36 Burst results for "Baby Boomers"

World Series favorites

Boomer & Gio

01:28 min | 2 weeks ago

World Series favorites

"So the no the Yankees are favored in the they are ranked Yankees are minus one, twenty, eight, the razor plus one away the as are favored in. That series against the Astros. MINUS ONE, thirty, six for the as plus one sixteen for the Astros. The biggest favorite is the braves. The second-biggest favorite is the dodgers. The third the as and in the Yankees the fourth. So, there you go. That's what you got now as far as the world series goes, it's goes dodgers the favorites go dodgers Yankees raise braves as the top four. I just like that they're all division divisional matchups. That's what I like. Yeah and tonight. It is Garrett cold they they are. They're pretty big favorite tonight minus one fifty, the Yankees on the on the money line. So, it'll be an interesting one and today the as are a big favourite same thing on the money line. So the as and the Yankees are favored the same number. Today and tonight how about? That it's Lance mccullers junior. Yeah mccullers is back. He's back. He's back baby boomer and Geo on the fan CBS sports now again, radio DOT com. It's the morning show with boomer excited and Gregg Giannotti boomer and

Yankees Braves Dodgers Astros Lance Mccullers Gregg Giannotti CBS GEO Garrett
Fresh update on "baby boomers" discussed on KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

00:17 sec | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "baby boomers" discussed on KSFO Morning Show with Brian Sussman with Katie Green

"37% of baby boomers expect Social security to be their main source of income in retirement. It's estimated that retirees need roughly 70% of annual pre retirement income to live normally, as most retirees also claim Social Security benefits before full retirement age. They need even Mohr saved than expected. A boomer, You need a financial planner to keep you financially steady. And that's.

Mohr
QAnon Goes Mainstream

Slate's If Then

07:04 min | Last month

QAnon Goes Mainstream

"I'M GONNA, try to give an explanation of what Cunanan is and then I want you to correct me. Okay. So in on at heart. Even though it seems like if you get to Cunanan supporters in the same room, they're like economists to different descriptions of what the beliefs are. But at heart, this is about a ball, a deep state conspiracy. Of Child Trafficking and pedophilia. Hidden in tunnels. Yeah, yeah for the most part. You said, there's like a bunch of nuance disagreement even within that I've talked to Q. Nonbelievers who don't even believe that which seemingly is a quartet of it but then I've talked to some who that's only the tip of the iceberg and they believe all sorts of bizarre things that go way beyond that. How often do you talk to a Cunanan supporter and find that they? have very different views from say that the Cunanan Forums Online? They're really easy to find it trump rallies, and so I, went to a couple to report out a story that was doing on like what in real life Cunanan, supporters actually believe and yeah, there was there was a contingent of people who believed to a t and they were explaining to me like these extreme theories that like even I who spend a lot of time in these spaces just like I heard before. But then there were other guys who were wearing full Cunanan shirts who had like signs, and then you go up and talk to them and. They would just be like I. Don't I don't know about these pedophile rains underground tunnels, bump I do know that. Trump. Is a good guy and that he's t stopping corruption. So back in March recorded this explainer video. And you ended by saying that q becoming a mainstay and also fading from relevance. Months. Later, do you still see it that way? No no I don't. That was a really interesting period in Q. and I. IT looked like it was in stasis twitter mentions for we're down its main platform eight had been taken down. But I think that pretty much as soon as the coronavirus lockdown started, it came back in full force. If you look at things like Google trends but Kapiti page views mentions of like given unrelated terms on twitter and facebook groups pretty much around March thirteenth to sixteenth when the lockdowns kind of hit the United States There's this massive explosion of interest in Q. Online that really hasn't subsided since the coronavirus started. To what do you attribute the the change in the popularity of Cunanan A lot of people are saying it's because of the pandemic and people are sitting at home and spending too much time on their computers. What do you make of that theory? I think that that does. Explain. Some parts of it pretty well. Internet traffic is way up people were spending a lot of time on platforms where they can be exposed and led down different Hyun on rabbit holes people more atomised, never been because they're stuck in their homes and they feel alienated. But I also think to Cunanan has a bunch of different appealing points to it to different types of people that explain the current political moment for them really well. It also makes q a non a very diverse crowd. I mean, you've got successful people a African American like Isaiah Washington who has his own show on Fox Cunanan supporter correct. Yes, that's that's one of the new scarier developments is that. This was pretty isolated. I started like an extreme online, right. Then it sort of blossomed out through facebook and then youtube to sort of baby boomers sat who are less tack wetter and more prone to these things. But yeah now you have people like Isaiah Washington. Even online. You can see that it's catching steam in all these different areas like wellness ANTIBAC- people are getting really into it hippie new age people are getting are getting really into it. It's bringing in more and more people to the fold every day, and that's really concerning there are a number of not only organizations but experts who study this very thing conspiracy theories and extremism. You refer in your reporting to some of a Mike One researcher at Concordia University. Who says that the membership in Cunanan has gone from two hundred just over two hundred, thousand members in March two. Almost one and a half million as of last month But you also spoke with people who who think this is being overblown and I I wanna read back a quote from your reporting a political science Professor University of Miami who says quote I'm reading headlines from reporters on the tech beat that well are well intentioned aren't tethered to reality. What is your response to this idea that that this is just being? Blown out of proportion. I don't I don't want to like overstayed the sort of anecdotal evidence that we can look to like I don't want to say that that overrides data but like there's just so many things that are showing that. Cunanan, clearly, having uptick in even if that uptick is not that large and it is like pretty close to the polling results, it's still showing more than it has more and more power and more and more impact. They're getting elected to Congress in small numbers. They're going out and committing acts of violence they're influencing political discourse there harassing people like. I talked to a lawmaker California who's trying to introduce a pro lgbtq legislation. He got accused of being a pedophile. He is absolutely harassed like his family members of drug into the mix I, mean, try telling him that it's just a small movement lake it. This guy's life was like Tumblr for days after this, and this is why you've said that we kind of need to separate the size of this group from the damage that it causes. Right? Yeah I I think that both are important but like the real world impact that this happening more and more and more any influence on not explicitly Cunanan non-related spaces the Cunanan followers are having the potential impact on the Republican Party and Conservatives. It's like something that people are going to have to deal with that shouldn't be underestimated at all. Cunanan's jump from Internet conspiracy theory to real world threat happened quickly last year a follower of the conspiracy shot and killed. In New, York mob boss on Staten Island. His Defense Cunanan had led him to believe his victim was part of the deep state. In May the FBI labeled Q. On and conspiracies like it domestic terrorism threats. The fight against Q. might become more complicated as Cunanan supporters win political offices in August a Cunanan fan named Marjorie Taylor Green became the Republican nominee for Georgia's fourteenth congressional district.

Fox Cunanan Cunanan Isaiah Washington Facebook Twitter Donald Trump FBI Google United States Tumblr Marjorie Taylor Green Congress Hyun Republican Party Concordia University Staten Island Professor University Of Miami Researcher York
"baby boomers" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

WSJ Your Money Briefing

03:58 min | Last month

"baby boomers" Discussed on WSJ Your Money Briefing

"Seventy, five, million baby boomers have found themselves living on a shoestring budget they're uphill climb to some sort of economic stability is much steeper than for other age groups a reporter. Claire Ansberry has been talking to boomers about this issue and she joins us to discuss. So first off Clare why is the impact on the baby boomer generation particularly severe that generation you know at their age, it's going to be harder for them to find another job once the economy comes back you know people are fifty, eight, fifty nine and you know they feel like not many people are going to hire them It's also an age group that is more vulnerable to covid. So there's a little more anxiety about going back to work if they could and having higher exposure. And the economy is just not great for anybody in terms of jobs and you know they just don't know if they're going to be called back they don't want to start all over and start something. No, it's a little difficult more than half of the people who are older work at jobs that aren't done remotely but something like fifty, five percent. So it's Not, an automatic for them at all know a lot of baby boomers are on fixed incomes. Where are they finding spending to cut some of these guys are aren't eligible yet for social security or Medicare. So what they're doing is some really basic monthly budgeting taking all their income and expenses charting it assigning dollars for categories like food, transportation utilities, and seeing where. There's some fat in. It's little things it's getting rid of the gym membership. It's you know some of them if they can. They can restructure debt subscriptions are going some people have examined their life insurance policies and thought you know what I have more than I need. So I can cut that coverage and reduce my expenses in the more extreme cases people are moving. To locations, maybe not a new state or new city, but maybe a neighbouring community where property taxes are lower. Now it's been well documented that Americans do not have enough put away in savings, but the pandemic has sort of become. You know an exercise in planning for the future. It has something like less than half of working Americans over the age of sixty. Don't feel that their retirement savings are on track and thirteen percent have no retirement savings at all. Something like the medium savings of.

Claire Ansberry reporter Clare Medicare
talkin' 'bout Our Generation

talkin' 'bout Our Generation

04:48 min | 2 months ago

talkin' 'bout Our Generation

"Those of you who are already part of the talking about our generation family. Welcome back for those of you or a new to our podcast. Welcome. This podcast is all about connections sharing caring communicating aimed at baby boomers me those of us born between nineteen, forty, six and nineteen, sixty four. We're about remembering who we were and what we've accomplished in what all that means. Today right now 'cause that conversation is really important. We launched last year on the fiftieth anniversary of Woodstock because that was an event that had a major influence on our generation. So we started with a series called the woodstock roads which are conversations with people who made woodstock happened, and who created that amazing magical woodstock spirit that still lives on in many of us today. Soon. We'll be airing our fifty first anniversary of Woodstock episode and we have a very special guest in store for you. We'll talk about that later in this episode but right now we invite you to listen in on our conversation with Lisa Law. Lisa has been a photographer since the days of Haight Ashbury probably even before that and she was also part of the hog farm that was responsible for feeding nearly two hundred thousand woodstock attendees. If. There is one word I would use to describe. Lisa, it's driven. If these were the days of the old West and we were heading from east to California. I would want Lisa driving the lead wagon in the wagon train. Join me now in my conversation with Lisa. You started documenting events in movements with your camera way before Woodstock back in the Christie Minstrel days the love ends in San, Francisco and Haight Ashbury. You were the witness. Through your is, we got to see a lot of the life from those times in the sixties and not just the musicians but the culture, the things that you covered were are conic I- I documented. Every part of my life and I was really lucky to be at the right place at the right time. I was there for the commune's for the. Haight Ashbury for Woodstock monory pop I just happened to be at the right place at the right time with her husband and while I was traveling around in my hippy bus. We have this big giant hippy bus fixed up in the second Alec I still drive it today. It's out of my driveway. I was able to have a dark room in the bus so I was always printing developing and. I was able to. Share those with other people and I felt it was important to show her how beautiful the hippies were in what their ideas were back to the land and natural childbirth eating good food and recycling, and all those values that are so important today were started in sixties. So let's talk about the hog was the hog farm commune. Farm is a Commun-. Of like people that chipped in and did. Helped up with a work. Great. The Hog farmers still commune. Have A ranch up in late in Ville. and. They still run campaign rainbow with Wavy gravy and Johanna Raw. Their commune lasted because. They. Really worked at. Her cat show there the they went to woodstock. got. What happened was? Wavy was. Living. Down at the bottom of this tale in Tonga with his wife and the pranksters with can Keesey came. And they stayed overnight with him. They were in the bus in the morning the owner said, get out all these people. And just at that point, there was a Fellow up the hill ahead a hog farm. And he had a heart attack. And he asked them if they would come up and slop hogs. So the whole group of. Wavy in his few people and then the pranksters all went up to the top of the mountain there and slop hogs. Okay. So they had some shacks they build some marsh actually had two buses that we're living in the buses and they all they would go out and get jobs. In comeback bring the money and they all live community

Haight Ashbury Lisa Law Woodstock Commun California Tonga Lisa SAN Johanna Raw Keesey Francisco Ville. Woodstock.
Census Bureau confirms plans to end data collection early

Joel Riley

01:11 min | 2 months ago

Census Bureau confirms plans to end data collection early

"Announcing last night. That it is ending Field Data collection a month earlier than had been plan. They were going to shut it down September or October 31st But now they say households have to complete the census by September 30. The date Census Bureau says that they're knocking on doors of households that haven't done the census that's coming to an end changes likely to raise new concerns about how the Census Bureau possibly undercounts. Population, and when you talk population in this country, babyboomers have kind of been the £800 gorilla generally regarded as the largest part of humanity in this country, But now not the case. New Brookings Institute analysis. They checked the US population with regularity, and they say it's the younger folks that are edging out the baby boomers, baby boomers right now 162 million. And when you look at millennials and points younger, it's 166 million. So the oldest millennials are now 39. Gen Xers be born between 65 80 Gen. Z after 96. So right now, younger populations are the lion's share of US population

Census Bureau United States
Sorry, boomers: millennials and younger are new US majority

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Sorry, boomers: millennials and younger are new US majority

"Move over baby boomers you're not in the majority anymore millennials and their younger siblings and kids now make up a majority of the U. S. population a new analysis by the Brookings Institution shows that fifty point seven percent of US residents were under the age of forty that as of July of last year the analysis of population estimates released this summer by the U. S. census bureau shows that the combined millennial Gen Z. and younger generations numbered one hundred and sixty six million but combine Gen X. baby boomer and older cohorts represented one hundred and sixty two million US residents I Shelley handler

Brookings Institution U. S. Census Bureau United States Shelley
Oliver Stone: Memoir and Movies

The Big Picture

09:51 min | 2 months ago

Oliver Stone: Memoir and Movies

"Stone, Amanda I in my mind have been circling a podcast episode about Oliver Stone probably since about Nineteen ninety-one, which is when I I had some consciousness about the work of one of the most fascinating figures of the last forty years in American cinema. There's a reason we're going to be having an episode conversation about stone today, which is that he has a new memoir that memoir is called chasing the light writing, directing surviving platoon midnight, express scarface Salvador, and the movie game. It's a very interesting book you and I have both read it. We're we're both. In some ways and perhaps frustrated confused devastated in other ways before we get into the book though and before we get into how we're going to talk about the scope, the massive scope, the unbelievable scope of Oliver Stone's career. When I say Oliver, stone, what do you think? Conspiracy Theorist just to be totally honest and filmmaker and. And really and boomer and I think that is going to inflict a lot of the way that I talk about Oliver Stone in his filmography because I am a generation younger I am a child of boomers and I came to Oliver Stone's work and to Oliver Stone's understanding of the world a generation after. He lived at and made it and it was very funny and re watching everything from platoon to to wall. Street to JFK. To realize the way in which those movies shaped, my understanding visual and political about Vietnam, and about JFK and about how we examine America and the government and I am both child of Oliver Stone's world, and maybe because of time in the way, the world has changed a skeptic of Oliver Stone's world at this point, which is just to say on the next generation. I. Think a lot of this will be boomer versus millennial and and that's good. That's how the world should work. Even Oliver Stone would agree with that though maybe not we can talk about it but I don't know what do you think of? Mid already. So many good points I. Think he's an artist to strains credulity while also I think enlivening imaginations he's somebody who is obviously immensely thoughtful and intellectual and spiritual and simultaneously feels like he completely out of control and trying to break the boundaries and stretch the concept of the truth all the time, and so he's just a a generational paradoxical figure. He's a he's a person who I think it makes immensely entertaining movies that. Don't always stand up to deep examination, and so I think he is he is an title baby-boomer figure in that way and that he is there's a certitude about his mission and there's an earnestness in insincerity to the message that he's trying to send. But also underlying that is perhaps a kind of cynicism and a skepticism about what he should be doing with his time versus what he's actually doing with his time, and so I you know I find, I've always found him to be fascinating maybe not as a human being per se but at least the stories that he tries to tell. I was GonNa say I do think he's interesting as a filmmaker and what else was a person and? We're GONNA talk about all the different ways in which Oliver Stone like quote breaks the rules but I have been thinking a lot as I have been reading his book, which is a fantastic read I will just say that the guy can write. and. Have also been revisiting his work that you and I are trained to as much as we can released I wasn't college train a separate the artist in the art the art has to stand on its own can't complete the filmmaker and the and the work, and you also need to understand that the work and the intention are possibly separate as well and Oliver Stone just makes massive all of that, and he makes a mess of that in his actual art and he makes a mess of that in the life that he lives and in the interviews that he gives and the work that he pursues and. To me that's exciting because it opens up conversation to talk about what can you take seriously and what is cynical and what is sincere and what is true and what is not true and how are we like an who is responsible, which is at least a different way to talk about art. So you know I give him that even though I don't agree with where I think Oliver Stone comes down on those the answers to those questions but even there, I'm just guessing. Well I, think if you look at the book, you certainly are looking at the man or at least the the self perception of the man, and so we'll talk a lot about him and his story in his life and and his the way he is capturing his own life on the page which I I agree I mean he's just in case you didn't know this is an Oscar winning screenwriter. This is one of the great writers of the last forty years is also as a person who didn't just write his own films but road scarface and Conan the barbarian and a number of other films over the years. So he knows what he's doing on the page, but he is also somebody who. If you look it the political thought not like a straight line where there is a left and a right. But if you look at it like a wheel like a circle, and if you go too far from one side of the circle to the other you can land. You may think you are liberal person and find yourself with right wing ideology or libertarian ideology and reverse can also be true and I think one of the reasons it's really hard to unpack not just what Oliver Stone says in interviews or what he even. Portrays in his documentaries but even when he puts in his films is it feels like he's constantly running around that track that circle of political thought and so he's actually a perfect figure for this moment where there is this desperation to find art that coincides with our political ideology or our sense of what the world should look like and as you said, Oliver makes a mess of that he really. is trying to he's contradicting himself in real time. He's contradicting the sensibilities of that kind of baby boomer antiwar mentality. But on the other hand, he's like an Avatar spirit animal of truth for certain kind of humanism and that sounds really kind of haughty. But I I think he really wants to representational person who is thinking about putting people before government business political structures, and it's complicated right? Because he's A. Essentially a wealthy well to do white man who was born in the immediate aftermath of World War. Two, and so he had so much opportunity to do the things that he wanted to do in a way that other people don't. So he's not he's just not a tidy figure for that pursuit of humanism. It's interesting that you said he's putting people in front of institutions and ideas and governments because I think that's true. But it's usually one percent, and if you look at his entire his filmography and and really I, think even if you look at how he says. A lot of political issues, but it's it's not. The, greater good. It's usually focused on one character who is often a man and quite often a white man it is and it is understanding history through a single person's experience. So it's like it's almost I. mean he certainly subscribes to a great man theory of history but at the same time as also reversing, which is like the the the one person's experience of history, which can be a really exhilarating in certain films that we'll talk about and really really misguided I find or not even misguided but just doesn't work and isn't illuminating and the way that he thinks it is. IN IN CERTAIN Aspects, and then also in certain cases, it can just be about himself and it is I. The thing that makes his. His memoir. So electric is that it really is self mythology and he is really trying to understand himself and trying to pin down that constantly moving wheel as you said simultaneously and and I really admire having access to that. I obviously read a lot of celebrity junk and and memoirs and. Interested in trying to have access to people's ideas and thoughts and understand their characters and most people won't give it up in that way and won't share and won't be as open and Massey at as as Oliver. Stone is and that's true of the book and that's true of politics for sure and it's it's making. The great man theory is is really relevant to this conversation not just because of the book not because of the film's but because it's a little bit unclear, it's a sort of a chicken and the egg or the proposition with him. Does he subscribe to those theories because we read about in this book, He is interested in the dramatic pursuit. He has a pretty clear understanding literally of how to tell a strong story and that story is usually through a homer like figure or a a habit like figure somebody who is you know on on an indomitable quest to achieve something that seems impossible he's he's really passionate about this and you know again, there is something kind of haughty about this but also he just he seems to come to a very sincerely and so he uses Jim. Garrison in. J. F. K. or he uses Jim Morrison in the doors or he uses Ron. Kovic. In born on the fourth of July as these avatars as these great men who are seeking to achieve something that no one else could even perceive as possible and I think Oliver Stone sees himself in a very similar fashion. He sees himself as this well, to do white guy who volunteer volunteers for the Vietnam War to explode his privilege and to understand the world in a hopefully deeper way,

Oliver Stone Boomer Scarface Salvador JFK Amanda I Vietnam Oscar Jim Morrison Conan America RON J. F. K. Massey
"baby boomers" Discussed on Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

07:08 min | 3 months ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on Bridging Realities: An Accessible Astrology Podcast

"When especially to strategist, because we can't be quite. Look at things Well because we're looking at the big picture of the biggest cycles, look at the astronomy things. And we. For example we saw some incredibly accurate fallout from astrology this year which? Many people have been talking about twenty, two, thousand eight, and then finally things rolled on. To the rest of the year. is a lot more supply album, afraid site, and that's just the bottom line. How it plays out is always unknown. The yet is. Is Lot more yet. It's a common with same. Okay now. How it played out this shades sins. Let's say this era degrees. Aquarius sodden conjunction that happens a lockdown an it was. Freaky for like two or three months, Aquarius Jay was foul. It's ends the astrology. Woman trying to get here as we look at things a bit more non attached or detached, Aquarius. And then we could lose our empathy sometimes. Say all the time sensitivity because. For example, they didn't go down the hood immunity route, which would have meant? The everybody gets it and everybody probably will get it and that's why. is whole vaccines dozens almost. Like well, who's making all this money out the vaccine you know, but at the same time is like no none of that generation are going to go outdoors until the say right because they're in fair. in so that their own. Senator Survival. has huge effects the mess decide to economically instaflex within the day. Most people are gonNA think I don't want parents together quite rightly, so you right and I am just think it's Hilarious, though that the World War Two generation or the consciousness of World War Two which was Cluedo Leo, this self-serving energy I mean when we think about Hitler's when we think about Japan in the kamikazes in how sucking and saying that was and why that happened, because someone was fighted at the treaty of Versailles right, someone got their feelings hurt. We'll let you start killing ourselves because of this this this chip on our. Our shoulder this this remarkable focus on the south, and now we've got an entire the whole world. Eighty five million people died in World War Two was massive disaster affected everyone on the planet. Similarly now we've got that same generation as we're moving into this Aquarius Energy Re sparked off like they're getting sparked again. Especially, as than Pluto will move into Aquarius. It's going to again bring in this counter vortex to the Leo, but now we've got this disease that will is targeted to hit them specifically and yet the whole world is affected once again, right? The whole world is nobody really are to? Yeah get up, but it's very true actually especially around us since Horus because the similarities that connects to adults however. Again it's like no soup. Seemingly no one really knows the ramifications of what's going to happen of course, obviously When when? We seems like everyone's being. Along hens solely. U-TURNS in visions, good woman's. You know everybody not knowing what the thugs guide on right so no. Required to wear masks to sit on a plane and yet were meals on the same plane in eating, said meals. There's a lot of contradictions. Live higher thing engine, and it should be really up to the individuals they want. Avoid interacting with us in their everyone who wants to avoid? Getting involved is a welcome to stay home. Everyone is welcome to self isolate in yet. Every you know there's this argument with A. The freedom to choose to do with your body what you want, right, there's that argument. The Health Freedom Movement right I talked about this actually one of my presentations. It doesn't matter the obviously. This gets into a lot of different conversations. We're way off topic. The point is there's something very similar to World War. Two and right now energetically in a in an. Why is at these baby? boomers are still the ones running to to do the president this country when? With. Motorable Party, you know. All of these things are just. To Me Generational, speaking interesting, and then to see how millennials have reacted to this, you know the riots. The protests Alsi all these things I'm just saying that the the generational piece of what's happening right now is bloody, fascinating, and yeah, it's just bloody fascinating. Look this place. Fan Right. You know. This this many. There's a lot of confusion about as you said. Quite rightly. Dot Generation is acting away. Could say selfishly self-preservation you know, and and yeah the same time you know we're all supposed to do. This is social responsibility. Cut Gone out at. So for example if we're trying to do the right thing. By society a parents all these of stuff than ideally what we're GONNA do is we're going to do told. K. Because that would be sensible things. The problem at the moment is that we're really questioning the authorities I'm a questioning. The advice and they salsa things, and obviously then you get millennials who might be? Might be a absorbing information that is contrary. The older generations because they have a different way of consuming information eight social media to fly that. And obviously you know people who were at the let's say bought massive than all people ready to take comes out and about. English rations. That's what you're doing. NEOM anyway. You Mo- yeah. If you being told to stay at home. and. Get out especially from working. Yeah, so he's not. Technologies also social anon- A. Fire and seventy basis, but just to go back to the older generations thing with with. Again the difficulty right now we're. Trying to do the right thing, and yet also questioning sentencings, because let's be honest. I'm not a politician. I not enough about all this stuff. I think. It's difficult. Conversation this but. Then a day if a virus! Rochow and a country doesn't inform the rest of the world. At the same time if an organization has paid to today with that doesn't actress phone Sibley. Then you go, ask the question..

Cluedo Leo Aquarius Jay Dot Generation Versailles Senator Survival. Japan Health Freedom Movement sentencings president Sibley Rochow Motorable Party Hitler
Make a will for free with Freewill

Talking Tech

04:20 min | 3 months ago

Make a will for free with Freewill

"A lot of US never get around to creating a will to make it easier. The APP free will would like to invite you to use their free online tools. co-founder Jenny Chia sprawling is here to tell us about it hi Jenny. So free will is a website that anyone can make a free state plan on, so that includes a will help care directive and a power of attorney. It's really easy process. You just go to www dot, free dot com, and you answer a series of questions very similar to when attorney might ask you in person, and our software takes those answers and populates a form a legal document that you can then print inside with witnesses and your gotten so on average it takes users about twenty minutes to get a completely free estate plan set up. Already your called free will so this is a totally one hundred percent free will. That's right. It's only possible through the support of nonprofits, so we get one hundred percent of revenue from nonprofits that WanNa make it easy for people to not only set up their estate plans, but also potentially, but you're not required to leave money for charities. Okay because I know people spend a lot of money to lawyers to get will's made. That's right and we think it should be very different access to lies a huge problem in the United States today instead, so we see that you know underrepresented communities have half the rate of will writing than majority communities, and that ends up being a huge barrier to wealth transfer from generation to generation. Some people just never get around to it, aretha. Franklin died without a will. Acting, right and princess well. Wow crazy. So, how long has the been out? It's been out for about three years, and we're actually experiencing a huge spike in demand right now since Kovic started booth, because people are actually able to or think about mortality for the first time, and having really important conversations with their family about what their hopes and dreams are if they were to pass away. How long does it take to create a will on the APP? On average less than twenty minutes. Okay what what motivated to start the at. I the big motivation. Is that you know we talked to a lot of people about their charitable giving and realized a lot of people don't have the ability to gave large amounts of money while. They're saving for their mortgage. Their kids educations things like that, but when they pass away, they might own a home and be willing to share a kind of five or ten percent of that with charity, and it turns out. This kind of charitable giving is actually the largest type of giving. On average in a person's life, so we started free well with the promise of making Book Estate Planning on charitable, giving in not really easy, and we've now raised over one point five billion dollars in commitments attorneys. Host on the charities that have gotten money from you guys. United way of heart. Association's Saint Jude's. People donate to all sorts of causes whether it's the universities that they went to the hospital. They had their children ought. It's just astounding the generosity during this time of course I'm talking to you on video. Video Window here on skype and you look really really young so you in your twenty s. I actually just turned thirty last week, congratulations. You seem very young to be concerned. About will's. Yes, so. You know it's important to write a will even early in life, a lot of people don't realize that one of the biggest purposes of putting a will place is to set up a guardian for your children. To setup protection for your pets and caretakers. If you have those to pass on your digital assets, such as your facebook or instagram account, so this isn't just something that baby boomers who had a house. They want to give away. should be concerned about, but really all people including people. My Age should have advice Jenny. Spalding from free will go to free will dot com. Go to the APP store, I assume the the IRS Google APP stores to download the APP. Just when www dot, free dot com,

Jenny Chia Attorney United States Co-Founder Facebook Spalding Kovic Franklin Google Skype IRS Instagram
MLB owners propose 76-game 2020 season

Freddie Coleman Show

03:28 min | 4 months ago

MLB owners propose 76-game 2020 season

"But every single day that baseball's away it just goes further and further away from people's minds it is just so disappointing forty eight game season seventy six game season I see this proposal ESPN dot com which need to know about the weekly baseball seventy six games twenty twenty season whatever they come up with will not be like the baseball season that you and I know it's not going to be the husky two game season that we know the grind of the season the ebb and flow looking at the schedule being able to pick out games you want to go to Eric and I looking at the businessman's special on out on Thursday to see the white Sox four one oh five start we're going on the weekends when we get an opportunity to go it is not the same it it it it just is amazing that what however it comes about it won't feel the same because we won't call you guaranteed rate or Miller Park or Wrigley Field to see the games will be able to go there it'll be in Arizona will be some other place will be a Florida someplace like that if they want you to feel the same but even with the kind of baseball that they're trying to propose that they're trying to put out there both sides took a complete agreement some thoughts from Jesse Rogers early on while in solving the offer for major league baseball Tony Clark and rob Manfred should be they also be fired after this it's just starting it really is it's just amazing I mean in in in a different world both sides what at the end of this year you do have people losing their jobs at the top I mean if we could do it you have a new commissioner and you have a new our executive officer at the at the union right at the top Tony Clark and rob Manfred I mean there's there's enough blame to go around but you know we'll see what that what the FRD is after the fact you guys sent there not any work if they're not any closer than they were a week ago this latest offers its its like throwing him a bone there's a few things there but it's less money up front a little bit more money if the playoffs are played so okay and the the no draft pick compensation it's a little bit a little bit of indicted to this coming off season that's a little scary but in general it doesn't move the Polly I asked us somebody that in the know what the union you know what does this even get as close to a first down he said not even close I'm just talk about a first down or touchdown he's in agreement not even close to a first down so you know it they're just they're talking around the edges guys now again that doesn't mean there won't be baseball as we know he can unilaterally decide this thing but but as I talk to someone else about it if that happens if you set your plane fifty you know too bad no more talk you played fifty Q. the Benny hill music is that the response I got is I don't know how the players are gonna react to that wow I mean that's wrong commenter from Jesse talk about just trying to place everybody because you know it's it's so disheartening baseball itself has been behind the times I've talked about that so many times in the show where they need to be able to be more modern they need to be able to create the opportunity for to bring more people into the tent baseball's not just for baby boomers and Gen x.'ers you need to be able to grow the sport and when it's out of the view of the average fan in which we have so many things to do now as far as technology now being with family going out all these things baseball trying to figure out the forty eight or seventy six games is just

Baseball
Millennial Netherlands

Travel with Rick Steves

05:35 min | 4 months ago

Millennial Netherlands

"Hi, I'm Rick Steves one of the few things certain about this corona virus pandemic is that this crisis will pass sooner or later it'll pass, and we'll be back to normal. And when that day comes, all of us will eagerly turn our pent up. Travel Dreams into smooth and bursting with fun reality. Let's continue to share. Our travel dreams together on travel with Rick Steves. Today on travel with Rick Steves are virtual travels. Bring us a millennials. Take on enjoying yourself in the Netherlands. Also stroll the sights on a guided walk around Edinburgh. Get a taste of that passionate atmosphere and end Lucia and go searching for Venus in the hour ahead. The. Netherlands seem to specialize in festivals. Fun Ways for the millennial generation to celebrate life to learn how we travelers of all ages can get it on the fun. We're joined in our studio by tour guide sisters, Yoda and Ruby Van Angles Dwarf who both happened to be millennials, Yoda and Ruby thanks for being here. For having us. You're actually twins. Ruby and Yoda and It's one of you older. Yes, maybe one minute older them a one minute older so Yoda. How do you to differ in your temperaments? Well I'm always told that Ruby, Nice. One Which is true? I am a little bit more direct assistance. Dutch people are think I'm a little bit more. Outspoken where we very patients and lovingly, and yeah, so you complement each other we do I think. Together the Dutch are famous for being direct. Yes, we are yeah. This is so fun to think about generational differences, and so on in America and what we call a baby boomer and you got in America people in their twenties and thirties or generate millennials do the Dutch look at generations in certain ways like that? Also? Yes, exactly the same we have baby. boomers are parents are a baby, boomers, and yeah, we're millennials, so millennials people in their twenties and thirties, gen-x people in their forties, baby boomers people in their fifties and sixties, baby boomers, being the most interesting and fun, loving and entertaining. Okay so tell me about the characteristics of millennials. In the Netherlands. Well, it's probably very similar. we are we millennials. Because we got handed everything to us right. We always learned where you're growing up. Everything is possible everything you wanted to do and instead of creating people who are very secure. What they WANNA do were all very insecure, and we're very well like I'm going to do and like every ten years. We changed jobs and There's a lot of enterpreneurs so a lot of people who want to create their own little thing, but we're all sort of this known at were unhappy with everything because we can have everything we're unhappy. Little bit spoiled came easily old. Yes, and impatient. You want it now. Yes, and if you don't get it now, you'll go somewhere else. Yeah, we're own press. And we invented the burn out. Is! Still Alive and kicking. This is travel with Rick Steves. We're talking with Yoda angles store and her twin. WHO's one minute older? Ruby angles. Talking about millennials and when we think about having fun as tourists, we can learn a lot by having fun as millennials millennials love. It seems like in the Netherlands parties in vegetables. Yoda. What's what's an example of festival that a millennial looks forward to every year and Amsterdam? We Love, King's Day. That is one of our favorites. Once It's not we do not have as many festivals in Amsterdam anymore more dough, so I'm stem because such a busy city day try to take people away from Amsterdam, so if you want to experience the holidays like King, stay or Liberation Day It's better to go to one of the less bigger cities. Also. Just what what? What is it? You'd like to go to for one of these big. Go to Harlem, because the most I am from Harlem, so we always love Liberation Day that is in Harlem. It's known to have the biggest festival only ration- days that its fifth of May we got free from the Nazis and every year. We celebrate our freedom. It's just really fun with a lot of artists in music. Video of me. I remember the festival Yeah Amsterdam is getting so congested so touristy. I was there for a King's Day once and there's so many boats you could walk across the canal just from boat to boat. who was just solid votes in the canals, but people were certainly having a great time Ruby. Festival that you look forward to. What would it be every year? ooh I always look forward to the food festivals. There are many food festival also around to Amsterdam. And we have a shoeless that SURF SC fall in the neighborhood of Amsterdam where people go to, they have to take off their shoes and walk bare feet it. It's of course when festival Shula Festival. They have a lot of food everywhere. Fit of electro music seems okay. Let's me to one of these food festivals. Then okay. So, what kind of food would you be enjoying? You would be enjoying some Sushi macos, but also local foods like French fries. The real food festivals hundred stance. You can try a little bit of everything

Rick Steves Netherlands Amsterdam Ruby Shula Festival King Harlem Lucia America Edinburgh
An early look at the 2020 electorate

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

02:42 min | 4 months ago

An early look at the 2020 electorate

"With the next election Jones five months away pew research is out with a new survey on the demographics of the American electorate pues Brad Jones is on the KRLD news line Brad what did you find when it comes to U. S. voters by age it is time getting older as to how that benefits one party or the other is you know that older voters tend to be a little more Republican in their in their meetings although we've seen axing last distinction across large generational groupings among it and the oldest among basically R. three older generation the silent generation the baby boomers and generation X. with millennials sort of being distinct and and we didn't break out this nine generations these separately here but they also tend to be more democratic in their views and is it the case that there are actually more people a higher percentage of people who identify as independents Dan as Democrats or Republicans Brett yes whenever we measure partisan partisanship we do it in a two part question so we first ask people if they identify with one of the two major parties or if they consider themselves independent independent associate associate with with another another party party and and we've we've definitely definitely seen seen for for the the last last few few years years that that the the number number of of people people who who declined declined to and hi Jennifer I with either party has has been highest was there anything in this latest survey that she really jumped out at you you know I've I've always been interested in the and geographic distinctions in the country and that's that's something that has continued to all rights so we've we've seen across urban and urban communities that are increased movement toward the Democratic Party where those in rural communities have been moving more more toward the Republican Party BC that it in fact every part of the country and I I you know I did it maybe didn't surprise me but it was it was interesting to see those numbers so starkly that is Brad Jones from pew

Brad Jones DAN Brett Democratic Party Krld Jennifer I Republican Party
Banks are Cutting Their Risk By Cutting Your Credit Card Limits

Business Wars Daily

04:22 min | 5 months ago

Banks are Cutting Their Risk By Cutting Your Credit Card Limits

"On this Wednesday may twentieth. Hey have you applied for a new credit card in the last couple of months if so and if you've had trouble getting approved well you're in good company? Given all the financial uncertainty were experiencing right. Now banks are nervous so they're making it much tougher to qualify for new cards to avoid taking on customers. Who may not be able to pay their bills. According to the Saint Louis Federal Reserve forty percent of. Us Bank say. They're getting choosier about who they lend money to. Where that's issuing credit cards or personal loans? That's the biggest pull back in lending since two thousand nine. According to see net among the biggest lenders to play defense this way discover financial services apply for a discover card. And you'll find the company verifying your employment not just your credit score and if you are approved your credit limit may well be less than you'd hope for on recent earnings called discover CEO. Roger Hawks Trial said the company's taking these and other steps to quote curtail risk to put it more plainly discover and other financial institutions. WanNa make sure they don't get saddled with too much. Unpaid debt pre pandemic discover had been growing steadily and profitably twenty. Nineteen was a good year and the company was expecting twenty twenty to be even better instead. Discover lost about sixty million dollars in the first quarter of this year and its future like the future of so many other businesses is clearly uncertain which is to say things may not be any easier at the other major credit card companies both city and capital. One say they are also tightening up credit requirements C net reports. Okay so maybe you can't get a new card and you haven't seen one of those zero balanced transfer offers that to flood your mailbox in months but that's not all. Some companies are reducing credit limits for existing customers. It's happening a lot one out of four American credit card users. That's fifty million. People have had their credit limits slashed on at least one card in the previous thirty days some have even had an account closed. That's according to a survey by compare cards a service owned by lending tree. Those changes are hitting Gen Z. Millennials and Gen xers equally according to see net. Apparently baby boomers are being spared so far. This is a tough thing to have happened. If you've just lost your job or you expect to and it often comes as a rather ugly surprise credit cards dot com analysts had rosman told Marketwatch. Most people don't realize how much freedom credit card issuers have to cut limits or even cancel cards without warning companies that acknowledged they're assessing credit limits. Include Wells Fargo. Us Bank in American Express and American Express spokesperson told Marketwatch that the company is based in credit limits on quote real time. Evaluations of a person's financial help so too is synchrony financial which issue store credit cards including JC Penney. Gap and American Eagle outfitters discovers. Roger Hawks child however is expressly said the company is not slashing credit limits or closing inactive accounts given the millions of Americans who are now jobless hawks trial call those actions challenging according to Bloomberg. Pulling away credit. When they need it most can have tremendously adverse impacts hawks trial set indeed. Many people rely on credit cards as emergency funds in April about a month into lockdowns about forty seven percent of Americans had credit card debt. That's up four points from March. According to a survey by CREDIT CARDS DOT COM and having your credit limit reduced or a card cancelled can hurt your credit score. Even as news rolls out about the new challenges of getting and keeping credit banks are also enrolling people in programs intended to help almost half a million discover account holders signed up for its skip a payment program. Those account holders have balances of more than three and a half billion dollars altogether. Yes you heard that right. Billion WITH A B. Other issuers are also

Roger Hawks Us Bank Marketwatch American Express Saint Louis Federal Reserve American Eagle Outfitters Jc Penney Hawks CEO Rosman Bloomberg
Panic in the Streets

Now Playing - The Movie Review Podcast

09:08 min | 6 months ago

Panic in the Streets

"We're discussing panic in the streets starring. Richard Would Mark Paul. Douglas Barbara Bel Getty's Jack Talents. Zero mastel directed by Eliah Kazan. This is the now playing. Co-host who's fond of Shishkabob Arnie Stewart? And this the CO host. Who Likes High Foreheads Jacob? Well we hope everybody at home is healthy and safe and likely quarantined. No matter where you're listening to us from the world. Yeah at the moment of recording. We are all separated apart. Watching the news is one of the shows that we've taped since this pandemic has hit America. We are hearing reports. There are over sixty thousand cases in America by the time this airs. Who knows but we are thinking about this pandemic and checking in with you. You guys told us you were interested in watching movies about viruses. I don't know about that you know I can understand why some people might be like. I want to turn that off. I don't WanNa think about that. It's scary to contemplate when you turn on the news these days. Yeah but people are I think indulging in it in some ways entertainment as of this recording contagion is the number four movie on Itunes and it has been for weeks and outbreak is in the top twenty five and let's face it. We had to kind of fill out our schedule. The new mutants is punted for the sixth time or something but James Bond got moved black widow. The new saw film fast and furious nine and just a couple days ago when we're recording. This wonder woman. Eighty four half of our schedule for the spring has no release date anymore. Yeah I thought it was going to be a super busy month person July and lots of new releases and now we don't know yes and we didn't really necessarily know how to approach virus movies. Either there are a lot of them and we've covered some of them and you can go find those in the archives. Twenty eight days later and I am legend. All the stand. I did a list. I wanted to see how many we've really done if people wanted to do. A full now. Playing virus retrospective. There's the I am legend trilogy. Starting with the last man on earth in nineteen sixty four. Yeah then Omega Man in seventy one. There's the stand from ninety. Four twelve monkeys. That counts right. Nine Hundred Ninety five definitely twenty eight days later two thousand and two resident evil also two thousand two twenty eight weeks later as well. Yep Yep rise of the planet of the apes and then its two sequels but rise. Came Out in twenty eleven. Dare I add it in the name of the King Two worlds. It might make you sick watching it. And there was someone plotting to release a virus. Yes and they did. That's the thing it's not if they were blinded they released it in the Kingdom of EB World War Z. And Day of the dead bloodline. Yeah I think what's different here because we do want to be sensitive. We're not doing the sensational Zombie outbreak. Type films I mean. We talked about all kinds of viral outbreaks. And we really wanted something that that would speak to. What's going on right now. Though yeah I agree I mean I want a very clear eyed view if you WANNA laugh and enjoy camping ones no judgment but it might seem inappropriate to make light of something that seemed so severe the way I thought about it is. It's more interesting even though we're told. Time and again. These are unprecedented times. Mankind has always dealt with viruses. It has always been a part of our story and it was interesting to think that we could go back through the decades and look at the ways that it was presented on film and how the general public thought about contagion and viral outbreaks. And it makes sense that we would start with panic in the streets in one thousand nine hundred fifty film when we were discussing the Tom Cruise film losing it Stewart. You pointed out that in the eighties. A lot of movies were being set in the fifties because baby boomers who were in their formative years in the fifties grew up and now they were writing films in the eighties so setting them thirty years earlier while thirty years or specifically thirty two years before nineteen fifty. The Spanish flu was out there so a lot of people. My Ninety nine year old grandmother is regaling me endlessly with this coronas. Nothing you should have been there for the Spanish flu. Nine hundred eighteen. Not many of us can say that we were there for that but it does sound awful. It killed a whole lot of people. And Yeah that comes up a lot. But even in the nineteen fifties which is the start. I think of the movie. Sub-genre virus movies kickoff with panic in the streets. Nine hundred fifty s were a scary time. That looked a lot like. Are you know right. Now we're thinking very much about protecting our seniors because they're what's at risk for covert nineteen but back in the nineteen fifties. Hide your kids to let them go to the pool. Don't let him play with other kids because if you do they're gonNA get infantile paralysis. Polio I mean the scare was real people close pools. They didn't let their kids out. He was considered a summer plague. School's out and then all of a sudden just populations of people all throughout the United States would suddenly be hit hard and kids would suddenly lose motor function and only able to breathe when they were put into an iron lung interesting statistic by the way it sounds a lot like corona only two percent of the population actually develop the disease and most of those cases were mild. Most of the people were not left with long term disabilities but it did impact a whole generation. I know my mom believes. She was diagnosed with polio. My Dad's second wife had it. You know the thirty second president. Fdr The reason why he was in a wheelchair he got it when he was thirty. Nine years old. You didn't even have to be a kit. People were living like we were back in. One thousand nine hundred eighty. When this movie came out there was a real field. If you send your kid to the movie theater. He touched another kid. This could happen wasn't until one thousand nine hundred eighty five. When Jonas Salk released his cure which was very controversial he was doing things that scientists disapproved of in order to get that vaccine and it worked one monkey equaled six thousand doses of immunization. And before you know it all the kids got to lead the iron lung and come home and famously. He didn't even keep the patent. It's something that warms my heart. When I think about it he thought it was unethical for anyone to profit from this cure and so he gave it away for free so there was panic in the streets in nineteen fifty and I think the other thing that might have inspired. The onset of movies talking about viruses was the smallpox outbreak of nineteen forty. Seven guy got on a bus in Mexico. City drove all the way to New York City. Didn't feel so well with feverish. The whole time went to Bellevue hospital a week later he died. That was when the doctors realized. Oh my God is smallpox. They had had a vaccine for smallpox for over century but because smallpox was so rare like nobody was immune from it so suddenly everyone. That man had come in contact when the bus was infected and it was being you know across the country so everyone literally was being impacted. Kind of like we are now. Everyone potentially could have smallpox what the government did was they started a big PR blitz. They put out commercials on the radio. Tv magazines go to our free health clinics. They opened them up all over the country. Get your vaccines and so everyone could sing the songs everyone knew about shots and the necessity of getting immune to smallpox. Hollywood jumps on trends. If something is big in the news. They're going to come up with a movie about it and I think that's the movie we're here to talk about today. I'd never heard of panic in the streets until we decided we were going to cherry pick. What is what the best the most iconic virus movie from each decade the fifties through the teens. And you said this is the top one on the list I I. I never heard of this. Yeah nor have I. This is totally new to me. I knew by reputation but I've never seen it either. I do think most people know Elia Kazan. He was a director more famous. Maybe for Broadway the stage but he helped pioneer the method acting. So if you know Brando if you know James Dean if you know all of those leading light actors for the nineteen fifties Elliott. Kazan probably worked with them and got them to be the actors that they were. Yeah I did look up this director and and unfortunately Brando. Unless he's in Superman or the godfather I I got a blind spot for his films as well as James Dean so I recognize. Yeah Kazan oh he's he's actually done some big movies but this one isn't one of his that I've heard of

Eliah Kazan Smallpox Shishkabob Arnie Stewart America Kazan Polio James Dean Brando Director Douglas Barbara Bel Getty FDR Richard Jonas Salk James Bond Bellevue Hospital New York City United States Jack Talents Mark Paul
Are We Experiencing a Black Swan Event?

Rich Dad Radio Show

09:11 min | 7 months ago

Are We Experiencing a Black Swan Event?

"This is a trick question. I have to ask you okay. You know what the standard pitch in from people on the world's go to school get a job work hard save money get out of debt. Invest long-term above their festival portfolios talks wants which avoids. Atf's so if you're a financial planner and you've been telling people for the last thirty thousand years. Invest along term and the well diversified portfolios stocks bonds mutual funds and. Don't worry you know the market's always bounce back by the dip is going to be probably a V bottom which means it goes down and comes right back up or a w goes up down and then back up again which it has done over the last. Let's say fifty years so if you're a financial planner and your clients are calling you and you've given them that advise of invested a long-term well-diversified for pulling the plug mutual funds. What do you say to them today? Harry well I I say a financial adviser is going to be more hated than I am. That were passing the end. Up this bubble booms When it happens and and that is true most of the time. But what my work shows and clear the bell clears your heartbeat. Every second generational booms come about every forty years technology surges every forty five and then big bubbles every ninety years when you get east. T- turning points like the late sixties and stocks or the late the roaring nineteen twenty nine stocks or now stocked. Go Down Robert. And they don't get back to those levels for twenty three to twenty five years. I think this time with slowing demographics and the US we may never see the dow higher adjusted for inflation than it is recently so this is not the time to sit through it these type of long-term corrections or crashes after bubbles. They're going to be seventy to ninety percent like twenty nine to thirty two that by the way not small-cap stocks or penny stocks blue chip leading stocks like General Motors Ford and RCA. Back then went down. Eighty nine percent. The Dow and two point seven years can talk until nineteen fifty three twenty four years later to get back to even so when a stockbroker tells you that doesn't understand history. Harry hang on you got to take a breath and so what Harry is saying. Nineteen twenty nine with a crash came if you are holding waiting for the market to come back so in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine dollars at three eighty one. It took approximately twenty four to twenty five years to get back to three eighty one and when I was a kid nineteen fifties when I was growing up most of the people who are part of the Great Depression my parents and the people who are pounded by the Great Depression and the stock market crash. They were never in stocks there so gun shy of stocks and then in my generation the baby boom generation that brought back the Sangala 401k defined contribution pension plans and all this at the stock market took off so the baby boomers are caught pro with the proverbial pants down and now comes the next big crash. Which you've been forecasting for a long time airy so what you're saying. This one might be a long one. Yes because this is the culmination not only of the baby. Boom gigantic is your heading the largest generation history and it wasn't just. Us hit globally to to grow up in earnest. Money which is totally predictable. Average person peaks in forty six for the baby boomers and spending forty seven for the millennials today and then and then decline so. We started to see that declined to name her. This is a rich audience. Like me a little slow. We gotta speak a little slower. So what you're saying. Is that when a person hits forty six? That's when they're at the peak. Earning and spending and millennials is forty. Seven is that what you're saying. Yes the average. The average person for more fluent people college educated professionals. It's more like in the mid fifties but still average forty six so baby boomers if that peak collectively in two thousand seven something. I predicted like twenty some years before that. And we've been just what we went down big big crisis worst since the Great Depression but not as bad because they printed so much money to stop it and we've been living on quantitative easing ever since to make up for these slow down in this generation spending. That's simple and we're not coming out so let me so. Let me go back again. So let's talk to you. Know My generation. The boomers you know. What would you say to them? If they bought that they drank the KOOL aid. Let's say they have a 401k on IRA one of those things are Roth IRA. They've they've they've seen their portfolio per se. Go Up and now it's crashing. What advice do you have for them? I mean how do they do? They stay in or they exit. We don't give advice rich TAB. I WanNa hear your advice. No you get the hell out period. I think he may have one more. Little run left could be a couple of months. Could be a couple of weeks because the feds pumping in more money than ever with the Repo crisis and now the Krahn advisors but I think this is the death knell for the stock market. They can print money to stop. A recession stopped banks from failing companies from failing even stocks from crashing too much normally. But they can't stop this virus from spreading and it just kills business businesses. Stop people stop. Traveling people start stop spending. I mean my wife's not going to a of of women stay over tomorrow night. They're all coming in from New York you know. And she's you know she made the virus and she's over sixty like I am and that's what it hit. Its old people like you said earlier. So so this is something. They can't buy with money printing. They have kept this following far beyond when it should've peaked in two thousand seven and now they've got something that this doesn't work on so I think this is it so you have to get out of the way so Harry. I was talking to this young guy. He was He's a laborer. Was Painting parts of my house and he says you know. I bought a house like you told me to back in two thousand eleven you bought it for like I think hundred thousand and the reason round numbers and now it's three hundred thousand and he has no retirement is what should I do. I said I saw my house I went. I don't once again ladies and gentlemen at Rich Dad. We don't give financial advice and I definitely couldn't advise US guys. Only forty got three kids. He's got a job. Painting houses got no snow stocks. You and I are calling for twenty five year possible. Depression long-term deflation. What do you say to people what you because if he sells he sells his house? I sit where do you go? What are you going to do with that money? Let's say you have two hundred thousand dollars. I gotTa Pay Capital Gains Tax on it. What are you GONNA do any? He was clueless. I I got some simple rules Robert. I had become a bubble experts since the tech bubble crashed and early. Two thousand on top of demographics and technology and all these psycho because we are in a bubble era and the last bubble era we saw the roaring twenties. So nobody's lived in a bubble before and real estate was not the bubble back then. Because you couldn't borrow money so easily against housing back is very difficult so now. It's everything the rule for. Housing is real quick bubbles. Go back to where they started that that house if he bought it at the bottom of one hundred eleven and now it's worth three hundred K. My rough estimate is going to go back to near that level if he's comfortable sitting through one hundred eighty nine thousand potential decline in something he probably has a mortgage against maybe some home equity lines that he went on deck that fine. I think anybody with any brains would say oh no. I don't want to sit through that one in by the way The demographics I've got a new real estate model. That doesn't just project peak spending like other consumer categories. I have to subtract the dyers and guess what baby boomers are now dying unprecedented rates and will continue to do so into two thousand thirty nine or forty that takes down the net demand even takes it negative at some point for real estate so homes are never gonNA appreciate like they did this boom even in the next boom so it's better especially older. People who retiring lot of baby boomers are realizing they didn't say per retirement. 'cause they're living in good times thought they didn't need to and now they're saying. Oh wait a minute though might make mansion which I don't need now that my kids are gone. I can sell that instantly. Fund my retirement plan and rent my retirement home. I think that's really excellent vice. Do that

Harry United States ATF General Motors Depression IRA Rich Dad New York RCA
New Guidelines Urge Most U.S. Adults to be Screened for Hepatitis C

America First

00:37 sec | 8 months ago

New Guidelines Urge Most U.S. Adults to be Screened for Hepatitis C

"The guidelines have been released urging millions more people to get screened for hepatitis C. the call is for expanded screening for Americans between the ages of eighteen and seventy nine and it's the first call since twenty thirteen one U. S. health authorities urged all baby boomers to get a one time hepatitis C. test the US preventive services task force says hepatitis C. is on the rise because of the opioid crisis fighting infections early is critical now that drugs are available that can cure most people after two to three months of treatment and the price of those costly medications has dropped sharply in recent years

United States
Nearly 1 in 4 millennials report having $100,000 or more in savings

Chris Hogan's Retire Inspired

05:35 min | 8 months ago

Nearly 1 in 4 millennials report having $100,000 or more in savings

"Is an article from Fox. Business and it is entitled one. Fourth of millennials have a hundred K. And the bank. A fourth of millennials have one hundred K. The bank now. Let's calm down here a little bit and realize it's a fourth okay. And so I'M NOT SAYING. All millennials But a fourth and buy in bank. What they're talking about is it saving for retirement Which is invested is the technical phrase that we would go with. But I like this. And it's got some interesting stats. The numbers are based on the Bank of America's twenty twenty better money habits millennial report and just so. We're clear because I if you're like me act can get confused when people start throwing out millennial Jax Gen Y. element of P. And all the rest of them. I mean there's it's confusing but get this according to this article a millennial can actually fall between ages. Twenty four and forty one. Oh that's probably surprising. Some of you. Yeah so a millennial A lot of times people think. Oh these are all very very young people And don't get me wrong. Forty one his young That's like spring chicken type young but for the sake of this study. That's what it is. So all that to say millennials are not necessarily so young anymore. The report found that millennials will beginning to save for retirement at age twenty four which is a good thing that means the message is getting out there. People are understanding they. GotTa get their own Cape. We're not waiting on the government to try to save the day We're doing stuff and I liked that. That means the message is moving. But get this. If millennials started saving at age twenty four which is around the time people get their first big boy big girl job. That's a good thing but Gen xers started saving it age thirty and get this baby boomers on average started saving eight thirty three so I like this trend. I like the fact that things are trending younger and people are making things happen but again. A quarter of millennials have about one hundred thousand save for retirement And I liked it. They're saving earlier than most other generations. I liked that. They are thinking ahead and they're thinking about their future And and and maybe they've heard me talk about and the trend out there that's been in the news. At Social Security is supposed to be insolvent by twenty thirty four twenty thirty five and so this is a situation where people are going to have to make sure that they're putting aside money for themselves to prepare for the future but it's not all good news. Millennials still have some money troubles according to this article. The survey showed that not including home loans. One in six millennials. Oh fifty thousand or more in debt. Oh okay that's not including home loan so you can go with me here in track where this would be. This is probably student loan. Debt this car loans and credit cards about seventy five percent. This one this one's stuck me about seventy. Five percent of millennials aren't confident about their money situation. Wow now that's hi. We're talking about almost eight out of ten aren't confident that means. They're not really understanding what it is that they're doing or or were there going. The trajectory that they're on millennials are though willing to sacrifice a staggering. Ninety percent of millennials said they will make a sacrifice in order to achieve their goals which is an excellent thing because it is necessary. You can't achieve a goal without being willing to make some sacrifices along the way these sacrifices could range from according to the survey Eating out less or not going on vacations or even being willing to work. That's good. Well here's my thing no matter of your age or your stage. I want you to be confident about your financial future. More importantly I want you to be rock solid in your plan. What's the processor working? Now if you're plugged into me and two things that we do here at Ramsey solutions you know that all begins with the baby steps a clear path for you to understand exactly what steps to take when to take it and how to get there. That's a game changer. It's a recipe for success. And I think when you have a plan and you have clear focus you can begin to have confidence. You can begin to move in the direction and you can know that. Hey this is the path that's GonNa lead me to where I wanna be and that's a positive thing so again. This article so interesting read From Fox business and the title of the articles afford the millennials have one hundred K. And the bank as always we'll put a link to this in the show notes That are watching on YouTube You can just click the link below. It's GonNa get you right over there. Take a read. I think it's really important for us to kind of continue to read. But more importantly let's share this information Share it with ranch. Talk about this. I think money is a thing that we all have to deal with and how effective we are with it really determines our results so I want us to begin to have these conversations and by all means do me a favor if you've got some young people in your life whether you go to church with them there in your neighborhood begin to talk with them about money. I'm amazed a lot of people. Assume that young people learn about it at home? And that's not the case. That's why we have a lot of young people walking around on college campuses signing up and doing things because they didn't know any better or they thought it was a grown-up thing to do. So let's share this information and I think you can help young people to prevent making some of the mistakes that maybe we all made in the past.

Bank Of America FOX Cape Youtube Ramsey Solutions
"baby boomers" Discussed on The Munk Debates

The Munk Debates

07:48 min | 8 months ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on The Munk Debates

"Stephen Moore. I want to talk to you about debt because this for any millennial or Gen xer listening to this podcast right now. This has been a reality of their lives either. Our for some cases for a decade or more crushing student debt and its effect on their life opportunities their ability to flourish in the way that limestone has has described. Isn't this something that we can lay at the feet of the baby boomer generation? That's burdening of their children and grandchildren with unsustainable levels of personal debt. I am concerned as I think. Most Americans should be an hour about this. Massive size of our national debt Those deaths help pay to win a World War Two and win the Cold War and make it a safer planet and So data's and always a bad thing. I've always said you know it really matters. What your borrowing for now when it comes to the student loan crisis I mean my Gosh your spine anybody on this planet. Who's more of a critic of our colleges and universities on the greatest. Financial Scandal of modern times is how much our universities and colleges are are charging our families. It's it's an outrage. Every College in University Should be charging half of what they charge and it is. It's ridiculous that kids are graduating from college with hundred thousand dollars of debt. But let's not forget that that I'll go back to that point that this generation is inheriting a hundred trillion dollars of wealth. No generation has ever come anywhere close to that and that's because of the incredible buildup of wealth. I am businesses and opportunities that happen because of baby boomers and people like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs and Fed Smith of fat accent. All these amazing companies that have really transformed the world and made it such a better place so from a financial standpoint. This generation will actually be better off now. I by the way I am. Concerned about these millennials. We're seeing you know millennials. That are twenty six twenty seven twenty eight years old That are living in their parents basement. Stolen that's a new dynamic. That is Is Not healthy by the way. This generation is better educated than any other generation history. So hopefully they should be able to use those educational advantages to gain. You know really good jobs that pay well so limestone responded Stevens argument here that in a sense the balance sheet looks pretty good when you have all ended up versus you know. Yes this generation encumbered with debt now but inheriting a one hundred million dollars. Sounds pretty good to me so stephen. I are both economists And so we both appreciate the time value of money. It's true that eventually mini my generation will have considerable bequests from their dead parents. I think most people find it unpleasant to think that there are economic future rests on the death of their parents. But more than that. That money's not here now that money might come later. Especially since as I mentioned life expectancies for older Americans are continuing to extend in fact. I actually appreciated what Steve said earlier about. This variety of technologies going into cure a variety of conditions. Mostly things that are experienced by older Americans reading very very good at helping a fifty five year old live to be one hundred instead of ninety ninety instead of eighty and have a higher quality life during that period as well. We're excelling at this partly. Because there's a very large market of boomers who have a lot of wealth to invest in research on those conditions. Were not getting better helping. Somebody make it to their twentieth birthday. We're not getting better at helping a twenty year old. Make it to thirty actually. We're getting worse at it so I think I think it's important to understand that when one generation is dying younger in another generation is living longer and vast amounts of the wealth of a society are tied up in relatively illiquid assets like retirement funds. That you're not going to hand off until you die or real estate that you're not going to sell while you live in it and increasingly we're realizing that the real estate that boomers have invested in is actually very difficult to sell. It's not necessarily what. The market is demanding. Now this does create a problem. Where yes you have all this paper wealth? We can't use it for anything. Do you WANNA come back on. That point looks a lot of. It isn't going to be inherited wealth but I'm talking about the wealth of our infrastructure of our businesses the most important wealth lyman. I think that your generation will inherit from baby. Boomers is the stock of knowledge. And Look. That's the most important wealth of all is that we've we are conquering diseases. We figured out how to do things that You know be people thought before. Were impossible you know. Look look at what's happened to the speed of transportation of information. You know I have A. I'm holding that cell phone that I found in my hand that has more computing power than virtually all of the computers that existed in nineteen fifty. So that's the kind of wealth I'm talking about the stock of knowledge that this generation will inherit lyman touch as member of generation X. Who's closer to millennials? Obviously than Stephen as what? What is the mood out there? And why an Stephen brought this up earlier in his remarks this kind of this renewed interest in a really strong critique of capitalism assertion that the capitalist system for many millennials. They feel it's broken. They feel it's time for something different. Where's that emerging from? So I think I think that's a very real sentiment. There is this growing interest in more extreme solutions even more centralized in controlling solutions and I think part of it is that there is this promise of these things. We'RE GONNA CHANGE THAT. You look at the civil rights movement and then you have all these various movements have asserted that they were going to make our life better happier and more free. And if you're if you're a black man today in some ways you're more free you're able to vote with liberty you did not have seventy years ago but your odds of being incarcerated and having no freedom are far greater than they were in one thousand nine forty nineteen fifty so you get this in some sense bipolarity of liberty right that for some societies much better for a fairly well educated black manner for a well educated black woman. Life has gotten a lot better for less educated black man that might not be the case. Wages have not performed extremely well for less educated. Workers Incarceration rates are astonishingly high for less educated black men and we see this other groups as well but this is I. Bring up this example. Just because it's extraordinarily clear between incarceration and civil rights. How these things played out and also because Steve mentioned this group one. That's clearly improved. It's yes some have clearly had an improvement in their conditions but we found new methods of control new methods of restriction and so I think the dissatisfaction. A lot of millennials have is that there are all these historic movements. That are supposed to have done. Great things for us right well. We beat the Soviet Union. But wait we're still dealing with Russia. What was the problem there? I thought we beat them. No we didn't right. We we got like a ten year armistice basically so I think we have a lot of skepticism about the claims of success of the past drew. Can I make one quick point that that I want to bring up an and I forgot to mention what I think is important in a when I think about the millennials and as a as I said I'm a father of two millennials what I see in that generation that I think disturbs.

Stephen Moore Steve Jobs Soviet Union Russia Stevens Bill Gates lyman Fed Smith
"baby boomers" Discussed on The Munk Debates

The Munk Debates

11:39 min | 8 months ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on The Munk Debates

"Call yourself a democratic socialist. How can any kind of socialist win a general election in the United States? We're going to win because I we're going to explain with. Chronic socialism is and what Democratic Socialism is about is saying that it is immoral and wrong that the Tom One tenth of one percent in this country own almost as much wealth as the bottom ninety percent. That when you look around the world you see every other major country providing healthcare to all people as a right except the United States. But if you look at just individual groups in for example what about women and women are more likely to go to college. They have higher earnings than ever before women are in many indis. Areas are actually outward. Earning now and the gap between men and women have been reduced substantially. So this is a great time to be alive. There's a lot of special challenges. There has been a way too much debt. that we're imposing on our kids but let's not let's not forget that this generation will inherit a hundred trillion dollars of wealth that was built up in no small part by the baby boom generation. Great Lyman and Stephen. I want to just pause for a moment here and just sum up for the audience. You're opening arguments. Lyman your saying in effect. That baby boomers have kind of closed the door on the types of opportunities the prosperity the dynamism of the economy that they enjoyed that allowed them to live lives full of wealth meaning and Things that millennials don't have like high levels of debt and a sense of Less future when it comes to job opportunities Stephen Moore. You've got a very different point of view. You're saying that the baby boom generation has created for millennials An incredibly bright free future a society that has been fueled by innovation that has had breakthroughs in healthcare and technology. All these things making our lives immeasurably better than they were in the past. And who would want to be born in your view fifty years ago? Twenty years ago versus the opportunities. You have for being alive today. So great opening arguments Let's get into our rebuttals. Limestone GonNA come to you. I and have you challenge where you think are Steven? Moore's key arguments in this debate. What I'm saying is not that hours a miserable time to be alive in general what I am saying is that this is a time where young person looks at the next forty years. The next forty years don't necessarily look great. It doesn't look like they're going to experience the same uplift that previous generation said they're not going to have the same opportunities. They're not going to have the same choices available to them. Because a lot of those choices have simply been walled off now. The other thing though the last thing I would mention is that this vast amount of wealth that will be inherited. This fascinating thing where you would think that that would be good for millennials to inherit all this but the reality is a lot of us aren't going to inherit it. Life expectancies are declining America. And they're not declining because of some epidemic of Cancer Alzheimer's killing retirees. It's happening because young people are dying because of suicide because of drugs because of alcohol because of a number of causes that selectively. Kill young people right now. You could say it's young people killing themselves. Yes but they're killing themselves into response to some set of social conditions. So they're going to inherit it. No they're going to be dead before their parents are. This is in many ways a wonderful time to be in live but I would push back on the idea. That in some sense the intergenerational balance is going to flow in favor of my generation when an astonishing share of us are never going to make it to retirement. Fascinating points limestone. Let's go to you. Stephen Moore for your rebuttal. Look I just think it's factually untrue. That young people are not going to have the same life. Expectancy that That our generation did they will have substantially higher life expectancy. I mean what's going on in healthcare. You know sometimes. I wish I had been born thirty years later than I was. Is You know we're going to see in the next twenty five or thirty years. The secures for Alzheimer's Runcie cures for Cancer Heart Disease Multiple Sclerosis. Parkinson's we have these within our RASP. And the you know what's going on in terms of gene therapy and so on cell regeneration It's quite possible. You know my kids could live to one hundred one hundred twenty years old so those are incredibly exciting Exciting dynamics going on in the economy again. I'll go back to this point that for young people that are black or Hispanic or women. They have incredibly more opportunities than people had thirty or forty years ago. And I think we're going to see an expansion of that and by the way when I grew up there wasn't google there wasn't Amazon there wasn't Federal Express. There weren't these amazing you know. Companies that are making life better for people people probably have to work less to make more money in the next three or four years. I shouldn't say probably they absolutely will work last as we move more torch artificial intelligence and robotics and three d imaging and all of these incredibly cool things that are coming down the line. So Lyman let's have you respond to an argument. That Stephen Moore has written about in the Wall Street Journal and elsewhere. That baby boomers shouldered a lot release significant burdens over the last number of decades. They participated in the civil rights struggle. They won the Cold War with the Soviet Union. And on the other side of that coin you have the millennials who Stevens view and the view of other people have these incense outrageous expectations. About what their life should be like and what they think is owed to them. How do you respond to that argument? What I care about is is slightly more objective measurable things so for example since the recession. If you look at household wealth in the survey of consumer finances household wealth has recovered for households headed by people older than thirty five. If your household is headed by someone over thirty five then odds are that you are wealthier than you were before the recession. If your household is headed by someone under thirty five then you've probably odds. Are you have not experienced any recovery? That is household wealth for people under thirty five has continued to decline. Now whatever you say about you know how much better it is to live today. It's wonderful have Google and to have clean air and have all these amazing technologies. I am not a decline EST but what I would say that whatever you think about how good it is to live today. The reality is that for young people. It is much worse than it was a decade decade and a half ago two decades ago now in the long run when you talk about generational contributions. I don't deny the baby boomers has made that. Many baby boomers have made excellent contributions. But you know we just because some people made a very good contribution. It doesn't negate how they've set up the next generation to perform and the reality is that you look at the health communities you look at the social environments. People inhabit in terms of their sense of connectedness to community there. There's recent survey on millennial loneliness right. These are fairly concrete things that we observe a generation struggling and dealing with yes. Maybe you didn't have Google fifty years ago but you did have the the the blessing of intact communities that would help raise children together and that setup children to succeed we don't have that my generation didn't grow up without. We grew up with broken families. Those were the choices of boomer. Parents Steven you're a trained economist. I mean what's your response to that? Seems like a pretty compelling argument of Lyman saying in effect this entire generation than Leno's have had no effective growth in household income since the great recession of two thousand eight. Two thousand nine. Well older people. The so-called Gerontocracy have thrived. That just seems fundamentally unfair. Well look we. We did have a terrible recession. Two Thousand Eight two thousand nine and and now we're we've coming out of it in a good positive way. I mean we have today Seven and a half million more jobs than people to fill them. With the lowest unemployment rate the lowest inflation rate the lowest interest rates the highest wage gains in a long time. So you know the economy's healthy and this is a good. It's hard to complain about this. Us economy right now. Now things can always change. As a parent of two millennials. We have in some ways. These these this generation you know. This was the generation that grew up where everybody got a trophy and this is the generation. You know that You know it was now believes that they should have safe spaces. This generation is facing special challenges. I think I'm an optimist. I think that will overcome these challenges. This generation has a lot of opportunities out there to flourish and one. I think to tell these young people. Oh it's going to be horrible and own. My Gosh you know the would be alive today rather than looking at the opportunities that that people have that are really unrivalled in human history I think that's what we should stress so limestone. Are you suffering from Trophy Itis? No I actually agree. I think there is a case to be made for optimism about the future but I think that a lot of the productive choices we can make for that future are basically to roll back the clock on the on the political legacy of of the baby boomer generation. It's to say okay. There were all these restrictions for this generation was obsessed with real estate wealth and so they established all these tight zoning restrictions to prop up the wealth that was embedded in these houses and now that means young people can't afford houses. Many Americans in their twenties and thirties may have given up on the dream of Home Ownership. A new survey finds nearly nine million millennials expect to be permanent renters. That's up more than a million people from a year ago. Nearly half of millennial renters say they have not save a dime for a down payment to buy a home. Cbs News you need to get rid of those regulations right or we can look at incarceration. There was a very real crimewave. Very real problem. It was responded to by a very excessive degree of incarceration and even now that Crime has fallen dramatically. We continue to incarcerate at rates that are higher than than essentially any country other than North Korea. So this would be perhaps a policy. That could be revisited. Maybe this was not. It was understandable at the time may be but we don't need it anymore so the path forward is to undo what was dot. You're listening to the debates podcast. Be It resolved. Baby boomers have ruined the future for millennials. If you like this podcast make sure to check out. Our other episodes including debates on everything from impeachment to social media to sanctions against Iran all free to download or stream on our website month debates dot com. Now back to the episode..

Stephen Moore Great Lyman Google Steven United States Alzheimer Tom One Cbs North Korea Soviet Union America Wall Street Journal dot Parkinson Disease Multiple Sclerosis
Leading a multi-generational team.

Hacking Your Leadership

03:14 min | 8 months ago

Leading a multi-generational team.

"For this talent Tuesday episode. I WanNa talk about the recent trend in many organizations of hiring generational consultant a generational consultant may or may not be what you think it is but the rise in this trend should come as no surprise given it for the first time in American history. There are five distinct generations occupying the workforce. I we're the traditionalist or silent generation. Those born prior to Nineteen forty-six. Some retired years ago in a return to the workforce because they understand the importance of continuing to exercise their minds. Some had retirement accounts hit hard in the recession. They weren't ready to retire when they initially planned. As we're told by angry spouse to go to the house I'm kind of kidding but not completely next to the baby boomers. Those born between nineteen forty six and nineteen sixty four. These people are between fifty six and seventy three years old around ten thousand of them retire every single day but millions are still several years away from retirement. Many are running organizations now while others are in various middle management roles and it started to see people twenty thirty or even forty years younger than the become their bosses third. We have Jenex those were between nineteen sixty five nineteen seventy-nine these people are between forty one and fifty five years old. They're mostly nowhere near retirement but the smart ones know that retirement is not an age rather a financial state. Fourth we have millennials those war between nineteen hundred and nineteen ninety-four. These people are between twenty six and forty years old and many of them haven't even found a career that will make them financially stable much less when they love half the American workforce last. We Have Gen Z. Those born after Nineteen ninety-five. Many of these people are still in school. But the ones who are in the workforce are occupying largely entry level. Jobs if you're listening right now chances. Are you work alongside people from at least four of these five generations if your leader you probably have people from a few different ones reporting to you? So why is this important? It's important because all these people are looking for different things from you. Their leader different stages of life come different priorities and every person reporting to you views their job as a vehicle for accomplishing those priorities. For some might be simply a paycheck for others. It's absorption of skills and knowledge in order to move on to bigger things for some it's simply a desire to enjoy the job hanging out with people they like and not dread coming to work and for others it could be a quest for deep meaningful fulfilment and a desire to give back while we all might assigned varying degrees of nobility to these priorities. None of them are wrong and to the employees who resonate with each one. None of the others are as important as theirs. In theory a generational consultant navigate. These waters they make you fluent in five different languages so to speak so you can tailor. Leadership style appropriately but were many leaders are missing. The mark is in their belief that they need any help doing this for their own. Teams you-know-who Generational consultants recruiters marketing teams. People who work in generalities are baby boomers selfish. I Dunno find me one who is a final. One Who isn't to millennials have poor work ethic. I duNNo. Show me one who does and I'll show you. Doesn't you see while broad. Sweeping generalizations are important for maximising impact when attempting to reach out to a community as a whole. They're terrible for reaching out to a person. They removed the individuality and made people feel like they are seen as a piece of data rather than a person. So if your leader people you find yourself. Trying to better relate to a multi generational workforce and help them meet their goals. Stop writing about their generation and start having real candid conversations and might be awkward. At first he may not anything in common with them. But if both of you share the goal of getting them where they want to be. It's fantastic jumping off point. It'll only get better with time. Thanks for listening and have a fantastic day.

Consultant Jenex
How To Achieve Financial Freedom In 10 Years Or Less with Brad Gibb

Entrepreneur on FIRE

07:54 min | 8 months ago

How To Achieve Financial Freedom In 10 Years Or Less with Brad Gibb

"Ryan say what's up to fire nation and sheer so the interesting about yourselves. That most people don't know what is up fire nation. Hey this is Ryan Lee and his Brad and guys The thing that most people don't about us We are to financial strategist and so many people think that we have all these degrees and pedigree one of us does one of us doesn't so I'm actually a high school dropouts And Bradley give over here is I have more degrees than fingers on one hand so so the interesting thing is how the two of US combined with our perspectives around money and finance. What it all means to help empower people in their financial planning. Well I love it and fire nation as I alluded to in the intro. We're GONNA be talking about how you can achieve financial freedom and we're talking ten years or less. We're not talking by the time you know thirty years. Forty years have gone by. Of course you'll be five x ten x down the road by them. We're talking in this decade fire nation. It is something that's been a focus of mine. One of the reasons I moved to Porto Rico. Three and a half years ago that might come up a little further on this conversation. And these guys. They've been helping people they've been connected with some great entrepreneurs actually about to be going to funnel hacking lives look continuing to up. Their education surround themselves with the right people. Suspicious breakdown four fire nation at the top this episode what Financial Freedom Actually Means John. I love that question. I mean you know. There's so many misconceptions. I think a lot of people throw around the idea. The concept the phrase financial freedom but as we talk to people about a very few people actually understand what it means that the simple answer to that is when your cash flow from your expense from your assets exceed your expenses. That's the simple answer but as you dive into it a little bit deeper you know in order for you to truly be financially free. There's one thing you have to own and it's your time. It's your most valuable and precious resource so when we go back to that simple answer of cash flow exceeding expenses that cash flow that you have coming in from your assets from from what you've put put aside has to be passive. It has to be income. That's coming in independent of you trading more of time to get it and you know as you mentioned we're on we're we're sitting in a hotel room about to go to our fifth funnel hacking live. We talked to a lot of entrepreneurs a lot of business owners a lot of W. Two employees and they make good money and some of them to a certain extent have saved money but they don't own their time so that that at the core is what we do. We help empower people in the conversation of money so they can own their time. Anything you want ads in bread. There's a thousand ways we can make money right but the conversations just are we making money. It's are we keeping it and is it positioning us to do. I am of a life of purpose. Wake up every day and do what we want to do. And what we're here meant to do to bring a Puerto Rico so quickly but that phrase you said Brad exactly why I moved to this island because I know that I've been making a lot of money for a lot of years but after California taxes federal taxes. I was like am I really keeping all this money and the answer was not really the move to Puerto Rico. The four percent tax. Everything has made the ability to do that. And that's why fire nation you've got to have your finger on the pulse talking to people who are smart in financial advising like these two cats right here because they are living there eating it. They are breathing. It's and let's just break down. Why why do most people struggle not just with money but with achieving financial freedom? A great question and loaded there. There's lots of ways we could go with this one of you just mentioned you said You. GotTa get advice from Smart People in John. I'd go a level deeper than that. One of the biggest problems with financial advice today is we're taking advice from people who themselves are still broke right or who themselves really don't have they might have textbook answers right. They might have answers that that sound intelligent by. It's really really hard to follow somebody or duplicate results when you're listening to somebody who hasn't done what you want to accomplish right and so a lot of it is is. We're just looking to the wrong places. Were we think that degrees we think that letters and acronyms after our names or big You Know Company pedigrees are the thing that are going to get US financially free. But it's like I I would hesitate to take marriage advice for somebody. Who's maybe on their fifth marriage or I'd hesitate to take parenting advice from somebody who doesn't have kids yet you. It's really really difficult if not impossible to live what you don't lead. And that's an epidemic in the financial industry today And then and then second to that would be because we're listening wrong people. We we believe in ninety seven percent of financial advice becomes dangerous misleading or outright. Wrong when we're not focused on answering the right question which really centered around our first response to to what is financial freedom so fire nation. Have you ever been in that gym class or you know? Gone into some kind of doctor session. And you're getting this advice. Health advices nutrition advice from just this overweight or even obese person like for me. I'm just like my friends. You're giving me advice that you can't even take yourself like there's no credibility there's no validity in that so you've gotta find people who have been there who have done that who have results who have testimonials who have proven concepts period end of story ends. You guys are known for Bowl statements. And I'm personally a big fan of bold statements. Bullishly break this down. Ninety seven percents of traditional finest dangerous misleading in outright. Wrong breakdown force. I love that and and that's kind of a controversial statement for shore and I'M GONNA. I'M GONNA take this back You know I think everyone can learn just about everything. They need to know about life from watching the Sitcom Seinfeld. You remember that one back in the day so funny I miss it so funny but In seinfeld there's this. There's this clip that George Costanza short bald. You know living in his parent's basement and nothing in his life seems to be working out and he's in the coffee shop with Jerry and his lamenting over the fact that he can't get a dates you know he can't hold down a job. Nothing's working and Jerry points out a really interesting thing you know. He says George. If everything you're doing in in your life right now isn't getting what you want. Then the opposite would have to be true. And George Ponder that for a minute he says you know what that's right. The opposite has to be true and so he stands right up. He walks over to To the bar there. And there's this beautiful blonde woman and says hey my name George Costanza short on fat on balls and I'm unemployed and I live with my parents and the blonde woman immediately. Response saying hi. I'm Victoria. I bald men. And so that's a reality man John if if people really take a step back and they look at the financial world everyone knows it. No one will acknowledge it but there is a major problem. There is a major problem with people not saving enough money going into massive amounts of debt putting their money in retirement plans that they don't control and then if you fast forward and you look at all these baby boomers like these baby boomers. Do not have enough money to retire and the relying on the government. They're hoping taxes stay whether at their you know. There's just a lot of problems. And if we keep looking at what everyone else is doing traditionally which is blindly putting money in a 401k with their fingers crossed hoping that it works out the reality of that is that problems just going to compound and so our goal isn't to help you do. What's not working better because again when you look to the Financial World. Everything is a plus one strategy. Well if you're getting five percent over there what are you.

George Costanza You Know Company Brad Ryan Lee Smart People Puerto Rico Financial World Jerry United States Porto Rico Bradley W. Two John George Ponder George California
Why Neuroscientists Love Running

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

06:28 min | 9 months ago

Why Neuroscientists Love Running

"Exercise has really really emerged as one of the areas that has grown with real biological evidence that it can prevent and improve brain function and brain health. And we used to think as you said. There was an and north of the neck and south of and that everything in the Alzheimer's was north of naked. Nothing south of the neck was related to it. When in fact now we know that things things like gut microbiome can alter your immune system and having a healthy microbiome can keep you healthy? And by the innate in you can boost your innate immunity addity which might reduce inflammation across the board across the body including the brain. Yeah and Exercise Helps Reduce Inflammation and B. D. and F. so the exercise. I have to tell you I hated running. But I've taken up running because of what is that This brain derived neurotrophic factor. Because I'll miracle Michael Growth for the brain in the funny part about it is almost neuroscientists are runners. They don't do anything but run. They have to have something to is the fastest way to raise. Major beat the NFL's which is basically this growth factor in your brain cells together so called Neuro plasticity which increases connections and neurogenesis genesis. Which is the developing new brain cells? Chris we never thought that was possible. Remember thought it was puzzle. Is that once. You'RE GONNA get it but we now know that the brains making neurons throughout their lights unbelievable soda so these things like Diane and exercise and optimizing your gut microbiome and stress reduction. They incense work by regulating inflammatory. That's correct that is correct. That is the inflammation of course is the unifying common pathway. That we can manage people think that you go to the doctor. They're going to fix you but the truth is eighty percent of your health is determined by what you do not with us. And that's the thing I want people to take away from. This is that you can engage in your own life plan to alter your risk. Don't wait you know people should start. They can change your diet today. They can I started exercising today. They can do yoga starting today. They don't need to wait so new research. Neuro brain cells. Don't age it's your blood vessels day. Yeah so anything anything that damages. Your blood vessels damages your brain so few know how to increase blood flow so things like exercise as and Gingko and beats and Rosemary and pepper. I mean really simple things Can actually help improve the function. Shen of your brain being upon us your table tennis. You're not stuck with the brain you have. You can make it better. And most people don't know that there's actually actually study from England on who leads the longest so they looked at sports. And so if you don't play any sports you don't live long. Tennis players live seven seven years longer if you play football or soccer you don't live longer than anybody else. Because you're putting your head with the ball. People who play racket. Sports live the longest. That's why play table tennis. Because you gotta get your eyes hands and feet all to work together while you think about this spin on the ball. Yeah Yeah I picked picked up tennis when I was forty five and I work at it as much as I can. It's just makes me so happy and I think it has kept me younger and well. It activates your Sarah Bellm and the Sara Bellum You know you're the young people listening. You're not going to know who. This is it horrifies me. I called the Sara Bellum the Rodney dangerfield part of the brain. You gets no respect. He even though it's ten percent of the brain volume it contains fifty percent of the brain's neurons and the cerebral is not just involved in coordination. It's involved in processing speed and thought coordination and so when you play Tana's you're activating the cerebral which has reciprocal connections since with your frontal lobes so it's actually making us smarter more focused. It's really a great game and my goal is really to keep getting younger a younger. I had my telomeres done. which are a measure of the the M caps of your chromosomes and they shorten as you get older but we know from research that through through diet through various vitamins through exercise stress reduction meditation you can actually lengthen your telomeres? It's not a one way street. I'm fifty nine but my telomere says I'm thirty nine. which is pretty awesome correct? TELOMERES are big big. Part about program we use and telomeres for many years But you're right just walking looking thirty minutes sixty minutes walking sixty minutes a day will let them your telomeres and increase your lifespan. By twenty five years just walking sixty minutes a day to some net easy. Yeah let's say you exercise your whole life compared to someone who is sedentary their whole life and you both had a heart attack from the books members for some of these studies. The person who exercise is going to have a smaller heart attack the person doesn't excise level large heart attack. What does exercise do grows? New Blood vessels I can speak for. Hours was on just cardiology and traditional disease management. But I mean here. We're talking about you know more natural ways to stay younger and healthier and live longer. It's great great. It's really great and I think the thinking about aging as a process that's not necessarily inevitable we can with a little effort work. Intelligence Urgence use lifestyle plus various innovative treatments that are regenerative to actually optimize maintain our health and even reverse some of the the things related to aging. Now I look at myself more. I've understood about diet exercise the more. I've implemented it the better I am. I you know I can tell you my my my bone density and my body composition was better than even just three years ago. Even though I'm getting older I'm getting healthy. So there is hope for all of us who are aging aging. Because that's the fastest growing segment of the population. And the baby boomers are all heading there and even if you're young important start young if you're listening because what you invest early pays off later. I've been taking care myself my whole life. I've never really been overweight. I've exercised and as you see. I'm almost sixty and basically as fit as a thirty year old or younger and I think that's possible for everybody. I just wanted to to have hope and believe that if they understand the basic workings of their biology if they understand how to create health that that it's available to them at any time and it doesn't take a long time. You're talking about really months or weeks for people to start to see massive

Sara Bellum Alzheimer Michael Growth NFL Diane Tennis Chris England Shen Tana Rodney Dangerfield Rosemary Sarah Bellm Soccer Football
"baby boomers" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on Ideas

"You're listening to boomer bashing laying blame on a generation. The episode was produced by. Tom Howell thanks to my guests. Jenny Bristow and Bruce Cannon Gibney you can find out more information about them and their books at our website. CBC DOT CA slash ideas. Yes if you want to respond to any of the arguments in today's program you can post comments on our.

"baby boomers" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

11:16 min | 1 year ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on Ideas

"The only way to save these programs stuff on his discussions but what they need to be sustained indefinitely or at least over seventy five year horizon. We are not having those discussions and as a result when they do go sideways there will be a sense of social legitimacy. The most insidious thing that you could do if you hate it social security is to do nothing and allow it to break. Its promises to younger generations. Rations and the twenty thirty s because then it really seems illegitimate so if you are sort of like a truce drowsy and right winger. That's exactly how you would take down Social Security Medicare you would allow allow it to break. Its promises we have to have serious discussions about this now. Just as the boomers had serious discussions for example United States with the Greenspan Commission eighty-two when when social security was teetering on insolvency and there was a you know a grand bargain made the taxes would You know be increased working edge slightly increased and benefits would be you know slightly adjusted trusted if we do not have that conversation. The government itself is very clear that these programs will kill over. What is your advice? The the same question I asked to Jenny. To The millennials out there who do put the blame on the boomer generation for what appears to be Much bleaker future for for them taxes. Unfortunately I'm not generally fanta taxes but taxes are going to have to go up so the question always with taxes is who should pay an and how and there are ways to sort of claw back taxes from boomers for example you know. Jenny was talking about the housing market implicitly. Why we haven't built more housing if you want I want you know better? More affordable housing and WANNA implicitly raise a tax to fund some of the services that we want blow up Nimby ISM. Have you know more affordable sort of higher density see housing do it. There are a whole series of things that we can do for higher income retirees tax more of their pension benefits. They don't necessarily need it the the idea that by the way we should be very clear about this. The idea that people are just taking out what they put into the system. That's just false. So if you discount the cash flows the average retiree the average boomer retiree takes out about a dollar fifty three from Social Security and Medicare relative dollar put in those are real inflation adjusted dollars. Fifty three cents is welfare. It's not you're just getting your money back with interest that's factoring in you know sort of inflation and a two year yield. That's welfare welfare. And that's normal right. I'm not against it because government and this is one of the reasons why we should be having a generational discussion. Government is just an insurance company with an army. It's here to redistribute and we should figure out who is worthy of redistribution. So let's start with that fifty three cents at least for you know hiring people who can who can afford to give come up and I'm by the way I'm one of them although I'm younger I'm not a fan of paying higher taxes but we've got to do it for the same reason that we have to start meeting climate. The sooner you repair things. It's easier to to do maintenance on your car than it is to buy a new car. That's Bruce Cannon given. His book is as a generation of sociopaths. How the baby boomer's betrayed? America and Jenny Bristow is listening to him from our studio in London England. She's the author of stopped off mugging grandma. The generation wars and why boomer blaming won't solve anything I just don't understand and I've read Bruce Book I don't understand why economic can policy failures are targeted so narrowly at the door of the baby boomers. I mean bruce like the critics of this kind tends to have a sort of definitions. The baby boomer's that Kinda works when he wants to blame them and doesn't want he he doesn't they should take no credit for civil rights offer abortion already the positive things that we associate with the sixties but they should be blamed for a whole load of other things if there were older younger generations involved in it at the same time I mean it just seems to me to be a a real evasion of things I did national audette problems with productivity what we do about climate change all of those big problems I just do not see any resolution for them in this narrative of Bouma blaming lightening Bruce. What do you say to the idea that this discussion is maybe ten gentle to the discussion? We should be having which is solving these issues. We should solve them but ultimately solving them requires financing and it's appropriate to figure out who should contribute. What this idea that you know bloomers when it's convenient? I don't when I don't if you know earlier earlier in the segment. I pointed out the whole sort of civil rights. You know counter narrative about the boomers responsible for civil rights. Let's just be clear. Nineteen fifty to the average boomer is borne orne fifty four is brown versus board of Education. So let's not civil rights movement took a long time. It's true. The march on Selma was top. was that toddlers was the march on Selma toddlers how the voting rights act or the Civil Rights Act. What you do see is the boomers unwinding a lot of the gains that were made you know with respect to debt again? You have to ask on. WHO's watched did the national debts balloon and whose benefit for example the tax cuts helped spawn? These as you know these bloated national debts who did they benefit now. I don't disagree that we should be solving these these problems but at the end of the day you have to make a pitch to the electorate and you have to say what's what's Fair for you guys to pay in who should pay it the answer that Oh well it feels bad to say that grandma was responsible or history. Will Judge millennials later on. That's just not productive. Is that a is that a fair characterization of your argument Jenny brief has given a good example of what I would describe as grandma among. That's exactly it to say what you need. A pitch to the electorate to say who should we blame now and he's very explicit about this in his book he says we need another right. We need the two other the baby boomer's make them the target so that we can get the money on the political of to make these changes now. I think that's very dangerous. I'm very very divisive and I also think I said it's an invasion dangerous. In what way an invasion in what sense you know. I have ascribed and traced through the flows of of cash tax benefits et CETERA. Who benefited and who has the assets to pay rather than the Ipse Dixit of? It's dangerous rather than sort of you know I'm mugging grandma. First of all grandma stole the purse from us so maybe taking it back doesn't quite count as mugging second. In what way is asking grandma. Contribute her fair share and by the way no one has reduced. At least the United States there has been no policy of austerity with respect to old age benefits so in what way rhetorical mugging of grandma tantamount to actually taking taking money from her is is it really the same as bloating. The national debt and ignoring climate. In what ways are these morally equivalent. This is false equivalents and if you would like to come back doc with concrete examples of the way in which grandma has been harmed at least the United States I deferred you want Britain but at least in the United States let me know. Do you want to take that on Jenny in the UK context context well in the UK context the effect of this kind of generations. Them has been very interesting because Rowley. All this talk about intergenerational celebrity. I can tell you it will not result in any more resources going to young people the intergenerational commission which David Willetts lead spent two years producing producing lows and those and those are data to show the depth of alleged intergenerational inequality within Britain and landmark conclusion. Was that every twenty five five year old. Should get a so-called citizens in evidence of think it was ten thousand pounds abuse. Twenty five thousand pounds. I it was ten thousand pounds. I they said to put towards a deposit on a house like this I divide you to pay higher education. The ten thousand pounds would mean nothing. And so it's a it's a symbolic lick maneuver. What it does it? Low As expectations of what people should expect when they're older. These are expectations that say people my age. I'm I'm in my forties. Have now all people in the thirties. It basically says to them. It's wrong to expect that once you start working you should get a decent pension for for example and that's the problem with it is not a redistribution strategy it kind of looks like one is just a penny pinching strategy that encourages people go to think. Actually yeah you know. We're not going to get anything in future Jenny. Do you think there is any merit. Is there some usefulness to the generational Lenz. I don't think is useful provided WE WE KEEP IT in perspective. I mean we have to be quite careful and quite precise about what we mean when we talk about generations because cause generations to me can tell us about history and generational differences in experience will perspectives or whatever but I think where we need to be really wary is taking all of that are context. And just looking at things in a very one-sided way so as I say in my book the baby baby boomers is like they're always associated with high sixties. Everyone forgets about the seventies. Everyone forgets about the Cuban missile crisis. The baby boomer politicians used to be associated with Clinton Insulin Blah. Now they become kind of satiated with the right wing was because everyone wants to have got the right wing politicians that you know I mean. It's a very promiscuous discussion speaking of large periods of time if it's useful to attribute the causes of upheaval generations to fifteen years slices of of the population. Why is it? The historians never seem to do that with big events in St You know like the American civil war the Roman Empire falling or things like that. It seems as though that the further we get away from some of these events the more that we see things in terms of religious divides economic divides. What does that tell US short? You know what's unusual about generations this time is this is the largest redistribution scheme in history old age benefits and the money runs out when the boomers die and that's the reason why this generation is super important. It's unusually large generation right. This is the first time in history where there are this. Many people thanks to technology sanitation. What have you who just are born historically speaking all of a sudden and who all have one one unifying interest which is not sustainable old age benefits coupled with a resource intensive and exploitative not sustainable methods the doing business now I'm four capitalist and let's be clear about this but that that's what super unusual bought them because none of these things that worked really well for this very unusual generation for which there is no president. And we'll after the millennials never be a precedent again isis. Back this is a one time shot in its present chorus That's what makes it sort of an unusual generation. And that's why we have to fix it. It is a bizarre and a historical departure. It's weird it's weird and so my my clarion call to people sort of like if if you think we should address problems political problems and debt climate infrastructure. Whatever by all means? Let's come up with a plan and if you WANNA forgive you know boomers or you. Don't think boomers responsible. That's that's you. That's your absolute right..

"baby boomers" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

14:30 min | 1 year ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on Ideas

"Inch welcome to ideas and a warning to baby boomers hold onto your hats because a gust of generational anger. We'll soon be blowing your way as we hear from a man who calls boomers generation of sociopaths. There's just no way around. The money runs out. When the boomers die Bruce Cannon gibney blame.

"baby boomers" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"Expert in culture, and governance and senior fellow at the institution Heller there Jonathan it's great to be here. Thank you. And with me in the studio is the economists very own will close to being millennial Joan US editor. Hello, john. So Jonathan what is characterize the age of the baby boomers? Baby boomers were absolutely enormous generation, and they came of age in a time of protests. This was civil rights movement that they were leading the Vietnam war protests that draft they turned to be moralistic and confrontational than when they became parents. They often became very protective and moralistic in that way to millennials tend to be more pragmatic. These are people who grew up in a time of of less plenty with less American confidence. They all remember nine eleven great recession. Of course happened when they were struggling to get a foothold. So they tend to be less confrontational, less sanctimony is I think millennials tend to be a little bit more cautious. You know, they're worried about global warming. They're worried about race. They tend to be to the left, and I think yes, if you pay attention to what goes on liberal arts colleges in the United States. You get the impression at they're very militant. And if this balance is shifting when do you think we would see the influence of millennials making a big difference? In say the way politics is conducted and indeed winners and losers. Well, there's two questions there, there's cultural influence, and then there's political influence cultural influence where seeing already that's, you know, the metoo movement in the United States is to some significant extent millennial saying, you know, we've had it. Our values have changed. We are not going to tolerate the sorts of things that earlier generations took for granted political. However is a different story because one of the curious things about millennials and the generation coming after but some people call. Hi, Jen is it tendency to vote in smaller numbers, baby boomers and greatest generation and silent generation voted quite heavily. And they still do. It's been very difficult to get millennials to the polls. And that's. Been a huge problem for the Democratic Party, and for progressives because millennials are punching way under their weight who why are they doing that? And you told us these pragmatic sensitive that they're looking at the world around them. They feel less secure. What do you think that why can't they just sort of get out the hipster barring going vote people say, it's because of a sense of futility? It's a sense of things don't really change if I vote, of course, it's a self fulfilling prophecy, but this is something that some of the smartest political minds in America are working very hard to understand many of them, of course, in the Democratic Party on the progressive movement because the Democrats have kept relying on demographic change and the coming of this more liberal millennial wave to begin a resurgence against the Republicans, and it keeps not happening because millennials keep staying home..

Jonathan Democratic Party United States senior fellow Joan US editor America Jen
"baby boomers" Discussed on Move or Improve

Move or Improve

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on Move or Improve

"Market. They do not want cookie cutter retirement communities. They want aging in place solutions and affinity living. New housing options are emerging as well. And that's a good sign that the baby boomers are finally having a say in how their want to retire. Sixty three percent of baby boomers want to buy a single family detached home. Now, seventy five percent of those want a single story home. If you percent of baby boomers for full or partial heats. Okay, skirting backup. Sixty three percent of baby boomers want to buy a single family detached home. Seventy five percent of those one a single-story home. Fifty percent of baby boomer form, a full or partial basement, very few of them. Only seven percent prefer central city location. Baby boomers have a lot of money, and they're not afraid to spend it baby boomers control more than seventy percent of financial assets. And have fifty percent of the discretionary spending power in America. Eighty percent of boomers own the home and twenty five percent earn at least one additional type of real estate like vacation, home or rental property. Baby boomers want and need to work three quarters of them do plan on working in retirement, and this generation most likely move in and out of the workforce throughout retirement boomers will look for houses that have been in home office in high speed internet connection in wireless capabilities that can double as low as guest room flex space to accommodate visiting family will be important as well..

America Sixty three percent Seventy five percent seventy five percent twenty five percent seventy percent Eighty percent three quarters Fifty percent fifty percent seven percent
"baby boomers" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

WJNT 1180 AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on WJNT 1180 AM

"We we right absolutely so what do you think were ion when i asked was roundtable why do you think we're seeing more alzheimer's dementia do you think there's more of it or do you think it's just we're talking about it i'll start with you alex both i think that we always wrote everything office memo that's just old age and now we're realizing that that's not so so that's one but the other really is we are climbing in numbers because we have other things in play now new chemicals environmental factors there's all kinds of things so i i think it's a little of of both lee yeah i agree what do you think well we we are facing the baby boomers so we have this big influx of seniors and people are living longer so in the past people would die safe from cardiovascular disease before they would get alzheimer's dementia so with that combination we're seeing a tremendous amount now are there are other factors going on we don't know because you know we know what happens with alzheimer's disease with the amyloid deposits in the brain and so on but we don't know what causes it suit can't will be safe from that degree i would agree with both of june aging population and environmental exposures in the one that i point the finger at is going to be uh nutrition the that in an i will bet you and i haven't google there but if i bet you i can find an article that links deterioration in the gut by own he's already absolutely bill which the deterioration of the gut by all means in a car a combination of dietary and environmental factors so now there's an adhoc gatt and brain by gala conclusion is it gulia eugenic diet and the treatment of alzheimer's in dimension there's actually some pretty good studies at trailing you get a genetic diet can actually improve dementia throughout it's all its stages so now in you know we were carbs outta there know they improve their cognitive function in alec steve you did you hear about the study about sleep you know they found that if you get into ram sleep your brain ashley washes at selling a washing machine and cleans up the plaques in the toxins and staff so lot are these people end up with alzheimer's dementia also have sleep apnea and we know sleep apnea in.

alzheimer lee baby boomers alex alzheimer's disease google
"baby boomers" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on WDRC

"You a baby boomer or a genetic sir uh i'm the tail end of the baby boom i know actually your eye gen xers according to this agenda ex her was born from nineteen sixty one to nineteen 81 laura okay yeah i've always thought that it was 1960 nineteen forty six tonight in 64 were the baby boomers that way i insulted wink opd yellowred so you know how that is just ten percent of baby boomers and gen xers give themselves an a grade on retirement planning sixty three percent of them i give themselves okay the other the raiding their own knowledge of a c or lower that's according to a recent survey by north american companies sammons financial group up forty seven percent of baby boomers can west that spending money on things that they didn't need and getting too much in that where their biggest financial mistakes that they made when they were younger and another one third of them say it was not saving enough for retirement and get this nearly one fifth of gen xers loretta are supporting their parents low while seventy one percent are still supporting their children so you've got to i now the hang on seventy one percent are still supporting their children and how many are supporting their a one fifth of the one fifth of of the the twenty other sent john there are supporting their parents so you know i as financial advisers of course our parents look to us you to check out their portfolios ally and and uh some things creep up and i realize that my mom is you know she's given a lot to charities you do not like she's she's allowing people to caller on the phone and she's donating everything we ended up changing our phone number gives is getting way too many calls and everything see at her heart is just over here just can't say no so you know it's really about i think really taking care of yourself first i mean we all wanna take care of our children we want to take care of.

baby boomers john north american one fifth seventy one percent forty seven percent sixty three percent ten percent
"baby boomers" Discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Is interesting about our world right now is a lot of people talk about the rise of the millennials you know being the largest population in quantity since the baby boomers and maybe in some people's enumeration larger than the baby boomer generation so how do you expect if you could put on your crystal ball if you're you know you're looking at data all the time and you're looking at data that sort of in essence provides a tool to predict behavior down the road so how do you see the coming generations using this data and and changing their habits and frankly changing the world's habits as a result of coming at this stuff from a different vantage point as they have well it's interesting because i think that um the baby boom generation uh was known for being um conspicuous who booed that we were there of conspicuous consumption so in my view so i am the mother of three millennials i view them as the generation of conspicuous optimize irs and what i mean by that is um i don't see my you know this is out of the scientifically proven the data test but just my observation and my uh just studying of data uh trends in in in the world is that i think that um this generation is committed to optimizing and getting the most use out of resources and to the i think they're very good at optimizing i mean just look at airbnb um they take excess housing capacity and uh rent ruin their rent rooms or they may maybe if they own a house they they rent a room so um they use over they are less likely to buy cars um so they using technology and using data there much more able to extract the the highest usage out of a limited resource pool so i feel that um you know is there uh.

baby boomers irs
"baby boomers" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Baby boomers talking to a fiduciary there were integrating the tax strategies with the investment strategies that we're talking about legacy planning that we're talking to have entrusts set up a right to save on as state taxes and to make sure that your wishes are carried through these are just a couple of the areas so scott what is another area that we can talk about with this generation well certainly insurance services so scott there's a couple of areas in the insurance product world that we do talk about there's only a couple of products that we would use here but were to those related to well we use fixed index annuities one of those is for secure investment growth and then there's another product that we used to create a lifetime cashflow yeah so there are fixed in annex in new these do have various uses in the right situations there may be uses abban subsitute or cash substitute for secure girl with there may be used for some of that doesn't have a pension or doesn't have adequate pension these aren't pensions but they're in equivalent way of providing cash flow for life that you can't out live much like a pension does so there are potential uses for the fixed in next to nunis we also integrate other areas we talked about the dst seminars delaware statuary trust so we have passive a real estate so that can take the form of the d s t for 1030 ones but is there a way to invest in real estate in a retirement or a qualified ira account yeah there is there's what's up it's called a real estate investment trust and they will accept funds from qualified retirement plans yes so that's a way that we can diversify even more for our clients portfolios so it could be into the insurance investment world.

Baby boomers cash flow real estate real estate investment trust fiduciary scott ira
"baby boomers" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That the baby boomers that rotation out of the labor force of the baby boomer's in the rotation in of lowerpaid millennials is holding down aggregate wage growth that certainly is an element at play but that also does speak to sort of the aggregate in flation mary pressures that the economy is feeling in they're pretty subdued so there again sort of active bank of japan may be demographics here are sick leading to a lower nominal momentum economy but that's not the only thing suggesting that we're not quite a full employment the labour force participation of primeage workers in particular has been on a pretty strong uptrend were still below the lows of prior cycle four primeage workers so again we're setting aside the demographic drag from retiring baby boomers so i think there is still scope and and unless and until we see that stall out i think you've got to conclude there is still a shadow labor force of some size does that mean that it's still is it to suit our re in are we ready to hike he could also take the view that asian folks too much on flation it doesn't have to be at two percent one and a half his okay ish pledge she the trend is strong i would not actually concur with that because when you're this close to this year a lower bounded does matter that you get to two percent you know the fed doesn't wanna get stuck relying on balance sheet policy as the norm going forward so being patient and taking your time in leading that momentum build pays dividends down the road if it allows you to get higher to a higher level of interest rates ultimately you do wanna let some of that nominal them momentum build julian twenty seconds what's the biggest concern if you if you wait too long to normalize is it that you don't have enough ammunition for a downturn well i think i would again i would turn that around if you normalized too quickly and interrupt the momentum.

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"baby boomers" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Life insurance and i'll pay you back out when you're helping them it is a gift it is there is now going to borrow a let's not give the illusion that anyone's borrow in any money if a baby boomers struggling financially the money they give is not alone right so if you are and you're thirty or forty isen in you look at the life of your parents and as they prepare for retirement or they're in retirement and you have to understand that the baby boomers are tragically unprepared for retirement i know there's a lot going on our world right now on a political basis and it's hard to read any other news that is a political news but there is a retirement crisis i talk about it on the show all the time there's a retirement chris ten thousand baby boomers a day or retiring right now in the vast majority already of those people are completely unprepared to retire so this topic may not be pertinent to you right now but it will statistically likely be important to you at some point in time it will be pertinent because chances are if your parents have not retired yet they will retire at some point in time in statistically speaking they won't be prepared to retire even though they're gonna retire this will people don't understand about retirement is that your allowed to retire even win you shouldn't right hey it's like it's like i can run with my shirt off at night around my neighborhood from exercise a shouldn't a shouldn't unless my neighbors are like hey i'm looking to lose a little way i want to eat as much can you run gershon off as an appetite suppressant for me and i was like shirt let me let me let me be.

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"baby boomers" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on WJR 760

"Baby boomers if you're hoping to retire within the next ten years or perhaps have already retired we're glad you're here this is the rich paul show the baby boomer's retirement survival guide and welcome back to the rich paul show eric heck here with you sitting alongside rich paul certified finance up later retirement specialist owner of rw paul associates and the author of the baby boomer's retirement survival guide talking about retirement planning as always and when it comes to retirement planning there are a lot of assumptions that people often make some of them turn out to be right many of them turn out out to be a wrong and it's very important to be careful about making assumptions when it comes to your retirement planning before you really know the facts are rich let's talk about some of these assumptions that people often make that can sometimes lead them astray i won knee is actually first couple are about iras there are people who who think that are just assume that are roth ira is going to save you money in the end over a traditional ira other people make exactly the opposite assumption traditional ira is always going to be better than roth ira why are these risky assumptions well i it comes down to this do the math before a make kenyan assumption either way on this i look at the young people there with their highest earning years ahead of him a ronkko almost always make the most sense but if you're already in the middle of your highest journey here's the answer isn't always clear sometimes foregoing the tax break that comes with the ceo traditional ira contribution and could be detrimental but they're still cases we'd be better off the take the tax hit now and contribute to a rock instead so when i say is when it comes to tax planning get some good advice an accurate projections that can make all the difference for you what about social security there are people who think especially as they get close to retirement well let me delays.

Baby boomers eric heck paul rw paul associates ira social security ceo ten years
"baby boomers" Discussed on Z100

Z100

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"baby boomers" Discussed on Z100

"Police in the morning show one the only ed sheeran i'm in the tape push and pull like a magnet although mahad berlin zoo i'm in your body last night in my room number bed she like you discover the brand new apple i'm in love with your body well i'm in the body i'm in love with your body why i'm in love with your body made is covering their brand new i'm in love the pardon bima baby ma cannot be a baby kamar bima baby boomer command being baby boomer command bima baby boomer obama baby boomer the baby boomer obama baby boomer worse still ran dot com yeah yeah correct this but you're mayo jeff varner.

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