35 Burst results for "Aztecs"

Mexico asks Christie's to call off auction of pre-Hispanic artifacts

KYW 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | Last month

Mexico asks Christie's to call off auction of pre-Hispanic artifacts

"Has urged auction house Christie's to cancel a planned sale of pre colonization artifacts that it wants to get back. CBS News correspondent Elaine Cobb reports from Paris more than 30 artifacts from before Spain colonized Mexico are due to go under the hammer at Christie's in Paris next week that Mexico says they're part of its national heritage and should be returned. The artifacts include masks, carved stones and figures by Aztec, Mayan, tall, tick and mixed her cultures. A few of the pieces are expected to go for more than a million dollars each. Mexico's National Institutes of Anthropology and History says the Foreign Ministry is working diplomatic channels to try to have them returned. Elaine CARB, CBS NEWS PARIS It's

Elaine Cobb Mexico Paris Cbs News Christie Spain National Institutes Of Anthrop Foreign Ministry Elaine Carb
Tezcatlipoca, the Aztec god of chaos

Mythical Monsters

03:41 min | Last month

Tezcatlipoca, the Aztec god of chaos

"Cosmology was based on the everlasting war between light and shadow on the side of light was the feathered serpent quetzalcoatl. The god of knowledge and on the side of shadow was his brother. The jaguar tez cattle polka sometimes associated with dark magic and discord but tense cattle. Polka is not purely an evil being in the aztec language of nahuatl. His name translates to smoking mirror. And he's often depicted alongside and obsidian mirror. Obsidian is shiny jet black form of volcanic glass and a key element of the jaguar. Mythos to the ancient aztecs. Obsidian was a mysterious almost sacred. Object warriors and kings adorned themselves in jaguar. Skin and carried obsidian blades to honor. Tez cattle polka. According to some stories shamans would gaze hours into obsidian disks as a way to gain insight into the dark corners of their psyche. The closer they got to their shadow self the closer they were to test cattle polka. The story of quetzalcoatl and says cattle pope as struggle was told in a cycle of endless creation and destruction. Over the course of five ages. Each one saw different god the role of the sun. The god in the position of the sun would ultimately be overtaken by the other god and the world's population would be destroyed and recreated stories of quetzalcoatl and tez cuddle. Polka were so influential that they affected as tech politics adorned with the same job war skin associated with tez cattle polka emperor. Montezuma the second was often seen as god in the eyes of his subjects when the spanish invaded mexico in fifteen nineteen some say that montezuma assumed spanish leader her nan. Cortez was quetzalcoatl reincarnated. This was due to the fact. That cortez was white. A color most often associated with quetzalcoatl though. This may not be true. The bloody conflict between the spanish. And the aztec would prove to be no less apocalyptic so apocalyptic that dark feline god had to lend his people a helping hand or claw. Captain fernando de la casa. Found himself alone in the jungle. He could not remember how he got there. Or why and his surroundings gave him few clues. It was so dark. The young captain could barely make out his hand in front of his face. That's when he heard it. He turned and saw an enormous jaguar. Bare its teeth. By the time he drew his sword. It was already too late. For nando woke up breathless his cod soaked with sweat for the last few days. He'd had the nightmare whenever he tried to close his eyes. The jaguar was there waiting for its prey. Only tonight it felt more real than it ever had before. He swung his legs over the side of his caught his heart. still racing. Sleep would be impossible tonight. So fernando left his quarters deciding to take a walk through the empty streets of ten. No ch teeth land.

Kings Captain Fernando De La Casa Pope Montezuma Cortez Mexico Nando Fernando
"aztecs" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

02:08 min | 2 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Meanwhile, the Aztecs looking for their next opponent that will be the Nevada Wolfpack, Thursday night, up on the maze of Yes Arena and as tech boom, the Aztecs and assistant Chris Acker. Are now seven and two on the season after 11 days off, they have eight games in four days. I know they're excited about getting out there and playing games. You know for us. We got guys that love the game and loved the play, so they're just excited to be able to play games. Let's practice less preparation and just get after it in the Vatican. Gonna pull their own challenges, and we're studying film right now and trying to get familiar with them so that we can present a great game plan to our team. That's Aztecs basketball system. Chris actor of their inaction Thursday night up on the mates against Nevada Wolf back and Alabama's Devante Smith, the best player in college football name the Heisman Trophy, one of the first wide receiver to earn it since 1991 Ernie Martinez Kogo Sports. Fox reboots The iconic game Show name that tune. Michelle Pelino reports. Jane Krakowski hits the right Note as host of Fox is reboot of Name that tune. The one hour show takes its cue from the beloved 19 seventies game show that tests contestants music knowledge as they battle it out over naming a song after only a few notes. I can name that tune into notes. Lipumba correct. Andy Jackson leads the band on piano. The show pits two contestants in a race against the clock. The more songs you know, the better you will do. They play a variety of games and the player with the most money at the end of the bitter note round wins. Oh, what Well, Bob, and then he goes. La Bomba were like that. There had to be like I can't or something in there. There's not that some kind of that some kind of witchcraft. No, there's no head. Are you sure? There's no hint? Guarantee you lies, lies. Melon Turn. You're my God. Springsteen fans have a big surprise coming their way this year, the boss teasing upcoming projects.

Aztecs Fox Chris Acker Nevada Wolfpack Jane Krakowski Yes Arena Michelle Pelino Andy Jackson Devante Smith La Bomba Ernie Martinez Springsteen Alabama Bob football
"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:54 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"The masika the aztecs in the city were treated quite well because the spaniards needed them to help them rule mexico to guide through to the rest of mexico. It wasn't really until the fifteen sixty s that they themselves were reduced to truly conquered status and having to pay taxes that they couldn't afford etc and at that point the michika rioted was was a terrible crisis in the fifties on the other hand in the area immediately around the city. The spaniards moved through the land a conquering one town. After another with the help of indigenous allies who had no real choice in the matter in many cases and then each place would have to make an each royal line in each place would have to make a decision. Are we going to fight for own independence and probably be replaced as a royal line or should we work with strangers and they. They took different tax. Many most did fight for awhile. At least others decided to quickly make peace but every region every place including downtown mexico city including the people energy eventually had to face the music that these outsiders were the most powerful conquerors they had ever faced and we're going to extract taxes from them. That were going to impoverish them. That happened as i said in different times in different places but it happened everywhere and among the challenges they had to deal with was i was just disease. You know. smallpox was was prevalent at the time. I wonder how 'bout at bow to get over the course of the first hundred years. We think that about ninety percent of mexico's population died and it wasn't about a say a percent a year. that might have been almost unnoticeable. it was it. Would it finally percents ninety percent over the course of a century and that took the form of great drops population drops and then periods of stability. I guess now that the world has been through kobe. We understand this so you might lose in the face of one devastating epidemic. You might lose two percent of your population member. They couldn't mitigate the way we do. They couldn't stay home and rely on the internet so everybody would get it if everyone were getting cove right now. Something like two percent of us would die so they would say experience a drop of two percent then maybe fifteen or even twenty.

michika mexico mexico city smallpox kobe
"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

03:51 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"And his people were in fact ejected from the city. And what the spaniards call the noce three stay and for a while. It was uncertain whether he would end. Up being victorious. I think some other european eventually would is. He was nursing his wounds literally while the indigenous people in the rest of the valley in one valley over were deciding what to do. I guess i would say. Based on indigenous records that it became more certain that the indigenous would side with him when more europeans and more horses and more cannons began to appear on the on the shore. A which happened during the course of fifteen twenty of the year. Fifteen twenty once. There were reinforcements coming and the indigenous could see that this was not just a few hundred foreigners but potentially thousands with similar weaponry similar horses etc. It became more obvious to them what they needed to do. And at that point more and more groups came over to the side of the spaniards the recent myth has been that the indigenous took one look at the spaniards and came running to them and wanted to join them in friendship because they wanted to get rid of the hit at aztecs. But that's really an over simplification. They would not have been so foolish as to assume that the enemy of my enemy is necessarily my friend they would not have wanted to be conquered by these other people likewise most of the royal families of central mexico were intermarried with the royal family of ten none so they felt some some kinship some alliance. It simply wasn't true that they thought the aztecs were horrible for practicing human sacrifice. Because they all did that. They all sacrificed a prisoner of war after a battle that they won So i think it really was. When they began to see the extent of european population and technology that they began to conclude quite quickly. We see what we have to do here. I'm your research delves into aztec sources. At the time and later they ones that were also later written to reflect on that time. So what aspects of the conquest surprised you the most. I think actually one of the things that surprised me most what we just talked about that. The indigenous people did not just flocked to the spaniards side saying oh glory hallelujah. Let's get rid of these aztecs. Being a bit facetious there. But you see what i mean. I think another element that did surprise me. Although probably shouldn't have is that after. They kicked the spaniards out. The people on the island energy had to figure out what to do. At first they thought. Okay we won but gradually they had spies and gradually. It became clear that more europeans were coming and they fought amongst themselves. The man who is very famous west now is a great hero. Courtney mc the man who took over from zuma he died actually turned on his own cousins. The other sons of montezuma And had them killed because he wanted to be sure of his own power in this state of crisis and i was utterly disheartened when i began to realize the extent of this but then i thought about world history. This is always what happens in a period of utter desolation when people are being destroyed and they can't bring down this overwhelming enemy. What they do is turn on each other because of their desperately different views of how best to handle this horrible situation because they are so distraught. We see this in so many places in world history. I shouldn't have expected the aztecs to be different. If we move into the post conquest period. How would you. How would you characterize. Instead of a general way. The decades that followed the conquest. What was it like the people who lived in that city. The decades that followed the spanish conquest. Really very great deal depending on who you were and where you were for. A while..

central mexico Courtney mc montezuma zuma
"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:07 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"To cement maintain power. He was very successful I actually think that the way he handled. The arrival of the spaniards was quite astute as well Even though in modern times he's been portrayed as having made terrible mistakes. Well let's talk about that. If we move into the their conquest period The received story. The cliche story that we know is that cortez. More or less walked into the area unopposed and that zuma was passive in can all but offered the kingdom to him. What's wrong with that depict. Well this story has been right. That most azuma just offered his kingdom to cortes But years ago actually a famous english scholar. John eliot debunked that and demonstrated that cortez needed to claim that that had happened because by the time he was writing to the crown. In spain the indigenous people were fighting back and fighting hard and according to the laws of just war. You couldn't just walk into somebody else's kingdom. They were fighting back against you and then defeat them and feel that you had got on your side but if they had already said we hereby give you feel we have just become part of your kingdom and then they rebelled then it was perfectly just and you had got on your side if you walked into their kingdom and crush them so since that was what the spaniards now had to do he had to create a situation in which people in spain believed that these were quote rebels. So that's why he made up that story. But there's no actual evidence that anything like that really happened on the contrary montezuma seems to have observed the the spaniards everywhere that he could One of the now what. Historians tells us that he kept what we would call a war room. That is a single place where all messengers came and he said that there were messengers coming and going all the time at all hours of the day and night so that they could keep track of the oncoming people. There is also indirect evidence in these histories that montezuma did in fact Send soldiers and warriors to fight with the spaniards and in those battles learned what the spaniards could do. They had armor that shattered stone eros so they were relatively invulnerable if they kept in groups of at least two hundred of the indigenous could easily pick off a wandering spaniard to even in his armor so he had learned a great deal through these sort of cautious battles experimental battles and through his spy system and seems to have concluded that the best thing to do was to allow them into the city where he could observe them negotiate with them etc so so. It's kind of reconnaissance battles. Yes yet but they were still. I think if i'm not mistaken they were still ferocious battles In of the they were tough. And i'm wondering if you could speak to what you think was the decisive moment When conquest came pretty much assure thing that's a good question. When the conquest become a sure thing well in the big picture. Eurasians asians had been farming for millennia. Five to eight millennia longer than the new world people so in the big picture. I suppose it's fair to say they ultimately were going to win. The aztecs had been farming about as long as the ancient mesopotamia potato had When they were at the peak of their civilization so it's a bit like we would be pitting renaissance europe against the ancient mesopotamia's as impressive as the sumerians. Were they they win. Win that war. So in the big picture. I would say it was always going to happen. But and the specific level on a more specific level at what point did cortez's for a a become highly likely to be the one that was victorious..

cortez azuma John eliot spain cortes zuma montezuma mesopotamia europe
"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"It's quite obvious to look very far. Because of the existence of human sacrifice people were being brought to the city as prisoners of war regularly and sacrificed at first in when the place was just a village they would not have been sacrificed in great numbers. In fact just as many masika or aztecs would have been being sacrificed in the after the battles that they lost. The gods asked human beings to appreciate what had been given to them and to make sacrifices mostly by bleeding themselves but sometimes even by giving the ultimate gift that of human life. If human beings refused to do this the fragile world might come to an end over time. As the aztecs grew more powerful as donald land became the dominant force in the area. It grew to be a large phenomenon by the time. You get to the eve of the spanish conquest. You are talking about a huge phenomenon. It clearly was part of their effort to maintain power. You'd think of playing king of the mountain bunch of school boys or girls on top of a desk. Pushing the others off are trying to climb up. The aztecs clearly felt that way that is that they needed to keep control of resentful others or they would lose their position of power and then themselves become the victims again and they became more and more terroristic in the way they they wheeled this violence to prevent others from rebelling. The reason i'm so certain of that is that it says so in the annals they make it very clear in their own histories that they knew very well that they had to repress others or they themselves would become the oppressed at one point. One writer actually says very explicitly. We used to kidnap people from the fringes of empire. The places we were thinking of conquering. Bring them by force to see the worst sacrifices and then let them go. We had never intended to sacrifice them. We just wanted them to bring word back to their towns that it might not be better to fight with us in the. I think the quotation was in this way. They were undone terrified and politically week so it is any indication of whether the worked as well. I think it did. I mean they had enemies. That's for sure but boy power was growing. They were constantly expanding. It looks from the records like the most typical reaction in the late fourteen. Hundreds and early fifteen. Hundreds of the most typical reaction on the part of an ordinary village was to say. Yes sir we will happily join your empire and they would have been foolish to do anything else because of the violence that was being wielded So that element is true. I do want to add. Though that. In the songs and the homes the artists creators of these songs and poems always expressed lament for the need for violence for death. I have not found anywhere. A- poem or song celebrating the violence or celebrating their victories in war so even though it was useful to them amongst themselves the aztecs clearly disagreed about right and wrong about what.

donald land
"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

01:56 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"Everything from scratch by premade tortillas little cakes squash already cut into pieces smoked djilas and ground cuco hungry. Shoppers could go to what was effectively. A restaurant a stan were prepared. Meals were available for sale ancient..

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:59 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"Colors of their wings glinted in the evening light like flashes of magic as the darkness grew the stars appeared priests observed and chartered them but ordinary people. Just admired them. The stars looked the michika. Sometimes joked buy popcorn scattered in the night sky..

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

03:00 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"The expectation that women would be brave was in full heartbreaking evidence. Both before and after the spaniards arrived the young women were to be peace offerings to the fierce newcomers. They could not outrun their fate. As the group came out into the bright sunlight they saw the giant boats. They had heard so much about with their cloths hung to catch the wind. The bearded ones turn from their smoking campfires to stay a brazenly at the offered women. What's remarkable about fifth son is not only do as take people and their stories come alive. So too does their capital before the spanish conquest. What's now mexico. City was known as ten not lamb. It was first a village and then eventually a great city on an island in the middle of a huge lake at the center of the basin of mexico the valley of mexico the forerunners to the aztecs the michika as they were also known migrated from. What's now the united states by the late. Fourteen hundreds the machine khas village on an island in a lake had turned into a world class city tied to the land by three causeways. Great painted pyramids rose on all sides surrounded by breathtaking gardens. The library of the ruler contained hundreds of books and the music and the dancing performed at the palace brought renown to the city. Imagine it's fifteen eighteen just a year before the conquest and we're flying overheads over What is now mexico city. I'm wondering as the plane is banking and we're looking down. What are we saying. Will you know these days. We've all seen photos of the earth from space and you can tell which are the richest nations based on where the clusters of the lighting as the electric lights. Well likewise had we been able to get an aerial view of mexico years ago you would have been able to follow. The clusters of lights in those cases are at that time they were pine torches resin torches which were plentiful in the downtown area of mexico city the city that they built on the island less plentiful and the outskirts and then in the rural areas the farming areas of the rest of the valley and then beyond the mountains was pure countryside so pure darkness during the night so you would have seen a bit akin to what we see. Now the lights bringing you into what was at the time The the richest and most powerful part of their world. And if you had then been able to approach the city You would see whence it was daylight The great two especially tall pyramids or temples dominating the rest of the city and then in each neighborhood also smaller.

mexico mexico city united states
"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:08 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"Spanish friars taught their young people to transcribe sound by means of the roman alphabet and the used. The new tool to write down many of the old oral performances. That had not been the spaniards original intention. The zealous friars taught the boys the alphabet. So they'd be able to study the bible and help disseminate the tenets of christianity but the as text students did not feel limited in its application. They were not startled by the principle of writing for their people already had a tradition of standardize pictographic symbols which they had long employed to create beautiful screen. Fold books some for the use of priests in their prognostications and some for the use of officials who maintain records of tribute payments and land boundaries. None of these works survived the bonfires of conquest but the fact that they had once existed proved to be important the aztec soy immediately. How valuable it would be to adopt. This new phonetic system. They could use it to record anything. They chose raiding not only in spanish but also sounding out words and sentences in their own language of now. What you speak of What you reference. What what you call as take animals. What do they tell us that other other records. Don't tell us some of those points are rather large. Such as the indigenous did not think the spaniards were gods that they were fully aware of the technological difference and wanted to know where it had come from and had some of their own theories and in other differences are women were a crucial in a civil wars that unfolded between these different city. States are the different sons of different wives of brothers who were born to different mothers often found themselves at ward once. You know specific things like that you can make a better sense of the unfolding of their history. Not something that perhaps changes the drama as whole but does help us understand more about what it felt like be there. Then how would you describe those animals. What what are they exactly the animals..

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:01 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"Raised their children to do the right thing by their own people and to be ashamed of selfishness. They believe deeply appreciating life. They danced with joy. They sang their poems. They loved good job. You write that from those animals from the ashtec. Annals hear them talking singing laughing and yelling. I'm wondering when you you personally. When did you hear their voices. most clearly. when the history tellers would speak a history Recite from an elaborate on one of these hsuehpa while these visuals sources visual timelines that they had they would stop when they got a moment of crisis a moment where they knew people listening would disagree about what had happened and they wouldn't affect put on a little play. We don't know of other people actually joined them in speaking. They did all the lines. But you would have the chiefs say one thing and then the chiefs enemies say another thing. They switch into the present tense. It becomes a little play in their their each voicing. Different views of. What's to be done. You know about these oncoming strangers or something like this And i remember one day in particular when a young woman who was to be sacrificed stood up in one of these texts and began to yell at her enemy. She knew she was going to die. She had nothing left to lose And there was just a torrent of words that were there. It was very political diatribe that she was giving. It didn't fit at all with the stereotypes that we have of the aztecs. Either of being brutal bloody vicious almost mindless savages or of the people. They conquered being pathetic victims. Who are waiting to be rescued from this nightmare by the company arriving christians This was a very astute young woman a very angry young woman. She had a lot of specific things to say and it was in reading her words that i thought we need to tell the history that they used to tell and as complicated away as they used to feel it limited and tell it. It's not surprising to hear you say that. Because the way you write about how aztecs roads so you say they were master storytellers. What story pops into your head. As as an example of when they told masterfully i suppose one of my favorite stories is the the one that gives the book its name fifth son. They believed that. The universe had imploded four times previously. And they were living under the fifth son. Thanks to the extraordinary courage of an ordinary man. Elders told the story to.

chiefs Annals Elders
"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:23 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Ideas

"Best friends. So join me alina mood. And a panel of the smartest culture. Critics that i know as we dissect the discourse but also have a great time doing it. This is a cbc podcast and this is ideas. The picture of the aztecs that has emerged is blood-curdling the flint knives with their embedded is the sacrificial stones the skull racks. We moderns. Look at them. And then invent the accompanying seen the spoken words. The music and the contac- we envisioned orgies of violence like the one depicted. In the film apocalypse apocalyptic the books written by sixteenth century spaniards likewise encouraged readers to believe that the people whom the conquistadors defeated or barbaric in the extreme that god will the end of their civilization as it encapsulated. All that was wrong with human nature but one historian wants to undo that blood-curdling picture of the aztecs. My name is kamilo townsend. I teach history. at rutgers. university. In new jersey camilla townsend is the twenty twenty winner of the prestigious kandal history price. My recent book is fifth. Son a new history of the aztecs. She recorded herself at her home office as we talked about her book. Fifth son and were taping. Okay i'm doing the same. You may hear the odd bit of background noise. But you'll also hear her passion for writing what she calls a new history of the aspects. You You make it clear that you went to kind of undo stereotypes of the aspects Specifically of the conquest of the aspects and of the conquest. But why is that important. It's very important to me to undo stereotypes related to the conquest and two mexicans for reasons that have to do with the present day. That is i think living mexicans. Today's certainly indigenous mexicans still labor under the burden of the stereotype of the savage. They still labor under the burden of having been quote unquote the losers the ones who were defeated. The ones whose culture came close to being raised. So i think it's very important for all of us now to understand more about the complexity of that culture the reasons for the loss the ways in which people fought back because it creates not only psychological but political burdens. If you walk around still with.

kamilo townsend camilla townsend alina rutgers new jersey
"aztecs" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

The Darren Smith Show

08:24 min | 3 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

"Loose cannons coming up at the top of the hour. Brady hoke will join them. Maybe whole spill the beans on his quarterbacks all to go. If i if i would wager say you'll hear you will. He will not make a decision or he knows he just won't tell them we're thinking those. Yeah i do you do yes. This is an easy decision. No i don't either now. But i think he knows what he's gonna do you. Do i think you'll start. Maybe the first half. Maybe each quarterback will start half or take turns with quarters. So it's a good question. That's a great system. Didn't lock you do that. A couple of times a rocky was yeah. All right. this guy's going to start the second half what sort of have to have different blocking schemes. One guys a lot more prone to take off the ball and start running. I think you want to drop some plays for one of the quarterbacks the other guy that you want to drop any place for other than turnaround and handed off so. I don't know maybe that'll be a question for the loose campus. Are you suggesting that they asked this pertinent question of brady hoke later. I'm sure they. I would imagine it's to lead off question. Who's the quarterback. Do you know who your quarterback is going to be. We're not asking you to divulge right. Do you know who your quarterback is going back now. There's your quarterback know who's going to be quarterback this weekend national television right. It's a big deal. It's like a different. Hd camera the difference. Between we're san diego state was last on the app as the first time in history. That eddy calls. Full team has gone from opposite your view your apt to why you are by the way yes is. The difference between bruce pearl's camera last night on the draft and john cale parties. Now if you didn't want the draft you don't get the joke so the joke is just for jim me okay. Well did you watch. Did you see bruce pearl. I do not see that moment. A rest stop on an iphone. Four calipar he's got a whole hd sourcing does it was amazing it was the most amazing thing ever was the biggest infomercial for kentucky basketball. You've ever seen. I like it right into the camera. Isn't that what part part of what this saturday is. Going to be. San diego state. Creating a you're gonna be showing shots of your new of your new stadium right and you're gonna show shots that video that jim linked out yesterday about just taken out ripping out the seats and the ball of qualcomm stadium. That was beautiful until the no see. I guess guess not now seats. I don't think they're gonna. There's no market for sixty five thousand seats from qualcomm. Now you can still sell them. There's still be a cell but not all of them for sixty five thousand. If i had a place to put them. I'd like a four pack of seats. Four pack of seats seats and put them somewhere. Well as long as you don't buy between ten pm and five. Am you'll be okay that officials so what's happened boy. Okay well my bike ride tonight at ten one pm just just because i can. It's not into effect right exactly. So it'll be breaking the law you get better. Hd equipment by the way. Gary danielson will join the show tomorrow. Gary danielson the analyst for san state and nevada. Maybe he can break the news. He's probably gonna interview us most likely. Tell me a little bit about this mountain west. What is it. didn't we meet him last year. Radio road in philadelphia for army navy as well. What does this mountain west. Let's come on out there. It's been a while since i've been in reno so gary danielson with john the show tomorrow always good. I love gary danielson. I really do tonight. Television it's a good one seahawks cardinals. Five twenty on fox and the nfl network. Hope this lives up. To all the hype. I just hope that. I think it's gonna i don't care if it lives up to the hype all i care about is the column has a huge four games in a row three points or less all probably score so decides for you some. I would hope so. I've also decided that. In addition to kyla murray. I'm going to double down on this game tonight and play christian kirk as a wide receiver so there ago very exciting naked afraid uncensored eight. Pm on discovery pair of super fans used the knowledge. They learned from their couches to take on the harsh elements deep in the amazon rainforest. Meanwhile tribal struggles against constant threats that a dangerous african kills. Why you deleting things off the tv listings not you are. i'm seeing. it happened as i'm trying to read this stuff. I don't know i don't the last days of disco eight pm on flicks west. By the way. Did you see speaking of disco. That the jed hoyer account has tweeted again. I have yes the third time. Ever jed hoyer has tweeted yes. Do you know what a tweeted about being the star boogie nights one night share. Okay see now movie yes. Remember that scene no solo start. Now you haven't seen that seen this really good. This some people would like this. I'm telling you. I wouldn't steer you wrong into solo was really good. I wouldn't put it up there with rogue one. It was great. It was way better than i think. You're giving a crowd because the thing that kinda got to me as star wars put out to many movies at the same just it was. It was too much too soon. I don't disagree with you. Now jim you can be the tiebreaker here. Did you like saw my first viewing. I didn't like it. second time. it warmed up to me. That's kind of weird good scenes the star wars prequel. Because usually i like something. I like it right away. Doesn't have to like marinate and it so you instantly like music like you don't need to hear music for a second time third time like i always think it's different but with a movie like that usually like. Oh yeah man. That was great. It grabs you or doesn't that's just me. I think you can grow to appreciate something. I think is pretty good. But i understand your apprehension. Your apprehension was. He doesn't really look like console but even possible irreplaceable harrison. Ford store the backstory of him into shoebox fantastic jersey shore family vacation nine pm. Mtv scrooge d- early christmas well listen. I mean we started this last week. Loved this movie. This is bill. Murray correct yeah ten. Pm on amc. This is about a greedy tv. Executive that makes fans in san diego chargers. Jets one o'clock on cbs. I mean can we. I mean really. That's the game getting. How do we go from that to those says. The first line was agreed. tv anyway. oh. I don't know i'm guessing that's now bob cat. Goldway is really know some deed he was the guy from police academy jim. Rabbi the joke how do pirates not there pirates. They think therefore they are. Oh lordy see. It doesn't matter. Because i already know now that jim knows to if he does a pirate joke. It's a guaranteed winner. Like darren had his finger on the button before you even delivered. The joke can never go wrong with a pirate joke. That's exactly a month but it out. I think pirate jokes are always funny. And it make you happy. They do they do all right loose cannons coming up next brady. Hoke will join them. They'll ask brady who the quarterback is going to be hanging have another. We're going to tell them. Did you have another weekly conversation with rocky long that is a weird thing about the scheduling that three weeks in a row. San diego state will play an opponent after new. Mexico has played that same opponent. Yeah probably not as interesting as i think it is. But it's interesting. i find it interesting. See tonight night on. Kogo camp zoomed facetime tweeted and posted. You've even learned to tiktok and go to it safe to say you can use a change of scenery. Abandon the beltway escape home for the holidays to a place where mountain views and warm apple cider said the mood so come on down. Make yourself at home. It's miles away from your new every day. Discover winchester virginia. Where social distancing has never brought us closer visit winchester. Va dot com..

Brady hoke San diego Gary danielson jim jed hoyer kyla murray bruce pearl john cale qualcomm stadium qualcomm seahawks basketball philadelphia apple reno eddy Mexico winchester virginia nfl rocky
National Spicy Guacamole Day with Adam Gamwell

Podcast Gumbo

03:09 min | 4 months ago

National Spicy Guacamole Day with Adam Gamwell

"All this is adam. I'm curious about national spicy guacamole as a person born in texas. I had my blood replaced with hot sauce at a young age and was raised thinking that guacamole was its own food group. I'm also a sucker for cultural history. So here's some food for thought. The original aztec take word for avocado apparently had shall we say in an atomic corlett. Is this true or is this story. I dunno nuts. Thanks for helping to solve this important mystery. I'm going balls out on his episode. Thanks to adam. There're so much to unsheathe here. So i'm going to do it in less than five minutes so here we go today. November fourteenth is national spicy guacamole day. Who out there doesn't love guacamole. But i have to admit that. I'm not sure i've ever had the spicy version. All i really know is that guacamole is made from avocados but that name is only for marketing purposes because a the real name is hard to say and be it means testicle. Yup you won't look at an avocado the same way anymore. I'll put a lincoln. The showed so you can learn more about. The origins of the avocado one atom sent me as request. He also said he is now loving. The short format podcast. There was only by coincidence that i found a short podcast for him about avocados for my first recommendation. I'm going with the nutrition. Diva podcast. As i just mentioned the episodes are very short and i found not one but two interesting episodes about avocados. So i'm going to give you both here both at take a total of ten minutes of your precious time the first episode kind of blew my mind about guacamole. I learned that when you eat something like celery it's much healthier to eat. It was guacamole. But maybe now for the reason you're thinking of the second episode talks about the difference between the california and florida based avocados. Who knew after listening to those episodes. Post your favourite guacamole recipe on social media using the spicy guacamole day. Hashtag my guest today. Is adam gamble host of this. Anthro life podcast. This annual life digs into the truth and hope in our creative potential through design culture and technology. If you are a coffee or tea drinker take a listen to the connected cup episode. Where adam interviews. Filmmaker and coffee anthropologists brooke

Texas Adam Lincoln Adam Gamble Florida California Brooke
"aztecs" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

The Darren Smith Show

02:19 min | 4 months ago

"aztecs" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

"Out of that. You should bring up absolutely you. Kidding goes on the resume who we couldn't and that stuff matters. You get the bring the ladder out from behind the scenes and let the kids cut down the net. If you find yourself in that position that would be too funny. I think you should try it. I mean it's it's worth the effort. I don't know i would enjoy joining us on a win. The opener ladder. Is that what you're suggesting. Yeah absolutely absolutely. I think it'd be great. You gotta listen dutch. What i've learned here watching all these other sports leagues all across the world. Play for the last eight months is there is something to you gotta manufacture your own energy at some point here you know in the absence of fourteen thousand four hundred and fourteen inside of us. I'm sure you've already thought about it. You do have to manufacture a little bit of that energy and excitement yourself. Yeah we're actually gonna try out crowd noise today. I think today or tomorrow when we're playing if we liked to play with the manufactured crowd noise so we're going to give that a go and see what that sounds like. I like that idea house. The rest of the non conference schedule looking. How many games do you do. You wanna play. How many do you have lined up to play. We get seven games in the non conference because of the pandemic. And we've got some good ones lined up Arizona state byu ucla irvine. We're still trying to finalize a a series of saint. Mary's we don't have the contract and that don yet but that's as good a not conference competition is we've ever played and so we're excited by that then we'll piece in a couple more games Based on how the conference schedule comes out. We still don't ever conference schedule. The head coaches way back when we started talking. So let's just play a traditional schedule Two weeks later that evolved into well. Let's play a par a pod somewhere trying to get half the season in a pot and then play regional opponents that went by the wayside and now the latest Thing that we're gonna do is play back to back the same opponent either on the road or at home so if we go to utah state. We'll play utah state on thursday and then we'll play him again on saturday at utah state and come home with the same team for two games so it's not ideal but it it sits to what the environment is.

utah Arizona Mary don
How To Teach History

Layers of Learning Podcast

06:21 min | 6 months ago

How To Teach History

"So, what what do you do with history? What's your basic? Approach, while I will say this, you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. When I learned about historical figure, it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, I had no concept of win. That was I thought they were very, very ancient people that was my impression. And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, and actually if you look back in history, my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, they probably had pretty much what we have today. Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. They were very much like we are, and then it collapsed. Yeah. Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, but you know thousand years earlier. So it has happened over and over through history. So it's really interesting. One of the things that we learned from that is hey. Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. It has gone through cycles of change over time, and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. and. Partly for that reason, Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, we study history in order, and partly for the reason, we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. Those progressions are important in history. So to teach it in order, I think vital.

Aztecs Rome Yellow River Valley Karen South America Greece Norte Chico India China
Why Is Carmine, a Dye Made from Bugs, So Popular?

BrainStuff

04:41 min | 9 months ago

Why Is Carmine, a Dye Made from Bugs, So Popular?

"Red Velvet cake and strawberry ice cream aren't only in the. They'll satisfy your sweet tooth. They likely share common ingredient made from a not so common source that gives them their red to pink Hue. That's Carmen a natural Red Dye, also labelled as cockatiel extract, e, One, twenty or natural, red dye four, and it owes its beauty to a teeny tiny bug, the female coach Neil Bug to be precise. In addition to its possible gross out factor, this tasteless FDA approved extract has a history full of. and. Intrigue a Betsy Ross even used this bright red dye to make red stripes on the very first American flag. The Koch Neil is a slate bug that feeds on prickly pear. Plants grown throughout Mexico South America southwestern United States, and the Canary Islands off the coast of Spain. The male Cockatiel plays its own unique role in nature, but it's the wingless legless female that interests dye makers. If you go looking for her, you won't find her vibrant red bounty on display. The female Koch Neal's grey exterior is covered in a white powder that protects her from predators as well as the scorching sun. And since the juice from CACTI her only source of nutrition, she boroughs in his. A bit stubborn about releasing her hold. In order to harvest the Koch Neil, the prickly pear pads are cut and brought to factories so that the bugs can be pulled out and processed, but it takes some serious people power. Approximately seventy thousand continentals are needed to create just one pound of die. That's a little less than half a kilo. Once harvested bugs are dried ground and mixed alcohol, solution or other compounds like borax. They give way to a vibrant long-lasting die that can be used to make colors from scarlet purple to pink to Peach. have been used to color everything from textiles to pottery, since the Neolithic period or New Stone Age with the majority, sourced from vegetables, plants and trees. Bugs have had their place to not only the Koch. Neil, another elusive die associated with wealth enroll status. Tyrian purple was made from the glands of snails. Neil bug is native to Mesoamerica. The AZTECS are believed to be the first to use Carmen to fill their lives with stunning shades of Crimson, when Spanish colonizers arrived in the Americas learned about Carmen and built enormous wealth by monopolizing the cockatiel market Spain kept the source of the color secret, and even made export the die a legal punishable by death. Coveted by the wealthy. The Royal Family is in the artist's crossed Europe. This die created fertile ground for contention. Those cumbersome and secretive production methods certainly made Carmen expensive. The car itself was an explosive part of Carmen's mystery and popularity. We spoke with Amy Butler. Greenfield author of the perfect read via email. She said red is the color of blood fired that end desire, and we can't help it. Respond to it on many levels. It makes her eyes dilate, and our breath come faster, and it's freighted with symbolic meaning. Also there are very few natural dyes that make a lasting bright true read so good ones had the value of rarity. Ounce ounce. Kacha new is the most powerful natural red dye in the world. That's why it was prized. When industrialization arrived in the mid eighteen hundreds, the demand for textiles increased dramatically and created a need for more cost effective dies. Chemists began to use petroleum and coal to formulate synthetic ones ultimately reducing the need for the Cockatiel bug. The shift towards synthetics pushed Carmen to the background, but it didn't disappear, and now it's making a comeback. Showing up on ingredient lists for anything from cake POPs to lipstick. Greenfield said when reports started linking synthetic grads to cancer and hyperactivity, and as people started taking an interest in natural foods in general, the market for catch. Neil began to rebound. So if Carmen is a natural product without the negative long-term effects of why did the coffee giant starbucks along with numerous other companies? Stop using it to add colour to their products. Well Carmen is safe for the majority of people can cause an allergic reaction, and besides that safety concern folks like Vegetarians vegans and people who keep kosher helped advocate for the change, but no matter whether you find eating a bug, appalling, fascinating or dangerous for such a tiny insect. The Koch Neil Bug has certainly left a vivid mark on culture, beating attractions, the beauty and power of red.

Koch Neil Carmen Neil Bug Greenfield Koch Neal Koch Betsy Ross Starbucks Allergic South America Spain Europe Canary Islands United States Amy Butler Mexico Americas
Utah St tops No. 5 San Diego State for Mountain West title

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Utah St tops No. 5 San Diego State for Mountain West title

"Malachi Flynn's half court heave at the buzzer rimmed out stealing Utah state fifty nine fifty six mountain west conference tournament final win over fifth ranked San Diego state Utah state trailed by as many as sixteen but took the lead for good when Sam Meryl drained a three pointer with two point six seconds left to play Meryl connected on six three pointers and led all scorers with twenty seven points Flynn sixteen points led San Diego state but the Aztecs shot just thirty four percent and drop to thirty in two on the season Adam Spillane Las Vegas

Malachi Flynn Sam Meryl Aztecs Las Vegas Utah San Diego Adam Spillane
No. 5 San Diego State advances to MWC title game

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

No. 5 San Diego State advances to MWC title game

"Fifth ranked San Diego state is headed to the mountain west conference tournament championship game after overcoming a sixteen point deficit to beat Boise state eighty one sixty eight after getting hit with a sixteen run midway through the first half the Aztecs went into the locker room on a nineteen three burst C. indigo state head coach Brian Dutcher says his team never wavered with great resolve they didn't panic they just fought their way back into it tied at halftime and then it was a very competitive second half Malachi Flynn led city a state with twenty two points while Katie Fagan made five three pointers and scored twenty one Alex Hobbs scored twenty one points off the bench for Boise state but the Broncos shot just twenty three percent after halftime Adam splaine Las Vegas

Aztecs Brian Dutcher Malachi Flynn Katie Fagan Alex Hobbs Broncos Las Vegas San Diego Boise
Mike Conley scores 25 points, Jazz beat Celtics 99-94

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Mike Conley scores 25 points, Jazz beat Celtics 99-94

"Fifth Mike Conley ranked San helped Diego guide state the jazz is headed past to the the mountain short handed west Celtics conference tournament ninety nine championship to ninety four game giving after Utah overcoming its fourth a sixteen straight point win deficit Conley to beat scored Boise twenty state five eighty for one his sixty third highest eight point total after during getting hit his with debut a sixteen season run with the jazz midway through the first Jordan half Clarkson added the Aztecs seventeen went into as the locker Utah leapfrog room on a nineteen Houston into three the four burst spot in the west C. indigo state the jazz head coach trail Brian twenty Dutcher six says seventeen his team early never but ended wavered the first with great half resolve on a forty they six twenty two search and led didn't by as panic many as they sixteen just fought their in way the second back into it Marcus tied smart's at halftime twenty nine and led then all scorers it was in a very the Celtics competitive third second loss half in four Malachi games Flynn led Boston's city a Jaylen state brown with twenty and two Gordon points Hayward while wrist Katie sidelined Fagan with injuries made five three pointers Geffen cooled and scored off twenty Boston one Alex Hobbs scored twenty one points off the bench for Boise state but the Broncos shot just twenty three percent after halftime Adam splaine Las Vegas

Fagan Boise Gordon Jaylen Malachi Brian Jordan Diego Las Vegas Broncos Alex Hobbs Geffen Mike Conley Katie Hayward Boston Flynn Marcus Dutcher
"aztecs" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"See sixty forty seven Aztecs airforce basketball full court pressure by San Diego state they got up high in his hand here's a J. Walker guarded by Fagan H. she will bring it up it's Paul by what's on the call Pasco side Lovell into the front court Walker gets you back how could she set up the kind of mismatch what so it's on AJ Walker how to apply to become a kind of tight with the whistle Fallon Mitchell at six seconds now the five on San Diego state next game here U. N. L. V. and Boise state six no VP the Broncos here badly well we can half ago here on this floor J. J. Walker works to the left dives into the late layup high off the glass still good with the left hand lane the rebound mouth it's dropping for airforce plane has left sideline against Morris play downstairs what so often it's a foul six homes little relate Ryan Dutcher says I don't like it what to lose third Brian Dutcher still complaining John bye said but the falcons it's going to get some offense now they just got a score like there's no there is no tomorrow like there's no tomorrow Scotty the tones of pot out AJ Walker H. A. only two points here in the second half Walker watched by speaking past live side of L. Scott on the trip look it's what's down the lane gets pumped goes up Mitchell takes it away good no call Mitchell frontcourt won all three against Morris offense of Faldo down he led with the left arm no doubt doctors theory is but that's a good call not because it goes in the falcons favor Mitchell landed with the left armer Dutcher is furious across the way Mitchell gets his third team found number seven and now they're telling don't you better settle down a little bit fans don't like it which was gone one on three two Elizabeth smart point by Mitch Morse has it back for five fifty three to go it's a waste of time and cut into the sleep Morris gets ahead Lavelle Scottie hi left hands will be weakened a pie with the basketball on the troop works left still with hopes up top Lovells top of the circle looks in the right hands divorced three final payment more since the three he's got nine sixty to fifty five twenty eight left in the green falcons down ten got to get some defense Fagan with a pond gives the flame went above the arc near site gets the top drifting to the right side still on the triple Axel down Chuck Plunkett twelve outside left pulling drives in from the left Rauner mystic repair out Wetzel had a choice takes gotta stop need a bucket.

Morris Wetzel Rauner Chuck Plunkett Lavelle Scottie Elizabeth armer Dutcher Walker H. A. John U. N. L. San Diego Aztecs Axel basketball Fagan H. Mitch Morse Faldo L. Scott Scotty falcons
Flynn, No. 5 San Diego State rally to beat Rams 66-60

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Flynn, No. 5 San Diego State rally to beat Rams 66-60

"Malachi Flynn scored fifteen of his seventeen points in the second half as number five San Diego state rallied from a seven point deficit to beat Colorado state sixty six sixty the Aztecs were able to bounce back from their only loss of the season going on a thirteen run over a five minute span in the second half to seize control of the game Matt Mitchell added fifteen points and Jordan shackle added eleven for the Aztecs who started out flat for a second consecutive game Niko Kovac show scored seventeen points and Isaiah Stevens added twelve in the loss for the rams Philip gone San Diego

Malachi Flynn Aztecs Matt Mitchell Jordan Niko Kovac Isaiah Stevens Philip San Diego Colorado
Decentralization Philosophy - Does Crypto Still Need Catalysts?

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

11:01 min | 1 year ago

Decentralization Philosophy - Does Crypto Still Need Catalysts?

"Less on the show. We were talking about the example of the Spanish conquistadors. Who were going into central and South America and they were conquering various tribes. And we talked about the difference between what happened. When they encountered the Aztecs the inkens who were quite centralized in their form of society and how it was organized and the Apaches who were actually quite decentralized and then how that changed with the introduction of gifts from the US government that introduced more hierarchy into the Apache society. Jonathan do you want to recap that because I know you were excited about talking about this? Yeah I'm always fascinated to try to understand where the compromises are at a consensus and community level from proof of work in proof of stake and when we were talking about the Apache and how their culture actually was what changed and what led to them losing their anti fragility specifically through the idea of giving a respected person. Money that they then can dole out then. Passively centralizing them through that. It's sort of reminded me a lot of the federal treasury model that's sort of emblematic of a lot of proof of stake chains and I was just thinking what the rest of the podcast thoughts would be on proof of stake. And maybe it's a lot more like you know the inkens than the Apache and that's not a bad thing. I just thought it was an interesting analogy. What do you mean by Federated Treasury in a proof steak model? Could you elaborate on that a bit? Jonathan? So you have a protocol. Such as dash or use where they have blocked producers or witnesses the thing about all the proof of stake blockchain's as they call the exact same thing different things all of their systems and the block rewards are from the people who are staking who are the witnesses or blocked producers in that environment and typically they will have a percentage of the block reward. Go not just to the ferrets who are maintaining concensus but will actually have a grant proposal system to be able to actually vote on paying out to developers or to community related activities or to bug fixes. So it's a pretty cool model and it's one that is interesting. Especially WITH DASH IN. That dash very seriously took the idea of being a decentralised application and so when they were thinking of a foundation they ate their own dog food into procedural foundation into the protocol rather than creating a legal entity and then just giving it twelve percent of the protocol the Protocol Treasury like model theory took so there are pros and cons to every sort of decision and a most fascinated to think through. What are problems that we don't yet know are real problems because it hasn't actually been around long enough for to manifest in a materially bad way and so thinking about this treasury model and the way that the Apaches were so anti-fraud for as long as they were until the system was imposed on them. It's just interesting to hear what you guys think is the long term viability of that type of model in a consensus environment for its long-term ability to not become centralized the historical example that we were talking about on the last show was the patchy. Were a tribe where there really was no central leader. There were just kind of respected people in the community so the Apache didn't really have any centralized leadership in their governance structure. There were basically just respected people within the community that were listened to by others and if they said something that was kind of they were not listened to as much and they could fall out of favor and other people could rise up and become respected. And so in this way. This made them really decentralized organization. Where if you took out one so-called leader that was fine because basically like a starfish grows back and arm they could kind of replace it and you can even take out several of the leaders and it would still not matter to their system. It wasn't going to take the whole system crumbling down if you whacked someone over the head and the analogy of course is the starfish and the spider. If you cut off one of the arms of starfish it can grow it back. It might even grow too. You can cut off multiple points of starfish and the starfish will still live and maybe even end up with two but in a spider. If you act on the head it's GonNa go splat and the whole thing comes crumbling down and we were talking about how this happened in Bitcoin. To Gavin Andriessen. Who was very respected? Member of the community said some stuff that people didn't believe and then kind of fell out of favor and was listened to a lot less than he used to be so this was Kinda like analogous to the Apache community elders who were interchangeable based on whether people believed them and gave them the credibility crypto. Twitter really operates a bit like that. I mean there are no leaders. Although certain people tried to be leaders in the crypto traders space especially bitcoin and as a result the favorability of various personalities on Crypto twitter rises and falls by what they say and is not in any way fixed and so that system makes it. Much more robust. It's very difficult to hijack community absolutely but the US government was doing an interesting little experiment. I don't know if they really plan. This are coordinated it but somehow it worked where they were able to centralize the Apache society by gifting cattle to the tribal elders. And then letting. Those people distribute the cattle within the community so you can see that this gives them now a source of power and there could be bickering and fighting that comes about as a result of how these cattle are distributed. So imagine if you gave pomp or Cobra on crypto twitter with free Bitcoin so that they could choose who they give it out to. Suddenly somebody has a lot more power. And there's an incentive to fight about that we you guys think well. I think it's not just that they have the ability to out resources but then infrastructure and social dynamics around the fact that that person has money gets created. And then once that person leaves though shelling points in those structures and those dynamics are there and it's easier to just put another person there than it is to just remove all of those structures that were built around the fact. That person was there right so basically a pyramid grows. And there's a spot at the top of the Pyramids and even if you take out the person who's at the spot they're still spot there that if somebody else steps into that spot still occupy that position in the hierarchy so you've changed the structure and it's not just about the person who's at the peak of that structure it's about the imposition of that structure itself. Well on crypto twitter. You could say the same thing applies with the accumulation of followers because that follows a power law distribution meaning that people who have a lot of followers gained a lot of followers. And the more you have the more you gain on a daily basis and as a result that concentration causes concentration but the difference. Is that if the person who has all of those followers leaves or stops speaking someone else can step into that space and essentially inherit the structure of all of those followers. So that's one key unfunded mental difference that keeps it less susceptible to that takeover right. So how do we tie this back to the example of the Jonathan brought up of proof of stake systems that are distributing rewards too early people and then they have a lot of power in the proof of stake system of that coin to correct myself for a moment? There are some proof of work systems like Z. Cash which famously has a block reward allocation scheme for developer grants as well and a very controversial proposal now to introduce this exact scheme to bitcoin. Cash this controversial proposal to be hard for can march or actually maybe it's a soft work but basically if it is a software it's a course off fork where the miners will purposely orphan. Any blocks that don't include. I believe it's a twelve percent grant to a Hong Kong legal entity that access foundation to dole out grants. This is exactly that in a proof of work system in bitcoin right. The question is always who gets to decide where these resources go. And how does that impact the system? Is it a centralising effect? I think you could make the argument. That yes and of course. This is what the starfish and the spider is pointing out. It's absolutely centralizing effects. And that's even demonstrated by the way that these schemes or mechanisms for grants are designed in the first place. Sometimes it's developers exerting their power through the code to create grants for developers. That's effectively what happens with a theorem other times. It's minors enriching themselves or creating these kinds of grants through the mining mechanism and Vitelic. Return has made the arguments. Why should it be miners and not developers? Why shouldn't developers generate glance and do that in either case though it certainly has a centralizing influence? Can we look at this happening on? Maybe a Meta level as well with different CRYPTO currency communities so for example people support crypto currencies and the communities that. Go behind them when they believe in the ideas and when they believe that it's a successful technology that's going to continue into the future unless they're scammers right and they're pumping it but most of the time they're behind it because they believe it's going to succeed in the long run and so- crypto currencies like that have public support and trust could become the tribal elders of crypto currencies themselves and they can be replaceable and they can change and they can fluctuate over time right which creates the other interesting things that released while Johnson said which is once you have such a leadership position for example once you have a crypto currency that has acquired over time the essential elements of reserve currency in the CRYPTO. Space has behaved as or fills the role and utility of a reserve currency. If that currency was to fail a get out of the way all of structure and shelling points that have concentrated that function of reserve currency remain. And what will happen is the any exchanges or users merchants instead are who need some kind of reserve currency taxes the main liquidity mechanism in the CRYPTO space will simply replace it with something that is equivalent tour feels equivalent

Twitter Apache Society United States Jonathan South America Protocol Treasury Federated Treasury Treasury Hong Kong Gavin Andriessen Johnson Developer
Haunted Places Rewind: Island of the Dolls

Haunted Places

04:30 min | 1 year ago

Haunted Places Rewind: Island of the Dolls

"The grandmother told us to stay away. We snuck down to the canal again. It's our favorite place to play. I like to tease the little fish. That swim in the Muddy Shallows. Adela likes to weave reads to make a crown and pretend that she's a princess. Sometimes we wrote to the island. Adela always stares down into the water like she's looking for something. Grandmother does not like the river. It's curse. She says evil then she scolds me for leading my little sister. Danger Grandmother tells stories. While we make tortillas sometimes she talks about her ancestors who built a huge city on lake hundreds of years ago other times she tries to frighten us with sales of spirits who live in the water. These stories don't scare me. They aren't true that Adela believes every single word. She likes grandmother's stories about mermaids. The best grim says that sometimes the mermaids choose a special person someone with the blood of the ancient Aztecs to join them. Adele asks if we have Aztec blood running through our veins but grandmother does not answer she hugs us makes us promise to never go near the river at night sometimes available sit on the shore and stare out at the water. What I asked her what she's doing. She says that she's listening. She can hear our ancestors whispering in the wind. It's a secret. She makes me promise not to. Tell Grandmother. I listen. I hear nothing odd little sister. Yesterday Papa came home from the city. He worked there and we had not seen him in a long time. He brought presence. I got a soccer ball. Adela got a doll named it Sierra after mermaids she loans a dylan is skipped rocks across the water is. She's getting better but she's not as good as me. I got a rock skip seven times before it sank but delic claim to see something big in the deep water. But I didn't see anything. We ran home in time for dinner when we went to bed. Adela couldn't find sid ENA somewhere on the way home. She had lost her Adela started to cry. She thought that pop it was going to be angry. I hugged her promising that we would sneak out early in the morning to go look for her dog. It was still dark when we tiptoed out of the house. We walked along the shore with a torch looking for sitting. I thought I saw something floating in the middle of the river but it was hard to tell as we rode out to see what it was a Dallas said. She heard singing. She asked me if I heard it but I didn't the ruble scraped against something. I cursed words. That grandmother watches my mouth for. I thought we had hit a sandbar. Tried to roll my or but it was stuck in the mud. Adela leaned over the edge of the boat staring down into the water. I looked down a big black shadow. Swim next to us. Something grabbed my own. It yanked but I wouldn't let go. I yelled for help me. What she didn't move. She was still staring down into the water. I yelled at her again. She got to her feet. Suddenly I could hear it to the to singing. The Distance Adela had a strange look in her eyes. She said she was a princess. And the MERMAIDS here for before I could stop her. She jumped straight into the river. I screamed but Adela disappeared into the blackwater with hardly

Adela Mermaids Muddy Shallows Adele Sid Ena Soccer Papa Dallas Dylan
UNLV hands No. 4 San Diego State its first loss, 66-63

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

UNLV hands No. 4 San Diego State its first loss, 66-63

"A poor first half was too much to overcome as number four San Diego state suffered its first loss of the season falling to U. N. L. V. sixty six sixty three yes just came out flat from the start shooting just thirty three percent and two of twelve on three point attempts as the rebels opened up a twelve point lead at the half as tech's head coach Brian Dutcher expresses his disappointment in not getting the perfect season well we tasted defeat for the first time it doesn't taste very good were vastly disappointed we wanted a perfect season but it didn't happen and that's college basketball you if he was led by Alisa Mitri longs nineteen points Amari hardy seventeen points and Bryce Hamilton's double double of eleven points and ten rebounds Malachi Flynn led all scorers with twenty four points for the Aztecs Tino losing costs Philip gone San Diego

Brian Dutcher Basketball Alisa Mitri Bryce Hamilton Malachi Flynn Philip San Diego U. N. L. Amari Hardy
The Chocolate Lovers' Guide to Trader Joe's

Inside Trader Joe's

08:14 min | 1 year ago

The Chocolate Lovers' Guide to Trader Joe's

"When we think about chocolate we really have to go back to plant. This is about Theobroma Theobroma Cacao so this kind of chocolate tree it grows in this tight band around planet around at Equatorial Band. Give or take twenty degrees north or South chocolate trees produce pods and those pods are like a big fruit and they can be strikingly beautiful. And those pods are harvested. They have to be harvested by hand and very carefully probably was something like a machete. There opened up. And what we're after are the seeds the seeds inside the pod are removed and they're fermented and that fermentation starts to affect some changes on those seeds feeds. Then the seeds are basically hauled. There's like a hard outer shell and inside is a colonel and those colonels turn into Nibs and and those nibs are then roasted the roasting then sort of toast them cooks them and really brings out a bunch of interesting flavors that material those roasted nibs are then maybe further ground or broken up and that mashing squeezes out cocoa solids and cocoa butter and that combination cocoa butter cocoa solids creates chocolate liquor. It's not alcoholic. It's booze in any way. It's just the word because it's more liquid. Although I think of it really as a paste cooked in a process known as conquering and then you can add to it. Sugar sugar or dairy to make milk chocolate or other flavors and the idea of using chocolate as a food or beverage it goes back. Thousands of years years people have found pottery from the OLMEC civilization shards of pottery with traces of Macau that are thousands of years old and and this practice translates and moves into Mayan and Aztec cultures Spanish conquerors conquistadors. Find this bring this back to Europe back to Spain and when the Spaniards brought it back the Aphrodisiac powers attributed to this CA- cow drink. Those monks had the lock up the recipe. Otherwise chaos ensued. Thank you Matt Right now. I'd like to switch gears a little bit and find out a little bit more about the chocolate that our customers might be able well defined say like now I have not breathed okay. We should've on so one might think think everything that's possible to do with chocolate has already been done wrong. That's Allison Allison. Is Our category manager for candy cookies and and cereal okay. Allison what is the reaction you get when you say to someone. My job is candy and cookies and cereal. Well I always think of it as like if you ask a kid what they wanna be when they grow up like I want to be in charge of candy and that's kind of what I do a careful what you wish for. It seems names that chocolates got to be top of mind for you guessed. The category is about seventy five percent chocolate because chocolate chocolate. It's a tricky business. This is stuff that is effectively starting off as a seed from a fruit. I think of it not too dissimilar from coffee L. A. Times. mcquaid it to wine where you have the grapes grown in different places. Cocoa beans are certainly a plant. They're taking in the terroirs of the environment around them. And and those have distinct flavors one big thing. Now is these single origin chocolates which are chocolates made from cocoa beans harvested from a specific area. And just that area area but when you start tasting this region as compared to that region it's astounding. How different this stuff can be? And it's all chocolate. Our customers are asking Vegan item missile or for instance we launched Almond Butter Cups. This past year on them. Butter was very popular in the grocery category. But we have been buttercup so why not almond butter cups that makes me think of a product that's still sort of in development but has been approved by the tasting panel that was milk chocolate but made with almond beverage as it. So it's an almond beverage based I milk chocolate as opposed to a dairy milk chocolate. But I wouldn't have known the difference if I hadn't been told I mean it just tasted like really good creamy milk chocolate and I feel like like our Vegan customers are going to absolutely flip for that particular bar new stuff new products things that you weren't expecting to find that's the treasure hunt of going into a trader Joe's. I WanNa see if I can name this product in to shake so. Can you give me a couple of shakes that to me. kind of sounds like sprinkled jangle. God that's so good it's kind of a springy take on the Jingle Jangle so it is pink and Yellow Drizzle Yogurt. That's all it is. Joe Joe Bark. which is my personal favorite item with Joe Joe Barca's so it's crushed up joe cookies with the cream and the coca cookies smashed in with a bunch of chocolate and rolled out into a bark and you know crumbled up? I'm glad you clarified. I thought it was like one of Rin Tin Tin side kick now Joe. Joe Burke INSERT DAD show it has butter toffee peanuts. It has dark and milk not dark and milk but both dark and milk peanut butter cups. It has spring parallels And it has Pastel candy bums. It's adorable and it's very severi chocolate. centric it it's a great mix of sweet and salty has some texture in there and those lovely spring collars so how how do you do this work though so if there are these different components you start thinking you started with an idea like this is a mix and then do you build bit by bit essay. Just say built bit by bit. I can't believe this is my life right. The suppliers sent me twenty five different items. That could be part of said mix and I put them out on a large table in the kitchen and I started popping them into a bowl to see what would go together. And I think that's where my culinary background helps with the textures and the balance of flavors and your this is what I came up with. Tell us about naming the product. When I was on my run I think about candy when I run my name is Alison Handy when Iran? So Jingle Jangle was on my mind I think we had just placed the orders or something and it hit me springall Django when you look at the springall Jangle it is mostly chocolate right. There's milk chocolate dark chocolate. If you had milk it's milk chocolate. You have to have at least twelve percent dairy for it to be milk. Chocolate white chocolate is actually none of those cocoa solids allege that cocoa powder. It's only the cocoa butter. It's funny because you know I guess. Technically speaking than white chocolate isn't really chock but it's just called Bat. Not because it doesn't have those chocolate solids cocoa solids and then Ruby chocolate sort of becomes this thing and the FDA is has taken a little bit of time and really even understanding how to name it or if it could be called. Ruby chocolate believe granted a temporary driver's license so it's got like a chocolate learner's permit. It's not dyed pink or colored ink just is because that's the color of those cocoa pods with the cocoa. Nibs that come out of them. We have a new chocolate bar. That sort of a similar color as the ruby chocolate but it is actually white chocolate with with raspberry and correct and and it looks like a flower. It should come out a few weeks before Valentine's Day and it's intended to last through mother's Day Eh. Alison thank you for coming in and talking to us about chocolate get ready. Yes start salivating. We're thinking early April that this one one comes out. Yeah the idea. I think it's more we're planning on mid to lady for mid to late April okay. I'm excited about this style

JOE Allison Allison Alison Handy Joe Joe Bark. Joe Joe Barca Theobroma Theobroma Cacao Jingle Jangle Joe Burke Equatorial Band Category Manager Europe Matt Right Macau Rin Tin Tin Spain CA FDA Iran
Wetzell, No. 7 SDSU beat Nevada 68-55 to remain undefeated

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Wetzell, No. 7 SDSU beat Nevada 68-55 to remain undefeated

"Yanni Wessel scored fifteen points and added sixteen rebounds leading the number seven San Diego state Aztecs to a sixty eight fifty five win over Nevada to remain the only unbeaten team in the nation after falling behind at halftime the Aztecs defense stepped up to limit the wall packed to just fourteen percent shooting in the second half and pulled away with a twenty to four run over a nine minute stretch what's all was one of four asked take scoring in double figures at San Diego State extended their winning streak to nineteen games Philip gone San Diego

Yanni Wessel Nevada Philip San Diego
San Diego State's Rocky Long steps down

Mike Slater

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

San Diego State's Rocky Long steps down

"Breaking news out of San Diego state whereas takes head coach rocky long as announced he's stepping down in handing the reins to former Aztecs coach Brady Hoke long has been head coach at SDSU since twenty eleven when hope left to become head coach of Michigan long who will be seventy at the end of the month is the second oldest head coach in division one football behind Ohio's Frank

Brady Hoke Sdsu Michigan Ohio San Diego Rocky Long
Tamales, a Gift from the Aztec Gods

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

06:17 min | 1 year ago

Tamales, a Gift from the Aztec Gods

"The word. The malia comes from the Nullah or Tom Ali which literally translates to wrap food for those that don't remember O. W. R. APD are a PT DT on the edge of its seat is rat wrapped. Yeah Wer For those that don't remember Or just a reminder now what is the indigenous language of the Aztec people of Mexico so still spoken through Mexico in some small communities So yeah wrapped food. A date cannot be pinpointed but it is said that the first Domino's were made as early as seven thousand BC. Seven thousand. And I didn't even think food existed back then which means we as humans and as a site. I've been eating them for over nine thousand years while I wonder how much the recipes changed changed since well since Chris was born. Whatever all the they are not quite what we know today? Because in early days of the Malas corn was not fully domesticated masticated at that time so instead they used They would use something called. They'll seat which is an ancestor of corn. Okay with the corn they would make a cornflour that is made into dough that the would then be filled with anything meets honey corn and somehow the more I read even Flamingo which which is a me but still. It's a weird it's weird. That is not what I expected imagining on Flamingo Hunting. That would be weird. I just went too far off. We don't get to edit this either. The my lives in the pre Christian era had religious significance. And we're using a ceremony is being offered to the Gods at various festivals while those gods must have been happy for example the Msci Asia people offer the Jaguar. God being the Ellis shrimp ones were offered to the fire. They were to Aztec holidays in which were more prominent I there was Christmas. Optimal squall literally celebrate celebrate my broad of the corn. God Did you practice out. And then the other East Kylie in which they under the fire Gods during Tamales as a gesture of rebirth cool outside of religious ceremonies. The food was favored because they were easy to transport in times of war after the brutal invasion of Spain and conversion of millions of indigenous indigenous people to Christianity Melas made their way into Christian holidays. Tamales are also became more elaborate because the Spaniards brought with them. I'm checking pork raisins. And other foods with the which incorporated into the Raisin tamales imagined cutting tamale and just like a bunch of raisins poor others fruit route ones to which I don't prefer. I prefer savory once but yeah there's fruit ones. Oh my God okay. with the Spaniard did also allow the families to make their way to other countries south of Mexico ago for a bit in the early nineteen hundreds tamales decreased in popularity in Mexico because political leaders saw the food as peasant food. Oh really interesting. Although thankfully people were much smarter than that and brought back the tradition as an agent of national unity and Mexican identity call the malaise of course eventually crossed the border north as well in Los Angeles in the eighteen hundreds at one time there were parts all over the city. That were almost got banned Imagine the Pamela AH truck on every corner music. Tamale Cart plays Many white people thought of the car's dirty port and thus saw the food the same way awhile. Yeah of course that didn't last too long and into the early nineteen. Hundreds of food became widespread throughout the United States. Making Tamales is quite laborious. boreas easy to say the least actually did know that because our friend has made some last year and he was talking about how much of a pain they were. That's how I know. Often communities are families would would gather together what is call for what is called a tomato which they would get together to help each other and making tamales in Bulk Doc This is something I can attest to you as I remember going up in New Mexico and often seeing this in being a part of it as well. I don't know how to make your family. Make Them Oh yeah. My mom always used to make him. Yeah although less can and are in any time of the year. They are quite more prevalent during the winter holidays. No one really knows why. But but some say it is a tradition that takes after the as dick traditional honoring gods but instead at Christmas honoring saints and of course Jesus perhaps it is a comfort food that just makes us warm or for people like me. It's just in our blood. No one really knows for sure. One time Thought as a ceremonial food. A Food of worship than food of the poor they can now be in in many places across the world although you can buy them in a store nothing can't compare to the the the model is that come from the kitchen of your community or family They they are food that brings everyone together whether to make them eat them or just celebrate The mileage an important staple to Mexican to Mexicans both indigenous and non-indigenous alike AAC and of course many other countries and people. It's not just the food that is amazingly good but for that is steeped in tradition and culture and definitely something. I could never get sick of so this holiday go out. Purchase the from a street vendor. And for God's sakes please remove the husk before you eat. Oh my God. I've heard that accent white people it. Well there's the POMONA incident. I don't remember which President he did that. And it's called the Great Pamela in really well that would taste awful Awful wow was that interesting at least that was super interesting. I like that whenever you'd said hike. Eat them every day. Hey Hon because I Thai food every day so I really want some time. Ali's tamales tie stuffy. Could you imagine imagine or like maybe just like a curry or some kind of sauce on them. That would be so good. I like my pretty authentic. How did you stumped like? Did you know no like hey I want to do this on. Tamales stumbled across this story. And we're like I've always known that they've come while for one. Christmas is a big time for us. So that's where I kind of started. But they als also knew they came from the Aztec peoples. I really wanted to see what the traditional that is super

Mexico Tom Ali New Mexico Flamingo Hunting Domino Chris O. W. R. Apd Los Angeles Spain Msci Asia United States Jesus President Trump Nine Thousand Years
Searching For a Lost Maya City

Science Magazine Podcast

14:33 min | 1 year ago

Searching For a Lost Maya City

"We have contributing correspondent lizzie wade and she went on a hunt for a lost city high lizzy hazara. Can you talk a little bit about your journey of course so we met up in a city called kami thanh in campus and then we drove about seven hours to part of the mexican guatemala border order. That's a little corner that we were staying at this eco lodge. We had guides from that eco lodge who took us into the reserve montessori so we went up i in a motorboat for a few hours when we set up a base camp but basically from there we were kayaking and hiking in the jungle and it was extraordinarily difficult. If there is no trails carved the guides would michetti through through the jungle but everything has fines. Everything is so different from each other. There's so much information and all the plants are so yeah heterogeneous and there's just like so much stuff around you that it's hard to even interpret individual things who is very easy to grab onto a tree that was covered in spines and not really even realize until your hand was also covered in spines they had to cut every out of the way every step i've been in some pretty remote places before but never a place where humans really hadn't been for for decades or potentially centuries and that was very very hard and it felt like the environment was just pushing us pushing pushing us out you know and making it impossible in the rivers were also completely covered in in brush and had to be the machete from the kayaks and late. It was really intense okay. Should i spoil it. Say whether or not you found missing city yeah i mean i think it's hard to talk about it. If we don't say what happened yes so spoilers. You did not find a long last jedi. Wha- what were you looking for. I went to chapas mexico wisdom archaeologist gal just who were looking for a city called sock belong which was the capital of the condone my there's two groups named <unk> condone one one exists today and one is pre columbian maya group when we were looking for this previous maya groups last capital sok-bom means the white jaguar and the lacandon built it basically to hide from spanish invaders which say successfully did for over over two hundred years. Wow what what's the timeline here and i guess i should ask. What century are we him. Yes so the spanish i come to mexico coach central mexico in the early fifteen twenties so to not mind which is now mexico city the aztec capital falls in fifteen twenty one and that's a pretty straightforward holmquest story aztecs were an empire the spanish also empire or wanted to be so they over that all that outland but when you get to the maya world. It's really really different because there's not really a centralized control. Every city is independent of each other and they're all in this elaborate web of allies and enemies. This finished can't come in conquer one city like <unk> or whatever and then everything passes is to them. They have to do it one at a time getting back to this missing city sock belong the lack unknown live there but they didn't always live there. They actually remove their city to this harder define location yeah though i condone lived on this island in lake miramar which is also a a were attacked by the spanish at least once. Maybe a couple of times. I can't quite remember and they had held out but they knew they weren't going to be able to do that forever. So preemptively the late fifteen hundreds they pack up move really deep into the jungle and built this other city called soccer mom but eventually cycle was taken by <hes> the spanish. Can you talk about how that happened by this point. It's the sixteen ninety s the english colonies in the u._s. Are firmly established at this point. I think harvard university has has been founded. This is very much the world we live in now most of the quote unquote conquest that are going on right now are not huge military invasions asians. It's more proselytizing so these two priests are like we have to convert the people of south <unk> devoted to the idea they hire these local maya ed guides who lead them around in circles for five months without them realizing it because the local mayor are so scared of sock belong like the people insect belong have been rating other my <hes> months and months go by of them just like walking around in circles and then finally they realized some things going on and they hired the leader of another local niagara and we don't really know what his motivation was but if you think of the condone being scary and potentially having attacked this town. This guy may have been like whatever ver- enough with this he takes a spanish. They're it's mostly diplomatic. They're not immediately killed. As previous spanish visitors were they convince serve a retinue of the lacombe leaders to come with them to sit in guatemala for more diplomacy basically but on the way they are on the way back almost all <unk> die get sick and die and it sort of clap says and there's not like a big battle this vantage descend on this town of a couple left one hundred thousand of their soldiers and their allied mike holders cycle. I'm gives really easily at that point and then it is is a spanish town for another fifteen twenty years and then everyone is relocated to closer to the pacific coast of water malla which was part of the the spanish colonial policy of it's called reducing might communities so murray by out of where they've always lived in make them live in his new communities where they easier easier control was surprises me then after all of those events is that the location of sack llamas not known yeah. No it surprised me too because it is done some spanish maps. I mean these are like seventeen hundred maps or not satellite abs- you know it was connected to the spanish world for a while but only only for pretty short time so they didn't really have a huge investment in the place when they move people out the jungle stays the jungle like there's not a huge amount of clear cutting so today the location of sucked plum is within this national park in mexico monsoon ways and it's considered an extremely extremely remote part of mexico. There are no trails no roads. Nobody's allowed to live there while you went with a group of archaeologists to try and visit this lost city what what made them think that they could find it and be what would they get out of finding it despite them existing for overlapping with the spanish colonial state for a couple of centuries. There's really no information about what it was like to live in sok-bom or any of the other independent my capitals that existed existed around this time sochua wasn't the only one was but it was the second to last two to be conquered. They wanna know who they were trading with. How connected they were to the outside world. How not connected they were headed they do this. How did they live in such isolation for so long so the reason they thought they could find it is or the method breath <unk>. They used was looking at the spanish documents from the time. After sokolow had been conquered. 'em spanish visitors would go and then they would go other places they would record their roots and how long it took them to travel to different landmarks lakes or rivers or another town's so you can construct a possible zabul arc of locations of the city and basically we were trying to get as close to that as possible so you have your starting point and then they ceo we traveled for seven days you know about how far they went in a circle exactly he's going to be on size herbal and not the other like you can make some inferences and they didn't record it in kilometers or anything that ban measure of distance we would use so you'd have to estimate how far they could walk in a day and it's quite fuzzy but it's a starting point you do have a description of what the spanish a how described cycle on when they arrived yeah it is about a hundred houses which primative adobe so they will not have survived until now there were three community buildings not quite temples but like city halls and those would have had stone foundations and that's what the archaeologists are interested in finding the region today is known for scarlet macaws the sort of iconic red parrots and apparently condone had semi domesticated them in every day at five p._m. They would fly out of the forest land on all the houses and the spanish. I thought that was amazing and so do i do feel like you were able to keep the same pace as the people who had traveled to suck palumbo for you know when you're looking at a previous trips yeah. It's hard to say i mean we weren't hearing oliver stuff. They would have been like did set up base camps. They probably would have been wearing stuff that was really tough to walk around and you know like lots of wool and potentially metal. This is not easy for them either. That was one of the major her things. I was thinking about in the jungle. I don't really care about the spanish confuses blake we i think we pay far too much attention to their experience in history because they're the ones who who got to write it but i was really taken aback by how similar are experience would have been there because of course a lot. Condone knew what they were doing and like we it ends so we we have we were much more similar to the spanish and i felt like if you have a city a few hundred people hiding out in the jungle against a globalizing belies ing empire like it's only a matter of time until they will be found and incorporated into that empire came away thinking that that really wasn't true at all. Oh it was so hard to do this that the conquest of cyclamen basically every other place in the americas was basically the historical accident and a fluke luke. The conquistadors had to rely on locals to help them find the city. Do you think that that's something that the archaeologists are gonna pursue while help was doc vital for the spanish and vital for y'all just now the ones sort of discovery quote unquote that they were able to make on this trip was the classic period read my it ruins which is a thousand years before sock bolom would have been founded but this town in the region knew about some ruins in this little patrick forest that they protect the reserve and they took the archaeologist they are in. It was really amazing. I mean i've seen a lot of unexcavated archeological sites in this was really special one and they never would have known it was there of the local people hadn't been willing to trust them and and tell them about it was tackle on the hard part is that nobody lives in monte. Sicily's there are people who go in there like their firefighters who might know the reserve. There are people who have lived there as refugees like from the guatemalan civil war are a lot of people took refuge there. There are people who know montezuma's ways a little bit better than average person in chapas but because has nobody lives in it. It's just so hard to find those people in it so hard to find the help that you really need to be able to do efficient archaeology. Let's say how far did you travel in all of this. I think we kayaked ninety kilometers in four days. This is a round trip so we went up river forty five kilometers that was already from the base camp. I think a lot of kayaking on in my life the walking was it was really shocking. How slow the walking. It was about a kilometer an hour which you know if i'm walking in a city i go ten minutes. You know the walking. I think it was like eight kilometers things hype it was it was it was not very long but it felt like we climbed mount everest. A lot of archaeology is don don with lighter these days using radar from planes to find hidden structures. Would that be helpful here in this area. It could potentially work. I think it it'd be really great to do it over months away. I know the archaeologist would love to do that to national geographic funded this huge light our survey of a very similar place in guatemala all and it revealed tens of thousands of of structures that archaeologists didn't know about the thing about lighter is that it's pretty expensive <hes> and it takes a lot of coordination and also when you do light. Are you still have to go out to the potential site and see it so it doesn't totally save you from the explorer our jungle adventure that we that we had one of these archaeologists going to do next. Are they going to go back. They are going to go back which i found a little bit mind boggling wing but they're really committed to exploring this area of chapas <unk> swiss and what stood was a give them some information about how how fast the spanish could travel like. Maybe it was a little slower than we thought. Maybe dot com is closer to these landmarks. If you have to go so slow a lot of the information on the satellite maps about the exact routes of the rivers turned out not to be totally right so it made making a more accurate map much easier and i think the most important thing it did probably was bringing these archaeologist in closer contact with the communities down there both the communities who who live in the towns and the guides themselves who know the reserve very well it takes a lot of work to to build a kind of trust you need to have people both agreed to show you what they know especially since archaeology in mexico as in so many places is often connected to the state and official narratives of off the country and potentially land expropriation and things like that people can be very wary of archaeologists for pretty good historical reasons yeah yea so you know you really have to spend a lot of time. They're showing them that you care about these places and you care about the current people's connection to those places in you're going to respect. That's

Mexico Chapas Guatemala Lizzie Wade Kami Thanh Harvard University Soccer Lake Miramar Lacombe Adobe Sicily Water Malla Mount Everest Sok-Bom Sokolow Palumbo
Diagnostic company Exact Sciences to buy Genomic Health in $2.8 billion deal

Bloomberg Surveillance

09:38 min | 1 year ago

Diagnostic company Exact Sciences to buy Genomic Health in $2.8 billion deal

"To get a sense of what's going on here in the equity markets with our good friend remain Bostick Bloomberg news brimming with a force well a lot's movie today I mean we can start with healthcare because we've had a lot of deal activity there of course there's that big exact sciences genomic health deal us in a lot of movement of course on both of those stocks these of course the big sort of diagnostic testing company that's kind of been all the rage for the last you know probably you're so for investors here and then of course yeah that Fizer my land deal Fizer a little bit weaker on this deal course Miley and are of rising pretty strongly on it basically five there's going to try to shuffle some of those legacy businesses the **** than of some of those other sort of a drug that are either off patent or getting to that stage where the generic competition is just going to be too much other doing sort of what you call a sort of a of reverse more stress deal were sort of allows them to do a sort of more tax friendly spin off of some of these businesses were you sexually create a separate entity and you have those two businesses then there's a really small micro cap company lexicon pharma obviously these companies are there almost kind of like a lot tickets get a lot of the triggers out I don't help people invest in Sony's biotech and bio pharma companies it's a book about a lottery Hey you you you pick it up off the floor and you hope at some point you know whatever drug trial they're working on turns out to be great and then it's so you're on to the road to riches apparently that's not gonna happen this diabetes drug that they were developing with Santa Fe Santa Fe essentially ending its partnership lexicon still going to go ahead and try to develop a drug but at least in the short term doesn't seem like this is going to be much of a winner so those are some of the big decliners today we did have a few big kind of gainers today GrubHub actually rising today up about six percent there was a big deal over in Europe up with take away that's a big Dutch delivery company buying just eats over in London so now there's of course a lot of speculation about consolidation in the industry GrubHub obviously only focus here in the U. S. but this is crossing causing some sort of world wide speculation about some potential MNA activity Hey you have pay pal to actually see me downgraded but there was actually interesting no doubt all here in the retail sector on under armor ahead of their earnings tomorrow a couple analysts out basically saying that think the numbers are gonna be much stronger mainly the company is a little bit more pricing power hasn't been discounting as much as they had in previous quarters so using the shares rise there up in the premarket remain Bostic thank you so much action in the equity markets pre market remain is bloomer television of course attorneys to give us some of the pre market action one of things we're gonna look for to this week in a big big earnings week over a hundred thirty companies reporting this week as can be apple clearly you know a bellwether for the market place a bellwether for big texture over day Bloomberg opinion commas covers all things tech for she joins us here this morning to give us what we might see Adam apple and I guess the the issue continues to be I guess the pivot this company is making a way from that the maturing iPhone on business into the services business whatever investor can be looking for here yeah I think that's right you've seen already that investors expectations of completely reset now about apple that we're talking about a company that is not expected to grow revenue much if at all for the rest of this fiscal year ending in September for apple and I think it's probably going to be more of the same so revenue not going up that which is a surprising thing for a a tech company but as you said poll the big story that investors are following is how is it going for apple's effort to sort of move beyond if it can this gigantic business in I phone sales and start selling people more you know after downloads at apple music sales an apple television subscriptions and things like that that it will least partially filled the hole left by the declining iPhone unit sales because he mentioned his iPhone units actually are declining on a global basis well we don't know for sure because animal started to stop disclosing that number but they stopped disclosing that number most likely because that number is declining now and is probably going to decline for the foreseeable future so we think that apple selling fewer new iPhones right here yes and obviously I think when we start for start hearing about China not becoming a a problem from a tree perspective all these low many months ago apple was really held out as one could be that's really expose would expect to hear from apple as it relates to China yeah I think China is going to be really important as well in this quarterly earnings report that the the the revenue numbers from trying to have not been good for apple ID been declined declining in a serious way and I think apple indicated three months ago that the trying to numbers are starting to look a little bit better so I think investors are waiting to see if that proves true yes because not only do they sell product into China they also manufacture most of their hardware there so the exposure I'm guessing is pretty extreme there versus maybe some other tech companies it is very extreme and I think apple is one of the one of the few very large tech companies apart from the chip makers that is heavily exposed to train in those two ways that as you said that apple sells a lot of products in China China is by far the top selling the biggest buyer smartphones in the world about a third of all new smartphones every year go into China and as you said trying to is central to the supply chain of apple and usually you hear people like president Donald Trump criticizing apple for manufacturing I phones and other parts of their products in China but the the company probably has very little choice but to continue doing so and in some cases right absorb some of the costs from increased component prices due to terror of some things like that so one of the countries as China begins to mature and roll over a little bit in terms of being a growth driver for apple is India how are the position in India basically apple is no where in India been taught well I know it India right now is the top growing big smartphone market in the world that purchased new numbers out today about vendor smartphone vendors in in India that are doing well and it's mostly Chinese smartphone companies companies like show me and vivo and off beau companies that have gotten big in in China in their home countries and are now doing well in India as well and apple's market share at least last time I looked at it was maybe one percent of Indian the new Indian smartphone sales even though apple's been talking about India as this important growth market as a long term growth market that still may be true but the fact is India's smartphone market is growing like crazy and apple is nowhere and apple's network they the high priced products presumably enough interesting yes sources are a big factor so it is a company it's amazing the stock up thirty three percent this year that's pretty commendable given that the company is trying to make this major pivot to services is our sense that you know the market I mean it I wonder how big services is ultimately become for this company yeah I I think I think investors are over into the Aztec about the services market the fact is there is no way to completely replace the whole created by declining I phone sales that whole industry smartphone sales are not growing anymore for apple and everyone else and apple doesn't have an answer to that and services are not going to fill that hole completely they can look at the more of these services products they introduce every new you know credit old men and credit card every new television product news all those things help a little on the margins and they're good because for the most part those services are relatively high margin products but it cannot replace the hole left by declining I phone sales how about if they're sitting on two hundred twenty five billion dollars in cash that might be helping things what what what's apple doing with this cash well I think the short version is there going to slowly return it to investors in the form of buybacks and dividends and you're right I think that is obviously hoping the stock price we should note that like a lot of these big tech companies apple took a big apple share price took a big downturn late last year and so if you look at apple's share price on a one year basis it's about even with the S. and P. five hundred right interesting just looking at the dividend yields got a one point four eight percent dividend yield right now returning cast between a twenty five billion dollars in cash that can buy you a lot of time as you either try to think of if you know determine what the next product will be or trying to ramp up your services business so we'll see what they have to say after the close tomorrow here of a day Bloomberg opinion columnist covering all things technology helping us out as we await the apple numbers after the close tomorrow again the stock up thirty percent year to date and is here mentioned you know kind of in line with the S. and P. on a trailing twelve month basis big tech took a big hit in the fourth quarter of last year was a market was hit hard by a series of issues including trade tensions which really flared up if we all remember from the fourth quarter of last year not of course had a disproportionate impact on the technology stocks including apple which is typically held out is probably one of the stocks long so the chip makers this year mention this kind of most exposed to China so want to see what apple has to say after the close as a company transitions from being a iPhone maker to a services a company with a lot of cash on the balance sheet this is

Bostick Bloomberg Two Hundred Twenty Five Billio Twenty Five Billion Dollars Thirty Three Percent Four Eight Percent Thirty Percent Three Months Twelve Month One Percent Six Percent One Year
"aztecs" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"aztecs" Discussed on KCRW

"The land from the Aztecs as they colonized the Spaniard strain lakes and replaced. As tech canals with streets and the Spaniards began drawing. Water from underground. Aquifers? But now with twenty one million people in Mexico City, the aquifers are being depleted, which is why water is being pumped in pumped in by pipes. So old that about forty percent of the water is lost to leaks will getting worse every time because the system is getting older. And also is because every year we will depend more on the system and lacing the ferry because the ferry social getting ran out of water and things could get a lot worse says Arnold Mattis. Mexico City's chief resilience officer. He says Mexico City is lucky that it hasn't faced a major drought on Mike, California or South Africa. We face prolonged drought in the next twenty to thirty years. And then we don't have the local supply of that provides the aquifer then that would be a really important risk for the entire population living in the metropolitan area. Martin says the water outage should serve as a wakeup call to politicians and citizens what major changes are needed. But until that happens. Mexico City will be relying on leaky pipes and drying aquifers to supply one of the world's largest metropolitan areas for the world, Emily, green, Mexico City..

Mexico City Arnold Mattis Martin officer Emily South Africa California Mike forty percent thirty years
"aztecs" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"aztecs" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"The aztecs this shit is weird we don't know for sure how this game was played you know if there was a official guide rulebook it got burnt evidence suggests that the wide variety of football games were played all somewhat some other like you can go visit the ruins of law these ancient parents and cities there's like they're still courts the courts are still there where they would play this game the most widespread version apparently was the was the hip game i swear not making this up took me long time to try and get my head around this it was played by two opposing teams with variable number of players the aim of the game was to put the ball in the opponents end zone without using hanjour feet sometimes they'd have to put the ball through this little kind of like a little tiny whole like a very small hold onto throw it through the article on i found says it only hips could touch the ball which i can't i can't even wrap my head around because like one of the balls on the ground rolling around how how how shit the move it with your hip the ball they'll nine pound deady made out of hard rubber i was actually never supposed to touch the ground but we don't know what the rule was if it did touch the ground ground we do a few things about the game was scored a different point systems again note no direct counts the precise but but we know it was rough we know that they had pads we it was violent and dangerous who's played on unforgiving stone court people wore protective gear that included like leather helmets kneepads arm and chest protectors and gloves and sometimes you get real violent and this is why i thought it was worth bringing up like when the aztecs would play it oftentimes when he has to actually play it the losing team would be murdered or sacrificed is they called it seriously they will get their heads cut off among the ashtec decapitation was a frequent end for the losing team man you're gonna fuck and play heart rights no you're not you're not saving it for the next game when you are when decapitation you're you're shooting for a blowout right you're you're you're you're diving for loose balls you are diving for loose balls if you know that you will literally lose your head if if you don't win the game right how how are we supposed to get a proper rivalry going by the way if every team you beat gets their heads cut off a supposedly the game was played between different factions having some sort of dispute in the game would be played in place of actual warfare so you know instead of war like we do this game and then it losing team dis tough tough time to be a skilled athlete that's now team you want to be picked for playing to the death and lighter news the olmecs domesticated the cacao tree they gave us chocolate thank you all mex us became my favorite culture mantle of chocolate go ahead go ahead chocolate romney doubt i'll have new ones put in and get right back to to a grinding up your sweet sweet candy now quick note about the mayans the longest running american civilization was the maya civilization occupying much of central north america central north american continent based on the on their base on the gulf coast of what is now mako between sometime between twenty five hundred bc and its earliest forms and last until around fifteen hundred sees so long run kind of you know they reached their height around six hundred ce they fell apart for reasons not entirely clear around nine hundred c and then it kinda struggled on for a few more centuries in fragmented form you know they weren't like a unified empire you know so to speak they were complex group of independent city states which shared cultural qualities such as their amazing complex artwork particularly had murals advanced drinking water collection system constructed amazing pyramids remain.

official nine pound
"aztecs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"aztecs" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The ancient language of the aztecs it's known as nouad and it's considered endangered wnyc's rachel buongiorno found a couple from queens doing their part to save the language by offering cooking classes witty all lissette be resolved scuttle the song calling on a sunday afternoon eto and sanchez stands in a small kitchen that he swops office in midtown manhattan mixing finally graham maze and dry alqatar leaves he's hosting an informal cooking cloth to share the language and culture his native now on community from central mexican within the being resi around one and a half million people still speak now want but linguists consider endangered because it's not being passed on to the next generation in part because of colonisation and the stigma of being indigenous in mexico throughout the close sanchez explains etymology of dishes and making like the spicy chocolate source moulay like more live mean this to move on he needs move even though sanchez learned the first spanish from it ends after moving to the us he was losing the connection to his language and culture but his grandfather's death around ten years ago inspired him to get back to his roots and many memories come with came like the fool like my child whole like stories the lung which also sanchez is the only one left emmys family he regularly speaks now so he sees it as he's obligation to pass it onto the next generation especially.

rachel buongiorno queens manhattan mexico sanchez ten years