37 Burst results for "BBC"

Fresh update on "bbc" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:56 min | 5 min ago

Fresh update on "bbc" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Around since 2010. But last year, Americans spent an estimated 23 billion at small businesses. That's CBS is Michael George. Early voting is underway and some Georgia counties in the runoff between U.S. senator Rafael Warnock and Republican challenger Herschel Walker. This voter was pleased by the decision to allow early voting in the first place. People in America worked 6 and 7 days a week. Why not give them an opportunity to cast their vote early voting initially? It was not allowed so close to Thanksgiving, but a judge ruled otherwise. So many people can't get there during the week and have many and more opportunities to vote. It's a wonderful thing. The Venezuelan government and the opposition have signed an agreement to try to resolve the country's political and humanitarian crisis. The BBC's Katie Watson, the government in the opposition, have drawn up an agreement that aims to ensure that billions of dollars froze abroad will be gradually released by a UN managed fund, and that money can be put towards healthcare education and food aid, search and rescue operations continue on a small Italian resort island near Naples, one person was killed after a landslide. Here's the BBC's Mark lowen. The fear is that as more areas are unearthed, the number of confirmed victims could rise. Vehicles were tossed aside and battered, hurled

Rafael Warnock Michael George Herschel Walker Venezuelan Government America Katie Watson CBS Georgia BBC Mark Lowen UN Naples
Fresh update on "bbc" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:17 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "bbc" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Says despite the weight the process was smooth. When I came through the first time cars were parked all along the road, but I decided to get in line because this really critical that we all come out and vote and do our part. Shannon county is one of a few in Georgia to offer Saturday voting in the runoff after initially being banned for its proximity to a state holiday. It's reporter Flynn Snyder, all Georgia counties start early voting tomorrow. The Chinese government is facing protests against its zero COVID policy that is shut down access to areas throughout the country. Protesters chanted down with the Chinese Communist Party down with Xi Jinping, as they took to the streets in Shanghai and Nanjing. Such demonstrations are unusual in a country where any criticism of the government and the president can result in harsh penalties, but after three years of lockdowns, quarantines and tight restrictions, patients for many is wearing thin. That's the BBC's Katie silver. In Ukraine, civilians are trying to escape the city of her song that city was recently recaptured by Ukraine's army, but has since been slammed by Russian missile attacks, and across the country repair crews are scrambling to restore heat electricity and water services that were blasted into disrepair after a punishing Russian barrage targeting infrastructure in recent days. Ukrainian president zelensky, meanwhile, hosted a conference on food security with many support of western leaders. Ukraine has been a top agricultural producer and the leaders want to make sure the country is able to continue providing food exports. North Korea is out with a brash new statement about its nuclear aims. Far from 20 18s diplomatic progress towards denuclearizing North Korea, leader Kim Jong-un and says his country's ultimate goal is to have the world's most powerful nuclear force. His vow was relayed by state media, which claimed the north's most recent intercontinental ballistic missile test proves it's already a full fledged nuclear power that's reporter Alex Jensen in South Korea. The Biden administration is easing some oil sanctions on Venezuela. It's part of an effort to boost talks between the government there and its opposition. Chevron, and other oil companies haven't been able to operate in Venezuela for nearly four years after the U.S. imposed severe sanctions on Venezuela's oil industry in an effort to weaken the corrupt regime of Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro. But in Mexico City, the Maduro government resumed negotiations with opposition leaders about holding free and fair elections, Maduro also agreed to establish a humanitarian

Shannon County Flynn Snyder Chinese Government Covid Chinese Communist Party Ukraine Katie Silver Georgia Xi Jinping Zelensky Nanjing North Korea Shanghai BBC Alex Jensen Biden Administration Venezuela Army Kim Jong UN
Most Economic Growth Happened Under Trump, Not Biden

The Dan Bongino Show

00:59 min | Last month

Most Economic Growth Happened Under Trump, Not Biden

"So on his claim that economic growth is up since he took office in his presidency I went to the BBC Ain't gonna get any more left wing than that Here's BBC fact checking Biden about economic progress Quote under mister Biden the U.S. economy is continue to grow this year but a large part of the recovery happened under former president Donald Trump Oh it does Oh it does say Donald Trump As a matter of fact if you see the chart most of the economic growth and recovery after COVID happened to other Donald Trump and went down under Joe Biden So he's lying about that too What about his claim that inflation is all under control no big deal CNBC went to a left wing site inflation barreled ahead at 8.3% April from a year ago remaining near 40 year highs Why did I pick April Because we're not going to see any adjustments to that number at this point Or big ones at least And it's even higher now at 8.4%

Donald Trump Mister Biden BBC Biden Joe Biden U.S. Cnbc
"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:15 min | Last month

"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

"I mean, almost palpable for knowledge, curiosity, the wider world, and so on. The director general gives you, in my day, a 100 million pounds all in. And says, here are all these people queuing up to give you the best ideas. Choose some and then go off and pick up the awards on their behalf. I mean, it's the best gig that you could possibly have. Of course, your conscious of the need, even within a radio four origins, to cater to different sections of it, but I mean, it is the most delightful job going. I'm very envious of the person who's got it now. Yes, and he's probably going to be very envious of the person who has it next. It is one of those jobs, isn't it? Paul just fill us in on, you know, inform educate entertain. It's subscribed and it subscribe to John reith, but when did it come in and what was the significance of it? Well, those values actually David Sarnoff was writing them down a few years before, even that, so I think it was David Sandler. So David Sarnoff, an American pioneer and thought that maybe that this could be a sense of we could use this to inform educate and entertain, although it took a lot longer, I think, from America to actually adopt that. That was more of an idea to begin with, that then I think Reese took some ownership of and this sense that when he had joined the BBC, not really knowing what broadcasting even was. And I even saw in his diaries that it's in January 1923 that he finally listens to the radio for the first time. He's been in post at the BBC for a month and not actually tuned in yet. So I think it took him a few weeks just a few weeks at least maybe to realize, okay, this is what we can do with this. This is the power of this. We now have a responsibility to do something amazing with this. And as Mark says, the people queuing up to be on radio for today. I love this idea. Even back then, they had a sign outside the BBC, the one room BBC, when it magnet house, they had a sign saying BBC come in. And anyone could come in and pitch their ideas and people did. And from that you get, for example, the chief engineer of the royal opera house saying, we've got opera season starting Monday. Can we broadcast that? And they laid a quarter of a mile of cable from studio to opera house stage and that was Britain's first outside broadcast from an idea from someone passing by. So that was a marvelous thing. And now it's outside broadcast to plenty Emily. Do you think the BBC is fulfilling its remit at the moment? Do you think the output is in a good place?

David Sarnoff John reith David Sandler BBC Reese Paul America royal opera house Mark Britain Emily
"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:05 min | Last month

"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

"And cultural assets if you can use that rather academic phrase. Because that's not going to be provided, I think, by the free market. We don't like to think of the BBC just as providing a patch for market failure. But this idea that Britain is somehow Britain is the creative economy and the BBC assassin at the heart of that creative economy for quite a long time. And I do think that it's really important as Mark says that people recognize and maintain that because it's not just a cultural driving in a way. And economic driver for the rest of the creative businesses in Britain. Okay, well let's go back a hundred years again. Day one of the BBC was general election day, which was an exciting day to launch. On day two, came the first broadcast from 5 IT in Birmingham and two ZY in Manchester. Around that time, as it started, maybe 20 to 30,000 licenses were out there, they were listening parties of 50 or more, but Paul. What were they broadcasting? We've heard about news, bit of weather, but what were they broadcasting? And why did those ones in Manchester and Birmingham not start the same day as the London one? The Birmingham station was a little slow to stop because they were simply moving all of the equipment from London and it got lost in fog, so they would have started little earlier if maybe the weather was more Clement. And then it's really day three, I think it actually properly kicks off. November the 16th, you start to have musical concerts, the first song of the BBC, a proper, I suppose is Leonard hawke with Drake goes west, and then it's light opera and comedians essentially from 7 until closed down at top past ten or so. And Mark earlier mentioned John reith, he's the name that we associate with the early days of the BBC, but you argue two other men were very important in shaping the BBC Peter eckersley and who we've already heard from and Arthur burrows, who were they. Well, Arthur burrows, then they both worked for Marconi company, but different wings. And I think both had very different ideas of what broadcasting kudos should be, so Arthur burrows had this rather high minded approach and wanted poetry and light opera and readings and things like this. But whatever Arthur burrows was on air in the experimental stages in the summer of 1922, doing these poetry readings and the like, Peter rack has Lee was on a rival station that was just there ahead of the London station in Essex two empty rittle.

BBC Britain Arthur burrows Birmingham station Birmingham Manchester Leonard hawke Mark John reith London Peter eckersley Clement Paul Drake Marconi Peter rack Lee London station Essex
"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:41 min | Last month

"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

"But of course, and it has to do enough or value for all the various people, millions upon millions who pay the license fee to justify it. That's of course true. But one, it gives you that sense of ownership. It doesn't belong to the government. It certainly doesn't belong to the BBC management at any given period. It belongs to all of us, and the second thing it gives you, in this case, through the license fee, at least until this point is economies of scale. The fact that we all pay for it means that we get much more out of it than if it was only there for people who could afford to pay it because you'd end up getting much less value for money. Okay, and Emily, I'm in the license for your survive fairly precariously for a hundred years. Do you think it will survive another hundred? Even another ten. Well, it certainly doesn't feel that way because, again, it is this very contested political football. And we know that the current government has expressed some desire to get rid of the license fees. It's very old fashioned, doesn't really work in the age of we keep hearing about Netflix, et cetera. But the point to make is that all of those ways offload. And you could make a case that says that even though it is a very peculiar anomaly and it is awkward. That it's actually more durable than an advertising system, which we've seen. It can be extremely volatile and also it can create monopolies and geopolitics as it has with Facebook and Google. And you also have problems with direct subscription services because as Mark says, you know, it cuts off universality and the idea of common ownership. And it also means that you get a quality of information, which is arguably the higher level that going to those people who pay versus those people who can't pay. So whilst it's very politically contested at the moment, there are real, I think, merits in this idea of common ownership. Well, news has been at the heart of the BBC for a hundred years, as we heard the first broadcast was a news bulletin, but there was a lot of debate about reading the news on the radio, Paul. What did the newspaper subject to back then? Well, there was this battle ready between the news and the broadcasters about the ownership of the news essentially newspapers felt that this was their domain, really, and even going back two and a half years before the BBC began with the very first test broadcast when they used to read out railway timetables and things like that just to try and test out the technology. And people were listening in, but then people were complaining going, well, actually, these railway time tables all very well, not realizing it's just a test. Can you read something more interesting so they would read the newspaper and even then the press got involved and were saying, well, actually, could you read yesterday's newspaper? Because we don't want you giving away the news for free, essentially. So the legacy of that that I think comes through into when the BBC forms and they have to wrestle this deal

BBC Emily Netflix football Facebook Google Mark Paul
Eric Welcomes British Actor Laurence Fox to the Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:38 min | Last month

Eric Welcomes British Actor Laurence Fox to the Show

"Fame is a relative thing. But if you are a fan of the BBC as I and my wife are fans of the BBC and as my producer Albin is a fan of the BBC, you know who my guest is. It's Lawrence Fox. Lawrence, welcome. Hi, Eric. You made a mistake there, my friend. The BBC never hired me in 22 years of acting. Now, you know when I say the BBC, because I'm an American, I'm being sloppy. I'm conflating the BBC with media in England in Britain in general. So forgive me. I'm just pulling your leg at 70. It's for fun. But I was saying in the introduction, which he didn't hear that it almost became funny to me, I guess two or three years ago, I got an email from your father. Saying he'd read my books and he was a British actor. And I looked him up and I thought, jiminy Christmas, I've seen him in a thousand films, and I'm honored to hear from him. And he tells me he has this actor's son. And from that point on, every time my wife and I watch something that comes from England, it seems that there's someone in the Fox family in the film. It's almost hilarious to me. Once I began noticing this, you were in the Frankenstein chronicles. What's the do you remember the name of the character that you played? Oh, I don't have a major habit that actors have a wiping script. Listen, I have no I have no problem with that because I'm that way with my books. People ask me about what you remember in your book, you said this, it's like you actually know I don't remember because I've moved on with my life. But the fact is that you played a very creepy character, a decidedly creepy character in the Frankenstein chronicles. It was wonderful. And so it's no wonder to me that my Friends and and fail them. My Irish friends who now live in Los Angeles chose you to play the creepiest character of them all. Can you tell my audience a little bit about this? Yes. Yeah, he is a creepy character, isn't he? I was very blessed to get to finally the script on my desk after having a couple of years of no scripts on my desk. Thanks to the wonderful cancel culture that we live in at the moment. And it was brilliant script called my son hunter about our favorite philandering crackhead Hunter Biden.

BBC Lawrence Fox Albin England Lawrence Eric Britain FOX Los Angeles Hunter Hunter Biden
Iranian female climber says hijab 'fell off accidentally' at competition - BBC

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

Iranian female climber says hijab 'fell off accidentally' at competition - BBC

"An Iranian female competitive climber left South Korea early after competing at an event without a headscarf Many worries she may have been forced to leave by Iranian authorities organizers say Al nasri Khabib didn't put on a hijab during the final of the international federation of sport climbing Asia championship in Seoul where Kirby's decision not to wear the head covering came a thousands protest the death of a woman who was detained for her clothing Reports Sarah Khabib was scheduled to leave a day later but her flight apparently had been moved up unexpectedly A later Instagram post on an account attributed to rikabi said her not wearing a covering was unintentional 5 weeks in protester ongoing in a hundred cities throughout Iran representing

Al Nasri Khabib International Federation Of Sp South Korea Sarah Khabib Seoul Kirby Asia Rikabi Iran
Kwasi Kwarteng Is Fired as U.K. Finance Minister

AP News Radio

00:27 sec | Last month

Kwasi Kwarteng Is Fired as U.K. Finance Minister

"The treasury chief is out as prime minister Liz truss plans an economy U turn Sky News and the BBC report that quasi quantang is ousted It appears trust has parted ways with her treasury chief as she struggles to car markets and hang on to her job the sudden shift comes three weeks after quantang announced a tax cutting mini budget that sent the pound plunging to record lows against the dollar Charles De Ledesma London

Prime Minister Liz Truss Treasury Sky News BBC Charles De Ledesma London
Jennifer Granholm: Russia Is Not a Good Energy Partner

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Jennifer Granholm: Russia Is Not a Good Energy Partner

"Mister bedou a Jennifer Granholm the energy secretary was with the BBC today I want you to hear this America cut 15 go I think Russia has proven itself to be an unreliable energy partner It used to be reliable no more no country wants to take the risk of putting a significant amount of its energy demand to Russia's supply It is clear And in fact I think this accelerates the EU's push to become energy independent through clean energy So let me ask you this genius She had no damn thing about energy Nothing zero Doesn't matter So I guess Florida is an example of not using electricity right Right mister producer Florida is an example of using coal And oil and propane and natural gas right America So as I speak there's still millions of people who don't have electricity in their homes in Florida And now people up the coast in Georgia but especially South Carolina is getting whacked now They've lost energy too Electricity Because the lines are down So is that an example Now I can do the same thing they do So apparently the Russians blow holes into quote the great press secretary in the Nordstrom pipelines In Nordstrom's pipelines it's the Nord stream I got it Although have you noticed the Tokyo roses of our society are blaming us But blaming us

Mister Bedou Jennifer Granholm Russia Florida America BBC EU South Carolina Nordstrom Georgia Tokyo
John Zmirak: 'We Are All Mark Judge Now'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:47 min | 2 months ago

John Zmirak: 'We Are All Mark Judge Now'

"Mirac, what else should we talk about? Well, I actually have a column on discussing what we were just talking about Cole. We are all Mark judge now. And that's at the stream. We are all in or soon will be in the same position of people like your own courtesy and Mark judge and Kyle rittenhouse. We face a regime that is an existential threat to the people of the country. The way the French did after May 1940. We face a hostile occupying government that is not legitimate that does not look for our consent that is intent on silencing us and persecuting us if we try to claim back our national sovereignty. That is the gravity of the situation. When I was talking to the good people in the audience at Christians engaged, I said, you think you're in America. You're not. You're in shine. And the media are virtually all state media, and they're virtually all repeating party propaganda. But there are broadcasts coming from abroad. There are little samas signals, like the BBC broadcasting into occupied France. And those are media like the stream, like Eric metaxas, like Steve Bannon's war room, like American greatness, Julie Kelly's reporting on the January 6th protesters. Revolver news, there are epoch times. I heard that epoch times is now the fourth largest newspaper in America. If that's true, that is extremely encouraging news. Because The Epoch Times is one of the only papers that would tell the truth about the vaccine.

Mark Judge Kyle Rittenhouse Cole Mark Eric Metaxas Steve Bannon Julie Kelly America BBC France The Epoch Times
Naomi Wolf Exposes the 'Great, Great Evil' of the Media

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Naomi Wolf Exposes the 'Great, Great Evil' of the Media

"So Naomi, you're saying things that are difficult to comprehend. But let's just continue to go through it. You use the word aside. Can you say that the BBC and NPR and all of these others whom we would ordinarily trust on the basics, you know? On the basics, they reported, they reported that the queen died and we don't say, well, they always lie. We just assume that that's their job is to report. But they have ceased to do that. And now we find out you find out that they were paid, but paid by whom. Well, people and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation directly in many, many cases. But also with the cares act, that was a $1 billion of our taxpayer money and millions of it went to buying up what were called trusted messengers, community groups, small news outlets, local synagogues, and churches, and I've got a filmmaker working on the Jehovah's Witnesses. Being influenced in this direction as well, buying up little arts organizations. All the way down to the most local level to speak with a unified voice to exclude people who challenged the narrative that everyone had to be vaccinated. So a great deal of money has gone into basically buying up our civil society institutions and our media to suppress this information. And lastly, big tech is invested in these outcomes and the bodies of others explains exactly how and an America first legal foia and also subsequent lawsuit by the attorney general of Missouri and the attorney general of Louisiana showed as I mentioned that CDC and The White House were colluding directly with Twitter and Facebook to silence critics like me who were saying truthful things.

Melinda Gates Foundation Naomi NPR BBC Bill Foia America Missouri Louisiana CDC White House Twitter Facebook
Queen Elizabeth II's funeral: What will happen in Windsor? - BBC

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Queen Elizabeth II's funeral: What will happen in Windsor? - BBC

"Of officials have made final preparations for the state funeral of Queen Elizabeth II the day before the late monarch has laid to rest dignitaries from around the world including president Joe Biden are arriving in London the funeral is expected to be a spectacular display of national mourning that will also be the biggest gathering of world leaders for years Around 500 royals heads of state and heads of government from around the globe have been invited Meanwhile thousands of people continued to line up to see the queen's coffin as they braved the chilly nighttime temperature in London Karen Chammas

President Joe Biden Queen Elizabeth Ii London Karen Chammas
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:10 min | 3 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You're listening to the BBC World Service on Julian Marshall and this is news. In South Africa, mister Zulu cars will a teenager's being crowned the new king of the Zulu nation in a traditional ceremony in the province of kwa Zulu natal. Zulus are the largest ethnic group in South Africa, the ceremony took place after a failed court interdict to hold the proceedings. The half sisters of the king claimed their late father's will, which paved the way for misses Zulu to become monarch may have been forged, our correspondent nonsense seko joins us now. So the zulus have a new king, he has spoken, what did he have to say? The king's message was that of unity, he said that he understood that some in the royal family were differing with him, but he hoped that they would return home and start over a new leaf because he is determined to unite the Zulu nation, which makes up a 5th of South Africa's population and the fact that so many people were at this traditional coronation thousands of people with it means that the Zulu nation itself does endorse me as the new king. He has no executive part. So what is his influence? It's very important that South Africa because of its turbulent apartheid past that there is social cohesion in this country. You would recall that just before 1994 when South Africa ushered in a democracy, there was political in fighting, which almost turned into a Civil War between the zulus who were part of the Inca freedom party and the governing African National Congress. So it's very important that the entire nation does get along and that is why such kings like miso Zulu are part of what happens in governance so to speak in South Africa, but he's not the only king there are others in the eastern cape of South Africa where the causes are in northern South Africa where the vendor people are. Okay, so South Africa, if you like a collection of monarchies, tens of thousands of zulus gathered today to greet their new king and you had a chance to speak to some of them number sir. There were a lot of people there who were very happy that finally they get to see the new king because there have been delays. They have been court challenges. They have been squabbles within the royal family and there was also a massive flood which led to the deaths of hundreds of people here in the entire province which delayed the coronation from taking part. However, I spoke to some of the people who were there and they were very happy that the new king has finally been unveiled. We hope and

South Africa Julian Marshall mister Zulu Inca freedom party BBC African National Congress king
"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

03:09 min | 5 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

"The BBC must significantly improve its handling of complaints, ofcom's report will feed into the BBC midterm review as our national broadcaster at the BBC must deliver for its audiences. Now, Alice Enders, is it inevitable whether of common intended it or not that this review becomes instantly political. It's inevitable. But I would like to add to the comments that we are living in a very opinionated and polarized environment that certainly is the finding that of Kong might have highlighted more today. And in that context, if a person doesn't see their opinion reflected, they view that as an issue of impartiality. Sitting on the fence in a funny way is taking a position that is what many people believe. And you see this in commercial radio, which is far more opinionated when they're dealing with news and current affairs. I know because I'm supposed to be the person to get that gets beat up on those media. And I just think that's just where we are as a society and not just in the UK, but more generally. In which case, let's ask Kevin backers about that, given that's where we are, Kevin, given that lots of broadcasters, LBC, GB news and others have presenters who express opinions, but across their output you deem them to be balanced. Why the BBC go that way too? I think the BBC has a unique position in British life, a unique funding system, a unique accountability, and actually uniquely has its own set of editorial guidelines as well, which go beyond the off con guidelines and rightly so. And the BBC in many ways sets the standards or should set the standards for things like accuracy in June partiality. And to come back to your point about the politics of review play, I mean, part of the function of the charter review is to help try and inform our reviews, try and inform the government's mid chart review of the BBC. What I would say is, of course, as an independent regulator, we are trying to bring the evidence to the discussion, we've looked at the evidence and we're trying to present it. Did you have interactions with the government while you were putting this review together? Not about the specifics of it. No, about the mechanism, but not about what we put into the review, which is wholly our own work and no discussions with the government about the output of what we're saying. On that, we're going to have to leave it. I'd like to have talked a lot more, but the media shows half an hour long, so the radio four schedule, of course, doesn't extend for any of us. Thank you very much indeed for talking to us that's Kevin back, group director of content and media policy at off con, Owen Meredith, chief executive of the news media association, roger mosey master of sew in college at Cambridge University, former head of TV news at the BBC, and Alice ender's director of research at Enders analysis. You will be able to get this edition of the media show all of our additions as a podcast through BBC sounds, but for the moment, thanks for listening and bye bye..

BBC Alice Enders Kevin Kong UK Kevin back Owen Meredith news media association roger mosey government Alice ender Enders analysis Cambridge University
"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:43 min | 5 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

"And they approve of that. And by the way, in general, they approve of BBC first as the right way to deal with complaints. However, once they get into that system, they get lost and as roger said, it is really labyrinthine for audiences. That's what our research shows, they're not quite sure where they are in the process. They don't like the tone of language. They get a response from the BBC. Many of them, when we do, when we were discussing this for the BBC, the BBC said, well, you know, this is a measure of our success that people don't come through to offer that much at the end. Our research shows people don't come through dwarf come because they give up the ghost going through the BBC complaints process. And don't really understand where they are or how to advance it. Well, as I was saying, the BBC has defended its complaints process, but also says it's willing to work further with you to make. I'm not sure it's always. I mean, the BBC is more transparent than other broadcast is for a good reason. They're the only ones who receive 5 million pounds of public money, and they should be. And I don't think it's always really helpful that the knee jerk is we're already doing a brilliant job. I think it's better sometimes to look at the evidence, which is what we do as an independent regulator and see where you can make improvements. Well, they have said, we will work with ofcom on this. So I imagine you're going to be having further conversations with the BBC. So there are these three areas where looking at services complaints. Next, let's consider impartiality. We've heard from ofcom's chief executive today saying it's the BBC clearly needs to address widespread perceptions about its impartiality, Owen Meredith from the news media association. Do you agree with that that there is a perception issue.

BBC roger ofcom Owen Meredith news media association
"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

04:57 min | 5 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

"Where the limits of the BBC's digital activity should be, particularly in the context of news? I think this is a really, this is one of the toughest areas and it's something that we have been talking to her in and colleagues at NMA and others about. And there is, as roger says, there are gaps around the UK in terms of local reporting and regional reporting. And the frankly is a lot of political pressure from around the UK for the BBC to step into those gaps and serve audiences around the UK. On the other hand, you know, we, I think it's fair to say, we are constantly talking to the BBC about how they could have more effective and better partnerships with local media. And there are existing partnerships and how they could build on things like the local democracy scheme, which there have been rather successfully running. And those are ongoing discussions. So it is the hardest, it's the hardest conundrum for the BBC, but also for the regulated. One of our other duties is about media plurality in the UK. And that is critical for all audiences around the UK. And of course, the question is where the BBC fits into that and when it supporting that plurality and when some feel it is constraining it. And on today's media show, we're looking through ofcom, the media regulators suggestions for the BBC, particularly through three points of emphasis. We've talked there about BBC services and how they should be defined and how perhaps they need to be limited in some circumstances. Next, let's talk about complaints because ofcom is focused on this and how the BBC deals with complaints. Roger, let me bring you in here. You used to be very senior at the BBC for many years. Lots of complaints just come with the territory of running the BBC and it's perhaps not a surprise it should be on the receiving end of quite a few of them. Yes, that's right. The BBC size and scale means to get lots of complaints. I confess when I was in news, I hated regulators and I hated complaints processors and thought on the whole we should just get on with the joke. I wonder before you go on, roger, Kevin, did you use to feel that way when you were a BBC executive? Yeah, a little bit, to be fair. I've switched sides now. Yeah, roger, sorry, carry on. Yeah, and now I'm outside the BBC. You see that accountability is really important. And it's very crucial for the BBC that it is accountable. I think it's rather badass accountability, really. The complaints process is very complicated. I've only, since I've been outside, I've made one complaint in 8 and a half years. And I own the system. And you've just got stuck in this labyrinth of not being able to work out how it was that you've got anyone track knowledge that there was a genuine issue there. Well, the BBC would say there's a point of contact where you can make a complaint, the complaint is logged and in a set out time frame, you receive a reply in the vast majority of people do. Yes, I think also what Kevin is getting at, I think, is that there's a broader accountability about the BBC about issues like Brexit or about the wake of the pandemic. And the thinking about some of the key issues which illuminate that, we never hear from the BBC. So I don't know how the BBC thinks it covers the pandemic. I didn't know how obesity thought it covered Brexit. There are all those things where a company can illuminate and on the whole they don't..

BBC UK roger NMA Roger Kevin obesity
"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:12 min | 5 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

"Digital form, and oh, and we wanted to speak to you because the NMA made you approached ofcom with thoughts on this review. I wonder what you told it. Yeah, firstly, thank you for having me on the show. It's a great pleasure to be here. I mean, we primarily have concerns around the BBC's digital approach to news and the way that it publishes in written format news on the BBC website. And how that interacts with the commercial sector. Clearly, there has been many reviews, government professional reviews that came across review. Primarily, but thermal review and others since that have looked at the sustainability of the press and the independent press and approval press in this country, which is vitally important for all of us to society and to democracy at the core of it. And clearly, having the BBC as a taxpayer funded organization competing in the digital space with commercial publishers is presenting a serious challenge to the ability of commercial publishers to monetize commercialise and therefore sustain their business models in that environment. So what we presented to ofcom as part of this was review was a number of issues around that and how we think the BBC could be a better partner to help sustain the commercial news sector, which I think is in all of our interests in the long run. Well, let's consider this issue of services Owen, isn't it the case though that the NMA was concerned about the BBC having any news product in the digital arena a few years back. So do you just fundamentally see an issue with the BBC operating in this space? I think the BBC is perfectly entitled to have 8 digital presence and a digital presence in news. I think where the parameters need to be discussed and negotiated between the commercial sector and the BBC. It's exactly the scope and scale of that. At the moment, the BBC is the largest news destination website in the UK. That's not what the BBC was set up to be. And of course, as consumer habits have changed in the way that we all discover our users change, the BBC needs to play a role in that new ecosystem. But let's unpack to make sure it's not doesn't crowd out the commercial spectrum. But let's unpack that a little bit with the help of roger mosey, master of selwyn college at Cambridge University, a former head of TV news at the BBC, also a former director of BBC sport and Alice Enders whose director of researcher Enders analysis which carries out independent research on the media. Roger, if I could start with you, isn't it inevitable that the BBC's remit has to change that it has to evolve the kind of products that it offers. That's not something to criticize the BBC four, is it? No, I think actually, that is good that the BBC is on many digital platforms because it gives you good strong impartial news there. And I think it's a bit of a red herring to say that the BBC is responsible for the troubles of the commercial sector, which are actually true worldwide, the BBC doesn't exist in America and yet there's still all that pressure on local media. And I certainly find looking at some of the local media websites. I used to rely on really thin and not really there in a proper form these days. So if the BBC feels that gap, I think that's probably good for local democracy and good for our national discourse..

BBC NMA roger mosey selwyn college Alice Enders Owen BBC sport Cambridge University TV news UK Roger America
"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

05:43 min | 5 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

"But they rate it considerably lower for delivering impartial content, and therefore we feel the BBC really needs to focus on ways of delivering that and also critically explaining how it does deliver impartial content. But that's what I'm trying to understand that you asking the BBC to change the content it's making so it's more impartial or are you asking the BBC to explain how it's making its content impartial? I think it's more the latter of that is explaining how it's making its content impartial. And it's also explaining where there are contentious issues around impartiality, how it deals with those and how it has been trying to achieve impartiality. And that leads us on to the second point of emphasis from ofcom, which is complaints because, of course, people complain about the BBC for a range of reasons, but one of them can be connected to impartiality. So again, help me understand what is the BBC getting right, but what do you want it to do better? So the way audiences need to complain to the BBC, which was decided by parliament is they need to complain to the BBC first before they come to come. The BBC has an opportunity to deal with that if audiences aren't happy in the end with how the beats deals with that, they can then come to Afghans. So that's the process. We feel that we have intervened already on this over the last few years. The BBC is not open and transparent enough in how it deals with complaints, the type of complaints it gets. And in particular, where it's dealing with complaints around geo accuracy in German partiality, which are critical to its news provision, it should explain more when it doesn't uphold complaints around impartiality. So again, I want to understand what you're asking the BBC to do. It already publishes data on the number of complaints that it responds to. Are you asking for it to publish reasoning behind every conclusion it draws on her complaint? No. What we're asking you to do is where there are complaints around June part Charlotte, June partiality of geo accuracy, which go right through the complaints process of the BBC, and in the end the BBC do not uphold the complaint that they publish the reasoning why they've not upheld those complaints. That's not a huge number, but they are often important in the high profile cases and we feel it would help sustain trust in the BBC and also explain to audiences better how the research decisions. Now, I'm interested that you say that would help build trust and we'll get into the reasons why you feel the BBC's trust trusting relationship between its audiences may be under pressure. But aren't the main reasons those relationships are under pressure, nothing to do with whether it publishes how it concluded one decision or another during its complaints process. It's because of the broader political media landscape in which the BBC is operating. That's the primary factor, isn't it? It's a very challenging landscape for the BBC on impartiality..

BBC Charlotte
"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

The Media Show

03:23 min | 5 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on The Media Show

"Podcasts. Hello, I'm ros Atkins. This is the media show from BBC Radio four. The media regulator ofcom has released a review of how the BBC operates. There's an awful lot in it, and of course focused on three areas how the BBC deals with complaints, how it approaches impartiality and how it decides which services to provide and across all three often wants an improvement in how the BBC explains to us all what it's doing. Now, as you can imagine, this raises lots of questions about what all of you get from the BBC and how you interact with it. So let's start with ofcom, Kevin back Hurst is its group director of content and media policy and a former news executive at the BBC, Kevin, welcome to the media show. Hi, rose. Looking at what of commerce released today it sounds shall we say underwhelmed by how the BBC explains its actions to everyone. Why? I think we feel the BBC should absolutely strive all the time to explain itself to audiences and viewers. And also to be transparent to the audiences who pay the license for you and also to the rest of the creative industries around the UK about what it's planning, how it is approaching programming, how it is delivering its mission, its public purposes. I mean, of course, we're all essentially is to make sure the BBC delivers what parliament has set out for the BBC, which is.

BBC ros Atkins Kevin back Hurst Kevin UK
Katty Kay: U.S. Having a Baby Formula Shortage Is 'Unbelievable'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:33 min | 6 months ago

Katty Kay: U.S. Having a Baby Formula Shortage Is 'Unbelievable'

"Here's Katie Kay from the BBC Another far left outlet over there She does the same thing Acting perplexed and confused that the big government that they all kissed the butt of is so incompetent that they can't even handle a baby formula crisis It's not Joe yeah Joe Biden is uniquely unqualified I'll give you that But surely there are people around him who know what they're doing And the answer is what they're doing is intentionally destroying this place They can't help you know that So they got to make it out that no no it's just a character flow at this administration here Listen to this check check out catty K from the BBC Take a step back The idea that the United States of America is having to import baby formula from Switzerland because mothers are running down to one can or even less to try and feed their babies They literally can not feed their babies and this is in 2022 The world's biggest military the world's biggest economy can't get baby for me a lot of people just seems frankly it seems kind of unbelievable If somebody had told this to me a couple of months ago I would have never believed that this was going to happen This headline started cropping up two or three weeks ago And two or three weeks ago there wasn't very much attention being paid to this The first story is I saw about it back then I thought I hope The White House is on this because this has the potential to blow up in their faces politically in a very big way And of course much more importantly it is causing huge amounts of stress to parents

Katie Kay BBC Joe Biden JOE United States Of America Switzerland White House
"bbc" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:12 min | 8 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on WBUR

"Claire grim and with the help of my BBC colleagues around the world I'll be trying to get a better understanding of the stories that matter to all of us Today Boko Haram high Islamic fundamentalism took hold in northern Nigeria Please note you may find some of the details in this program upsetting Miami Jones became the BBC's correspondent in Nigeria in 2019 Welcome to the explanation Miami Thank you very much for joining us Thanks for having me clam Where I really want to start is just a chat about the lay of the land with this Can you explain to me how the country is divided along those religious and social lines because geography plays its part in their story doesn't it Yes certainly does Roughly speaking Nigeria is split in half with the southern part of the country being the kind of wealthier predominantly Christian part even in terms of its vegetation it looks very different It's very green very humid and perhaps more reminiscent of people's ideas of what sub Saharan Africa looks like whereas the north of the country is a lot dry a lot more arid and in that part of the country the population is mostly Muslim Obviously you have minority Christians and Muslims in both actions and actually you have a stretch in the middle of the country that has a kind of mix of different ethnicities and populations but that's roughly how the country is divided So if you look towards the northeastern region then that became fertile grind for the growth of Boko Haram Yeah exactly I mean it's a part of the country that doesn't have the oil resources that the south has to move tends to be poorer western education particularly is not as entrenched And so over the years many families have tended to send their children to Islamic schools rather than western schools All of this was kind of fertile ground form a young man called Muhammad Yusuf to start preaching in the late 2000s talking about westernized education being Haram being forbidden And that's what the name Boko Haram actually comes from It means western education is forbidden is Haram.

Nigeria Miami Jones BBC Saharan Africa Claire Miami Muhammad Yusuf
Conflicting Reports That First Ukranian City Has Fallen to Russia

The Dan Bongino Show

01:23 min | 9 months ago

Conflicting Reports That First Ukranian City Has Fallen to Russia

"Bad news up front We'll give you a variety of perspectives here Number one it appears and I say it appears because I'm even getting conflicting reports on this It appears that the first Ukrainian city has fallen to the Russians Meaning it's largely largely under Russian control That city is curse on Khrushchev Now I say it appears because I'm getting some conflicting reports from people over there I told you I'd give you all the perspectives You can formulate your own opinion yourself But I'm getting conflicting reports from people with very good sources that curse on is it a lot of trouble but may not have completely fallen yet Now that strange because the BBC is reporting here Ukraine Russian troops take control of the key city of kurson says the mayor Of the city Now apparently the Russian forces in the city have set a bunch of conditions For the Ukrainian citizens there Folks none of this is easy to take Again in the comic books the citizens revolt they shoot and kill all of these terrorist invaders to their city They win They pull up their flag and the credits roll and we all live happily ever after after our popcorn and our $10 movie which is probably $20 now In the real world there are hard choices

Khrushchev Kurson Ukraine BBC
Why the U.S. Is Reluctant to Kick Russia Off the SWIFT Banking System

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 9 months ago

Why the U.S. Is Reluctant to Kick Russia Off the SWIFT Banking System

"Not feels defense minister has criticised European nations for failing to cut Russia off from the global bank payments network all keys public's comments come off to the US and EU stopped short of blocking Russia's access to the swift payment system when they announced a new round of sanctions late on Thursday Publix also castigated fellow E. U. nations that have refused to provide lethal aid to Ukraine saying only the UK Greece Poland and the Baltic states had done so in an interview with the BBC public suggests many European leaders don't want to take these financial steps because they would cause economic hardship for their own countries I'm

European Nations Russia E. U. Nations Publix EU Baltic States Ukraine Poland United States Greece UK BBC
UK: People with COVID in England won't need to self-isolate

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 9 months ago

UK: People with COVID in England won't need to self-isolate

"In the coming week people with Kevin nineteen will no longer be legally required to self isolated England's the U. K. government announced the scrapping of the five day self isolation rule as possible why depend they have cooled living with K. visits the plan will also likely see testing for the coronavirus scaled back U. K. prime minister Boris Johnson told the BBC that England has reached a stage where the balance can be shifted away from state control to personal responsibility but some of the government's scientific advisers said it was a risky move they believe the new listing of restrictions and testing could bring a sinus infections and leave the country more vulnerable to possible new and stronger strains of the virus one a position health spokesman accused Johnson of declaring victory before the war is over Karen Thomas London

Kevin Nineteen U. K. Government U. K. Prime Minister Boris Joh England K. BBC Government Johnson Karen Thomas London
Mike Graham Describes How the Journalism Industry Has Devolved

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:16 min | 10 months ago

Mike Graham Describes How the Journalism Industry Has Devolved

"Mike, you have this almost unique experience. Because you're not just a media professional from one country. You've done it here in America. You've been massively successful being this. You know, one man why a service for the globe before you came back to the UK and then started you also talk radio program. Let's drill down here a bit on what's happened. Because as a kid growing up in West London, you know, I'd love a news junkie. I was listening to LBC radio as a kid, you know, Adrian love at midnight as an 8 year old and my little transistor I'd buy the you know I'd pick up the Evening Standard coming home from school on the tube on the subway. That media doesn't exist anymore. Back then, you know, if you said the word journalist, it wasn't necessarily pejorative, and it was actually a trade. I mean, you knew stuff, you worked your ass off, the unions were problem, but you had a skill set and you were challenging the establishment. Yes, the BBC was always lefty. I get it. But it was a skill set. It wasn't just, here's a typewriter right stuff. Today, a snotty nose 21 year old is given a Gmail account and a search engine and they're allegedly a journalist. Will you walk us through you as a first hand witness? What has happened to your industry mic? Well, you're absolutely right. I mean, the BBC was always slightly left leading, but it was never so obviously biased, as it is now. You know, when I grew up watching people like Richard baker reading the news, you know, these were people like sort of Walter Cronkite, you know, they were respected and you could believe everything that they said. And that now has kind of changed. Now we have a guy called Hugh Edwards who makes 750,000 pounds a year. Now, I know that his dwarfed by some of the salaries over there. But he took a 250,000 pound pay cut and thought we should be grateful that he'd done it because he was apparently saving us all some money. That's paid for by the taxpayer. That's our money. Right, because if you don't buy a BBC television license, you can actually go to prison. It's the only tax which immediately sends you to jail if you don't

Lbc Radio West London BBC Adrian Mike America UK Hugh Edwards Richard Baker Walter Cronkite
BBC Gobsmacked by Larry's Response to January 6th and Trump's Potential Second Run

The Larry Elder Show

00:49 sec | 11 months ago

BBC Gobsmacked by Larry's Response to January 6th and Trump's Potential Second Run

"Earlier if you just now joining us, we played the entirety of my interview with the BBC that I did this morning. Got an email from then they invited me to discuss the events of January 6th and told me that they've been speaking with Democrats. And they thought they'd reach out and speak to a Republican. Really just one. And they were just gobsmacked. That I didn't believe that January 6 rose to the level of 9 11 rose to the level of Pearl Harbor, gobsmacked that I would support Donald Trump if you were to run again. If he were to run a kid, would you just put him? Yes. Even though he'd be 78 years old, even though younger than Biden, bro.

BBC Pearl Harbor Donald Trump Biden
Who's in Charge of 'Forever'?

Latest Sunday Audio

00:58 sec | 11 months ago

Who's in Charge of 'Forever'?

"I was listening this morning to the BBC. Which is not always wise, first thing in the morning, but I was, and there was a program I was listening to about how if we would stop eating meat and go with soy milk and do a number of other things, none of which are actually committed to doing. Then it would be plausible for us to create a context where we could all live forever. And I said, wow, I said, that's interesting. Forever. Who's in charge of forever? He, who is the same yesterday? And today, and forever.

BBC
Dennis Asks 'Sinatra: The Life' Authors Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan, 'Will Frank Sinatra Endure?'

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:06 min | 11 months ago

Dennis Asks 'Sinatra: The Life' Authors Anthony Summers and Robbyn Swan, 'Will Frank Sinatra Endure?'

"And I have just come across this new biography of Frank Sinatra with filled with pictures as well as great fascinating detail about his life. The two authors are Anthony summers who was a former BBC journalist, and Robin swan is also a journalist and they have written biographies of Jay Edgar Hoover and Richard Nixon. Anyway, this book is titled Sinatra the life. You can't get much briefer than that much more concise. So Anthony and Robin, I welcome you to the program. Hello there. You're both now. I'm speaking to you, you're in Ireland. Yes, that's our home base. Okay. We both brought in as you actually will gather in a moment is America Italian American born and bred. I'm from Ireland and this has been my base for years, but America in a way has been my patch as a journalist for many years. Well, welcome to America via radio to both of you. I have so much to ask you. First, I guess the first is, do you believe, 'cause I was talking about this just the other day. I finally came across didn't come across. I finally worked out my own definition of great art, music, or any other art. And that is that it will endure over generations there are two and that it endures in repeated hearings for any given listener. Will Frank Sinatra endure, I think we think so, would you agree Robin? Absolutely. I think we think so and a measure of it perhaps is in sheer longevity and endurance as a test, we worked on this book so not for the life for the past four years. And when I say work, I mean sort of 8 days a week. And that meant that 8 days a week and often far into the night, we both played Sinatra. We have two because we were writing his life. And we still like it. Now there aren't many people that you could listen to every day for full years and still be successful. And we're not

Anthony Summers Robin Swan Jay Edgar Hoover Frank Sinatra America Ireland Sinatra Richard Nixon Robin BBC Anthony
"bbc" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

02:08 min | 11 months ago

"bbc" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And Janice, I mean, she had a reputation of being a real mentor as well. So all the young people that came into broadcasting, she would put an arm around them. So she definitely had a big impact. If I think about my music breakfast show, presentation team now, they are all female bar one out of 5. And I think that's significant. I was reading earlier on that the BBC Radio one DJ Adele Roberts actually tweeted saying thank you for everything you did to inspire others and open doors for other women and other radio presenters to prosper. We've got a tweet which has just come in here from Kiera and saying Janice was a great DJ and a great supporter of new music. There was no box ticking. She had to work twice as hard as a man would have to do to get the same recognition. Would you agree with that launer? Well, I would say that if you're in a room and there aren't any other people who look like you, it's going to be more difficult. And you do have to have pretty special skills to negotiate your way around. Number one, a pretty complex organization like the BBC is big and it's impressive. And you have to be able to maneuver yourself around what is still a male dominant music industry. And with Janice, all of the people who she interviewed all of the artists, they all leave that interview with a really warm feeling. It's one thing getting the opportunity to talk to impressive, important musicians. It's another to leave an to leave a really positive impression. And that's the effect she had on people. And we mustn't forget that the sexism that she had to endure we were talking to Niki about that just before you joined us. Lauren, I mean, I was reading that Janice long believed it was because she became pregnant while she wasn't married. That she actually was effectively sacked from radio one. And she says that she complained about it. The corporation privately conceded it was the case, but at the time her contract didn't allow her to do anything about it..

Janice Adele Roberts launer BBC Kiera Janice long Niki Lauren
Caller Begs the Question: 'Can We Make News Boring Again?'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Caller Begs the Question: 'Can We Make News Boring Again?'

"Is. Well, you know, I'm calling in because this fox headline, I'm all over the political spectrum. I take in all sorts of media from all sides. I love your show. Thanks. I love Fox News. But I still watch all the other outlets. I will DW, BBC World news because it's good to get a picture of how everybody's feeling. Sure, I got it. I feel like these stories that with Fox interview in this guy is such a cheap shot and like Mike, you remember when news was boring when they weren't trying to get headlines when they weren't trying to get very different kind, and that's the way it is. Tuesday. Boring

FOX Fox News BBC Mike
"bbc" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on WBUR

"On Facebook Instagram and on YouTube on Twitter we are at BBC World Service You can also get in touch via BBC upload where you can send us your reaction directly and send us a voice recording which we might even play here We really love hearing from you Now although very rare it's thought some people may be genetically resistant to coronavirus Scientists want to find them in case they hold the key to developing drugs that can help protect other people And this was the topic on our health check program We are going to look genetically at areas that are different in these individuals compared to individuals that get the infection and get the virus And even if we identify a single genetic area or assume a gene or an area next to the gene that compressor resistance that will be major because that gives us the possibility to target for therapy for prophylaxis for treatment Are you confident that you will find somebody who does have a genetic resistance to the virus or even several people It's a very difficult task It's a genetic task I would say But we are confident we will identify some or at least one Even if identifying identify one it will be major more than 10,000 of you on Facebook reacted to this story which reached more than 200,000 accounts You left stacks of comments too with lots of theories about who where and why there may be people who react differently to the virus Alice says it's just nature Emma says unfortunately not me get well soon Emma and paju says I'm resistance to governments and mainstream media propaganda We have another piece on that topic in just a moment.

BBC World Service Facebook BBC YouTube Twitter Emma paju Alice
Norman Stone on the Success of His Latest Film 'The Most Reluctant Convert'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:47 min | 1 year ago

Norman Stone on the Success of His Latest Film 'The Most Reluctant Convert'

"Votes my guess is Norman stone film director and the film we're discussing the new film is the most reluctant convert all around the country all around the world, but you can find it at C. S. Lewis movie dot com C. S. Lewis movie dot com. You have to be excited about the success of this film Norman. I mean, it's one thing to have artistic success. You've never not had that. I've watched your stuff. But to have people respond, has to be very gratifying. It's you Americans. When I work for the BBC, I was known as the half American kid because I loved it over here. I like Americans. And I love filming in America, and so on. And that stays, but even me with my experience of your visionary possibilities. This is grown me away. We came over for Wednesday. What is it now? Monday, Tuesday. Tuesday. Wait and say again, I saw that again. I don't know. We came over here. It's a day. We came over here and there was this meant to be this little launch with summer and then discovered it's going to be elsewhere. But it just got bigger and bigger and bigger. It tells me two things. It tells me that people are hungry for this story, which is great. And it tells me that I can swing open the library doors to the rest of Lewis. Somebody asked me that when I was doing the first shutter lands and I said, what do you want to achieve? And I was a good question. And I said, really what I'd like to achieve is swing open the library doors, because if you haven't read Lewis, and you're not aware of him, it's all there. It's all there. He's sold a billion. A quarter of a billion must get too exaggerated. He sold a quarter of a billion books. I don't know if it's done that. He has died in the 63. He's selling more books every year than the previous year don't you hate people

C. S. Lewis Norman Stone Norman BBC Lewis America
"bbc" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Ever really busy. Really expensive is a great british summer at the moment on the beaches. Well i i guess that's the benefit you know you keep some of the funding inside of your nation. Is the bbc covering you know things like that. I mean is it only social media. That's showing us videos like that of these sort of internment camps or wrapped around hotels is the bbc. Do you think. I mean. I'm not getting to see it but is giving a balanced perspective right now of issues like that. I wouldn't say probably moves so on that morning show but We have had an interesting relationship with the media over the last year. And a half. And you know you've got some elite leak dissenters. really great. Need your brands at the telegraph things and spend tastic stuff. You see a little bit coming through from the sun to mirror the mail at times that you do get a little bit of truth and They tend to be the baby sky. Giving the worst at bbc at times having better in constant contact with people. I used to work with the bb saved sky interesting conversations going on a number of people who had co whistled knows actually and somebody who coincides with me for the bbc. She said she was on the table. She's one of the senior editors And she said to me she wants to reach out and speak to other beat within the being see if i could put her in touch with them and i was shocked to make. This clear can't do that because you know you could be doing this for fishing. Exercise to find out who they are and they removed them. She did tell me she said. The story is going to go live at six pm today on bbc health. Just say you know that. I'm genuine and it is so i knew she is genuine The people at the bbc genuine some Trying to reform from within is what i would say. They really not happy with what they do. They're shames they are ashamed and something really important delano. only little bits and pieces gets rajiv down. Social media We had a protest compliments ago and there were thousands.

bbc delano
"bbc" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"BBC News with any McCue and approaching Tropical Storm has forced officials in the U. S State of Florida to bring forward the demolition of a tower block that collapsed nine days ago. More than 100. People are still missing following the disaster, With 24 deaths confirmed so far. The authorities say the remaining part of the building won't be able to withstand high winds forecast to hit Miami Beach on Sunday. Former president of South Africa, Jacob Zuma has for now avoided going to jail after the Constitutional Court agreed to hear his appeal against her 15 month sentence. Mr Zuma was due to hand himself in by Sunday or face arrest for failing to appear before a corruption inquiry. An Israeli cargo ship has been attacked in the northern Indian Ocean. The crew is said to have been unhurt. Israeli officials have reported to believe that Iran was behind the assault. In recent months, Israel and Iran have been targeting each other's vessels at sea. Protests against the Brazilian government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic have been taking place in cities across the country. Tens of thousands of people have been demanding a boost to the vaccination program and the resumption of financial support for the poorest. Ethiopian Human Rights Commission has called for urgent measures to ensure the safety of civilians in the northern Tigre region. Eight months of conflict there have left hundreds of thousands of people experiencing famine. Former European Council President Donald Tusk has returned to Polish politics after a seven year absence to lead the country's main opposition party and more so he denounced what he called the evil that ruled Poland. And in football. England appeared to be heading for the semifinals of Euro 2020, therefore nil up against Ukraine and on course to face Denmark in the next round. Danish beat the Czech Republic earlier in the day. That's the latest BBC news. Welcome back to Noosa and to Canada now where the government is to send military aircraft to the west of the country to evacuate towns and help emergency services tackled dozens of wildfires they've been sparked by lightning strikes and the record breaking heat wave. Soaring temperatures have led to a surge in deaths in Canada, the western province of British Columbia is one of the worst hit areas. My colleague Julian worker has been speaking to the journalist Satinder Sidhu, who's there. There are currently something like 168 active wildfires across the province of those nine arts said to be of concern, But there are fears that there could well be new fires springing up in the next day or two, a figure of 70 was mentioned. The largest of these fires is near the city of Kamloops, and that's 310 square kilometers. Firefighters did manage to save about 400 homes, but they are now describing that is completely out of control. The most symbolic perhaps was that of the village or small town of Litton, which earlier made history by becoming the hottest place ever recorded in Canada, three successive days with record breaking temperatures 49.6 degrees Celsius. Unfortunately, that town has now pretty much been destroyed by these wildfires. The cause, principally 12,000 lightning strikes, according to the wildfire service on Thursday alone, presumably alongside the extraordinary heat. You've got such dry terrain to Absolutely. The conditions are being described as a tinderbox. There has been this prolonged dry spell for the last three months across Western Canada and the wildfire season as a result was anticipated, but as a consequence of this very unusual heat dome effect Which is the cause of the very high unprecedented temperatures. Um, that wildfire season has come at least three weeks earlier than expected. Now that Heat Dome, which has dissipated but hasn't gone away entirely, is heading east from coastal British Columbia into Alberta, Saskatchewan. And Manitoba, the prairie central provinces of Canada. As the heat drops clearly, particularly in a place like Litten, it is going to take Goodness knows how long for people to recover from this for for the rebuilding process to take place. Absolutely, And there is also.

Satinder Sidhu Miami Beach Canada Alberta Sunday 310 square kilometers 15 month Manitoba Jacob Zuma 24 deaths Kamloops Western Canada Litton Zuma Noosa Euro 2020 12,000 lightning strikes Julian Litten Thursday
"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:36 min | 1 year ago

"bbc" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The mass protests that have convulsed Belarus since August's contested election. Watching on was a so called people's assembly of more than 2700. UN elected delegates. They're expected to rubber stamp Mr Lukashenko's planned to hold a referendum on constitutional changes in 2022. Mr Lukashenka, who's led Belarus since 1994 said the reforms would reduce the power of the president. Myanmar's military government, where protests against last week's coup are continuing, has drawn up plans to increase Internet censorship or details. Now from Jonathan head. They've drafted a really tough law, which will criminalize any kind of social media Internet posts, which the military judges to be threatening to public order. People who work in business and the economy there say that perhaps what the military doesn't fully appreciate is how much In a country that didn't even have any Internet to speak of any 10 years ago. How much now small businesses depend on Facebook. It's one of their plans because social media is being used so effectively at the moment to mobilize people and we've had yet again. Huge numbers of demonstrations of people coming together all across the country. This is the latest world news from the BBC. This is W. N. Y. C in New York. I'm David. First, Many elderly New Yorkers are still struggling to book Covad vaccine appointments, even though they've been eligible for nearly a month. Some of those seniors are also Holocaust survivors. Mayor De Blasio's announced the city is launching a special effort to make sure they're vaccinated for So many people. Presence of Holocaust survivors in our city is a reminder of just how recently that history took place. We've got to be there for these people. The effort includes partnering with organizations in the Jewish community across all five boroughs. It's unclear how many Holocaust survivors in New York City remain unvaccinated. New Jersey governor Phil Murphy is quarantining after a member of his family tested positive for covert 19. Murphy's office says the governor tested negative yesterday and that he doesn't qualify as a close contact to the family member. But the governor says he'll isolate out of an abundance of caution. We're being extra extra careful here at hearing both to the CDC guidelines. Also taking no chances. This marks the second time Murphy has had to quarantine due to possible exposure to the coronavirus. He isolated and canceled in person events for several days in October. After socializing with an aide who later tested positive. The NYPD has removed most of the barricades around Trump Tower on 56th Street and Fifth Avenue. A spokesperson for the department says the decision was made in partnership with the U. S Secret Service. The area had been largely cordoned off to the public since the summer of 2016 when Donald Trump was campaigning for president. People are now free to walk down the sidewalk unimpeded and to go into the lobby of Trump Tower. 26 degrees. Now cloudy skies expecting a high near 35 this afternoon tonight Partly cloudy with a low of 19 degrees. Hello. I'm Razia Iqbal. Welcome to news hour from the BBC World Service. It comes to you live from our studios in central London. Coming up in about 30 minutes. Our first interview with America's top scientist Anthony Fauci, since President Biden came into office will speak to him about variants vaccines on the very, very long view of cove. It I believe that if we do things right and pull together as a global community, as opposed to individual countries, but doing things together. With the vaccines that we know we can develop. I believe we can turn this around very similar to what we did with smallpox and polio and measles. So I don't think so. When I hope not that my great great grandchildren will have to be worrying about Cove. It Anthony Fauci do stay with us for that lots coming up this hour. We begin today, though, with the continuing protests in Myanmar ever since the military took power in a shock, predawn coup last week, detaining and San Souci and other National League for democracy politicians Who won the recent election, Throngs of NLD flag waving protesters have been on the streets in many places around the country. This public display of discontent is at great risk to the tens of thousands on the streets. Many remember or know about the brutal crackdown in 1988 after students protested against then decades long military rule. Thousands were killed. We've heard over the last few days that protesters are merely waiting for the military to act The world is watching. And on Wednesday, president Biden said the U. S would enact new targeted sanctions against the military. As the head of the Army and the man who led the coop. General men online. Is somebody that we haven't heard a great deal about in a few minutes, someone who's had lengthy meetings with him but first let's hear from a protester in Yangon, the country's biggest city. My name is Esther's and all I'm a economics researcher, and I also apology remember off Revolutionary Democratic Front, which is one off the alliance off anti gentle must movement. It has been six days already. Until now. We started the movement and after that hundreds of thousands of people are currently involving in this generous track in different regions off Emma. Most off the people in this strike is the Generation Z and then they are very creative in expressing their interests and also their various type off strikes like protesting in front off central bank government offices, which support the power off civil disobedience movement to grow. We have spoken to reporters in the last few days, and they describe on atmosphere almost like a festival. How would you describe the atmosphere off these demonstrations? Ah, yes, I think it is very creative and all off the young people are drying in here. Almost all of the young people are trying to hear And since yesterday I feel like it becomes very look like as a festival, you know, But on the other hand, that is why it is very important to point out the principles which the movement can follow on. So we're now promoting that kind off principles and they number one abolished the military dictatorship number to abolish the 2008 Constitution, which is the main pillar off the military cemetery, Full federal democracy and number four free all political prisoners, So we're not promoting these four principles to the public right now, because Must do not have a focus political agenda right now and most off the slogans and return as 3000 city and we don't think that free gone sense, which he only can bring the dictatorship down because at the root cause is the military dictatorship and the 2000 Constitution, which we really have to be abolished. You talk about yourself as a Politburo member. Are you hoping expecting thinking that perhaps someone in the military High command will Will speak with you. What? What are your expectations were not expecting that But we are. We are also preparing for that Even though we're not expecting the principles we are holding is What we have to talk with military, so we have to prepare it. And we are also no negotiating with political parties, too, because the most influential political party in Yemen is the energy and the energy has not come out with the concrete principle right now, too. To feed the public. Well, most of them are being detained by the military. That's our understanding. Let me ask you about the relationship between the demonstrators and the police and the army. We have already seen the use of water cannon, tear gas, rubber bullets, and in in one instance at least Some live rounds have been shot..

Anthony Fauci Razia Iqbal Donald Trump Lukashenka David 2022 BBC World Service New York City BBC Lukashenko 26 degrees Wednesday Yangon 1988 U. S Secret Service Murphy Trump Tower 56th Street Facebook 19 degrees
"bbc" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"bbc" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"The BBC in the UK jumping ahead this week in 1968, the MBA awarded expansion teams in Milwaukee and Phoenix. A special expansion draft was held in May so that the two teams could Acquire players from the rest of the league this week in 1973, George Foreman, T. K. Oh, Joe Frazier and two rounds for the heavyweight boxing title. This'll Week in 1976, the Pittsburgh Steelers went back to back Super Bowls, beating the Cowboys and Super Bowl 10. The M V P award went to Steelers receiver Lynn Swan, making one of the greatest catches in football history. Sticking with the Steelers this weekend. 1992 Bill Cower becomes the head coach of the Steelers, becoming only the second head coach of the team. Since 1970 that was Chuck Noll. This'll weekend 2005 Roger Clemens agrees to a one year $18 million deal with the Houston Astros, making Clemens the most expensive pitcher in Major League baseball history. This week in 2006, Kobe Bryant scores, 81 points and a regulation NBA basketball game, which is only second to the legendary Wilt Chamberlain, who had 100 points in 1962 on that's just some of what happened this weekend Sports history the weekend sports Time capsule on my heart radio. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is investigating claims that one of Ford Motors recalls didn't fix the issue. Brian Shook has the details. So far, The administration has received 11 complaints, saying the power tailgates weren't fixed when the super duty pickup trucks were re called in 2019. Ford recalled the F 2 50 F 3 50 the F 4 50 models after owners complained the power tail gates were opening while they were driving Kroger's trying out new smart card tack That is Eliminates paying at a check out the new crow Go system is on a trial run in Cincinnati, Shoppers can fill up their cards, which in turn can recognize what's inside than a quick swipe of a payment card, and it's out the door. Treasury secretary nominee Janet Yellen is urging lawmakers to go big on another coronavirus stimulus package was interest rates at historic lows. The smartest thing we can do is act big in the long run, I believe the benefits will far outweigh the costs. Yelling is former chair of the Federal Reserve, she told a Senate hearing. This is a good time to spend money to rebuild an economy that has been battered by the ongoing Corona virus outbreak. Ellen was one of president Like Joe Biden's first Cabinet picks. She would be the first woman to head the Treasury Department if she is confirmed by the Senate, one of America's largest Me Cos. Is paying over $221 Million to settle a lawsuit after was accused of inflating chicken prices. Tyson Foods announced Wednesday that had reached the settlement with end user consumers. And commercial purchasers without admitting liability. The settlement does not cover the legal battles the companies involved in with big companies, including Chick fil A and Wal Mart over similar claims. President Biden is holding the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. The pipeline would have carried oil from western Canada to refineries and distribution centers in the U. S Consumer Business News. I'm the Muto, NBC news radio. Some New York City school teachers who've been working on site are upset that remote teachers are being offered the covert 19 vaccine. At the same time, there's no mechanism in place for differentiating, which teachers work wear. But Union president Mike McGrew says there's plenty to go around. We don't want vaccines on shelves.

Pittsburgh Steelers President Biden Ford Motors Ellen Senate president Roger Clemens George Foreman Chuck Noll Joe Frazier Kobe Bryant Wal Mart Lynn Swan Wilt Chamberlain UK Milwaukee BBC Houston Astros