35 Burst results for "Baird"

"baird" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:55 min | 7 months ago

"baird" Discussed on How I Built This

"Successful. We're going to take a quick break but we'll be back in a moment with more from danelle Baird of black power, stay with us, you're listening to how I built this lab. Welcome back to how I built this lab. I'm guy Roz. I'm talking with Dan Albert. He's the founder of black power. All right, a $100 million that you've raised incredibly impressive. I think you've done work on more than 1200 buildings. You've got this partnership in Ithaca and growing partnerships. Do you have a sense of when you get to profitability? I mean, in your mind, is it ten years from now, or is it faster than that? I think we were profitable last year. Oh, wow. There was like a stray $1 million in there that I couldn't quite get my little grubby CEO hands on that they hid for me and so I think we made a million. I think we did like 18 million in revenue last year. So you are already profitable. Yeah, but again, we have a mix of capital from Silicon Valley and Wall Street and Silicon Valley. You don't really have to be profitable as we're all learning. Correct, right. But on Wall Street, you do have to be profitable, right? And so the majority of the capital that we've raised is actually from Goldman and Microsoft and we have to repay them. And so every dollar that we take in from them has to have a plan where we can give them four or 5, 6, 7% return out of the profits that we generate. So again, our business model is to go in, use digital models and software to figure out how to profitably upgrade and individual building. And to make an investment using Wall Street capital in greening and electrifying that building and saving so much on the energy bill that the building owner sees them savings and our lenders see some profit. And if we play our cards right, so do we in our Silicon Valley investors. Now, having said that, over the next two to 5 years, as we prepare to go public and IPO, we will not be profitable. If I'm doing my job, we will be investing in R&D and expansion, just like Uber did, right? Or Airbnb or any other tech company because we want to take the message of electrification to every corner of the country. And so our job is to make those investments so that we can grow rapidly. And I think that that will be the best thing for our company and I think it will be the best thing for the planet. So the plan is to take it public. We got to go public. And again, why? We partner with conservative energy utility companies with mayors, with Congress people with city council folks who are trying to decarbonize and electrify their city. They don't want to partner with a startup. They want to be able to go on Google and see that you're a publicly traded and you're stable and your financials are good and if a mayor signs an agreement with us that 5 years from now, all its voters aren't going to kick him out of her out of office because we went bankrupt. So they want that stability and transparency and we're going to need to do that in the public markets. Absolutely. Presumably there are other companies out there there. I know there are other companies out there that are doing similar things to what you're doing. But let's say brand, right? Your competitive advantage is you already have built the connections, particularly in low income communities where there's a huge potential to electrify tens, hundreds of thousands of houses and homes and buildings. Yeah. I think in Silicon Valley, and this is why we had such a hard time raising capital initially. You know, look at Tesla, like they come out with the roadster first and it's like, I don't know what it costs a hundred grand, 200 grand. Yeah, something like that. Yeah. It was expensive, right? Like most Americans can't afford that. And then as you're successful, you're selling enough of those things you invest, you buy more machines, and then now you do the sedan. Can you get the model three? Yeah. Right? And so now you're charging people like 75 K and then you keep investing and then you bring the cost down to 30 K. Same thing with the Apple iPhone, right? We've flipped that on its head and said, we're going to start with the lowest income people first. And that allows us to be mass market first. And so that has been a painful journey, but now that we've seen a little bit of success, yeah, we do have a competitive advantage and that we can expand to be mass market before other kinds of companies that have really been focused on more affluent customers. So that's right. And look, more importantly, I think that allows us to build a political coalition of people who can access our technologies. And it's a broader range of people who are going to care about climate policy, so maybe we can get something passed. And that's what this is all about. You know, I spoke to a founder of a carbon capture company on the show a couple weeks ago. And he said to me, carbon capture is going to be one of the biggest commodity markets in the world and 50 years. Yeah, it's going to be like bigger than gold and oil. That's correct. It's hard for us to wrap our head around that right now. And you're basically saying the same thing. What you're doing, this electrification, and the market opportunity is so huge what we just can't entirely see it yet. Politically, they're still huge challenges to overcome in the United States, right? Like this is not a problem that a couple of Silicon Valley VCs or some billionaire philanthropists can solve. This must be solved at scale and it can only be solved with a huge massive federal government incentives and in dollars, right? Correct. And so what does it look like to do that, right? And so yes, it is important to have federal incentives. And we have some of those in the bipartisan infrastructure Bill that was passed. Now what's interesting, the president used the defense production act, which puts us on wartime footing to produce all the electric appliances. Yes. And so heat pumps and electric ovens are now going to be incentivized through this wartime production act to be manufactured in America at low cost. We're not going to have to ship them overseas, right? And so the cost and these things are going to drop dramatically if this plan works. And over the next two and a half years, the Biden Harris team will put a lot of capital out to finance companies and green infrastructure projects across America. And then what needs to happen guy is those projects, we need like half of them to be successful and then they need to share their data on their engineering, their construction, their design. They need to open-source and share that data globally. So that Silicon Valley and Wall Street can duplicate and scale those projects. And so with our project in Ithaca, for example, we are signing up 9 other cities across America to race Ithaca to electrify all of the buildings. And I think we got to make it interesting and competitive for local folks, right? Like what are the ways that we can collaborate in a scenario where we have robust federal investment and how do we get this done even if that federal investment tapers off. And then there's other countries around the world, right? India, they don't have robust government investment across the continent of India to get this done. And so we've got a demonstrate and explore and then share data and that data will allow capital markets to scale and replicate solutions across the country. 20 years ago, I didn't think that everyone would have an iPhone or an Android, but billions of people across the world now do. And so we need that kind of solution at scale. And I think it's possible. And

Silicon Valley danelle Baird Dan Albert Ithaca Roz Airbnb Goldman IPO city council Microsoft Tesla Congress America Google Biden Harris Apple India
"baird" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:52 min | 7 months ago

"baird" Discussed on How I Built This

"To how I built this lab. Reunion is a beautiful island rich with culture, fantastic food, incredible surfing beaches, and the world's deadliest shark attacks. It all started in 2011 when sharks on reunion just started biting people way more than ever before and with lunatic violence. The Réunion Island shark crisis became one of the most extreme shark attack epidemics in recorded history. How have the locals, government and business owners navigated this complicated nightmare? This season on reunion, shark attacks in Paradise will tell the remarkable stories of people who lived through these attacks and how the entire island coped to the surge of sharks activity in the water. So why is all this happening and how has this complex problem seeped into every aspect of island life and culture? Join host pro surfer and bestselling author Dan Duane on his trip to Réunion Island as he seeks answers. Listen to reunion, shark attacks in Paradise on Apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts or subscribe to binge all episodes now. Small town girl Bonnie Lee bakley always dreamed of marrying a movie star. Her obsession with celebrities resulted in 9 divorces until Bonnie eventually married famous actor Robert Blake. However, Bonnie learned being close to the spotlight comes with consequences within a year for marriage, her Hollywood dream came to a tragic end. When she was found fatally shot outside of a diner in north Hollywood. From wondery, the execution of Bonnie Lee bakley is a thrilling new chapter in the hit Hollywood and crime podcast series. Robert Blake knew Bonnie spent most of her life as a con artist, who dreamed of being famous, but when Robert Blake reluctantly let Bonnie stay in his guesthouse, it began the role he become most famous for, an accused murderer, explore the darker side of fame, listen to the execution of Bonnie Lee bakley on Amazon music, Apple podcasts, Spotify, or you can listen early and ad free by joining wondery plus in the wondery app. Welcome back to how I built this lab. I'm guy rose. My guest is Dan Albert, founder of black power. So you literally founded this company while you were a business school, right? Yes. And you launch it formally in 2014, but not as a nonprofit as a for profit business. Correct. I learned enough about business and business school to say, well, look, I mean, green and buildings in America is going to cost like $5 trillion. There's a 125 million buildings in America. Literally, it'll cost $5 trillion. Literally someone's going to have to put up $5 trillion. But there's a way to do it and make a financial return. So someone's going to make like $.7 trillion by investing $5 trillion. So someone's going to make huge fortunes, right? By investing in greeting all the buildings and that's why we work with Goldman Sachs, right? It's not like they are nice people or at least the part of the bank that we work with are nice people. But they're going to make a lot of money if this all works out. But you started this as a for profit business because you wanted to attract capital and you wanted to show that there was a business model and basically converting low income apartment buildings into not just energy efficient, but carbon free buildings with solar panels and the idea was you could actually do this and it can make money. We thought that we could go into the poorest neighborhoods in America and build a business, making those buildings, greener, smarter, and healthier and make our investors a ton of money. That's what we thought. And that's what we've been trying to prove. All right, so you've got the concept and you know what you want to do. Now, help me understand what that is. Because this is not what the Obama administration was doing when you were trying to green buildings or make them more efficient. It wasn't about pumping better insulation of the building. You had a very different plan, which was to take a building and to do what with it. We want to decarbonize the building. And how do you basically do that? There's a set of new hardware that allows us to make buildings all the electric. In the same way that Tesla and rivian can take an automobile and rip out the fossil fuel engine and replace it with an all electric engine. We can now do the same thing with hardware and buildings. And so we can go into basically any building in America and rip out the existing fossil fuel equipment that heats the building, heats the hot water for cooking in showering. We can rip all of that fossil fuel equipment out and replace it with equipment that only uses the electricity and actually reduces greenhouse gas emissions by as high as 70%. And so then the next question is like, okay, well, if it's using electricity, is that electricity sourced from burning coal or gas? Well, sometimes, but you can also source that electricity from solar on the roof of that building or a solar farm or a wind farm or a hydroelectric project. And so by converting the building to a 100% all electric equipment, you create the opportunity to fully remove fossil fuel consumption in that building. So that's what we do. Let's get granular for a moment. And let's just take a, let's say a ten story apartment complex in bed stuy. And it's an old building built in the late 60s, early 70s, not super well insulated, not super efficient, but you want to convert that building. You can essentially put enough solar panels on the roof of that building to power that building or would it require other sources of energy as well. If it was a building and downtown Cleveland, you could put enough solar on the roof. But because New York is so dense, the roofs in New York aren't big enough to like providing enough power to the tall buildings. What we do have in New York City is we get most of our electricity or will next year from a hydroelectric project in Quebec. And so there's this giant dam in Quebec that bends a bunch of turbines and produces clean electricity and sends that electricity down to New York City and so the source of our electricity in New York is going to be far far cleaner than it is right now and then it is in most places in the country. And so you can convert that building to that power source and Quebec, for example. Exactly. So that ten story building, maybe burning oil or burning gas right now for heating and cooling and hot water. And for cooking. So we rip out all of that fossil fuel equipment, replace it with all the electric. We electrify everything in the building. It's a fundamental core of this. It has to first be electrified. The building, you got to remove gas and oil, and then you focus on the source of that electricity. Is it going to be wind, solar, hydro, et cetera? Exactly. We electrify that building. So you got to get electrified first. Okay, so that's a first challenge. And then let's say you're talking about ten story building with, I don't know. 7 or 8 units per floor. Are you going into each unit and replacing the stove tops, putting in electric ovens, and so on and so forth? Yes, sir. We're going into each unit. We're putting in all electric induction stoves that use electricity to cook on the stove top and use the electricity to bake. And then in certain kinds of projects, we're going to put in a small modular air conditioner sized heating and cooling system so that that apartment building can control its own comfort with a local N unit electric heat pump. Basically replacing an in unit air conditioning that might be painful. Or air conditioner, that's right. And the heat pump is electric powered and they're still relatively new, and in the U.S. for sure, and they basically work by sucking out warm air in the summertime from a house in by pumping in

Bonnie Lee bakley Réunion Island Robert Blake Bonnie Dan Duane wondery Dan Albert America Hollywood Obama administration Apple north Hollywood Paradise Goldman Sachs Quebec Amazon Tesla
"baird" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:45 min | 7 months ago

"baird" Discussed on How I Built This

"The buildings in America, we were not able to pull that off. So what I'm curious about, you're working on this federally finance project to help quote unquote green these buildings, which is to make them more energy efficient and maybe put in solar panels and things like that. Presumably why you're doing this, you're learning a lot about the inefficiency of buildings, because when we think of like carbon emissions, we think of coal powered energy plants, right? But buildings, I didn't know this. Buildings account for 15% of the world's CO2 emissions. 15% of the world's CO2 emissions, 30% of the United States CO2 emissions. Wow. Than in New York City where I am buildings are 67% so if you look at New York City in San Francisco, you have massive amounts of CO2 and greenhouse gas that's being emitted by buildings. And so there just isn't a way to deal with climate change unless you green the buildings. And that comes from presumably the energy used by everybody in the building so that when they plug stuff in or the lights or whatever, you know, but also other things like in a home, I guess you're washing machine, you're dry or your gas oven and stovetop are all those factors that add up to 30% of carbon emissions. That's right. There's all the appliances and all the electricity that we use in our buildings. And so we burn oil and gas or coal in some places to produce electricity and send it through transmission lines to use the electricity in our homes. And then onsite in our homes, we burn gas to cook with, to produce hot water that we shower with, and we also burn oil and gas for heating. And so for example, in New York City, there's 10,000 giant apartment buildings that burn oil for hot water and for heat like a truck filled with oil pulls up once a week. And runs this tube into the basement into the heating system and pumps oil from the back of the truck into the basement and then you burn that oil to produce hot water year round and that is how apartment buildings in 2022, 10,000 of them at least use fossil fuels. And that's on site, right? So it's a pretty significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. So this is a huge problem. You are exposed to this problem, and even the so called energy efficient buildings, or these programs that you were part of to insulate homes better and to make them more efficient and with efficient appliances, even with those things, it's still a problem. It's a huge problem. Why are we digging up dead dinosaurs and burning them in our houses? This isn't ancient Mesopotamia. What are we doing? It's 2022. Yeah. And we literally are. That's what oil is. It's just the compressed plant and animal life from millions of years ago. Yeah, there's a better way to do this, right? By the way, it's really dangerous. I mean, there's all the pollution that it produces that we breathe in, but you know, look, if you put a gas explosion alert in Google as I do, then every week or so, you're gonna get an email about some poor American families home blowing up and exploding because the gas was leaking and someone lit a match or flipped on a lightbulb. And so this is like an unsustainable, unhealthy, unsafe, and super expensive way to power buildings. And so we need to do something new. All right, so you start to realize this and around 2012, you decide to go to business school. Did you have a fully formed idea in mind about what you thought you might want to do? I did. Apparently in my Columbia business school application, I wrote up the argument for block power. And basically it was that there seemed to be all of these challenges and opportunities in the green buildings industry that I was learning about while I was working with the Department of Energy and the labor unions. And I just couldn't figure out why we couldn't do a better job of fixing the industry. And so I would ask this question around, well, why can't Wall Street provide the capital to pay for us to green all the buildings? And the answer would be, well, Wall Street can provide all the capital. And I'd be like, okay, why can't we train more mechanical engineers to do a better job of analyzing the buildings and figuring out what kinds of green equipment should go into buildings and the answer would be like, well, nothing stopping us from doing that. There was just no one who was focused on it, who was willing to kind of invest, I guess their whole life and make it their mission to solve this problem at scale. And for me, because I care about climate change and because I care about creating jobs and low income communities like the one where I grew up, green buildings just seemed like a really important mission. And it seemed like it could just check a lot of boxes for me and be a life well lived. If I pursued figuring out how to solve the problem of greening buildings and so in order to do that, I needed to get an MBA to at least learn enough about business and so that was the school I applied to. And I did have an explicit mission of trying to figure out how to build a nonprofit called block power or something similar. So people who have solar panels and all of these things that enable them to live in a less carbon, polluting way tend to be higher income people. You essentially said, look, there are tens of millions of people who live in low income buildings, not only the U.S. but around the world. And they should also have the opportunity to live in a green building, and that was from the get go that would be your focus. From the get go, that was my focus. I wanted to engage with the communities that I grew up in and grew up near and served. To green their buildings. I mean, when I was working with the Obama folks, I had one of my favorite passers in bed stuy, call me, and he goes, hey, you're working on green buildings, right? I'm like, yeah. He's like, I'm spending $10,000 a month on my energy bill. And I'm like, what? So he had a 150 year old formerly Catholic building, and he had a school for neighborhood kids, like elementary school, and then he had senior activities and lunches. So the church was like, constantly filled 7 days a week. And so the heating system and air conditioning system was always on, right? So he's spending $10,000 a month on his energy costs and he goes, I only have $300,000 a year of revenue coming into the church and a $120,000 of that is going out on energy. Wow. So it's a massive pain point for low income people, right? So the other part of it is like, you know, when I was growing up in Brooklyn, man, there's like two kinds of waste that I saw when I was growing up and when I was a community organizer, there was like a waste of all of the energy and the fossil fuel. It's just wasteful, right? When you look at it as someone who cares about climate or just someone who cares about efficiency, why are you heating a building to 90° when it's 20° outside and doing that with gas ovens and then all of the heat is floating out the window. It's absurd. And then the other waste is the waste of human potential. When you walk around these neighborhoods and you see scores of unemployed young people who have children that they need to provide for and they have talent and they have genius and they have dreams. But they don't have any opportunity and it's like, you can address both pieces of this waste by training those young people to go and green those buildings and just make everything much more efficient. And so that's what I wanted to do. We're going to take a very short break. We'll be back with more from danelle Barrett of black power in just a moment. Stay with us. You're listening

world's CO New York City United States CO U.S. Mesopotamia San Francisco Department of Energy Columbia Google Obama Brooklyn danelle Barrett
"baird" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

14:11 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"That is called Michelin. Antwerp didn't do that if they produced for middle and South America in Spain in the 17th century they gave their release Spanish names. So in the archives you find names like punto praise and other Spanish names. If they exported to Northern Europe, they would probably give names more gear towards customers in Northern Europe. Now, after a few centuries, that makes it incredibly hard to find out what it is guys in Antwerp actually sell how do the names you find in archives coincide with existing still existing lace. And that's where the hardship begins through the researcher, but that's also what makes it totally fascinating. Now we spoken about the historical connection of lace and Antwerp. But what does the landscape look like today for lace making? Who was still keeping this history alive? A loose making was done pretty much over the entire territory of what is now Belgium. So to see what is happening now, you also have to look at that wider picture with a few institutions that really work hard to keep the lace alive. And I think the lesson to remove the organized courses, they have periodical, but they're also in the process of trying to reinvent themselves to remain meaningful for the 21st century. There's another organization called for the count. That's an organization that tries to keep technologies alive. They also have a periodicals. And there's a number of new schools and a few of those are in Antwerp. Teach traditional techniques, but some of the schools among them running Antwerp. They tried to make their students make more contemporary renderings of lace. And finally, what are the ten technological developments that excite you the most, which do you feel could spare on more creativity and contemporary lace making? The contemporary that I'm most interested in right now is 3D printing and very much hoping that that will yield very interesting things that could actually not be done with any traditional technique in existence. For much of my career, I struggled against this viewpoint that lace was something that was nice colors that kind of dowdy old ladies would wear a technique that nobody would want to be associated with these days. And so for years, you felt is the interest in less going to die with me. But it's changing. And I'm very glad it is changing. Frida sober there. She was speaking to Monica's melee Evans. The exhibition places looking through Antwerp lace, is on at the city's fashion museum the Momo until the 9th of January 2022. And finally, on today's show, we reflect on the fashion trends in menswear that we've spotted across 2021. The journalist and creative strategist Alex svete kovic joined me in the studio to discuss his story that was featured in monocles winter newspaper. I began by asking Alex, a very serious question, have we reached peak sneaker? I think we possibly have, you know, you would expect sneakers to be one of those categories in menswear that had just absolutely rocketed during the pandemic right. And in terms of retail sales, you know, it's a huge proportion of all the big retailers sales, et cetera, but lots of interesting things are happening in sneaker culture and in kind of collecting culture. And I think what we've seen over the past, let's say, two years is a bit of a sneaker price bubble develop. And the resale market has got silly, you've got pairs of rare releases of sneakers going for tens and tens of thousands of pounds or dollars or Euros and the collecting communities just tired of it. And the interesting thing that we're seeing, of course, is, as opposed to moving into another kind of casual footwear category, a lot of these sneaker heads are actually getting into what is ostensibly a formal footwork category, which is low foots, but in a very cool, youthful kind of street where kind of look and feel. Before we move into Lopez, let's stay on sneakers for a bit. I'm interested to know these people who are collecting them. Are they wearing them? Are they sitting in a box in a cupboard, never been looked at? Are they displaying them? Are they holding their value or just their market fluctuate? How does it actually all work? It very much depends on the mindset of the sneaker head in question right or the collector in question. So some people really are collectors and they accrue huge spare bedrooms full of box fresh sneakers that are never worn and they're almost treated like art objects. Other people just want to wear cool rare sneakers that they identify with on an aesthetic level or there's just a color or a styling tweak on a limited edition piece that they really want to buy into and actually get them on their feet and get out and about in them. Some people, somewhat more cynically, are now buying sneakers to resell them. Because resale prices are just going up and up and up. One of the examples I put in the story was the Dior air Jordans that were released with Chanel last year. They were going at something like $2000 a pair, and now you're going to pay 18,000 pounds on a sneaker resale site for them, which is scary, right? But cynically, if you can get your hands on a few pairs, you know, people are doing that and hoarding them to resell. And is it the design? Is it the brand name? Is it this perfect combination of an incredible whatever Kanye West design sneaker that actually looks beautiful? That has the right names. It has the right numbers, I guess, in terms of how many pieces they actually create. I mean, what's the kind of perfect recipe for a valuable sneaker? Gosh, that I'd love to know. But what is it? It's the right balance between scarcity, it's having the right names, it's having a designer that's kind of in Vogue in front of mine for collectors. And then kind of attaching it often to some really great heritage. I mean, obviously like Nike air Jordans have this extraordinary backstory and are a proper sportsman sneaker, but they've become an incredible canvas for kind of collaborations and mad kind of design touches and experimentation, which brings us to Lopez because how experimental gonna love for being in terms of design. I mean, in the story you've highlighted a number of great brands. A few of which I'd never heard of, and I'm really excited by them because they are doing interesting things with design. But you know, how eccentric can you be with a loaf of watts, catching people's imagination? Well, leopard print loafers are a new one on me, but I'm quite enjoyed exploring the world of leopard print loafers for this story. One of the brands in the story is back stock and weather in New York. And Chris the founder deliberately set out to create a loafer only brand that operated like a sneaker brand in terms of having regular drops and limited edition products and styling the loafers deliberately very sporty way. And the materials he's playing with are just crazy. You know, there's white brush swayed that you'd normally see in like a pair of limited edition added ass. There's aforementioned animal prints, hair fabrics, like black pony hair and things, faux crocodile, anything bonkers that you want. You could probably find it now. So they have like sneakers become a bit of a canvas for creativity as opposed to being your formal office shoot. And is this translating across Europe and the U.S.? Because you mentioned in New York brand, you highlighted a company from Denmark, I believe in the story. It seems to be everywhere at the moment. Yeah, I think a lot of independent kind of young, well, yeah, full look brands and just shoemaking brands are playing with it. There's another brand that I referenced Stockholm Scandinavia. Vinnie's, but then in London, there's a couple of guys who are actually ex menswear kind of buyers who've set up a brand called ratio that I absolutely love. I've got three pairs now. I can't keep out of them at the moment. And they're hero product is a loafer called beaufoy loafer, which is basically a modern take on a proper kind of 1980s horse bit with a lovely little gold horse bit on the front and again they're using bonkers leathers and sourcing vintage suedes for Italy and things like that. So it is everywhere. Guys seem to be getting into it. And that brings us nicely to this subject of what men are wearing at the moment and what men are choosing to wear. Obviously we're coming out hopefully touch wood from this pandemic and moving into a world where we can we were talking before about going to fashion weeks in Italy next year. We can be out and about an eccentric loafer is maybe one part of the men's wardrobe that's a bit more daring and brave than previously before the pandemic. Is this a trend we're seeing across the entire wardrobe but people just going mad? Do you know what? I think so. I think what's happened is the sensible uniform parts of your wardrobe, like, for example, office clothes and work clothes are the thing that we've just not needed over the past couple of years. Obvious reasons. So these kind of traditionally slightly more formal, slightly more stiff, parts of the man's wardrobe have fallen away, and as a result, we're seeing this real kind of return to creativity, like a word I keep using a lot of the moment is just menswear seems quite loose at the moment. And there is a real blending of soft, comfortable tailoring and sportswear. I also am sort of trying to think about my own wardrobe in terms of high low style at the moment. And I'm really enjoying doing things like putting a beautiful tailored overcoat with believe it or not like a pair of cashmere sweatpants. And then some mad bit loafers on my feet. But it is. It's all getting a bit more playful. And I think one of the strange side effects of the pandemic has been actually to kind of liberate men's dress codes a little bit. More and more guys seem comfortable exploring and brands are doing the same thing in terms of design. An evening whereas a topic that you would like to highlight as well. Obviously, we're into Christmas party season now. People are thinking about what they're wearing. I'm guessing you're not going to be wearing sweatpants to a Christmas party, but maybe you are. I mean, what's going on? I guess in terms of the evening where it's becoming more colorful, a little bit more playful and what should people be wearing to Christmas parties this year? Well, I think, you know, at the risk of giving him all the listeners a cliche, we really this season have to take our lead from James Bond. Because Daniel Craig's hot pink velvet that's been across all over the headlines really has set the standard, I think this season. Velvet evening wearing really bold kind of dual tones is having a real moment. It's a great excuse for any male listeners to get that velvet smoking jacket you've always wanted this year guys. Again, have some fun with color. But if you look at sort of all the red carpet dressing over the course of the year, so many celebrities have been incredibly bold ahead of this conversation. I was looking back at the Oscars and Leslie Odom junior wore a beautiful brioni double breasted suit that is made from 24 carat gold thread. There's a lot of experimentation out there at the moment. And again, evening where you can really feel that you can have some fun with it this season. And it turns a design as themselves. I mean, you reference an Italian brand that often maybe the Italians are a little bit still reserved and conservative. Obviously, there are exceptions to that rule and Gucci is kind of gone all out on a lot of different designs, I guess. But where is this creativity coming from in fashion at the moment? Are there particular Hobbs, interesting brands that you'd like to highlight? Parts of the world where, you know, things are changing rapidly. I think for me, it relates back to this idea of hilo and brands that are experimenting with high low dressing. That's been a really interesting kind of thread for me this year. I am getting a lot of inspiration from independent brands in New York right now. The aiming on doors of the world that are mixing tailoring and sportswear, the Noah's, we interviewed, of course, Brennan were benzene a couple of months ago, didn't we? And he has been really instrumental in kind of creating a new lexicon of American style. And Paris as well, there are a lot of great brands in Paris doing interesting things. I'm loving what first sack is doing at the moment. And actually, their evening, whereas really strong, that's a good place to look if you're in the market for evening wear at the moment. But very modern clean chic tailoring dressed down as opposed to up. And it just feels very composed and very easy and not formal or corporate at all. That's really what this year has been about. It's about those brands who've been able to keep menswear wearable, but make it really fresh and kind of take the stuffiness out of it that we were living with and working in pre-pandemic. And big question finally, is it here to stay or are we going to look back at these photos of our Christmas party 2021 and think what was going on? I mean, I look back at what I was wearing last year and think what was going on. So I think that happens all the time. I would just say go for it. Just embrace the velvet. It's 2021 rolling into 2022. It's not about rules anymore. It's about having fun with your clothes. That was the journalist and creative strategist. Alex svit COVID. And that's all the time we have on today's show. If you're keen for more design related listening, then catch our 5 minute mid week sister show monocle on design extra. It adds every Thursday. Today's show was produced by Charlie Phil mccort and melee Evans, who also edited the show with the assistance of Chris a Blackwater. Thanks to our researcher Nick manis, I'm Nolan Giles. Thank you very much for listening and goodbye..

Antwerp Northern Europe Alex svete kovic Lopez Michelin Frida South America Belgium Spain Monica Evans New York Alex Chanel Italy Vinnie Scandinavia Nike
"baird" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

09:34 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"And actually what happens is a lot of information gets stripped away and turned into a utility, right? So a logo book might have like 4000 logos in it and you will get some cursory information. You'll find the designer you may even get the color values of it. But you really have to keep digging to find the stories behind it and sometimes the stories almost seem like reveries. The very short, but even just understanding what where in abstract logo came from, what were the references? I find is a really fulfilling experience. So it's really trying to rebuild the stories and put the stories in one place. Where before that sort of thing was largely a tool in which you would look at to generate your own logos. So I think it's just, I'm trying to find ways in which young designers can feel something of the history rather than just seeing a logo book a way to generate their own forms. And this is the problem with today's because these things are so saturated. The young designers just see old workers as a series of tools that can be reconfigured in a certain way to generate new forms, but they kind of miss the point, which is that meaning making as I tend to call it. And just a simple question. Why do you do this? And the level of detail and expanding the brand and expanding the conversations, including other designers, I imagine this is hours and hours and hours of your time. So what's the motivating factor that keeps you going with this? I think that's just a fundamental joy. It's hard to explain it comes really from deep within where there's an aesthetic joy or an intellectual joy in the idea that is embedded in a form it's a very complex process of getting something reduced down and still be distinctive. As part of the process, what we're trying to do is digitize things that are locked away in very old books, rare out of print stuff. And by drawing these things over and over again, what gets embedded is a series of techniques for making techniques, meaning making techniques and because I've done it for so long. When I am engaged in a corporate identity project, then I have to do a logo, for instance. Rather than going to a book and saying, right? Okay, let's look at all the architecture logos in history. And trying to sort of generate something from that is that the experience of sketching becomes far more fluid, I have embedded a lot of different form making techniques just in my mind. So there's less chance of accidentally duplicating something that you've literally researched. So there's that. And this is there are the historical elements learning about designers, learning about the processes, seeing sketches, all these kind of things. And it offers a bit of a counterpoint to BP know, which is design of the present. So logo archive is what might be considered the historical research portion, which complements BP know, which is my contemporary research program. In terms of the logos, if you look at it just scrolling through your Instagram accounts and obviously everyone has different tastes, but I feel like for myself and probably a number of other people, you're drawn to these designs of logos and the large majority seem to come from this kind of amazing period and design history from the 50s to maybe the early 70s. And there's still so enjoyable and so clear in their communication. And so witty today. I mean, what was going on in that period? Because it's not just limited to say the U.S., there was a lot of great design from the U.S., but you've got the Lufthansa logo. You've got all these great European things as well. So at a time when designers maybe weren't communicating, well, they definitely weren't communicating like the way they do today online, but what was the kind of the shared spirit of that time through the design of logos? So it's embedded in modernity, right? And modernization. As with many things, it's driven by technology and technological change, cultural shift. So put simply things like post war diversification of products where because of the war it was they'd gathered a lot more technology from the war experience. Also, the fear of only having a single product in post war realizing that that would be a dangerous mistake to rely on a single product. So there was the modernization of industrial practices that were modern ways of structuring corporations. And so they were looking for a way to externalize that to the public to show that there was this modern outlook, a vision for the future. So just as they streamlined their industrial practices, they streamlined their corporate identities made them more useful, more flexible, they had to exist in link across many different diversified services and products. And so that's fundamentally technology and changes in corporate structure and diversification of products. And then let's move on to BP and no, because it's definitely a favorite newsletter that I get in my inbox and obviously a beautiful website and project as well. Well, maybe first, if you could just explain the concept and then give us some information in terms of how you actually select the projects you want to feature 'cause it's a super global mix and often it's might be something brand new or it might be something from the past. Is it just a reflection of what you're into at that point in time? BP no has been around for ten years now. And just as it has changed, I have changed and although stylistically is remained as pretty much it was back in day 1 February 2020 11. I've changed and it's purpose has changed. Initially, it was a young designer. Looking to develop a voice to see if people shared that point of view and whether I could build an audience and allow that to push me forward. And I've got to give a lot of credit to army vet in the U.S. who started brand new and I was reading that and he had such a convivial way of talking about design and it was very, very entertaining and I'm actually very different. I'm not humorless. But I would say I'm more formal. I thought maybe I could give a more formal way of discussing graphic design. And so I did that every day for a good 7 years. The way I built it was I challenged myself to beat some of these really well established institutional publishers. And I respect them a lot of creative review, design week. I thought, well, what if I was to publish the latest pentagram project first to write about it to get up at 6 in the morning, search the Internet, grab the latest project before anyone else write it up and be so excited to discover these things and I would just sort of write an article for an hour and a half, I'd load it up with all the key words. I do all of the boring SEO stuff that I knew these other publishers just didn't have a taste for. And that's how I built it. Running around trying to get the projects. But I never ever felt like I was compromising. And I think the problem is today is sometimes the big studio names are a bit of an easy and default way of choosing projects to post. Because they generate interest and clicks and retweets and stuff like that. And I was always said to myself look, you have to like it in order to write about it. And I would be really disappointed when I posted it and I posted it like ten 15 had found this was the optimal time to post on Twitter. And I'd get no retweet and I thought, oh my God, I've just spent two and a half hours writing about this thing and I was so enthusiastic about the nuance, but you start to learn that there's this kind of disconnect between the idea and the cultural nuance and the strategy. And that kind of visual appeal, right? And I think today more so than ever that visual appeal is what drives a lot of publishing. How does it look on the surface? And so that's what BP know is. It's not about the surface, although we do like design craft, it's about ideas and going back to logo archive. It's about stories. And how does the response, the piece of work tell a particular story or a point of view or the values of a brand or what they stand for? The designer writer and publisher Richard bear there..

BP U.S. Lufthansa army Twitter Richard bear
"baird" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

Monocle 24: Section D

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on Monocle 24: Section D

"This is monocle on design, our weekly look at the best in architecture, craft, furniture, and fashion. I'm Nolan Giles. On today's show. We speak to brand identity designer, Richard Baird. We learn of Antwerp's significant role in lace production and have we reached peak sneaker. We reflect on menswear in 2021. All that, coming up, right here on Monaco on design. Do stay tuned. We.

Macy's test flys new balloons ahead of parade

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Macy's test flys new balloons ahead of parade

"With thanksgiving less than two weeks away Macy's test out its brand new balloons for the thanksgiving day parade it was a windy Saturday at Citi field in queens when hundreds of volunteer handlers went for test flights there are six new balloons ada twist to any B. Tony the bandleader Baird tiptoe a new version of Ronald McDonald holding his heart in his hands and pop culture icon grow group better known as baby that will cost produces the parades and marching bands we have fifteen trying hard to lose got twenty eight loads got a whole host of performances over thirty

B. Tony Citi Field Macy Queens Baird Ronald Mcdonald
NWSL Commissioner Baird resigns amid scandal

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

NWSL Commissioner Baird resigns amid scandal

"A day after North Carolina courage coach Paul Riley was fired accused by two players of sexual coercion and misconduct the female commissioner of the national women's soccer league has stepped down Lisa Baird spent less than two years at the helm FIFA and U. S. soccer have opened investigations into the case with the statement that player safety and respect is the paramount responsibility of every person involved in this game coach Riley's denied the allegations which have rocked the league and prompted the cancellation of this weekend's games I'm Jackie Quinn

Paul Riley National Women's Soccer League Lisa Baird North Carolina Fifa Soccer Riley Jackie Quinn
"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Have a fiscal sponsor. Our five oh one c. Three application is in a time. Yeah we're in that middle ground. But they can. They can make donations that are tax deductible And yeah every you know everything you you know you support and feed your your feeding someone. You're helping provide A nourishing meal. You're also helping us you know. Help people get materials about their own health and the climate etc kosher. You're supporting the climate. I replacing that meal with a plant piecemeal and is at work. Like you can pick a restaurant like i want to choose this restaurant and donate to that one and then they will provide the food that goes to where currently yes. It does how that's not tax deductible though because legally that would be sort of a money. Laundering got the donation directly to the restaurant. Then the restaurant his donating to us. If that makes sense or you can just donate to our general. Finding you could specify a city you could say like to be in a. Or philly or new york or something. How do you identify where the where the meals get delivered. We always great network of wonderful organizations. And like i said we really tried to partner with org where we can make an impact for them. They're interested in what we're doing in providing this healthy food for their for their families. So you know. We're we're looking at organizations in these areas of food apartheid in that. Have these community bases you know. Newer earthlife is an amazing organization. Has kids from thirteen to twenty five. In instead of incarceration or between incarceration also fed all their families. So it's where we can make the most impact with people who are food insecure but also really make a larger impact to create systemic change in the community and with what's available to them or what they can real solution not the band aid. The bigger solution. You gotta do something around the release of. They're trying to kill us when that movie comes out hundred percent. Yeah i see. I'm waiting for that. We have some great plans for that to lilly. So i i hope they get great distribution and everyone can see her walls. Good talking to you so nice talking here. I'm such a huge fan of you and your family and everything that you guys are about. I just love it all and please consider me a support system for you if you ever need anything and good luck with the tour and everything that you're doing. Yeah i really appreciate the work you're doing and it's super inspirational. How you've raised your kids in the example that you said and how you lead with service. Yeah and salary me you. So if people want to connect with you obviously sport v dot org and then nagy and baird on instagram airbus. Yeah and support and feed on instagram as well right instagram. I think we have to talk to either now or shortly. I love watching the cooking thing that you did with toby. His son their they're superstars per fun with a comeback talking to you again sometime shit piece plant. Thanks for listening. Everybody for links and resources related to everything discussed.

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:41 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"You know to be able to say things and create everybody and a few people can suddenly corral an army of people and then a thing exists that maybe need not exist maybe need not or maybe didn't even and it got changed and you know a lot of times. I look even my own hateful comments. And i'm like i look at the you know the count and there's they have no no followers they have no. It's easy and and we love you like if you got your instrument. Fan accounts for. Billy are always throwing so much love. Well i love her fans. But that's my point is that sometimes i think these things get started by people who are not in the fan at all in fact many are not even on the progressive side of society and things get started We're quite quick on the progressive side to cancel. People hold people very accountable in the maybe the other str- spectrum isn't very interested in that but they liked to take people down so you have to be careful. I think people. I wish people would start to think. Like is this person we wanna destroy or is maybe this even coming from from someone who would want to destroy that because they're you know have a different agenda you know and that's really scary time that let's say like you look at the account you're like. Wow this person isn't even a real person or at least we don't know who they are. Where is that coming from i. I don't know that's why keep i've been thinking lately. Just more and more about like we have to make this move toward More compassion and resort of justice and a different way of looking at people's mistakes and flaws and in humanity and has to be a two way street on where you fall you know on the spectrum. Yeah you have to be forgiving and accepting in like in learning can we learn is about. How can you learn right. can you learn. can you change. can you grow Do you learn you change to grow and you can give that benefit of the doubt to any to anyone on any side right to side. I mean side is a dangerous word but you know on any full philosophical point. Can you learn. Can you be compassionate. can you grow and I mean i think about you know. I mean it's nothing new people. People who are this generation is in a unique positions cruise. It's crazy and you being a mom. I mean your daughter's like nineteen you know with untold millions of people who all have the right to say whatever they want to say about her the protective instinct. Like i just you know it's like a hug you like. I can't imagine you know it's hard. It's hard not to shout and yeah and and say stuff you know and and yet it's hard it's really you can't protect them from this in its is she the you know i mean i. I know very talented artists whose careers have been destroyed already. They'll never really have the career they merited because of something stupid they said at fifteen you know on the internet and and maybe it was really actually bad and they actually meant it at the time or something but is at worth destroying them forever. You know we're just in this infantile or adolescent stage with our reckoning with social media because it's so unprecedented. I can't imagine you know. Billy generation is the first to grow up with this from the gecko. Everybody is going to have their lives completely documented. Everybody's saying stupid shit and making mistakes and there's video of it. So is everybody going to get canceled. I mean how are we going to select the people that are gonna be criticized for these things. Like i mean thank god. These things didn't exist when i was a kid. Well that's what everybody says. It's like an episode of black mirror. The whole thing is an episode of black mirror. Feels like it's it's so extreme. You know it's so extreme. I dunno it's infantile. You say like how do we teach people you know i would go you know. My niece is a school vice principal. And she's trying to get you know. Non violent communication restorative justice into the schools. I think we have to start teaching from day. One like in our homes in our schools. You know mindfulness and compassion all these things. But that's a tall order really tall order to imagine a long way to go but if you look at the vegan movement and everything that's going on crazy it's it's a compared to where it was not that long ago five years ago when you were a kid in western colorado to on your dad. You wanna eat meat. I was not a kid in thirty five years ago. it was like a full on. I'm not thank you for over long ago long ago but yeah like can you imagine. I mean you know i had years. I ate a salad dry. Baked potato you know. And i was happy that if there was some kidney beans in the salad bar yeah. I've heard you talk about how you spent years if not decades serve being apologetic like always overly accommodating to every everybody else because you don't want to ruffle feathers. I know what that feels like. And i love what you had to say about letting go of that and just being. Why am i apologizing for being who i am. Yeah and why. Am i apologize for for being away am. Who's doing something that is right is is moral better act. Yeah making a positive impact. There's nothing negative. About the way. I live my life as far as my diet is concerned. Right it's only positive it. It's more positive to the climate. It's compassionate toward animals. Why would i apologize politics for that. Why would i. But i get it. And i think this is a dilemma for a lot of people who wanna step into this lifestyle because it's so socially fraud and they don't want to have to be a problem to their friends and their family members and i think it scares a lot of people off who might or might wanna take a look at it because they don't want to be difficult but i think it's empowering to let people like you don't have to apologize and we're now or in a culture where wherever you go. There are vegan options and people get it and they're more accepting if not embracing of the whole thing and we don't have to be in that mindset anymore. We can like standing our strength with this way of living. Yeah and still be. You're still find yourselves in situations where you have to be shouting about it at the time and place after be gracious. You have to be gracious to the kindness of the people around you and their journey and you can't be shouting about it every time but that's different from being apologetic you know. And that's the that's the change you know used to be invisible about it and i don't mind me you know i'm sitting in the corner with my tupperware. I brought food. Yeah i made a whole separate entree. Because i knew there would be nothing here for me to you know and now you you know you may find yourself still in places where you know. People have a different philosophy. But you know. I i deal with my part of it differently. Permission to be obnoxious. No it's definitely. I think that's a beautiful way to say it. No you don't get to be obnoxious. You just don't have to be cowering and apologize right. In the meantime we can all go out and support support feed. Yes you're in four cities right. La washington where else city or and how many restaurants do you have off good question. I don't know the answer to that But many odd yeah. i mean. they're look. It looked like at least a dozen. Yeah we have a lot and and also we don't just not just restaurants you know we also help provide Kind of a pipeline for products if someone has extra almonds or extra of follow your heart cheese and we can help get it to people who need it or maybe to a restaurant to make more meals for people. We've done a lot of that as well. And like i say we're gonna be in in many many cities in two thousand twenty two and even in europe because the opportunity with this feeding people meeting people expanding the mission and then ultimately you know all fifty states and of so-called presence and tours is going to be like steroids. The africans lucky opportunity at such an amazing and we have the support of everyone on..

Billy colorado La washington europe
"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"That i found to be the most interesting was the scene in the backyard where she's essentially blocking her music video and you're sitting at the table as stand and she's like this is how it's going to go and this is what the cameras gonna do. And it's not going to do this like those other cheesy things. It's going to do this now. Mom pick up the water and drink this. And she's literally making her music video with a camcorder or the phone or whatever it is and i just thought everybody else just needs to get out of the way because this kid knows exactly what she's doing she has such a command over her creative voice and such a sense of purpose and direction with where she wants to take it and it was so beautiful to see that at such a young age before any of those things manifested that confidence. That self assuredness in what it is that she was here to express. That's nice I always wish. I had like puts a makeup on and worn like a little nicer clothes. Little did you know i. I think that's the whole thing and a lot of times it's me filming to and then it's like and then if somebody i look horrible but that was really. That was her though she was making movies like that. From very early she made music videos with her friends. Bosson her friends around telling them what to do. Church assured you know. She knew what she wants. You had the you know what. She took her first steps into a video camera because from the earliest days. She wanted that camera and so i was filming finished. Air and she wa- she goes mec- and she wanted to look at the camera and she walked into the camera. We got her first ups on camera but from the earliest days. She wanted that camera in her hand. She wanted to see what was going on. She understood it then. She had her friends come over. She filmed everything. And i mean. I'll say parenting tip. Maybe if it's a tip let your kids have the body camera. I mean now that you know it's a phone but you know we always let our kids like us the real stuff you know like have the real camera have the real tripod. Have the whatever mess up the house. Trash it but she was making movies with her friends from from so early i remember coming out one time and she and we have a little house you see on the backyard she's put. The aerial circus met on the ground outside the garage. She's put a wedding dress on from a play that i was in the heidi chronicles that i kept the dress. She's on top of the roof. She got camera setup. She's filming herself. Jump off the roof onto the mat with the camera like in a wedding dress. She would come up with these crazy ideas early on and i think that's like another parenting lesson. Just think how many kids are out there. Who right now you know could make our. I mean they are listened. Locks is full of kids making amazing art schools. All over the world are making kids. Not in school you know. Gymnasts are at their prime at these ages. Right and so are a lot of young artists. You know but that was definitely her she. She's always like that to this day. She's directing or videos and you know every take and you know the the the she finally gets to make that video with this director amazing director. It was amazing but then she still like next. I'm directly. you knew what he was awesome. He had a very quiet though so she couldn't hear him so she made them turn the monitor around so she could see it herself and she had a very clear vision and then people were like if she's going to have that clear vision. It's really kind of not even fair to the directors and so is she's gonna co-director has to be a director who's like knows going in like she's going to have a lot to say minimum extract from that like in a broader context. Is it from a parenting point of view is just the the the power of like allowing kids to be kids and just getting out of the way like i said earlier. Like in that scene where you're being a good sport. You could been like well. You might wanna think about this or did you think it. No you. don't say any of that. You just let your kid. Have this exploration i about jumping off the roof. There's something to be said for just you know letting kids be instead of policing them or over scheduling them or putting them in a specific lane. And saying you're going to be this like so much of parenting is just receding into the background in those moments and providing them this base so that they can indulge their creativity. Yeah and carrying the stuff you know a famous said that to somebody recently. You know you don't need to buy your kid a three thousand dollar guitar. You know you don't need that in a what what can you do. You can help them hall their stuff into the car and haul them out at the band practice or whatever you know about so many right hauling it like making sure they get their you know Yes allowing it and not not kind of over pushing it. You know a lot of people. I think they're like oh. My kid is interested in this so the next day. They have my parenting moments. It's my moment they're gonna have a classical guitar lesson. They're going to have three thousand dollars guitar and they have this like it doesn't have to be that you know 'cause also that's a lot of pressure for kids you know. Most you know this was another parenting thing. That was hard but we parented. I i we parented in the age. I'm really happy to say was with the kind of anti good job philosophy. Do you know that okay. Well there was. I'm not going to remember his name. But there was a great set of essays and things that was about the overdoing of the phrase good job right and our felt fortunate that we were to hear that philosophy because there's a kind of over praising that happens to kits you know like good job carrying your this and good job peeing and good jobs like what does that mean range and and so it was. It was kind of philosophy more about like. It's less about what i think about you and is what about how you what you think about me right. So let's give the example of like 'cause. I taught aerial circus for a long time. If somebody climbs the aerial silks for the first time. i don't say good job. I'm like you did it. You got there. How does it feel. It's more about your accomplishment right and and when finished was a little kid was like this kind of precocious drummer. Like we got it. He wanted drum kit at three and he would drum any crazy and it was great but then sometimes people would come over and they're like you're an amazing drummer. You're the greatest jermiah. That's like very counterproductive for kids Fini's went to a karate class. One time he loves his karate class so much like you could see the light in his eyes. He was running. I had this long hair. He loved it and then the end of the end of the class. The teacher goes all right at this studio. We have a ritual. We always have a student of the day and they get the head you know the whatever the had take home and my heart sank al's like oh no ono finished going to be the student of the day i know it because he was new and of course he was. He got that headband. Got to take it home. It ruined because all he now cared about was all my gosh. I was student of the week. Oh my gosh. I got the the headband. I got this. I crochet and well and also like okay. I'm gonna be the student of the week again next week. And i'm like i know comes performance oriented as granted and then the next week. He's like. Why wasn't i student of the week this week. Mom i'm like well. They give to different kid every day. Every week he goes. Yeah but i really worked hard. And i was the best i was like. But that's not what it's about. The whole. The reward became the external prize before they had the reward. He loved the class and it literally sunk it and i saw it happening and it was the most visual physical experience of it like through ward has to be the doing. The reward is making the music. The reward is learning the the thing it's not the prize and the prize can be fun but yeah the reason. Now take that example. And let's play that out in a huge broad context billy eyelash sitting at the grammys. They're about to announce the winner and she's mouthing like please don't let me i mean. Is that any different than the famous in the karate class. It's kind of the same thing. Well it slightly different. Because you know the reason don't let it be me is cushy. No she's.

Bosson Fini karate ono al billy eyelash ward grammys
"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"And he brought me. I got the job mattis actually health insurance. Yeah yeah yeah. The groundlings seems like it was fun. Now you were. You were there at a golden era of all it was You taught there too. Yeah there yeah. It was fun you know. Some one of my best friends still is from the growlings. amy yeah it was fun. You know. I i came out to. La from play been touring in a play and my mother had recently died. And i i was very sad and came and i saw show with the ground. He's another friend of mine was in. I was like oh that looks like so much fun. Wow i didn't honestly didn't even know that existed like i'd always wanted to be like lily. Tomlin on snl. All that. but i had been in the kind of more serious acting world. You know the more traditional acting world so When i saw that i was like that's for me. I want to go do that. I'm so sorry taking classes at the groundlings and the thing about that. Was you just laugh. So hard all the time you know and teaching the same. I really miss. Teaching is not easy for me to do that now. But i miss teaching. Because it's just laughing for three hour. Teaching improv top. Melissa mccarthy well not that she needed to learn anything so let's say. She was in in my class for cool based her basic teacher. Her first teacher groundlings. Yeah but that whole class of melissa's was great. Everybody in that class was great. May think taylor went on to be successful director. I mean i could name. I don't wanna name. Because i will miss somebody and they were all crate. Her whole class was great. Fundamentally i think of you as a teacher in general like that that's your lane. I think that's where you excel because that shows up throughout your life and all these different ways like whether it's through some kind of odd job or the way that you raise your kids or the groundlings like when in doubt like you find a way to be a teacher in some capacity like it feels like you're always pivoting back to that well. It's interesting because my father was a teacher and he was a beloved teacher and yeah i mean i think you're right actually love teaching and i have found a way to teach anything i know how to do. I will try to teach someone else. Because i want them to share in the fun. I mean i've taught cake decorating and aerial circus and songwriting and ukulele and life skills and litter drama. You know kind of anything. I know how to taught a lot of improv. Obviously but yeah i do. I do like teaching and sometimes just for survival like all barter you this so i could get this. I'll teach this class so that my kid can get in theft transcript by. That's totally my husband. And i did a lot of bartering so i would teach I i started assistant teaching aerial circus of it. My kids and i could do it. And then i started teaching it you know and we did a lot of bartering. My husband like us to do handyman work at the little gym. So that billy could have gymnastics classes. Yeah worked it. Worked out bartering system. Sweet yeah. I fell in love with your husband watching the documentary i mean. He is like the unsung hero of the movie. Always lurking in the background taking care of the laundry or kitchen or putting stuff away like he served just always there making sure that everything is a well oiled machine. Yeah picking up. The dog poop shouting. He makes noises you. He always has made noises. He and billy have a lot in common goofy like strange noises and stuff and he. He's always doing that in the background and sometimes like a new person. We'll see like when finished his girlfriend. Claudia came into our lives. We kind of forget about like patrick's auditees you know. And then a new prison comes over there. Like dad's a hang on doing. He's like shouting. Yeah he's unusual. I love his mustache to in the movie. The mustache no that was a rough period. I did not love it. But i've always been world class. It was but i've always been like what you do. You wanna do. I don't care like facial. Hair comes goes do what you wanna do right. I've never been controlling that mustache. God the little old because we were on tour forever and just kept getting more and more and the problem with something like that is. It's the same currently for I'm going out danny. Billy's manager for this. He has his beard that has grown and grown and grown to cove it. And we're just like what is it gonna go but the more attention you get like because you know when you got mustache like patrick hat like everyone talks shirt you know. Everyone comments on it all the time. How can you get rid of that. It's it's a conversation wall. The movie was one of the best things that i've seen over the last year. I just absolutely love it. I've watched it a couple of times going into it as i suspect you know. This might be the case for a lot of people thought. Oh this'll be a documentary about billy's trajectory and it of course is that but it's really this incredible like layered on top of this coming of age story. Is this incredible document of a family. It's really a movie about parenting as much as anything else. And this unit. And how. They're trying to navigate this crazy insane skyward trajectory while trying to maintain sanity and remaining grounded. In what is most important i think. Rj did an amazing job. I think that's definitely how he saw it. You know and he did a great job telling that story. They also used a tremendous amount of my footage. Sure which. I think is new to documentaries. You know to really have that kind of immense amount of phone footage etc And he did a great job of like incorporating like real home values. I think that was kind of his his goal to like. Have a story of a of a family for sure..

mattis Melissa mccarthy Tomlin snl billy amy melissa La taylor gymnastics patrick Claudia danny Billy
"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:45 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"This goes back a long time for you. As you mentioned you grew up in colorado your dad hunter and fisherman. So were you the dugout to say. I want to be vegetarian as a kid. My brothers became vegetarians. To my father fish. We always went fishing. Who's indoctrination didn't didn't say dad was awesome. By the way and he loved the outdoors he'd been asthmatic kid on the east coast got sent out to the west to go to boarding school because he would literally die in the east and he discovered the out of doors and he loved it he loved fishing. He went hunting every year. It was in. I grew up in western colorado. That was a big part of the culture. I loved going fishing with my dad. Because you know meant sitting in a boat outside all day he threw all the fischbach. You know eventually And he had three kids who didn't want to eat meat or fish. Snap funny not one of us would ever eat a fish ever and none of us would eat a deer We all re issued. I don't think any of us ever eight steak like those saying. I don't know something in our dna. The you know we made to eat meat but like the only thing would do you know the most burned kind of unrecognizable. I remember the only term what was ever kind of punished. I sat at a table for many many hours. I have a very very clear memory of sitting at a table. Because i would not eat a bite venison So i don't know why we all my brothers to this day there's still -tarian they've never eat mean ever since where here's black Dna fragment or something happened along. The way. i've i've met other people like that For no kind of obvious reason from early on or like. I'm not eating that and you know at the time it was really one hundred percent. The animal component was. I'm not going to eat an animal. And then of course later it became about the environment and then very sadly my mother died of a heart attack. Fifty seven suddenly and my mother had been a family where heart disease was very prevalent. My brothers and i all have genetically extremely high cholesterol. So know. The health component generally came in at that point. You know. I think there is something about growing up in proximity to animals though. So many vegan activist grew up on farms. And perhaps something about your dad going out and hunting and being around those large animals or you know in a different way from the way you experience when you go to the grocery store or the restaurant when you see bandies mom you know goes two ways either you become the hunter and the fishermen and there is a beautiful appreciation for nature and a deeper connection to the food that you're eating so i wanna make sure i say that but also that sensitivity to the fact that it is essential being that didn't exactly sign up for being eaten. Yeah and interestingly. I would agree with you about the hunting. I mean a lot of people over my lifetime. I've heard say things. Like i would never hunt and i'm like but you would buy in a package at the grocery store and to me. If i'm if i'm going to have an opinion i be like i would respect someone who hunts it more than someone who would never go about. They're doing they're doing the terrible dirty work themselves. Not expecting someone else to do it. And then we'll say that in my father's later he died of pulmonary fibrosis. Twenty years ago. He he did not feel good about the hunting he. He kind of regretted it so he came to different place with it in his older age around. No he died at seventy four so he didn't he didn't love it. Didn't love looking back at it so he came somewhere with interesting. Yeah he's stuck around a little bit longer. May maybe he would have gone in your direction interesting and also for his health you know. Here's something kind of interesting you know. I was a vegetarian for many years. Well if since i was a teenager but in when i became a vegan you know it was all the reasons i learned about animal agriculture. The dairy in the eggs and it just became unavoidable. Like you know you can only deny you know. Oh it's cage free eggs. Oh it's this and then you go out all of that kind of nonsense right so i did. It massively changed I had really been developing arthritis in my hands that one way then my family. Who was all vegetarian. Patrick veneers and billy. They came to separately later and each of them had him major health. Change from it. Each each different. My husband had had a lifelong problem choking on food And it was quite serious. He had to have several medical procedures and it was like a daily occurrence oded vaginas and when he gave up dairy it went away. It's cruising basically overnight. You're turned out his condition called e-e-e-e-no listened phillix esophagitis and at the time they didn't know it was but subsequently they have discovered it. It's it's an allergy in your safa guess primarily today dairy eggs fish while yeah. Isn't that crazy. That's so crazy. All his medical any. I went to the doctor and he was like he told the doctor. Like i cured it and doctor of course didn't believe him and then you know eventually within the next year to they signed up that's why zip coming back for more. Don't you worry but first let me get a word in about my favorite shades.

fischbach colorado east coast hunter heart attack heart disease pulmonary fibrosis Patrick veneers arthritis billy allergy
"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Then you're opening yourself up to all the criticism about that but there is no electric truck or bus even if there was then it would be like well. Do you know how they create the electricity for the bus like you. You really can't win. So the only way to move forward is to make the best decisions and immunize yourself from all the chatter goes on around. It was reverb part of the live nation decision to go plastic free like with the with the water bottles and all of them. I mean i think you know. I'm i'm really happy to say. I think a lot of some of that has come from billy. you know. we've been pushing for a long time to have these things and we've been live. Nation has been very very responsive Charlotte michael repea- no. They've been really responsive you know. We went in with a lot of concerns and they've listened and some very cool things are happening. You know even just you know on billy tour of the rina's are actually kind of changing their names to be away from names that are associated with meat. And they're heading vegan substitutes and they've really come a long way and what's been really cool. Is that in the beginning you know. In the beginning it was kinda me being a nudge. I mean i was annoying me. I'm sure everyone found me very annoying. Ono magazine mccall what she going to ask you know but it's gone from me going like you know what about this and what about this and can we do this to them. Literally presenting us. They've laid it out there like they're coming to to us with. We found a way to make this sustainable and we found a way to do this. And we know you might be concerned about this so we've already addressed. It's massive pretty cool. Yeah well that's the responsible effective use of the power that you wheel to be in this very privileged position with everything that's going on to be able to create those kind of changes in the world. I mean if you're not gonna do that then what else doing. What else is and also to be honest. You know the the the challenges. Listen the life of of of my family is. It's it's great. There's so many perks but you know there's challenges to that thing to and what makes it worth it is. You can do some good. You know. it's kinda the only thing to do in life. I think you know and you know my brother always says you know. Billing finished have a superpower and it always depends on how you use it and you know it's that is having a platform and having you know being able to take action and a lot of outs nut super visible to people. It doesn't need to be visible. It's what you're doing You know behind the scenes that that's really changing but it's also what you you actively promote as walker. I wanna talk about the family piece I'm i'm just obsessed with your family after watching the documentary which i absolutely loved as somebody who's been an activist in feel strongly about so many of these issues that we're talking about and as this uber mom who raise their kids with this ethos. How did you my feeling is that kids. Go one or two ways with this stuff either. They're on board because they revere their parents and they want model their behavior after the example that their set or and at some point they need to kind of push the envelope and stretch their own limbs a little bit and separate and they do that by rebelling or or or doing the opposite of the example that was set to distinguish themselves and their individuality but it seems like with billion. They're on board with all of these idea that there's passionate about this stuff as as you are. Yeah well i mean. I think you're absolutely right. Those things can go either way. And i mean we're lucky we. We definitely always talked about these things you know there was. They got the message of. Why always why. So if you're hearing the reason behind it and people used to say when they were little like why. Why don't you let them eat meat. You know well. Because i'm responsible at this point for their health and their well being in that includes their moral mental health. And when i look back at my life. I regret having ever eaten right and so at this point when i believe ethically morally for all the reasons. We know that it's correct to not eat it. That's what we're gonna do now. When they grow up they have a right to change and think whatever they want but they won't look back and regret not having done something. You know what i mean like having done it you. You can't take that back but having not done it you can. You can do later so so that was kind of the philosophy there but then along the way you talk about why in oh you talk about why do we do and you know they. They hear it and you know. Are they indoctrinated in it. Yes you're indoctrinating. As opposed to an entire culture that's trying to indoctrinate in a different way right so Yeah i think it's just that they they learned about it. I mean. I'm watching a documentary with billy. David attenborough documentary. I mean it was radical to her. You know really really affected her. So it just was kind of part of our family and i think it was It got into their into their mindset. And you know is they're probably a little bit about like. Oh my gosh what. What would my mom think. Oh they have other things that they do that. Are you know not something i would do. I have no tattoos. Yes yeah either. Still say well..

michael repea billy mccall Charlotte walker David attenborough
"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Woop allows me to calibrate my daily effort. Adjust my training and adjust my sleep time so that i can. More finely tuned my daily output to maximize results maximize results. So if you're looking to be smarter about how you sleep recovering train so you can be your best. You got check out whoop and right now for you guys. Woop is offering fifteen percent off when you use the code ritual at checkout go. Whoop dot com. That's w. h. o. Dot com and use the code ritual at checkout to save fifteen percents off your order. Unlock your best self when tates russell brought to you today by my fine finish. Fungi friends at four sigmatic. Purveyors of my favorite mushroom coffees and elixirs. What mushrooms you say. Say i do. It might sound odd but stick with me on this because this stuff is actually surprisingly maybe for some delicious yes delicious. It's organic it's vegan. It's gluten free. It's crazy nutritious packed with the immune system boosting focus and productivity enhancing adapt degen's found in cia lines main mushrooms and many other mushrooms. I love it. It's crazy effective. And it gives me a nice alert com without the typical coffee jitters or late afternoon. Caffeine withdrawal crankiness tastes great. And they've got a huge variety of adapt agent and fused options to tailor your beverage to all your needs and desires right now. We have worked out and exclusive exclusive offer with four sigmatic their bestselling mushroom coffee. But this is just for you guys my listeners. Get up to forty percent off forty percent off plus free shipping on mushroom coffee bundles to claim this deal. You must go to force agnostic dot com slash. Roll this offer only for you guys. My listeners and is not available on their regular website. you'll save up to forty percent and get free shipping so go right now to f. o. U. r. s. I g. m. a. t. i c. Dot com slash role and fuel your productivity and creativity with some delicious mushroom. Okay maggie baird so. This is a conversation about activism about solving food insecurity. The growth of the plant based movement and working to make the music industry. Touring more sustainable. It's about the challenges of pursuing and artistic life. It's about parenting how to raise conscious kids and the benefits of homeschooling and unscrambling. It's also about.

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Musical home schooled kids and trying to keep them grounded as they skyrocket to just insane fame. I certainly can't imagine that but this week's guest can because she has lived it and continues to live at. her name. is maggie baird and if that name sounds familiar it could be because she's an actor a performer with a long list of credits to her name. But more likely it's because she's like the coolest mom ever to to the biggest musicians in the world. Billy eyelash yes that billy irish. The seven time. Grammy award winning nineteen year old. Billy bush and billy's equally talented eight-time grammy-winning twenty-three-year-old brother finishes all of whom are portrayed alongside. Maggie's husband patrick o'connell in the recent and quite amazing documentary on apple. Tv plus called the world's a little blurry which is to my mind at least this beautiful story about coming of age but also it's a documentary about family. It's about parenting and the challenges faced by a mom and dad just trying to consciously guide their talented kids through this vertigo. Inducing assent to superstardom. Maggie's also longtime vegan. She's an animal rights and environmental activists. And she's also the founder of something called support and feed which is an incredible and relatively new nonprofit that partners with restaurants across america and soon the world to provide plant based meals to those experiencing food insecurity. We're going to dig in in a sec. But i do you ever have those days where you wake up. You feel lousy. And you just don't know why i don't know how you have you ever have. Of course you had that or conversely you seem to just peak out of nowhere. Why is it so sporadic. How do we harness an optimal performance state. And stay there will. This is whoops mission to help you understand your body better. So you can unleash your full potential with maximum consistency. Woop is a fitness tracker. That i have not removed from my wrist. Since i got it over two years ago. It's basically a small device that provides next level insight into what's going on with your giving you quantified recovery metrics so you can optimize the way you recover train and sleep. It doesn't just measure things like resting heart rate average heart rate hurried variability and sleep performance at actually analyzes your physiology to let you know how much your body is working properly function. It has been helpful to wake up and review my status before training and through the team's function. I can now see how my friends are doing and hold myself accountable and because going on feel has its limitations..

maggie baird Billy eyelash billy irish patrick o'connell Maggie Billy bush Grammy award grammy billy apple sec america
"baird" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Life without being a cynic maintain a optimistic skeptic attitude while this has been a tour to force of all things muniz if people wanna follow y'all's writings your funds. Everything that you guys are up to where they go where they find out more baird. Funds website is a great place that will give you access to any of the materials. We recently wrote a piece talking about baby boomers and how they're being impacted by the low rate by a white paper you know in the midst of the pandemic talking about reasons. Why misspelled these are going to be. Fine so i think it's a way to get access to some of the research that we do. That would probably be the best way. And then if they're interested obviously in investing with us you know we have several minutes bond funds. Any upon what you're looking for and again i would say that we're concerned about and how we want to build a business. As we tend to ill very diversified portfolios we think about risk management i inner portfolios. We manage our mutual funds or some the lowest cost mutual funds away from the passive products. That are out there. And then our view is that if we consistently outperformed the benchmark but twenty five to fifty basis points over the long term. You're gonna win. And then finally taking carrier clients. I think we provide a lot of direct access to portfolio. Managers analysts no matter. What your investment size is that would be the plug put in for a buried advisers. I've only been here a couple of years but it's a great place to work. It's privately held company on two thirds of the employees our shareholders and they can think about the long term and methodically growing or folios and not about eight. We gotta be at x. Assets under management today. And we wanna be at you know three or four x in the next five years. That's not the way they think about the world. If we do a good job for investors guess air self and the analysts will buy you a coffee or beard summer fest while watching guns and roses right you come out here. We'll definitely do that but you should. It's a great great festival and again usually. It's held in late june early july but because of pandemic pushed it out. That's usually at ten or eleven or twelve days in a row. But now it's going to be. I think over three weekends in september so come on out awesome. Thanks so much for joining us today..

muniz baird
"baird" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"baird" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Co host pizza. Mind here bryce paul's here with us as well. Bryce fed a while serving able to come together. And do one of these things together. How you bet man yes man. Sometimes it seems the craziness of life. You'll grab guest all gas. I always think that the best episodes are when you and i are together in action And so luckily. We've got an amazing yesterday who scheduled sync up extremely well with ours as well. We have dr leeman baird from hadera hash crap with us Dr barry welcome to the show. Thanks great to be here. Be here with you. This is wonderful. And did i pronounce that one hundred percent correctly. You did leeman barrett very nice. Thank you. I'm buried and you prefer doctors baird leeman had just cullman lebron. Everyone custom given her and leaving. I mean you. You have a renowned snoring You know a really renowned for offer you've been bent waters of a very profound aspects that run decentralized and distributed systems. And so it's an honor to have you on the on the crypto. One podcast and we briefed you before again crypto. One audience. is you know cook. Don't want one. We're not your typical audience. You might write a professor oriole dissertation do or a cryptographic white paper or anything like that. But you know you got such an interesting background. I think that people will be learning a lot here over the course of the next thirty forty five minutes. So can you can you. Could we introduce yourself in. Let us know a little bit about your background. Sure so i'm leaving I enjoy doing stuck with nafta with computers a computer scientists. I've done all sorts of different things. I was a professor a long time. And i've started a bunch of companies and i like to write programs for fun like to do math refund. Enjoy teaching stuff Just all sorts of different things to do a wide variety of things a lot of different things in my past. Yeah.

bryce paul dr leeman baird hadera Dr barry leeman barrett baird leeman cullman lebron Bryce
High tide in Suez Canal raises hopes of freeing ship

Rush Limbaugh

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

High tide in Suez Canal raises hopes of freeing ship

"In Egypt at high tide will finally free that skyscraper sized cargo ship stuck sideways in the Suez Canal is blocking the waterway that connects the Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean and through which about 10% of all global trade flows. David Baird, president, founder of the Texas based shipping firm Baird solution. What will happen is that some good might take an alternative measure so longer. Sailings will go by air that will be inflationary, and companies will pass that along. But what what is pointed out is how fragile our hand to mouth global supply chain it's

David Baird Suez Canal Baird Solution Mediterranean Sea Egypt Indian Ocean Texas
Mikes Exciting New Business

The EcomCrew

06:46 min | 2 years ago

Mikes Exciting New Business

"Bryant so like i mentioned at the top joined by two good friends and now business partners mr michael janice from e com crude dot com and build l. andrew from elements brands dot com looking forward to diving into the deal and talking through it and before we get soon gritty wanted to give a disclaimer. One thing. we're not gonna do. It feels a little strange mike. I know you are really transparent with what you do. Bill you are as well traditionally have shared everything. We decided not to show the name of the company that invested in partially in large part. Because we have a lot of investors here in just out of sensitivity to them partially because we want to be can sensitive to the to the seller as well but kinda love to be transparent and usually usually are but needs to be a little bit more just a little bit more sensitive with the name and the details of this company. So that being said i wanna walk people through can how the deal came about how we structured it Some the closing challenges. And can i get an update on how things have been going since we closed and mike what originally the seller who is someone that we both know how to relationships with reached out to you and i to talk about selling and kind of morphed into potentially. Hey we should take a look at this. What was it that you liked about the deal. Mike and then maybe bill you can share as well kind of from the outset. Yeah i mean for me. It was just knowing knowing the person. So i knew that i was getting full. Transparency mean whenever you buy business offer any website or platform you always have to worry about. What is the the cellar hiding. And so no we know was talking to the seller before they even contemplating to us like i felt like we have an inside track on the margins. Really good in this business. There's some some secret sauce. Defensibility that i think that you know is is really appealing and so that's kind of how the whole thing how the whole thing started once. They decided they didn't want to sell. I did bring up well. Maybe that's something we'd be interested in and so it's kinda hold the whole thing together. Yeah that's similar to the thing that i like to which is kind of does all come back to the seller. I knew this person pretty well for few years. Also and the thing that i knew about this person was that they had great systems. They were really a kind of festivus. Entrepreneur had everything documented. And this was out when we got the tax returns and they tied to the penny or almost almost exactly to the penny to the company's financial records. So i knew that this person was running a tight ship because i knew who they were and that was baird out during diligence. So for me. That was that was an important thing as well. I'm thinking back to the original conversation. Now that i had with them and the only thing that was kind of going through my mind because you just mentioned bill like they run a tight ship. You're always for things that you can approve upon. It's like when a businesses like really running. Well it's not really the thing that i think that we look for typically right. We're looking for something where we can fix something. That's broken in some ways. But there was a few things that they just feel comfortable with or didn't really want to to mess around with them. One of them was sourcing from basically from china and so they're buying things from suppliers in the us. That are the things from from china. So i thought oh well. There's a opportunity there. I saw some opportunity in. Seo stuff where. They just wasn't their biggest focus. They were focused mostly on on the amazon staff and so it was kind of thinking through things. Okay while the parts. That i don't necessarily want to deal with neo the the operational stuff where i'm not necessarily going to make any improvements to it. We can take that stuff over and let it continue run smoothly but the things that i think that we can add our secret sauce or or knowledge to are wide open spaces and so that was the only thing that appeal to me. Yeah that was kind of the perfect combo in this business. Right there was there was really tight systems for the things the business was doing. But this seller kinda said look you know. This businesses optimized a lifestyle business. I really like my lifestyle. I have a great one the seller gave us a list and they said on day one. You should do this this and this and we saw a. Why didn't you do those things and seller says. Be too much work. You know. I make enough money. You know i'm happy is great and this kind of sounds ridiculous but i see this on elements. Brands deals as well as you know. People are making six figures a year and they're happy right so that was sort of the perfect combination. Usually the people who are on cruise control are not very well organized and so the downside of of lots of stuff to improve that you've also got shore up the basic operations but this was a great combination that the seller was super buttoned up. Kind of on the things that were in their wheelhouse and had just consciously not pursued a bunch of things that we real excited to pursue. Yeah i remember having a conversation with the seller during diligence and diving into advertising and some of the advertising was returning a pretty good good level. And there's a lot more room as well. Why why didn't you just bump up spent here. It was working well. And and i i just think she hadn't wasn't something that she had the pan west or inclination to do and so it's tons of opportunities for growing the business. Yo things i liked about it too is a checklist. I had on the espn capital front for businesses to look at good margins which is important. This one has that repeat. Business is a big one and ahead. I think really strong business. Thirty percent plus of people. Reordering a boring or unsexy niche. And it's that is. I think you know i like that. I like niches. That are not super glamorous. more money in their often. The only thing that scared me was the amazon concentration and it had most the sales come from amazon but the thing the only thing they gave me comfort there was bill like you said that history with the seller knowing how risk adverse they aren't how cleanly in from a white hat perspective built that business gave me a ton of at least a lot more comfort on that front. I mean you can be comfortable with all you want but like amazon. You're still in amazon's pie and so remote or whatever and this was the concerns me like even going into this. But i think that's something that we all accept as as amazon sellers. Hopefully this isn't the thing that they target to amazon. Basics thing or disrupted in some other way. it's always a little bit scary but it also goes to thing that i'm excited about. Which is your. They were not necessarily focused on their own website. As much as i think we're going to try to be. We'll see how how this plays out a lot of times. You know as a buyer business you have like all these dreams and they don't always play out the way that you think they will. But i'm pretty confident that efforts in just kind of digging into things after talking to the seller now for pull last couple of weeks. There are some pretty big opportunities to at least lessen. The amazon risk factor. It will never be fifty fifty or anything like that in terms of website sells damas on at least we can get more more sales through our

Mr Michael Janice Mike Amazon Bryant Andrew Baird China Brands Espn United States Damas
Sacramento to get national women's soccer team in 2022

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Sacramento to get national women's soccer team in 2022

"Team KFBK Staler Martin has the story. The city of Sacramento will be joining the national Women's Soccer League in 2021 National Women's Soccer League Commissioner Lisa Baird announced the big news during a state of the league address yesterday. Back in August, Sacramental Republic of C was in the final stages of negotiations with the league to bring women's pro soccer to the city of Sacramento. Taylor Martin News, half a 20210.1 kfbk It's four or six on the KFBK. Afternoon

Staler Martin National Women's Soccer League Lisa Baird Sacramento Taylor Martin Soccer Kfbk
"baird" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

04:34 min | 2 years ago

"baird" Discussed on Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

"Everything. My mind is what hardest maiden an. I'm not a paid spokesperson. I don't get a check. But i have everything taken care of all the way down to the wound. You know for the for the repast. Where i wanna be. I'm not going to be baird. I'm gonna be doing the anatomical donate s another thing if you want your body donated to science. You have to do the paperwork now. it's not like he used to say okay We don't have anywhere you can donate is. Everything's about paperwork. New hospitals don't want to be soon if your home don't want to be sued. The the the.

baird
Tom Hanks' is hopeful that big movies will save movie theaters

Donna and Steve

02:07 min | 2 years ago

Tom Hanks' is hopeful that big movies will save movie theaters

"Hanks is hopeful that Marvel Comics and other large franchises will save movie theaters. In a recent interview about his out new movie that he's got coming out. He acknowledged that there was a change coming to movie theaters that was inevitable, But he believes that movie theaters will still exist. When he was asked that very question, he said, Absolutely. They will on a big event. Big event. Motion Pictures are going to rule the day of cinemas. Now. He added that again, like I said earlier, this is all important. It's very important that we get other franchises like Marvel. Things like that to get on board of on Lee releasing movies in theaters to try to keep that patrol. Yeah, I know. Some people are worried about that right now. People are gonna be so excited about going back to the movies. We're going to see a resurgent of movie events where people are dressing up in costumes. I love that kind of stuff, right? I hope so as well like there because we It was a destination programming was here and I hope that we get back to that again because You know, it's all fine watching it at home, and some people have some really great home theaters. But there's something about that experience that I missed two. I do, and there's something like if you are bothered by people like because the only thing I don't like about Movie theaters are other people. They're I mean, they're the ones that hurt you. I've gone off on people before, as I've expressed on the show, But, you know, I think it's about the time of day you choose to go buried your followed by this. Do not go to Friday night opening of a movie, right? You're gonna get all the annoying people with it's packed, so just go on a Tuesday night when no one's there different is a very broad definition. Some people are just so bad. I'm theater is like, sure. Baird up ahead of new people are art. Yeah, I hope the one thing they stick around with and I know they were doing this a little bit beforehand is some of these retro movies like I was actually going. I want to see back to the future, all of them. I saw grease. I saw all these great movies and nobody was in the theater wearing my mask, of course, but I hope they keep some retro movies in there every once in a while, and I hope that some of our smaller second run theaters do have things so support your new home cinema grills your parkway theaters. All right, We have a chance when you have a chance. Make sure you support them as well.

Marvel Comics Hanks Marvel LEE Baird
New York - Cory Booker wins 2nd full Senate term in N.J.

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

New York - Cory Booker wins 2nd full Senate term in N.J.

"And one time Democratic presidential candidate scored a second U S Senate term. With at least 63% of the vote count in Booker Beat Republican Rick Matter 61% to 38% Booker. It rains. $14.5 million for his campaign. Baird a meta Trump loyalists at $564,000. We have election results in

Rick Matter Booker Senate Baird Donald Trump
Amy Coney Barrett sworn in as newest Supreme Court justice

WBZ Afternoon News

00:30 sec | 2 years ago

Amy Coney Barrett sworn in as newest Supreme Court justice

"This morning at the Supreme Court Justice Amy Cockney Barrett was officially sworn in here's A Bee sees a nestling patera hours after being confirmed by the Senate with a 52 to 48 vote Justice Barritt taking the judicial oath at the Supreme Court, officially kicking off her tenure on the nation's highest court. Baird, assuming the late Justice Ginsburg's chambers, with Ginsberg's clerks being reassigned to other justices. Ginsberg passed in September at the age of 87 as delicate. Terra ABC NEWS Washington

Supreme Court Justice Amy Cockney Barrett Justice Ginsburg Justice Barritt Ginsberg Terra Abc Baird Senate Washington
Senate Judiciary Committee approves Amy Coney Barrett nomination to Supreme Court

Mark Levin

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Senate Judiciary Committee approves Amy Coney Barrett nomination to Supreme Court

"On the Senate Judiciary Committee with unanimous vote to advance the nomination. Of Judge Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court have been here a while and I've never seen anyone more capable Then Judge Baird on the law committee chair Lindsey Graham. Democrats boycotted the vote because they say the nominations being rushed through before Election Day. Ah full Senate vote on the confirmation is expected Monday,

Senate Judiciary Committee Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Judge Baird Senate Lindsey Graham Supreme Court
Judiciary Committee sets date for vote on Barrett confirmation

Here & Now

05:18 min | 2 years ago

Judiciary Committee sets date for vote on Barrett confirmation

"This morning, Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee tried and failed to slow down the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney Barrett, who appears to be on track for the high court before the November 3rd election. NPR congressional reporter Claudia Gonzalez joins us with the latest and Claudia Today is Day four of Cockney barrettes confirmation How far apart of Republicans and Democrats on this committee over the sheer pace of this confirmation hearing? It's really going pretty fast. They're moving as quickly as they can. Republicans. Are they? Both sides remain very far apart. Just this morning is you had mentioned Democrats were able to delay today's proceedings. They did that by about two hours. And they're hearing now from a series of experts and Barrett is not appearing s. Oh, it's just a reminder of how these two sides are so opposed right now. Democrats don't want to see this nomination move forward, but they also have very limited tools and their disposal to stop this process. Republicans have been steadfast in their mission to approve Barrett to the court before Election Day, and even this much of the country is already in the midst of early voting. So this is moving on schedule for Republicans, even with the Democrats attempts to stall with a vote set for next Thursday to move her nomination from the committee to the full Senate floor. What's been some of the analysis of how Cockney Barrett has has come across this week, while surprisingly, even with this bitter partisanship on display right now, this hasn't been this combative and contentious as we saw during the Brett Kavanaugh hearings from 2018. Democratic senators told reporters last night that Barrett isn't his combative as Kavanaugh. So that's taken Ah lot of the heat out of this wave of hearings this time that say they've complained repeatedly that Barrett has been evasive. She's declined to talk about how she might rule in the future on certain cases. And she's also dodged questions on climate change and other matters that air of importance right now, But in light of that, Republicans say Barrett and her background is still resonating with the American public. She did have some things to say, though, about the case coming before the high court this week after the election, challenging the affordable care act, what stood out there? So she hasn't said she'll recuse herself. From that case, she was grilled extensively on this. Democrats say Trump is putting her on the court to overturn it. And Democrats say Barrett auditioned for the court threw a Siri's of critical pieces against the we should note. Again that this case will be before the court just a week after the election, and she hasn't said this week, however, that she's on a mission to destroy it, but still, it remains unclear how she could rule here. And says she hasn't looked at the issues yet and doesn't know how she will either. There was also this moment yesterday in an exchange with Senator and Democratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris, who pressed Cockney Barrett on her beliefs about whether Koven 19 was infectious. Whether smoking causes cancer. And whether climate change is real. I will not expressive you on a matter of public policy, especially when that is politically controversial because that's inconsistent with the judicial role as I have, explained Barrett and you've made your point clear that you believe that's a debatable plan. And in Harris was responding there on noting that Cockney Barrett is saying climate change is a debatable point. What are other Democrats saying about moments like this? And what are Republicans, also saying in response, Democrats are using this as ammunition that Baird has been evasive and using. This is an example of claims that the American public still doesn't know. Bear it well enough to know she's a right fit for the Supreme Court in this ties into another concern, just raised by Democrats in today's hearing. Claiming Barrett has yet to submit comprehensive information of the committee about her background because again, this is such a rushed process on. Even Democrats have conceded they haven't had enough time to dig in to bat. Barrett's background to bring some And even more comprehensive look at this nominee and how she could shift the court. So in terms of her asking thes questions that Paris and others if they feel like they're haven't been enough answers, But Republicans say that she's presented a complete picture enough to be approved to the to the highest court. Okay, So what's the timeline for the committee to vote on her nomination and then the full Senate? So we know to Republican Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski. R potential. No votes, but But even still, is this a done deal? This appears to be a done deal from here. Of course, a week is eons away these days, so we can't say for sure what's going to happen. However, the committee has set that vote for next week to vote her nomination out to the full Senate floor so the full Senate could take this up sometime in the remaining days of the month. And in terms of who might vote against that, Yes, those two Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska are two potential no votes. Democrats are still hoping that they'll have more Republicans flip and vote against this and perhaps derail the effort. But right now it looks like this could be a done deal.

Amy Cockney Barrett Supreme Court Senate Judiciary Committee Senate Kamala Harris Claudia Today Brett Kavanaugh Claudia Gonzalez Susan Collins NPR Lisa Murkowski Reporter Donald Trump Alaska Maine Paris Baird Siri
Senate Panel Wraps Confirmation Hearings for Trump's Supreme Court Pick

Rush Limbaugh

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Senate Panel Wraps Confirmation Hearings for Trump's Supreme Court Pick

"Court nominee Amy Cockney. Barrett underway with members listening to witness testimony today. Jamie Tony Baird not actually present at this final hearing. Instead, members on the Senate Judiciary Committee quizzing experts from the American Bar Association and outside witnesses about barrettes qualifications. The committee vote on Barrett's nomination is set for October 22nd at 1 P.m.. And as delicate terra ABC NEWS

Barrett Senate Judiciary Committee Jamie Tony Baird Amy Cockney Terra Abc News American Bar Association
Live updates: Barrett faces questions on Day 2 of Senate hearings

Morning Edition

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Live updates: Barrett faces questions on Day 2 of Senate hearings

"U S Supreme Court nominee Amy Cockney. Barrett is declining to say whether President Trump has the authority to delay the general election. On the grounds that doing so would basically make a judge illegal pundit on the second day of her confirmation hearing in the U. S. Senate. Judge Baird also weighed in on originalism. I interpret the Constitution as a law that I interpret its text is text and I understand it tohave the meaning that it had at the time people ratified it. The Republican majority is set on confirming Bear before the election, the Democrats fear landmark laws they've champion will be in jeopardy. A bipartisan group of Christians has formed a

Judge Baird Amy Cockney Supreme Court Donald Trump U. S. Senate Barrett President Trump Bear
Boston's Franklin Park Zoo makes history with twin tapir tots

WBZ Morning News

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Boston's Franklin Park Zoo makes history with twin tapir tots

"Zoo. Zoo. It's It's taper taper taught taught to to new new baby baby tapers. tapers. After Mom Abbey gives birth to twins, The male and female taper tots are Believed to be the first set of Baird's tape or twins on record. And for those of you not up to speed a taper looks something like a pig and this native to jungles off both South and Central America, right,

Zoo. Zoo Mom Abbey Baird Central America
Giga Texas Timeline Update, and the TSLA stock rebound

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:49 min | 2 years ago

Giga Texas Timeline Update, and the TSLA stock rebound

"Everybody. Robin our here, and today is kind of a Giga Day. We have news from gigafactory Shanghai Gigafactory, Texas gigafactory New York, and then we'll talk a little bit more about lucid ahead of their livestream unveil of the lucid air tonight, and of course, the stock which we can start out with dessel stock on the day to day finishing up eleven percent to three hundred, sixty, six dollars twenty eight cents on the back of a rising macaroni Environment Nasdaq for the day up two point seven percent. So as I said, yesterday, I, hate, stop-loss orders. This is exhibit a for why that is as Tesla today without much news swung back significantly in the. Other. Direction. That's really my only thought on the stock today. So let's move into the news. There was an interesting post this morning on Tesla Motors Clubs Forum by Ridge. Twenty twenty about a possible time line for Tesla's gigafactory in Texas. This user writes quote have some information on the tear factory build schedule. Tesla is sourcing how vendors slash contractors to bid on work at the site and quote this user then shares some screen shots presumably of some documents involved in that bidding, the most interesting of which lays out a project schedule in that project schedule not a first substantial completion date of May I twenty twenty one according to the American Institute of Architects. Substantial completion is quote the stage in the progress of the work when the work or designated portion thereof is sufficiently complete in accordance with the contract documents so that the owner can occupy or utilize the work for its intended use and quote the schedule also notes that the first dry in what happened on December thirtieth twenty twenty I xdrive just means that everything is sort of sealed up with the building shell so that interior work can commence without having to be exposed to the elements, and then in a separate page here that has also included. There's a more detailed schedule noting that in September they'll be doing things like underground electrical, mechanical plumbing, etc.. October would be fencing porta-pottys waste removal metals, recycling recycling removal, and then November would be architectural interiors which based on the dry and date assume would be non weather sensitive into your stuff. So obviously take this for what it's worth. It has just forum posts, but the documents to me look like they would be pretty legitimate I. Don't think there's a ton of reason to doubt it. I. Think for those of us that follow closely this would be pretty much in line with our expectations. This will be going from breaking ground to possibly production ready in under a year which we know Tesla is targeting based on their work active factory Shanghai originally and now With gigafactory Berlin as well. Speaking of Shanghai Tesla continues to make rapid progress at the gigafactory. They're the global times earlier. This Week reported that Tesla has completed the main section of phase two, which is for the Mata why and they write quote at present interior decoration and electromechanical testing being carried out and are expected to be completed on schedule in October and November and quote not exactly sure what interior decoration needs to be carried out and completed. I'm guessing that's probably something that's lost in translation probably more equivalent you interior design meaning, functional interior design. But regardless, we continue to see these reports about phase two in Shanghai though the Global Times appears. To also expect production to begin for the Monterey in one though they do cite other media reports on that which we have talked about. Personally, I'm still expecting some motto is to come out of gigafactory Shanghai. This you're probably not enough to be immaterial to quarterly results or the financials but more. So again, sign heading into twenty twenty one which cannot believe were that close to you already shifting back to the US and over to the energy side of the business with Peissel's gigafactory. In New, York a different type of gigafactory Tesla. Roddy today posted an article with the headline of quote vessel energy ramps hiring AC in New York for accelerated solar production and. Quote you on did actually re tweet this article in which Tesla Roddy writes quote a source familiar with the matter who spoke to Tessa. Roddy talk to employees at the plant who indicated the facility is currently operating on a twenty four hour schedule six days a week to keep up with demand. Altogether, this move seems to confirm the eighty eight acre location is accelerating solar production and installation insignificant way which coincides with the company's growth and the energy sector and quote while energy storage has definitely grown historically solar has actually been quite slow Tusla recently, which I think was correctly pointed out by Gordon Johnson in our bowl baird debate. So if we go. Back to two, thousand, seventeen, for example, cutie, Tesla deployed one, hundred, seventy, six megawatts of solar energy versus this most recent you only twenty seven megawatts of solar. There are a lot of reasons for that. The business model has shifted significantly but right now it's not at the point that at once what's Tesla's hope? Of course is that the solar roof changes that about which started in their cute you letter that quote solar roof installations roughly tripled in Q. to compare to key one, we continue to expand our installation team to increase the deployment rate and quote of course, this is a new product so to starting from a very low base for Tesla from. But hopefully, that growth rate continues we've also recently seen tesla cut their prices significantly for rooftop solar. Now, offering the lowest price systems in the United States at least at a dollar forty, nine per watt after incentives under cutting other systems and the US by about thirty percent on average. So plenty of reasons to be hopeful that Tesla is on the precipice returning to growth for the solar business and are on their way to finding a business model that works for them consistently for solar going forward. Next today on into provide an update to yesterday's discussion on delivery wait times. I've seen a few comments noting that those have changed for people today they have actually changed for me as well. So the model y currently sets for the all wheel drive version at seven to eleven weeks for me here in the Midwest two to four weeks for the performance for the Model S. and the Model X. Both of those currently sit at eight to twelve weeks versus yesterday's ten to fourteen. Weeks and the model three has held steady for all trims at two to four weeks.

Tesla Tesla Roddy Shanghai Tesla Tesla Motors Clubs Gigafactory Shanghai Gigafacto Shanghai Texas United States Gigafactory Shanghai Global Times New York Robin American Institute Of Architec Twenty Twenty York Monterey Mata
Demonstrate God's Word in Your Life (Ezekiel 4:4-8)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:49 min | 2 years ago

Demonstrate God's Word in Your Life (Ezekiel 4:4-8)

"Zekiye chapter four versus four through eight. Then, lie on your left side and place the punishment of the House of Israel upon it. For the number of the days that you lie on it, you shall bear their punishment. FRY signed to you a number of days three, hundred, ninety days. Equal. To the number of the years of their punishment. So long. Shall you bear the punishment of the House of Israel? And when you've completed. You should lie down a second time but on your right side and bear the punishment of the House of Judah. Forty days I assign you a day for each ear and you shall set your face toward the siege of Jerusalem with your arm Baird and you shall prophesy against the city. And behold I will place cords upon you. So you cannot turn from one side to the other till you have completed the days of your siege. And so much we could talk about in these verses but the basic picture is God is calling Ezekiel as a prophet to do two things one to prophesy about the city. So to speak the words of God and to tell what God has said to him to the people and then second to demonstrate these words with his life. He's specifically talking about the punishment of the House of Israel the punishment of the House of Judah, basically God's judgment on Israel and Judah and how he would take action specifically lying on his left side for three hundred ninety days. On his right side for forty days representing the number of years associated with judgement punishment toward the House of Israel and the House of Judah we don't know specifics of how this would play out like for all those three hundred ninety days on the left side and forty days on the right side. But basically. Lying there for long periods of time on those days, unable to turn from one side to the other as a demonstration is an illustration is a picture of the words he's speaking. Now, how does that lead us to pray? Why want wants to think about our lives, your life, my life today this week. So again, we're seeing this over and over again, there unique things about Ezekiel Old Testament prophets but there are also parallels to our lives as women who have received the word of God and have the spirit of God and us have been commissioned to proclaim the word of God, not just with our words. But with our actions with lives that are fluctuation of the words, we proclaim the words we believe the words God has spoken. And Specifically. I was reading this and as I. WanNa lead us to pray I was thinking about people who are going through difficult times difficult circumstances. Could it be than even or difficult circumstances situations we walk through? That there are things we are portraying about who got is in the midst of hard times that are intended by God to be a reflection of the truth we believe. Of the word that we hold fast to just like we see in Paul throughout the New Testament saying I, fill up what is lacking in regard to Christ's afflictions. He's not saying that he experiences suffering in the exact same way as Jesus did, but he is saying that he shares in the sufferings of Christ he shows the supremacy. Of Christ, he shows the joy of Christ that even when times are hard and difficult and he is holding fast joy and peace and courage and confidence in the middle of that he is displaying Christ he is reflecting the word of Christ in his life. So God, I pray the you would help us all today to embody you word. To reflect your word, not just with our mouths Oh God. Yes. As we prayed recent days help us to reflect your word with our mouths helps to speak your word to give witness to your word to warn people of coming judgment to share the good news of Your Grace and gallery. Pray that amidst whatever is going on in our lives. Right now, you would help us to reflect your word in our lives. Guttering, we pray that you would help us to reflect your joy even in the middle of suffering. We pray the you'd help us to reflect your strength and our weakness. Gharib, we pray that you help us to reflect your peace amidst so much unrest. Around us. Maybe specifically in our circumstances or just unrest in the world gunnery prayed help us to reflect your piece. Got Re pray that our lives would be demonstration today and this week of the truth we believe and we hold fast to God 'cause you're a word to be clear in our mouths and clear in our lives we pray. In Jesus name. Amen.

House Of Israel Judah House Of Judah Ezekiel Paul FRY Jerusalem Israel Gharib Baird
Travel to Iowa

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:15 min | 2 years ago

Travel to Iowa

"I'd like to welcome to the show Sarah brewers from travel with Sara, dot com, and also mid west travel network, DOT COM and oddly enough we're going to talk about the mid West and specifically serious here to talk to us about Iowa Sarah Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me. I'm excited to be here excellent well and I put out the. Word among my travel blogger brethren and written and I don't think that this thing put a couple of weeks ago and said, I've got three missing states I missing Iowa Nebraska and Hampshire, and at least one person I think it was more than one said if you want Iowa have to talk to Sarah and why is that? Sarah. What's the connection to Iowa? Well I live in Iowa. I have lived here all my life and I live on I will farm I'm married the neighbor boy in two thousand eight I started a blog and it was in two thousand thirteen that I really dove into the travel side of things. But the one thing that I realize is a lot of people didn't know a whole lot about the mid West or my home state of Iowa in. Most people don't realize that I will has beautiful cornfields and soybean fields we have that, but we have a lot of other amazing things and that's why you need to come to Iowa to visit and we're GONNA get into all of those today and I can't wait to share I. Clinical Slices a paradise will normally ask why someone should go I. Think you jumped into that one ahead of time anything else you would add to that I will surprise you I think the art, the culture, the scenic byways will blow you away. You could spend probably one home month exploring Iowa's scenic byways and I think that's pretty darn. Cool excellent will and where are you going to take us to what you're gonNA recommend where we starting. Well, let's start and do and. North, central. Iowa. Route, which is near where I live. I live near Mason. City. Mason. City Clear Lake and we're GONNA go to Charles City those three towns there, and then he can go up to forest city where you can see we're winnebago motorhomes are made. So you start in Mason city, Mason cities, a great base camp, and I would recommend that you stay in the park in hotel. The parking hotel is the last known hotel in the world designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Can stay there. Okay. People come from all over the world to Mason City Iowa population twenty six thousand something. So I have to Mason City, but I stayed in the holiday and see this is my mistake. You need to come back and see if the. I'll give you the grand old tour I. Didn't know he had designed any hotels. That's true. The first thing people say to me is Oh I don't think I could afford to stay there. and. I'm telling you that rooms at the Parken Hotel in Mason city. Iowa. Are Very affordable. I'm talking one twenty, nine to one, fifty, nine at night in a historic hotel. Designed by Frank Lloyd. Wright. I mean that is amazing. So when you're in Mason City, you want to do the river city's sculptures on parade, which is a sculpture walk, and it's always fun because I travel a lot and you know these artists that create these sculptures are all across America and maybe some of you've seen the Humpty dumpty sculpture that's around. I. Know I'M Thinking, the last place I saw one was in Mesa Arizona Okay I just have to take a Selfie with it because I'm like here's how you know Humpty kind of manages to be wherever I am but the sculptures are really a nice walk because they also take you through the Rock Glen area in Mason City, which is where there are other Frank Lloyd Wright designed homes. So is not only the hotel. There's other homes there as well and McKnight or art museum is a fantastic museum in town. They have the bayard puppets, Baird Marionettes, wizard of Oz the marionnettes that we're using the wizard of Oz are in the museum in Mason City and you can go across the street to Music Man Square we what puppets were in wizard of Oz are we talking about flying monkeys or what? Yes. Monkey is there okay it's a really Nice Museum but then you go across the street and you go to Meredith Wilson's boyhood. Home The music man. So, Meredith Wilson was born in Mason city. Iowa. And the Music Man Square has museum in there that is home to. Meredith Willson. So in the streetscape is in there and it looks just like in the movie, but you would envision it. So that's pretty cool. Meredith Willson he's also buried in Mason City and you know what? There's a lot of people that look for famous people were buried. You know who knew a lot of people cemetery tourism is kind of a big deal but then you go, let's go estimates saying you've already Charles City and get to Whitewater rafting most people don't think of Iowa and Whitewater rafting. And you can do that in Charles City Iowa. In Charles City I'm not sure eight, ten thousand people maybe. And you can stay in a luxury cabin there at red? Cedar. Lodge cabins that are overlooking the river great place for extended families to stay. But you've got the river

Mason City Iowa Mason City Iowa Charles City Iowa Mason Charles City Meredith Wilson Frank Lloyd Wright City Clear Lake Sarah Brewers Nice Museum Music Man Square Parken Hotel Sara Frank Lloyd OZ Art Museum Arizona
You will be with Me in Paradise (Luke 23:43)

Pray the Word with David Platt

04:49 min | 2 years ago

You will be with Me in Paradise (Luke 23:43)

"Chapter Twenty three verse forty-three. Jesus said to him. Truly I say to you. Today you will be with me in paradise. Those, not some of the most beautiful words and all the Bible. Spoken by Jesus as he's hanging on a cross. He's being mocked. Is being murdered in the most cruel form imaginable in that day. And he looks to this criminal hanging beside him who realizes that? Jesus has done nothing wrong realizes and we don't know all the details but. He realizes who Jesus is. In such a way that Jesus says to him, truly I say to you in other words market down. This is guaranteed today you will be with me in paradise. Like today not in the future. But as soon as you breathe your last breath, you're gonNa be with me in paradise this word for heaven this word for the place where we're finally with God free from Sin Experiencing. Eternal life in Darnell. Joy An eternal peace in him today you will be with me in paradise light let that soak in. That for all who trust in Jesus is. And what she has done on the cross. In the moment you die on this earth. That day that moment you will be with Jesus in Paradise. An heaven you will experience the hope of salvation. You will experience freedom from all sin and all suffering and victory over death Jesus, we praise you for this reality. Even as I think about the anniversary of Mind Dad's death just a couple of days ago. And fresh tears. Crazy you. That the moment he breathed his last breath. When he had that sudden heart attack like that moment that day was with you in paradise and today he's with you and for the next ten trillion years, he's going to be with you now based on what he had done based on who you are and what you had done to save him from his sins and for that hope, I have that hope that each one of us has that no matter what happens today or tomorrow or next month or next year. Ten years from now you're fifty years from now whenever it is, we breathe their last breath that in that moment on that day, we will be with you in paradise. All Glory be to your name. Jesus we trust in you with our life we trust in you with our death. And we break a replay for. People who don't know this confidence who don't have this whole people who've never even heard this hope. A reprieve for the Moghal people in Pakistan, we lift our hearts. Our voices together. For them right now all one point three, million of them. No. Moguls who have put their trust in Jesus that we know the. I. Know Moser who died a will be with you in paradise. God We pray for that to change. Got Pray for the Moghal to hear the good news if you're love the. Greatest News. In the world that deaths been defeated and eternal life as possible and you gotta re pray for the spread of that news for the sending of. For the mobilization of Your Church take the Gospel to the Moghal in Pakistan. In God, we pray the help us to share this good news with somebody else today knowing nobody we interact with today is guaranteed tomorrow. So Al Buster made the good news of who Jesus is what Jesus has done known today. Even as they live with this rock solid death to find confidence. That on that day, we will be with you and Baird is. We. Love you Jesus, and we can't wait in a sense for that day to live is Christ and to die is gain. We. Praise you for that reality. Pray these things in your name. Amen.

Jesus Paradise Pakistan Darnell Baird Moghal Al Buster Moser
Aquarium collecting coins in waterfall to help pay for animal care

WBZ Afternoon News

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Aquarium collecting coins in waterfall to help pay for animal care

"Zoos and aquariums, finding themselves facing dire straits as well through the pandemic. There's a facility in North Carolina, finding a new way to pay the bills in North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knows Shore. Shut down a huge waterfall in director Liz Baird says when they drained that they found there about three or four inches of coins at the bottom that people have thrown in a beard says those coins will help take care of the Mariam's 5000 animals, though they were tossed in for an age old cause. We were sort of you think wishes to help move us forward, Beard says. While it remains closed, the facility is offering online fund such as animal cameos really fun to have a turtle or Howell or AH, vulture pop in and be a part of your meeting.

Beard North Carolina North Carolina Aquarium Pine Knows Shore Liz Baird Howell Mariam Director