17 Burst results for "Bahcall"

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

04:15 min | 10 months ago

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"That time fast forward twelve years. Later steve. Jobs came back. What happened on the one hand. Johnny is one the legendary cray product designer artists of all time on the other hand tim cook was called the of inventory his previous job. Any ultimate islands and the ultimate soldier people say oh johnson what. He really learned the truth behind the stars. He learned to balance his artists in soldiers. Equal in home took over. When steve jobs died the soldier when he was interviewed in the last year or two of his life. He told his biographer asking. You what's your ultimate accomplishment. Said i think job said i think my greatest innovation.

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

13:02 min | 10 months ago

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"More window dressing. I think you're absolutely right not to keep going back to our too but that idea that. Turn the course of the war radar. The usual history is sort discovered in england in the mid nineteen hundred turns out to scientists in a lab discovered the same principles ten years earlier. You could've shorten the war could have saved a lot of lives but what happened. They were rejected by people in this large organization not poorly intention people but they said well that'll never it'll take more than you know eighteen months to play out so let's not do it so fast forward. I think the better organizations have learned this. And i'll give you an example. Which was doing some of the research for. This book is surprised me which is a microsoft. I got to know some of the people in the research. And when such in adela takeover they did have a research group which worked time some ideas but one of the things he said he took one of the leaders in the group and said i think your ideas may not be crazy enough so i want you to break off of the crazy idea group and work on the great india's that are too crazy for the crazy idea groups the crazy crazy idea groups the crazy squared ideas. And that's what they're doing today. So i think the batter forward thinking companies. Do this separate their artists in their soldiers and that gets their artists and then they're really really really crazy artists into different groups different homes and nurture that because that's the only way you can have sustainable growth other questions raised there. I saw it so first of all. Congratulations on the book. We we bow genuflect with awed admiration and can stop. Okay next question so Let me ask an unfair until unanswerable question. There is a degree. Jack's question everything. That one has to do a book like this. Is you look back. At what has worked and try to find patterns that are similar and tease out lessons and observations. That can be useful to apply to the present and the future. We're thought experiment. Way if you were to take some of the aspects of loon shots which should be what people do. They're trying to do things that haven't been done. You could potentially read your book. And and then distill. The lesson of one should do nothing that you say other people have done in the past. It's worked for. It's not entirely clear whatever's worked in the past will continue to work in the future. Had he had he grappled with that. In the sense of the copying of pass patterns is very soldiers thing to do. And so what what you do with that. Conundrum wrapped surrounded by a mystery. Next question. two things one is. I wish if if if i could have one wish is the phrase disruptive innovation be cut out of the dictionary because i think it goes to. What if you just focus on what some guru with a powerpoint is telling. You is going to be the future and the transferring your market. You will take your eyes off the ball of the small little changes to your main business that your competitors happened to be working. Give you an example. Pm so was focused on jet engines and building. Bigger faster these crazy things. Its competitors were working on subtle not very glamorous things spo- fly into their or develop a heaven spelled more. Become more faster turnaround times not nothing very glamorous but when airline deregulation hit panin was debt had these giant planes and high fuel costs around that time and it was gone. Its competitors who've been innovating around the small changes in no-one said would be disruptive actually did very well so the first thing you want to do is you want to nurture does loon shots to challenge belief. The crazy ones that are really out there but without taking it doesn't mean that your take your eyes off your ball of the main products. You're working on in the small little adjustments to doesn't you have to do both you have to nurture both of those things in order to succeed an don't worry about market potential so many times when sam walton. I've mentioned the sam walton started when he moved and started little store was he saying. Here's what i'm going to disrupt the retail industry now. He just wanted to stay married and had quit. So you end up a win win. The scientists who i developed the transistor. They said we're gonna to revolutionize electronic communication no the scientists who are working on a transistor returned bill better switches. And when i built a transistor it was so unreliable. Inexpensive known could figure out what to do with it actually useless in communication. It took five years to figure out the first application which was hearing aids can put a vacuum tube and hearing it so the scientists in nineteen forty five and six and someone they working on this project. Say i got a great idea boss. Let's disrupt the hearing aid market. No you nurture lean shots to challenge beliefs. Don't worry about market potential. And don't take your eyes off the ball by your main business to the next one. So as retirement the concept of separating artists and soldiers struck me as incredibly familiar. You're like every single day of my life only because writer. You're both writers and so i'm curious how that process happens in your hat because you know the writing process is kind of like what you're describing where he got to be the artist just kind of vomit on the page but then at some point the soldiers gotta show up in tidying-up and turn it into something recognisable presentable. Some just curious if you've thought about that aspect of it in your experience it was. That's a great question. It's wearing different hats. So when you're in creating mode you're not as mode you just have to speed creating is about creativity and for me is three things at speed attention encourage. You just got speed for searching for ideas got pay attention when you see a tongue in the doesn't fit all that's the way in the courage to follow it so that's the artists that when you just trying to create create some really wacky crazy idea stuff. Then you have to take off that hat and edit if you confuse those two things you'll get nowhere because if you try to create really fast i always think about in my artist. Had i think about it as right. Fdr right fast bad and wrong because if you one person got it maybe never mind. But i think of it like that because if you did this when i first started is if you write a sentence lekic the nine hundred thirty seven and then you're away was thirty seven going kapika might have been thirty five and then it was april and then you get curious about what happened in may and then four yards and now you're like fifty seven minutes in two hundred hundred wikipedia and google and nothing happened so it's like you're driving a car. You just need to go at high speed. And if you accelerate to five miles an hour in decelerating to and accelerate. Never get faster if you have. Some perfectionist and niagara is a scientist. So you wanna get facts right. So it's it was very difficult effort of will to say i'm gonna write in one thousand nine hundred five blah blah blah blah happen. I'm might be wrong. Just in order to get into the flow of pre crazy. You have to read as fast as possible. Don't worry about spelling. Don't worry about grammar. Don't worry about writing a sentence and then perfecting it and right. That's a disaster so separating artists and soldier. It's exactly what we were just talking about you separate in time when you're writing is one example if you're an actual ernest same thing you've got to make your art but then you know you actually have to sell it and if you a crappy job on that you kind of going nowhere so you need to have all these crazy ideas that you put on the pavement. They need to stop van before you send it out. Let's go back. And that's totally different mode. And it's completely the opposite and counterproductive to creation. Need to separate them time. And if you confuse that you'll get our and that's whatever whether you're running a company you gotta have some take time out and brainstorm if you just too much soldier. You're just doing the next thing. You're the rat on the treadmill that that that the let's do this milestone. that's do that. Milestone psychologically. It's very stressful. Thing to be an entrepreneur and you fill your calendar with these little milestones. Because you feel like you're getting done but you need to take a break execution operations get that done on a different hat of and helps you to create different hat. It does if it helps you to wear a different hat do it. Because you don't wanna be that rat in the treadmill going going going going going. Then you're gone over a cliff. You want to pause take a break whether today or a week and just say let's think of all the crazy ideas out there that might kill us seriously from our customers. Our suppliers our partners. What can kill our investors. What could they do that would kill us. And then set aside all the How could we killed better discovered that in your own room when you with your team members writing thinking about it then with an actual bullet to your head so tanka. We think of our day couple of days. Just think about that. Why not only made it prevent you from being killed but you can turn it around. Let's say a one or two more before we wrap up. Yes over your place. High all assam. Third idea which you said. It was very very refreshing. Which is to treat a the the creative artists and the soldiers equally which i don't see very often especially in certain industries like the media industry the fashion industry. You know the people supposedly is the big ideas are like god and they're replaceable. In the foot soldiers considering montaigne replaceable. So how do you talk to those leaders to address them to address this issue. Buys Reminding them that foot soldiers in there is actually a equally important part deserve of treated while and are also closely related to that is once you separate the two cadre of people even though you claim that you treat them equally the foot. Soldiers might consider themselves to creative people to and they want their ideas to recognize. How do you off the potential resentment from this camp. All right well you can start with a story that i in doing some research for this book. I'll tell the story. It's about a very famous person that we all think we knew. Because what i thought i knew about it when i think a lot of people think is not really. What happened in illustrates. Exactly what you're talking about. And that's a case of steve jobs who is hailed as this while product. Innovator crazy are and when he was young in his first time that apple when he was in his twenty s and up until he was about two years old he saw him son and kept arguing with pride. I am an artist and when he was working on. This new project called the macintosh. He said we're all artists and everybody else. The navy where the pirates and the artists and create it. And you guys literally you guys suck and call them buzzes. And actually that was ninety. Five percent of the company that was generated ninety five percent of the revenue and they to wear a buttons with the clown red line or not. Buzzers what happened. The morale was terrible. People started leaving on the franchise side apple through the people who are working on the apple. Three like wozniak. We're doing really creative things for the apple three and they left and the people on the mac side. The jobs was leading. It was such a dysfunctional. You know the the road between those two buildings was called the demilitarized the dnc because there is so much hostility just like you said he created this. It was incredibly dysfunctional. So what happened when the mac lines up advertising the super bowl commercial. But it overheated. It was too slow is not usable. People that use it. It was a complete club and the franchises flopped. Apple was a disaster.

sam walton panin adela england microsoft Jack india aids niagara wikipedia google van apple steve jobs navy wozniak
"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

07:52 min | 10 months ago

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"To this crazy. Scientists urologist a bunch of kooks. And they don't want to deal with it so vannatter bush who was in charge of that worked with them to get the sign. Get the pilots to try it out and they did. Nothing happened for almost a year. So finally he said the problem was transferred the other way so we got the scientists the crazy artists to get in the carpets with the pilot and they discovered when they were flying over the atlantic or when they were flying over battlefield the pilots when they were being shot at fine hundreds miles an hour. They didn't want to deal with in a thirteenth switches on these crazy boxes worked but there are so many switches there. We didn't have time to figure it out. They realized that technology was great. The user interface was lousy. They went back identified. This created this display the movies with the oscilloscope and sweeping line. Put it in the plans. Planes went out within thirty days to germany. Lost one third of ubud fleet two months later the german admiral sent a message. All the boats in the atlantic withdraw. The dallas lost. The lanes were clear to resupply england. The lanes were cleared for an allied invasion your so. That's how managing the transfer is so important. You need to be gardner. Not right they say you need to set up a loose shots to have in a business sense. Your soldiers are are actually delivering. The profits from franchises. That you've already established you gotta make sure that there is. They're separated but there's a channel of communication between the now you also write about different types of lucia. Some of them are more about strategy. Some of them are more about products tells about that why matters this is enormously especially today because there are these two types of it. There's a a product. Explain what i mean. But there's a product that everybody says will never work whether that was telephone where people sit out. It doesn't work that if it does is just going to be a toy the transistor you could never make stretch out of solid state devices or personal computers digital products and people said could never work. Small shifts in strategy are subtle changes in how you deliver stuff to customer. That had known technique. I'll give you an example sam walton. When he was a young kid wanted to open a retail store. So i want to do it where people are which is big cities so of course it turns out his wife didn't like big cities and said i'll sam honey support your dream but i'm not letting town with more than ten thousand people so he liked being married also liked clam hunting and he discovered. There was one region in the country whether these four states that are you know media points in four different quayle seasons. We said. let me go there. Because i'm not gonna quayle all year round and also remarried. Win win bentonville arkansas. That's where he opened his store new technologies. He just moved a slightly different place. Sold stuff a little bit cheaper white out the entire industry that was s title in child. No technology so the problem is most people have a blind spot to one or the other especially today in our culture today. We worship products. Brian product these product. Innovators myths subtle shifts in strategy. And i'll give you an example. I mean if you remember when ibm was dominant computer company. In the world. The industry was ibm. In the seven dwarfs it was so much bigger than any other computer company. And what happened to that. They're not even players in that in that computer business now. What happened to them. They had a blind spot what was by. They saw themselves as a company and that was true for thirty or forty or fifty years. People think the personal computer took out. Ibm not what happened. Ibm was the dominant product company. And they thought what we do. Is we make people buy our products. Hey personal computers and other product. Let's do it. And they went all in and personal computers and there were a little bit after apple a little bit after commodore and tiara and radio shack and they ate their lunch. They went to number one they at billions of five billion sales. In first three years they were the dominant personal computer company happened. They missed a subtle shift in strategy. They missed with customers cared about so in the course of building. This product is everybody buys. Ibm brand because we're ibm. We make the best products in another product by this stuff in the course of building that computer. They said the stuff inside doesn't matter slow stuff like oh i don't know. The operating system outsource that to at the time and thirty two person company in seattle called microsoft and other components that called the microprocessor. That also doesn't matter what matters is product in our brand because that's what people want the product. So let's we're going to outsource to a little Chipmaker company that's kinda struggling financially in silicon valley called intel fast forward. They didn't realize customers didn't care about the brand. They just wanted to send emails to their friends and for that. The brand of the box doesn't matter what matters is standards stuff like software microprocessor. Today the combined. Mike marquis of microsoft and intel is well over one and a half trillion dollars. Ibm is not even a tenth of that. So that's what happens when you miss your blind spot. What is a lesson from the book about how to be effective as a leader in a large organization. The three things you need to do one into set by since. I don't have a very good memory. I remember it. Visually i remember it as an ice cube a garden hoe and a heart ice cube separate your artists in your soldiers does different jobs different languages. You need different systems. Ice and water number to be a garden. Moses you gotta manage the transfer number three may actually be the most important anyways and it's not talked about as much and it's it's so frustrating people get so wrong number three. I mean love your artists and soldiers equally. I'll give you an example. A friend of mine is a well-known magazine and his putting is in charge of putting out an issue every thirty days and she was complaining to me. She said the senior management is just always in love with whoever squeaking the loudest about the the latest shiny penny in about others as we could deal with this purge blah blah blah blah and pays no attention to the people who are doing ninety five percent of the work of putting out a magazine every day. So how does it make. Those people feel like crap taken for granted. Why raining little scrapers. Getting all the attention from the ceo's what you find is truly great leaders have learned to balance and appreciate because you need just having an idea is getting the ball from your your goal to your five yard line. The next ninety five yards down the field is about turning that idea into a product about delivering product and then on time on budget. You need the soldiers for that ours for that and they both have to be appreciated. And let's go so for the many folks here who are at being worst building company. So they're at they're very embryonic stage. What are some lessons.

Ibm vannatter bush quayle atlantic sam honey sam walton gardner lucia bentonville dallas germany Mike marquis england arkansas intel Chipmaker microsoft Brian silicon valley
"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

07:44 min | 10 months ago

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"It's a beautiful summer day in houston. Nineteen sixty two and john f. Kennedy is at rice. University's football stadium telling a crowd of forty thousand why he wants to pursue an impossible goal. But why some say the moon. I choose this as our goal and they may well ask why. Climb the highest mountain. Why thirty five. Years ago. Fly the atlantic. Why does rice play texas. We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon we choose to go to the moon and this decay and do the other things not because they are easy but because they odd because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills because that challenge is one that we're willing to accept one. We are unwilling to postpone and one we intend to win and the others in the end. We didn't win. The rice played texas a month later and they only managed to tie but six years later. American lives up to kennedy's bold. Promise all man ever since. Then we've used the word moonshot to describe audacious goals but savvy to call says it before you can achieve a moonshot you've got to start with a loon shot. That's his made up for game. Changing ideas that are so outlandish. Their 'obediently dismissed neglected written off as crazy. Kennedy's confident prediction. That we put a man on the moon was the ultimate moonshot but the loon shot. That made it. Possible was widely ridiculed claim made by scientists back in one thousand nine hundred ninety six that you could power a rocket by exploding fuel inside of a metal canister. The lesson here is that you need to foster loon shots to make moonshot achievable which begs the question. How do you do that. What are the conditions that foster that like what leaders do to foster loon. Shos things you need to do is separate your artists and your soldiers. So that's a big idea in this book. Artisan shelters tells who are the artists who were soldiers. Sorry it's an artist are whether they are creative designers or their scientists or their people inventing new products. They have different motivation different language. They wanna take as much risk as possible. The soldiers are the ones that take a new idea and turn it into products that you deliver on time on budget on sped to customers consistently. Those are two very different jobs. Here's the reason to separate them. They speak different languages. Here's what i mean by that. The english word risk now to a soldier. Risk is really bad thing. If you're going to the battlefield you don't want a lot of risk to in fact the commander might say you've really de risked this battle and that's an awesome thing boom if you're manufacturing tanks or you've really direct this process. Imagine going to an artist and sin. Well you really taking all the risk out of your art. That's a complete. It's the opposite so it's totally different. You don't want to tell us soldier for an artist you say a scientist or someone who's inventing something you say tried ten different things twenty different things. See which of those ten things are good. You don't tell someone manufacturing planes. Here's here's waking me to do. Let's fly ten points into the skies and see which a crash continue totally need to separate your shoulders. And that's kinda step one now. Would you say separate physically. Tell me the specifics are is is. Physical operation. Is it literally. Different offices is different on ways of leading those kinds of people. Get a more specific. It's all of the above. So if you if you're lucky enough look we'll come back to what to do if you're a solo person and you can't separate yourself in space at least not yet but if you're a large enough company and can create separate laws they creating a separate building is sort of almost a cliche. That's the least interesting things there to other things you have to. You have to separate your artists and soldiers which includes creating completely different systems because one you want as much risk as possible. The other you want us low risk is you have to get two completely separate systems. But the second thing in all that people do that but the second thing which is where most teams and companies or any kind of group fail is in the transfer because the problem with real innovation creating new ideas in teams companies are group's is not the supply of new ideas idiots in many ways. Leap you can have tons of ideas are a lot of creative. People cannot motivate them in surface. Good ideas it's not that hard innovation fails in the transfer so you need to manage the transfer. Not the technology gives you. If you're a manager leader gives you a different way of thinking about your job. Job is not to be a moses standing on the top of a mountain saying all right. I'm anointing of the holy loon shaw. This is the chosen project this year. Let's part the part. This season make way all us soldiers. Just do what i say. That doesn't work. It's it's from the top you need to manage touch and balance between these two groups because that's the key. No one else can be in charge of the transfer. You can artist doing their job. Soldiers are doing their job if your manager or leader. Your job is the transfer and that's where things fail not just one way. Get the baby ideas out not too early not too weights but the way because most of us fail and if you don't get the feedback from the field to the artists it'll just stop. It was an example of a case. Where either this went right went wrong. Well i I'm kind of a fan of world. War two history and one of the examples. That line is the technology soon made an enormous difference. Winning the course of world war two is radar microwave rate on that's because the us allies two or three or four years into the war we're being killed by abouts and this may or may not be tonight and many of you but you were strangling the atlantic for the first few years of the war and by the fourth year the war by early nineteen forty. Three england was running oil three months left of oil and the bus was shooting down ships. In the atlantic america was trying to resupply your was shooting down ships in the atlantic faster than the allies could built up and that was because of the problem would turn the course of the war was technology called micro raider which allowed planes to see. So you'd think the classic sort of revisionist history as soon as the scientist invent microwave radar. You're done you do a little test. Is a bunch of guys in the building in boston. Look in boston harbor. We can see the you know the first time they said we saw. We have radar. The pilots were like anna new technology. Which is like all soldiers everywhere. They're familiar with their stuff. You're works they're busy. The first thing will never work. They're gonna have to figure.

Kennedy john f texas atlantic houston kennedy rice football atlantic america england us boston harbor boston anna
"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

08:22 min | 10 months ago

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"There's no ceo molecule with a bullhorn sangala. Thirty three everybody slash around one okay. Everybody line of non. it's back to they. Just do it why. That's called a collective behavior and so it was sinking through that and applying that to the collective behavior of people that you see the people will have they will suddenly transform from embracing wildly ideas too rigidly reject him them and has nothing to do with the individual just like no individual molecule is saying liquid. Today let me just run around bridge. Bridget i'm just going to stay in place very it's the same old you. If you take one million on a block of ice what does it do. It freezes when molecule. You put it in a glass of water sloshes around. So that's how i thought about. I started to think about teams and companies because an underlying that is too forces a tug of war between two forces and the same kind of time between two forces. Are you having a glass of water. That's the structure. Underline the culture is what happens inside a company for too long just talked about the surface of patterns of behavior. The culture the you see. But underlying that is the structure and structure are the underlying incentives. That drive those patterns. Dave so so in some level what you're doing is you're so a lot of along with the business books about empowerment. There's a whole shelf full of blizzards books about culture. And there's a line you might have used it even at mckinsey where in certain business thinking up culture eats strategy for lunch. But i think we you're saying is is that structure culture for dinner that's right executive culture pattern behavior. You see on the surface now. Structure is what may be driving that culture culture is very hard to change structures. Actually very easy to change. That's why it's so important. I'll give you an example. Suppose organized people into a group and you create when you get in the group create to forces want to two things. At tugged people. One is the stake and outcome. Let's your small biotech company. You wanted to develop a new cancer drug. You have an enormous stake in outcome. It works but he's a here on a millionaire fails. Everyone's unemployed now. Let's say you're at pfizer just to make up a name totally at random company just for anyways i might know no relation. Now you have many more people. You can't manage them like you do with ten people with one team cap you need. You need a vice president senior vice president maybe the executive vice president is second incentive in that is perks of rent. Those two things are in conflict and change structure. You change how you reward people. You'll start to favor one over the other. So for example if you compensate people based on rank what are people gonna do that their motivation to fight that ladder. And how do you fight up the ladder. Well you stat the other guy. One thing doozy stabbed the other guy in the might have some innovative idea. You might have some terrific ideas. Desecrate idea dan. Dan go talk the bus. you know. wanna send it in front of anybody else but listen let me tell you about all flaws in his idea. Why does he want the next job. Perks of rank become more important. So what happens is collectively everybody. I might like your idea. You might like my idea. But i- incentives perks of rank. So we shut down our ideas. So that's the structure if you reward rank you creating a political culture if you reward people based on their nurturing of their crazy ideas. You create an innovative culture in. Sounds like these are two different cultures and they are two different cultures. But what makes it so. Different is the underlying structure. Culture is hard to change putting people in a room and playing videos and seeing combat and hold. Hands is not very effective. I don't know if you've ever done that in a business situation but it just doesn't work very well. The businesses keep trying to do motivational stuff like that but changing culture is much easier ordering these molecules to be rigid or be fluid equivalent of trying to change culture. So the idea is that in one structure of an organization. You're gonna it's gonna be amenable to loon shots in another structure. It is going to be resistant to it. That's right one of them is going to be the the molecules of to remain the same as the people remained the same going to run around and foster linda shots and other ones are going to be rigid placing concerned about rank. So give us bring this. Bring this to specific example. So give us a sense of an organization or any kind of institution that has battled this and how an came out and the reason that it's so exciting and kind of fun and interesting to think about this. Is that changing cultures. Like changing temperatures. A small you'll have to order each molecule. Go do stuff. You just change temperature in all chain for one example. What encourages a political culture. Will if your boss is making your decisions on who gets from. Let's say your boss has ten direct reports and a new spot opens up to be her peerless if she's vice president that she has ten associates and she is the one who's choosing who's going to be promoted well. What are those ten associates going to be doing all year long. They're going to be subtly fighting each other for who gets that slot now supposed to do something kind of radical. Which is done. Google has done in the kinsey Bunch of forward thinking helping you take those decisions away from the manager. The manager just focuses on the strategy and taking care of employees but the promotion decisions. Someone independent comes in doesn't interview process manager. Her opinion ask the other associates clients customers. You actually take the manager out of the equation then went. What are those can associates can do. It's pointless to be lobbying. Her all year round said why because when the interview person comes into make that call to just say that person's dick and they're not going to get promoted singing the lobbying don't to politics so that's just one example of of how you think about structures versus culture. Okay so by manipulating the structure of your business can change the culture but if you want to foster a culture of creativity what if you want to build a loon shot factory. What kind of structural changes to make them safi. Has the answer right after the break. It's amazing. how far are accessories have come in the last few years. I have a watch tells me when i've been sitting for too long. A ring attracts my skin. Temperature of belt buckle doubles as a bottle opener. So why did the shoes on my feet look exactly like the ones that were gym. Class in. nine hundred seventy nine well. Good news my bipedal. Friends one brand is finally bringing some much needed innovation to the footwear game. It's called bionic. 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Bridget mckinsey pfizer Dave cancer dan Dan linda fasciitis heel pain Google dick vanek trent
"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

08:24 min | 10 months ago

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"As a as a as a scholar. Yeah i i think i'd set foot often university until i was twenty nine or thirty and then i started to get really curious because i observed something about the world and this may shock you but not all people are physicists mathematicians and in fact a large majority of people are not actually physicists mathematicians and say what did they do for a living. I was just very curious. What do people who are not fizzes. They get up in the morning and then what happens. I just got very curious about that. I remember i was dating somebody at the time i was like. You have a real job. What is that like can take into an office building and can these people. I don't know what that is. And i really didn't. I was curious. And she was actually an official. Be talking about this. My wife will never watches but she was working at a law. Firm is a paralegal. So i said take me okay. Sure went around and asked him but a little thing. You like your job. no you know. This doesn't sound good. Guys should stay physics longer. But eventually i got really curious about how the rest of the world works. What is become a small companies entrepreneurs that makes the world go around. I was curious. How does that work. So you went for program into mckinsey consulting companies. Yeah how long did you do that. Mckenzie's curb like a halfway house for academics. Just before they let loose in the real world kind of train Speak english normal sentences proper amazing that they paid you to learn. So that's what i really but then you left there and you started a company. Well in you know the motivation and academic scientists the search for truth which is kind of an exciting ambitious Higher purpose and mckinsey was really a a learning experience. Your job is to solve business world problems with your softening puzzles and problems but your goal is to make successful companies more successful and over time. I just started realizing what would was really satisfying for me. As if i could help other people around the time of around that time my father got sick. And i realized there would be something. We lost my father eventually. I realized there's something enormously powerful if you feel like you are working to give people and families on earth more time with their loved ones and that s just such a motivating force and power and such a great reason to get up in the morning. And that's what i wanted to do is combine science and business and help scientists who had ideas that were stuck at universities or in the lab. Bring them out of the lab and turn them into products. Could help people when you did starting to come. Thirty company a specialized in cancer drugs. Yeah that's right so we spent about a year on the road is sort of talking to different scientists at different universities and i ran into a scientist scientists. Now emeritus and professor at harvard. Who had a bunch of terrific ideas and they were sort of stuck contract. And i decided to work with him and start this company and we developed a portfolio of products but mostly focused on new drugs for treating cancer. Company did well. You succeeded at least in part in your mission we i. It's still going. I left a few years ago but we took the company public and we had some ups and downs like everybody tech company. And we'll see jerry slow now so let's move into into book. So how did you prepare yourself for this role. Starting a company. Did you read business. Books i did. I was when i first started my biotech up. And i was in my early thirty so i read like drinking from a fire hose. I read everything. I could find about what it takes to be a great leader. Great manager who is kind of frustrating at the first five or ten books articles about you create a great culture and your this stuff you know. You're like oh yeah. That sounds good. I want people to be empowered. That's awesome. let's do that. And then the tenth time. Power and the hundreds time. Power people in sub. You're like is there. Anything more. The sound i want something a little harder and more satisfying so it got a little frustrating. Was that was the germ of this of your book lynch shots. Do you think the frustration with what was out there. I was always looking for something beyond in business. Books are sort of two kinds of ceo. Biographies i mean more or less. Explain to you. How great i was. And how done my competitors last was. I'm sort of paraphrasing a little bit for what they say but the second one is we took a survey and ask successful companies and looked at unsuccessful companies. Here's the difference. That's uncertain if you did a survey of the thousand. Ceo's looked at total return shareholders. And the ones that were successful. Drink scotch and the others. Drink whiskey scotch. So i just got kind of unsatisfied. Trying to understand if there's a more scientific way of there's something underlying that culture stuff. So i think that in the course of this. This journey are let led to this book because we ended up writing a book rooted in a business book. Rooted somewhat in physics and at the core of the idea. Is this notion of. What alluded shot a loon shot. So how is shut different from moonshot. We have a sense of what you know companies. Don't well we need a new job. Some big hairy dishes goal. Nobody ever until two weeks ago was ever talked about loon shots. What the heck is that if you if you look back at the course of history the big ideas the one that change the change fields of science transform industries rarely arrive with blaring trumpets. Red carpets dazzling everybody with their brilliant. They're usually dismissed or neglected for years sometimes. Even decades in their champions written off office crazy. There wasn't any good word in english language to capture that. So i made one of us. An example jet example is blu become charts. Your one now. Moonshot is a goal is a destination nurturing shots as jala get somebody for one example when when john kennedy declared we're gonna put a man on the moon that was the original moonshot. But how do we get there. Well it out thirty years earlier. A guy robert goddard suggested a crazy idea. What we're gonna do you explode fuel inside this metal canister that'll go into space people said you're out of your mind. People ridiculed emily from new york. Times turns it wasn't just for a year or two years. It was thirty years and of course that was liquid fuelled jet propulsion. And that's what ended up getting us to the moon. So kennedy's goal has ambition original moon. Shaw and god's idea was a classic lewd shop and so one of the arguments in your book is that most many organizations don't do enough to foster those shot so what should organizations be doing so that they they're able to nurture these kinds of things and they're not immediately dismissed as crazy ideas reading. It starts with a strange puzzle. Which is if we take a nice audience here and if we take any individual person and say here's this kind of crazy wild idea. What he we talk about the merits of the like. Let's go do it now. You bring all of those same people together into a group in their rejected. Question is why. And that. That if i could take a break and talk about a glass of water please do because i think that's like the key to me. That's the key metaphor. After reading this book. I will never look at a glass of ice water. The same target status glass of water. You can stick your finger in and swish it around. And that's true for any liquid demolliens just slosh around except as gradually adjust the temperature. All of a sudden completely change behavior thirty two fahrenheit completely changing becoming totally rigid. The water will freeze into ice. Why exactly the same molecules..

mckinsey consulting treating cancer mckinsey Mckenzie harvard jerry robert goddard cancer jala john kennedy emily Shaw kennedy new york
"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

07:35 min | 10 months ago

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"Go out and buy win or maxed. I introduced safi. South mccalla is an extraordinary person. I had the great pleasure speaking with his mother earlier this evening if you are the son of a legendary astrophysicists and legendary theoretical physicists. What do you do. it's obvious isn't it. You graduate sumo laude from harvard. Get a phd in physics at stanford and then you say well. Maybe i need to do something different. So you take a job advising companies at mckinsey which of course inspires you to start a company of your own. A revolutionary biotech firm aiming to cure cancer and then to cap it off. You write a book about the intersection of physics history and business. It's called loon shots. How to nurture the crazy ideas that win wars cure diseases and transform industries. One person described it as the davinci code meets freakonomics. It's a brilliant book about how you can use the simple laws of physics to provoke creative breakthroughs and it's a wonderful treat to listen to sock conversation with dan. Maybe even do it. I did close your eyes and pretend that once again you're sitting shoulder to shoulder with a bunch of strangers learning something new all. Enjoy the conversation tonight. So further ado dan. Thank and south. Maybe you've got a car to sell or maybe you're looking to trade in or maybe you're lying about a to a. I'm wondering what your car is worth. Well wonder no more. Just grab your phone and heads a car. Backs dot com. Answer a few simple questions and in two minutes or less. Can you believe that you'll get an offer for your car. That's good for seven days. Now you're the driver's seat with a full week to shop at around and think it over and carmax will buy your car even if you don't buy there's so don't lose another minute of sleep wondering what you can get for your car know where you stand with an instant offer from carmax real offers real fast carmax the way it should be. Did you know that sixty percent of inbound leads don't convert into a meeting. That's why you've got to check out chilly piper the most advanced sprouting scheduling software for revenue. Teams chili pipers concierge tool is a lifesaver because it converts your inbound leads into qualified meetings instantly. Chili peppers products helped demand generation teams convert more leads into attended meetings sales teams book. More demos faster visit chile piper dot com slash. Big idea to learn more. That's chilly piper. Dot com slash. Big idea thank you chilly piper. Did we split. The two for one deal admits warehouse. I lost so it's all hearing back seats so it's great to be here. Thank you for all of you. Support the next big idea club just to echo said we do. Have this world where you feel like. The culture has coarsened where people don't have conversations discriminate where people aren't actually concerned about ideas but their concerns merely about confirming their own existing biases and in some ways in many ways. Next big idea claw is a direct. I think there are potent antidote to that. I think is one reason why it's grown so fast so it's really it's a delight to be part of it. In the reason it's a delight to be part of it is to get an early look at some extraordinary books including the book. We're going to talk about tonight. It is call lou jots by this guy now. I always think it's interesting to start with people's backstory because gave us a hint savvy. But where did you grow up. I grew up in jersey princeton. The mean streets of princeton new jersey. Ask a very rough gang so you so tell us about your mother and your father and and if you can like what's it like growing up with two parents. Who are physicists. Recognize your mother is here so be polite. Act should just stop by saying that. Every now. And then. When i get these kind of glorifying introductions i say gosh. I wish my mother was in the audience. I hope you believe even ten percent of that stuff so far also i should say it may be the first time i've ever been introduced preceded by a story on colonoscopy so thanks visual which will no longer accept to both of us. What was it like growing up. This is serious question because it like you like you like. You came to write this book at home where he wrote this book. Twelve thirty nine late forties. Yeah so you can't say a whole history of your life until you got going to hear a little bit about it. So what were you like his kid. What were you interested in. I think back at sounds dramatic and glorious to astrophysicists parents but a lot of the times like what. What's for dinner. Is hokey havener. Who's gonna open. Who's going to fix the vcr for those people. Remember what that was. But i think what it did. In the benefit of the excitement of that is we had a family of asking questions. So when you're a scientist you really focus on asking interesting questions. And that that stayed with me my whole life and that kind of drove a lot of things in my life and changes that i made in my life and how i think about what i wanna do. Next is curiosity. Do you have to come to the dinner table arm with a question. Mom is that right now. It wasn't like ebay. Just you see that around you. They're always like oh here's something in the world like when you're to turn into therapy sessions. Maybe a little bit. Sanford coming here. Did you have a sense of what your parents did like when you were when you were a kid. Did you like physicists. Did now no clue now. But you know we'd be driving. I'd be driving along with my dad. And i in down the street and you'd see this shimmer and thing that looks like a lake driving asphalt and incentives. Just ignoring. he'd be like well. Why do you think that why does it look like and we talk about refraction that just creates. I'm sure that happened to that's cool. I think that's interesting but you ended up studying physics in college. I did and you know. Part of that. Curiosity thing is that you are just you see stuff in the world. Why is the sky blue. I mean that's sort of classic you start looking around. Why is water wet. He's just start asking why the world is the way that it is and you just keep going and so you went even further and physics to get a. And what was the impetus behind that. Just like more questions. Yeah it's it's just. You're just teasing in undergraduate science. Just learning some of the basics of the basic rules the basic language inserted like writing. You learn some basic techniques of writing but that's very different than producing a book jersey go to graduate school learn. Okay done all the elementary rules. Now how do we figure out something new about the world. Now it just interesting but you chose not to pursue that path.

carmax South mccalla cure cancer safi dan lou jots mckinsey jersey princeton stanford harvard princeton new jersey Sanford ebay
"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

07:18 min | 10 months ago

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"You all for coming out tonight. It's a great pleasure to introduce our extraordinary speakers today. Don't you miss that not be applause that that's nice too. I mean the ambiance live events indoors and in-person silencing your phone squeezing into a folding chair wishing you topped up your plastic cup of wine before they turn down the lights in the before times we held events everyone at the next big idea club headquarters and lately i've been scrolling through the next big idea app and reliving a few of my favorites like this one. A conversation between our curator daniel pink and physicist turned biotech entrepreneur. Safi call in my introduction to the event. I shared with the crowd that very personal effect. Dan's book when the scientific secrets a perfect timing had are my life. It's a book which. Dan devotes many hair-raising pages to the correlation between the afternoon slump and medical malpractice two months ago colonoscopy scheduled. I called up and canceled and it was not going to go into over to say. You should definitely go if you if you plan to ever get surgery in the balance of your lives. Definitely go out and buy win or maxed. I introduced safi. South mccalla is an extraordinary person. I had the great pleasure speaking with his mother earlier this evening if you are the son of a legendary astrophysicists and legendary theoretical physicists. What do you do. it's obvious isn't it. You graduate sumo laude from harvard. Get a phd in physics at stanford and then you say well. Maybe i need to do something different. So you take a job advising companies at mckinsey which of course inspires you to start a company of your own. A revolutionary biotech firm aiming to cure cancer and then to cap it off. You write a book about the intersection of physics history and business. It's called loon shots. How to nurture the crazy ideas that win wars cure diseases and transform industries. One person described it as the davinci code meets freakonomics. It's a brilliant book about how you can use the simple laws of physics to provoke creative breakthroughs and it's a wonderful treat to listen to sock conversation with dan. Maybe even do it. I did close your eyes and pretend that once again you're sitting shoulder to shoulder with a bunch of strangers learning something new all. Enjoy the conversation tonight. So further ado dan. Thank and south. Maybe you've got a car to sell or maybe you're looking to trade in or maybe you're lying about a to a. I'm wondering what your car is worth. Well wonder no more. Just grab your phone and heads a car. Backs dot com. Answer a few simple questions and in two minutes or less. Can you believe that you'll get an offer for your car. That's good for seven days. Now you're the driver's seat with a full week to shop at around and think it over and carmax will buy your car even if you don't buy there's so don't lose another minute of sleep wondering what you can get for your car know where you stand with an instant offer from carmax real offers real fast carmax the way it should be. Did you know that sixty percent of inbound leads don't convert into a meeting. That's why you've got to check out chilly piper the most advanced sprouting scheduling software for revenue. Teams chili pipers concierge tool is a lifesaver because it converts your inbound leads into qualified meetings instantly. Chili peppers products helped demand generation teams convert more leads into attended meetings sales teams book. More demos faster visit chile piper dot com slash. Big idea to learn more. That's chilly piper. Dot com slash. Big idea thank you chilly piper. Did we split. The two for one deal admits warehouse. I lost so it's all hearing back seats so it's great to be here. Thank you for all of you. Support the next big idea club just to echo said we do. Have this world where you feel like. The culture has coarsened where people don't have conversations discriminate where people aren't actually concerned about ideas but their concerns merely about confirming their own existing biases and in some ways in many ways. Next big idea claw is a direct. I think there are potent antidote to that. I think is one reason why it's grown so fast so it's really it's a delight to be part of it. In the reason it's a delight to be part of it is to get an early look at some extraordinary books including the book. We're going to talk about tonight. It is call lou jots by this guy now. I always think it's interesting to start with people's backstory because gave us a hint savvy. But where did you grow up. I grew up in jersey princeton. The mean streets of princeton new jersey. Ask a very rough gang so you so tell us about your mother and your father and and if you can like what's it like growing up with two parents. Who are physicists. Recognize your mother is here so be polite. Act should just stop by saying that. Every now. And then. When i get these kind of glorifying introductions i say gosh. I wish my mother was in the audience. I hope you believe even ten percent of that stuff so far also i should say it may be the first time i've ever been introduced preceded by a story on colonoscopy so thanks visual which will no longer accept to both of us. What was it like growing up. This is serious question because it like you like you like. You came to write this book at home where he wrote this book. Twelve thirty nine late forties. Yeah so you can't say a whole history of your life until you got going to hear a little bit about it. So what were you like his kid. What were you interested in. I think back at sounds dramatic and glorious to astrophysicists parents but a lot of the times like what. What's for dinner. Is hokey havener. Who's gonna open. Who's going to fix the vcr for those people. Remember what that was. But i think what it did. In the benefit of the excitement of that is we had a family of asking questions. So when you're a scientist you really focus on asking interesting questions. And that that stayed with me my whole life and that kind of drove a lot of things in my life and changes that i made in my life and how i think about what i wanna do. Next is curiosity. Do you have to come to the dinner table arm with a question. Mom is that right now. It wasn't like ebay. Just you see that around you. They're always like oh here's something in the world like when you're to turn into therapy sessions. Maybe.

carmax daniel pink South mccalla cure cancer Dan Safi safi dan mckinsey stanford lou jots harvard jersey princeton princeton new jersey ebay
"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

The Next Big Idea

06:47 min | 10 months ago

"bahcall" Discussed on The Next Big Idea

"Curator daniel pink and physicist turned biotech entrepreneur. Safi call in my introduction to the event. I shared with the crowd that very personal effect. Dan's book when the scientific secrets a perfect timing had are my life. It's a book which. Dan devotes many hair-raising pages to the correlation between the afternoon slump and medical malpractice two months ago colonoscopy scheduled. I called up and canceled and it was not going to go into over to say. You should definitely go if you if you plan to ever get surgery in the balance of your lives. Definitely go out and buy win or maxed. I introduced safi. South mccalla is an extraordinary person. I had the great pleasure speaking with his mother earlier this evening if you are the son of a legendary astrophysicists and legendary theoretical physicists. What do you do. it's obvious isn't it. You graduate sumo laude from harvard. Get a phd in physics at stanford and then you say well. Maybe i need to do something different. So you take a job advising companies at mckinsey which of course inspires you to start a company of your own. A revolutionary biotech firm aiming to cure cancer and then to cap it off. You write a book about the intersection of physics history and business. It's called loon shots. How to nurture the crazy ideas that win wars cure diseases and transform industries. One person described it as the davinci code meets freakonomics. It's a brilliant book about how you can use the simple laws of physics to provoke creative breakthroughs and it's a wonderful treat to listen to sock conversation with dan. Maybe even do it. I did close your eyes and pretend that once again you're sitting shoulder to shoulder with a bunch of strangers learning something new all. Enjoy the conversation tonight. So further ado dan. Thank and south. Maybe you've got a car to sell or maybe you're looking to trade in or maybe you're lying about a to a. I'm wondering what your car is worth. Well wonder no more. Just grab your phone and heads a car. Backs dot com. Answer a few simple questions and in two minutes or less. Can you believe that you'll get an offer for your car. That's good for seven days. Now you're the driver's seat with a full week to shop at around and think it over and carmax will buy your car even if you don't buy there's so don't lose another minute of sleep wondering what you can get for your car know where you stand with an instant offer from carmax real offers real fast carmax the way it should be. Did you know that sixty percent of inbound leads don't convert into a meeting. That's why you've got to check out chilly piper the most advanced sprouting scheduling software for revenue. Teams chili pipers concierge tool is a lifesaver because it converts your inbound leads into qualified meetings instantly. Chili peppers products helped demand generation teams convert more leads into attended meetings sales teams book. More demos faster visit chile piper dot com slash. Big idea to learn more. That's chilly piper. Dot com slash. Big idea thank you chilly piper. Did we split. The two for one deal admits warehouse. I lost so it's all hearing back seats so it's great to be here. Thank you for all of you. Support the next big idea club just to echo said we do. Have this world where you feel like. The culture has coarsened where people don't have conversations discriminate where people aren't actually concerned about ideas but their concerns merely about confirming their own existing biases and in some ways in many ways. Next big idea claw is a direct. I think there are potent antidote to that. I think is one reason why it's grown so fast so it's really it's a delight to be part of it. In the reason it's a delight to be part of it is to get an early look at some extraordinary books including the book. We're going to talk about tonight. It is call lou jots by this guy now. I always think it's interesting to start with people's backstory because gave us a hint savvy. But where did you grow up. I grew up in jersey princeton. The mean streets of princeton new jersey. Ask a very rough gang so you so tell us about your mother and your father and and if you can like what's it like growing up with two parents. Who are physicists. Recognize your mother is here so be polite. Act should just stop by saying that. Every now. And then. When i get these kind of glorifying introductions i say gosh. I wish my mother was in the audience. I hope you believe even ten percent of that stuff so far also i should say it may be the first time i've ever been introduced preceded by a story on colonoscopy so thanks visual which will no longer accept to both of us. What was it like growing up. This is serious question because it like you like you like. You came to write this book at home where he wrote this book. Twelve thirty nine late forties. Yeah so you can't say a whole history of your life until you got going to hear a little bit about it. So what were you like his kid. What were you interested in. I think back at sounds dramatic and glorious to astrophysicists parents but a lot of the times like what. What's for dinner. Is hokey havener. Who's gonna open. Who's going to fix the vcr for those people. Remember what that was. But i think what it did. In the benefit of the excitement of that is we had a family of asking questions. So when you're a scientist you really focus on asking interesting questions. And that that stayed with me my whole life and that kind of drove a lot of things in my life and changes that i made in my life and how i think about what i wanna do. Next is curiosity. Do you have to come to the dinner table arm with a question. Mom is that right now. It wasn't like ebay. Just you see that around you. They're always like oh here's something in the world like when you're to turn into therapy sessions. Maybe.

carmax Curator daniel pink South mccalla cure cancer Dan Safi safi dan mckinsey stanford lou jots harvard jersey princeton princeton new jersey ebay
"bahcall" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"bahcall" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"That's a good question While we talked about, Richard Feynman. I actually. If I were to go back in history. I would love to speak with You Highness Kepler. Is. People don't realize. They give so much credit to Isaac Newton for launching modern science really transforming our species from thinking about all the world works based on God's and things inside nature things inside. The heavens are being you know controlling what we see in nature and they give credit to noon for helping. Launch what's probably the most transformative single idea in the history of our species, which is that underlying these things that we see around us Are What we now call laws of nature. And people give credit to Newton. But in fact, if you look back and you'd have to pick one person who really drove that idea, it would be honest Keppler. and. That's because. For Two thousand years people had said, well, the planets and the stars in the sky they all moved away. The gods tell us and they move in these circles and he just looked and he said. It just doesn't work. That's just not but. Even though he was a religious person and of course. Different days everybody was very religious. He said what all these religious leaders and divine rulers have been telling us in the ancient Greeks that we worship have been telling us. It doesn't work. And I think there these laws of nature and they're telling us the plans move in this very different way. And he wrote down those laws I, mean it took many years. But he really broke the bonds of this legacy of two thousand years of thinking, and in fact, it was to explain Kepler's observations that Newton came up with some of the basic principles of gravity with a few other people who helped along ways. So I'd love to talk to Keppler in. Under that, that would be just an incredible. Experience in going back in history because that was a turning point maybe the biggest turning point in the history of our species. You mentioning incredible experiences in I really feel like that. Every time I'm fortunate enough to talk with you and the word that I think is going to sum up this conversation was the word that summed up your previous year and and that's around curiosity. Southie I know I know you've got a lot. You're working on right now that we weren't even able to tap into. So I think we're GONNA have to around three at some point but. Anywhere. Else you went to listeners staying connected with you. Of course, will have the website linked up in a lot of the articles you right in addition to the book. which was one of favorite books I've come across over the last decade. So we'll definitely have that linked up where else he went listener staying connected with you. Now, they can email me directly as I said, first name at last name on my website taking it the first chapter. I think what's been kind of interesting for me as with that a small handful of people, I started to develop close one on one relationships, CEO's and people who are leading..

Isaac Newton Kepler Richard Feynman Keppler CEO
"bahcall" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

05:17 min | 2 years ago

"bahcall" Discussed on What Got You There with Sean DeLaney

"New York to the Hamptons. We keep put one or two people at a time and started carrying people back and forth and grew that into. This Pan Am international airline. Successful. Airline. Ever And Polaroid was something very similar was a guy named Edwin land who is an equivalent unbelievable entrepreneur who just had an idea when he was a young guy of a lily nineteen years old about how to create a filter that would. Separate the two kinds of light. The two kinds of polarization of light, which is a hundred year old problem that no one had saw any self that it's a nineteen year old kid create a cheap inexpensive filter, the polaroid filter, and that launched this whole company that became kind of the apple of its day, and he came up with that as a young kid as well, and then continued to innovate. So these are examples of phenomenally innovative leaders the problem was. Not that they lost their hunger, the problem was not that they they grew fatter or or complacent. The problem wasn't that they said, well, it's enough innovation. They stayed hungry their entire lives they loved innovation. The problem was what I call the Moses Trap. The problem is when you have a very strong leader at top Mrs, exactly what happened to Steve Jobs the first time around and why Steve Jobs coming back to apple the second time around was escaping the Moses trap. Example of how you use the power of being bordered while it to escape the Moses, DRP but the Moses trap is this. You have this incredible and you asked about what will keep happening or companies escape this? I think it will keep happening unless you until you understand this most trap what happened with Juan trip and Pan Am what happened with Edmund Land which keeps happening over and over. So the Moses Strap is when you have. A person on top who is a product person they think about when we think about innovations or new ways of doing something people typically think about products Oh you created the ipod that's a great new product or Oh, you created graphical user interface like a Macintosh two great product or with Edwin Land Oh you created instant film printing. That's a great new product or with one trip..

Moses Trap Edwin land apple Steve Jobs New York Juan
"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"So it feels unique because it's both firm and soft at the same time. The purple mattress keeps everything support while still feeling really comfortable. Plus it's breathable sleeps sleep cool. It's not like the memory foam. You're probably used to when you order. You'll get one hundred nights risk-free trial if you're not fully satisfied. You can return your mattress for a full refund. It's also backed by a ten year warranty with free shipping and returns. You're going to love purple and right now. Curiosity daily listeners will get a free purple pillow with the purchase the mattress. That's on top of all the great free gifts they're offering site-wide just text curious to eighty four eight eight eight. The only way to get this free pillow is to text curious to eighty four eight eight eight that C. U. R. O. U. S. Two eight four eight eight eight message and data rates may apply. Today's guest will help you understand the two major forces at work in almost every team or organization and understanding those forces can help you figure out what's motivating both you and your colleagues and maybe even help you achieve great eight things. Safi Bahcall is a physicist and biotech. CEO who took his company public and he also worked for President Obama's Council of Science advisers among other accomplishments implements. He's also the author of the new book. loon shots how to nurture the crazy idea that win wars cure diseases and transform industries last week. He explained that you have to forces and a glass of water namely entropy and binding energy and the balance of those forces determines whether that water is liquid or solid in the same way there are our forces at work in groups of people that determine what that group can accomplish. Here's a two in one lesson in physics and group behavior. Whenever you organize people into a group you create two competing forces if that group has a mission and her award system tied to that mission which is essentially any team or company or nonprofit organization our military our nation whenever you have a mission and a reward system to that mission you create two competing forces stake in outcome perks of rank stake in outcome perks rank for example when you printing ten people together stake in outcome is huge your tiny biotech company and.

"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Hi you're about to get smarter just a few minutes with curiosity daily from curiosity dot com. I'm cody golf and I'm actually Hamer today. You learn about the taste receptors. That that exists deep within your internal organs. Then you'll learn about the two major forces that determine what a group of people can accomplish with physicist and entrepreneur. Safi bahcall left satisfy awesome curiosity. I love eating when you think about it. It's kind of sad that you can only enjoy the flavor of food while it's in your mouth I mean what's you. Swallow it that's it. It's beyond your taste buds. Or is it done done done. It turns out that you have way more taste cells Dell's in waste ranger places than you ever imagined and these mystery receptors are essential for your digestion and metabolism in the early two thousands researchers at the University of Liverpool unearthed. A surprise when studying how the gut absorbs nutrients they found that the walls of the intestine are wired. With the same glucose sensing cells. Tong uses to detect sweetness in other words. They pretty much found taste buds in the intestines. Once the scientific community caught wind of this the race this was on to find more taste receptors in surprising places. Robert Markowski is the director of the Manila Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia and a key figure in this taste taste receptor research. And according to him scientists have found taste receptors quote in the stomach and the intestines in the pancreas in the lungs in the central nervous system in the testes in the skin. Unquote what used to these organs have for tastebuds. Scientists can't be sure exactly what they do with every receptor but the general idea. India is actually pretty simple. The taste buds in your mouth. Help Guide your decisions about what to eat back before. Most people had easy access to salty sugary and fatty foods. Humans woman's ability to taste help them choose foods with nutrients their bodies needed the taste receptors in your gut. Don't help you consciously make decisions but they give your body important information mation. It needs to digest the food. You've decided to eat from the moment. Food enters your mouth until the second it goes out the other.

"bahcall" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Epic Achiever with host Marcus Aurelius Anderson

Conscious Millionaire Epic Achiever with host Marcus Aurelius Anderson

10:46 min | 2 years ago

"bahcall" Discussed on Conscious Millionaire Epic Achiever with host Marcus Aurelius Anderson

"Loon shots how to nurture the crazy ideas that when wars cure diseases and transform industries senator Bob Kerrey wrote if the Davinci Code and freakonomics had a child together. It would be called Lynch shots. Now I I learned about Safi after hearing his incredible interviews on the Tim Verret show which were very powerful testimony Lou shots but there was something that just happened yesterday that was actually pretty groundbreaking. Well Safi could you tell us a little bit about what is happening It's humid. I woke up and found out that Bill Gates had recommended Lynn Shots in the Wall Street Journal. You asked me before we shy are you. Are you still reeling from. It was like actually. I didn't think it was particularly. You know US another reader like the book that's Great and it didn't occur to me that it was such a big deal but I you know my I publish your. I hadn't heard editor hadn't heard from a couple of months often calls me up. It's like eight o'clock at night. Hey did you see this so then I started to put together that it might actually be kind of a big deal. I got a lot a lot of emails about it. Says that's huge and then you said that. What did they say on Amazon? They had three the effect of. Oh yes they then I then I looked somebody direct like my Amazon page ever online. They have this Little things they say about your book I looked and then they. The publisher had replaced the first line and was recommended by Bill Gates. Daniel Conman the Nobel laureate in comics and Tim Ferriss and so I just started cracking up. I called my wife. I forgot to see this as we were talking about a new team when we're both younger guys just single guys hanging out with before his books and stuff anti wow tim. Tim has really arrived. If they put like the richest guy in the world a Nobel Ardenne canonic and Tim. I'm like man that was south. You Bolt arrived on a salmon. You put in a lot of work. You guys have done a tremendous amount of stuff to to get to the point that you are so congratulations. That is truly epic and did you ever think that when you're in the cave writing this book that you would get the kind of that sort of response because we never know how far reaching something that we create can be for others Now I had no Clo. I wasn't really thinking man. I was Kinda doing stuff. I was just following my curiosity. That's Kinda been in some ways my guiding principle my whole life. What am I curious about? Let's just keep going and I would went into a cave from two years and just finding these things that I thought were true GonNa growing up up as a kid being told were true and then the more I pulled on those threads. It's not really what happens. There's so many things like that. Just got curious in all inspired by kind of one idea and connecting them by one idea and seeing if I could also the challenge of trying to connect these different stories you know from Einstein to the the hunt for u boats in World War Two to the rise followed Penam to the to the to the British Empire and the follow the Ching Dynasty connecting acting. All these things by the same one idea was kind of interesting and fun creative. Challenge now idea if anybody you know if two people would read it you don't want to. which would be my mother and my wife and kids one of them would be my mother? The other would be my mama buy two books. They was like a marriage and more than two people. That was kind of fun. Well I think it's reach more than a couple of people at this this point. Obviously you're making huge impact with that and we talked about the martial arts before. Do you think your early introduction and experience with martial arts may have led to the way you think now where instead of having an arrogance or an ego you more had this curiosity to see what actually works. I never thought about that. I think the one one there a couple of things like I got outta martial arts and I know you use studied even far longer than I did and I study. I started with judo and there aren't too Akito then went into shorter cotton. I'm one thing it teaches you discipline. You just gotTa keep at something. I mean in each of these forms you just common in sometimes times every day and you're repeating the same things over and over until they get better and better and writing and crafters is very much like that you start off really crappy like like you do in any new art form or any new style of martial arts or any kind of physical skilling and it's just very very very slow but gradual so if you've seen yourself go from white belt all the way up a senior Then it gives you maybe a little more confidence Ah which is why. I think it's a great thing to teach kids because they see they can experience themselves getting better not so much they can beat people up later but more is a confidence booster in learning new skills through practice through deliver practice and so you know writing was totally writing creative. Nonfiction era was a totally totally new thing. Very different than you know when you're running a company and writing press releases or you're writing a scientific paper you're you know promoting you're describing Describing run their reading something for general audience where you want people not to be able to put it down to keep turning the pages. That's a totally different skill. Gil So in some ways it was like martial arts. You start off as a white belt. And you're just flailing around and people throw any slamming left right. Feels like wishing boom boom you. Remember Juda Break Your Brain Cells get good people picking you up tossing your way up in the sky in smashing you on the ground. So yeah that's pretty good practice for life like that is a lot like that where people just crapping all over you right in the beginning. So accident excellent yeah. I thought that was so incredible. And that's why eluned shots where you were talking about you talk about the artist and the soldiers and it reminds me very much of a like. If you're a martial arts instructor you had the heart of a teacher if if I'm coming to you to learn and you really want me to be good you're going to give me time you're going to feed me. You're gonNA allow me to cultivate ultimate that meticulously and give me this idea of success but if you're the kind of person who just has the idea of will just warrior or on just trying to fight and if this technique technique doesn't make me more effective right now in this moment that I don't WanNa learn it that very much kinda parallel which you were talking about with that idea and loot shots. Could you tell us more about that when you you were talking about in the book when you were saying how allude shot especially when it's beginning is is very tender and it needs to be nurtured compared to the idea that the soldiers when they look at them yes yeah sure the The one of the things that was so surprising in fun and doing the research for the book and one of the things that sort of got me started is dead. Did so many ideas that we take for granted today have these revisionist histories that whether it's a company with a color brochure Kinda whitewashing. She made history saying Oh. We had this idea Monday. Tuesday we recognized. It was great Wednesday. We launched Friday was approved by the FDA EH When you really look back so many of these things were dismissed? Neglected quashed even inside organizations or companies original inventors. They were just sitting there for ten or twenty years in the company's many times. Let's say it's an I- idea from a accompany many times the company had tried to kill it internally for years before eventually so that was sort of I mean it was interesting and but it's also important because if you make a mistake that breakthroughs will just really important ideas will be obvious obvious to everybody will dazzle people with their billion so break down all barriers. And just. That's a fatal mistake. Because those little breakthroughs will say he's trapped inside the basement give you one example. The statin drugs does the cholesterol lowering drugs. Probably the most important medical breakthroughs of the of of The last twenty or thirty years. They've said probably prevented millions. Tens of millions of heart attacks. Millions of lives and Wenda They I the the guy who kind of came up with the idea for doing the statin drugs history. That's not very well known because there's one pharmaceutical company. Okay based out of New Jersey. That kind of takes the credit for it but that's not what really happens. It was a guy in Japan. Had this really intriguing idea about how to search for mushrooms assumes a church for whether it's a fungus or a mushroom or a mold that releases the substance that might lower he just had this idea yeah of why that might work which was kind of a fascinating idea and absolutely worth the Nobel Prize. Hope gets it soon. He's in his late eighties now and then people started at people like wet lower cholesterol. No way that's like the stupidest idea I've ever heard every cell in your body has cholesterol every we sell wall in your body as cholesterol if you take a drug that lowers cholesterol. You kidding me. It's GONNA hurt every cell in your body at sounds Ridiculous so most people dismiss it. That's an example of being fragile. And it's something I call like the three deaths of the lunar shot and that was based on a scientist of a very well known scientists scientists that used to advise us when I was running the biotech company and he had he had succeeded in two amazing breakthrough actually earned him a Nobel prize and he. He told me one one day when I was feeling kind of down about a project he said Wasn't working out in the lab. He said. Oh it's not a good drug unless it's been killed three times and I've always. I thought about that that it's not a good idea. It's not a good breakthrough. It's not a good drug unless it's been killed three times sexy something to that. Why because if it didn't stumble symbol in a really difficult way? Probably somebody else would have been there already. So this guy who is working on the statin drugs you had all these. This was thirty or so years ago there were all. These e started convinced his bosses in Japan that that is a good idea and then there are all these sort of cholesterol lowering. Dietary Terry Trials. They all failed L.. Failed to show anything. And so everybody's like Seaweed told you it's a dumb idea. Some most companies got out of and then the art of convinced his boss to keep going and he said fine. Fine fine again a little bit of money so he finally found this drug from isolated from a a grain and a rice store. In Tokyo Mold. It was growing there and he found this thing that these molds bacteria used to like defend themselves against bacteria by tacking cholesterol..

Bill Gates Japan Safi Amazon Nobel Prize Lynn Shots Tim Wall Street Journal US Tim Verret Bob Kerrey Tim Ferriss Lynch senator editor New Jersey Daniel Conman Bolt Tokyo
"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"So when you step on your sidewalk in the morning you wet your shoe in a puddle. Instead of slip on a block of ice and end up in the hospital so that once you understand that and work that out because it's more than analogy it's sexiest series of equations. And you can write down those incentives and a group once you understand that and write that down. It gives you a whole new set of insights for the things that are the equivalent of sprinkling a little bit of salt to design teams. That are more likely to embrace new ideas. I relate to this part of our conversation taste of Safi because it's cool to look things. Through the Lens of phase transitions in physics. Scientists have actually applied the transition idea to systems like cars on a highway way and even to humans at rock concerts. And just like how you can use a set of equations to look at a phase transition Safi offers what he calls the innovation equation at the end of his new book. loon shots it's an actual mathematical way to design more innovative companies. Like he told us you just have to understand the forces at work whenever you organize people into a group as for what those forces are and how to deal with them. You'll just have to tune in next Thursday when Safi joins us again for a masterclass in group psychology. So what did we learn today. Well apparently my almond milk. Lots hey isn't is new and original as I thought because it was popular back in the Middle Ages. Yeah well you're just drinking a little bit of history. History just tastes that fourteenth century history or twelfth or seventeenth. Take your pick. Whichever is your favorite and okay so let me get this straight? Water is liquid or solid based on the balanced between two forces entropy binding energy and in the same way their forces does it work in groups of people and understanding. Those forces can help you figure out how to design teams to embrace innovation. Yes you can always have the same group of people but the way. They're organized Organiz the way that they interact. That's what makes the difference between a good team and a bad him. That's super cool. Yeah today's first story was written by Reuben. WESTMIS- and edited by Ashley Hammer. WHO's the managing managing editor for curiosity daily? scriptwriting by Cody Gov and Sonya Hodgin curiosity daily.

Safi managing editor Ashley Hammer Organiz Middle Ages Reuben Cody Gov Sonya Hodgin
"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Let's sing. COON buy and hold hands and watch movies about being innovative. Or whatever is going to make any difference just like no amount of someone yelling at a block of ice. Hey Molecules when you just loosen up a little bit is going to melt that block of ice but a small change change in temperature can get that job done. Small Change in temperature can melt steel. So that's what makes us up. So interesting is once you understand. What are those two forces attention to those two forces just like in a glass of water? You have this tension between two forces when you organize people into a group you create these two forces once you understand those forces and you understand that transition Shen you can begin to manage for example when it snows at night. What do you sprinkle on your sidewalk? Salt Salt. Why do you sprinkle salt on your syrup? Because the salt changes the balance of those two forces to the two forces in a glass of water is entry which is just a fancy word for saying run around and be free and finding energy which is a force at wants to lock. Every molecule two point eight Angstrom not two point seven two point nine and it's the balance of those forces. Sources that determines whether you're liquid or solid at high temperature entropy wins and then as you lower the temperature `boom-boom entropy gets weaker and weaker. We Kern binding energy get stronger stronger for Armstrong and then boom at thirty two they cross the system suddenly snaps that tug of war between these two forces flipside and the water suddenly freezes has nothing to do with culture or yelling at molecules. It's just the temperature and that's the key to understand a totally different way to think about the behavior of groups. Once you understand when those forces and that transition you can begin to manage it so you sprinkle salt. Why well it makes them? Molecules less sticky makes the binding energy weaker weaker so they're less likely to bind less likely to be rigid. So what does that do. It lowers the freezing point. So when you step on your sidewalk in the morning you wet your shoe in a puddle. Instead of slip on a block of ice and end up in the hospital so that once you understand that and work that out because it's more than analogy it's sexiest series of equations. And you can write down those incentives and a group once you understand.

COON Armstrong
"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"bahcall" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Actually Hamer. Today you'll learn about the surprising early early history of almond milk. Then you'll learn about some basic physics principles that can help us understand. Why good teams killed great ideas with physicist and entrepreneur? Safi bahcall call. What satisfy some curiosity when you think of almond milk? You probably envision vegans ordering dairy free Lotto's at starbucks or something the lactose intolerant poor on their cereal. Cereal either way. It's a pretty recent invention right wrong. Almond milk has been around since at least the twelfth century and it was a staple all of the medieval diet when it comes to life in Europe and the Middle Ages you can attribute many facets of life to religious demands and almond. Milk is no different a lot. A lot of the medieval Christian Diet was restricted by the church and importantly that includes fish days when you weren't allowed to consume meat or any product of a warm blooded animal for that matter so it's pretty easy to see how almond milk would fit into that context. It was a substitute for those days. When you weren't allowed to poor cows milk on your medieval fruit loops? Medieval doctors also knew about the medical benefits specifically. They thought the little nuts particularly good for the brains of young scholars. So that explains why cookbooks and medical medical texts going back to the Twelfth Century Prominently Feature Almond Milk Recipes but the more you look at recipes from the period the more you find items like blame. OJ type type of pudding. Made with almond milk stewed chicken and lots of sugar almond milk or no. That's one meal that's not gonNA fly during lent in reality. Almond milk probably became Amo favorite ingredient of the upper classes because it was expensive and exotic plus it takes on coloring really well and Medieval Gordon. Ramsey's loved to liven up their meals by mixing in and coloring agents like violets beats in corn flowers that all adds up to a must have ingredient for any fancy fourteenth century Pantry and then he fancy fourteenth. instintively party Gimme some of that almond milk pumpkin spice.

Medieval Gordon Safi bahcall Ramsey starbucks Hamer physicist Europe