35 Burst results for "BBC"

Norman Stone on the Success of His Latest Film 'The Most Reluctant Convert'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

Norman Stone on the Success of His Latest Film 'The Most Reluctant Convert'

"Votes my guess is Norman stone film director and the film we're discussing the new film is the most reluctant convert all around the country all around the world, but you can find it at C. S. Lewis movie dot com C. S. Lewis movie dot com. You have to be excited about the success of this film Norman. I mean, it's one thing to have artistic success. You've never not had that. I've watched your stuff. But to have people respond, has to be very gratifying. It's you Americans. When I work for the BBC, I was known as the half American kid because I loved it over here. I like Americans. And I love filming in America, and so on. And that stays, but even me with my experience of your visionary possibilities. This is grown me away. We came over for Wednesday. What is it now? Monday, Tuesday. Tuesday. Wait and say again, I saw that again. I don't know. We came over here. It's a day. We came over here and there was this meant to be this little launch with summer and then discovered it's going to be elsewhere. But it just got bigger and bigger and bigger. It tells me two things. It tells me that people are hungry for this story, which is great. And it tells me that I can swing open the library doors to the rest of Lewis. Somebody asked me that when I was doing the first shutter lands and I said, what do you want to achieve? And I was a good question. And I said, really what I'd like to achieve is swing open the library doors, because if you haven't read Lewis, and you're not aware of him, it's all there. It's all there. He's sold a billion. A quarter of a billion must get too exaggerated. He sold a quarter of a billion books. I don't know if it's done that. He has died in the 63. He's selling more books every year than the previous year don't you hate people

C. S. Lewis Norman Stone Norman BBC Lewis America
Director Norman Stone on His New CS Lewis Film 'The Most Reluctant Convert'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Director Norman Stone on His New CS Lewis Film 'The Most Reluctant Convert'

"And let me just tell you, I'm a fan of C. S. Lewis. Which brings me to my friend Norman stone, the film, director, Norman stone, got on the map early in 1984 by directing a film called shadowlands for the BBC starring Claire Bloom, Joss ackland, and he's been doing all kinds of things, but a little bit of C. S. Lewis here and there. He has just directed a new film called the most reluctant convert starring our friend max McLean and Norman stone across the pond from the environs of Glasgow is here with us in the studio. Norman is that you. This is still me, yeah. It's still you. My friend, listen, we've been friends for a long time. And you and I have had millions of silly conversations or at least hundreds. But we both love C. S. Lewis. So when I found out from max McLean, in this studio, you know, he's starring as Lewis, but that you had directed it, I flipped, because I said, there's literally nobody else who should direct the film. Can you tell us because there are people tuning in, they didn't hear the max maclean interview. They may not know about the film rather than my telling them what I know. Tell us what is the film and what will we find in the film? Okay. Louis did write a lot of books, you're right. One of the ones that's probably the most impressive in many ways is the surprise by joy. Basically it's his own story. He writes with a self deferential wit and information comes out and you want to read more. So this is how he began life turned into an atheist and then was a very dogmatic atheist. Anyone can university after a trip for the First World War and so on. And he soon being challenged by people like

Norman Stone C. S. Lewis Max Mclean Claire Bloom Joss Ackland Max Maclean BBC Glasgow Norman Lewis Louis
Prince Andrew's lawyer wants to keep 2009 legal deal sealed

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last month

Prince Andrew's lawyer wants to keep 2009 legal deal sealed

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting prince Andrew's lawyer wants to keep a two thousand nine legal deal sealed an attorney representing Britain's prince Andrew asked a federal judge in New York Tuesday to keep sealed a two thousand nine legal agreement that the attorney contends can't protect the prince against a lawsuit claiming he sexually assaulted an American woman when she was under eighteen the request was made in court papers in Manhattan federal court a lawsuit was filed in August on behalf of Virginia's you phrase saying the prince of used her on multiple occasions in two thousand one when she was seventeen and a minor under US law attorney Andrew Brettler called the lawsuit baseless and said he is preparing written arguments to ask that the lawsuit be dismissed in late twenty nineteen Andrew told the BBC he never had sex with you Friday hi Mike Crossey up

Prince Andrew Mike Rossi Manhattan Federal Court Britain Andrew Brettler New York Virginia United States Andrew BBC Mike Crossey
Prince William wants saving Earth to come before "space tourism"

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last month

Prince William wants saving Earth to come before "space tourism"

"Britain's prince William has criticized some of the world's richest man for using their wealth to fund a new space race and space tourism rather than trying to fix the problems on planet earth in that stat in comments to the BBC William voiced his disapproval a day off to the former Star Trek actor William Shatner became the oldest man to fly to space in a rocket built by Amazon founder Jeff vessels we need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair this planet not just trying to find the next place to go and live said William who is second in line to the British throne billionaires Elon musk and Richard Branson also

Prince William Jeff Vessels Britain William Shatner William BBC Amazon Elon Musk Richard Branson
Paul McCartney says John Lennon responsible for Beatles breakup

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Paul McCartney says John Lennon responsible for Beatles breakup

"Paul McCartney says he did not break up the Beatles I merges our letter with the latest Curti tells BBC radio four it was John Lennon who ended the Beatles or as he calls them our Johnny McCarty has often been blamed for the break up McCartney says part of the confusion comes from their manager who wanted them to keep quiet so he could finish several business deals McCarty says Lennon walked into a room one day and said I am leaving the Beatles McCartney ads is that instigating the split or not he says he was said about the break up because they were still making pretty good

Curti Johnny Mccarty Paul Mccartney John Lennon Mccartney BBC Confusion Mccarty Lennon
Pastor Greg Locke's Popularity Has Exploded Because He Speaks Bold Truths

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:23 min | 2 months ago

Pastor Greg Locke's Popularity Has Exploded Because He Speaks Bold Truths

"Pastor greg tell us first of all what. What is the website for your church. Quick before i forget it. Globovision bc bible church dot com global vision. Bbc dot com. How long have you been pastoring. where did you grow up. I grew up here in hometown. A profit not without honor but in his own country led jesus said but it was a tiny little five thousand person town and then it's just exploded. We're kind of like the last bedroom community here in nashville came back home in two thousand and six so fifteen years ago. I started the church from from scratch. And now we're in a three thousand seat tenant and people just keep showing up because somebody saying something. And god's given us a voice to the nation so thank god for it well. This is what. I have noticed that. Those pastors who've been particularly heroic and bold their churches have exploded. Because there's a there's a hunger for this out there even among nonbelievers or among people that they don't believe it. But i don't really go to church. People are really hungry for this. So i find it kind of funny that the free market sometimes does really wonderful things I mean it you know if you have a virtuous population they will choose virtuous and good things and that seems to be what's happening. We know that our friends in california jack hibs and others their churches have gone up. The numbers have gone up speaking a cornerstone chapel in virginia. In a few days they've experienced a similar thing. When did you decide to kinda get bold on. This stuff was there. It was there a moment for you. Was it During the last few years when did you decide to be outspoken. And become a target of people who just don't like bold people the damn kind of broke for me in two thousand fifteen when the supreme court made their ridiculous decision for same sex marriage and so i did a video called. I'm coming out of the closet and that was it. I mean we went from five thousand followers fifty thousand followers to the blue checkmark and pretty soon two hundred and fifty five hundred million and then of i started fighting target over the transgender bathroom nonsense and planned parenthood just back and forth with them and so it just seemed like controversy began to build the ministry and jumped on the trump train literally because i did a couple of bus tours for mike lyndale and some others and so it just seems like every time i would just i would say something people would resonate and they would say you are saying what we are pastors would

Pastor Greg Jack Hibs BBC Nashville Jesus Virginia California Supreme Court Mike Lyndale
Building Your B2B Content Team in 2021 With Wordable CEO Brad Smith

Voices of Search by Searchmetrics

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Building Your B2B Content Team in 2021 With Wordable CEO Brad Smith

"When you're thinking about doing something like a migration when you're building a new website when you're just looking at your beginning of the year plan how do you think about be to be content strategy something we're thinking about a lot for the mar tech podcast but making sure that you're being roi driven. What's your advice orcher. Yeah it's really challenging and it's also a good segue actually because monday dot coms one of our clients enter code list so we've done a lot of content for them. It's really hard for me to be because you can't just it's a longer sale cycle number one number two. There's there's less of a direct conversion event so for example or like a software company you could write about topic xyz and someone's gonna read that and then someone's going to opt in or do a trial or something else right after that. Because it's a very narrow like very low hurdle or lombardo jump over for bbc. It's usually tupper because there's more people involved in sale usually more complex sale and so we do really think of it as a couple of things classic marketing funnel so top middle bottom where we doing content of why for example stuff like case study content stuff like customer interviews while that stuff's going to be really good for like middle ish of the funnel bottom of the funnel could also include like comparison. So we might do monday. Dot com versus asana or monday dot com versus click. Up would be another example of that to be able to show not just from trite example of like. Oh well this tools better because because we say it is but really talking to educate consumers who are going to do that research and do wanna see more like a side by side comparison and understand. Who's better in. Why for their circumstance. So i think it's it's a little more challenging for me to be because again. There's it's usually like a layered multi step approach. I think that you know when. I put my digital marketing hat on not just my seo content marketing hat on a couple of things that you said stick out which is long sales cycle. And you never really know where someone is in that sale cycle whether you're building awareness whether they're inconsideration but what really matters when they get to the bottom of your funnel when they are actually in market. Do they have awareness. Would they consider your product

Lombardo Tupper BBC
UK Spy Chief Warns Taliban Takeover Could Fuel Terror Plots

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

UK Spy Chief Warns Taliban Takeover Could Fuel Terror Plots

"The head of Britain's domestic intelligence agency warns the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan could fuel teraflops MI five director general Ken McCallum believes the Taliban has hardened and emboldened extremists and could lead to the return the major al-qa'ida style attack plots against the west McCallum adds Britain could face more risk because of the withdrawal rule of NATO troops on the overthrow of the Afghan government in a rare interview with the BBC he says nations must be vigilant both for the increase in spot to resume which has become a trend over the past five to ten years alongside the potential regrowth of al-qa'ida style directed plots Charles Taylor this month London

Ken Mccallum Taliban West Mccallum Britain Afghan Government Afghanistan Nato BBC Charles Taylor London
How Technology Changed Music: The Electric Guitar

BBC Newsday

01:10 min | 3 months ago

How Technology Changed Music: The Electric Guitar

Very Big Things Founder Chris Stegner on Outsourcing the Role of Technical Co-Founder

Mixergy

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Very Big Things Founder Chris Stegner on Outsourcing the Role of Technical Co-Founder

"I wouldn't have thought that investors would be willing to back accompany where the key part of what they do is outsource to someone else. You realize this was a thing because you worked in a venture capital firm. And what did what were you seeing that made you say i think i have new idea for what i know. I love it. That's a that's a great question So to your point. I was i was a cto and junior partner ida vc fund in biscuit the idea was we cut a check to a startup for three to five million bucks on at that. Point is supposed to jump in helping figure out whatever game whether it's the good market strategy monetization their development design. Whatever it was and something that i'd get plagued with was say okay. Here's three million bucks now build a deb team or expand your one person deb team to a real dev team because we want to see all this stuff that built in the next six months gave you three million bucks six months better be done ready to rock and then six months later. They're sitting there and they're still trying to hire two or three people that can just work well together. Didn't lie on their resume. Paying there wasn't drama k. or they realized. Hey we need front. People need back in people. Need all these roles and it's just taking a long time to hire them so there's dad said things which drove us to say to them. Okay forget about building a team right now. You can do that over time. Just go and hire agency. An agency is the flip side or they're like cool. Give us a scope. Give us a check. Give us three months and we'll come back. And here's your product and good luck right okay for anybody building. Businesses especially businesses her determine agile. You need to be constantly paying attention to what's happening. Throughout the development what features people are liking doing focus group testing all these different things for the actual in product. Should never really be you. Set out to build on day one and there was no agency to do this purity. So it's it's the old best advice entrepreneur ever solve your own problem right. So at that point. I just i grabbed from the fund our vp of investment. Our creative director. You hire them away from the bbc fund hired him away okay said hey guys. This is a problem. We're all facing. Nobody solved it. Why don't we meet the guys solve it. People have the same problem

Ida Vc Fund DEB BBC
BBC Reporter Leaves Russia After Credentials Withdrawn

Monocle 24: The Briefing

02:30 min | 3 months ago

BBC Reporter Leaves Russia After Credentials Withdrawn

"Bbc's moscow correspondent sara. Raynsford was forced to leave russia at the end of august when her visa expired. Russian state media said ver- move was in retaliation for the refusal of the uk to grant visas to russian journalists. Bus raynsford antar. Employers believe she was targeted because of her reporting which even saw her heckled live on tv. By the belarusian president alexander lukashenko and his supporters. I'm pleased to say that. Sarah has made. It's back to london and joins me on the line. Now good afternoon to you and a warm. Welcome to the briefing. Sarah is a good i to tell us in your own words. What exactly happened. You say this is about my visa not being extended but actually before. I even found out about that. I was heading back to russia from belarus a story proposing there and i was stopped at the border and i wasn't allowed through by the russian border guards who said that i've been put on an fsp blacklists and being declared a threat to national security in russia and as such i wouldn't be allowed back into the country which is obviously a pretty shocking kind of ten of affairs. I've been living and working. Russia this time for some seven years and before that on an author the two decades basically the entire vladimir putin's presidency so we told that i was a national security threats inbound mentoring. The country was a pretty major step and something i hadn't really seen coming to you. Were allowed to enter the country but just to basically collect your belongings. Well yeah not took twelve hours of pretty intense and forensic negotiations from the bbc. And as i understand it from the british embassy as well Calls to the kremlin and to the foreign ministry to find out what was going on but we still don't know the obviously doesn't disclose details when it designated security threats We don't really know why this happened near the official line. That i'm getting from the foreign ministry. Is that this is retaliation for a russian journalist who was denied. Leave to remain in the uk but that case was a two years ago and at the time nobody made any fuss tool and in fact when the foreign ministry will questions Live on air by an independent tv channel. About who exactly. There's journalist was what their name was. Even what agency. They worked for performance. You spokeswoman was weaving ducking and diving and wouldn't even name the reporter so it's quite weird case to be considered retaliation for this is obviously the russian government going after the bbc but it also feels pretty personal to

Russia Raynsford Raynsford Antar Foreign Ministry Russian Border Guards Alexander Lukashenko Sarah BBC Moscow Sara UK Vladimir Putin London British Embassy Russian Government
NASA's Perseverance Rover Successfully Cores Its First Rock

BBC World Service

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

NASA's Perseverance Rover Successfully Cores Its First Rock

"Mars today will attempt to confirm that NASA's perseverance Rover successfully court its first rock NPR's show, PALKA reports Iraq cores are due to be returned to Earth on a future mission. Although perseverance is a pretty sophisticated robotic geologist, scientists would like to be able to confirm the rovers analyses with instruments only available on Earth. Especially if the analyses hint that there was once microbial life on Mars. The rover drilled the rock sample on September 1st. But mission managers wanted to be sure the sample made it into the collection tube. Initial pictures were inconclusive, so another set is being taken. Perseverance will ultimately leave the collection tubes on the Martian surface for a subsequent mission to return them to Earth, perhaps in a decade or so. Joe Palka

Palka NPR Nasa Rovers Iraq Joe Palka
Nigeria Beat Liberia in World Cup Qualifiers

BBC Assignment

00:55 sec | 3 months ago

Nigeria Beat Liberia in World Cup Qualifiers

"News down African qualifying for the 2022 World Cup where the Leicester City striker Colecchia Natural scored twice for Nigeria, who kicked off their Group C campaign with a comfortable two nil victory of a Liberia well, Nigeria will be with that natural and other top players for their next game, however. As Cape Verde drew 11 with the Central African Republic is on the UK government's covid red list. It means that anyone entering such a country would need to quarantine for 10 days upon their return to their English Premier League club. The two time African champions Every coast were held to a goalless draw in Mozambique, sides kicking off their in Group D Cameroon had a decisive two nil win over Malawi. Also on Friday, Tunisia went top of Group B, They beat Equatorial Guinea three nil. Zambia defeated Mauritania and in the group G Open in South Africa were held nail nail in Zimbabwe, Ghana beat Ethiopia one

Colecchia Natural Nigeria Cape Verde Drew Leicester City English Premier League Club Liberia World Cup Central African Republic UK Mozambique Cameroon Malawi Tunisia Equatorial Guinea Zambia Mauritania South Africa Zimbabwe Ghana Ethiopia
Facebook Disables Topic Recommendation Software After It Tags Black People As "Primates"

BBC Newsday

00:16 sec | 3 months ago

Facebook Disables Topic Recommendation Software After It Tags Black People As "Primates"

"News agency. AFP says Facebook has told it that it's disabled its topic recommendation feature after it mistook Blackman for primates in video clips. Facial recognition software has been criticized by civil rights activists who say it can be inaccurate.

AFP Blackman Facebook
New Zealand Police Kill "ISIS-Inspired Terrorist" After Mass Stabbing at Mall

BBC World Service

00:53 sec | 3 months ago

New Zealand Police Kill "ISIS-Inspired Terrorist" After Mass Stabbing at Mall

Yoshihide Suga to Step Down as Japan's Prime Minister

BBC World Service

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Yoshihide Suga to Step Down as Japan's Prime Minister

US Completes Afghanistan Withdrawal as Final Flight Leaves Kabul

BBC World Service

01:26 min | 3 months ago

US Completes Afghanistan Withdrawal as Final Flight Leaves Kabul

"Decades since American troops invaded Afghanistan. The U. S has formally announced the end of its military involvement in the country. U. S ambassador in Kabul was among the last to leave the country ahead of that evacuation deadline, agreed with the Taliban. As the last troops withdrew, Taliban forces fired their weapons into the air in celebration. A Taliban spokesman said that with the departure of the last U S soldier from Kabul airport, Afghanistan had gained complete independence. This is what two men in Kabul had to say about the occasion. Then the Americans want to know the short Today is the last night of 20 years of the American troop occupation. During these 20 years, the Americans have done a lot of damage to the Afghan state. What will happen to the Afghan state. After this? I appeal to all our political leaders, elders and young people. Let's take matters into our own hands. How long will we remain dependent on foreigners? Let's put our homeland together ourselves. The anonymously get their shape. Today is the day of the departure of the Americans. After the foreigners have left, Afghans should start rebuilding their homeland again. They should resolve or political differences through dialogue and take concrete steps for the construction, stability and peace of the country and to take such measures that in the future, the security of Afghanistan is never jeopardized.

Kabul Taliban U. Afghanistan
Reggae Legend Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry Dies at 85

BBC World Service

02:10 min | 3 months ago

Reggae Legend Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry Dies at 85

"A living legend of the musical world who has passed away the Jamaican reggae and dub style. Perry Lee Scratch. Perry has died on the island aged 85 public response from Jamaica's Prime minister Andrew Holmes, who called him a legendary record producer and singer and a great pioneer. He's one of his earliest releases people, funny people. One of the first acknowledge reggae songs from 1968. Mhm. David Katz wrote the biography people, funny people. The genius of Lee Scratch Perry and I'm delighted to say he joins us now on the program. Just just tell our listeners Lee Scratch Perry. Why was he called Scratch and you turned it shopping. I I don't think we have David. Their bit of sound. Yeah, so sonic invention there. It was the man himself the way to pay tribute to the man himself, actually, because I didn't interview on that a little bit earlier Scratch private. He did a song called Chicken Scratch, And so they produced a record called Chicken Scratch. You could have asked me It's a shame we couldn't get David to talk about it. I think that's the the The line has gone down. But what we can do is there again. Hello, David. Join us Go, and I've answered the first question. Hello? Give us another quick going role. Um You know he was he was He was a collective figure wasn't he Wasn't Keith Richards, who described him as the Salvador Dali of music. Yes, indeed. I mean, he was a multifaceted character. He began his career as a singer and then moved into record production where he really excelled. And of course, his innovative techniques really changed the way that popular music has been recorded and disseminated. In what way In what way? Well, he really stimulated remix culture. What we take for granted. Now, you know, he reused his rhythm tracks for songs he'd recorded originally as vocal recordings and overdubbed new instruments on them and mix them down. And really help to dub come into being as a genre and an art form. And that

Lee Scratch Perry Perry Lee Scratch Prime Minister Andrew Holmes David Katz David Jamaica Perry Keith Richards Salvador
"bbc" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

02:05 min | 3 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Ever really busy. Really expensive is a great british summer at the moment on the beaches. Well i i guess that's the benefit you know you keep some of the funding inside of your nation. Is the bbc covering you know things like that. I mean is it only social media. That's showing us videos like that of these sort of internment camps or wrapped around hotels is the bbc. Do you think. I mean. I'm not getting to see it but is giving a balanced perspective right now of issues like that. I wouldn't say probably moves so on that morning show but We have had an interesting relationship with the media over the last year. And a half. And you know you've got some elite leak dissenters. really great. Need your brands at the telegraph things and spend tastic stuff. You see a little bit coming through from the sun to mirror the mail at times that you do get a little bit of truth and They tend to be the baby sky. Giving the worst at bbc at times having better in constant contact with people. I used to work with the bb saved sky interesting conversations going on a number of people who had co whistled knows actually and somebody who coincides with me for the bbc. She said she was on the table. She's one of the senior editors And she said to me she wants to reach out and speak to other beat within the being see if i could put her in touch with them and i was shocked to make. This clear can't do that because you know you could be doing this for fishing. Exercise to find out who they are and they removed them. She did tell me she said. The story is going to go live at six pm today on bbc health. Just say you know that. I'm genuine and it is so i knew she is genuine The people at the bbc genuine some Trying to reform from within is what i would say. They really not happy with what they do. They're shames they are ashamed and something really important delano. only little bits and pieces gets rajiv down. Social media We had a protest compliments ago and there were thousands.

bbc delano
"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome to you say from the BBC world service without a cause to John Connie shock because police have been accused of being violent while the full second dawn to dusk curfew we'll go to a hospital in Tokyo sets up in ten days to counter the growing number of coronavirus cases in Japan and a mother of an autistic child tells us how much destruction the sun structure has caused problems for the phone BBC news the head of the American agency overseeing the development of a coronavirus vaccine says he was removed on Tuesday for opposing the use of two malaria drugs promoted by president trump as promising cave it's nineteen remedies Dr Rick bright says that sidelining him and placing politics ahead of science was putting American lives at risk resident trump has played down the dangers of a second wave of coronavirus cases it later in the year Mr trump said that could be embers of corona that combined with the seasonal flu could create a mess but it may not come back until he was contradicted by his top infectious disease expressed Anthony Fauci officials in California say the first deaths from cave is nineteen in the United States took place there in early February much earlier than previously thought the health officer for Santa Clara county says the death of a woman on the sixth of February may not be the only one that was mistaken for a flirt European Union leaders are expected to sign off on a huge rescue package for countries hardest hit by the coronavirus crisis when they held a video conference later on Thursday they also expected to approve a common approach to lifting national lockdowns the government in the Czech Republic will discuss how to re open the country's borders a month after they were close to come back to the correct of ours pandemic the foreign minister Thomas Patrick Jack wants to ease restrictions slowly the president Milos Zeman's once the board is to stay shut for a year to prevent new infections such as in France are investigating whether nicotine may help protect people against the corona virus data from hospital in Paris showed that smokers with statistically less likely to be admitted to the cave is nineteen the trial is due to open in Germany later on Thursday of two suspected members of Syria's security services the Pat recused of crimes against humanity BBC news thank you for that news hello and welcome to Newsday other procedure with you from the studio in London and me Connie shop coming to you from my home west of London keeping a safe social distance will head to Kenya in a moment Japan and the United States in the next half hour and if you want to get in touch on any of the stories you hear look for BBC world service on Facebook or Twitter you can also drop us a text or what's app message the number is plus four four seven seven eight six twenty fifteen eighty five yeah how to know if you on March.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"BBC world service I met a massive cash injections this week from rich world governments and central banks to rescue the global economy but what about the whole world today we're hearing from people in Manila and I wrote to city struggling not with the fire is quite so much as with the low down aimed at preventing it some health experts are wondering are we going to far to arrest cove it nineteen that's in a couple of minutes BBC news with Erin Sasfin forty million people in California the most populous states in the U. S. have been ordered to stay at home to help fight the spread of the coronavirus California's governor Gavin Newsom said it was time for tough decisions and appealed for a billion dollars to back the medical response to covert nineteen the Olympic flame has arrived in Japan ahead of the twenty twenty six games in Tokyo speculation is mounting that the games may have to be postponed Saudi Arabia has suspended all domestic flights because of concerns about the spread of the virus buses taxis and trains have also been stopped for two weeks in the next few hours Australia's ban on entry for non residents will begin at Argentina has become the first country in South America to announce a national locked down until the end of March NASA says it is suspending work at two rocket senses off to an engineer was diagnosed with COPD at nineteen the announcement is a major set back to the space agency's goal of returning Americans to the moon by twenty twenty four in other news Iran has executed four men for the gang rape and murder of a young woman on a bus in Delhi in twenty twelve they were hangs on Friday off the old appeals have been exhausted Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has claimed that his country has benefited from American sanctions the Ayatollah said the restrictions had forced Iran to be self sufficient president trump reimpose sanctions on Iran after putting America house of an international nuclear deal two senators from Donald trump's Republican policy are facing calls to resign over allegations they used insider knowledge to sell off shares before that prices tumbled due to fears over the coronavirus Richard Burr the chairman of the Senate intelligence committee and Kelli Leffler but denied any impropriety and that's the latest world news from the BBC hello there I made but not unwelcome to business daily from the BBC world service coming up life under lockdown one of Africa's biggest slums the greatest enemies not given that latest and you know when you have that today to ask you these days so now the file I have a little scea we hear from Nairobi and Manila today two cities undergoing tough measures to combat coded nineteen is the queue or worse than the disease we are damaging lots of other things that not only because money eventually they cause deaths I mean if you if you're doing the economy that will translate to millions of people dying directly or indirectly that's all come in business days from the BBC the last two.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To Newsday from the BBC world service show me all of you to review thank you for joining us the U. S. president has announced travel restrictions with most of the European Union to overcome the outbreak of the corona virus in the United States we will be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States for the next thirty days the new rules will go into affect Friday at midnight these restrictions will be adjusted subject to conditions on the ground I feel mogul Harvey Weinstein has been sentenced to twenty three years in jail his victims say they feel joyous with how companies in future will have to make it easier for you to repent their products rather than upgrade Matthew Kenyon with your sports news the NBA suspended because of the corona virus Juventus Pieters positive title holders Liverpool out of the European champions hello on Neil Nunez with the BBC news president trump has announced drastic measures to try to contain the outbreak of coronavirus banning travel from twenty six European countries to the United States for thirty days in a televised address from the oval office Mr trump said strong action was necessary against what he called the foreign virus we are at a critical time in the fight against the virus we made a life saving move with early action on China now we must take the same action with Europe we will not delay I will never hesitate to take any necessary steps to protect the lives health and safety of the American people Mr trump who had previously been accused of playing down the seriousness of the virus announced a swathe of economic measures and support for businesses and workers more from NYC bronze double trump delivered a primetime oval office address to reassure his increasingly fretful nation European ambassadors in Washington will blind sided by the announcements and it's instantly created confusion was the decision to exempt Britain may for reasons of diplomacy or of public health the corona virus is now having an impact on almost every aspect of American life the MBA which runs professional basketball here suspended its season until further notice after a player from the Utah Jazz tested positive the European Council president show Michelle said the E. you will assess the situation following the announcement of the U. S. travel ban in a tweet he said economic disruption had to be appointed Mr trump's address box for the falls on global stock markets Japan's Nikkei closed more than four percent down in Italy where the virus has killed more than eight hundred people the government has ordered from the stringent restrictions old bars restaurants and shops with exception of food stores and pharmacies have been ordered to close for two weeks the UK's prime minister Boris Johnson has described the killings of two Americans and a British soldier in Iraq as deplorable but he died in a rocket attack could come Tongji it's a miniature base near Baghdad we get more details on this report from mark Lubell around a dozen rockets were fired on the base housing coalition forces at around seven thirty PM local time camp Taji not only acted as the headquarters for the battle against the Islamic state group but is where Iraqi forces are trained as well as the three people killed around a dozen coalition personnel reported to have been injured the attacks bear the hallmarks of pro Iranian fighters and the fear is that this latest strike will fuel the recent upsurge in skirmishes between the Americans and Iranian backed forces that have plagued Iraq for many months now mark Lovell this is the world news from the BBC Australia's highest court has delayed a decision on whether to overturn cardinal George Pell's sixty a conviction for sexually assaulting true Quora boys in the nineteen nineties will stay in jail while he awaits the verdict which could take several months he lost the first appeal in the state of Victoria in August a report by a British climate think tank says building coal fired power stations around the world wastes hundreds of billions of dollars because they're now more expensive than new wind or solar farms the study found that within a decade the cheapest option for generating electricity would be to replace existing coal power plants with new renewable power stations and G. government protesters have returned to the streets of the Chile's capital Santiago as the country marks thirty years since the end of major route clashes with police led to closure of part of the subway system huge protests against income inequality that erupted last year have morphed into criticism of heavy handed police tactics a rare medieval brooch discovered by an amateur metal detectorists on a farm in Britain is about to go on display at the Victoria and Albert museum in London the man who found the flower shaped brooch one of only seven in the world initially thought it was an old bottle top his record Jones with mall once experts removed the layers of dirt using pheasant and ostrich feathers to limit any damage the breach was revealed its exquisite and intricate sculptural in design it's made of gold and features diamonds and a huge red stone in the center the firm was once a royal hunting ground and it's thought the bridge was torn off it great force and most hearing the chase is part of the hunt it's lain undiscovered for six hundred years BBC news thank you for that use hello and welcome to Newsday without a decision Connie shop is not shown the spread of cope with nineteen this hour president trump bans flights from Europe to the United States you get on the gets tough on a potential spread and we have an expert on strings all your concerns about the vice you've sent us lots of questions via our Facebook page will try and get through some of them and remember you can text a what's up boss the number is possible for seven seven eight six twenty fifty well box we've coronavirus the.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hello welcome to BBC trending with me Mike Wendling coming up the internal UK government documents and on reddit in the first place as Britain prepared to go to the polls a trove of sensitive documents was leaked online and as the media storm raged Russia emerged as a likely suspect we follow the evidence and go down the path of whispers forgeries and secrets that's B. B. C. trending after the news BBC news with rates remaining three senior members of the royal family in Saudi Arabia including the younger brother of king Salman prince Ahmed bin Abdulaziz had been arrested in the kingdom the former crown prince Muhammad bin Nayef one of Saudi Arabia's interior minister and his brother have also been detained no reasons have been given reports in the U. S. media have linked the arrest of the crown prince Muhammad bin Salman as China recorded twenty eight deaths from corona virus on Friday who bay for Vince at the center of the outbreak registered nine new cases outside the city of Wuhan for a second consecutive day meanwhile new trade figures showed Chinese exports fell by seventeen point two percent in January and February some remote aboriginal settlements in Australia of banning outsiders for three months in an attempt to stop the spread of the virus the minister for indigenous Australians says first nation peoples are particularly vulnerable because they have a higher prevalence of pre existing health conditions the former Brazilian footballer Ronaldinho Kelly shoe has been arrested in Paraguay after he attempted to enter the country with a false passport prosecutors say he was given full spark up William passports in essence you own when the plane landed he says he thought the possible with a courtesy gesture the president of the Supreme Court in Portugal has warned that people are losing confidence in the country's justice system in an interview to be broadcast this weekend judge Antonio P. Saura called on judges to console ties they may have with football clubs well criminal investigations are carried out against some of the biggest in the country and the influential American jazz pianist McCoy Tyner has died at his home in northern New Jersey age eighty one Alfred McCoy Tyner was the last living member of the John Coltrane quartet and played on that best nine records including a love supreme and my favorite things BBC news thank you very much for coming if you watch the thirsty this story starts with a press conference in the middle of a tough fourth election campaign you're the same cars Johnson lose his cool not anything out of the ordinary you might think but what happened next big news what I have here it's something I can reveal to you four hundred and fifty one pages of unredacted documents and information leak of sensitive documents accusations of a cover up a potential bombshell that might have changed the outcome of the vote and all fingers pointed in one direction Russian we now three months on from the UK general election those leaked documents were brandished by the opposition labor party and they detailed closed door talks between Britain and.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The news on the BBC world service it's hard to talk with me Stephen sacker president Emmanuel mackerel is bold promise to break the political mold in France has collided with the reality of his reform plans from tax to pensions have stirred a backlash against what protest is called his neo liberal elitism and as his internal problems of mounted so too have doubts about his ability to be the E. U.'s visionary leader my guest is Gabriel atoll minister for youth and a rising star in Mr McConnell's party what we've seen in France for instance with the yellow vests movements is the bursts of the cover of a pressure canner that had been bubbling up for a thirty or forty years so the the the the problems in French society we are seeing right now actually existed for a long time that's Gabriel atoll on hard talk after the news BBC news with Gerry Smith European stock markets have continued to fall amid growing fears that the corona virus outbreak may cause a global economic slump the selloff in early trading comes after some of the losses in Asia the Nikkei index in Japan and Hong Kong's hang Seng closed down more than two percent Monica Miller is in Singapore has more on the Asian markets investors aren't feeling confident that the corona virus will end in the near future which sent Asian markets off a cliff the Nikkei ended the trading week by hitting a six month low the hang Seng and KOSPI dropped more than two percent following wall street's latest tumble the SMP global ratings has warned that the disease could wipe out more than two hundred billion dollars off Asia Pacific economies this year that's the lowest level in more than a decade governments and central banks have been rolling out stimulus measures to stabilize the markets but the rapid spread of the disease and rising death toll are putting a greater strain on economies video showing angry residents and will come to the city of the center of the virus outbreak have been widely circulated in China leading the central authorities to promise an investigation into alleged mismanagement by city officials the videos show the quarantine residents of an apartment complex screaming it's all fake as a senior Communist Party official inspects and local food delivery scheme the residents said they had not received the food they've been promised health ministers from the countries of the European Union the meeting in Brussels to discuss coordinated measures to combat the corona virus outbreak the European medicines agency has warned of a possible shortage of medicines because many pharmaceutical ingredients come from China with the viruses affecting manufacture arriving for the meeting the European union's health commissioner Selig Kerry cases said you countries would work together of what she called a critical moment in the fight against covert nineteen we'll be looking at the preparedness of member states that needs and will be looking at the need for solidarity.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The BBC all the videos circulating on social media purporting to show policemen gunning down suspected coronavirus victim's own eight Chinese street in fact it is just a montage of various unconnected footage relating to a rabid dog on the loose and a motorcycle accident this is one of a broadening spiral it seems of fake news around the crown of ours of coded nineteen outbreak Christina tada green is an associate director of the international fact checking network this moment is fake news online we got falsehoods regarding the origins of the virus some people accusing the baths some people accusing bananas some people accusing the Chinese biological weapons and then we also got some conspiracy theory people say that was everything was Bill Gates falls right he was behind it all and then we saw a lot of videos and images out of context people falling down air parts of supermarkets and people would caption those videos saying that they were dying from corona virus and that was not right and then we saw the United States this wave of people saying that drinking bleach would prevent you from getting infected from wildfires in yeah that's actually very very dangerous but the truth is now the number of mainstream news organizations are being dragged into all this misinformation carry involve your consent is a professor at the college school of journalism media and culture she's been studying how news organizations have been adding to this general sense of fear what we see particularly in some of the tabloid news coverage is an emphasis on the coronavirus insect killer disease this fear of this unknown and very dangerous disease so this kind of language I think has the potential to spread panic when in fact we don't have sufficient information to actually make any conclusions of that sort it's a dilemma though isn't it because at the beginning of any potentially dangerous health situational health emergency you would want to generate a degree of fair or degree at least of of awareness of anxiety and that by doing these high profile stories you're helping to make people realize that they need to take precautions I think it's very important to call attention to this outbreak but at the same time what's also incredibly important at the moment is for mainstream traditional media to be extremely responsible about the verification of the information that they share and what we have seen particularly on social media is a lot of conspiracy theories and one step are often quite racist and that has also had some impact on mainstream media coverage and that is a very problematic development I think every time we talk about checking the media and how they speak and talk we have howls of protest around the limitations on free speech how do you think we'd best address this problematic area right now one thing that leads to particular spread of misinformation is the fact that the Chinese authorities have such tight information control so it's extremely difficult to get a handle on what's actually happening on the ground in China and so that in turn leads people on social media to really kind of go wild in the speculations so I don't think that the solution to this problem is to crackdown on free speech but to be extremely cautious about believing claims that we see on social media as a car involved your concern well she mentions China that the epicenter of the outbreak where the overwhelming majority of infections and in the deaths of so far the current Kerry Allen makes a living with us here the BBC monitoring Chinese social media she says this outbreak has presented some very unfamiliar challenges to China's usually heavily controlling social media senses when we were starting to hear about six the world these questions online about what was happening the government didn't have any answers and what happened was that people were becoming citizen journalists they were providing the information about what was happening themselves now if you see what we've seen in in recent weeks as the government has stepped up efforts to formal medical workers to be treating the crown fires all over the country lots of people in quarantine all self quarantine I'm using a lot more of the controls that we used to in China so there been cases where people who have been seemingly out spoken have been a blessing for questioning so controls coming back into place yeah let's hear an example of that this is Aman cold fine being he's a Wu Han resident he's a self styled citizen journalists and he had posted images of what looked like bodies being taken from a local hospital then after the video went viral it seems like the authorities came knocking what if you want what do you intend on you don't even know what he was doing you press next right a fine band that I'm speaking to the authorities through his door his own local telling him to go away with the walls it seems later arrested and he hasn't been seen since is this part of a trend just saying that yes there have been two people that we know of this been found bin and there's also been a local gin is consensual should he was putting videos on Facebook and Twitter talking about his life in self quarantine what he was seeing outside of his window he also visited a number of hospitals in Wuhan and he said that the government wasn't giving as much transparency as people believed goals that we've seen in the last forty eight hours well they're outspoken locals speaking on WeChat having their accounts blocks it's interesting isn't it because so much of the fight against this virus does depend on trust in the authorities doesn't it and making this work is about making ordinary citizens behave in ways that they ought to in ways that are responsible so far you get the feeling that trust in the government is holding up John eight it is and this is partly due to the World Health Organization also saying that during this outbreak China has been giving much more transparency than it normally would but at the same time there is a rise of fake news results of this the people have been saying videos weather been claims of people not getting enough food claims of bodies in the streets some of this we we can't prove we can't say whether these are true or false but the government has basically been saying you should be reading all messages you shouldn't be looking at this media and very much trying to maintain control and debunking fake news where it sees it do you think that there is a this was a turning point will potentially a risk of a turning point in China and it's kind of famous great firewall it needs to strike a different balance from the one it's used to striking yes and this this coronavirus story has tested the Chinese government because they have to show that they are doing the most but at the same time it is an authoritarian country and it does like to maintain control and you don't really know what's happening and maybe we'll never Alan here on business daily from the BBC one thing he used to sing to be having the most striking impact outside of China at the moment we're hearing right now is the sound of a near riot in a small town train or bus arrived.

BBC coronavirus
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Listening to the BBC world service one in four adults in the U. S. has a criminal record making job hunting almost impossible could scrapping background checks get more ex offenders into work was that the Ching interviews all together we find out in business daily with me Thomas in force after this latest world news BBC news with Gareth Bonner hundreds of passengers who tested negative for the new coronavirus have left a cruise ship in Japan after fourteen days of quarantine the vessel was carrying more than three thousand seven hundred people when he was only slated in early February more than one in seven on board now have the virus China has revoked the credentials of three will see journal reports is open editorial and bounce the coded nineteen epidemic the foreign ministry said that the column describing China as the real sick man of Asia was racist and criticised the paper for not apologizing the British government has unveiled plans for any points based immigration system saying the economy needs to move away from a reliance on cheap labor from Europe industry leaders have warned that the changes could spell absolute disaster for sectors of the economy the U. N. bags Libyan government says it's pulling out of peace talks in Geneva of the forces loyal to a rival parliament shelled the capital journal who leave a half does trips to being besieging Tripoli since last April rights groups in Iran have condemned the prison sentences given to aids conservationists convicted of spying and conspiring with the United States late word with the environmental group the Persian wildlife heritage foundation to track endangered species Boeing is facing in the safety issue of the what's known as foreign object Avery was found in the fuel tanks of a number of seven three seven mags and Croft so stay remain closed ranks tools and other materials left behind after the assembly process the model has been grounded on to two fatal crashes and soon to say the shipping industry could be powered by ammonia as a way of reducing carbon emissions the chemical produces no common dioxide than it does generate another greenhouse gas experts however say say who green ammonia can be created by renewables BBC knees hello I'm Tom is in force welcome to business daily from the BBC really move rates in the US and the U. K. around then lowest in decades in the state there were more jokes than applicants yes for the millions of form of criminals the count even get an interview employers really do you worry about hiring some with a criminal record they worry that people with the record will be less productive on the job maybe they'll be more likely to commit crime when they're on the job one way to tackle this scrap job interviews together the way it works is that we give people who want to work a job with no questions asked no background check to know interview today we're exploring how employee is helping ex offenders get back into work that still in business daily from the BBC thanks a friend is in the United.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Newsroom program on the BBC world service stay tuned for more coming up on can also listen to our global news podcasts one of the U. S. leading experts on food security is warning that Simon is possible if you'd swarms of locusts in East Africa are not brought under control soon the insects have so far affected Ethiopia Somalia Kenya Tanzania and Uganda our global affairs correspondent Naomi grimly has more list swarms of locusts currently afflicting East Africa read the worst seen in decades of the wet conditions they did that breeding patterns areas which were already suffering from food shortages and metal scene crops and post your white count by the federation's path swarmed the size of room can consume the same amounts of food in one day the total population of Kenya Dominique virgin is the director of emergencies for the U. N.'s food and agriculture organization he says the international community needs to find seventy six million dollars to help he doesn't this situation we did early and and then what you would need is comprised massive the systems for you when you turn situation that may even get out of control when you have people in acute food insecurity I mean it's not very far the U. N. is arguing there were just a matter of weeks in which contain the problem three spraying affected areas otherwise it says the number of late because already in the hundreds of billions could multiply by five hundred fold by June their own Naomi grimly there after more than two years of rising trade tensions China and the United States are reducing some of the tariffs they imposed on each other's goods in a trade war that was started by Donald Trump the tariff reductions are due to take effect on Friday as part of what has been called a phase one deal intended to ease the trade tensions our economics correspondent Andrew Walker reports these new moves by the two sides we've many of the additional tariffs imposed in the dispute in place but they do mark a step in reducing some of the barriers that Chinese and I can exporters face in selling the goods to the other country this is part of a deal that also included commitments on China's part to buy more US goods and to provide more protection for patents and other intellectual property which the US plane was often unfairly acquired by Chinese runs the speed was one of a number of steps taken by the trump administration the marked a more confrontational approach to trade policy the US action against China was officially driven by concerns about intellectual property the Chinese acquisition of patents and technology from American companies whose home the US economic interests the president trump also has a long standing objection to the imbalance in trade between the two countries China sells more to the U. S. than it buys and he sees that his indicating that the US is losing from the trade relationship and center Walker rose Marie has some of the stories from I used to ask the United Nations says more than eight hundred thousand people have been displaced in northwestern Syria since December when the government backed by Russian act how it launched a devastating new offensive on the region the U. N. says some sixty percent of those fleeing the fighting in and let the neighboring Aleppo province I believe to be children Stefan do jury a spokesperson for the U. N. secretary general said people are facing severe conditions reports on the ground indicate that thousands of civilians or on the move from around the M. five highway with most people moving further north and north west towards the Turkey Syria border inclement weather including snow fall is exacerbating the situation both for civilians on the move and for those who remain in unfinished buildings and camp settings tens of thousands of Californians are to be cleared of that kind of bass convictions under a pilot scheme designed to help minorities disproportionately targeted by law enforcement the clear my record program used an algorithm to identify people eligible to have their convictions of raised under the law that legalized marijuana in California in twenty sixteen the Los Angeles district to tell and he said this would bring relief to those people who would suffer the unjust consequences if U. S. struggle officials say clearing convictions makes it easier for people to get jobs and housing the remains of a ninety million year old carnivorous dinosaur distantly related to the tunnels Tyrannosaurus rex is being discovered in origin tying Patagonia by a team of paleontologists the full meets a long term approach was discovered in February twenty eighteen in the central Argentine province of Rio de Janeiro Rio Negro scientists have christened it tight record stores meaning from that.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is the latest BBC news hello I'm Debbie rests a Ukrainian security official has said investigators are exploring various theories behind the downing of the Ukrainian playing in the Iranian capital Tehran Alexi Denny love said they included a missile strike and engine Sadia rainy investigators say initial findings indicate the Boeing aircraft had tried to return to the airport before it crashed on Wednesday killing everyone on board a correspondent in Kiev Jennifer isha reports the head of Iran's civil aviation organization announced that the initial investigation showed the plane had been on fire before it crashed that's an attempt should be made to ten and possibly go back to Tehran airports and that no distress call had been made a team of Ukrainian officials and investigators has now arrived in Iran and is hoping to visit the crash site they said to be exploring full theories as to why the plane came down including the possibility that it was hit by a Russian builds anti aircraft missile assault the reigning military commander has said that the aim of missile strikes lodestone too and buses and bases excuse me in Iraq was not to kill US troops but the damage what he called the American military machine the head of the revolutionary guards aerospace force that they were the start of a series of attacks more from a Middle East analyst Sebastian usher this speech by general Hodges our day is apparent confirmation from around it would have been widely suspected that is true talent to missile strikes on the air bases in Iraq we designed to wreak revenge without inviting further escalation from the US the fact that there were no US casualties know any others as far as has been reported allowed president trump to say that Iran was standing down but the revolutionary guards commander went on to say but the appropriate revenge for the killing of sort of money would be for US troops to be expelled from the Middle East more details have emerged about clashes between Nigerian security forces and to hottest militants in the northeastern state of Borno earlier this week dozens of I. S. fighters attacked the town of Maan gooner at least three Nigerian soldiers are reported to have been killed from a ghost his money Janice quoting two news agency fighters from the Islamic state with Africa province were able to access the garrison town by posing as soldiers the then attacked troops inside when will the reports that a car bomb was used if he is at a number of shelters for displaced people were also destroyed this latest attack exposes the vulnerability of McConnell strategically important location for the Nigerian military and international aid workers a group of international envoys based in India have arrived in Indian administered Kashmir for a briefing on security in the region is the first visit by the Delhi based diplomat since the Indian government revoked Kashmir's special status triggering protests you're listening to the world news from the BBC this is WNYC in New York I'm Richard hake police here New York fatally shot a man early this morning in alphabet city in Manhattan after he shot and killed another man and his parent like the NYPD says that happened outside of a lounge on Avenue a near east seventh street police fired three times of the suspect no officers was injured to firearms were recovered at the scene and officials are now reviewing body camera footage from the trump administration has lost its latest bid to implement a rule that would make it harder for low income immigrants to get green cards W. on my sis Beth Fertig reports that a federal appeals court panel yesterday denied the government's request to let the public charge will take effect last fall a federal judge in New York issued a national injunction blocking the new rule he said it was repugnant for the government to make it harder for immigrants who were in the country legally to get green cards if they take benefits including food stamps the government appealed and argued that two other courts had already lifted similar injunctions but the appeals court panel in New York seems reluctant to act noting that a full hearing will be held in a few months on whether to lift this particular injunction immigrant advocates and many states including New York sued to block the public charge role from taking a fact last October lawmakers are calling on the federal government to distribute billions in aid to Porter Rico after the island was hit by an earthquake this week representative Nydia Velasquez and senator Chuck Schumer among lawmakers who sent a letter to the department of housing and urban development asking them to distribute over eight billion eight that.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:58 min | 2 years ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Welcome to Newsday on the BBC world service with Connie shop chains joining is our top story this morning the US have killed Iran senior minute she commanded general fussy insulin money in an air strike out to Baghdad apples he was the face of the revolutionary guards and the mastermind of Iran operations in the Middle East and his death may have serious implications there is no doubt left now in the eyes of many observers that the ones will respond incline and that will simply enter the two countries the dishes cycle of escalation and on the bush fires in Australia we spoke to one man trying to defend the family farm is a very scary day and we imagined tomorrow being the bar was coming in our direction of the wind change the wind as the monster the after this for the send of the laces well hello this is David Austin with the BBC news Iran's most powerful military commander Qasim sort a money has been killed in a U. S. S. strike in Iraq general Soleimani the head of the codes force of the Iranian revolutionary guard died along with others at Baghdad airport Jeremy Bowen reports the Pentagon said Soleimani was planning more attacks on US diplomats and service members in Iraq president trump without further comment tweeted a picture of a big American flag the Americans and their allies in Israel and the west have tracked suit Imani closely for years it's likely he's been in their sights before the fact that this time the Americans pulled the trigger suggests that president trump believes the reward is worth the risk that the Iranian regime has been so weakened by isolation economic sanctions and recent demonstrations that it will rage but not all for the serious strategic threat the Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has filed severe retribution for the death of general Soleimani he said the killing would encourage Iranians to defeat the US and Israel he has these two sets the actions taken so far by Ron are very calculated to very diplomatic they've already summoned the Swiss site envoy in the capital Tirana though who represents such US interests in Iran three days of public mourning have been declared the first task will be to organize what they will hope will be a massive public funeral for custom city money who was not just to the man who orchestrated Iran's military operations abroad was in charge of many tree intelligence York is treated the network of proxy forces across the region he was also was significant political figure inside Iran cult status among the wrong revolutionary guard corps celebrity status for others and some regarded him as the future let's ical leader oil prices have risen following the death of general Soleimani Brent crude is trading up by more than two dollars a barrel the Australian prime minister has cities countries entering a critical few days with extreme fire conditions full cost Scott Morrison has been criticized for his failure to address the wild five crisis two warships are evacuating hundreds of people from Malibu to a town almost encircled by fires in Victoria these women are among the evacuees it has a an amazing the services has everyone has come to give it you know and very stressful time and I for everyone but it's just been either well me I actually have held it together pretty well to yesterday when I heard that it could be coming back not so when I yeah I had my breakdown and I felt better after it and now I hear me getting on the part and we're going Harmon was saying their families world news from the BBC officials in Indonesia.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:12 min | 2 years ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the BBC world service with me man with us on a cross and in business daily off to the news with talking to people who work at deep bunking conspiracy theories why do some conspiracies keep cropping up why do so many focus on the philanthropist George Soros plus we hear from the founder of Snopes one of the longest running back checking organizations on the internet that's all for the BBC news with Jerry submit a Kurdish let militias says US troops have withdrawn overnight from positions in northeastern Syria opening the way for a full scale Turkish invasion this one is a statement by the White House that take you will soon go ahead with the long planned operation in the area raising fears about the fates of Kurdish fighters there the Syrian democratic forces have been the Americans main allies in the region Iraqi military authorities have admitted that excessive force was used in the district of the capital Baghdad overnight clashes between security forces and protesters left at least thirteen people dead the government has now ordered the withdrawal of all army units from center city a densely populated suburb of eastern Baghdad replacing them with federal police police in Australia New Zealand arrested dozens of activists belonging to the extinction rebellion movement that's demanding that governments and urgently to limit climate change the demonstrations were among the first plans by extinction rebellion in sixty cities across the globe over the next fortnight the Supreme Court in India has ordered the authorities in Mumbai to hold to the cutting of trees in the are a forest known as the city's lost green long the authorities started felling the trees on Friday to make way for new dental for metro trains the general manager of the Houston Rockets basketball team has apologized every tweet supporting Hong Kong's pro democracy protests Darryl mores said it was not his intention to offend the team's Chinese phones or sponsors the woman at the center of allegations of misconduct by the British prime minister Boris Johnson when he was mayor of London has denied that he shows her any favoritism Jennifer Curie refused to confirm or deny rumors that the two had an intimate relationship arguing that she was being objectified BBC news hello and welcome to business daily from the BBC I'm on weight loss are awesome coming up fake news conspiracy theories and the business of debunking the classroom like and what we do the house work as in it's never actually done it it says you do it and then once you're finished you immediately start over again do social media and the internet make things worse the only thing to blame here humans I mean this is a part of human nature there's something very natural about those if we shut off the internet tomorrow I have a feeling we have more conspiracy theories rather than last that's all here in business daily from the BBC the.

BBC
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:30 min | 2 years ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"BBC news. welcome to hard talk on the BBC world service with me Stephen sacker my guest today has a personal story which suggests she has immense reserves of determination and self belief from childhood Kimberly monthly knew what it meant to be different to not fifteen she was raised in a poor part of Milwaukee in the American Midwest the daughter of a black former servicemen and his north Korean wife who'd mac while he was on deployment in South Korea Kimberly struggled to put herself through college and law school and became a public defender in Milwaukee's criminal court system she was ambitious she wanted to one better money so she left a young family behind and signed up to a US government program training lawyers in Afghanistan a decade later she can reflect on an extraordinary experience she quickly grew skeptical about the utility of her official role so she immersed herself in the realities of the Afghan courts and legal culture soon she was herself representing some of the country's abused and powerless people primarily women to force the Afghan system to listen to and the Ford legal protection two women and a whole new way to us her experience give grounds for hope or despair mom Kimberly mostly joins me now welcome to halt thanks for having me I want to take you back a little bit I'm just wondering whatever prompted you as a young lawyer in the United States to sign up for this U. S. government program to go to Afghanistan it it seems quite a remarkable decision to take as a young woman well it definitely was I mean I went to Afghanistan in two thousand eight basically to train and mentor Afghan defense attorneys prior to going there I was a defense attorney in the US and it really was a financial decision I have three kids and going there would be making more than tripled my salary so I went there to at is. my first time leaving the US as it should be said were you with the walkie another going wrong with Milwaukee but it's in the Midwest the United States it's a city which perhaps isn't the most cosmopolitan America I just wonder how much you knew about Afghanistan you know I don't know much about get us in other than what most people know from what they see in the news about you know if the war torn country I don't know anything and frankly I probably with a struggle to find on a map you since written and of course you've written and then a remarkable book about your overall I've got expensive when you reflect on this early period you say one of the biggest mistakes that American made when we came to Afghanistan and it was evident in my program was to employ a this is the right way mind set that everyone on the ground was expected to blindly follow doesn't sound like you were very impressed with the thinking behind what America was trying to do in Afghanistan well I wasn't impressed with our program our program was very much a top down approach so there are what was in the park and it wasn't about how the Afghan legal system is it's about serve what the Americans read the Afghan loss to be there wasn't a lot of substantive training you know was more or analytical training it was more in article sounds of the constitution says this and so I felt like within the training from the I was involved in Afghan war as weren't learning to become better attorneys they were just were certainly just in this program she I I'm just wondering where that over time you began to feel this for symptomatic not just of your program but in a more general sense of the U. S. aperture to Afghanistan I mean you seem to be saying there was a a lack of of local knowledge a lack of context the lack of new owns a lack of sort of sophistication in in the effort to modernize restructure and reform Afghanistan I always look that my role being there was to support the Afghan legal system to support the Afghan programs but I think a lot of people that went over there especially from America went there with the intention let them versus a certain mentality that their legal. system should be like X. so you know I think that was a problem because the cultural context is really important if you want people to be successful within their legal system I wonder if language is important I mean you've already shoulder without saying it explicitly indicated to me you have no knowledge of dari or Pashto language when you've got to Afghanistan I just wonder how much real days and a contact empathetic contact you had with the Afghans who was supposed to be training for me personally everyone that was in our training from spoke English so I had a lot of direct contact with Afghans that were frankly rare compared to the demographics of the country that were dual language they are unusual yeah right you know compared to the you know the whole country then they are more educated than the normal Afghan would would have been at that point in time they are college grads everyone that was in the program that we are working along side but they were you know very good teachers at least to me in terms of teaching me what the Afghan legal system was like teach me about the laws and things like that and I did express my concern with with frankly our embassy my embassy and I did express my concern with the managers where I felt like our training was not effective at all and you you've described how you you really felt over time that you out of sympathy with many of the Americans on your old program including some of the people that we bosses but you told them some plan this seems to be very important said I'm going to go and try to see what it's like actually inside an Afghan call rather than doing this all sort of based on paperwork an abstract theory I want to get inside the system and they didn't really like that now all they did and and frankly me wanting to go to the courts which is what I wanted you to just observe or me won in court of the prison so talk to people and understand their experience within the legal system to me it seems like something that everyone that was being sent there should do and it wasn't just the Americans that with their capacity building the legal system there they had their own programs from U. K. a program to France from all. over the world of experts that we sent there to capacity build within program now I think generally speaking the people within the program were were generally well intentioned but they just didn't know how to make that connection with the legal system Afghanistan without completely understanding that they are in and it's a different court room so when you get inside a cool I mean you you twist a few arms and you persuade one judge to let you into his court and there you go I guess it was quite a novelty for you to get inside the courtroom after all of this dry as dust training that you've been trying to do what impression did you get all of the judicial system when your sword up close first hand well I mean what I got is that number one the money that is being served find it to Afghanistan with the justice system it's not being spent and the way that's most effective to help build the capacity within the justice system the first case that I saw was of a man that was shackled from his hands and his feet and they brought a man with a bag over his head and this was in the national security court which is a court where purportedly they bring terrorists there and so long story short the prosecutor stood up he read the indictment and he basically said that this guy was being accused of being a terrorist because he was running a taxi and in the taxi they found there are three people and they found guns and weapons in the car and so based on that they charge this guy with being a terrace and now with all the evidence they had there were no witnesses the guy didn't have an attorney he wasn't allowed to present any evidence and souls completely ridiculous that he was even charged with that so that would in effect there was no trial meeting of exact defense attorney and there were no witnesses there was in effect no trial dole there is a trial but it was is a travesty I mean there was a trial and this is a call the national security goal that was trumpeted by the Americans a sign that the Afghan government was serious about confronting terrorism right I mean it's it's funded by the U. K. and U. S. government both governments and so yes it was definitely one of those situations that it was. find a buyer governments well intentioned but they're bringing a lot of in my opinion innocent people throw just to to justify the money that was being spent was that a moment when you saw this unfolding of course as a lawyer with very basic principles of your own was this a point where you said I need to sort of not just be a training here I need to be and involve player I need to play a role inside courts in Afghanistan if my presence here is to mean anything well me I think going that court definitely started my wheels turning it wasn't at that mall where I was saying I need to take cases like this was still new to the game but I think when it really sort of resonated with me was when I went to the prisons and I talked to hundreds of people that were locked up that basically we're saying the same thing that this man was saying that you know they were tortured they didn't have an attorney when they went to court no witnesses no evidence they do you understand a lot of people don't even realize that they have a right to an attorney or what an attorney was because I was a relatively new concept so it was very shocking for me and and also seeing a lot of women that were locked out with their children for moral crimes you know for adultery and running away which also was frankly illegal I saw a lot of that and then that's when I sort of thought okay I need to probably get involved and also met a lot of foreigners that were locked up English speaking foreigners there were locked up who didn't have an attorney that were English speakers they know how long they were there they we know what their charges for and so then I sort of kind of felt compelled to get in well I you see what's fascinating is then you made this extraordinary leave your began to see the fundamental flaws and problems in the system you clearly felt you know I I'd like to do something about this but he you are a young American woman not speaking a word of the local languages how did you go about convincing frankly everybody in the system from the judges to the defendants that you wanted to work with to the your U. S. bosses who presumably have some sort of a say in what you. did next how did you convince everybody that you should take cases that you should become a litigator in the Afghan colds yeah I mean it wasn't easy I well the first thing I did is I quit my job with the U. S. state department justice funded program because this is something I was doing independently all right sounds like with that and I sort of just went to the Afghan Bar Association I went to ministry of justice I went to the Supreme Court and I ask for their permission to allow for me to represent people I had clients or people in prison that wanted me to represent them and so from these conversations with the different heads of these legal institutions they all gave me their permission and that's what allowed for me to represent people in the court and you ended up representing over years some extraordinary client drink it cases that are difficult to read about let alone deal with on a face to face basis let's just talk about a couple of stop perhaps with a team that you dealt with the young woman called golden eyes who was raped by her own cousin's husband right and after that she became pregnant she went to a doctor obviously highly distressed the doctor then reporter and took it to the police right and then she was the one who faced criminal charges very serious why charges she ended up being sentenced to twelve years I think it was defined under Afghan lores adultery by force why not actually wasn't illegal crime it wasn't a crime that was codified in the Afghan laws well it may not have been a crime go to five it is certainly lead to a sentence of twelve years and she and her family than I guess reached out to you but I'm just wondering with a case like that what you felt you could offer well me I felt I can offer legal representation I mean she under any Africans who could offer the legal representation and fight frankly you know within that culture with the language in a way that perhaps would have been more effective than you could. well I'll say that she did have an Afghan lawyer and this is frankly routine that the Afghan Lars would often if there is a rape victim try to broker a deal with the rape victim with Mary the perpetrator and so that's what her attorney was trying to focus on whereas I was trying to focus on the law you know tried the slot the fact that she should not have been charged or and frankly convicted of adultery by force and also so I argue the semantics of the case and I argue the law the Afghan long and that's what I do there you know I don't come in from like this morality you know perch and just sort of judge I use the law attention to my client so you have to have an extremely detailed knowledge of Afghan war you have to have dug deep into it yourself absolutely I mean that's part of my job that's the job of a litigator to represent their clients and argue the law as it relates to the best interests of their clients but I guess that's why you know you've said in the book you say repeatedly I you know I didn't see myself so much as a human rights lawyer I saw myself very much as an inside the courtroom litigator you know you want just taking a grandstand overview of human rights in Afghanistan you were doing it on a case by case basis with an intimate knowledge of that particular Afghan war that was relevant right exactly I mean to me that's more effective I mean I I definitely respect human rights lawyers but you know frankly petitioning marching that wasn't gonna help cool NAS what needed to happen is we need to legally are you this in court and one.

Stephen sacker Milwaukee American Midwest BBC Kimberly monthly twelve years
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"BBC world service at six hours G. M. T. welcome to weekend with Judy more. the US is sending hundreds of troops to Saudi Arabia to protect its oil fields from another attack the US defense secretary mock expert says it's a signal to Iran the attack on September fourteenth against Saudi Arabian oil facilities represents a dramatic escalation of Iran integration also a school girl climate activist in New York tells us why she took part in Friday's global day of action if we keep on doing these things are going to die we're going to die like people are doing things and that really does bring home with me throughout the rest of the time in both and economist David Robert Grimes Irish cancer researcher physicist and science right here all weekend of the latest world. hello I'm Tom what's with the BBC knees the United States is to send troops and missile defense systems to Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates in response to last week's attack on Saudi oil facilities Washington has blamed Iran for the attack but as the Iranians insist they were not involved with more details his friend got the multiple drone and missile attacks on Saudi Arabia's oil installations have exposed a major gap in its defenses by the U. S. its strategic ally this offer to help plug that gap with the package of defensive measures the US navy destroyer is being stationed in the northern Gulf to intercept any missiles coming from that direction the Pentagon is also announced a further deployment of what's being called a moderate number of troops to Saudi Arabia to join there's already help in the country pull strips anti missile defenses hundreds of protesters took to the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities on Friday night and a red sign of opposition to president Abdel Fattah el CC in Cairo small groups gathered near to his quest to demand an end to his rule please find tear gas to disperse them some people were detained descends has been repressed since president CC took power. the Swedish should teenage activist a great to tune back has addressed the large crowds in New York at the end of an international day of climate change process which she inspired describing it as a wave of change she prays those taking part in what she called the biggest climate strike in history she said the eyes of the world would be watching to see if politicians would act to slow global warming we are doing this to wake up. we are doing this to get them to act. we deserve a safe future..

Pentagon Abdel Fattah president Tom what physicist researcher David Robert Grimes Cairo BBC Gulf Washington United Arab Emirates United States New York Iran
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"BBC news with David Austin pro democracy protest is a holding a rally at Hong Kong's International Airport in an effort to attract global attention to their concerns at port and line stop for taking part many a carrying signs condemning the violent attacks on anti government protests as last week North Korea has said that the missile tested carried out on Thursday were intended as a solemn warning to the south Korean media have accused soul of talking peace one holding joint military exercises with the United States a man jailed for a gangland killing in Australia has had his conviction quashed off to his lawyer was revealed to be a police informer Farouk or man who'd served twelve years was defended by Nick had a gold bow a barrister who for fourteen years combined her legal work with secretly passing information to the police a Bosnian football player who plays for arsenal is being hailed as a hero on social media helping fight off two armed robbers who targeted him at a teammate in a suspected carjacking say I'd called Colossus Cholesky knock was being driven by the Germans Thomas said because of in London when the incident occurred resident macro of fronts has invited Britain's new prime minister Boris Johnson to make an early visit to Paris to discuss brexit the presidential source stressed that Mr macro would stick to the E. U.'s refusal to reopen negotiations on the withdrawal agreements state media reports in China safety authorities suspect the US delivery company fed ex illegally with holding more than a hundred packages addressed to the Chinese telecoms firm qual way a member of the Nigerian have force who handed in forty thousand dollars he'd founded a missing Postle has been promoted as a reward for his honesty BBC news I'm just a robot and your listening to business study today we'll be discussing something that generates a really deep seated fair nuclear radiation why because the world needs all the low carbon energy can get we worry about nuclear power because of the fear of radiation but how we more anxious than we should be that's all coming up here on business daily one of London's most famous landmarks tower bridge it's not somewhere you'd immediately associate with radio activity not like say because she or the bikini atoll but bear with me because the truth is that radio activity is everywhere we're exposed to it every day one of the most radioactive places in Britain.

Britain China Farouk David Austin telecoms E. U. Paris Boris Johnson prime minister BBC London Thomas Nick Australia United States North Korea International Airport
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:22 min | 3 years ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"From the BBC. In my twenty s I worked in communications investor relations instead of being somebody in a company talking to financial institutions I wanted to be in Haitian Heather McGregor is the dean of a business school and inexperienced board member and company Arna, she's famous in the UK for her newspaper careers advice columns, which ran for years under the pseudonym, MRs Moneypenny, she explains how she came to sit on her first board. So I did an MBA business school, and then I joined a camera hog and I worked for nearly a decade, and I left a because I wanted to buy business say joined an executive search company Bennett, and I joined them with the absolute aim of buying the company, which I didn't he thousand four then I let that company for another decade or so until I was approached to join Heriot watt university as the head of its business school. How? How do I get my first booth position? And that was because a group of people I knew needed to add an independent director the board. And they approached me they thought that I had sufficient financial services. It was a financial services company. They thought that I had the the right skills that are looking forward to a very human resources and people skills. They were keen to have someone that will say that they knew that they could spend a lot of time with because that's what being on a board is bat. You I spend an awful lot of other people. It did lead to further cooled on other boards. I if you're a serving the paper who get calls almost daily about setting the boards are people like serving female finance directors. Now, if you're a finance director of a public company, I would wager that you would get a phone call a week asking if you would serve on the board Heather McGregor dean of the Harriet what business school in Edinburgh. There's clearly been an improvement in the numbers here in Britain thirty percent of board members and the top one. Eight hundred companies are female still a long way from poverty, but better than it was eight years ago, the figure it was just twelve percent Heather played a big part in pushing for that change back in twenty ten. She helped launch the thirty percent club. But don't think that was a call for a quota system of the kind legally mandated in Norway and elsewhere. It wasn't Heather explains. When you heard countries like say, Norway or France that have enacted legislation about getting large number of people in no way, protein legislation overnight saying that forty percent of all had to be women and a small number of people don't multiple boards, very quickly. This phenomenal is name this golden skirts. I it hasn't actually expanded the pool of knowledge because it's just a small number women doing lots of jobs, and I think that was the case in the United Kingdom right up until the year twenty ten and that we do have in the footsie one hundred percent of bullets and lots and lots of women are newly appointed every year. It's not just a small group of women anymore doing multiple directions on passionately antiquated that was a central tentative the thirty percent club. It was a group of women. He didn't believe in quotas, and we believed in NFL action, and and people being very aware and bringing awareness together of what women could bring to aboard an important diversity of thought. But we didn't believe in in legal solutions to this issue. It's about making chairman more aware nominating committees more aware, and it's also about encouraging women to put themselves forward and people have to remember the hiring. A board director is not hiring decision. It's a risk mitigated investment decision. People want to make sure that the person comes on board is going to be truly independent. Yes. An end to hold everybody to account, but also is going to know how to work as a team other than anybody wants quotas. So I I don't know any senior women women on the way up who would be pleased to get a role because it'd been quoted role sue agrees about quotas. She's the co author of the. Glass war, a book on success strategies for women at work. She's worked in senior positions in several media companies, including media, calm the UK's largest media agency what I believe in its targets. So I think saying to a business look at your succession management. You should have two candidates for succession management, one of those should be man. One of those should be a woman if that's not possible over time. Then you need to look at the reasons why I think they need to be targets for recruitment. So we now insist on fifty fifty shortlists, but the other thing that we do as well is we insist on fifty fifty recruitment boards. Just to clarify the difference between targets and quotas. Is it that targets come earlier in the process? Yeah. Yeah. So I think that's why said if you're set a target that you will work over the long term to achieve it. Whereas I think quotas come late and just make everybody feel as though they're being disenfranchised thirty five we've been speaking in general terms. About women on boards, but let me look more closely at the figures, there's a much bigger problem at executive levels so women who have roles such as chief executive or chief financial officer representation falls dramatically in the UK is top one hundred companies. So in the latest numbers from October twenty eight hundred on the footsie one hundred there's only two percent of executive of the board is executive women directors and the footsie three fifty it's even lower than that. So out of a total of three thousand people on those boards and fifty six of the old woman executive director circuit less than two percent. And that's the figure we really don't hear much talked about at all we hear about the progress being made we hear about women in general making a greater presence on boards and the figures do show that, but when it comes to the women actually in those executive roles on boards, the number is very very low the numbers, very low. It's very static. It's very stark at the same figures since it's being being. Measured. And yes, nobody talks about it. It's almost as if as women that were being asked to celebrate the progress that is being made. Hey, look over here. Nearly a third of people on board are women. It's almost as they were being after look away from the other important figure here, which is the number of women in executive roles is very very embarrassingly low. Yes, I was surprised at the evidence in the report about the number of executive women on those boards. That's that's the pipeline. Right. That's the women who should be coming through. It. Does seem extraordinary that for the whole of the footsie three fifty. There's only fifty six executive women on those boots. So you'd expect women from executive roles on those footsie three fifty boards to be the ones that would move up into Charles and roles and the number of women CEO's on boards is so remarkably low on the footsie three fifty it's. Actually, the lowest now at twelve in October twenty eighteen since they started counting in twenty eleven. So that figure is actually come down, and you know, the anecdote that you are much more likely to be a over fifty three or fifty if you could or Dave then if you are a woman looks like it's holding tree. So how do we get Joanna's and Deborah's in the same numbers as John and Dave's sue says confidence has a huge part to play men show of much more naturally in the office than women. Do it. They seem to come into the workplace knowing that that's one of the things that they've got. We say you've got to be aware of this being aware of it is one thing. But I'm sure many women will feel that it's just not part of their personality. And they'd rather ignore that kind of behavior minimize that kind of behavior rather than emulate at themselves and create an environment where people are showing off all the time that you'll saying it's the only way well, there are ways to show off the first thing, we would say, look, we're not advocating that any woman behaves more like mom. We're not advocating that anyone does anything that they're uncomfortable. With what we suggest in the book that there are ways to show off that you might find more acceptable. So there are some people who would write a monthly Email to their boss. Just to say, here's some of the things that happened this month or his how I've helped the team this month. There are other people who would find a friend to talk to that person and just drop into conversation. You know, I was out with Vivian the other day. I was massively impressed with some of the things she was she was saying, but the real point here is you need to understand the rules of the game. So if you choose not to play that's fine. You can take your ball, and you can go home. But if you're sitting there expecting to be promoted, not getting sheriff voice in terms of the team achievements. Then you will be disappointed in you will be frustrated. So what would we your top three pieces of advice? The women either trying to get on board in the first place in non executive roles. And then those women trying to go further and take up the executive roles. I think top three bits of advice are first of all to be resilient. So if you get a knock back ask again and ask again and ask again and ask again said time and time again, what what seemed to come up in in the stories of the book is that if a woman gotta know she would be knocked back for some considerable time. If a man gets a no he doesn't and as one of the interviewees for the book out, she said to us Tommy Mandujano who will ask. Ten women out and beat alighted. If number ten says, yes, but kept going to tend to ten asks how many women do, you know, he would ask ten people out and keep going pacifist rejection? So we have a different attitude to rejection, I think in terms of applying for those senior roles resilience is very important. I think that it's important to be really clear about your own achievements. Don't do them down. Don't for goodness sake. Ever say, I'm so lucky to have this role dot dot dot dot dot. You're not lucky to have the role. They haven't given you to the the rollout of charity. They've given you the role because you could what you do. And because you've learnt it. So that's the second thing is be clear about your own chievements. And I think Thirdly find a way of showing off when we gave a talk about the book a big city firm. One of the most senior men that was there at the end of the Turkey. He sort of stood up and said, look, I've learned something today. He said I've been showing off since like. I got this job all day round every day around me, I him and showing off. That's that's that's that's what we do. He said you're right now that you pointed out I don't hear women showing off his March. If I'd given a second thought, I would have assumed it was because they didn't have anything show off about that they were treading water. And he thought that for twenty years, and he actually said this is a real pacey CEO message really is that women themselves have to take a share of responsibility for this and really make the change L selves. I think business needs to make the change. And I think women need to be aware of what the rules of the game are and find a way of either beating them or breaking them. We did a phone in young women called in and said, I'm working with a full team of men. I'm the only woman whenever there's a kind of tea break. One of the men will say get in the kitchen lawmakers cente- now, I think it's possible that he thought he was being funny. She was disproportionately upset about it. But didn't know what to say about it because she found it to offsetting there all sorts of situations where sometimes pops the might be a new colleague or a new customer to the business and the tone in which the men talk about her maybe just become something that as a woman you find unacceptable. It's it's it's too personal. It's not professional again. And again, you find yourself in the situation. Where is it me? That has to say something is it always me that has to say something every time. I've reached the conclusion actually the answer's probably. Yes that you do have to say something. But the the way to do is with humor yourself that. We would never be bystanders. If we all spoke up either on behalf of ourselves or on behalf of colleagues. That's whether we all men, or whether we all women, or whatever we identify self identify as than I actually cultures in offices would get much better and be much more reinforced diversity, I think that something. We can all do something about these tips are provocative, and that they put the responsibility for change onto the shoulders of women Heather is equally unapologetic when it comes to calling on women to rally themselves and each other and for her one of the most effective routes the women is well what I've always known as networking. I have to tell you right now. I absolutely hate the use of the word network has a verb. And I use it myself. You don't do networking you build a professional network. That's what you're doing is its a noun, and it's more than that as well. All the academic, literature and all the work in. This regard shows that you don't have to build a professional network..

executive Heather McGregor United Kingdom director executive director Edinburgh Heriot watt university CEO finance director BBC MRs Moneypenny Norway Arna Bennett Britain sue chairman
"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"bbc" Discussed on KQED Radio

"BBC BBC. Now history program witness with me, Rebecca Cosby, and today, we go back to the launch of a book that opened up a new conversation for the women's movement in one thousand nine hundred seventy s focusing on self image problematic relationships with food and why the female body has become politicized fat is a feminist issue sold millions of copies worldwide and he's still in print today. Four decades later. Two. Is an idea in the mind because we have such fat phobic societies particularly in the west. And sadly, this idea of fat being terrible has been spreading throughout the world. Susie Orbach is a British psychotherapist and writer in the mid nineteen seventy she was studying in New York and involved in political activism. It was a time when the women's liberation movement was flourishing workshops lectures on everything from globalism to environment and one day. There was a little noticed that said group on women and self image next Tuesday. And I went to long to it. There was a motley group of women, and we began to talk about our relationship to our bodies the politics of what had we ourselves come to believe about our bodies. I remember feeling some kind of shame or embarrassment about talking about women's bodies. Because wasn't that a bit trivial compared to napalm Vietnam? And what was going on in the world? What was this focusing on the individual? It has the women began to share personal stories about their own relationships with food. It uncovered some interesting thought for season. Consciousness is a very strange thing. When you get political consciousness the penny. Suddenly drops the I grew up with a mother who dieted twice a year. She didn't eat any chocolate solo. Apparently she did in the middle of the night. So I just thought, oh, well, that's what it means to be a woman. And when I grow up, that's what I will do to and here, I found myself as a grown up going up and down the scale not seriously disturbed me that there was something about eating and not feeling comfortable in my body that made me relate to the other women in the room and think about how this had come to be. So out of this group, we devised idear that really we should stop dicing. We should eat what we were hungry for we should actually developed. The notion of identifying this thing called hunger. Those discussions inspired Suzy's. First book fat is a feminist issue exploring. Why we eat what we eat? And why we eat it. When we do how eating can be connected to emotions not all of them positive. And how some women can feel disconnected from their own bodies viewing them as objects to look at rather than as a healthy.

Susie Orbach BBC BBC Rebecca Cosby Vietnam Suzy New York Four decades one day