like this really work when you keep deleting it. I don't feel good about my side in the moment and the moment you can post that you deleted Uber but then do you post the reinstalled it I do. But you know that company former CEO. Theo Travis Kalanick's he's a bullet China shop. He's a guy that would lead a team going into city. After city and irrespective active of their local laws ordinances requirements dictates have elected leaders irrespective of that. He'd say let's set up shop. Let's suit thing and it. It was fascinating to me in covering uber to see how this leader this chief you know with an army of hundreds if not thousands of lawyers could go in and just exploit legal loopholes. I mean Uber is a feat in legal engineering during far more than the actual engineering but to watch him pull off his feet and legal engineering to just break rules flagrantly in different municipalities and to never face any criminal prosecution it fascinated me. I remember leaving leaving home leaving Queens New York City my father his travails leaving all of that and coming to Silicon Valley were the Kremlin Cram. Live where the hyper leader setting up shop. Where they're building things and seeing how they don't have to pay? Hey the way working class people to they don't face consequences to their actions far greater actions than my father did they. Don't face consequences like a shopkeeper on twenty eighth street of Broadway would and so again I would say that my life's journey has has given me such a lands into how power works. I've mentioned before the information cemetry white you know versus what you don't know affected act in how you can play the game at the ever been to simply the consequences given to you for breaking rules. Do Face Ten to twenty years in prison or do face maybe a ten million dollar fine which is a drop in the bucket for your company given the investment capital coming from Saudi Arabia. And it's fine. And that goes back to America being a capitalist society. Right it's your worth is valued monetarily as an individual. We see that with individuals. We'd see that with ortganizations right. Yeah no I think that America is clearly at a juncture where as many parts of the world there's a burgeoning populous movement and what we're grappling with is a government that has been failing. It's people us for many many many years. As part of that failure failure has to do vision. Who are you serving? What are you serving and so I believe that in my book and here we are what I'm trying to do? Not just for myself and my family but for my country is show. Hey here's a family. The Shahani family family that was failed by the system. And we're one little speck of dust. There were many many many others like us. And when you look at us all together and you ask yourself. Does the American dream exist anymore. You've got to look at whether it exists for the newcomer and if it does activist for a newcomer. That's incredibly telling about what's happened in our country. How it's failing people I feel like it exists for people depending spending on how you got to the US? I feel it's very much a function of where you're coming from. And what led you to be in the US. I've seen that with so many of my friends and my husband and I came to the. US early the two thousand dollars for college and then it was the same process after college. You get your each one and then your green card and citizenship. Ah Yes you are. American dream is realized in many ways but then the pats that we took was way different from the bat that other steak and probably the path that we talk and I'm not trying to trivialize our struggles on our issues with the system and all and we are probably very vulnerable at times teams as well but it was relatively easy compared to the stories that I hear through my podcast. Yeah and I appreciate you saying that. Here's an indicator mind. The the journey of a middle class or upper class Indian from Asia to the U. The US exactly the university is not representative of the American immigrant experience. Those are at most tens of thousands thousands of people but the actual pool of people were talking about tens of millions of people. So that little sliver of what I would say is elite migration. I mean the the money station is supposed to be a way to level the playing field. That's the foundational story of this country. Is You had people the Irish the Italians when they were coming over through Alice Island were they educated in university. Bound no these were house servants. These were you know they were. They were affixing shoes and add laying bricks and you know cleaning homes and cooking for the upper class but then there are children. Got To leap McKay and so what I think is really important to understand that if you are somebody who's migrated to America from means you come from a relatively stable middle class or wealthy home you we're not. We're not the working class migrants of the post colonial era searching for a home in a horrible global reordering. I feel America. Tends to serve people like US better. Yeah it is geared towards doing that which is unfortunate because what you said generations of immigrants who came two hundred years ago. They didn't have the means and didn't even have there was no legal visa system or immigration system. Contrary to what many people may see our ancestors came. Legally there is no uh-huh clashes before that but now America's changing it wants people who in some ways ourselves steaming initially. At least I mean I. I actually think that that's what the conflict is. It said you have some political leadership whose notion is oh we just want the quote unquote skilled migrant. This exact model is followed in other countries as well as Canada Canada only focuses on skilled migration. He shouldn't here's the thing is I think that there are certain ways that America that the United States which is an enormous country is actually at peace with being exceptional. Or I'm okay you know. So for example the US plays a role in the world or has historically played a role in the world's in terms of you can call them humanitarian interventions against vamp mass atrocities that is a uniquely US role I mean for example Samantha power who recently wrote a MRI while Extensively about the distinctly American role. What comes to intervention in in foreign conflicts for humanitarian purposes? I would also posit that the. US plays a distinct role when it comes to migration we're the first nation state to allow or to have birthright citizenship. Okay right if you were born here you are of here. That's distinctly American. No other country did it before so when I hear people talking about. US Migration and saying oh it should be like that country or that country. What I think to myself is wait? We were the leaders. There's now you want us to be the followers. Yeah exactly like why wouldn't why wouldn't we be country that continues to defiantly have our own vision of how how expansive we can be because you know what when you allow people to come in with the openness that we do that's how you get fusion cuisine and tech startups. Exactly absolutely. It's part of culture was country so I think that anyone who says oh well. Singapore doesn't do it that way. I'm like well I didn't sign up to live in. Singapore reported. You and I just want to go back to your memoir for a second. What did you learn about your family through this memoir? When you were writing this memoir I would say that the most important thing I learned about my family was the specific reason we came to America? I'm very close to my parents. Fathers since passed and here we are in a lot of ways a dedication to his life a eulogy for his life. My mom is still with us and I remember asking her actually with some resentment. When I was writing the book I was working through a great deal of resentment? Okay resentment that I had add that my life had somehow been constrained too much by what my parents dealing with the daily into heavily again. These are really familiar feelings right so I remember asking my mom. Look mom you guys always told us. We came here for a better life for you kids but we had a crappy life. I mean we grew up for like I vividly remember growing up in a one bedroom apartment in New York City where the heat didn't work and a roach crawl on my bare skin. When I saw that I would wake up with data? You're that kind of thing that was incarcerated. We fought a long protracted deportation case. I mean it wasn't it wasn't easy. It was a really tough life. Why the Heck would you in dad as to adults with three little children? Why would you cross the Atlantic Ocean and choose used to live undocumented? That is crazy. Who does that? Why would you do that? And that's the first time that my mom Actually opened up to me and told me the specific `push factor now. My family back home in Morocco was living in what's called halted joint family. This might be very familiar to you with living with my mom and Dad with my dad's brothers and his mother at my mom was in a situation where my right grandma My father's mother would not allow my mom to leave. The home without permission would not allow my mom to open the refrigerator without permission would toss plates at my mom. If she didn't like the food that was made. My grandmother would not allow my parents to sleep in the same room and so this is a very embarrassing fact that I shared my father slept in the room with his mother. And my mom's slept on the living room floor and that went on for years and years and years and then at some point eight a specific thing happened and it was the straw that broke the camel's else back and my mom attempted to take her life if enters. My mom is the most resilient human being I've ever met she is not somebody Who is prone to giving up? She has tremendous emotional resources. So for me to hear that the the most resilient person I know tried to take their life is wild. I had no idea about that. She was not successful. She swallowed pills. She ended up waking up anyway. They she came back to. I was born nine months later. I was an accident and parents brought me home from the hospital. My Body my grandmother either would not let mom and me into the house because I was a girl. She's like. What have you brought me at other girl this wretched thing and at that point my dad finally gave in to what my mom had been requesting for quite a while which is hey? Let's take the kids and go to America. Let's just get out of here and this is kind of the the funny thing about about migrating to this country and many people. This'll be familiar to many people is it was in a way easier her to cross the Atlantic Ocean and tell the family. Oh we want a better life for the kids. It was easier to do that then. It would have been to try to move across across the street. The distance was security and so that facts of why we came here. It's really humbling to me. And it's made me changed for example how I see the families at the border when you look at the images of WHO's coming in from the border to in children. It's a lot of women and children. Then you call up the lawyers who are doing the the legal down there is i. Have they'll tell you. The caseloads are overwhelmingly mothers with their children. You know what I have a great deal about just sympathy for now. Nobody like. Oh you're fleeing to America. Maybe you're fleeing rape gang rape sort of consequences of the drug wars ars. Maybe you're fleeing an abusive household. Whatever it is you're fleeing America you've long seen it as my mom did the land of freedom and that's okay if it could be okay for US wise since it? Okay for the for the newest generation. And how important do you think it is for kids to ask. VPN's this question the one that you asked your mouth. If you don't ask you'll regret it. I just I know it because I've had so many people who've read my buck whose whose parents have already passed. Nuke sent me tearful notes about how they wish they had known they wished they had asked. And so you do yourself a favor. I mean it's really awkward right like it's sort of. You might be arguing with your parents about what you're going to have for dinner and then suddenly be like so tell me about the real push factor kind of inelegant but I think that apart while migration is for many of our parents. For many of us us the boldest thing we will ever do in our lives. It carries a lot of trauma a lot of very hard ups and downs happened along the way and so by design. It's something we don't want to talk about right. Like a TRAUMAS. A place for there are so many lessons to be gleaned but it's very hard to revisit I'd be before we RAPA. What does listen on facts about you? If you don't mind just repeating what else I know I feel like I just told all I mean. There's something that people still don't know about you. Do during your downtime. Let's let's talk. Oh Bat oh. It's so boring. I during my downtime I I read. I explore nature. You're catching me at the beginning of the New Year and what I did for the last couple of weeks I was literally I was in Baja California Mexico and I was reading voraciously Climbing up downhills announce any new year's resolutions agents or do you believe in New Year's loose. You know it's funny. I didn't feel motivated. They're concerned ears. Why Britain New Year's resolutions thumb most of which I've never accomplished but I think that I have a resolution for the New Year so much as I have reflected a lot because we're in a new new decade right right after sent New Year and I thought about what I was going through ten years ago ten years ago I was just finishing the fight to keep my father in this country? I was angry at my family for holding me back for keeping me in a place. I was fighting for them as opposed to achieving my dreams. Whatever those may be and I was pivoting into a new career? I wanted to know who am I what I'm not being an emigrant daughter and the answer became business journalist and I chased that really hard and now I'm just trying to this decade ease into a sense of self. That isn't so angry at anyone. Anyone part but knows how to let the different parts coexist together. Can I embrace my identity. As the daughter of immigrants who struggled. We're GONNA be in this country and never forget it and somehow continue to be of service now to my country with that identity the knowledge it gave me. Can I allow myself south to keep having you know a mischievous and veracious appetite for new strange things. I mean like you know I don't want that'd be pigeonholed I want to explore. I WanNa write about many things. I believe my next book by the way is going to be romantic comedy. And so what I'd like to see for for myself and for you. It's just allowing very different parts to coexist without having to be one thing and if you were to describe America in a would daughter freeze or a sentence how would you describe it. It's complicated but ultimately I would say hopeful. Where can people find your book is like? I'm sure it's available everywhere. But is there a specific specific. Please you would like people go and buy from. It is everywhere. My Book is available everywhere. It's called here. We are American dreams American nightmares. It's on Amazon. Indie deboned on audible. I narrated the audiobook. You can pretty much pick it up anywhere here. We are American dreams American nightmares and my name is artificial addi. Thank you so much out of the this was wonderful. Thank you you know taking time out of your busy schedule for us are so excited to share this. Intangible everyone one and thank you everyone for taking the time out to listen give us feedback and if you like what you hear please share. We have a go fund. Me Deals are on website and social media and also in the description onto the next time when we bring another inspiring story and in the meantime stay connected

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E115: Hyperthermia and Detoxification for Lyme Disease With Michelle McKeon CCN

Living with Lyme

50:31 min | 5 months ago

E115: Hyperthermia and Detoxification for Lyme Disease With Michelle McKeon CCN

"Greetings this is Sydney Kennedy, and I'd like to invite you to subscribe to the podcast series at www dot, living with live dot us. This will keep you up to date on all our new releases living with line podcast. Maybe, discussing very controversial topics, the information contained in these podcasts are from the guests, personal experiences and are their own opinions. These podcasts are intended for information. The opinions expressed are solely the guests zone. Please, discuss treatment options with your personal health care providers before changing or adding treatments enjoy the podcast. Living mid live is brought to you. In part by Dr fired formulations, a supplement company offering products such as Labor, civil harvested liposuction, Oregano oil, and the most Luca patients can purchase without a prescription and practitioners can open a wholesale account and carry the products an office to learn more visit Dr inspired formulations dot Com. That's Dr It's fire formulations dot com. Also like the bank Hopkinton drug. Many people have healthcare needs that mass produce pharmaceutical medications. Just can't beat. That's why more people turned Hopkinton drug of as compounding pharmacy whether it's lime disease, bold illness, thyroid hormone replacement therapy paediatrics, dermatology, hopkinton drugs specially trained licensed pharmacists had great customized compounded medications to be your specific needs. Shipping is available nationwide go to our health dot com. That's our ex health, DOT, com, or call eight, hundred, four, three, nine, forty, four, forty one. Drug Compounds with. Hi everybody. This is Cindy Kennedy and you are listening to a another episode of living with Lime. We're excited to be here today I. Have Michelle mckeon with me. She's very unique lady. She is a certified clinical nutritionist. She specializes in lyme disease and she specializes in all the problems that go along with lime disease in terms of Gut, health and detoxification. She's also very very avid, functional medicine proponent, and how she does a lot of her work. She's an author and she owns a very important company. She's got a very very interesting background and she's going to tell us all about it and. Really educate US so welcome Michelle. How are you doing today? I am doing pretty good. Thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be beyond here and Yeah, no, thank you for what you do. I feel like I'm is super misunderstood, and it's podcast like yours that are creating more awareness for lime disease, and really advocating for it, so thank you. You know you try to you. Try to do it. You know it's. Sometimes it's a him. Pardon my French here. It's shovelling shit against the tide. Honest to God. You know meeting with mainstream medicine is so frustrating. It's like just get out of your space. Go do some some classes learn more about it, but they're kind of stuck in the old way. They're old. Education and It's unfortunate because it really is very significant problem so. I know you had your own very significant line journey? So tell us a little bit about what happened to you and Kinda you ended up where we are today. Sure so I was bit when I was eighteen I was working at fire island for the summer as super excited, it was the first year out of college, and so I was with my friends working at an ice store, and then it was kind of like a dorm style, setting up top two are all there for the summer and I was dipped biotech and picked up at me, infected me, not only with lime, disease, but Bartonella Protozoa. mycoplasma pneumonia and house virus, so as lime plus lots of different co-infections, and I went from being completely healthy, my whole life to marry much debilitated. I had full-blown Lyman Colitis so right from the GECKO I had trouble thinking. Heat noise light sensitivity was very severe air, bad dizziness and Vertigo I developed cervical Tonia so that is a neck condition where I didn't have any control over my neck for a while, and developed seventy percent nerve damage to my left inner ear so again a lot of vertigo, dizziness and Trouble functioning at it was just just a complete mess I. Felt like a Zombie tired all the time and a ton of had pressure I'd have to walk around like kind of holding my head because I had so much pressure and this did this happen right away. Did this happen over the summer? Did you have a bull's eye? Everybody I know what's going to say you know. How fast did this come about in? Were you treated or will you not treat? Those are great questions. it Cam I was. I was feeling great, and I woke up the next morning and I went down to go to the beach, and all of a sudden I felt like my body was shutting down so yeah the next morning I woke up and I. Guess The tick must've at me during the night or that morning, and I just didn't feel like myself. they were actually going to helicopter me out of the island. Because my body just really shut down so fast, I had trouble thinking. I had trouble speaking I couldn't move my legs at first and I think that was probably. The cow is in virus because it's like full-blown Encephalitis, a Lotta Times with the POWs virus. yes, so so eventually I did kind of come to, and then I left fire island. I went to the emergency room, but they. You know they I didn't see a rash I never saw tick. Bite me. I did ask a lot about lyme disease, because a higher island is known for line with us and I even asked. The doctor is Barry. When they're, they're like. No, you don't have a rash. Definitely, don't have line. So so yeah, it was really confusing. At first and I went to a bunch of grapes. Facility is in in new. York City I grew up in northern. New Jersey, so we're really close to your. Wonder, like the best of the best hospitals and I had multiple different tests done. still kept asking about lyme disease. hadline tests on everything came up negative, so it wasn't until four and a half years later when I was like completely debilitated that I finally got my diagnosis. meaning that you finally tested positive or someone actually said this chick doesn't have anything else, and it's a clinical diagnosis, so what happened? So. I originally was diagnosed with cervical. Estonia kind of just said you know I think you virus. The damage is done, and you're going to continue to heal, but I would go in waves. I went back to college, and sometimes I'd have symptom flare ups and was really tricking. Not Knowing what was going on in my body I graduated Behemoth Fifth Grade Teacher. Loves teaching, but it got to the point where even simple like fifth grade math problems. I wasn't able to do and I was kind of like what what's happening. What's going on with my brain? I? Really need to take a medical leave. And that's when I did a ton of more research and I came upon a woman story with neurological lyme disease and again this is this is all about the line community a lot of times we find out about different symptoms and how to get treatment through each other. so I reached out to her and. And she told me a lot more about lime, and I went to Kenneth Leaner and I did get a positive PCR testing through a urine sample and I finally had my diagnosis, so yeah, this is four and a half years later, but I know for other people. Sometimes, it's a lot longer. Isn't he cute, Little Teddy, bear guy he's. He's amazing He was the first person that gave me hope that. Maybe one day I'd have my life back. Wow, so, what kind of treatment did you start on during net during that time, I mean here are for plus years out, and this is you know you have collateral damage at this point right? Absolutely most of my symptoms, neurological and that point I started having these weird symptoms of anxiety and depression, and and I've never had those symptoms of force. That was also really frustrating to add that into. into the loop, but we started treatment with antibiotics, and I kind of had a mindset like I'm GonNa? Do really aggressive treatment do this for a year and then I'm going to go back to teaching. And I'm going to have my life back. My Body did not respond to antibiotics I did oral the by selling injections I did I Vienna -biotics process ending a Miocene I mean they had me on everything, and I was also doing like beautifying ideas. VITAMIN SUPPLEMENTS TRY TO BALANCE MY body. I searched over to Dr. Horowitz at that point and we. We really had tried so many different treatments. I mean they were really really amazing there. and they were really trying to work with me, so my question is when you said it didn't work for you. Do you mean that you couldn't handle it? Meaning your body was not detoxify dig. Deep detoxifying, or were you just getting any symptom relief? In the beginning I got a little symptom relief, and then and then I had trouble with my pick line, so I stopped for peaks and I relapse completely, so it was a lot of like moving forward one step going back to steps and for me because it was chronic, lyme I I think I had a lot of biofilms and biofilms that goes around the antibiotics can't go through the biofilms to get to the infection, and so some of the infection would hide, and the antibiotics win all of it. It would come out when I got off of antibiotics. Cycle bed. My body was not responding to you, and I became sicker and sicker I, having got issues. And I got to the point where I lost so much weight I was down to ninety pounds. and I just wasn't able to wait and I god. You almost had to be put in a car seat. You didn't wear enough. It was it was really really it was really a crisis. I couldn't recognize my friends or family I can I looked at American. Recognize Myself I. Yeah I was a disaster neurologically. It had completely taken over My brain and we're kind of like. Like okay, we need to do something fast. Because I'm not gonNA. Make it if we don't do something fast, and that is when my doctor is recommended. HYPERTHERMIA treatment which was terrifying and I had a panic attack in the doctor's office when they told me about it, but then I did a lot of research on it and I realized. You know what I think. This is probably be the best treatment for me. It's probably my best shot and getting my life back. Oh my God, just the thought of that. Okay, so so who who recommended that Dr Witches Office so they yeah they. They were throughout this whole process, and we're kind of at the point where we needed to do something something different, and so they had heard about hyperthermia, and they had put me in touch with a few people to reach out to them and find out about it so bad they'd helped a little bit with the process, but it was really kind of like reaching out to these people and I'm talking to them and hearing their success and I'm. GOING OVER THERE And we're joined by Germany right at this point. Yes, I want you to Saint George Clinic. Germany I stayed for two weeks of Treatment and now they offer additional third week, but but yeah. It is an inpatient hospital that you receive to whole body hyperthermia treatments. I'll go into that a little bit. And then you receive a lot of detox therapies. You've got there and you do a lot of detox ing. They keep you busy all throughout the day getting your body ready for hyperthermia and getting new you know other infusions like ozone vitamin. C would on just really trying to build your body up. You're seeing of your first hyperthermia juryman. It lasts about five hours. you you get up to. To Above One oh five is the goal I tell everybody that you are. You're under sedation. You are in a toilets, so you don't remember anything you countdown ten. And then I woke up later and I was exhausted, but it I wasn't in pain. You know it's a lot by to go through, and you're having died. Offer reaction as well from all the from all the pathogens that are expelled. But but yeah, it is. It is a very safe procedure It sounds a lot scarier than it is I've had it done. I also gone on with my clients to treat and I've seen them. Get a dime. an accent, hundreds and hundreds of people over there and we really haven't had complications so when you do look into hyperthermia treatment. You WanNa one nick sure that for lime disease, it needs to be extreme whole body. Your whole body is getting heated up as Linus a Senate. That to you. WanNa go above one five degrees so extreme whole-body because many clinics out there only do moderate hyperthermia treatment, so that's one hundred and four degrees that is great for boosting your immune system, but it's not going to get high enough to kill these lime pathogens. So Janette, dewitt, they heat your your head to be either heating your whole body. Yeah, whole body, you mean. Yeah, you're. You're adding to that temperature as well and it's not immediate. They slowly bring the temperature up, and your vitals and everything are watched to make sure your body can handle it I might keep your the peak anime slowly. Bring you down Yes, so. Again it found scarier by it, but I was able to handle it. And we see the sickest of the sickest people and all of them are able to handle it. You are very closely monitored the hospitals that I work with us. The half machine which I feel like is the best machine for this would take again it's. It's a hackle machine. heckle light joker hackel. CK Yeah, Yeah Yeah E. L. E.. I think it's L.. Yeah, okay, well, you know it's you know the English language. L. E. E.. L. A. Gets confusing. Yeah, I think that is how you spell it, but that is the top notch machine and you WanNa make sure it's through infrared heat, which is the safest way to do it and you WanNa? Make sure you're an impudent hospital, because it's a lot by to go through. And when pathogens die, they expel toxins. Toxins also create inflammation which is going to give you more symptoms, so you WanNa. Make sure your body can handle this. You WanNa make sure the is hospitals are detecting you and getting down this inflammation yeah so. That hospital was great for getting these pathogens Outta my body, and then helping me detox. Okay, so this was a two week stint got there you have to obviously fly there? and. Then this process now. This was how many years ago. I am thirty two now and I went when I was in my early twenties, I went like nine years ago. Okay, okay, so was there a significant difference? Immediately both good and bad. Okay, so when I had spoken with people that've gone, they had noticed an immediate difference, so I was expecting to go over there and come back feeling great. That was not the case for me. I came back, and I always felt a little bit better, which is really scary I mean I'm in my early twenty S. my brain still can't function and now like this is the only treatment that was going to work for me and I. Still I'm still sick but I know you. Sick. Sick then do you have KwaZulu symptoms? Do you have pain? I know that your brain is like Squirrelly, but but what about other things, so? My symptoms were Vertigo, stale. Horrible it's debilitating. Yes, white heat noise sensitivity anxiety had pressure tons of brain fog. I couldn't sleep at all. I, had insomnia, so my symptoms had lessened, but not. To the degree that I'd be able to go back to work. And, so I I came back. Notice these little improvements every day and I was like okay. My Body is responding to it, but what is exactly going on, and I did a lot of research, and I spoke with more doctors, and I was just really toxic. It's not that hyperthermia didn't work. It's just pathogens die bake, N, N toxins formed, and we have to get these toxins out to see him relief, so I did a lot of detoxing I did fine ideas. I did the Patricia Keane Protocol which are four different ideas that not only help you detox, but also help repair cell membrane damage, so it's ludicrous I am. It's Luca warn. It's fast the title Coleen and beauty rate, and they were amazing and a recovery process for me, It was hyperthermia. The did a great job county pathogens. Patricia can protocol that really helped my body detox and repair. It was that joint approach that used that gave me my life back so yeah I would receive these ideas, and and then I did infrared Saunas. toxin binders for the Saunas I. would do you talks fast? I would do Kalanick's happy demise. I would sing off full time job. This is nothing like getting over. You know whatever, but this is a full time job and you have to be all in. This is one of the biggest problems we have is not understanding that it is an I'm caring for someone right now and I. I unfortunately frightened him because I said. It. This is a journey, and this is not quick. Fix You know. Thank goodness. He's not having this neurologic stuff. Because this is really really bad, but none the less people have to know and they have to. They have to take charge and take control. Yeah, exactly and doing a detox treatment once a day kind of helped me. Mentally say okay, I'm doing something every day. That's helping me move forward so three months from when I came back from the George. notice significant results. I was able to say my body is responding to treatment, and I am moving forward six months after treatment I was tested again and. came out may give so before I went to hyperthermia treatment. I was tested at FRY. Laboratories and FRY lab is pretty cool, because look the blood smear and see how substantial the infection is in your system, so I had that to look and compare to when I came back and everything negative. Told me, you know what hyperthermia did a lot to kill pathogens. When I came back I was able to get the inflammation out on the toxins out, and then I also used Stephen. BUEHNER is protocol for anti-microbial herbals to kill whatever is left in my system I. Don't think hyperthermia kills everything. I don't think there a cure out there for lime. Disease I think line is incredibly articulate. Infections in general is incredibly complicated, and there are all these little pieces to the puzzle to fully get better so yeah. hyperthermia played a role in killing pathogens. And then my body responded really ball to the anti microbial herbals. Buehner right right right I. I. Really I really think that it's super important to I. Think it's an all angle approach. You can't just Kinda just on one thing you know. I'm super impressed debt. People who have a great immune system to start and they're able to Kinda know wrap around! You know maybe a month of antibiotics and they're beautiful. Everything is great, but even people like that. You know six months down the road. Can all of a sudden start developing odd symptoms in I? Really I feel terrible for people who just take a diagnosis like M., ass or a LS, Lou GEHRIG's disease, and not ask questions about it and none understand that general lab tests are. Not as sensitive not as reliable as more specific testing, as they go along their merry way, and they're just not educated and I was one of those people I relied on the medical. MODEL, and saying Hey Gimme. They know what they're doing. When they went to medical school, right, I went to N. P. School a Masters degree. Did I know anything about it? No and I was one of those kind of like. Those people are crazy because people are crazy. And then I became the crazy person I became the crazy person and my first symptom, and isn't it the craziest thing when you think about it on that specific day date and time I know exactly when my first symptom occurred, and it was anxiety, and it was hilarious, because this was all happening in my head, and wasn't feeding into it because I knew what it was, so I was like this is ridiculous. What is this all about? You know that was it you know like? Oh, Gosh, so you know similar. I had a similar path, not not anywhere near as significant as yours, but you know here I am somewhere around almost nine years. Trying to you know. Get Get your body back. Get your body back. Get your system back and make yourself healthy, and you know so that you can lower the inflammation I think an a will add this little bit about covid right now. 'cause recording here in twenty twenty. People. Who got sick? People who died had to have. A level of inflammation that was either unrecognized or diagnosed with a diagnoses such as diabetes such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, these type of things arthritis, whatever there is some inflammation there, and that just sets a stage for a big fire. I completely agree I. Think Kobe has been very interesting. A lot of the cytokines are the same cytokines as lime disease. So the whole thing with site opines face, start inflammation, and then with Kobe it is blocking. People from it's. It's having with their lungs and people can't breathe and going respirators, but if we get the estate of out before it gets to that level, people wouldn't get as sick as they are. And I think we'd be experiencing a lot less five fatalities, so I did a I did a research article that I send into towns on what are able to interview a bunch of doctors from China and then of doctors around the US in different parts of Europe. List you, who are you? Yeah it was just really curious. I wanted to see if some of these treatments would respond on same treatments as lime disease would respond with Kobe patients, and so looking into I B. I g ozone, lithium, ion, vitamin C. I B. As and when you give them at high dose, it does help. The cytokines released decrease that inflammation. It's A. It's a cascade. People have to understand something happens. That triggers something else, and then it's Your your immune system is like military, so you have those sentinel guards right, and they then send out warnings to other members who then send out troops, who then now the communication isn't there and the right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing, and then you have a proliferation of inflammation based on. On the fact that your body gets out of control and there isn't a regulatory way to diminish what's going on and that's how you have to control things, so you have to really rain in, and you have to go. You know it's detected. Stan, gut health, it's it's all of that and you understand that you know in the functional well. It's not just kill. Kill Kill Kill it how to? Get your stress. Levels down had to get you to sleep how to deal with. You know you're either. Probably lack of support for some people as well as just movement. Let's get you moving. Let's get you been. You know all of those things that are so critical, but if we take that model and we put it to general health, just general health, not sick people, people wouldn't get so sick. We'd like to take a moment to thank our sponsors. Botanical medicines are an important part of the Internet of Live Disease Program. Bio, Sidon from biomedical research is a professional strength broad based program that has been extensively researched for effectiveness. Has Nutricia support in live and code affections? Asked her effect issues about bio. Sidon, LSF and visit bio SIDON DOT COM master supplements specializes in probiotic enzymes and fiber that support digestion. Their products provide results that you can feel working within sixty days or money back guarantee. Their staff is available to help you decide which products programs are right for you. Visit Master Hyphen. SUPPLEMENTS DOT COM or call eight, hundred, nine, six, two, nine, six for more info. Okay, so you know you've come back. You're feeling better and now you're. You're caught. You've been really really. Feeling like Gosh. This is my path. How did how did it go from there? What did you do? And how did you get to be where you are today? Which is incredible? Thank you! So I I was starting to feel like myself again, so I started writing blogs to try to advocate for Hyperthermia as a successful treatment option for people with tick borne infections that also helps people that are dealing with cancer, as well and I stayed in touch with the hospital that I went to and worn. More people started reaching out to me for my. My blogs and asking. Can you tell me about your experience? What did you do beforehand? What did you do after and I, told them all about detoxing and I also ended up. Looking into militias have got us changing my diet, so that's when I really decided. You know what this is. Something that I wanNa do long-term and that I'm really passionate about. And that's when we create Atlanta Cancer Services, and that is a company where we help people with scheduling before they go to hospitals that offer hyperthermia treatment, we help people with lime, disease and cancer. We freighted to books to really hold their hand along the way, and we go over every detail of the treatments of what to expect when you're there how to travel what to do when you come home treatment wise and then I decided to go back to school and create a nutrition practice. balancing pathway as I ended up going to school at University of Bridgeport and I got my master's in human nutrition and bouncing pathways works with helping people specifically before they go giving them less toxic and getting their got ready, and then when they come back, we work with them in killing any pathogens. They have left. DETOXING now is dead pathogens out of their system, and then I work with them on mold issues which I see as a huge roadblock for a lot of my clients, I helped heavy metal issues with binders and and then really changing their diet out and trying to figure out if we are missing any pieces so that they have the most sustainable results. Yeah. That's it sounds. People need that support Michelle. People need that support and you know you'll. You're probably here or you do here. I'm sure I can bet my life on it that people. Have lost faith in medicine They feel taken advantage of. They feel on cared for and when they meet someone like you. That says okay. Sit Down, let me explain. Let me offer. Let me educate and let me help you Oh my God that just the ability to guide someone is is so important is really. Is really something that it is a calling, isn't it? I mean you couldn't get away from. It. Just kept tapping you on the shoulder, right? He got something I've become really passionate about. Yeah, and you're really you're very educated. You and I've had some conversations and I was like. Wow, I forgot that. Yeah, yeah, I gotta do that, so that's awesome. That's awesome when you said we WHO's we? You me myself and I. Can't services I now work with Christina, Carter? WHO's GonNa Amazing? She helps with consoles, and then at bouncing pathway. It's just me but really I. Guess Arenas Whole Journey. My friends family have been very very supportive, so it's been. Spent whole village that had helped me get to wear am today. Tell me about Christina Carter. Yes Oh Christina actually had line disease as well and so she went for hyperthermia treatment and she started advocating for hyperthermia. A successful treatment option, and so I reached out to her, and I just said I. Love what you're doing and and I don't know if you'd be interested and working with Limi- cancer services, and she's been amazing so she had line her daughter had her husband had line, and then her son had lyme through congenital transmission, so she is incredibly passionate about helping people. She really understands all the different recovery, fat recovery factors, and just as like. Working with someone, she's been credibly supportive with me and. It's been. It's been very amazing having the team. Yeah, and it's nice because it's. It's good to be able to bounce things off. Someone who's been there. You know there's no. There's no judgment factor. Right you know it's. It's really it's really hard, so so in here we are today. Do you feel like you're fully recovered? So I. Don't think I'm dealing with pathogens anymore. I think that because I was so sick I still have some damage. I have still have seventy percent damaged my left inner ear, and when I push it too much than I will have a little bit of Vertigo so when I was going back to school and working full-time. Someday that'd be like okay pushing it too much. I'm seeing some vertigo! But but really for the most part I have my life back. I. I ha- a healthy lifestyle. Eat Healthy I. try to detox once a week whether it's an infrared sauna or clinic or something like that, but I'm able to do everything that I want to do in my life I feel like myself again and when I do have set-backs I was like in A. I had I was in a place that had mold, and so I did start feeling semi symptoms. Come back, which was really scary, but then you detox and I know what to do to get my body healthy again so I was able to do that, but but yeah I'm. I am feeling myself again and it's been. Still on time to get here, but it is possible so people that are still sick. Don't give up hope because you can definitely get there. Did. You know that your environment had mold. I always WanNa know you know like Something's not right. The symptoms that I have when I'm around. Mold is Vertigo and eighty and brain fog, so I normally feel pretty healthy every single day, but I started feeling. Some of those symptoms announced clue like. What's going on and then I realized okay. There I was in animal environment, and so I got out of that might have been detained. In can I suppress that and I just couldn't. Thank you. Okay. Yeah, you know sick buildings or problems? Yeah and people need to know that yeah mold is significant. I have a lot of I have a lot of interest. with people I think it's more curiosity. About Kalani Lake or coffee ANIMAS. Can you. Can you explain a little bit more about that? Sure so I think they're great ways to detox I. think that sometimes people can go overboard as you definitely want to work with a hydra, therapist or someone that really understands what they're doing, but a clinic is able to go deeper into your system ben a than an animal. Assault usually had some of my clients do a colonic once a month, and then some of my clients will do a coffee once a week. Depending where they are in treatment, a coffee enema is great, because it stimulates, go on, and on helps body detoxify the natural way for your body to detoxify, so those are kind of y you can. See the benefits of a academic and a coffee on nights, really just helping getting these toxins out of your system, decreasing the inflammation and helping you feel like yourself again. Similar all. They love their coffee, but they don't coffee. Like that you know. What. He ever figure this out you know like. Did someone fall on their Coffee Cup and then they're like. Oh, wow, I feel so much better. I mean what how did that even begin great question? I have no idea I would love to find that out. I remember when I first heard about. Coffee is like business crazy? This lady and be crazier hyperthermia treatment and I was I started it when I came back from hyperthermia, looking into ways to detox and my two friends. Taylor Margaret like helped me throughout this whole process. They actually would come over and help me with coffee animas it on Tuesday night. To figure out the whole process I bet, and at it helps me feel better now I can do them on the on to yeah. Yeah Yeah. bridget danner has a really good youtube on on coffee, animas and I I like it because you know in theory. I get it, but it's really good to see now. Obviously, she wasn't. You know nudie inner tub doing it, but she really she really Kinda portrayed the person. While she had her clothes on, and and how it would be, and it's Yeah kind of like you know despite day kind of thing you know haven't tried it, but understand that it's it can be very very helpful. I guess explaining it and talking to a person about it. You really have to have a way to make it sound not as invasive as it is, and just portrayed those those really good benefits of increasing. Antioxidant Glutathione, and just really having that is such a huge benefit, and some people will just really say Oh, my God I feel so good after. He I think it's important when you're dealing with toxic issues that you try to get the toxins out from there, so you're calling your liver, but also your lymphatic system, and that's where an herb like red route in a people with Bartonella, specifically have issues with their lymphatic system in the toxins. Getting stuck there, so using infrared Saunas to get toxins out of the skin Columbus. Get things out of the colon rhetoric to get things that'll emphatic system. It's rate to incorporate all these different modalities to really make sure your inflammation going down right, right? Right before this whole crisis occurred in pandemic. My wellness center was. Days away from opening and one of the things that I'm so excited. To offer is far infrared sauna I for people who really are not up to that yet. Because of course that can promote A. Die Off for sure. I. Do have a far Red Matt. That does the same well similar, because it is some penetration, not so much as certainly the sauna, but it's called the biomass so both of those services. You did okay. I I love it, too. Is. Really interesting is the first time I use I used it I was at a conference I was like. I just had this. Not. Not, a horrible headache, this nagging headache and I didn't know really what it was, and so I, said well, I told them, and they said here have a treatment so i. don't know. was there laying down for? Twenty minutes I kinda get Zeke has got a little. A little shield over my eyes and I'm wondering who staring at me. anyways, so I got up and I was I. I and then within fifteen minutes after I was like. Oh it's gone. It's gone so. It is a lot about that that input into the body in those things that our body really needs and I think people really need to. Try Try different things especially if they're not feeling as well as they should, and they're like well. Maybe I should give this a world. Especially things that are going to do harm nearby I think people are very concerned about things that could that they're not comfortable with they don't know. You know you say the same thing that I. Do you really have to get to the gut? What is your experience with gut healing especially after antibiotics. Yes so I? Thank got health is a huge part of getting better because inflammation in the gut also causes inflammation in your brain so I would notice when I eat certain foods, I would start having different symptoms that were more neurological. Not We've got issues and I could definitely see that connection, but even working with my clients, so many of them being on antibiotics and having to born infections, they're dealing with CBO and leaky guide and IBD. Yeah, it's. It's really really tricky and so I work with them. Really healing the Gut lining, we incorporate different things into their diet. I usually happen on an elimination diet so i. take them off things. Their body is having an inflammatory reaction to and then I. Corporate Foods that are going to build the lining up the gut bacteria, and then also I add in different smoothies and supplements. Supplements and powders to again build the lining so that you can fully heal, and it is a process, but usually within a few months we are able to see a lot of results, and then we can start introducing the suits back in without having that inflammatory reaction right right, it's a it's an over sensitization, and there are people that become very sensitive to environment to send to. You know to food stores kind of things that never bothered them before do you? Are you a big proponent of? Removing gluten from the Diet. For many of my clients, I seek gluten to be an inflammatory component. So I think that it can be helpful. Initially a lot of times it is individualized, but really looking at the clients that I've had in the past win is one of the things gluten sugar dairy, those are usually limited initially from the Diet, but then they don't have to be forever, and you can introduce some back end. I, right I mean longtime ago, gluten free things were far and few between we had A local, pizza, place. My husband went out and came in I, did not came in with this box i. knew what it was I was like all diem. No, because the crest is gluten free, and then I said Oh damn no. What is fabulous? It was delicious and it was awesome so yeah, so I wish I had their recipe, but I don't so you know I think that overall people really need to find that person that is listening to them, and they feel that they can offer a variety of different ways. One shoe doesn't fit every foot right, so when's is doesn't fit. All and individual approach is GonNa be much better than kind of an overall, and I think that by people learning and understanding that they can really can empowered to say hey, you know what about this or what about that people reach out to me. Just with general questions. How do people reach you? How do people work with you? Find out more about you. Get your e books where where people go, tell me. A lot of it is through word of mouth, or the Internet I also is doing a bunch of conferences before Kobe happened, but yes, so you can either reach out at through email or hall out, and I would send over different forms as I get a better idea of everything going on in your system To See if we'd be able to be a good fit, each other and I can help them. Move forward and and then we get started so for people looking into hyperthermia treatment. We have them send over different laboratory tests, and then we send that over to hospitals, and we help with scheduling, and then people looking just for general general, not even lime disease. It could just be got health, or could you just feed mold issues? Issues than they go through bouncing pathway, and we have a discovery call, so it's an initial free call that kind of just goes over their health history and gives us idea. We'd be a good fit. And then I sent him over forms, and we began work together. They can do individual consults or I also have different programs that are three month programs six month programs depending on what they're looking into. And so, what is the websites? So my nutrition practice is balancing pathways asset, www dot, bouncing pathways dot com, and then for Hyperthermia, treatment and information and scheduling on that. It is Wyoming Cancer Services Dot Com. That's excellent. That's excellent is a great resource. You know for many many people especially if they really have. Interest or you know I think sometimes the person gets to the point where they just have to do something else, but the family is probably holding them back a little bit because of fear. So do you find that as is an issue? Yeah. I think that when people come to us, they are completely exhausted and they're kind of like. We've tried everything this is. This is so frustrating and we don't know what to do from here and I got it like. I've definitely been there and yeah, so we are able to kind of hold their hand through the process and do a lot of the the work for them so that they can. Can kind of just sit back a little bit and understand what's going on. also lyman cancer services as a completely free service, which is nice, because I feel like everything with line, disease, super expensive but yeah, so we kind of are just there to help you along with the process. Make sure you know if you do hyperthermia treatment, which is Pricey. We WanNa make sure you do it right and. And there is a lot involved with tick borne infections and general. It's not a silver bullet treatment for everyone that we wanna make sure that you're prepared before you go, and we look into every different, also Pius, you come back. You have again most sustainable results the elephant in the room. What's the cost factor for going over in having hyperthermia? It depends on the different clinics. We work with two hospitals in Germany the Saint George, hospital and Dr Hers Ox. Hospital doctor Herzog. is about trump thousand five hundred euros for two weeks St George. Hospital is around sixteen thousand five hundred euros for two weeks, and then we also work with Santa. Me Of Medical Institute in Baja. California Mexico which has been amazing especially during Kobe, because it's easier to get to for people in the states. They really haven't had any issues with Kobe and. Any Asa there about twenty thousand US dollars, so it's it's about the same as the Saint George Hospital. Everything is included in regard to your room and your meals and. An on your treatments as well. Do you work with any foundations that offer financial assistance for people going through this? I have. To a few different foundations and we are looking into. Various projects that we can do to help people afford this treatment as of right now we're in the works with things, but for right now I tell my clients to always ask for an itemized bill when they come back from the hospital. Because a lot of times, my clients low re-submit to their insurance company, and they are getting a significant amount. Back is not a guarantee, but I'm happy I'm seeing it happen more often than not so I mean every little bit helps when you're dealing with lime disease, especially in I can go for post, treatment and helping you detox Yeah, so it's really worth as those questions that that's true and it's great advice. Did we miss anything here? Do, we cover just about everything. I think I think we did. A Good Job Lady, good job you. Wonderful so listen everybody. If you have any questions, please reach out to Michelle. mckeon her information certainly will be on the website as well and for those who are stuck home I hope you're listening to all the PODCASTS and enjoying them. If you have any concerns or questions, you can reach out to me at Cindy at pursue wellness dot us and. visit the website www dot pursue wellness dot us as well and. Come back and listen to us again. Tell us what you'd like to hear I. Appreciate everybody out there. I wish all well. Stay Safe and love everybody that you love. Of course she do okay take care bye bye, thank you for listening to another episode of living with line. We'd like to take another moment to thank our sponsors. Botanical medicines are important part of an integrative Lime Disease Program. Bio. Sidon from bio botanical research is a professional strength broad spectrum formula that has been extensively researched for effectiveness as nutritional support in live and co-infections. University studies have shown that this combination of plant medicines is also effective on biofilms. biofilms that may be hampering treatment as well as providing broadly acting herbal support, the life of Soma form of bio side and called bio side, and LSF is used by literate physicians, such as Dr Richard Horowitz, and Dr Jill Carnahan ask your practitioner about bio side Lsf and visit side and dot com for more information masters supplements does living with live, every overwhelming and finding the right supports difficult will master supplements can help master supplement specializes in probiotics. probiotics enzymes fiber that helps support digestive health during and after antibiotics master supplements, products provide results that you can feel working with a sixty day. Money back guarantee. Their staff is available to help you decide which products and programs are right for you. Master supplements is dedicated to science based products with the highest standards of quality control. Visit Master Hyphen Supplements Dot Com for more information or call and talk to a team member at eight, hundred, nine, two six. Six, two nine, six one. That's master hyphen supplements dot, com, or eight, hundred, nine, two, six, two nine six one thanks so much again for to living with line. We'd like to remind that you have not done so already. Please subscribe to the podcast. You can visit our website at living with line dot us. Make sure you don't miss any episode until next time. Thank you so much for listening and we'll be back sued with a new episode.

hyperthermia Vertigo Kobe lyme disease fire island Michelle Germany Cindy Kennedy Michelle. mckeon Dr Richard Horowitz US US Colitis Master Hyphen Supplements Dot mycoplasma pneumonia Dr Sydney Kennedy dizziness
Nature Gardens At The Natural History Museum of LA County

Cultivating Place

56:50 min | 1 year ago

Nature Gardens At The Natural History Museum of LA County

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history in the human impulse to garden from nor state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer jewel this week. We visit a remarkable public garden in California during California native plant week the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County are testament to just how much one garden can do where once a parking lot sat stay with us, the landscape architect and museum staff. Collaborated very deeply on the original planting a pallet for the entire garden. It was master planned and every plant that was chosen to be a part of this garden was chosen for a contribution that it would make to providing habitat. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel in this hour fifth but not quite final. Listen for more information towards the end of this episode in our five part series on our gardens as habitat, and we gardeners as powerful land stewards and bio-diversity protectors. We visit a remarkable public garden in California. It's California native plant week the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County are testament to just how much one garden can do to turn back time and help restore habitat even in downtown LA where once a parking lot sat Barron an overheated. We're joined today by native plant expert, Carol Bornstein, director of the nature gardens and by Leila Higgins, senior manager of community science there. With hard data collected over the last seven years and huge hearts for this work. They bring us up to speed on what the nature gardens and the habitat they provide can offer to us all Carol and Leila. Join us today with the help of audio producer Joanna clay from the nature gardens. Welcome Carole and Leila. Hello. I I'd love to have you both start by restating your job title, and tell us what that actually means in your working life day today. Let's start with you, Carol. I'm the director of the nature gardens here at the museum. I also oversee the the museums live animal program. So I joke he like to tell people that I'm responsible for the living things here at the museum as opposed to all the the dead specimens that we have in in our collections. There's no typical day, really. But a fair amount of. Time will be spent out in the garden communicating with our head gardener and some of the other members of the garden team just addressing what's going on with the the plants in the in the collection itself. Interacting with many other staff with regard to how the the gardens are being used of for educational purposes carefully for some of the research work, just all sorts of different collaborations that revolve and spin off of what's happening out in the gardens. Yeah. What about you? Leila. Hi. So I'm the senior manager of community science which some people refer to as citizens science about a year ago. We changed the name not everyone is a citizen who we want to participate. I'm personally, not a citizen of the United States. And we also were approached by the community and asked to change the name. And so that that's the rationale there. But the. Definition is the same regardless of whether you call a community signs like we do or citizen science, and it's getting the general public involved in answering real research questions and are real research questions or what's going on with nature here in Los Angeles. And that's not just in the garden, but all over the LA southern California region. But now that we have the garden it's an amazing field research site for both are scientists work in research and collections. I have a degree in entomology, so insects are among jam. But I love I realized that I wasn't going to be a hard science researcher. I realized I needed to communicate science to people, and that's what gave me true joy and getting to help build this garden here at the museum. It's just so amazing coming into work and seeing kids around the pond like literally getting their feet wet following chasing a butterfly getting to see birds up-close or them crawling through the wormhole in. Dirty zone. It's it's something that gives me like tangles every day. It is a it is an incredible garden. Carol will you describe the scope of these gardens that were we are talking about an a little bit about their history that how big are they when were they I put in. Why were they put in? Well, so the guards are roughly three and a half acres, and they took the place of a couple of parking lots and some rather mundane landscaping fair amount of lawn and not not a whole lot else. And the idea came about during the process of doing some major renovation to the the museum itself earthquake retrofitting the old historic wing and some of the galleries throughout the museum. And I wasn't here at the time Leela can speak to this perhaps more detail. But the the idea was to take the museums work, it's research work, and it's. -cational programming outdoors on our own property and to use the space the outdoor space as part of our our mission based work so becoming a museum of nature and natural history. The museum staff they developed a team of of biologists and educators, and that's where Leila came in wearing both hats at the time and worked with meal and associates local landscape architecture firm to develop the concept for the gardens and to help to construct them. And the goals were were multiple. They wanted to build something that could be used as a field site for conducting research also for many educational program opportunities for nature play because so many people who live in Los Angeles. Don't have the opportunity to have some type of connection with the outdoors. They they don't get to the beach or they don't go to the mountains. Nhs their school yards may be more asphalt than anything else. And there was a very strong belief that we needed to provide some opportunities, whether it was a first touch for nature or giving people a chance to just move along that continuum and become better aware of more connected with nature that is around them and also to serve as a demonstration garden of what they might be able to do in their own space and last, but certainly not least to create habitat for wildlife in this urban setting Lindy one adds something to that. So I've been at the museum ten years. And when I first got here and heard about this project, and I was like, oh my gosh. How can I start working on that? I have a master's degree environmental education, which was paired with my entomology undergrad degree and was like this is going to be a really powerful space for many of the reasons Carol outlined, and as a person who grew up on a form in England and got to run around playing hall trees and pretending to be a badger and chasing butterflies down a country lane. I felt really really compelled to help make a space where people can have experiences like that here in Los Angeles safe natural outdoor spaces where parents could bring their kids and kind of the parents could sit down and relax and kids could get their hands dirty in compost and climb on a tree stump and chase butterflies. Maybe. Okay. Maybe they also. Oh can pretend to be badgers. But American badges note European badges? But I got to work on that literally had started in December of two thousand eight and then halfway through two thousand nine I got assigned to the nature gardens project working with the head of exhibits at the time, Karen wise and found myself as the most Judy person in the room with the president of the museum and head of our construction company listening to the pitches from all the different landscape firms that we're going to possibly wanted to work with us. And then we selected Mierlo layer at associates, and I was just like how my in this space and an in getting against the whole completion cycle and then hiring on Carol and the now having a full complement of garden staff and seeing kids and adults out in that space. It's kind of just like a magical thing, it is magical thing. And I wanna go back to Carol for just a second before we get into more of the science being. Done there, Carol as really one of the premier native plant experts in California, especially in public garden space, your whole career has been dedicated to to this kind of work will you describe for people the kind of range of plants both implant types, and maybe how many species you have. And just like, what would we mean when we say were planting for habitat, give us some tangible names and faces to that. Well, I I'll just start by saying that the the gardens are not an entirely, California native composition, there are exotic plants here. Although most of what people see when they come was part of the overall planting design, very very little of what remained prior to the groundbreaking is on the property, but there are some exotic species and those reflect part of the fabric of the. Urban landscape that exists throughout Los Angeles. And that was intentional to make it be accessible in a visual way. That people could relate to some of the plants that were already here that they do see around the city, but I'd say about two thirds are California native plants, and they range from local native species of plants that you might find along the natural reaches of the Los Angeles or the San Gabriel rivers. So right Perry in vegetation such as a Royal willow, the California sycamore oak woodland, primarily we would we have coast live oak. But we also have a few species of other native oaks on the property. Lots of Toyin, which is the official Strub official native plant of Los Angeles that absolutely thrives in this garden, several different kinds of CNN 'thus and man's anita's coffee berry and. Currents and gooseberries. So there's a quite an extensive array of Woody plants, but we also have a lot of native grasses Perennials. There's even an aquatic component. Because we have an unnatural Listrik pond that is populated entirely with California native plants and the Hollander meadow actually have to pollinator gardens one that is exclusively California natives a mosaic of grasses and annual and perennial wildflowers with a few shrubs for structure around structure, but we also have an a'mixed Hollander garden that is a more formal in presentation to appeal to people who might not like, you know, the the less tidy look that the the meadow a presents in addition to all of that there's also an edible garden that doesn't fact have some California native plants mixed in partly for their in secretary benefits. But. Also because some of our native plants definitely have an edible component to them. That's a kind of a general overview. Yeah. And there's roughly six hundred or so different species and cultivars in the garden, not including the edible plants and the annual wildflowers so for the snow barely size. There's a lot of plant diversity a lot of impact. When I was last there. I think the the Wildflower meadow mosaic area, you were referring to was just getting started. And with this great bloom year going on can you describe that a little bit for us shirt? Yes. It's in bloom. It's it's probably the most dynamic part of all of the nature gardens other than the changing annual beds in the edible garden because of the composition of the diversity of plants that are there, and the fact that it has. It has definitely evolved since we planted it. It was the the last section of the garden to be installed. The meadow originally had a lot more annual Wildflower component to it. And over time the bunch grasses have naturalized and taken up more of the real estate. So there are probably there's less of the ground plane of annuals, but there are more of some of the other plants that we landed such as the desert APR ikat and the Indian Mallow and the annual sunflower some things have just been super super happy in that location. And we have let a lot of things just evolved on their own trying to take a to some degree a bit of a hands off approach and let things find their place. But at the same time, we are we are still managing it just in that description alone where you have the, you know, really Connick. Canopy trees of the sycamore and the oaks there and all the way down to the to the native bunch grasses. There is this beautiful and wholly Representative plant communities there which would allow for a lot of year, round, observation and information collection. So I'm going to move to you Leela and have you talk a little bit about the different ways that you are incorporating both community science and hard science with all of that opportunity throughout the year. Again, we were very excited about this garden opening and even before it opened. We started surveying the space with our scientific staff. We had this group that we call the habitat team. And I was one of the lead content educators on that team. But also had. A science background. So was able to work with an across the science to education side of things, and we have been doing a lot of field research out in the space. So we have our Tamala gist out there putting up Malays trap. That's been up since the garden has opened animals trap for those of you don't know it's like almost like a tent, but for insects that fly through the environment, and they get caught on the piece of netting. That's there. And then they are tracked into flying up to try and get away they fly up woods. And then they get cold in this jar, which is filled with alcohol, and yes, they do parish. But we take killing things very seriously here. We're only doing it to to help our understanding of the planet and to hopefully, make the planet and our environment, especially here in Los Angeles better for humans and for wildlife. So we. Found hundreds and hundreds of insect species in the garden through that Malays trapping projects and our staff and volunteers sorting through those insects inside of our nature lab exhibit. So the public can come in throughout the week in the weekends and get to see volunteers and work study students from USA sorting through those insects, and we have a microscope setup. So they can see them up close and see some of these life forms that are flying around in also even their own backyards, but are something that are so small and so tiny the people don't get to see. So we've had three hundred and five species of insects observed in the nature gardens through this logical survey to split that up nine species of dragonflies, damsel flies which mostly relying on the pond because dragonflies and damsel flies lay their eggs inside of water. And so their babies live on the border of putting in that wall. A source really helps to increase the bottom versity in relation to the dragonflies. Dams of is we have fourteen species of butterflies in a found in the garden. Nineteen species of flower flies, also known as a hover flies they are pollinators forty five species of scuttle flies. So these are in the true fly group there also known as humpback flies because they have this very large hump behind their head an-and, sixteen species more than sixteen species of bees, and then thirty four species of beetles, which Beatles, my favorite order insects. So very excited to see so many of those in our age gardens, and then beyond the insects. We've had four species of reptiles amphibians found there was a turtle dumped in the pong. There was a American bullfrog dumped in the pond. So those are species that we've seen were not necessarily very excited about having them in in the space. They are again invasive species that have. Wrought havoc around the world. But then we have to species blizzards have shown up and there were not really lizards in the space before the gardens were built seventeen species of mammals, ten species of sales slugs and one hundred seven bird species are. Yeah, it's amazing are one of orange haired the museum Kimball Garrett he has lived in Los Angeles his whole life. He grew up playing in the Hollywood hills all birds around and he scored a job here at the museum and has been here over thirty years. And since the gardens opened he has been going out weekly and he's done two hundred seventy nine bird surveys. He seen twenty two thousand six hundred fifteen individual birds, which represents one hundred seven species I wanted to just add something about all these creatures. None of that wildlife was intentionally brought into the garden. There's only there's only one animal that we. Intentionally introduced in that was the Arroyo chub, which is a native fish that. We actually had to secure a permit in order to release it in the pond, and it has been so happy that the initial seating of maybe twenty five to fifty or so fish has now turned into many, hundreds if not thousands of fish, but everything else, you know, that we have been documenting has arrived on its own accord. Although as Leila did say a couple things apparently were deposited in the pond that we pre mmediately removed. Carol Bornstein is director and Leila Higgins, the senior manager of community science both at the nature gardens of the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County in downtown LA, the three and a half acre garden was conceived and planted in what was mostly as volt parking lot. The natural history museum is LA's oldest museum building and the present day anchor of an emerging cultural educational and entertainment hub in exposition park. Natural history museum. Visitors are awed by extraordinary specimens and the stories behind them. In addition to sharing the history of the planet. The natural history museum also explores a more local transformation, the outdoor nature gardens and the nature lab. Look at how environment and people past and present interact in LA the unifying. Theme in these indoor and outdoor experiences is the interplay of nature and culture in Los Angeles and the world the gardens put living nature into the life and science of this historic natural history museum. We'll be right back after a break to hear more. Hey, I've had so many wonderful comments and notes about the impression this habitat series has made on all of you and me to how it's opened your thinking and inspired your own gardening at this time of year in particular. You'll hear more about this at the end of this episode. But I just couldn't help myself. I added one more episode to what was supposed to be a series of five. It was too hard to stop because in reality all gardens are about habitat right there have tat for us for our sanity for our wildlife, and our plants and well engaging in life, more, fully and richly on all levels. It's because of you donors out there that I was able to put my head around curing such a series and the forethought planning scheduling in communicating. This involves so thank you to each and every one of you who showed up as donors as well. As listeners we have a lot of new ideas here at cultivating place, and we need listener support to help us out. If you wanna be the gardener to our garden, please consider making a tax deductible donation by clicking on the link that says support in the upper right hand corner of any page Eckel debating place dot com, while most people give us a steaming donations of twenty dollars a month. Kenny size or one time gift goes a long way to make these important conversations possible. Thank you. Now. Back to our conversation with Carol Bornstein and Leila Higgins of the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel. Welcome back to our conversation with Carol Bornstein and Leila Higgins of the habitat intense nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County in downtown LA. So that was one of my questions when when you referred to frog and the turtles being dumped, these are non native species that somebody came and just released without permission into the environment. The turtle happened during construction we did have a camera trap on the pond of time camera trapping is something else that way, we do in the garden to help to collect data and we saw some construction boots coming in the frame, and then the next day turtle was in the pond. So it was a rhetoric slider. It's on the top one hundred species list of invasive species that is on the red list way had somewhere live animal staff. Oversee the removal of total and rehoming wanna go back to all of these wonderful numbers of bugs, you were giving these three and a half acres of gardens went into a place that was basically just as fault. It was just paved over and more or less, and then these gardens come in you've been what I understood from what you said is you've been collecting this data on the insect and other life in the gardens for all of these years or a great many of them since the garden was planted. We're hearing all the time right now about how fresher are insect life is in the world. And it's decreasing numbers. We don't have data from before the garden was there. But in theory there clearly weren't, you know, damsel flies and dragonflies because there was not water. So are you seeing trends of upward and downward? Are you what are you seeing there? And what does it say to you? So the Malays trap that I was talking about is one of well, it was originally in the first ration- of this research product, which is called bio scan which stands for biodiversity science city nature just run by our Tamala staff here, and Dr Brian Brown are Tamala just he's a fly specialist, and so that Malays trip in our nature gardens was one of thirty that was all over the city of Los Angeles and through. Those traps they discovered forty three species of of these flies that are brand new to science not new Los Angeles. But brand new no scientists knew that they had existed on the planet until our researchers looked at them and identify them. Yes. So this is real science happening. And in two other flies that he looked at in that sample one had never before been found in Los Angeles. Edit only been known to exist in Europe, a third one also never before found in LA only known from the east and west coast of Africa three scientific discoveries one new species, and then to range expansions we found to date is they're working on publishing a lot of state. But so I don't want to preempt them on that. But what Carol Annan other people have been saying plant native plants plant native plants, and or climate appropriate plants, and you will increase by diversity in your space. I think for Gardner. There's maybe our greatest joy in life. E is this idea of making. Gardens that welcome all of these creatures even in a small space and being able to make that difference. Just feel so hugely helpful to me and hopeful to me, given what we are seeing worldwide in terms of declines of these creatures that we we rely on them for everything and we harm them at our own peril. So with that in mind, I wanna move back to Carol. And you know, we talk about habitat nor garden's very generally, but you can give us some really I think beautiful specifics, perhaps on ways that you have as a plant person thought about the habitat needs of these, you know, many different species and said, you know, maybe this is their larvae. Food. Maybe I'll plant this this is there, you know, this would be great nesting material for for hummingbirds. Maybe I'll plant this has there been a kind of intentional planning for the support of the different life stages of some of these creatures mean, I think the the most common when we hear about all the time. Of course is the milk Weeden and the monarch or you know, for us the pipe vine and the Aristo Kia with the pipeline swallowtail butterflies have had there been other examples like that that you can share with us wherein, you think that long term for what your plants and your final relationships are doing together while they the short answer is. Yes, that that was definitely intentional the team that of Leland. I mentioned of the landscape architect and museum staff. Collaborated very deeply on the original planting. Palette for the entire garden. It was master plan and every plant that was chosen to be a part of this garden was chosen for it. What a contribution that it would make to providing habitat also to be compatible with our Mediterranean climate here in Los Angeles, and to be to survive on fairly low water over its lifespan, not everything has worked for one reason or another because guards, of course, are grand experiments in and things don't number one live necessarily live forever. And we're constantly editing and changing trying to honor the original intentions, and when new plants are brought into the garden. They do need to pass muster with that same goal in mind to provide either a food source, whether it's through the flowers or the fruits or nesting material or shelter as far as specifics. Well, there's a plant from. Baja California Mexico. Culver Beena, Lila seena that. One of the things that people do like about that. And it has become very popular year in central and southern California is that blooms almost all year long has lovely purple flowers that happen to be fragrant adapted to our dry summer climate here. And it attracts a quite a diverse array of butterflies, so from skippers disqualify sales monarchs so that is one that is popular not only for its beauty. But also for its attractiveness to butterflies, the native sunflower, I mentioned that earlier I've been delighted by how happy it is in our garden. But also the fact that not only do native bees neck, visit the flowers when they're in bloom in late spring early summer, but as the seeds ripen, then it provides a wonderful food source for gold finches, they will just hang upside down and just feast away until they. You know, get disturbed by something and fly off and then of Chile return. So that's a plant that that that gives in multiple ways coast live oaks and oaks in general, you know, have a reputation of being fantastic habitat. Plants. There's documentation that oak trees provide some type of support to over five hundred different creatures of wildlife at some point during their life. Whether it's a food source or nesting or shelter. And so we definitely see an awful lot of activity among the many oak trees here in the garden Ciller of few very very few examples. I remember when I was there being really taken by the bat monitoring equipment that ill had down by think by the pond area. Well, I I know that we've documented I think it's five. Species now. And I think that the reason that we are seeing that kind of activity is because of the fact that all of these plants are providing some type of food source for insects in the the bats visiting to eat, the insects and Leela can probably fill in more detail about that. Yes. So the person who puts up the bat detector is Miguel Oriana he works in the community science office. He's also an urban cone of researcher an Mamool gist. So we've had a bat detector up for number of years in the garden. We have one two three four five species of bats that have been detected. We've got the big Brown bat red bat hoary bat pallid bat and Townsend big eared bat, one of the other things that the again, I keep mentioning the pond the pond is a great resource for bats, not what was people would think it's because of all insects that live in the aquatic environment. And then emerge. Urge as adults and these flying insects are then food source for bats. And you'll often see that's fine. Ovo waterways around Los Angeles at dusk. And it's a really beautiful sight to behold, and you're like, you might be eating any of the mosquitoes that a flying around right now and bats so that was one of the things like we have to have a pond, we have to have a pond, we have to have a pond known only going to add all of this diversity and habitat for these species that really rely on that quantum environment. But I've done a lot of ponding with children. And so taking kids out to the edge of the pond hitting them Annette giving them a even a simple tool like a plastic smoothen and a ice cube tray. They can then sample for the macro invertebrates in the pawn, and they get to find things like two strikers and Dragonfly. Larvae and dams affi- larvae, and we don't actually have very many mosquitoes upon which is an tastic all the Orioles job undoing their job eating eating them. Lots of other insects like may fly larvae we found some pita larvae living in the pond as well. Beyond the pawn. We also wanted to make sure that we added habitat value in addition to the plant, so we have be hotels, we put up out there. And I remember working with some of our exhibit team with some old pieces of wood Brian round or Tamala just had in his backyard, and we drilled hundreds of holes into them and put them out, and we're so excited when we saw Ie's moving in these a solitary bees, not the, you know, honeybees that live in these giant, colonial groups, so they're much less likely to Singley solitary bees, and they move in. And they lay their eggs inside of these holes and provision them with pollen sacs. And then the babies hatch out and get to eat Napolitan. There is inside there. So that's that's really fantastic things that get provisioned with spiders or actually wa-. So we have we have areas that we let go muddy and then wasps come and collect the mud from those little edges of the muddy puddles and make little Ness on the side of the building. We've also left lots of area is like bare sand because their ground nesting sand SPS in the ambiguous which have these beautiful green eyes. You know? That's not something that most gardeners may be no about, but yet if you want to have these beautiful wasps, and again, these are solitary wasps, so they're not gonna be out there trying to sting us. Humans like yellow jackets are and then added bonus for those mud Doha's. You know, if you have any phobia of spiders there they as part of their life cycle they need to vision their their their nest with those items for their babies too. In this fifth episode in our series focusing on the important role. We our gardens can play in supporting bio-diversity in this world. We're speaking with Carol Bornstein director and Leila Higgins senior manager of community. Science at the nature gardens of the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County in downtown LA the gardens were designed and planted by Mia layer and associates a firm now known as studio M L A in two thousand thirteen in collaboration with science and education. Staff at the natural history museum specifically to re introduce native habitat, by way of water rocks. Trees other plants and soils for the native wildlife of Los Angeles to return, the resulting insect reptile, mammal and bird diversity. Making this oh Acis garden. Their home is reminder to us all of the power. We have to create habitat for all on our own patches of earth. We'll be right back after a break. Stay with us. Okay. So thinking out loud. Here you want to know what I'm loving, the very most about this conversation with Carole and Leela it's this. We're speaking so little about pollinators now that might sound like a funny thing to say, but if you've been listening to these conversations in this series, you might have picked up that my feelings are this when we talk about habitat and biodiversity loss. It's not about one subset of life animals, we humans, call pollinators. We don't need this issue reduced to a sound bite. We are fully capable of grasping both the nuance and the complexity of the damage we have done to these living systems and our capacity for helping to restore balance. And it's not about us doing this because it benefits us as humans that the loss of pollinators will severely impact our food. Ops. For instance, we care, and we can act based solely on the fact that it's the right thing to do the problem. We've created is not simple and the answer is not simple. But it starts simply with starting from where we are doing what we can to not only change our actions in decisions, but to increase our own understanding and wariness garden variety everyday actions from the ground up. It is about the monarchs in the hummingbirds and the honeybees, but as Carol and Leila demonstrate it's also about lizards, and spiders beetles and bats, it's about flies and sand wasps, we might be preconditioned to be scared of, but which are in fact gentle, and they had the most beautiful iridescent is and they have an important place in this. Well. Of life that we're one tiny part of we can do this. We you and me gardeners, we most especially can do this. Now back to our conversation with Carol Bornstein and Leila Higgins of the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County. This is cultivating place. I'm Jennifer jewel. Welcome back to our conversation with Carol Bornstein and Leila Higgins of the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County in downtown LA, you know, as home Gardner's in in you have both sort of reference the idea of the garden serving as demonstration for other people to see what they can do. And clearly not everybody's going to be able to put in a big pond or plant an enormous oak or even planned to small oak that's going to become an enormous oak. If you both of you had sort of one to three things that you would say to listeners as to what you would love to see them do in their gardens to move in this direction. What would those with those three things being let's start with you. Carol. Well, that's tough. I've thought about this a lot. I guess maybe the first thing I would suggest is to if you're using any kind of toxic chemicals in your garden to just stop doing that the statistics about the use of of herbicides pesticides in this country is a very alarming, and in my opinion. It's it's unnecessary. And we are managing this garden using organic practices, and we are not using toxic chemicals at all and we're not using synthetic fertilizers either. So I would encourage people to just abandon those practices because that is killing both beneficial as well as the occasional pests that might be visiting your garden and allow natural natural predators to help come and provide some kind of ecological balance in whatever size garden, you might have. So that I think that might be my first suggestion, certainly incorporating some Nick, California native plants into your garden, if you don't already, and if you're space is really really limited. I would concentrate on those that are as local as possible to your area. With the expectation that those would ideally be the best adapted to your site. That isn't always the case, but more likely than not they would they would hopefully be better adapted than something from tr- SU super far away as many of your listeners Nell, California's incredibly diverse state with over six thousand species of native plants and not all of those are going to grow well in your mediate area. So try to narrow your scope. Releasing chemicals using native plants, regardless of the size of your garden tried to incorporate different layers vegetation. So that you're providing habitat for as wide in array of of wildlife as possible. And by that, I mean plans that cover the ground in your kind of a blanket on the ground mid story as well as some type of canopy because different species occupy all of those different zones, and that not only adds to the visual interest of your garden. But it definitely will also nurture other forms of life to a appreciable extent. So I have to add one more, and that is some type of a water supply, even if it's just a tiny little dripping Byrd bath type of setup at that has everything needs water to some degree, and it doesn't have to be exuberant or expansive, but just a little bit. We'll go a long way to supporting life. What about you Leela? Okay. Get rid of your loans as much as you possibly can especially in southern California habitat value, basically zero I'm not saying don't have any loan. I totally see them as a great place for children and dogs to maybe play or laying down on for a picnic or taking a nap in on for all those things but as much as possible frequently drive by and you see people not using the loans for ninety nine percent of the time. So yet rid of his much loan as possibly feel it. You can outdoor cats are really destructive unloved cats. I love my friend's cats, but they kill so much wildlife. Lizards birds insects, even and I know that's really hard for some people here. But that you can have. You're happy. Indoor cat you could make an outdoor cat run. One of the women that I do a lot of work with a huge advocate football life. Here. Nelly. Susan gottlieb. She has a lovely nice big cat run outside. And so and she has hundreds and hundreds of hummingbirds visit her house, but that Cameron allows the cats to be outside the birds to be safe, and then Leslie, Carol mention the no pesticides. I'm going to get really specific one kind pesticide not dentist sides any rat poison the being put out they can be really destructive going up the food chain getting all the way even to in are amazing mountain line p twenty two he was suffering from mange had to be captured and administered medicine, and that's that's directly linked to rodenticides. And so that's something we're really trying to fight against here in Los Angeles right now. And getting that to be something that the. Adopted across the city, and hopefully Ross the county, and hopefully other cities counties will follow suit. Is there anything else you would like to add? And I wanna remind listeners that there's this amazing opportunity coming up the city nature challenge is gonna be able twenty seven th through the twenty nineth for survey shin period. Get your smartphones digital cameras out take pictures any plant or animal in any city. That's participating and that's a project that I helped to star in co-founded when someone from California academy sciences, and it's a competition between it was originally for years ago. L A versus San Francisco, which cine can find the most ager in the hundred forty cities around the world. Lots of cities in the western United States LA and San Francisco a long standing rivalry. Help us beat San Francisco. I just remembered one thing or new book while I'm one of the co-authors Carol was one of our scientific advisers. We have a whole we have twenty five field trips around LA, the nature gardens is one of them. So on vine, okay hero. Anything you would like to add in terms of the the plant in wildlife connection to the plants that I didn't mention it all that are really kind of should be at the top of the list for providing capital are the buckwheat s- the area games and Bacchus so buckwheat ZIM backer as have been huge stars in terms of the the insect diversity that they support how many different species of buck weeds. Do you have in the garden and our their lists of plant and plant species that you have in the garden up online under on the website. We don't have it online. I do. You have a plant database, and you know, we share it with people who express an interest in it. But it's not live. I can roughly say that we have probably seven or eight species of buckwheat in the garden. I'm really glad you mentioned both of those because they are such for one thing. Great season extenders, we are very close to our time. So I think I will move to is there is there anything else you would like to add maybe speaking personally to some moment of beauty or engagement in the garden that you could share with visitors about, you know, not just the wise. But not just the like you should. But the this is why it's so powerful to you personally. Well, I could say that for me the time that I spend not only in this garden, but my own garden brings me joy just by virtue of seeing the beauty that plants that are thriving provides and the support that they also provide the the dynamic between the plants and the wildlife is just a constant stores of. While inspiration, beauty and pleasure. It's it's part of the fabric of of our landscape in. I I don't know how I came to. Appreciate that. Exactly. I I've been gardening since I was a child, but I don't really think I paid that much attention to the wildlife. It was more the plants initially and over time I've come to appreciate the connection. Between all of these different living things, and how they how they change over time to me that is I think one of the most interesting aspects of being a gardener and the happy surprises when something does what you don't expect it to do, and that can be a wonderful thing in of itself, the problem solving aspect of being a gardener realizing that not everything is going to work the way you want that there are going to be failures. But they'll also be a lot of successes the willingness to you know, the willingness to fail and to to try something new, and it's always changing. That's what I love about. What I do that. It's it's unpredictable, and I really appreciate and value that very highly. What about you Leela? So for me, it's really going to see people in this space engaging as the manager of the community signs program like getting right before this interview. I went onto I natural. Which is the platform we use to help documents nature in this garden space, like how many species observations have been found documented by people who visit the museum and some of those people coming to our programs. Some of those people are kids in you know, some of our kind of like nature clubs, but some of them are just general visitors who maybe don't even get a personal interaction with. And so I looked that up. We had over two hundred seventy two people submitted three thousand seven hundred ninety seven observations which represents five hundred twenty eight species in that garden space up. And so seeing the power of that data set that has been collectively created by many most of those people are not scientists they're not they don't have undergraduate degree or master's or PHD in science, but they are out there and they care enough to take a photo and they care enough to submit. And so we get to see that data. And then get a better understanding of what is here in this garden space, and that's really powerful to me than having those personal interactions in the space will ink out, even if I'm just really rushed in Woking to meeting will through the space and see a group of schoolchildren kind of running joint smiles on that faces. And then when the they realize that they're allowed to kind of put their hands in the pond and failed at pond Volta and the teachers like, yeah, okay. Go ahead and just like this exuberant joy on those faces that feeds me feeds, my soul and shows the true power of the space. Thank you. Both very much for being guests on the program today. It has been a great pleasure to speak to you both and learn even more about those powerful gardens. Thank you, a pleasure to be a part of this series. Yes. Thank you. Carol Bornstein is a California native plant expert and the director of the nature gardens at the natural history. Museum of Los Angeles County. Leila Higgins is an entomologist educator and senior manager of community. Science at the natural history. Museum with hard data collected over the last seven years and huge hearts for this work. Carol and Leela are just two people in a large team working to increase support and learn from the nature gardens and the habitat they provide they provide that habitat to us all humans and other wildlife for more information on the nature gardens. Please see the museum's website at N H M dot org where you can follow the data collections and live cams that Carol and Leila were telling us about placed out in the gardens. You can also check out their new book co authored by Leila on which Carroll served. A science editor it's called wild LA exploring, the amazing nature in and around Los Angeles. As they say alligator lizards and free flying parakeets are just the beginning. While this was meant to be the fifth and final episode in our deep dive series into our gardens as important in sustaining habitats for the wildlife of our native areas, and we gardeners as important stewards of bio-diversity. I just couldn't help myself. I have extended the exploration to one more episode because it fits in so beautifully. You might know of the iron. Rush plants woman and garden designer Mary Reynolds from the movie dare to be wild of which her surprising gold medal winning garden design at the Chelsea flower show and her passion for nature in gardens is the focus or you might know her as the author of the garden awakening in either event, I think you will really enjoy hearing her garden life journey and her concept for gardens as arcs of hope for wildlife, the globe over join us next week for that cultivating places a listener supported co-production of nor state public radio for more information and many photos from the inspiring nature gardens in Los Angeles. See this week show notes under the podcast tab, Eckelt availing, place dot com. Our engine near skyscraper field. Original theme music is by Mark muse, accompanied by Joe craven, and Sam Bevan cultivating places distributed nationally by p r x public radio exchange until next week and joy, the cultivation of your place. I'm Jennifer jewel.

Los Angeles Leila Higgins Museum of Los Angeles County California Carol Carol Bornstein Jennifer jewel senior manager Leela director United States Natural history museum researcher museum of nature Carole Acis garden head gardener producer