19 Burst results for "Babson college"

RIP Business Suit?

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:10 min | 2 d ago

RIP Business Suit?

"Tina Ob is a professor of management at Babson College and she says, a lot of students will come to her. You know before they're interviewed for the first internships or first jobs and they will ask like Bush should I wear this job. So she thinks about the question of like how professional and professional norms a lot when I asked most people what is the most big symbol of the business world and visit professionalism almost everyone says the business eventually and Tina started thinking about why in about where these norms come from also she herself had a special relationship with the business suit because before she was in academia Tina worked in banking and I absolutely were businesses because We think about the prototype of a banker is that you have a tailored suits white man play golf. I'm a black woman doesn't play golf. So I had to get the soup right and they was. I mean I had the best. They were beautiful suits and they were tailored. It was by putting on a crown almost I felt special I. Felt you don't have on my uniform. This is my beautifully tailored uniform and people perceive me differently. So now Tina works in academia and she loves researching things and so all of this got her thinking like wait why is the business suit? The thing that we all wear to work like what about kilts or row observe why not something else so she started tracing the business suit back through time all the way back to its origins in the sixteen hundreds it turns out we have Charles the second to thank for the suit he was the. King, of England four hundred years ago. Yes and at the time when he became king, the fashion in the royal courts was like very very over the top men were these huge poofy wigs and they had these big sleeves on their clothes and crazy colors because di was very expensive. So it was a sign you were wealthy men wore high heeled shoes but all of his over the top nece in the royal courts it was it was starting to cause some problems for Charles getting all this criticism from religious and economic leaders who were saying that the royal family there were morally Herat's overly decorated, and so he was looking for a way to try to. Present himself and As more restraints, the sewage back then were made from wool instead of silk, and even though the colors were still kind of like Easter and colors just all over the place. This was still super restrained at the time and it starts getting even more strain. So details on the codes when Charles the second I started wearing, them were quite long but they got shorter and shorter and shorter and eventually the. Colors that people in suits became more muted product. We see today or at least what we used to see I, mean I actually can't remember the last time I saw someone in a suit, and you know says, she can't remember the last time. She wore one I have on a workout Sir Yoga pants but you know what typically going to work I wouldn't have the song. Oh, it's the same for me talk. It's so nice, oh. Yeah. I can actually there's been a lot of talk on social media and in all of these articles think pieces about how much people have been loving dressing down Lali living that yoga pants life right and it's not like working from home is going away. I. Mean millions of offices are closed through the rest of the year and beyond and. Even for people who do go back to the office, the setups probably going to be pretty different probably fewer people some partitions, maybe less reason to suit up there. Also Tina says that now the people have tasted this yoga pants life going back is going to be hard. There's something to say about the sigh of relief the collective sigh of relief I think the world. That tells you that there was labor associated with getting dressed in a professional way. Tina says for now she is advising her students to still put in that Labor for job interviews in banking and consulting jobs, or at least take care of the top part that people are GonNa zoom suit jacket suit jacket. Exactly and you know the suit has survived four hundred years of change electricity, the combustion engine, the Internet two world wars the suit has survived. All of that is working from home really going to be the thing that takes it down death by Yoga. Pants, seriously towards yoga pants that killed the I'm on. I like the idea of the suit as King Kong. But you know I don't know Cardiff because the business has been around as you say for a very long time for four hundred years I mean. Things change and maybe this is the business suits swansong like maybe it's time for us to start wearing other kinds of close. WE'RE NOT GONNA be wearing suits forever right drew I put this all to Tina and she said, you know if you want to know the fate of the suit right now, you've got to talk to people who work in fashion right look at fashion person at twin watcher about what we're seeing from shoppers and what designers are

Tina Ob Charles Golf Tina King Babson College Bush King Kong Professor Of Management Cardiff DI England Herat Lali
"babson college" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:24 min | 9 months ago

"babson college" Discussed on KGO 810

"I. G. G. O. A. ten you can now listen at home by simply saying Alexa Lee KGO eight ten now here's my god the story from the US right from says that he would walk through executive privilege Walton from testifying before a Senate trial on impeachment he what is he trying to hide how stupid are you people that support this guy that you can see that he's done something wrong otherwise why would be led Bolton patrol I I don't believe executive privilege can't that that's that's like saying that impeachment he's gonna stop stop in Peter because I'm checking a privilege that if he if he loses the election get approved it's ridiculous my god you guys are so dense how I don't want I just impairs I'm embarrassed for you I am embarrassed the level of ignorance I'm running out of work site the other story that came out here in is that hours after the strike that killed Somani we went through a Swiss back door and told Iran don't escalate I I mean don't you know don't don't get crazy and then it's like okay great I would just go to the Swiss on that right he made like when the actress sniffling away Tom is going to kill them all anyway it's going to be the worst we burn the cultural centers than a detailed that's against international law within your non CO two centers just your your drive ins maybe you know it's god I just don't understand you people all right I I'm feeling for Oisin machine Fonzie was trying to be funny hi he he is a professor who is you know was was just to you know like one of the things that he's a and that the cuts Babson college I never heard of it before but it's it is a real place apparel and so he was you know he I think he's it doesn't say in the in the article I can find out where he's from but the picture of me looks like he could be armed from the Middle East and but so he made a joke and and we don't we you and I I may discuss however I I wrote up for up from that I made a joke about the cultural centers when saying trump is gonna bomb cultural centers I said how what trump no a cultural center he's probably gonna bomb of dukkha hazards museum or something right this is a little worse and that it was better as a better job it was M. amid all the tension right it was happening more try trump to threaten to target fifty two sites important Iran and Iran in culture again violation of international law and he backed down I he here's a joke he said Ayatollah Ali Khamenei should we listed for the two sides of cultural American heritage he would bomb like mall of America or Kardashian residence that's funny so that the country doesn't have any cultural yeah but anyways so it was a self deprecating joke about the United States and it's funny and then when the spell hit the fan I he said that was a bad attempt at your dell dude it's a funny joke you made a funny joke and they told the Boston the baptism in the boss there he told The Boston news outlets who's on poking fun at the art relative lack of of of ancient culture not so we don't have culture we're just on two hundred years old right we're not that old did you know that the the Middle East twenty five hundred years old what a different feel after that let's see I mean it is true anyway I so Babson just fired him are they the they are they said this particular pose from a staff member on the personal Facebook page clearly does not represent the values and culture a Babson college so you are essentially a humorless twit is what you're saying you are Babson college can you please be a twit it would be a like a I said is that a bad word well yeah I think replace the I was in a that's a bad word I think I don't know but I wouldn't say it if you call somebody about a twelve it's a death that's a better are there twice off anyway though they did so they fired him and and this is a fire them like wine I just paid administrative leave till of blows over may you want a good professor just maybe yeah right it was because of an excuse yeah maybe she'll be doing stand up a Bible part ma'am anyone I think you're funny man go again for next Friday I mean I but is so you know the yeah it's a private school so there's not really if a first amendment issue or a public school right I think I don't know anymore I mean I definitely think because I have friends who are teachers in our in our professors or whatever but I have friends that are teachers they're very careful very very careful about you know what they put on there like public pages now if you are it's ME texted if you tax of that too is friend or maybe made the job now I I don't know if he said it did he make this joke on his page or was it a response somebody else's paid it was on the school face well okay so there you go so you're done okay you're damn he people need to be smarter about social way okay he's he describes it right yeah now this is on page Facebook page well that's stupid as well if you okay so let's say somebody made the joke on their own Facebook page and you made that joke on their Facebook page I think that would be okay but because you did on your public I'm a professor of X. Y. Z. school then they can don't they didn't you know say maybe representing us X. yes it's a funny joke at a great I'm just saying when you want to make jokes especially when you work and you know education or some sort of public feel like that where it's not kind of incorporated into your job and you gotta err on the side of caution you just do and you know I I think it was a funny joke I get it you're out of a job though well I remember I did a joke when Reagan got shot I did the night after right now classe yeah well it was in a comedy club and the joke was that you know that fortunately there was never any worried they would hit his heart right that's really cold here really full kill though and it was because everybody was tense about it you know and and the the comedy clubs literally six blocks from where it happened it was of the garments which is maybe late morning no one not far from anyway point is is that I'm the humor in in a moment like that real I mean it is important to be able to do that now the did you ever see the the want to give a guide for dead all about the what was said what was the name of that special he had it back in their two thousand one hour each tell a joke it's it's it's everybody has the same joke and has this different punch line but tells that's called no idea Karen star membership nest anyway but they did some something cats right the aristocrats nearest cap that's yeah restaurants and so they would tell the joke it's the same set up to the job and I and us fungi and and there were some funny we just harshest sell stuff and you know when you what when you see Dennis Ross do a it was a Dennis Ross who does the the the gross the different rose to people who is the Toastmasters I wanna say Dennis Ross but I don't think that's his name I think I'm gonna mixed up with another comedian but the I mean that's a that's a really harsh and funny and and that's what this is here's the kicker is like both Clinton and trump did have a sense of humor really Obama had a great sense of humor you can you can knock Obama I mean I I'm ever listen into WTF with Marc Merrin and when they were doing it and and is there some point in that interview Obama kind of took over because Merrin is I mean despite the popularity of that podcast it's okay do you ever listen to it not so it's not great any kind of like he was at the end of it he's gonna given suggestions on how to do a interview really making some jokes of the United as in in an obviously that's been total control situation I've always admired people that can find humor in in situations that are first for that are unfolding because it's hard you can do it quickly you know and and get another window of making that is what he will Durst is always good data that you know that everyone's going to hit but political humor is really difficult again if you don't know we're talking about the the professor from Babson college just got fired I made a joke about you know the fact that trump said I mean he's do cultural sites and he said yeah maybe they should aim for our cultural sites I don't know what they would be like the Kardashian residence or mall of America that's just funny to fire somebody for that I don't know my I got a look at Babson college I would hope that there's been a push back from the academic community in the school you know I mean there could be another reason yeah I mean there could be an maybe I I again this is a great how long hair administrative leave how long do you see K. last as a professor it's not at all now right anyway I am I'm I'm just you know I'm I'm I'm thinking about like you know I mean the day of nine eleven I was at work as somewhat I'm I'm waiting to go on there and I said to my producer I go like this is a dentist Newsday in the world right before because because I I what I work from nine to twelve eastern time and in the plane first plane hit right before nine o'clock and I was walking down I could you know everybody member when you first saw it look I was a small plane that hit it right you know and and I said to somebody I go I you know this fed ex they're getting carried away with these deliveries right I said it's my friend right never said on the air but like I just did but I'm but I in and then I go in there in the world changed I I I was on the air when the second plane hit and and then we know about two minutes later we switched to ABC news course in New York and just the whole thing but you know it humor humor frightens the humorless people like trump when when thought I saw it a bomb one of his jokes he goes well Donald Trump is still is here still it though okay the correspondents.

Alexa Lee KGO Peter I. G. G. O. US executive Walton Senate Bolton
"babson college" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:43 min | 9 months ago

"babson college" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Of good news today stock market hitting all time highs John Kerry weeping the pockets over the death of his dear dear friend solo Monty the director of sustainability terminated at Babson college and others and there's more good news though this news is from the sunshine state of Florida where I am right now and it is in vero beach you may recall a few months ago there was a a a deplorable fellow by the name of Bob young blood was enjoying himself minding his own business at the hurricane grill of great Florida name the hurricane grill in the vero beach Florida wearing a maggot hat and a foreigner can I call my crap he's from Germany I cracked came up the Bob Youngblood a a a deplorable mag hat wearing American citizen and knocked the hat off of his head and called him a racist and a communist a foreigner called American a racist and a communist and so today the foreigner went to court and we have Bob Youngblood to make a victim impact statement for us and the Phyllis in on what happened Bob young blood thanks for being with us again here on the how we car show thanks how a great to talk to you again wonderful day here in the sunshine state and two two two great thank you got Solomonic and Mister.

John Kerry director Babson college Florida vero beach Bob Youngblood Phyllis Bob young vero beach Florida
"babson college" Discussed on The Pitch

The Pitch

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"babson college" Discussed on The Pitch

"And get some cough. Yes. Yes. And Likewise, I think with super interesting to us, and we love hearing one I've had calls with students who cried. Because of how much of a difference is product has made in their life tracking these micro habits is so important and just getting that like ding by just marking it off. I'm sure you guys know is really special to them. He's trying to train self-awareness. Yes. So I totally identify with the problem. I'm having a really difficult time. Connecting of problem statement. Yeah. The products of this one's going to be a path, but I can tell you have real enthusiasm and energy about this. But for me, it just it just doesn't compute. Yeah. Now. Yeah. I mean, not so much. I'm appreciate the feedback. What about that connection? Do you still feel like I'm not trying to find? Fine. I I don't understand the feedback cycle. Like I understand immediate. Like, hey, it's Monday all of your classmates. Turn this did this everyone started your computer, science home. Right. And you haven't started do it. Now. Like I understand like immediate intervention, and I understand look back. Like, hey for the last thirty days, you started all of your scientists late. Don't do that next. Shoveling with this. If you have some insights here when or those surfaced, and why not more immediate quick feedback to the user that like, hey, you haven't checked this off. Did you do it? Maybe just said, oh, I didn't check it off. But I did it, and I'm just struggling with how does the product actually effect user behavior, and like what are the signals at the generates? So this this is kind of where we're going in our next version. So it's very Spencer takes out his phone again. And shows the investors the latest version of the we do app with all the new bells and whistles like there's a notification the app that says, wow, you've completed more things this week than last and tells you exactly how much more productive you bet. And so it's very conversational. Okay. So as we start bubbling up these insights, we're going to ask them, you know, how is this is a helpful insight and then start getting that kind of insight about what would help gonna move phony hers you to get to this like in the first ten minutes of the. Show it show to fill. It sounds like these new features are finally getting the investor psyched about we do. We'll find out just how psyched after the break. This sort of the pitch is brought to you by Babson college MBA program at Babson. You can go full time or part time. Whatever works best for you. Babson offers classes that are designed with employer.

Babson Babson college MBA Spencer ten minutes thirty days
"babson college" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"babson college" Discussed on Mixergy

"And it was the right thing to to return that in terms of ownership was I write the Mak is a little bit quieter than you. Yeah. I think he he's a he we're very different people. Right. Like in every way. Right. So he cares about design so much more than I do. And I learned so much from him about that design and brand. And you know, I think across the board. I think he is I don't know necessarily quiet as much as kind of more formal than I am. So I'm a little more casual in my conversation with with people. But like the what's been great as we've done everything together from grasshopper on and it's been a great benefit to me to learn from him. He's in super fat. Wow. How'd you guys meet? So we met in college through mutual friend. We both went to Babson college. We didn't know each other at all. But we were both playing in the same space and thinking about similar things. And someone said you guys should meet each other. And we did like the worst possible thing. Which is like like, okay. Let's do this together. We had no formal agreement. We had. No like there was no like anything like, okay. Let's try it. And let's try it meant what grasshopper right lead something else at the time. It was called God v mail. So we're like, let's just build this. And let's just sell it to customers and see what happens and who built the first version this is before twi-, Leo and all those other tools, so. I built the original stuff, plus one other person that helped me on an outsource basis like the cheapest outsource recod- find, and we built the absolute least we had to to make it function. So we could go and sell it to people. And I thought I remembered seeing it in the back of newspapers in New York, right? Used to advertise their. Yeah, we did the little tiny ad back of entrepreneur magazine. And like those little classified ads. Yeah. Grow customers. Yeah..

Mak Babson college New York Leo
"babson college" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

StartUp Podcast

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"babson college" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

"Ended up landing in yacht. Bill who no one has ever heard of before then besides Napa Valley in the wine world, but no one really cared about Yountville. And you know, when I opened up the book, it was just like that's when the light clicked that's when the light actually came on in. I realized that there was so much more to the food world that I wasn't seeing in that I needed to be a part of it at a needed to get out of my circle in Florida to experience something more. What was it about the book? Why did you see in that book that it was just it was? It was takes on classic things that we were learning in culinary school in put in reality for me classic sauces that I finally get to see done elegantly done in a lighter fare innocence. French cuisine is very heavy if you can go back from a traditional standpoint on a lot of butter making sauces of ruse on things that are like they can rich. And then there was a there was a swing to kinda make French cuisine. A lighter lighter fare nouvelle cuisine in just figuring out how to make French cuisine just fill healthier. I mean, he had a perfect chef Keller had the perfect balance of classic techniques. Classic dishes done on this nouvelle kinda thought process. But also kinda he had fun with his food. You know, he had a coordinate dish. Salmon tar tar in this little toil that looked like an ice cream cone in thought it was like, wow, that's beautiful is amazing. And it's like massages can that you can think about ice cream, but it actually is fish with crimp fresh air. And it's like what is this? And then like rule odds and terrains, and and and you know, various techniques that just like we talked about but never saw and just to see the pitcher and just like see clean. It was. And how precise is recipes where it's just like, it was mind blowing just like I want to be a part of this like this is how you become a great show opening that cookbook was like opening a travel guide to a world he wanted to get to, but the French laundry some kind of place, you can just show up and get a job. How it to Jordan went from manning deep fryer in Orlando to the kitchen of one of the world's best restaurants. That's coming up after the break. This episode is brought to you by the Babson college NBA at Babson college. You can learn to think and act.

Keller Babson college Yountville Napa Valley Bill Florida Orlando Jordan NBA manning
Saudi Aramco made $111 billion in 2018, topping Apple as the world's most profitable company

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Saudi Aramco made $111 billion in 2018, topping Apple as the world's most profitable company

"Let us begin today with a story that is both straight ahead business and economics and at the same time. Oh, so very geopolitical. We learned this morning. Exactly. How profitable the most profitable company on earth. Really is. And if you're thinking, wait KYW, we already know how profitable apple or Google or maybe Exxon Mobil is well think again, we speak here of the national oil company of Saudi Arabia Saudi Aramco by another name, the company opened its books today at least partway for the first time since it was nationalized back in the nineteen eighties. Wall Street was pretty impressed which for Saudi Aramco seems to have been the point from Washington. Marketplace's Scott Tong, it's as going the money printing machine known as Saudi Aramco made one hundred and eleven billion dollars in profits last year. That's almost twice what apple made nearly four times Google's profits. And. Five times ExxonMobil's. This is really the most information we've ever gotten Ellen wall. That transversal consulting is the author of Saudi Inc. Everyone's kind of been wondering what what is this big horrible secret that they're hiding the answer is that there isn't a big horrible secret. One big reveal Saudi Aramco pays a mere three bucks to produce a barrel of oil that's crazy cheap as they can sell it for sixty nine and Wall Street to bond rating firms Dave the company high grades, though, not the best Michael Goldstein teaches finance at Babson college. This is lake instead of their credit score being eight fifty and they're getting a perfect lowest possible mortgage on their house. They're still going to get whatever size house they want. It's just they're going to have to pay a little bit more than the absolute perfect credit score. Saudi Aramco does wanna borrow tens of billions from the market to buy another company and spend the prophets and diversifying the Saudi economy right now, it gyrates wildly up and down with oil. Oil prices says economist Paul Sullivan at the National Defense University. Anyone that move from the roller coaster and dry toward diversification. And they need this money to accomplish that the Saudis wanted more balanced economy by twenty thirty right now seventy percent of the nation's revenues come from oil.

Saudi Aramco Saudi Arabia Saudi Aramco Saudi Inc Exxon Mobil Apple Google Ellen Wall Scott Tong National Defense University Washington Babson College Paul Sullivan Michael Goldstein Dave Eleven Billion Dollars Seventy Percent
"babson college" Discussed on Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"babson college" Discussed on Rants and Randomness with Luvvie Ajayi

"So yes random randomness fan. I am excited to walk in my friend and powerhouse rich Dennis to the show. You might know rich as a creative shame moisture or his recent purchase of essence magazine earlier this year making it one hundred percent black owned again, rich. Thank you for coming. Thank you for having me, y'all got rich in the studio. Okay. Penrice down like pin and done a cloud. How many giving people your fischel bio, so they actually really know what should be up to one in Liberia sundial brand C over Stennis came to the US with ten Babson college for business school, and when he graduated ninety one he was unable to return to library because of civil war damn, you know, what no scrap that piece. I don't wanna read that. Because I want to tell that story. So anyway, richest bio, you know, what I'm gonna give you all his bio. I'm gonna just have rich tell his own story rich. What did you want to do when you were growing up? I wanted to be a citrus farmer. Wait, a citrus farmer wanted to a citrus farmer. You know, I grew up. As you said in in Liberia between Liberian early on. And I would always see like like the fruits would just sort of grow wild like there'd be orange trees like on the sidewalk, and there'd be mangoes and pineapples and just it just grew right? The ground swell was very fertile. But it always struck me how wasteful it was because it would just it would fall to the ground and just spoil or people will people will take them home. And and they spoil because there was no there was no canneries right there. There were no there are no process. And there was no processing so it was just a life the lifespan of the fruit. And so you couldn't really turn it into. You can really turn it into an economic benefit for the people. Okay. And so I saw that. And I, you know, and I remember I must've been like nine or ten and ours. Always like, wow, we got so much fruit. We got so much fruit. But then you would never have any juice. That around. You didn't have any juice, or or, you know, take the squeeze it. And then there'd be people selling by the roadside. And so it was just that was that was just that was just what hit me, and I'm still going to become a citrus farmer. That is still a dream do it onto a so how did you go from wanting to be a citrus farmer to then come into the US to study? Because you can't study citrus farming. Nice cold. So when did you pivot and come to the United States? So, you know, I grew up at a time where we had a lot of civil unrest in in both Liberian surly on and you know, my mother's from Sierra Leone. My father's from Liberia. And I was born and raised in Liberia. But during that period of time, we had Khuda ties we had attempted coup d'etats, and it was just always some some something, destabilizing happening and. As I got, you know, as I got a little bit older. You know, and seeing what my mother, and my grandmother, my by my grand-, my grandmother's on both sides, entrepreneurs father side, and on my mother's side..

Liberia United States essence magazine Dennis Sierra Leone Khuda one hundred percent
"babson college" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

07:27 min | 2 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Jay here. Ryan Davies associate professor of finance Babson college here to talk about bonds. I really am enjoying learning about bonds and not having a weird fearful mystery next. We're gonna go to Maryland and talk to Jim in Maryland. Jim. Hello. Born and Bradley. Your previous caller brought up subject of savings bonds answers, a lot of questions that I had. I got a question back in the early sixties when I was in elementary school. We pay the done to get a stamp book a war bond worth anything other than going on EBay. A war bond. Ryan knows Ryan's young. We'll see what do you know about war ads before my time? All right. Sorry about that. Okay. Spent my milk money. And and it matures. I don't know if there's any as their general any any time to turn it in right now it should. I although I think those war bonds for special, right? I mean, they were they were designed to finance the war effort. Yeah. The Vietnam war. No, that's okay. Hey, call anytime. Okay. All right. Hey, Jim in Albany to gyms, no waiting Jim in Albany, Bradley. Hi, hi, Ryan. How are you? Hey, I'm fifty eight I got a 4._0._1._K hundred thousand in it, and I'm pretty well diversified. But I'm still wondering air, sorry, go more into funds and styrene. I've got about twenty percent and bond investments and the rest of it in stock investments. That comes advising. And we can't do that from afar, we can just call you about the instruments and how they tend to work. I want to take more of a hit a lost about seven grand ready to win a week. So again, we cannot give personal advice. To more bond funds. What I wanted to ask at this time. What's the what do you want to ask? They get more into personal. I appreciate the call. That's personal advice. It depends on your situation which takes a down not a phone call next and sorry about that. Did you need to talk to someone that specifically going to advise you your adviser for that? That's personal vice we're not doing that. We can talk about how the instruments work. Now, it's Mike in Florida. Hello, mike. Nice to talk to you Bradley enough. Thank you very much for the show tonight. I'm enjoying it. Thoroughly. My question is is actually you may not be able to help you. Because of the last caller says you can't give any advice but mass mass municipal bonds fresh. Very low cost with vanguard. And I'm just wondering if bond funds versus Barnes. I know that Dan carried out so take one or two percent for their guidance. And all that that, you know taking. Taking it upon yourself to just get yourself. Is it a better move in most cases than go on with with vanguard that's gonna take out a percentage of the money? So I think I think Ryan can answer that because it's really just the wisdom of the pros and cons of bond funds over individual bonds, which we kind of went over, but we can go over again go here. Yeah. Know. And I think for the average investor having a diversified portfolio. Bonds is is is not practical. The transaction costs. In in bonds. Are you small size and co to sell them? There's not necessarily a buyer on the other side by them. You're going to have. No, you know, one of the reasons why you have bonds is because you use them almost as like a safety net. Right. And you're talking about individual Bosnia individual fun takes care of. To seek those cuts mass community through group Bank art, and it's, you know, interestingly enough, it doesn't go up very much as most farms, but it's the Saqlain if it's a down month for a few sounds. I'm getting more shares for months, and that's just compounding, which seems to me the right way to go. And I was wondering if you know compared to stocks, there's a little more safety and all that every month. You're getting more shares. Gets reinvested. So if it goes, if the value goes down, you get more of them, cool what you mentioned. More and more in giving my risk averse itself. Right. I guess a good mixture of stocks bonds is always more diversification is probably Stephen King. The worst times times right now. I think it's. We don't know what's going to happen. I have a copy or smell, so, but I appreciate your time. I just I really enjoy your show. I wanna let you know. How important is a lot of us advice. Thanks, mike. Well, we can do our this kind of thing. We can we joke. Thanks for your feedback on that. Mike and Florida good guy. You can just tell you can tell right away. He's a good guy. And who's not? It's Paul in west Roxbury, more local. Hi, pal. I wanted to ask your guest. Issue bonds, which ones. Or principal protected. I want my principal to be protected. Could you explain a little about that? Thank you very much. What were the two types of bonds? You wanted to know about. Municipal bonds. And government issue bonds you west bonds treasuries, which one siren sure or principal protected. Okay. We got it. Go ahead. So so treasuries are not insured, but they're backed by the full faith of the US government. And so to that extent, they're considered risk free. Because this is the US government. You know, he's never going to default. They can always print new new money to to meet their debts. So whereas municipal bonds asserted come in two flavors. There is municipal bonds are issued where you do have default risk. But traditionally specially weaker weaker municipalities. Also, add on sort of a layer of insurance that. The other insurance companies provide against the fault. So they're using the money to buy insurance against the fall. That's right. So you get a little value, but you get more safety when when they're issued they go to what's Montelena insurance company. They've thank goes and provides an extra layer of protect. How would he know either? If his what type of municipal bonds, he has whether it's the insured or not, and how does one know and they're buying them. If they are not it says read the fine print or ask your broker. That's right. Read the fine print. Alright. Well, we handle that one. That's good six one seven two five four ten thirty..

Ryan Davies mike Bradley Jim principal Maryland EBay Florida associate professor of finance US Jay Albany Bosnia Montelena Barnes Dan Stephen King
"babson college" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on WTVN

"And delegate other things so set aside planning time set aside important things for. Things? That. Are even more important and if necessary talk to your supervisor here my priorities right now here's what I can. Handle and what I can't. Handle so it really calls for a new kind of planning skill. Really and communicating skill to keep your to do list manageable I thought it was interesting to. Like Microsoft is even stepped, in, to try. To help you with, some software right right they've created a tool on. Their outlook platform where you will Jewish, you begin to plan to many meetings if your wall to. Wall with meetings, which can easily happen with. People were working on, multiple teams at once you get in so many meetings. That you have no time to do your own work and, you, wind up staying after work to do your real work. Right so yes Microsoft has drawn on the street searched by Robert cross at Babson college and actually started creating. Some? Tools. To help people manage their meeting time on a related note There was a. Point about not answering, every Email that comes to right that's right I, it some people another pitfall that you can fall into when you're collaborating on multiple projects as you want a sense of closure which isn't always something you get in the, complicated work we do today so you might decide I'm. Going, to empty my E mail box every, evening and I'm going to answer via Email that's in there, and, that will, give me a a rewarding sense of closure that can be, hazardous, chew because first of all you probably. Don't have to answer all those emails especially if the inches you send her poorly thought out or hasty that just creates confusion or problems for the people who received them and you wind up making more work which in this study is a a gauge of effectiveness, like? Can you, get the most done well wasting the least amount of your colleagues time Wall Street Journal columnist sue shellenberger thirteen minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend Watch the most popular. Artists. Of today. Go to our website, and see them all on the Eldorado psycho.

Microsoft Wall Street Journal Robert cross supervisor Babson college thirteen minutes
"babson college" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on WLAC

"Able to adapt they figure out well I'm. Going to have to let go some things and ordered to. Do, the rest of this stuff I've been assigned really well they're the ones who learn how, to delegate and hand task saw, so there really is a demarcation, line between those who survive and those? Who really, become overwhelmed, speaking? With, Wall Street Journal columnist sue shellenberger, her piece is called you could be too much of a team player. So how do you say no it's tricky I. Think you really have to pull back and create planning time on your calendar this is one of the imperatives that came out of this Study you have to focus on certain goals. They rear northstar and make time as, often as you need it and think okay what. Are my top objectives here and you may be working on multiple projects at once. With multiple teams this is a common situation in today's workplace unique to identified the highest priority goals and delegate other things so set aside. Planning time set, aside important things for. Things that are, even, more important and if necessary talk to your supervisor here my priorities right now here's what I can. Handle and what I can't. Handle so it really calls for a new kind of planning skill. Really and communicating skill to keep your to do list manageable I thought it was interesting to like Microsoft is even stepped, in, and try. To help you with, some software right right they've created a tool on. Their outlook platform where you, will, not Jewish. You begin to plan to many meetings if your wall to wall with meetings which. Can easily happen with people were working multiple teams at once You get in so many meetings that you have no time to do your own work and. You? Wind. Up seeing after work to do your real work right so yes Microsoft. Has drawn on the street searched by. Robert cross at Babson college and actually started creating some tools to help people manage their meeting time geez On a related. Note There was a point about not answering every Email. That? Comes way. Too right that's right, I it some people another pitfall that you can fall into when you're collaborating on multiple projects as you want, a sense of closure which isn't always something you get in the complicated. Work we do today so you might decide I'm going to empty my E, mail box every evening and I'm going to answer via. Email that's in there and that'll give me a rewarding sense of closure that can be hazardous to, because first of all you probably don't have, to answer those emails especially if the answers you send her poorly thought out or hasty that just creates confusion or problems for the people who received them and you wind, up making more work which in this study is a. A, gauge of effectiveness like can you get the most done while wasting the least amount of your colleagues, time, Wall Street Journal columnist sue shellenberger thirteen minutes now in front of the hour on this weekend Thinking about life insurance what if you could, make? One free. Phone call and learn, your best price from nearly a dozen highly-rated price-competitive companies or that's exactly what happens when you call selectquote life, for example George is forty he was getting sky-high quotes from other companies. Because he takes meds to control his blood pressure though when I shopped around, I found him a ten year five hundred thousand dollar..

Wall Street Journal Microsoft George Robert cross sue shellenberger supervisor Babson college northstar five hundred thousand dollar thirteen minutes ten year
"babson college" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Thanks. For, being, with us this, weeping workplace trend pushing collaboration some people are finding they play a little too well with, others causing stress and overwork Wall. Street Journal columnist sue shellenberger says this. Can stem from a. Basic inability to draw boundaries or an ego driven desire to look like an office MVP sue what's up here Many many workers are spending almost all of their time collaborating with other people clients and colleagues on Email and meetings and conferences on calls and it it's very. Easy to get sucked into interacting with others all the, time, to the point where you become overloaded and burn out burned out and this was the, finding of a major study at, Babson college eight year twenty eight, employer study on the topic that really? Goes in depth into, how? All, this collaborating is affecting people's work, lives while you got some folks who say yes. To everything yes it's a temptation sometimes if you're if you're deep into. A lot of complex ambiguous projects which happens a lot these days and somebody comes along and says can. You help me with this. Task it's something you, know really. Well it's tempting to just say yes because a it feels good to help other people the maybe your. Coworkers will see you, as valuable and is an expert these are the subtle things that can happen when you're really up to your. Neck, in. A collaborative projects And what are the dangers here The dangerous in the study had researcher rubber cross found that some, people just slowly become so overwhelmed kind of like. The fraud in the cook pot they're taking on more and more until they really. Aren't able to function well anymore one woman started having serious health problems and they wind up either burning out on the job and not. Doing well even, quitting their jobs in. Other cases employees, dribble, to adapt they figure out well I'm going to have to let go some things in order to. Do the rest of this. Stuff I've been assigned really well they're the ones who learn how. To delegate and hand task sauce so there really is a demarcation line between those who survive and those who really become, overwhelmed, speaking with. Wall Street Journal columnist, sue shellenberger her piece is called you could be. Too much of a team player. So how do you say no It's tricky I think you really have to pull back and create planning time on your calendar this is. One of the, imperatives that came out. Of this study, you, have to focus on certain goals if they were your north star and make time as often as. You need it and think. Okay what am I top objectives here and you may be working. On multiple projects at once.

sue shellenberger Wall Street Journal Street Journal Babson college MVP fraud researcher eight year
"babson college" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Makes. Me with us sweeping workplace trend pushing collaboration some people are finding they play a little too well with. Others causing stress and overwork Wall Street Journal columnist sue shellenberger says this can stem from a basic inability to draw boundaries or an ego. Driven desire to look? Like an, office MVP so what's up here Many many, workers are. Spending almost all of their time collaborating with other people clients and colleagues on Email in meetings and conferences. On calls and it, it's very easy to get sucked into interacting with others all the time to the point where you become overloaded and. Burn out burned out And this was the finding of a major, study at Babson college eight year twenty eight employer study on the topic. That really goes in depth into how all this collaborating is affecting people's work lives while you got some posted to say yes, to everything Yes it's, a temptation sometimes if you're if you're deep. Into a lot of complex ambiguous projects which happens a lot these days. And somebody comes along and says can you help me with this cast get something you know really well, it's tempting to just say yes because a feels good to help other people the maybe your coworkers will see you as valuable and is an expert these are the subtle things that can happen when you're really up to your neck. In a collaborative projects and one of the dangers here Well the dangerous. In the study head researcher. Rubber cross found that some people just slowly become so overwhelmed kind. Of like the fraud in the cook pot taking on more and more until they really aren't able to function well anymore, one woman started having serious health problems and they wind up either burning out. On the job and not doing? Well. Even quitting their jobs in other cases employees able to adapt they figure out well I'm, going to have to let go, of some things and ordered to, do the rest of this stuff I've? Been assigned, really well, they're? The, ones who learn how to delegate, and hand task saw so there really is. A demarcation line between those who survive and those who really become overwhelmed. Speaking with Wall Street Journal columnist sue shellenberger pieces called you could be too much of a team player so how do you say no It's tricky I think you really have to pull back and create planning time on your calendar this is one of the. Imperatives that came, out of this study. You have to, focus, on certain goals if they were your north star and make time as often as you need it and. Think okay what are my. Top objectives here and you may be working on multiple projects at. Once with multiple.

Wall Street Journal sue shellenberger Babson college MVP fraud researcher eight year
"babson college" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on KTRH

"Today Speak with us this weeping workplace trend pushing collaboration some people. Are finding they play a little too well with others causing stress and overwork Wall Street Journal columnist sue shellenberger says this can stem. From, a. Basic inability to? Draw. Boundaries or an ego driven desire to look like an. Office MVP sue what's up here Many many workers, are spending. Almost all of their time collaborating with other people clients and colleagues on Email in meetings and conferences on. Phone calls and it, it's very easy to get sucked into interacting with others all the time to the point where you become overloaded and, burn. Out burned out And this was the finding of a major, study at Babson college eight year twenty eight employer study on the topic that. Really goes in depth into how all this collaborating is affecting people's work lives while they would get some folks to say yes, to everything Yes it's a temptation sometimes if you're If you're deep, into a lot of complex ambiguous, projects which happens a lot these, days and somebody comes along and says, can you, help me, with? This, cast get something you know really, well it's tempting to just say yes because a. It feels good to help other people maybe your coworkers will see. You as valuable and it's an expert these are the subtle things that can happen when.

sue shellenberger Wall Street Journal Babson college MVP eight year
"babson college" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on KTOK

"Thousand k., t. okay Makes me, with us the sweeping workplace trend pushing collaboration some people are finding they play a little too well with others causing stress. And overwork Wall Street Journal columnist sue shellenberger says this can, stem from a basic inability to draw boundaries or an. Ego driven desire to look, like an office. MVP sue what's up here Many many workers are spending almost all of their time collaborating with other people clients and colleagues on Email in meetings and conferences on phone calls and it it's very easy to get sucked into interacting with others all the time to, the point where you, become overloaded. And burn out burned out and this is the finding of a major study at Babson college eight year. Twenty eight employer study, on the topic that really goes in depth into how all this collaborating is affecting people's work lives while posted to, say. Yes to everything Yes it's a temptation sometimes if you're if you're deep into a lot of complex ambiguous, projects which happens a lot these days and somebody. Comes along and says can you help me with this casket something you know really. Well it's tempting to just say yes because a it feels good to help other people maybe your coworkers we'll see you as valuable and. It's an expert, these are the subtle things that can, happen, when you really up.

sue shellenberger Wall Street Journal Babson college MVP Thousand k eight year
"babson college" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on How I Built This

"Um i did the family laundry and just did a variety of things to support the house as best that could and and uh try to be as good a friends my mother's i could be i remember periodically out that would take her go bowling i remember one time she was very young looking somebody would ask me will is that your girlfriend is it on us my mother not my excellent my door but uh she was always very young at heart her young in spirit she loves to dance the very much of a caring person you went off to college at at babson college is a small business college in massachusetts was that was that your intention to get into business at of school well i think really what happened after my dad died uh we will talk about what's going to happen to the family business we had hold on you know my mother would you know get remarried she did she exceeded our wishes she did several times over we she laughed at that too whether we think that would be very funny so uh but in any event so my brother was going to take over the of pharmaceutical under the business and i will take over the business and the business so that that was really the plan he went to pharmacy school i went to business school and was able to develop some skills in terms of how to work with others and be inclusive and uh and and be a good leader so that that was very important for me in college.

the house babson college massachusetts
"babson college" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on WLOB

"Sort of raise yourself up uh two or thirty thousand put view and think about it from a labour market perspective is that the economy really operas offers opportunities those people who are on the front traditionally been on the fringes of the labour market so for people like students or stay at home parents or retirees or the disabled the gig economy offers opportunities for people like that who were never really going to get uh fulltime jobs at a very high rate it allows them in a way to participate in the labor force when and where they want to and how much they want to so it i think in particular opens up opportunities for the fringes of the labour market nearly interesting feature of the gate economy it really is an interesting feature out wh when you were writing the book what type of research doodoodoo give us a little dawn unwitted the information came from an and how you got to the point an though i thin i created and have been teaching an mba close at babson college here in boston uh for the past five years on the gig economy so a lot of the work that i did on this topic came from teaching the class over the past five years and hearing my students and their feedback in their perspective and understanding the topics that resonated with them and you know the the court i modified the course quite significantly over that time uh to respond to their interests and needs as they were preparing to graduate and then go out into you know a world of work that looks very different than it did even ten years ago um i also did a lot of traditional second research looking at surveys and studies to the extent that there were some that had been done on the gig economy i have a policy background um so i i did a fair amount of reading on the policy aspects of the gig economy and the labour market and i also conducted over a hundred interviews of people who were both in traditional jobs and then people who were in the gig economy at all who were doing all different kinds of things people who working on platforms people who were professionals people who had had successful careers working in traditional jobs and had now entered the.

babson college boston five years ten years
"babson college" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"To raise money for cancer research by writing from babson college in wellesley two patriot place in foxborough today among the writers wp wbz tvs very on berry burbank who chatted with wbz's doug cope about why he's writing this year it's a fantastic right it's great to be with everybody here we're here for a common goal were all writing city and getting to the end line and we want to find that cure for this horrendous disease cancer so it's it's just phenomenal as being with all these people going in the same direction to reach that goal is awesome and so from you know we all know lots of people family members friends young and old that have dealt with this disease there's a lot of survivors someday everybody it'd be a survivor will kick this disease that's what it's all about raising money for research let's get this thing go on a very very appropriate to talk to you today because the weather is perfect i arranged that i wish i could say ahead control over it but i was thinking about this for the last several weeks thing i hope it's going to be beautiful weather and yesterday wasn't quite as beautiful some of the riders because they ran a little bit of rain but today it just doesn't get any you better than this everywhere from all over new england so this is awesome all right goal course wherever they riders might be it's going to be fantastic by the way the pmc hopes to raise forty eight million dollars this year for cancer research at a danafarber cancer institute in boston it's already raised five hundred and forty seven million and dollars since nineteen eighty held out that wbz news time one twelve here's mike riley from the aticketcom sport's studio mike good afternoon that as a tough act to follow hats off to them the pmc everybody down there where a great ride this weekend iron red sox close out there ten game homestand today and they go for.

babson college berry burbank wbz cancer england mike riley wellesley foxborough boston forty eight million dollars
"babson college" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"babson college" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Wellesley the province town so you could you could give money to lease a hughes who is usually what they call a heavy hitter i think she raised about fifteen thousand dollars last year i'm writing just on sunday fifty miles from babson college and wellesley down to gillette stadium than back to babson you could donate on my behalf as well i'm writing the this year for a specifically for um patriotic cancer research hostage hear about the miles fifty map communicate ten grand right that's true that's old boy who knows you got everybody should bills that will go congratulations thanks so much for fru coming up with this wonderful idea and it's unbelievable five hundred forty seven million dollars you're gonna get pretty darn close to the six on million dollar mark before this weekend his haute um that is our hope very much dan billy our pleasure thanks very much pmc dot org david way congratulations both to you and lisa for doing what you're doing thank you and thank you to all of the generous people out there who you know they've been sending us tweets throughout the week twenty five dollars here too twenty five dollars there it all adds up and every year when billy says i'll this year madoo thirty million this year madhu 35million forty million every year see how we're going to get to that number and every year he hits the mark so we're pretty excited about it logic lotta a great people here in new england and in massachusetts and if you're in san of revellers pmc dot org thanks david waite decadent and lisa hughes's well we're going to take a break we come back we're going to talk about an event not an event that a real tragedy and that's because that's gone of import on this week actually for a long time in portland oregon and also going to talk about now what the governor of massachusetts is proposing to at least have some cooperation between federal officials federal law enforcement and local officials and state police here in massachusetts it is a step a step in.

babson college babson massachusetts oregon Wellesley gillette stadium dan billy david waite lisa hughes portland federal law enforcement twenty five dollars five hundred forty seven milli fifteen thousand dollars million dollar