35 Burst results for "Babylonian"

Israel: A Nation With No King

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:02 min | 3 months ago

Israel: A Nation With No King

"I'm talking to our friend Bill Federer. You can find him at American minute dot com and other places. He's written many wonderful books. Bill, you were just sharing something that is really not often enough mentioned. It's almost never mentioned. So take us back before we have king Saul roughly a thousand BC for 400 years after between Moses and Saul. We have millions of people, the nation of Israel, effectively governing themselves. What am I missing? Right, so Yale has on its coat of arms. Hebrew characters. The scholars at this time were called Christian hebraists, John Sadler, whose sister Anne married John Harvard. You had all these different scholars studying this first 400 year period when Israel came out of Egypt before they got king song. Now, one of my books I wrote is called who was the king in America? And I actually spent a few years researching every century of recorded human history from the elamites, which became Persia to the Assyrian to the neo Assyrians, the Babylonians to Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar, 2000 years of Egyptian pharaohs, 5000 years of Chinese emperors, Indian maharajas, the whole world, the most common form of governments, kings. And with military advancements, these kingdoms get bigger to find the king of England had the biggest. But the first instance in recorded human history of a nation with no king is Israel that first 400 years when they came out of Egypt. So 1400 BC, give or take a couple century Israel comes out of Egypt and for 400 years, no can. We don't really appreciate it until you realize when you look at all the other countries. That this is the first instance in all of recorded human history of a nation with millions of people in no

Bill Federer King Saul Christian Hebraists John Sadler Israel John Harvard Egypt Moses Yale Bill Anne Julius Caesar Alexander America England
Eric Recalls His Early Days as an Advertising Copywriter... For Ex-Lax

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:58 min | 6 months ago

Eric Recalls His Early Days as an Advertising Copywriter... For Ex-Lax

"Oh, here we are at the Babylonian interview show and we have a very special guest mister Eric metaxas in person at the Babylon B not literally in person, but yeah. Not little. I think he is literally in person, isn't it? Well, I guess technically, that would be true. Or off to goods. Do you want to be a little about the word literally? Yeah. Have you noticed people English major writer? So when people miss speak and say, literally, it's like, you know, we literally blew up, you know? It's like, no, that's the whole point. You didn't literally blow up. You blew up. The numbers blew up, but that's not literally, but no, I actually, I got to confess, I am literally here. Well, speaking of literally blowing up. Great transition books about smart Luther Dietrich bonhoeffer, William wilberforce, and you also wrote a commercial for X lax. Can you tell us about that commercial? I did write it right here. Actually, this is not insignificant. In a way. It is totally true that during the worst periods of my life had to take a job as a copywriter for gray advertising. So if you think advertising is cool, like anybody in the advertising business who thinks it's kind of cool. They think yes, but if you sell out, you go to gray advertising. Like they do the stuff that no one else will do. Like X lax. And so I was working with an ad director who was so evil seeming to me that I asked if I could be switched and I said, yeah, well, three years to Mark Schwartz, he does, you know, pharmaceutical. He was a really cool guy. And my first assignment was ex lax, and the ex lax thing, it's so weird because some commercials like it's so they kind of write themselves like they tell you what they want and they just need someone physically to be there and to say like, okay, I wrote this. But so they had this whole thing, you know, somebody comes home with a bag of groceries a mom. You see you got your ex lax, you know, blah, blah, blah. So I wrote that. But the point is, I do they ask their parents, say, I see you got your excellent. It was certainly no. When I was 6. I remember. So you got your exact. But here's the key to the whole thing. The key to the whole thing is that at that time, X lax was either being sued or something because it was such a powerful laxative. Let me say that again. It was such a devastatingly powerful laxative that is sometimes gave people unbelievable cramps and this and that. So they were moving over to an herbal formula, which of course couldn't be nearly as effective, right? So the commercial that I did for X lax was the last actual X lax commercial. After that, they switched over and it became X lax and quotes because the brand. So for 90 years they had this formula soil I wrote the last X lax commercial.

Eric Metaxas Luther Dietrich Bonhoeffer Mark Schwartz William Wilberforce
"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

05:23 min | 7 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Fun to think about. Mechanisms of the universe that exist outside of this man made legal system and that that would be derivative of some universal law and some universal process of contracts and accepting or not accepting them. And i guess that's just the way the world works correct in once you see it starts to make sense so what we got here is a version of that they create the illusion that there's contracting. They taken up very solemn sort of idea of contracts and free will universe and they have manipulated soda. Looks like it's contract but it's really just more control and breed and.

"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

05:56 min | 7 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Holiday. Do it is. There's a date you know october first or october twelfth. You need to have you know. Show proof of double vaccination and or blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. The insinuation is. You can't work here anymore or you will be fired but generally the boarding isn't quite that strong. It's more by an insinuation so i'm telling people just keep going to work until somebody actually keeps you from coming in or you get a piece of paper saying you are terminated from your employer and don't go into violence but the door should be kind of tapping you on the bomb as you go out so then you are fired. It's different than quitting. And you're in a different legal standing. So i think you'll find that some employers not all because it's not cut and dry like that. Nothing is cut and dry. So i think some employers will change their mind on trying to enforce something that the government is telling them to enforce depending on how many employees they would be losing over this if they were to fire them because they got gotta look at their bottom line to like. How do i run my business if half my staff is gone. So they're hoping that people will just comply and or quit but moving them towards an actual firing that puts them in a bad position because they're firing over something that could be arguably discrimination going against privacy laws practicing medicine. All kinds of things could come up if they actually had a piece of paper. Saying i terminated that person the whole gang changes because they participated in something which later on could end up being used against them. Well said. I think those are really really important points. I came from the world of retail. And i saw many situations where a company would apply pressure on a person. Make them feel like they're being watched and there's so many regulations and policies within a company that no one's following all of them but we all have leeway until you don't and so they put that pressure on the person and i've seen some people quit due to that pressure but well they got it out for me. I'm just going to quit. And i saw other people wait until they were actually fired and fired for violating company policy and on camera yet they still went to court and they got a unemployment. So it does happen. There is a massive difference between quitting and being fired right now. I'm seeing a lot of people may be internet clout chasing by posting their resignations online. And everybody's like good for you like the comments are full of supportive messages. And i'm sitting here like wait a second. Why did you resign. Nothing has really happened yet. We're still in september. You've got a week before this thing. Even is mandatory. And then you're just giving up. Why don't you stick it out and make them actually accept liability again. It is all about liability the first thing. The vaccine manufacturers did is removed legal liability for any damages and now the government is doing the same thing by mandating the companies to fire the people..

government
"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

03:43 min | 7 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"You're technically correct except the problem is the courts are corrupt. So you can go in there but you're not likely to get any results. So that said in law merchant which is mono mono merchant to merchant. The bills do have value. And i'll just leave it at that. So the in their system any evidence of debt has the value of it on the face of it and then in the market it could be discounted depending on what the true value of that piece of paper is So in your documentation you say. The notice of liability process has nine steps to it. The notice of liability the notice of fault the notice of default three rounds of true bills and then three notices of deader so a lot of these rounds are just follow ups establishing the legal paper trail and then you say that ultimately these things altogether create a valuable security. That's right what is valuable security and when we get to that stage hypothetically like what can we do with that walla lavelli security a mortgage is a valuable security so the bank. Because you went in. And i don't wanna get too far into what happens there but the mortgage itself has a value because there's an expectation that the homeowner is going to pay x. Amount of dollars over a long period of time plus interest so the piece of paper itself has value. You could sell that mortgage And they do. They put them in mutual funds and et so because there's evidence of a debt that's the best way to put it and somebody's evidences of debt are quite wake so there's grades of paper. Abc paper yoga's they put people into mortgages they know are going to fail. So that would be like a degraded valuable security so in in the actual market value of it. It wouldn't have full value because there's a chance of default did the person may not be able to make these payments because they're in over their head and house may not have the set value as well so each piece of paper has market value in and of itself but suffice it to say it's evidences of debt our money. They have value in this upside down. Debt based system Yeah that makes sense. It's evidence of a debt. So you never know if it's going to be paid or not but no one does on a mortgage or anything but this is a legal structure that provides evidence that through this nine step process. No debt has been established. And they're somebody who does and so yeah. I could understand how just that structurally legally does have value and to talk a little bit about these issues themselves. The smart meter being the first one. You really tackled. I mean this is a big one because not only is the ems exposure having negative health effects on people who are sensitive to them. But as you say in your video in two thousand sixteen the government admitted uses them for spine and they've we need smart meters so we can gather the data to adjust our habits meaning. We're going to use climate change legislation to throttle your energy use from the outside. So.

walla lavelli Abc
"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

04:14 min | 7 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Impossible to prove a weapon is safe because it's not designed to be safe. It's designed to destroy something and therefore they can't do it so what ends up happening. Is you go if you still push this product on this weapon on me after you have not proven. It's safe then. I'm going to charge you x. Amount of dollars per day. Do we have a deal. And you can just basically put any amount in that blank space. And i guess legally if they take the action of putting the smart meter on your house. They've kind of agreed to those terms. Is that what's going on a. That's exactly how it works. It's how they're doing it to us. We're just flipping the tables and the whole thing hinges upon them proving that these things are safe. Which can't do therefore they are in the dishonor position and if they move forward than they agreed to the contract which they started. That's another key to this. It's.

"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

03:47 min | 7 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"The law court particularly in england was very slow and you had to prove things and it just took months and depending on what the cargo was the ship that had to go. This was not practical. So a lot of people liked the law merchant better than the common law courts. It was almost like a competition and people liked it much better so they fused it in and then then the judges were told to us. You know still the common law court. If there was a merchant type dispute they were to move as a law merchant court over time because they're both operating out of the same court room and the same judge. You could easily start to move everything towards commerce and then in the in the nineteen hundreds. They really moved everybody into commerce by creating the birth certificate and turning you into a merchant and therefore all the merchant laws apply and some of these laws are or customs are quite strange to non merchants including bills of exchange in the way that they would print money. Nothing so all of that stuff stems from those days. We just don't see it because we're not told and that's the issue. Were treated like merchants. But we don't understand that we are merchants Well said and so. I'm going to skip some of the context to get to the results because we have heard people talk about this stuff before and it's really hard to sort out who's finger is truly on the polls but results speak for themselves and so knowing what the game really is. You've learned to craft a proper notice of liability and put the responsibility back on those with the agendas. Now we're talking about like smart meters five g. backseat nations. These are the big issues of freedom that you're trying to focus on and this is where people should really start paying attention because talked to us about some of the early success. The group has had in say seattle and detroit with the smart meters because this is pretty impressive. Yeah we'll the kept the meters off most of them in detroit and seattle in detroit. We made the mistake of publicly stating that and they went after them. So they're still the odd one at has their original meter but because we were publicly stating that they really went after them aggressively within days. Like it was knee-jerk but around the united states because we're not publicly stating at we have people have kept their meters info saturation and we've got lots of examples of it. Yes in the video. You have four the members you talk about the attorney general of michigan calling for a free opt out three of the six city council members didn't seek reelection in one situation. Maybe this was. The ceo of smart. Smart meter company and utility company resigned. Maybe you can tell us who kevin lynch in. Carol taylor are but by basically coming up with this notice of liability and delivering back to these people you got a lot of powerful influencers running for the hills and it's the resigning of some of these. Ceo's that i think is the most interesting but what happened in some of these situations.

detroit england seattle Carol taylor united states kevin lynch michigan
"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

03:14 min | 7 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"Of here for this one and comeback to the ninety nine out of one hundred. Who don't know how to do that. Is that kind of the gist. That's kinda the gist. So yeah it's just indemnifying yourself now. What happens because of the birth certificate. Everybody is bonded anyway. You just don't know it so it's hard to say how much they are willing to allow as a bond for you bought. When you do it knowingly you can actually put an amount in and if that amount is larger than all of the other bonds in there then there's a chance that once their bond has been exhausted than their personal assets can be collected. So that's the system. Yes i know. Liability is a big aspect to all this and of course that's a kind of financial liability that they don't wanna incur at all and let me ask you more about really merchant law. That's kind of the umbrella term for some of this but you write on the website that in the middle ages. The law merchants court ran separately from the king's court in the later. Half of the seventeen hundreds lord mansfield under the kings instruction it is assumed officially fused the law merchant into the common law. This is a historical fact. The judges were told to take judicial notice of the law merchant over time. Common-law has become more and more merchant law to the point where everyone has been made into a merchant through the birth certificate and the ensuing persons corporations that arise from it thus almost all if not all court cases actually fall under merchant law however the fusion of the two has never been openly discussed and now the courts make what is termed summary. Judgement instead of the proof needed an pure common-law while obviously that's a lot but talked with more about why this was done. This merchant law bayton switch and how it's more beneficial to the system itself. Well merchant law moved very quickly. That was the main one of the main positive aspects of the law merchant. You could get a judgment in ours not months and this was due to the fact that the merchants were very transient so if there was an international affairs the merchants traveled and they could easily disappear. Same thing was ships. Ships tended to move with the tide so if there was a problem with anything on a ship with a cargo on it or the crew or anything any argument about what was on a ship or the ship itself. That ship could disappear at high tide. And you may never see that again in your lifetime. So law merchant move very quickly. It was hours you could get summons three times. You know once an hour to appear this tribunal type thing so that was the beauty of it and the merchants liked it. It was very balanced. And you got to the root of the matter and there was always remedy in. It happened.

law merchants court king's court lord mansfield
"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

The Higherside Chats

05:11 min | 7 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Higherside Chats

"That was really the impetus for finding out. What the truth was. So the bible adage seeking you will find and i just kept seeking and kept trying things until something you know. I got the results that i was looking for. So that's really all it was just trying to figure this out in tried different processes and ideas and arguments and musab judge out of the room than i. I thought i was onto something and it turned out. I was so. That's the short story. Yes let's talk about that the first time. You really saw some results. What happened in that. Specific instance while it was a driving without insurance case. And it probably had a couple appearances on that ident- couple of processes probably had been arrested. You know. I'm going by memory. But i was arrested so many times and probably had signed day promised to appear so they were ignoring most of that all that stuff. The name game all the things that i've tried so i took a course on commerce and the light bulbs were going off over the two or three days that we were there and i saw in context of what i was now learning the mistakes that i made. It all started to make sense why you know. I wasn't winning in court per se. I was making mistakes in commerce and then it just all was like. Aw that's why that's why. Oh so i had a piffle. After fanie came back bonded the case which is part of commerce indemnifying myself then on the next appearance same judge. We're waiting outside the courtroom because we don't like doing the stand up when the judge comes in always do the all rise and the sheriffs. Were getting quite aggressive because warren standing so we would wait until the judge came in the room. If we're going to sit in the room or we just wait in the so. We're waiting in the hallway at this time and they called my case inside the room. I wasn't there so then. They paged outside into the hallway. And so i heard my name and as we walked into the door. The judge was running off the bench. And i mean running. It's not an exaggeration. He was high tailing. It is if i came in with a gun or somebody came in with a gun or somebody shot gun. He was moving that fast. He was like out of there. We were still in the doorway. And everybody's looking at each other like what's happening here. 'cause the judge just left the room and now we're all we're all just kind of staring at each other. What's going on then. The sheriff said all rise. Like a question and i guess we're taking a break so that's how that went in. That was different than how. I had anything that i had seen.

fanie warren
"babylonian" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

The Bible in a Year

01:53 min | 11 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

"No this is <Speech_Male> what's going to happen. There's going to be <Speech_Male> a king king. <Speech_Male> Cyrus who's going to send <Speech_Male> the people <Speech_Male> back to <Speech_Male> jerusalem. He's going to send <Speech_Male> them back to build him <Speech_Male> a temple <Speech_Male> to rebuild that <Speech_Male> city of jerusalem <Speech_Male> and here. It is <Speech_Male> the second book <Speech_Male> of chronicles <Speech_Male> chapter thirty <Speech_Male> six. <Speech_Male> Whoever is among <Speech_Male> you of all people <Speech_Male> may the <Speech_Male> lord has got to be with him <Speech_Male> and let him <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> go up <Speech_Male> tomorrow. we <Speech_Male> begin walking <Silence> with the prophets. <Speech_Male> The prophets <Speech_Male> have so much <Speech_Male> to say to the <Speech_Male> people of israel <Speech_Male> so much to say that the jewish <Speech_Male> people the province also <Speech_Male> have so much to say to <Speech_Male> us today. and so. <Speech_Male> that's where we're going to do for <Speech_Male> the next number <Speech_Male> of days we're going to be journeying <Speech_Male> with the prophets if you want <Speech_Male> to know <Speech_Male> what we're going to be saying <Speech_Male> what we're going to be reading from. <Speech_Male> You can download your <Speech_Male> own bible. The reading <Speech_Male> planet ascension press <Speech_Male> where we're going to do for <Speech_Male> the next number <Speech_Male> of days we're going to be journeying <Speech_Male> with the prophets if you want <Speech_Male> to know <Speech_Male> what we're going to be saying <Speech_Male> what we're going to be reading from. <Speech_Male> You can download your <Speech_Male> own bible. The reading <Speech_Male> planet ascension press <Speech_Male> dot com slash bible <Speech_Male> in ear. That way <Speech_Male> you'll know what's coming <Speech_Male> not only do we have isaiah <Speech_Male> tomorrow. We also have the book <Speech_Male> of toby. Which for <Speech_Male> those. You have never <Speech_Male> read the book of toby. <Speech_Male> It's pretty <Speech_Male> pretty interesting. <Speech_Male> It's a great book. <Speech_Male> We'll probably <Speech_Male> joel. Coming up nee <Speech_Male> whom have a cook <Speech_Male> zephenia rook <Speech_Male> all these prophets. <Speech_Male> And we're gonna get some <Speech_Male> of the major prophets as well. <Speech_Male> He's cheol up over <Speech_Male> starting tomorrow with isaiah <Speech_Male> and towboat <Speech_Male> as well as continuing <Speech_Male> with the proverbs. <Speech_Male> Gosh you <Speech_Male> guys. Let's keep going <Speech_Male> because the story <Speech_Male> is not over <Speech_Male> in fact we're kind <Speech_Male> of doubling back <Speech_Male> to hear what was god's <Speech_Male> saying this whole <Speech_Male> time what was saying <Speech_Male> to get the attention of his <Speech_Male> people to win them back <Speech_Male> to win back their hearts <Speech_Male> this whole time <Speech_Male> that they were taking their <Speech_Male> hearts from him. We're <Speech_Male> going to hear those words of those <Speech_Male> profits starting <Speech_Male> tomorrow so <Speech_Male> i can't <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> wait. We're going to pray. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Pray for me. I'm <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> praying for you. Please <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> pray for each other. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> This is not. you're not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> alone. You're not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> alone when <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> his father. Mike can't <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wait to see you. Tomorrow <SpeakerChange> <Music> god

jerusalem toby israel Mike
"babylonian" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

The Bible in a Year

05:07 min | 11 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

"Our lives restore us restore us to our home restores to your heart. In jesus name we pray amen in the name of the father and of the son and the holy spirit amen. Okay gosh okay so here we have. We have it. We have the last chapters of kings and chronicles second kings twenty-five his second chronicles thirty six. And we hear this is. This is a critical moment right there. There have been so many critical moments that we've we've listened to. We've heard of in this whole bible in the year for the last one hundred ninety one days the critical moments of being sold not sold into slavery in egypt but to find themselves in egypt and then slaves but then also to be delivered by slavery by the hand of the lord. God himself in all these miracles that he had done against the egyptians to set them free from farrow and from slavery how god led them through the wilderness and lead them into the promise land and lead them in by moses by joshua gave even good judges and some bad judges word about how god blessed anointed samuel to be able to anoint the first king saul and then tonight david we saw all of these ways in which god continues to call his people to himself into give them this blessed land and now here with the conclusion of these two books. Second kings second. Chronicles the are leaving their land. And they're being brought to babylon couple things to keep in mind. The kingdoms of the north kingdom of the north of nations of the tribes of the north those ten tribes. They're gone they're gone only to be restored in the age of the church. But these two tribes. In the south judah and benjamin they are misplaced right there in exile couple things to highlight just to kind of point out. We have king's at a kaya kaya. He what happened is here. Is the army of the caldeans. And they captured him and brought him up to king of babylon and they slew the sons of setagaya before his eyes and then put out his eyes..

egypt farrow king saul north kingdom joshua samuel david benjamin army setagaya
"babylonian" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

The Bible in a Year

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

"The second book of chronicles chapter. Thirty six jehovah has his rule over judah. The people of the land took jehovah has the son of joe asya and made him king in his father's stead in jerusalem jehovah has was twenty three years old. When he began to reign and he reigned three months in jerusalem then the king of egypt deposed him in jerusalem and laid upon the land a tribute of one hundred talents of silver and talent of gold and the king of egypt meet alike him his brother king over judah and jerusalem and changed his name to jehovah kim but nico took jehovah's his brother and carried him to egypt. The rain and captivity of joachim. Joachim was twenty five years old when he began to reign and he reigned eleven years in jerusalem. He did what was evil in the sight of the lord. God against him came up nebuchadnezzar king of babylon and bound him in fetters. To take him to. Babylon nebuchadnezzar also carried a part of the vessels of the house of the lord tobacco on and put them in his palace. Babylon now the rest of the acts of jehovah joachim. And the abominations which he did. And what was found against him. Behold the written in the book of the kings of israel and judah and jehovah keen his son reigned in his stead. The rain in captivity. Of roy keane to hoya keane was eight years old when he began to reign and he reigned three months and ten days in jerusalem. He did what was evil. In the sight of the lord. In the spring of the year king nebuchadnezzar sent and brought him to babylon with the precious vessels of the house of the lord and made his brother and zedekiah king over judah and jerusalem said the kyw's reign over judah. The kyle was twenty one years old when he began to reign and he reigned eleven years in jerusalem. He did what was evil in the sight of the lord has god. He did not humble himself before jeremiah. The prophet who spoke from the mouth of the lord. He also rebelled against king nebuchadnezzar. Who had made him swear by god. He stiffened his neck and hardened his heart against turning to the lord. The god of israel all the leading priests and the people likewise were exceedingly unfaithful following all the abominations of the nations. And they polluted the house of the lord which he had hallowed in jerusalem the fall of jerusalem the lord the god of their fathers sent persistently to them by his messengers because he had compassion on his people and on his dwelling place but they kept mocking the messengers of god despising his words and scoffing at his prophets till the wrath of the lord rose against his people till.

jerusalem judah joachim joe asya egypt king nebuchadnezzar nebuchadnezzar king Babylon nebuchadnezzar hoya keane nico zedekiah king kyw roy keane kim israel kyle jeremiah
"babylonian" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

The Bible in a Year

05:02 min | 11 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on The Bible in a Year

"Keep not giving notice this. I have not kept like hammering away. The point about the subscription of these things. that's all just noting that it is one hundred ninety one. We reading second kings twenty-five second chronicles chapter thirty six and proverbs chapter nine versus one through six. The second book of kings chapter twenty five and in the ninth year of his reign in the tenth month on the tenth day of the month nebuchadnezzar king of babylon came with all his army against jerusalem and laid siege to it and they built siege works against it roundabout so the city was besieged till the eleventh year of king. Zedekiah on the ninth day the fourth month the famine was so severe in the city that there was no food for the people of the land then a breach was made in the city. The king with all the men of war fled by night by the way of the gate between the two walls. By the king's garden though the celtics were around the city and they went in the direction of the era but the army of caldeans pursued the king and overtook him in the plains of jericho in all his army was scattered from him. Then the captured the king and brought him up to the king of babylon at re blah. Who passed sentence upon him. They slew the sons of zedekiah before his eyes and put out the eyes of zedekiah inbound him in fetters and took him to babylon the babylonian exile in the fifth month on the seventh day of the month which was the nineteen th year of king nebuchadnezzar king of babylon new era. Dan the captain of the bodyguard. A servant of the king of babylon came to jerusalem and he burned the house of the lord and the kings house and all the houses of jerusalem every great house. He burned down. And all the army of the caldeans who are with the captain of the guard broke down the walls around jerusalem and the rest of the people who were left in the city and the deserters who had deserted to the king of babylon together with the rest of the multitude was aired.

zedekiah caldeans jerusalem king nebuchadnezzar king celtics jericho army kings house babylon Dan
"babylonian" Discussed on Mythology

Mythology

04:44 min | 11 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on Mythology

"Have you ever been stargazing on a cloudless night. Maybe you drove far from the city lights to where the night is. Its truest deepest black. Perhaps as you laid in the grass or on the hood of your car taking in the glittering canvas before you you pondered you ask too big cosmic questions to which there are no easy answers and tried to reconcile your existence an infinite universe and in doing so you took part in the human tradition as old as mankind itself from the ancient maya to the babylonian empire our ancestors look to the stars for answers about fate also used them to learn about ourselves for those who practice astrology. The ever changing alignment of the stars influences every day of our lives but it's the celestial patterns on the day of our birth that shape our very identity of the eighty eight constellations. Their twelve that correspond with the twelve signs of the western zodiac the constellation in which the son was positioned when we were born determines our sign and thus what kind of person we will become but these constellations aren't just clusters of stars. They're also stories myths about gods and men monsters and heroes ancient tales. That reveal more about who we are then. We.

twelve twelve signs eighty eight constellations babylonian
"babylonian" Discussed on Parcast Presents

Parcast Presents

02:56 min | 11 months ago

"babylonian" Discussed on Parcast Presents

"Have you ever been stargazing on a cloudless night. Maybe you drove far from the city lights to where the night is. Its truest deepest black. Perhaps as you laid in the grass or on the hood of your car taking in the glittering canvas before you you pondered you ask too big cosmic questions to which there are no easy answers and tried to reconcile your existence an infinite universe and in doing so you took part in the human tradition as old as mankind itself from the ancient maya to the babylonian empire our ancestors look to the stars for answers about fate also used them to learn about ourselves for those who practice astrology. The ever changing alignment of the stars influences every day of our lives but it's the celestial patterns on the day of our birth that shape our very identity of the eighty eight constellations. Their twelve that correspond with the twelve signs of the western zodiac the constellation in which the son was positioned when we were born determines our sign and thus what kind of person we will become but these constellations aren't just clusters of stars. They're also stories myths about gods and men monsters and heroes ancient tales. That reveal more about who we are then. We.

twelve twelve signs eighty eight constellations babylonian
Creating Your Environment With Aromatherapy

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Creating Your Environment With Aromatherapy

"Today. We're excited to talk to jay baldwin about creating your environment with aromatherapy jade. Thank you so much for being here with us today. Thank you any ongoing very privileged to be here so the first question i want to ask about this topic is i think one that a lot of people have and that is what is aromatherapy. Where does it come from. I still well any Aromatherapy is a modern name for a practice that has been around. For a long time it's basically using aromatic compounds such as essential oils from plants. It's been used by humans. For thousands of years the essential oils are the steeled and cold press aromatic compounds found in the leaves. The flower grind and bach of the plants as different plants produce different types of essential oils. As what's we learn. What each one does we can use it for. Whatever it is that we need. So the ancient civilizations such as greece rome china arabian in-depth of used aromatherapy and religious ceremonies and rituals. We can even find a examples of aromatherapy in the bible. Who's well. I'll give you an example. Actually the babylonians and the assyrians that would then frankencense during their religious ceremonies because the warming aroma of the oils of So that's what they use for me. Any i'm vietnamese of heritage. No when i was growing up. I didn't realize that my family did aromatherapy until thought about forbid. My mom used to boil up gross and eucalyptus leaves in sixers ryan's in a pot and then made me smell the steam and it was for me growing up in australia but it really helped.

Jay Baldwin Greece Rome China Ryan Australia
The History and Development of Oral Torah

The Jewish History Podcast - By Rabbi Yaakov Wolbe

03:13 min | 1 year ago

The History and Development of Oral Torah

"Today i wanna understand the history of the transmission tower and a little bit about the nature of the transmission and the perpetuation of torah. How torah evolve. How tour was innovated. How torah change for moses until today of course that's a big subject and we're gonna only take a small piece out of it because it's very vast but we're going to give the the outline of how torah change and how it developed until today Mental today but give the the the inside the big picture of how these things work now. The first mission on practice of os tells us that the torah was transmitted from osha at sinai motion gets from god and then he passes it off to joshua with this means is that moshe passed the baton of leadership the responsibility of maintaining the accuracy in the perpetuation. The torah he passed onto the next leader of the generation namely to joshua and after tasha chorus he led the people with great skill and he passed onto the elders and the elders to the prophets and the prophets. Pass it onto the men of the great assembly. This mission of the first michigan avas actually covers around the thousand years from the time of moshe until the beginning of the second temple era around three hundred and fifty years before the common era rambam actually enumerates a more comprehensive list. He gives us the forty generations all the way from moses until arrive ashi the compiler of the babylonian talmud now over the course of these centuries and these generations we're gonna have change the torah development innovation of the torah learn about the dynamism of torah. What changed and of course what. Stay the same. And i think this will illuminate are subject in general the divinity of torah and thrilling understand. The relationship with we have today the core of which we got from moses at sinai and all the things that were added and what is the nature of those things that were added. And how does it relate to us today so we spoke about moshe already in the past. He of course received the torah sinai. Anything just get the laws. He got the details the principles the nuances and over the course of the forty years in the wilderness. He conveyed those principles and those details the people but the tells us that there were parts of moshe's transmission that he did not receive from god. The thomas in the of shabas page thirty a moshe rubbing mozart master. Gaza are comedies aeros. He decreed several decrees and he enacted several ordinances and behold they are upstanding there immutable forever. This i think adds another layer to our discussion of torah.

Joshua Moshe Sinai Osha Tasha Michigan Shabas Gaza
Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

Kottke Ride Home

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Is This Ancient Biblical Forgery Actually Real?

"So close to a century and a half ago. A man named moses wilhelm shapira found fifteen manuscript fragments in a cave near the dead sea. They were written in an ancient hebrew script and contained. What shapiro claimed was the original book of deuteronomy blitz despite interest from the british museum to the tune of a million pounds. The manuscripts were found to be forged. Shapiro was disgraced and the documents disappeared but now a scholar named don dershowitz is questioning. If those documents might have been real all along so while the british museum was examining the manuscript fragments for authenticity themselves. Back in the nineteen th century. A few of the fragments were also on display to the public already attracting tons of visitors. The news of the possibly oldest ever discovered biblical manuscript had made headlines around the world. While awaiting the museum's official decree of authenticity. Someone else decided to take matters into their own hands. Charles simone clermont. Is you know who the times describes as a swashbuckling french archaeologist and longtime nemesis of shapiro's end quote examined the fragments for a few minutes and immediately went to the press to say that they were fake. The risk he played on his cursory examination paid off when the british museum experts agreed. Shapiro was humiliated by this and ended up. Tragically dying by suicide a few months later. The documents were sold at auction for a fraction of what they were originally expected to sell for. And most people soon forgot about the whole thing now. Dershowitz from the university of potsdam germany has published a new paper and companion book making the case that the manuscript was real all along quoting the new york times but dershowitz makes an even more dramatic claim the text which he is reconstructed from nineteenth century transcriptions and drawings is not a reworking of deuteronomy. He argues but a precursor to its dating to the period of the first temple before the babylonian exile that would make it the oldest biblical manuscript by far and an unprecedented window into the origins and evolution of the bible and biblical religion dershowitz. His research closely guarded until now has yet to get broad. Scrutiny scholars previewed his findings at a closed-door seminar at harvard in two thousand nineteen are divided. A taste of fierce debates likely to come but of dershowitz is correct. Some experts say it will be the most consequential bible related discovery since the dead sea scrolls in nineteen forty seven and quotes the times. Sagely points out that it's much tougher to prove something authentic than it is to prove. It's fake but there's an additional hurdle to be jumped. In this case the physical fragments themselves may no longer exist so back in eighteen eighty three there was a mad rush at the time to find biblical artifacts that would prove or disprove various points of contention emerging in biblical scholarship moseley around the documentary hypothesis. The idea that the first five books of the bible or the pentateuch were actually written by various authors. Not just one traditionally thought to be moses. It was in this climate of aggressive archaeology that shapiro. I established himself as an antiquities dealer in jerusalem and during which time he and clermont no became enemies. After camacho correctly denounced a collection of pottery. That shapira had sold to the german government. It's also important to note that shapiro was a convert to christianity having been raised jewish in russia so he was viewed with some skepticism from the other biblical scholars and archaeologists and also faced intense antisemitism after the deuteronomy manuscript was denounced. Fast forward to now. Dershowitz says one of the main reasons he thinks the fragments could have been real is because their contents differs quite a bit from the deuteronomy in the bible and many of those differences lineup with discoveries that were only made when the dead sea scrolls were found in nineteen forty seven sixty four years. After chapitoulas discovery of the fragments dershowitz also investigated. Some of shapiro's personal notes archived at the berlin state library and found three. Handwritten pages of shapiro trying to decipher the fragments. Filled with question marks and transcription errors. Dershowitz said quote if he forged them or was part of a conspiracy. It makes no sense that he'd be sitting there trying to guess what the text is and making mistakes while he did it end quote while some scholars of the evolution of biblical text or undershoots side cautiously believing the deuteronomy fragments may be genuine. Most pig refers people who study inscriptions are the ones that usually authenticate documents. Most of them aren't convinced they say the original fragments bear the hallmarks of modern forgery. That they agree with the notes made by the experts who examined them at the time and since no one has the fragments to examine physically now. It's a closed case and as for the content being impressions christopher rolston leading pig refer at george washington university said quote. Forgers are pretty clever with regard to content and they've been very clever for twenty five hundred years and quotes despite dershowitz his published paper and companion book. The jury is still out and who knows if it will ever truly be born ounce. It would have some pretty huge complications. If it does due to some of its key differences for example. It's missing all of the laws of the deuteronomy were familiar with in the bible. Ones upon which traditions and entire libraries have been founded. It would also bolster the theory that are tons more stories and traditions out there than just the ones that have been preserved in the hebrew bible.

Shapiro Dershowitz Moses Wilhelm Shapira Don Dershowitz Charles Simone Clermont University Of Potsdam British Museum German Government Sagely Chapitoulas The New York Times Berlin State Library Moseley Shapira Camacho Germany Harvard Clermont
Purim Torah - Anna Solomon

Judaism Unbound

06:54 min | 1 year ago

Purim Torah - Anna Solomon

"Anna solomon. Welcome to judaism unbounded. It's really great to have you. It's great to be here. So we've been doing this series on the bible and it's really exciting to be able to talk to somebody who's written a what you call exactly a biblical novel. A you know that generates itself from a biblical story. But i love to start by understanding like how you chose to write a novel based on the biblical story. You know you've written other books before wh what was the process that brought you to take this on the initial impulse really came from a children's book that i was given to read to my own kids which was sort of a children's version of the book of esther. I expected it to be simpler somehow or to kind of make the book of esther more straightforward and it turned out didn't it all in it actually raised all of the questions that had always had about the book of esther but it was like wait a second. Why was it that. I was always told that esther was really virtuous and it turns out. She's concubine a harem. And what about this fusty character. Who seems to actually have made what we would consider to be the quote virtuous choice by saying no. I won't parade make it. There were all these questions and then plot holes Hush worse who it seems by the end is sort of shocked by what heyman has been doing. This genocide earlier on is like yeah. Sure whatever you know. There's just so many there's so many sort of plot holes and inconsistencies and and my kids had all sorts of questions and it kind of made me want to go back to the book of esther itself and investigate on which is not something. I really have a lot of experienced with the local tax that that was the initial impulse that drove me back with all of these questions. You know a lot of times on this podcast. We've talked about wanting to have people. Will we call regular jews. You know people that are unauthorized. Feel empowered to take on jewish topics and jewish practices and reimagine. Them and a lot of people are intimidated to do that because they say well. I'm not a rabbi. I didn't study. How do i know how to do you know and so. I really love to talk to somebody who's done that kind of day. She's move of saying well. I'm going to really you know. Come to this. Not as somebody who's had a tremendous amount of expertise before i started and i'm curious both about the process of getting started. And did you feel intimidated in that way. And how did you get over it. And also the process of like. How much research did you do until you felt confident to the point of saying okay. Yeah i actually can write a novel about this or like you say i can contribute mid rushed to this book which you know other people say well i mean who are you after. Two thousand years totally. It's a great question. And i am absolutely a regular jew as you said i love that term and i think actually the what you said so the the research was totally tied into my getting to a point of being able to say i can do this but but not in the way. You'd expect not so much. Because i got to a point and i i felt like i knew enough it was because i got to a point and i realized that no one knows and so it gave me the freedom to go in. You know. I mean. I i began by going to my rabbi. This is in park slope brooklyn congregation. Bethelehem rachel to moaner. She's really wonderful. Insertive saying pronounced guest. Oh yeah She so great. And i said you know where do i even start and i was really open about how little i knew and she really you know is like in her office. So here's where you can even begin to go looking for interpretations translations other stories Mid rush of course. And i think for me one of the things that was very freeing in particular was was reading. The very ancient rabbis takes on The book of esther which were wild like really really wild things. That don't have any seem to have any basis in the book itself like in one hayman's daughter Heenan has a daughter first of all and she mistakes heyman for mortified or the other way round in in prayed and drops feces on his head on her father's head and it's like where does that come from in in many things like this and i think the more i read in the more outrageous at all was thought well if the ancient babylonian rabbis could do this then i guess i can. Do you know. I wanted to talk a little bit. About how your book is structured because on the one hand it's not unique to your book. There are many books that have a structure where you know chapter by chapter sort of different. I guess it's not different narrators in your case but different protagonists. I remember reading As i lay dying in school. Growing up by william faulkner which was like my first time with that and i didn't like that book i found it very disorienting but do i have grown into that style and i bring it up because i actually think you could see it as like. Oh interesting counterintuitive style for a novel or you could say when it comes to biblical text. I'll speak for myself. This is how i read it. Basically like when i'm reading a biblical text my process in my head is like For smidge i am in the text. I am like in the book of esther and then flashing to my life and that. I'm back to the book of esther and then maybe i'm to my parents. Lives are my ancestors recently but what was happening in terms of the structure of the book and in what ways might actually have something to teach us about how to approach whether it's biblical texts or any kinds of ancient texts that we work with. Yeah it's so interesting. What you say when you describe the way that you read the text in that you're going between them to your own life and two other to your ancestors etc because i think that's i think that's sort of how he read any text in a way. I mean we're always projecting ourselves into it in onto it and Whether consciously or or sort of subconsciously. And so i think in a way the weaving as you're talking about that i do in this book between these different narrators and really without between these very different times. 'cause there's the there's contemporary brooklyn there is nineteen seventies washington. Dc in ancient persia is meant to really have the effect that you're talking about that you have read which is which is to bring us closer together and to reckon with not only how much has changed but actually how much continues to be the same. In how how shaped we are by the stories that have come before us in shaped we continue to be and that we become i think then also more aware of the power of the stories. We are telling now you know to ourselves to our children to the people around us and the effect that that will have on their lives and their future. The potential for that kind of writing but also for reading is to make those connections and maybe be a little more conscious of our own powers as we as we tell our stories.

Anna Solomon Heyman Esther Park Slope Brooklyn Congregati Bethelehem Rachel Heenan Hayman William Faulkner Persia Brooklyn Washington
The Code of Hammurabi

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:03 min | 1 year ago

The Code of Hammurabi

"Hemmer robbie was the king of the babylonian empire from approximately seventeen ninety two to seventeen fifty bc. Just to put that into perspective. This was over a thousand years. Before the city of rome was even founded as babylon emperors went hammurabi was pretty successful when he rose to power babylon was still a relatively minor player in the region and when he died he had conquered most of potato along both the tigris and euphrates rivers. The region was almost entirely in. What is today modern iraq. Like any good king win. Hammurabi wasn't conquering nearby kingdoms. He was passing laws and making sure that his kingdom ran smoothly and efficiently. It is believed that hamurabi sent out scholars to the various kingdoms. He conquered to collect the various laws of all realms and then collected them into a uniform code of laws for everyone. The result of this was the code of hammurabi which is believed to be two hundred and eighty two laws regarding any number of different infractions. Crimes and disputes the laws were inscribed on a stone and clay tablets and spread around the kingdom. The stele which was found in one thousand nine hundred one is exceptionally well. Preserved the object itself is a hard blackstone known as diorite. it's shaped like a giant human finger at the top is an image of hammurabi receiving the laws from the babylonian god chumash. There is then a preface which states the following quote and who in bell called me by name hamurabi the exalted prince who feared god to bring about the rule of righteousness in the land to destroy the wicked and evil doers. So that the strong should not harm the week. So that i should rule over the black headed people like chamo- and enlighten the land to further the well being of mankind unquote about six hundred years later. The was taken by the king of elam. Shrek know if you've ever watched the two thousand two movie the emperor's club with kevin kline. You'll remember that should noonday was as the example of someone that no one remembers except that i just mentioned him in podcast and he was in a movie under the reign of Dante was believed that he erased two three dozen of the laws. Originally written by hamurabi researchers have been able to recreate the deleted laws by finding other clay tablets. That had the law's written on them sometime after that it was buried as ancient things tend to do and it was rediscovered in one thousand nine hundred one. So what does the code of hammurabi say. Many of the laws are examples of what is known in latin as lex talionis which is a law where the punishment is similar to the crime. You might know better as an eye for an eye. For example law one hundred ninety six states quote if a man destroy the eye of another man they shall destroy his. I if one break a man's bone they shall break his bone unquote however the rules were different depending on what social class. You're in for example. I didn't read the entirety of law. Ninety six just now the rest of it is as follows quote if one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman. He shall pay won gold meena if one destroy the eye of a man slave or break a bone of a man slave. He shall pay one half his price unquote so the social status of the victim of a crime was a consideration in the law. If some of this sounds familiar. That's because it's very similar to the laws that are in the bible in the book of leviticus the code of hammurabi was written well before the book leviticus so it's quite possible if not probable that some of the laws from leviticus were adopted from babylonian laws the final version of leviticus was written after the jewish babylonian exile. So it's in fact very possible. There are laws in the code deal with commerce divorce rent liability and even medical malpractice there even laws dealing with contracts and the issuing of receipts. It's true that most of the laws are of a rather brutal. If x than wide variety with punishments ranging from drowning burning severing hands gouging out is that cetera. Most of these type of laws are no longer on the books in most countries. Obviously however there are some surprisingly forward thinking laws for something that was written down thirty seven hundred years ago for example law one hundred forty nine states quote. If this woman does not wish to remain in her husband's house then he shall compensate her for the dowry that she brought with her from her father's house and she may go unquote that is basically an ancient version of no fault divorce. However there was one concept that was in the code of hammurabi which was revolutionary and is still with us today. That is the concept of being innocent until proven guilty. In fact these are the very first law's written down in the code. Here are the first three laws in the code of hammurabi quote law one if anyone in snare another putting a ban upon him but he cannot prove it then let he that ensnared him be put to death law to if anyone bringing accusation against a man and the accused goto the river and leap into the river if he sink in the river his accuser shall take possession of his house but if the river prove that the accused is not guilty and he escaped unhurt then he who had brought the accusation shelby put to death while he who leapt into the river shall take possession of the house that had belonged to his accuser law three if anyone bringing accusation of any crime before the elders and does not prove what he has charged you shall if a capital offence charged put to death unquote so basically they had really harsh perjury laws and they made it really hard to pass frivolous lawsuits. So while i don't think anyone would really wanna live under the code of hammurabi today. It's an important part of humanity's legal history old hammer. Arby's two hundred and eighty two law's written in stone with a very first step in creating a system which has led to the one hundred and seventy five thousand two hundred and sixty pages of the united states code of federal regulations today

Hammurabi Hemmer Robbie Hamurabi Lex Talionis Kevin Kline Elam Rome Iraq Dante Bell Goto Shelby Arby United States
"babylonian" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"babylonian" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Interesting. When we look at our history, especially when we look at what we can learn from different civilisations, you know, like the Roman Empire and kind of the times of the Babylonian empire. So you know, my question is from a historical perspective. Um, you know what other times in history, do you Phil are similar to the path America is currently on. And what do you think we can learn from them? Thank you. Well, America is similar to ancient Babylon in certain respects, but Babylon was founded as a country in the time of antiquity. It rose in the time of the book of Genesis. It was actually conquered and dominated by The pharaohs of Egypt and then by the Syrian empire, and it wasn't until the Cal Deion's who were a separate nation to the south of ancient Babylon, The cow beans crept in on ultimately set up their secret societies and through their sorcery took control the throne of Ellen, It wasn't until the Satanic deep state acquired political control. That Satan lifted up ancient Babylon as a world power. The same thing happened in our country. We were an isolationist country, minding our own business for the most part in the 1st 150 years of our history, and it wasn't until the Cal be in deep state, the sorcerers of of the secret societies assumed control of our country. Shortly after the World War two period ended in what became known as the American Century. Once they were in firmly control in firm control of the country. They embarked on a campaign to basically try to lift America as a world empire. And at that point we became the mystery Babylon of the end times..

Babylon America Cal Deion Egypt Phil Ellen
Culture and Faith: Called To Be Set Apart

The Angry Christian Podcast

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Culture and Faith: Called To Be Set Apart

"Today's episode is going to be how we have as a church. Allowed our culture to really come in. Intertwined almost like imagine a bird's nest all together. I think you mentioned that to me. Was like yeah. That's kind of what it'd be like our culture and our gospel in our church light. It's all just kind of intertwined and you can see that in so many little areas and we want to talk about those areas. Yeah you know. The bird's nest thing i think about fishing real like whenever i cast a fishing reel in backlashes on. And if you don't get the fishing reference i'm sorry but like it backlashes so bad that it can no longer be fixed like you can't get the knots out and it's just gotta be like completely cut out in response in. I'm not saying like by any means. I'm not saying that's where our church is. God's just got to destroy it and restart you know. That's not what i'm saying. But that like it's. It's become so hard as a christian to identify where our culture ends in our faith begins. Where's that line. And that's heartbreaking. You know in in in some places. It's like it's easy and we can look at these other places. Yeah i was thinking about this this last week because i was thinking about like church in our church has a lot of missionaries and in we're very mission and so i think about like pastors who were in africa and eastern europe and things like me and these got it made. They've got it made you know because they don't have this prosperity gospel as as as in their faces. We do here. But then i started thinking about something i started thinking about some other friends of ours. That have been to haiti and in haiti. Know i'm sure in many places it's like this where there's some kind of influence from their ancestral or their previous life before christ so hates witchcraft and voodoo initially and it's now become so combined so grade so blurry with christianity that there's an entire religion that is a mixture of christianity and witchcraft. In i think we have the same thing here in america. We've just it's acceptable to us. It's acceptable to us. Because it's the gospel we've heard We haven't heard another docile. The gospel we have heard is enjoyed the enjoy the world. But don't let the world control you in. You know like that's just not that's not gospel. That's not gospel. Listen to this sort of scripture that your you know To we have to be in this world but we're not to be a part of it and that's a scriptural go into his exit james four four. That's good. I'm glad you brought that up. Because james four says that he says you adulterous people. Do you not know that friendship with the world is immunity with god. You wanna be a friend with the world you will be at at odds with god like how can we. How can we be so blind sometimes and again. I'm not saying like oh. We need to walk everywhere because having a car is you know. That's not what i'm saying. What i'm saying is like this heart condition of ours. That i'm going to enjoy the spoils of this of this babylonian agip addiction system the world but at the same time i'm gonna i'm gonna stamp across on myself and say you know what i mean when i think it would look kind of like this. You maybe go to church on sunday and then you go home and church in god or all separate than your life outside of church and the people over here so whenever they're two separate that's whenever you're trying to bring them together you know how to explain that like it's that's when you're living in both worlds basically when we're win when god says for us to to be as you're saying how got said for us to be holy. What what does that mean.

Haiti Africa Europe James America
The Day of the Lord is Near (Obadiah 1:15)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:36 min | 1 year ago

The Day of the Lord is Near (Obadiah 1:15)

"Ovadai chapter one verse. Fifteen for the day of the lord is near upon all the nations. Just gonna stop there. The verse actually goes on. But i just want us to soak in what we just heard and pray. According to it for the day of the lord is near upon all the nations and the context here in ovid. Is this the shortest book. And the old testament just one chapter and it's addressing specifically got speaking through the prophet ovadai About the people of eithm the might who had helped capture fleeing israelites. And turn them over to the babylonians when they were being driven out from jerusalem and god makes clear in this chapter in this short bible. Bug that eat them. The nation the eat mites will be held accountable for what they have done and so we read this verse verse. Fifteen for the day of the lord is near upon all the nations and the verse goes on to say. As you've done it shall be done to you. Your deeds shall return on your own head in other words all people in all nations will one day give an account to god and in his holiness and his justice he will judge all the nations of the earth which means all people in all the nations of the world. Need the mercy of god. All people and all nations are senators. Who have rebelled against god and who deserve his just judgment yet. We know from new testament. God so loved the world all the peoples and all the nations of the world that he gave his one and only son that whoever believes in him will never perish but have everlasting life. The good news of the gospel. The great news of the bible is that salvation is available for all people in all nations that jesus revelation chapter five has died to purchase people for god from every nation tribe tongue language every nation every people group in the world. And that's what we need to think of when we hear nations for the day of the lord is near upon all the nations. Don't just think geopolitical entities countries like we think of two hundred or so united nations today think ethnic groups think people groups this is why we pray continually on this podcast for unreached people groups like today the karakolpak. People of us becca stan. Me tell you a little bit about the car. Call poc people so this people group is almost one hundred percent muslim. And i say almost because i we and our church family have been connected with believers among the karakolpak people who are meeting underground in secret who are gathering at great risk to worship god to study his word and to proclaim the gospel they are working to lead other karakolpak people to faith in jesus and we. We have stories of people being baptized. Among the caracol puck people so the gospel is going forward. The reality is though among the seven hundred and fifty thousand or so karakolpak. People and use becca stan. Most of them still have never even heard the good news. Of god's love in jesus and ovadai one fifteen makes clear that the day of the lord is near upon all the nations all the karakolpak people of us back. Stan will one. Day stand before. God as judge which means we give our lives praying and giving and going as god leads to people groups like the caracol people to make his mercy known among these people who've never even heard of love is not they've heard about jesus and rejected him. They've never even heard of the mercy of jesus. So i want to lead us to pray specifically for what god is doing among the caracol puck people for you and i right now in this podcast in the next two minutes to be involved with what god is doing and use becca stan and at the same time to step back and see the world through this lens when you look at world news among the nations and all kinds of different ways no every nation every tribe every people group in the world will one day stand before god as judged so as you look world news let it drive you to pray for the spread of the gospel and this nation among that people group in this language. Let's be world 'prayers. Let's pray with a world lens for the spread of god's mercy among all the nations knowing the day of the lord is near upon every single one of them so god we pray right now we intercede on behalf of the caracol but people and use becca stan.

Becca Stan Karakolpak Jerusalem Ovadai United Nations Stan
How did we name our days and establish the weekend?

The How in the World Podcast

05:16 min | 1 year ago

How did we name our days and establish the weekend?

"All right. Welcome to the podcast. So this topic stems from a conversation. I had with our thirteen year. Old son pete a couple of weeks ago on monday afternoon as we drove home from basketball practice. Pete was lamenting the fact that the weekend had gone by so quickly and decided that weekend should be four days long and the workweek or in his case. The school week should only be three days. that sounds about right. Yep so this conversation naturally led to the questions who decided how long the weekend should be and how were the days named that. I thought was a perfect topic for this podcast. And that's pretty good. See that's exactly why we came up with this podcast. We wanted to answer these kinds of questions that we know people have every day right. I mean it really is perfect. So let's start with how the days of the week were named. And i know honey. You've been researching this so go ahead and start us off. Okay be glad to so. Let me begin by saying that. Each of the various resources. I found on. This topic had some variations but generally they were all in agreement and really. That's not unusual for our research. So i'm going to present a version that is a sort of a homogenized version of all of these. Okay that makes it okay. So prior to christianity specifically in the days of the babylonians there were several pagan. Gods running around doing things with thunder and lightning and water and stuff like that. That was probably a pretty interesting time. So at the same time the babylonians were also very into studying our planets and the moon and the sun and placed a lot of importance on these heavenly bodies So at some point between around nine thousand nine hundred bc and five forty bc. The babylonians decided that there would be seven days a week and that they'd be named after the five known planets plus the sun and the moon since the sun and the moon were the best known in the most important they would start the week So back then and still today. They started the week with sunday and then monday followed. So the first two are obvious. Sunday in mundi right but then they went in order of the slowest to fastest in the earth's sky. So tuesday was named after mars wednesday after mercury thursday after jupiter and friday after venus. Okay those don't sound anything like our days except in spanish they do well. They don't see on anything like our english days. Yes yes and there is a distinction here. Okay because that has to do with two things one language and the pay to the pagan gods gotta in the language of the day. They were basically saying mars is day right. Mercury's day and so on. But when the anglo saxons invaded great britain which was much more recent on the world or timelines they decided to swap out the planet names for their god's names. Okay so you take over from here alright. So these more. Recent folks left sunday and monday alone but they named tuesday after the norse god of justice to t i w they named wednesday after the most powerful norse god odin or warden and widens day eventually morphed into wednesday. It's a little bit of a stretch right but that also helps explain the weird spelling of wednesday which i've never understood. These are all based on the old english form of the english language. Yes thursday if you think in terms of famous pagan gods you can probably figure out. Third equals thor right so thursday is the perfect day to get out and do some hammering on carpenters. Really love thursdays. They're big right. Finally friday was named after odin 's wife frigg which is a very unfortunate name so frig f. r. i g. g. was said to be nearly as powerful as her husband so she got her own day. Frig day eventually became friday. And for some reason i forgot to mention saturday which is horrible. Because saturday's the best day saturday is named after again. You can figure it out if you go back to the planet's part sadder saturday saturn's day so is named after the planet saturn. We didn't change and we didn't change that to a god right because saturday's the best day we don't wanna change. Don't make it not the best right. So you've got saturday sunday and monday. That remain named after heavenly bodies in the rest or named after norse gods yup and there you go there. There's your week boom

Pete Basketball Britain Odin Frig
"babylonian" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"babylonian" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Never change most people do and with God, all people can. That's part of today's message. By Dr Michaels. Signal way, do not have the power to change in, but we know the one who does. What if you believe that No person is a lost cause. What if you believe that? No one is outside of the sacrificial love of Jesus. What if you believe that No one is beyond the transformative power of God's word. Herself included. What would you lose? If you believe that And later, Dr John Nunes introduces us to a modern day saint. We should remember. That's today on the Luthor an hour. Hello. I'm Mark. I sure Thanks for joining us today. In this hour 90th year your gifts and prayers help the Luthor in our bring Christ to the nations and the nations to the church. Thank you for your faithful support. Now, here's our speaker, Dr Michael Ziegler. You've probably heard this phrase before. I'm almost certain of it. You might have even said it. It's usually said when a person is frustrated or disappointed in someone who's let them down for the umpteenth time, See if you can fill in the blank. Some people never Change, right? Some people never change. What does that mean? I don't think I've ever heard it as a compliment. It's usually said with this kind of tone, son people. Some people never change. You might have seen examples of this. You you knew someone. That guy was as mean as a snake when he was in school and on Lee meaner. Still, now that he's old. Smart people tell us Don't try to change people. Some might even say people never really change. On the other hand. You could cite examples of people who have changed profoundly changed changed for good. Well. There's exceptions to every rule. The question is, what do we make of the exceptions practically what we make of them. When you're dealing with Ah, person who seems to be a lost cause to you. What do you make of that person? How do you know whether or not That one day they might prove to be an exception to this rule that some people never change. The Old Testament Book of Daniel tells of a surprising exception. To this rule. In what is now modern day Iraq. There are many archaeological digs. People have been digging around there for more than 100 years, and in these digs, they find lots and lots of Bricks, bricks that once belonged to beautiful buildings, bricks that bear A name. Hundreds of bricks stubbornly unchangeable e stamped with one very proud name. Nebuchadnezzar. King of Babylon. Daniel, Chapter four speaks of this Nebuchadnezzar. And God's power to make exceptions to our rules. Daniel, Chapter four is unique because it is a first person account from Nebuchadnezzar himself. It's a letter from King Nebuchadnezzar to the nations, in which he tells how he became a changed man. It seems that he has written this letter in the last decade of his life, perhaps when he was in his sixties early seventies. And for the last 30 years, he has been invading and pillaging and conquering, you know, doing what Babylonian King's D'oh He stomped down all those people and stamped all those bricks because he wanted people never to forget his legacy. But now Near the end of his life. He's a changed man. What happened? For the last 30 years or so Nebuchadnezzar has gotten to know a Jewish slave named Daniel. Daniel was captured by the Babylonian tze and taken into forced service. To serve the king Nebuchadnezzar. And over time he became one of Nebuchadnezzar's most trusted advisors. Daniel grew up in Babylon. And when Nebuchadnezzar wrote this letter, Daniel was probably a middle aged man, maybe in his forties. Over the last three decades, Daniel has witnessed How the one true God his God. Has used him and his friends to have a profound influence on this pagan king. And now the king of Babylon is starting to look toward The king of the Jews for hope and inspiration. Nebuchadnezzar is starting to change. Not so fast. We all know that people like Nebuchadnezzar don't really change. He's the king of Babylon for crying out loud people like him. Don't change. Besides this Jewish story about the one creator God, all powerful, good and wise and benevolent, who created everything out of nothing. And then, when his human creatures fouled it all up, he chose of people and promised to send a king who would restore the original goodness of the creation. Change the world and change people. This sounds like a fairy tale. To the Babylonian ear. In the Babylonian story of the world. Things never really change. People never change. For the Babylonian Sze. There is no good Creator God who created everything. In the beginning. In the beginning, it was Survival of the fittest. Chaos and bloodshed. Wars and revolution. In the beginning, there was a war of the gods and these gods hunted and preyed on one another until one group of God's evolved and reach the top. The Babylonian gods, of course, and the Babylonian gods, then from the mangled corpses of their defeated foes created humankind to be their slaves, and the most prominent off humans is The king of Babylon. And the king of Babylon is job. Is to reenact this violent victory off his gods by waging a war against everyone everywhere as long as he sits on the throne. It sounds harsh..

King Nebuchadnezzar Daniel Babylon Babylonian Sze Dr Michaels Luthor Dr John Nunes Dr Michael Ziegler Lee
Jesus - the one who would drink the cup of God’s wrath

The Bible Project

07:02 min | 1 year ago

Jesus - the one who would drink the cup of God’s wrath

"So. All of this has huge implications for how we should talk and think about how Jesus understood his death. What did Jesus think his death meant how did he talk about it and how does it fit into this will conversation. So remember the meaning of the Cup of God's anger in in the prophets there's an important story in Matthew. Chapter. Twenty. Where two of his disciples their mom comes up to him to Jesus and asks if two of her sons can be Jesus as like special special princes when he becomes the King of Israel helicopter parents. Just, be a good mom. So. Wealth is great. So. Will you know command in your kingdom that my Tucson's will sit on your right and left Jesus answers. Sorry you just simply don't know what you're asking for. Are you able to drink the cup that I am about to drink and the two men said to him? Oh yes we're able and he said to them you know you actually will drink my cup but to sit on my right hand or left sorry, that's not my authority give but to be on my right and my left that is for those whom it has been prepared by my father this is a little hint forward to criminals. Jesus. Yes. But to Jesus thrown in other words when comes in his kingdom, he will have one on his right and one on his left and when in the Gospels is that moment happen? Why did it all the Gospel Authors? Tell us that he had one on his right and one on his left when he was Chris when he's crucified yes. That's right which is a type of upside down and thrown. Yeah. That's right. So already here he's hinting that the cup refers to his coming execution. And many of his disciples will actually lay down their lives for their witness to Jesus I. think that's what it means. You will drink my cup, but his point is that the way I'm going to become king over Israel over the nation's is by drinking the cup and there's only one place. Where that Jesus getting that image from. But the the passages we looked at in a previous episode, which is Isaiah Fifty one Jeremiah twenty-five in Psalm seventy five with three main cup of passages of Gaza. If they were familiar with the Hebrew. Bible would they know exactly what he was saying here? Are you able to what they have understood that? Well, yeah. In the moment in the actual moment of the conversation. Yeah. I don't know Jesus was a ridler he spoke in scriptural language and the riddles all the time the Gospel authors want the reader to pick it up because Jesus is going to use the image again in a couple of chapters. So what is he saying what did authors want us to pick up? Are you able to? Remind me again about drinking the Cup yet drinking the cup is what Jeremiah says will happen to Jerusalem when it surrounded by Babylonian armies because they're king broke a treaty with Babylon and they've been unfaithful to God. So drinking the cup, is another way of saying God handing you over to the consequences of your decisions, which ultimately it seems like our death throughout the biblical story line, not not as in the consequences. Of Sin are death in the trite way we think about it. But in the story line being handed over is kind of simultaneous with and specifically being handed over to be conquered by pagan armies. What would it mean then for Jesus to drink the of? That's exactly right. You gotTa keep on Reading You gotTa let the story. Tell you what she's means because he brings it up again in the garden Africa semi. Well, actually skipping his story at Passover. Right at the last supper when he brings out the cup and he says, This Cup is the new covenant in my blood. So he gives them a cup to drink and they're the this cup imagery is really rich. He's borrowing imagery from Covenant Making Ceremonies and the Old Testament likening his blood, the blood of the animals that would be offered up to God in the making. Of Covenant. Then after that, he goes out to the Garden of Disseminating Matthew Twenty six and in the in the garden, what he's praying is this it's in Verse Thirty Nine in Matthew Twenty. Six He says three times Matthew says, Jesus, prayed my father it's possible May. This Cup be taken from me but not my desire, but your desire be done so Jesus keeps talking about. His coming death as drinking the Cup on behalf of his people. That's his conception of death and drinking the cup in say Isaiah fifty one is image of experiencing the consequences of God turning his face Yup and those consequences are God allowing foreign armies to overtake his Covenant People. That's the concrete expression that it takes in history and so Jesus is using this phrase. We know it's intense. We know he's excited about it. Yeah. So Jesus is going to experience. God turning his face away. Jesus knows that if Israel turns away from his message that they're going to be destroyed. He's been making that crystal clear all throughout his warnings of Judgment. He intentionally goes to Jerusalem for Passover during the feast week when they celebrate their liberation from a pagan oppressor Egypt. And he intentionally goes there and he poked the bear, it doesn't just poke the bear. He likes stabs the bear jabs at for a week. You're. Provoking, the temple leaders, the city leaders I you know he's intentionally creating problem and he keeps saying throughout this week, I'm going to drink the cup. I'm coming here to drink the cup. So Jesus is going to put himself in the place of faithless covenant, breaking Israel and experienced defeat at the hands of pegging armies on their behalf. If, you just think through with all these images mean to drink. The Cup means to be conquered by PAGANO, presser job because of covenant violation Israel here specifically Jerusalem the warning is given. That Rome is going to burn it down and takeover death destruction and. What Jesus is predicting that's going to happen is he's going to experience that he's going to experience what it's like to be. destroyed. By the Roman oppressor. That's right. He's GonNa Drink That Cup

CUP Jesus Matthew Twenty Israel Jerusalem Isaiah Fifty Jeremiah Gaza Tucson Chris Bible Rome Babylon Africa Pagano Egypt
Character of God: A Cup of Wrath?

The Bible Project

06:52 min | 1 year ago

Character of God: A Cup of Wrath?

"Okay, here we are we are talking about. Anger. We're talking about God's. and. We're talking about exodus thirty, four versus six and seven were said to be slow to anger, and here in this conversation is like the previous conversations, Tim Tim. Hi And KRISTA accuracy. So Let's jump right in. We've just kind of been taking ground Tim you've been walking us through some of the revelations you've had studying God's anger and God's judgments I don't know if Chris you're Tim WanNa do a bit of a summary Or. If you want me to or do you WanNa just jump right in share I can go for it. Okay. So the first thing we talked about was that this is kind of an uncomfortable topic for a lottery. Reasons that anger is a difficult thing for us to understand in humans and also in God. So we talked about that. We talked about how God's anger God's judgment are not intertwined in the biblical story. So God gets angry without judging. Actually he shows acts of mercy the first time that he gets angry and then he judges often or brings justice without being angry we talked about how bringing judgement or justice is often a handing over to natural consequence or to. Zion that actually I started avoiding the word natural. Because that's just loaded with some modern concepts I actually struggling to find a good replacement word, but it's the logical outcome. Hands people over to the cause effects sequence that they have chosen. Started themselves something like that yes. Oh, we looked at the first occurrence of God's anger with. Moses. After he resists being God's Prophet five times and that's followed by an act of mercy. He just says, okay. Well, I'll send Aaron with you to help you out. We looked at the incident of the golden calf where God gets angry at the people and talked about how his Anger a lot of times is related to to his people not trusting him or or breaking the relationship with him. So a lot of times, his anger or his judgment occur in that context. So that tells us something about divine anchor consum- some red. Okay. Anything else good summary. So I think where we WANNA come from here then is just look at main portraits of God's anger in the Torah in the Prophets of Old Testament and then. After. That in the story of Jesus how Jesus Came as a as a prophet of good news in Israel. But also that comes with a warning of God's judgement, and then after that exploring God's anger in especially in the letters the Apostle Paul he he's got a pretty nuanced way of talking about it. So the Torah, the Prophets Jesus and then Paul that's the roadmap simple. So. Okay. So let's we already talked about the three first occurrences of God's anger. They're all in the book of Exodus when Moses Stubborn and resist. You just Kinda summarize Krista the second one is after Pharaoh and his army perish in the Red Sea. There's a poem that Moses Miriam Sang about it and they talk about how what happened to Pharaoh was instance of God's anger to bring barrels evil back on himself and then the story of the Golden Calf and we talked about that a fair amount in the last conversation I wanted kind of zero in on it as we start actually here and I've been reflecting on that last conversation then I think I have a few. Better ways to to say it what divine an anger means in the story of the Golden Calf. So God gets angry of Moses Beckett Exodus three. But as you said, he doesn't act in any kind of severe way. Does it at the burning Bush inside the burning Bush when you get to the people all of a sudden God is angry and he wants to destroy his people to to bring an end to them is what he says to Moses give me rest I want to bring an end to them and that is severe. John Every time. Read it. It makes you little allergic and uncomfortable. So here's a way to think about it. The whole narrative of the biblical story is got a point humans to be as representatives in the world they rebel they WANNA, get blessing by their own wisdom, and so they you know take from the Tree God, exiles them, and what they do is corrupt and ruin the land through violence and bloodshed flood. God appoints a new humanity noah, his wife and his family, and they go and repeat everything that Adam and eve and their kids did from the chapters genesis. So God tries this new strategy of investing in one particular family out of all the nations that's Abraham and so. Pretty much from Abraham four word God it's as if the more corrupt humans become, the more tightly got binds himself to one particular Human Family through these covenant promises and these Covenant Promises Create More Complexity for God's purpose not less 'cause. Now God's committing himself investing himself allowing certain people to be as representatives, but there are no better in fact, they're often worse than other people. So by the time you get to the Mount Sinai. God has married himself to a whole nation of people and we talked about this principle that I tend to get more emotionally stirred up by people the. More emotionally connected to this kind of a natural thing. So I think that's actually a really important dynamic 'cause the rest of the Old Testament. After Abraham is all about God's relationship to one family, and what you'll see is that God gets most angry in the all estimate at the people who are most close to him and I think that's important because that's actually part of the Messianic trajectory of the Old Testament. Story. Is that these people are selected from among the nations to get God's blessing but that also makes them more liable to God's justice than your average whatever ancient Babylonian something because God didn't rescue the Babylonians out of Egypt. So they're not as obligated to be faithful to him but when the people that he did rescue are not faithful to him it makes him more angry. This helps us at least begin to think about God's intense anger in the Old Testament is mostly directed to the people of Israel and the golden calf story is a good good example of that.

Golden Calf Tim Tim Abraham Israel Moses Stubborn Moses Beckett Moses Miriam Aaron Tim Wan Egypt Bush Mount Sinai Krista Red Sea Adam Chris Paul John
Help Us to Obey (Ezekiel 23:49)

Pray the Word with David Platt

05:52 min | 1 year ago

Help Us to Obey (Ezekiel 23:49)

"Ezekiel Chapter Twenty Three Verse Forty Nine And they shall return your. Lewdness. Upon you. And you shall bear the penalty for your sinful idolatry. And you shall know that I am the Lord God. So, this is the last verse in a long chapter. The depicts God's people as two women. One Who represents Samaria? The capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel among God's people. And the other who represents Jerusalem the capital of the southern Kingdom of Judah. God's people there. And the whole chapter describes how. God showed his judgment how God showed his judgment on the northern Kingdom of Israel Samaria. By delivering them over to the Assyrians. And then how God showed his judgment among the southern kingdom, his people in Judah specifically that capital Jerusalem by delivering them over to the Babylonians. and. Then you get to the very end of the chapter and Gajah says very clearly. Very plainly after forty eight verses of this depiction of women who have committed adultery who have committed idolatry as God's people. At the very end God says, you shall bear the penalty for your central. Trie. A. You shall bear the penalty for your sinful idolatry as you hear that phrase. I just think this is a simple principle. I think about going into details a a discipline conversation that heather and I were having our children recently. And we've had this conversation up million times. It seems like with different children I when you disobey. There will be consequences like it is not good to disobey. Is Good to obey that leads to good things when you disobey that leads to bad things and that's The Clear simple principle that God is saying over and over again in the book of Ezekiel. And he says it right here you shall bear the penalty for your sinful idolatry idolatry. Is, not, good, it does not lead to good. Immorality disobedience is not good at does not lead to good. This seems so basic yet how often? Do. We need to be reminded of this. As we are tempted every day to disobey in different ways. And God says to us in his word by his spirit over and over and over again, it is good to obey it is not good to disobey. So in a fresh way today Oh God, we pray. Help us. To choose that which is good. Today. Or, if we're listen this is we're gonna bed and night stowe wake up in the morning remembering that it's good to obey listening this at the very beginning of our day or somewhere else like as always we have time left in this day God, help us to choose that which is good. Help us to obey you help us to trust you help us to worship you alone. God please keep us from idolatry immorality disobedience and all that flows from it. Today and tomorrow in the next day to choose obedience. In every second in every moment and every decision every word and everything we do by Your Grace Oh God help us to choose obedience and to experience your goodness. And God, even as we pray this. We we. Know Our tendency to disobey. And we are so thankful. Jesus. We praise you. All timidly for bearing the penalty do our sinful idolatry. help us never to get over this. That you Jesus have paid. The price endured the penalty the judgment that we deserve four, our sin on the cross. All Glory be to your name that we don't have to be afraid. Of the judgment, we will experience all ultimately in eternity because you have paid that price for us. All Glory to your name. So all the more help us to live in obedience today. Elvis to experience your goodness today as those who've been forgiven of sin free from sins power help us to walk in Worship Review in obedience to you in love for you in all that we do help us to choose obedience life love for you and everything we do today and tomorrow and the next the next day please in every moment we pray in Jesus name in the name of the one who is paid the penalty of sin for us in his name we pray.

Ezekiel Judah Kingdom Of Israel Samaria Jerusalem Samaria Gajah Israel Heather Elvis Worship Review
Bible Study: Lamentations 1-2

The Bible Recap

05:22 min | 1 year ago

Bible Study: Lamentations 1-2

"Today. We dropped in on the book of Lamentations. No one knows who wrote this book but most people throughout history have connected it to the major, Prophet Jeremiah it's a book of poetry written as a lament over the destruction of Jerusalem and the Babylonian. So who better to offer up that kind of book than someone known as the weeping prophet not only is Jerusalem's destruction the worst thing that has ever happened to the people of Israel by far. But Jeremiah himself had spent years warning them about it while suffering the consequences of their unwillingness to listen. Chapter. One focuses on the destruction of the City of Jerusalem Aka Zion the once thriving capital of Judah has been emptied out her enemies rule over her former inhabitants they've lost everything. All along God has been asking them to remember and now they finally do but they don't remember him. They remember the things they used to have in the peace they used to experience I. Seven says Jerusalem remembers in the days of her affliction and wandering all the precious things that were hers from days of old not only did Jerusalem forget what God had done in their past, but they also forget what God has promised for their future. Anytime. We choose sin. We fail to consider the future sin occurs when we live so much in the present that we forget about the eternal kingdom sin is short-sighted. The Israelites are living in nostalgia for a time when they'd been disobedient to God. They longed for the days when things were easier for them. But if you recall those were days when they were. Their children and worshipping idols at the high places? This is not exactly righteous morning. There is a way to grieve and mourn to the glory of God but so far in lamentations this isn't it? The author goes on to express all the ways God has directed this destruction chapter. One tells us that God afflicted them. He inflicted sorrow he sent fire authority their efforts he weakens them and handed them over to their enemies and it's true. They're not wrongly blaming God God has been telling them all along. He would do these things that they didn't repent. And the author shows us that Judah finally owns their role in this. It says, the Lord is in the right for I have rebelled against his word. Not only does this verse reminder that God is just, but it also makes the truths versus twelve through sixteen. Bearable. An inverse twenty, it sounds like Jerusalem truly repents. It says, my heart is wrong within me because I have been very rebellious. They mourn grieve their actions not just the consequences. Meanwhile, they're enemies gloat over what's happening to them in chapter two, we get a second poem about the fall and destruction of Jerusalem. It points outweighs that their relationship with God has been affected by this disaster verse five says the Lord has become. Like an enemy like an enemy is not an enemy, but it certainly feels like it to them but they know that his actions were justified. He was enacting a necessary discipline for their sins the consequences of this disciplined reach further than just the destruction of their home. In addition to that God, himself seems to go radio silent prophets have no visions or words from the Lord the elder sit on the ground in silence. When I've been through emotionally challenging situations sometimes, the only piece I can access is the nearness of God and the comfort of his word if I didn't have that, I would absolutely despair. Actually, experienced that once wrecked me the silence of God is devastating and it exacerbates the pain of the trials. If you're in that space right now and you feel alone, you're not alone God is drawing near to you. Even you fix your eyes on these pages. The time of your trial does have an end. Okay. Back to, Judah they know this is all part of God's plan I seventeen says the Lord has done what he purposed. He has carried out his word which he commanded long ago. Maybe they're finally remembering that this is what he's been warning them about this is not some knee jerk reaction to their sin God hasn't lost his temper. In the midst of Judas worst tragedy I love that we're reminded that God is patient and methodical. We aren't walking on eggshells around him. He hasn't volatile unpredictable in that way. My God shot was the very existence of this book in scripture. What does it reveal to us about God that he included this book for us? I believe it shows us that he is eight God who can not only handle our feelings and emotions, but also values them and wants to engage with us on that level. Chapter. Two Verse Nineteen says it like this. Pour out your heart like water before the presence of the Lord. These poems contain a lot of feelings and frustrations and the author pours it out unguarded before the Lord. God receives values our emotions even when they're the result of our sins, you want us to talk with him about what we're feeling. We've seen all along how he's after our hearts. It doesn't just want a one dimensional glossy love. He engages with the good the bad and the ugly in our hearts. How else can he work with us on those levels if we keep the ugly emotions back from him?

Jerusalem Judah City Of Jerusalem Aka Zion Jeremiah Israel
Which is cooler, zero or infinity?

Tai Asks Why

09:22 min | 1 year ago

Which is cooler, zero or infinity?

"Zero and infinity. They're both kind of just like the. Ultimate mind boggling what happens if I pit their cruel nece against each other, which was more important more expensive. The mind blow up factor best and kind of only people that I would really talk about it would be none other than mathematician. Hi Do I have both of you you have me. Hi. Okay so on the phone right now, I was able to call up James Grind and Eugenie Chin. There are both super awesome math people who do a lot of thinking about the importance of these numbers I give lots of talks around the world and people might see me on Youtube Channel could number file. Now Eugenia is the scientist in residence. At the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, which is pretty cool and I've written several books and the second one was cooled beyond infinity. I have that book actually. Oh, I'm so glad to hear this is the crazy super debate about coolness of zero versus infinity. James. Can explain to me what zero even is as a mathematical concept. Okay so on one hand zero is a number. As, like the other numbers one, two, three, four, five, two, nine. Zero Times one is zero. Zero. Times two is zero but also that means that it just come. You come sit out Zeros. I'm have one goes to well no, we can't. So we do have to treat zero slightly differently from the other numbers. It's a number that represents nothing. Both of them of an abstract ideas in ways, but that's what matters about. Mathis about going to the abstract to solve problems. Because like even if we just have the drawing of the number one that doesn't mean, it's one that's our interpretation are symbol to represent the concept you could point out one sheep, one, cow, one coin but one of those things have in common is this idea of oneness that they have in common, which is not something you can point at, but is something they all share? When you try and teach small child how to count You keep showing them objects in going one, two, three, one, two three but they have to make a leap inside their head from the objects in front of them to this concept of as James says one nurse. And you can't do it for them. You can't point that's it. You can't see you can't touch it. You can't feel it. You can't eat it and so you just have to do it in your head. It's weird because it's it's there. But at the same time, it's not there. That's how I think of maths. It's kind of it's definitely there in my head, but it's also not fair because it's just in my head the shame applies to zero you can't really point at. Zero is the harder idea. It's harder than one, two, three, one sheep and one cow have something in common but zero sheep zero cows almost have more in common somehow at least to me, it's much easier to get zero sheep and zero cows. I've got them right in front of me. Now what about infinity? You can't go up to your kid like look this is one cow this is no cows. This is everything. Infinite. Yeah. Unfortunately, we don't even have infinite cows on the entire planet so we couldn't even try to assemble infinite cows and it's so it's really something that happens inside your brain but something that you can show to any child and they've probably understood it themselves is that if you eat half of your chocolate cake, then you have Hof left and then if you eat half of what's left, then still some left and if you eat half of what's left there, still some left. If you keep eating Hof of your remaining chocolate cake, you can take an infinite number of bites of chocolate cake and there will still be some left. I have the best producers in the world and they actually brought me a cake God this. Oh, awesome on the traffic cut infinitely and see if it goes to zero. Okay. Here we go. So I'm cutting the cake. Eaten at times? Dom. Yep. We'll just keep eating whenever you. Half again, make the third. Sky The sixteenth. Through I could keep calling it forever and ever and ever ever. Ever ever. Anyway. Back to the question at hand. Is a lot less flashier than infinity is something. That, you would use in everyday life actually came from merchants and traders and accountant rather then they sort of intellectuals studying Matt's but then again, infinity turns out to be practical as well, and it also turns out to be everywhere through the field of calculus, which is a piece of mathematics that really governs everything that changes continuously I'm that means practically. Everything in the modern world including things like well `electricity and that's how infinity can be thought of as very practical as well as having mind-bending and weird properties way you can play around and create strange pistes and strange universes in which peculiar and amazing things happen. Yeah. Infinity is the one that's the strangest I mean strange paradoxes the I can't understand. One. Example of those paradoxes that cake conundrum which explained in the cake break and another one is Hilbert's hotel. That was proposed by the mathematician Hilbert's where he said let's imagine we have a hotel with an infinite number of rooms. Now Hubert's hotels confusing for bear with me. matchy of a really big hotel. Now, this hotel infinite roofs. and. Let's say that one man walks in one night and says, Hey, on the book room, you know you can't send him. To the infant floor that doesn't really seem fair. You know because you still have to walk all that way. So. You sent him to room one and send the person on route one term deal. Then send the person on route to to room three and keep going. So instead of this one guy after travel. So incredibly infinitely far everyone just travels wants. which works out such a small number, but it eventually converges into infinity. And that's quite odd because in a normal finite hotel. If it's full, you can't just fit in other guests dune without asking them to share room which they probably wouldn't want to do. Yes my head hurts. We're all getting clever. Now, James, what do you think of what you genius saying and why do you think Zeros Cooler Think, we're going to find that these two ideas are going to be very connected because they are related ideas. One being nothing won't being everything, but without zero, you wouldn't have any of modern mathematics today the reason zero. So important is because without it you wouldn't have a place value system. So in the old times when you wanted to count thirteen sheep or something like that, you would have to make a mark for each sheep. So you have make thirteen marks you can count them what the Egyptians and the Babylonians did is they started using news to represent lodging numbers. So now if you want to count thirteen, you can just use. A one and a three. So now you need zero in here because what is the difference between thirty two and three hundred to? Well, you need that space in the middle in the old times that would be actually a space. It was any later that zero recognized as a number. But with place value system, you can do the whole of mathematics today. Oh Man. If it wasn't for the concept of the numbers zero, we would still have to use the talents just be no the one where it's like one, two, three, four, and then five is the horizontal line. That won't be pretty bad. It's like that boat will cost thirteen, thousand dollars one, two, three, four, I agree with James Zero is really important and possibly even more important than infinity because more maths depends on zero. Really. But just because something's important I personally don't necessarily think it's cool. There are plenty of things in life that are really important without being cool to me at all like, for example, sleep which I find pretty boring but I recognize that it's very, very important.

James Zero James HOF Youtube Hilbert James Grind School Of The Art Institute Of Eugenia Scientist Eugenie Chin Mathis Hubert Accountant Matt
"babylonian" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"babylonian" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Everything. Humans did five of these four planets as we know them now, and the other two were the sun and the moon, but still seven so the Babylonians they also had a seven day cycle. No, I mean, at least there's no evidence of that. But here's how they came together in the second century BC, the Alexandrians brought together three beliefs that were pretty firm. At that point. The first was you've got the seven planets which came in a particular order. And then you have the 24 hour day and third. There's this idea that the planet that ruled the first hour of each day ruled the entire day. It didn't take too long for the set of beliefs to run smack dab into Judaism and the two sets of believes sank Tup. At the end of the first century C e the Sabbath Again the only day that really mattered to the Jewish cycle and the day of Saturn, just one of the seven planets in Babylonian astrology were one and the same. By the third century. See, the week was pretty widespread. Yet in the seven day cycle stuck and was gradually adopted by pretty much everyone, though this isn't to say that there weren't a couple of pretty big attempts to implement different systems, was actually curious to see who tried to come up with better systems over time and found a couple of good stories that be honest, I had actually forgotten about from history class. Like what? All right, well, let's start. Let's start with the French Republicans after the French revolution during the Revolution, Assembly members decided to come up with a new calendar still with 12 months, but they wanted to make the other time units is close the metric as they could So each month had 3 10 day weeks. Each day would have 10 hours divided into 100 minutes each in each minute would have 100 seconds. I mean, actually so confusing to think about this, then there would be five or six days left at the end of the year that would be reserved for a celebration. It is interesting to note that this system is very similar to what the Egyptians had created when they became the first civilization to create weeks, which is all super interesting, and I so want to get in a time machine and witness the celebrations sounds really fun. But you could see how that structure could make sense if it's what people have been used to, but given that they were used to a seven day calendar with 24 hours per day It's probably pretty confusing why they even attempt this? Well, there were a couple of reasons. I mean, the biggie beyond just being a more rational system as they saw it was that they wanted this very really new beginning kind of. Ah, break from the past. And obviously that didn't last forever. So how long did it last round? I actually find it surprising that it lasted as long as it did. It was around 12 years, and it was just too confusing for everyone, especially because so many refused to stop keeping track of the old calendar. Even find reports that when newspapers were required by law to quit publishing the old date alongside the new one people were still using the old calendar. Keep track of certain important dates.

Alexandrians Tup
Why Are There 60 Minutes In An Hour Instead of 100?

BrainStuff

03:01 min | 2 years ago

Why Are There 60 Minutes In An Hour Instead of 100?

"Today's question is why do we measure time the way we do at the first glance? It seems like it's a sensible thing. Until we start delving into it, so let's start with the day. What is a day? A day is just the amount of time that it takes our globe to make a full rotation on its axis, simple right, but then we divided day into twenty four parts for some reason, and then of those twenty four hours we measured those in sixty minute increments for some reason, and then we get down to A. A minute we measure that in terms of seconds again a collection of sixty for some reason, but when we get two seconds, we measure those in the most popular numerical system today, the decimal system, so we talk in terms of a hundredth of a second, Ori Millionth of a second, but why? How do we even start measuring days in dividing them this way well, the Babylonians were measuring time in what's called a sexist decimal system as opposed to a decimal system. They were based on sixty instead of base ten so earlier, we said the decimal system is the. The most popular and it makes sense right because the vast majority of human beings have ten fingers. It's very easy for the human species to count to ten. So why would you use something that relies on sixty? Or why would you use something that relies on twelve well? When we look at the Babylonian System, it actually makes some sense. There is some method to this ancient madness and here's why if we use the base ten idea ten to one hundred, the notation that we would have to make measure a specific time of day would become ridiculous very quickly. Quickly and complicated as well. The thing is that sixty has some advantages because sixty. If you just break it down is essentially five times twelve, then it has both the advantages of a ten and twelve as a system, so that is why it makes sense for us to use sixty seconds and sixty minutes, but the big explanation that no one's figured out yet is how this spread around the world did it happened because it was an accident of history. Did it happen because it was really the most efficient way that human beings have figured out how to measure? And one last thing we're all familiar with a PM. AM stands for Anti Meridian, and PM stands for Post Meridian. These are terms that came about during the Roman era when they used to divide the entire day into two things just am and PM. This was so important in fact that they used to have these people whose Job was to wait until the sun crossed over, so they could run to the forum and say everybody. Okay, it is noon. It is officially he am and the reason. Why is because lawyers were required to show up by new?

Post Meridian
What Is Pi?

BrainStuff

04:26 min | 2 years ago

What Is Pi?

"Come to brain stuff. A production of iheartradio rain stuff lauren. Bo-bottle here the number referred to as pie has mesmerized mathematicians for four thousand years. It's the rarest of back medical constance and unfailingly accurate ratio. That's also never ending. The digits of Pi have been calculated out more than twenty two trillion decimal places without ever repeating a. That makes it an irrational number. The definition of Pie simple. It's the ratio of a circle circumference. That is the length around the circle divided by its diameter or at the links across the circle. But what's remarkable? Is that no matter. The size of the circle you're measuring that ratio of circumference diameter will always equal three point. One four one five nine two six five three five eight nine seven et cetera usually shortened to three point one four divide the circumference of a tennis ball by its diameter. And you get three point one four divide the circumference of the planet Mars by its diameter. And you get three point one four divide the circumference of the known universe by its diameter. You get the point. Pie is critical to several basic calculations geometry physics and engineering including the area of a circle which is Pie Times Square of the radius and volume of a cylinder which has pyre squared times the height of the cylinder when ancient Babylonian attempted to measure the precise area of circles back in one thousand nine hundred BC. They signed a value to pie. A three point one to five. The ancient Egyptians came up with three point one six zero five the Greek mathmetician archimedes working in the third century BC and the Chinese mathematician. Xue Changsa working in the Fifth Century. Ce ARE CO credited with calculating the most accurate approximations of Pi before Calculus and supercomputers gave us a more definitive answer. Then in seventeen o six. The self taught Welsh mathematician. William Jones assigned the Greek letter P. To this magical number without end possibly because P is the first letter of the Greek words. For periphery and perimeter symbols use was later popularized by Eighteenth Century. Spec petition Leonard Euler but wasn't adopted worldwide until nineteen thirty four. The fact that Pie can be found everywhere not only in circles but an arcs pendulums and interplanetary navigation and intimately long has inspired a cult following that includes plenty of Geeky tattoos and even its own National Holiday National Pie Day was officially recognized by the United States. Congress in two thousand nine but the definitely not square roots of the holiday can be traced back to nineteen eighty-eight and a man named Larry the Prince of Pie. Shaw Shaw was a beloved longtime employee at the exploratorium. A Science Museum in San Francisco California and came up with the idea of Pi Day on one thousand nine hundred eighty eight staff retreat following the death of exploratorium founder. Frank Oppenheimer the date for celebration. Well because the first digits of Pi Three Point one four March fourteenth or three fourteen even better march fourteenth is also Albert Einstein's birthday making Pi Day nerd doubleheader the first Pi Day celebration was nothing more than Shaw and his wife handing out slices of fruit pie and tea at one fifty nine. Pm One five nine being the three digits following three point one four but the holiday quickly gained fame in the bay area. Shaw eventually built be Pi Shrine at the exploratorium a circular classroom with a circular brass plaque at center. Every day celebration at the exploratorium ended with a colorful parade led by Shaw blasting his boombox with a remix of pomp and circumstance set to the digits of Pi and circling. The Pie Shrine. Exactly three point one four times. The parade ended with the singing of happy birthday to Albert Einstein. The prince pipe passed away in two thousand seventeen but the annual exploratorium party continues as do Pi Day celebrations. The world over popular ways to celebrate include. Baking a pie orb some kind of circular treat and holding pie recital contests the current world record for memorizing and reciting the most digits of Pi was set by Sharad Kumar Sharma of India in two thousand fifteen when he recited a staggering. Seventy

PIE Shaw Shaw Pie Times Square Pie Shrine Albert Einstein Pi Shrine Sharad Kumar Sharma Exploratorium Tennis Leonard Euler Frank Oppenheimer Xue Changsa William Jones Congress India San Francisco Science Museum United States California Founder
Security tight, Jews gather at stadium for religious event

AP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Security tight, Jews gather at stadium for religious event

"Security was tight at new Jersey's MetLife stadium as thousands of Jews gather to celebrate a major religious event today the completion of the reading of the Babylonian Talmud officials say more than fifty law enforcement agencies were involved in security for the event that follows a spate of attacks against Jews in New York and New

New Jersey Metlife Stadium New York
"babylonian" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

05:24 min | 2 years ago

"babylonian" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Be dissolved and Babylonian cease this policy of maximum pressure. and pursue a policy of dialogue and logic and reason even if that happened Rouhani asked why should they trust the United States given how the current administration has withdrawn from past agreements it is about. the United States on bad again. on Wednesday the U. S. imposed more sanctions this time targeting Iran's ability to sell its oil by imposing penalties on six Chinese companies and their executives for continuing to transport Ronnie in crude Steve casting down New York let's shift gears at eighteen tell and bring in Jim Bohannon young people are all liberals they don't know anything at all about the way this country is run well that's the conventional wisdom is that entirely true or even partially true let's talk with the young person who is not particularly liberal and who is a quite well informed cheers obriga Taylor decker a pundit founder and president of interesting website I am to Morrow dot com but spelled as you would then text messages shorthand I am the number two M. O. R. O. dot com I religious at group do our group focuses on educating millennial the generation beyond sounding principle but it's been proven to work in America and we are focused on engaging that next generation of the political process. there has been a survey taken of gens the individual's ability ills young people if you will of which indicated a lack of understanding about such concepts as the free enterprise a market economy is and the like socialism but included in that tell us specifically what that poll found yeah you interesting findings of forty percent of college age students had a positive you okay store them but when they were asked to define those all of them only two percent of students answered by simply saying it meant free stuff and so we see this disconnect where overwhelmingly the next generation doesn't understand what the term socialism means that there is another New York times report that found only sixteen percent of colonial could define the term socialism. the thing about the first study is that even though they couldn't define the term social with them eighty percent of generation be had a favor for you a small business seventy three percent unfavorable view of entrepreneurs and so we feel that they are actually supportive of free market of printable than things like entrepreneurship and all that while at the same time biggest lack the understanding of of socialism and so there's this disconnect where the next the next generation does understand her. all right is this the result of them not being taught at all or is it the result of them being taught very specifically by those with an axe to grind with an agenda. a great question I think it's both one they have been taught that socialism and communism is good and capitalism evil eye the same study found that that sixty percent of the next generation did not have a favorable view of capitalism so she used Herman very clearly the follow up to that if they have not been taught what the term actually mean don't know that capitalism is is free markets and support entrepreneurs and small business and they don't understand that socialism is what the government control of the means of production distribution and exchange so we're dealing with those problems. it is nothing for such misinformation or lack of information to be taught in the private schools but in tax supported institutions that takes it to a whole nother level whether it be public K. twelve or state supported the institutions of higher education at some point those are dispersed the money that is to say principally state legislatures should be held accountable here yet exactly right and we say all the time a few things need to happen parents need to be involved in though what is being taught in in the classroom especially in junior high and high school levels and the second thing is taxpayers your point need to know what's being taught in in public universities and every university that take state funding of public funding which is virtually all of them you have a role and responsibility to play in in what is taught there so we need to be involved in the process and make sure that that we know what the next generation of being hot and the church is needed and realize that if you want to preserve things like religious freedom you need to be involved in the conversation as well and our faith have something essential to say you are world problems and so family get away in the church can weigh in and we need to make sure that we don't need it all just a couple people in education a jury that the next generation. Taylor decker and the website I am to Morrow I am too M. O. R. O..

Taylor decker M. O. R. O seventy three percent sixteen percent eighty percent forty percent sixty percent two percent two M