35 Burst results for "Azam"

Strong quake shakes southern Peru, but no report of victims

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 9 months ago

Strong quake shakes southern Peru, but no report of victims

"A strong earthquake has hit Peru The magnitude 7.2 quake has shaken a remote region of southern Peru sending frightened people running into the streets in nearby Bolivia too though there have been no immediate reports of damage or injury The U.S. geological survey says the 7 a.m. quake was sent at 8 miles northwest of azam garo but was fairly deep 135 miles beneath the surface the quake swayed some buildings in La Paz the capital of neighboring Bolivia and was felt in other Peruvian cities as well as in northern Chile I'm Charles De

Peru Bolivia Azam Garo Earthquake U.S. La Paz Chile Charles De
"azam" Discussed on Celtics Lab Podcast

Celtics Lab Podcast

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Celtics Lab Podcast

"The floor and i think as an assistant coach he also kind of brought a high level of energy and can thursay azam and fire to his kind of day to day work so it might be less a slight at brad stevens and more of ages. General commentary on the differences in leadership styles between those two. And i wouldn't be shocked if dochas brand of leadership is frankly a little bit more to jalen 's tastes given what we know about jalen. Generally i mean throughout the years the brad stevens era largely the have been good or last year just unbelievably tragic sprinkled in there. There have been locker room fights supposedly and players only meeting supposedly. And i mean remember last year that yelling and the chair throwing in the stuff that we kind of excused because it was a really tense here. I wonder if that Stuck with with the players maybe more than a stuck with us so this idea that there might be at such an overused way. Framing things in sports like an alpha leading the locker room by of coach november brad. I don't know that he was the guy to really snap things into place in a way that maybe someone with a stronger voice or a more imposing leadership style might be able to. I don't know that that's really conjecture on my part. I don't know if it's Mississippi that so much is even in normal course. Events through a long tenure. The team eventually people start to new out now. That larry bird quote that. We discussed in previous podcast. That coaches have about three years. I mean we're talking about you know. I think it was basically referencing. Bill fitch when she's hall fame coach and maybe maybe one day rat will be hall of fame. Coach probably next during is much As a very successful as coaching this time we must be administered. Hoping things but any of a hall of fame coach can have some some data about them who he still credits as. What's important influences in. Brits career I think there's just something about where if you hear. Somebody's voice all the time. You've just tuna mouth. Never listen to you guys when you talk on the podcasts moderate. All right saying it's funny because it's true. Think number three the an i. This was my takeaway. I picked this one. Marcus smart's enthusiasm for being the top point guard. It got brought up a lot. He likes to talk about it a lot. He seemed per usual like he was driving energy and the enthusiasm at this event. But i suppose this podcast included there were questions about whether or not smart would be the lead point guard at least on the outset of the season and it seems like that answer. That question is answered itself. So just go to you just because you were tuned in most of media. Am i right that that is something. That was heavily implied. Or am i over. And he's getting the ball he his. It's his job to lose to start. He was probably the most positive about that. What he can do Crucially also framed as how he's going to get the ball to where i think i'm gonna paraphrase here. It needs to go jalen and jason. So yeah that is that is super important in terms of everybody really knowing the will dennis schroder as an aside. really sounded symptom similarly echo. This he did not sound like someone who's going to try to be no upsetting applecart for personal reasons quite the opposite but there was a little bit of..

brad stevens jalen thursay azam Bill fitch larry bird Marcus smart brad Mississippi dennis schroder jason
"azam" Discussed on Apathetic Enthusiasm

Apathetic Enthusiasm

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Apathetic Enthusiasm

"This episode. We are using every waking hour of our time to play video game about factories And maybe watching or to susie azam apathetic enthusiasm coming to you live from the west and east coasts. Also if you're on the london coast really any coast if you're watching us currently as we're recording this fly over states if you're in flash for state that's right that's right. Hopefully you're on a an american airlines flight to cincinnati ohio checking us out live on america online in demand on american airlines flight out. Great eight hoke out great. Would it be if this podcast. For some reason was buried in the menu of american airlines inflight entertainment and it just like we trick the algorithm. And what if that's where all of our listeners and viewers this people they're like what are these guys talking about like we are academic lasso or these dudes can talk about video games for half an hour This is a tough one oral. Watch the day. The dan the dave burn documentary. It's on hbo where he does and burns. Are you trying to find. Ken burns at the name. No no no no dude from talking talking heads. Oh okay all right. Now he does he does. This does does that thing with his hands. I don't know i've been on flights to understand reference It's great it's great. Check it out well. This is apathetic enthusiasm. i could tell you're good. Thank transition so i beat you to it. If you're listening to this podcast. Thank you so much you can find this on a couple different over twitter to at apple's asked if you want to catch the show twitter he is at juggle marino. Emmy and oh. I am at barnyard. Crews facebook dot com slash apathetic enthusiasm. Show email apathetic enthusiasm show at gmail.com. Go ahead and send us an e mail. We'd love to have you. instagram apathetic. Underscore enthusiasm you can get to our website. Www dot apathetic enthusiasm dot.

susie azam london coast dave burn hoke cincinnati Ken burns ohio hbo america twitter Emmy apple facebook
"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"He can trace that memory. You know so. It's really beautiful. Do you ever have okay. I have to ask you because majority of people i know. They've never remember their dreams. My son is the first person i've met you now. Second really who really. I don't know that many people who who actually Study there. Who who have these kind of dream experiences. Would you ever have time during the day. Where the world's just feel so surreal to you like almost like it's not real. I think when you get caught in a rut especially creatively or when you go through a a stressful situation or maybe at times you're depressed time certain things come out. There's also times. I think we're so used to life being portrayed as happens to the media and it happens when we were used to being portrayed in a certain way that when something unexpected out of left field happens you don't know how to react to it Almost like we don't prepare ourselves for the unexpected. And maybe that's is that how you feel sometimes and things get real like. This couldn't possibly be happening. Yeah but it doesn't necessarily have to be run a particular circumstance because yes. I know that there are stressors. In live that sometimes make things surreal and as are we go into sort of fight or flight mode kind of surreal. But i'm just talking about sometimes. I'll just be sitting somewhere so perfect moment. There's nothing to be then. Suddenly there's this weird paradigm shift just like. Wow you know like it just feels a bit. Surreal i i really cannot articulate it but sometimes wonder if that happens to me because of the way that i drain the that that overlaps what feels real and what doesn't feel real sometimes is possible. I mean we have we have. We've overactive imagined or people say could say we have overactive imaginations. It's like one of those never done drugs. I make my mind is already twisted enough in so many different ways. I don't know that..

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"You know you're in the ear into the nighttime of imaging your lyrics in europe. And you're you're so i i mean i do it for a living and i'm i'm usually reading. What other people's are. But i'm doing some creative writing on the side and it's a lot of brain power people don't realize you can't just crank out. Millions stories at once was composing music. You can only do so much and then your brain just shuts off for the day exactly but writing so much more difficult than making music. I mean honestly you know. They're especially now that i've developed my craft so much you know once i have an idea i feel like i found the structure i can. I'm pretty much to the point now. Where for like three hours. I can go on autopilot in terms of production. You don't i'll go on autopilot and i. It turns out very well but you can. There's there is absolutely no autopilot and writing how you choose one particular word when you have to auction of ten others is for me. Mind boggling you know not instruments right though is same with like a lot of construction instruments dumped compared because from me. Writing is the in terms of all the artistic expressions for me. I think writing is the most difficult. I have a few friends who are writers when they finish your book. I i'm blown away out. How did you do that. How did you write an entire book in one year. You know it so remarkable. I think it's the one art form. I admire the most and because it's also not something that at i love doing and wish i could do so i have great admiration for it. I wrote this post recently on social media and people laugh so hard for me. Grammar is sexy. Actually i find grammar to be so sexy when people write me emails and they take time to write properly. I i love it you know. I just think great that has been lost in time where we don't write anymore we don't you know people now. They don't even like to capitalize the first letter of the alphabet after the full stop. It's become so lazy writing everything is about mediocrity now yellows. Jeez yeah forget all that nonsense..

europe
"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"He said when someone walks in a room the way you sit up and the way your body language reacts very much like a bird and and it makes perfect sense. Thought i am someone who has constantly flying at night. You know and i have this man telling me that you know. Have my body reactions like that of a bird. And i think part of that is I've i've come to peace with it. You know Coming back to the words reconciliation. Because that's what my art is about that transformation. And i think i am now got to point in my life for a celebrate the fact that it was sort of my fate to not be tied down to one particular route that i'm a meant to be a world citizen and someone who is not is tethered. The word you wanna use and this sandra is that you know. I'm not connected to any one particular saying you not like i'm someone One of the reasons. I always struggled as iranian artists. Is that i never took pride and in. My iran ness whatever that means and an iranian to say. Well you are. You not proud of being iranian. And i i used to say well an still say it. I don't even know what that feeling is. Because it's so arbitrary the geographical location you're born in the religion you're born into the sex you're born into those are sook such arbitrary occurrences and for me. It's always been about the kind of human being you choose to be. That should be what you should become proud of. Not something so arbitrary as the geographical location where you were born so in many ways i feel that not being tied to those kind of roots has made me a lot more free. I think that's the best word i can use. I'm free are there any types of art forms that you'd like to explore. Actually i love writing. My husband always tells me. I should write more. I love writing essays. Actually i don't think i would have people. Tell me you write a book about avenue locations. But i love essays. You know. it's i'm so passionate about them. Actually i ended up meeting the member. One of the members of cocteau twins because i wrote an essay that got published Wits running with that that got published about they asked to write wia covered cocteau twins on what it meant to me and he ended up reading the essay and writing to me..

sandra iran cocteau twins
"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Find my healing and transformation and then hopefully i create something that is meaningful that i can then offer to others and they can find those things in What i have created so whether it's visual art or music or whatever else it is that i decide to do It's always going to come from the intent of first needing needing for myself to heal myself so your family went from iran to india to the states. Yes well actually. My family didn't go. My parents I actually leak came from a. You're probably the first person i will ever discussed this in an interview with. But i like you a lot. And as i'm getting older i'm feeling a little bit more about sharing intimate details about my life but actually i came from a mixed religious family. My mother's side are behind and my father's side are muslims and it was a marriage of love and i had a brother be born before me and he died at the age of one while my mom was pregnant with me and over. The death of my brother was just so much pressure. You know between just multi-religious family and they ended up getting a divorce. It ruined their marriage and my mom was pregnant at the time so i was born already into a very tumultuous situation and my mom was a bad as woman you know. She was the first woman and her family to become educated. Should be percents. You worked in one of the biggest hospitals and to her on but she couldn't look after me. She was also very damaged and at that time when women got divorced especially she since she was not a muslim the chances that she would get the rights to me were next to nothing so her best choice at the time was sending me off to boarding school in india and she sent me to the english boarding school. Why lived for eleven years. I actually grew up myself..

iran india
"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Wander with me and Over here with lady of the lake is like the sky or the water is moving in the background. The image still. But you're slowly bringing moving elements to the visuals and So it sounds like you're gradually expanding and doing other things. It's interesting because you know your new album. You did it yourself. Most of it. He no in the studio and the first time you've done that is unusual. Isn't it sort of doing that. More in a solitary environment rather than collaborative effort very different. And i think you know. Also i mean. I'm not a feminist by the. I'm not like me too. Feminists in that sense. Whatever that means. It's actually it's it's a terrible thing to say. But i think it gives a certain idea of kind of you know what i am the seminary in my own right to put in simply just means that i believe women and men should have equal rights to everything. So i'm not but feminists you know by still like when gentlemen opened the door for me doesn't mean i can't open the door it just means it's nice. It's nice when someone opens the door for you but a lot of this album. Also i think for so many years and collaborating i am also always grown up. Men have always been my best friends. Have a tough time Finding close female friends. But everyone i've ever collaborated with so far has been men and a lot of times You end up sitting in the sidelines. Because an. I don't think it's anything deliberate in that sense. It's just the way it has been structured indus field in the music business and especially in the electronic music scene. There are some remarkable female artists. But still not as many as i would like to see an a big reason why i deliberately was not going to bring in Anyone else to program..

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Mike gateway ban was depeche mode. You know. that's i think. Originally where i fell in love with technology. And what's great about that whole dark. Wave movement is is their choice of melodies on the way they you know is related to that coming from the east because of our music is about melodies. it wasn't you know what i mean. So i got into that on all dot music at got me through such a dark period but it was still a very dark period so by the time i finished the album i realized i started thinking about how we all. You know if you're lucky to old how we almost have so many lifetimes within one lifetime you think about. Maybe the person you were ten fifteen years ago on what you were living in we were living with on your other relationships and it's almost like someone else you know you're the kind of disassociation with who used to be thinking about that in terms of phantoms. That you know we have. We developed these multiple personas and even today in our lives. Who you are with your girlfriend who you are with your colleagues who you are with you know Your friends and so on and so forth there are so different. And we've moved so fluidly through these that even thinking about it that you are being somebody else and i wanted to reconcile all of these aspects of who i am and kind of make peace with the assam in the eighties. Ninety suffered so much on struggled so much and we'll so depress and music saved her and it became about that for me. and that's why. I called phantoms. It's about reconciling all our personas and does ghosts at live with us and we'll continue to live with us as we develop more personas as we get. If we're lucky enough to keep getting older and living you know. The artwork kind of is a very similar. It's a completely different persona of who i am you know. Yeah well i look at the the prince here for childhood dreams which is more light. I mean it's use standing on a chair holding up a giant dandelions and as a lush green hillside in the background. That's a got a more positive. Actually i created this one for my son because my son was obsessed with dandelions when he was little you know he almost twelve and he has this huge light hanging in his room in its giant. The line was always obsessed with them and one of my favorite memories with him. It's something we did regularly. We'd go into dandelions fields and just for for hours. He took pick down two lines on blow on them so this was a piece..

Mike gateway
"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Half of them have a dark environment or majority of you have a dark environment some later environments here also deal with the raven because growing up and i was afraid of ravens so they kind of held a very dark place and my psyche. Really want to make that a major aspect of the artwork. Kind of reconciling sort of that childhood fear. I had of them. And now i've learned to love them. I find an extremely beautiful while you have this image of you or your backs to the camera. You're facing a giant moon in the sky with your hand held up almost like. You're giving melania like pressuring allegiance to the moon I it's interesting. You have even the lyrics of the new album is a lot of nighttime imagery. it's moody its melancholy in these very dreamlike images. And you and. I've talked about the fact that we have very vivid dreams that we remember when wake up yes like the one actually the first track record. I vision visual. He's created was the one call. Trust me floating over the ocean. I mean and this is a sequence. I've seen in a dream. You know their time. I wake up. And i'm actually really upset that i woke up because it was so vivid and i've even had days where i have such intense dreams that it affects the way. I have my dates almost as if i had as if those experiences really happened. This ever happened to you it. It's interesting i actually. I feel like..

melania
"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Boss to the electric kucic middle eastern of nina's to the often ethereal global tapestries ever solo. Work assam wrote produced and perform most of the parts on our latest solo album phantoms which is more electronic nature than previous efforts yet equally. Beguiling it includes a cover of cocteau twins shallow then halo as artistic aspirations in passions. Extend beyond music for episode eleven of side jams. She spoke with me. I escaped from her home in los angeles to discuss her fine art. Composites photography admiration for writers and fascination with the world of dreams. Our conversation recorded near the end of twenty nine team entered more personal territory but she opened up her. Life's odyssey which began in. Iran continued india and then ultimately lead fee nited states. We were in the midst of a three hour interview for billboard that also with us into this spontaneous side jams chat snow for the side jams thing is are there any hobbies outside interests. You have things that you're passionate about one of the things. I got interested in on ten years. Ago is Look very young. I used to paint. And i originally working was thinking before. I decided to go into music. I wanted to become a miniature artists. Those really fine.

nina los angeles Iran india
"azam" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on The Eddie Trunk Podcast

"Let's let him go home and get better and we told them to you. Know and It's never happened. I mean. I think he got better than he didn't. And it was a roller coaster ride from utah a month or two you know on your show before he perished and he was he was good. Yeah i talked about that before you came on the air you know. I did not know him well at all. I interviewed him. Maybe once or twice total. I i did not know him. I beyond beyond having worked. You're done an interview or two. I did know him. Like i know you or other so many other guys to tax caller. Or what have you. But i have a lot of respect for him and people ask me all the time about when we had him on that metal show. Because i remember joey. That was a tough thing for me. Because i remember he wanted to come on and at that time and i think people forget this because you just said you and you just talked about it you you moved on from him. You had brought robert mason in You know before janey passed away you had made that rocco hollick record which is great record and then janey was out doing whatever he was doing and then at that time i remember you guys are about to release that record and then janey was going out and doing some shows with his own band and both both of you had come. Both of your camps had come and said hey. Can we do that metal show and i remember taking it to the network and they said well. We can't do warrant and the former singer in the same a block season. So we'll do janey this time and we'll do warrant the next time and that's what we ended up doing and janey came on and people ask me all the time like how how was he and i said the same thing i mean. I didn't know him well but he was great with us that day. And that's why it was even bigger shock that very shortly after that we shot that interview before it even got to air. He he was gone. And i never saw that coming off of the guy that i interviewed that day on tv Did you have experiences like that with him to did you. While you on the road was it like you'd have a good show seemed. Things seem to be fine and then the next day. You just didn't know what you were going to get. Was it up and down like that absolutely a roller coaster. I mean the guy was incredibly talented as a writer a singer and a front man and and and you know you and very charming as a friend and a brother and very very kind of fans. I mean not a bad word to say about any of that You know and then and then this this dark thing would happen. And you just didn't know it was like just like jacqueline hyde situation where you had this extremely talented loving caring guy And then and then you know an hour later it would just be the guy that was looking right through you And i think you know during during his stimpson rehab. That i'm aware of doctors told him you know you need to stop. You need to stop your body. You know physically when your body says it's over with it's over with you know and he took to heart because he was smart and he listened. But i don't think he could overcome whatever whatever it was that kept him. You know you know going back to that bottle. I don't think he could overcome it No matter who tried to help his family his brothers his brothers and sisters all tried to help different friends. You know different wives. He had an ex tried to help him. And you know it was just something that you didn't know when that switch was gonna get clicked on or off. I wanna talk to you a little bit more about him. Azam musician and being in a band with him from that standpoint the good times the positive stuff so we know that he wrote the i believe. Pretty much He's credited as the sole songwriter on almost every warrant song. If not everyone from that era. How did that decision come about. Was it. just that he was bringing in the material and it was that was that him dictating that or was it just that that's where the wealth of the songs were coming from. And you guys said. Hey we're just gonna roll with this because this guy is bringing the goods. How did it work creatively. I think i think you know he was the main songwriter. He did right and pen. All those tunes. All the lyrics There was you know the things would come in to the studio. And i would come in. He'd play them on an acoustic guitar. Sit down with me or eric and we'd go through the guitar parts. And then you put your own twist on things and how you play them on a you know electric guitar versus an acoustic guitar and how things would be arranged so all that was done as a ban but the general idea would come in sometimes from start to finish completely written. And then it's just about. How are we gonna play all the parts and record all the parts and we would do that with producers and work through all that. He held that very close to to. You know the cuff. I mean songs like. There's a song on cherry pie. Sure feels good. Where i was at a i was a jv franken. Danny stag from kingdom. Come we were jamming together right. And one day and jeannie came over and we had that rift going and and i was working with danny on it and he gave danny and j. b. writing credit. I didn't get writing credit. Not a big deal but to this day. Danny stag license said why. Didn't you get writing credit. So he held all that stuff really really tight I know that eric got some credit on cherry pie. Because he was there and health with some of the arrangement. And i know that bo hill interjected some of his ideas into a few things here and he took some writing credit but back in the day i.

janey rocco hollick robert mason jacqueline hyde joey utah Azam Danny stag eric danny franken jeannie kingdom bo hill
"azam" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

Hire Power Radio

05:39 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Hire Power Radio

"Core value is giving. You have a purpose. You have caused that you're giving to and yet you probably look for that in the people that you bring on board and it probably surfaces in the interview that hey look at. This is something that's important to me. We see that you give in on a giver and boom. I resonate with this. And that's why. I want to be part of this absolutely by us. Being transparent with our cause and transparent with our mission we attract like minded people. Those people are very excited to be a part of the journey with us and essentially. There's a lot of momentum that's built up when we join our uzi azam with each other as we go as it should be. So why is this important for our peers for other entrepreneurs why should they put this into their organization and day one. Yeah so. I think that's a question. That's different for every entrepreneur. But i think there's one way to look at it that is relevant to everyone building. A healthy culture with a fully. Remote team is a very difficult thing to do. You've got decentralized people you're most likely not in the same city. You're most likely not in the same time zone. You could be very geographically diverse and so there could be a lot of reasons that you're disconnected ultimately and so creating a connected team when they're fully remote is a challenge and so we found that our social mission is the glue that holds our remote team together. It gets us all fighting for the same thing. It gets us working together in communicating. Well because a celebrating the same things. We've gone as far as to set our. Kpi's around 'cause based outputs instead of internal revenue numbers in performance driven. The cause output is based on the revenue but we really focus on that output to our social mission in so. I think that as all of us were forced into some form of remote work last year. Were we're having to decide okay. We all had to do remote work last year in twenty twenty..

uzi azam
"azam" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Pocketnow Weekly Podcast

"Write them off automatically. And i'm like you really shouldn't do that. There are some some crazy good products out here from companies that you would not imagine What was one of the best ones that i've heard a long time was from apple. The apple inc o. X. are there there. There's a partnership with them and dine audio and excellent and apple week. Normally get it here at the order. I'm like autumn on the expressway. Like a month for them to arrive or something. Yeah But excellent excellent ear buds. One hundred fifty bucks. I was shocked so Yeah i mean there's there's so much good out there as long as people remain open to stuff outside of like the big four if if people wanna find other deals and i'm glad to see a lot more people are starting to see this stuff like they're finding these other brands and and be like okay so it's not like because i have people like well. Well they're not apple. So i'm like it doesn't have to be it doesn't have to be like the cooling thing about apples. If you have a problem. Take into an apple store. That's great but you know aside from this there's a lot of other options out here for you and lower prices like if you just want to step into the market right now. It's beautiful time because you can start off slow thirty bucks fifty bucks amazing products under one hundred year old. It's been more than a hundred bucks. You have such a wide. Plethora of options and fully featured. We'll talk an app support. Noise canceling ambient sound wireless charging. I mean everything. You could possibly want an ascetic ear. Buds like the p. threes. I mean for everything you get. these for. eighty dollars is just nuts lighting. They i told him directly what he is doing. Because i have another one hundred twenty. Yeah and i think those ones i. I've checked out the hundred twenty dollar once they were really good. And it's like these are just as good just slightly different but he's also offer a gaming mode as well. I'm like what i adore. I adore this level of passion. That i'm hearing from you. Know new on the tail end of the show. Now but like yeah. I mean that's the thing though right that passion is still there so even if we are trying to take breaks once in a while and actually take care of ourselves like the passion is still there. So where how do i word this out. I like i was telling jeff right before this. Show like already on a livestream song. I'm on my my my whole life. Chest area and vocal cords are like old hired on like taking time to like inbetween my sentences but mainly what i wanted to do as a sign up for the show is. You're just open up the floor for you. What can Everyone look forward to seeing on your channel. Make sure to let everyone know where to find you and Yeah like go ahead. I the floor is yours. I'm trying to do more more of what i've been doing. So so basically gonna be like as far as stuff that's known it would be the pixel by zan that's going to be coming out. Hopefully the jaybird vista to. I've azam issues with them. Some hoping they'll be a second review sample of those so we can kind of get that review knocked out of a knock that away Also looking forward to looking at some airbus designed for sleep. So there's a few companies out there amaze fits doing stuff like that Bows i believe they got into it as well. There's a couple of others but that's a big wide open market that not a lot of companies are addressing. So that's something that i definitely want to take. You know i don't i don't use airbus. Were sleeping but i get so many requests about that. That i wanna make sure that i dropped some videos for those people that do need that. Some people have to have that noise. Whatever may be so that. That's something that. I wanna make sure i addressed to so we'll be doing that plus I'll be doing a video coming out on this guy..

apple inc zan jeff azam airbus
"azam" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

02:37 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"Trappers. sure there. I feel like they're very drunk. Our you know nominated once and then you know like they're like walking. I remember like college parties. When azam watt take your heels off walk into the parking lot. Get the damage. my feet. Her walk you said i. I did drink so i was to sober for all that But you know i to me. I don't know about you should help. I felt like a good par party when you're like. Wow that was really fun. That's the that i was getting from them. It was it was hyped. That's the that's what scrappy gives. Safari is extra so you put the two of them together going to be a good time if nothing else visit. I can't talk. My first concert was slim. Doug so i. Who am i to juvenile all my guy. Send juvenile years ago oakland. Yeah they do this like it was juvenile eat forty and was the only god who is the other big area rapper. Now short short my guy they were all together like it's jairo days what it's called really. I liked that. Yeah and i was like yeah not like jazzy music but music. I actually like so anyway. Safaris like yeah. You should get a massage when you get home. Scabby hell. No has my wife's pregnant and she's gonna say. Give me a massage. It'd be valid points on both sides of correctly detected. but and then you know they're like this is where you know scrappy crappies grown up. 'cause he's like man. You should be having more kids. 'cause i don't wanna be the only one with all these kids and then our friend safari is about i. Our relationship is just now starting to be normal. So i'm gonna get to me right now. Sasha here's my issue with this moment as we. We are talking about this episode out of order. We're telling stories as they come up but let's be very clear throughout the episode. We are getting cuts and of safaris. Very very pregnant wife erica. Who is very very pregnant and throughout the clip. They're interviewing her life. So how how'd you know you're going to tell them. What did you think you were gonna tell it. Why when were you gonna tell them all kinds of stuff so it's like a slow moving train wreck because he's telling yet i'm not.

azam watt jairo Doug oakland Sasha erica
"azam" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

The Babylon Bee

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on The Babylon Bee

"Interest by drone jupiter. To but my. I really don't need glasses. Don't need this. I don't know who is stupider stupider. The guy had the poor the lady in the car thinking that was stupid. All right sir hear your story three right. Oklahoma woman arrested after commenting on. Police departments facebook post concerning shooting. She was involved. In so on wednesday the tulsa felice department posted on facebook that lorraine graves was wanted in connection to the murder of eric graves. Who was shot earlier this year after the facebook post went up. Graves responded by commenting. What's where's the reward money at so she'd come into mama. Ingredients says learning graves. What's where that reward money at. What's where's the reward. -at's where's 'cause if it's greater than the bail money then. She was going to turn a prophet. I thought she was going to start off. Saying what's the reward. Yeah and then. She changed it to backspace. That's usually what i do. Yes she was in a hurry probably than they tracked her down on thursday afternoon and they tracked her down and arrested her north tulsa. But my favorite part of this is if you click on the little linke's sent the She looks in prison full. She looks very happy with how things turned out would be sorry. I'm try keep trying to use your accordion things. I want to show the picture for in the jail cell and then the song that would be playing with that facial expression and can you quick sort of like a sad trombone but kind of like a stinger on a sitcom. She's sitting in the way can you can. You probably probably can't do career suzy. Azam theme foam butternut of. I don't know that. I can just get the photo ready games on comes in so i'm looking at her comment. What's where's the reward money at. It's like she's offended that there wasn't any reward offered for her capture. Is that the ideas. I guess out. What is it worth the original post. They just say anybody knows where. This girl is not award. Money need to commit a bigger crime. That's us thinking she could get it. You're right. she's offended that they weren't offering a bigger like at least something to catch her. Where's the reward money we what. Where's what's what's what where's what's wears you all. Don't forgetting a key part of that grant i. Hey are you guys ready for pregnant. Man emojis. I know i am. They don't look like they're enjoying pregnant. They look like they're like it. Looks like this picture above the picture. The captured could say diarrhea is like a storm. Raging inside you. Then you'll get the guy. He does talking like a giant burrito huge burrito regretted every bit of it be a beer gut emoji. You combine that with toilet emoji enough. Said i regret drinking thirty six pack of keystone light escape atv also gather moustache moustache restraints. So you know. It's a guy tom sell. I don't know it's very strange girls because he has moves to a little bit of moves..

tulsa felice department lorraine graves eric graves facebook north tulsa linke Graves Oklahoma Azam suzy diarrhea tom sell
"azam" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

03:53 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"Was my only cheerleader. I was constantly telling myself this is awesome. You're gonna help people. You're not just doing this to make aprons. Everyone was like. Oh that's so cute. Good luck with your cute apron idea you hear apron you think of a grandma you hear apron you think of something little and i was like this has nothing to do with grandma's or being little. This is about empowering people in professional settings and by the way now. The company is a direct to consumer brand. It's very different but it started like that but in my mind it was always about the attitude. I was delivering to people and so when people shut it down. I just ignored it. I put on my kind of like a horse race horse. I put on my little blinders. And i just kept going at it and i would ignore people on that stuff and i was just working so hard. Focus on that. I didn't have time to listen to the noise. I wasn't wallowing in it. 'cause they needed to be an action so that really helped me get through those first years. The other thing that i really leaned in to was humbling azam. So it's a chapter in the book. And i talk about basically how i would approach people who didn't know who i was didn't really care about what i was doing. How did i get people on board. I was always willing to share and willing to listen so very excited when i was sharing so it was like this urge to tell people something i'm doing like when you're talking to your best friend and you're telling them about your favorite new show that you saw like oh my god you have to see this. It's so good. I'm telling you you need to drop everything. Go home and watch. This show was very different than you. Walking through a mall and getting hustled to buy a hair street ner. And they're like wait. Can i just straighten your hair. Your you repel the person. And so i always thought about it as like well. I'm gonna make things for people. I'm gonna make aprons for people because i'm going to help them. It's going to help them. It's gonna make their restaurant look better their staffing about her. So i always thought about it as a service function. And i was excited to share the so when i would tell people about it i would be like. Oh my god. I just started this thing. It's so cool. We have so many fun colors. I have to show you. I think you'll really like it. And i love for you. Tell me what your thoughts are. I'm still working on the design. So i want to know like what do you think what do you love. What are you hate. And that's the excited to learn part right so excited to share excited to learn and they're actually quite polar opposite because when you want to share something sometimes not willing to listen to other people in here. The thoughts about maybe something. That's not so perfect about your product. So i would sit with a chef and i tell them all the things that i'm working on and then he'd be like yeah but you know what. I love those straps pockets. Don't lay right. Maybe we like fix down. Were what if you add a strap over here and they were basically my focus group without realizing it. I had this free focused group of professional chefs that were michelin star chefs. So that really helped open many doors and it took people being pessimists about what i was doing to true believers and when you get somebody to contribute to something there they have bion so then they wanna see you succeed. 'cause it's infectious. Yeah like your spirit and energy is so infectious it was infectious on watching your interviews on on prepping for episode alone being in front of you and so it makes such a difference because the thing is like whether it's a business or it's just a dream that you have if you don't believe it's possible if you don't believe in that goal in that dream of i want to achieve this. I want to do this. The no one else is going to. And then when that happens negatively comes everyone's wounding you write the like the lift me up. It's warning and then you start to buy into the warnings. That's right that's right and you can't you just. Can't you have to believe so deeply in this thing not fire..

azam
How Octavia Butler Used Science Fiction to Address Social Injustice

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:18 min | 1 year ago

How Octavia Butler Used Science Fiction to Address Social Injustice

"For some science. Fiction is way to escape problems. In the real world for octavia via science. Fiction was away to shine a light on those problems. She used other worlds to examine real human experiences and address issues facing humanity. Her works touch on the environment race. Theory black feminism queer theory and disability studies. She was a pioneer in the development of africa. Future azam octavia had a powerful certainty and drive in her writing career evidenced in the archives of her work at the huntington library she wrote. I shall be bestselling writer. And i will find the way to do this. So be it. See to it. She was right octavia won many awards including the nineteen eighty four hugo award for best short story and hugo award for best novel. Let in nineteen ninety-five. She received a genius grant from the macarthur foundation. Becoming the first science fiction writer to do so with this grant. She was able to buy a house for her mother and herself. In two thousand five octavia was awarded a place in chicago state. University's international black writers hall of fame by that point. Her books had been translated into at least ten languages selling more than one million copies a year later. In two thousand six octavia died after taking a fall in her washington home. She was fifty eight years old. Since her death octavia butler's writing has become even more popular. Her work is featured on college campuses and there are plans for some of her stories to be adapted for film and television one of her books parable of the sower feels particularly prescient. Set in the twenty twenties. Parable of the sower is based in a world that's largely collapsed due to climate change class inequality in corporate greed. In her work octavia exposed flaws of this world by creating others her uncanny ability to see understand and reveal deep-seated problems continues to inspire and provoke readers today

Octavia Azam Octavia Huntington Library Hugo Award Macarthur Foundation Octavia Butler Africa Chicago Washington
"azam" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

Inquiring Minds

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"azam" Discussed on Inquiring Minds

"Even though we're very good friends. I have a lot of respect to her interest intellect. I think she's wrong. But this being santa whistle was actually a call there on motion paper that we did because what we could agree on is the fact that so. Let me explain the debate here. I think she has produced very strong evidence that they facial manifestations of emotions possibly are not innate and possibly are not universal. I think this evidence is convincing. It's another question to ask our emotions as effective categories in age and this does not necessarily require to say anything about facial expressions of emotion. Dr no reason to believe that the two are one and the same and in fact one one wonders why. It's the case that in a lot of the effective science literature people have almost been printing them as one in the same inasmuch that the evidence for say universality of emotions cross culturally has been gleaned almost exclusively from looking at whether people recognize facial emotions whereas i don't know that it would be very convenient if they do and it looks like possibly they don't but that does not negate the possibility that emotions as effective computations are possibly innate so when i say it's not as that in my experiments ask people about recognizing facial expressions of emotions. So would you know. Infants recognize happy faces versus angry faces as such. It's very different from asking whether the emotions as categories are in need. I think there's a good reason for white. People equate emotions with their bodily expressions essential. Azam tells us exactly the answer because when we think about the witness we are prime to anchor. Whatever is in it in the body so where prime to you to search in the face for instance externally in we tend to equate emotions and their facial. Manifestations as if it were wanting the same and i. I don't see why that should be the case. So looking at the signs. Certainly with respect to facial expression of emotions. They probably are not innate. Although this is still debated but i think we've solely we can assume that's the case lay people do assume that facial expressions of emotions are innate ideas. Here lay people saying no.

Azam
Ellen Bennett: Are You Creating a Product People Actually Want?

The EntreLeadership Podcast

02:25 min | 1 year ago

Ellen Bennett: Are You Creating a Product People Actually Want?

"Up. I we've got our conversation with ellen. She got her start by saying we're going to make the best aprons ever which was a bold move considering she didn't even have a business. Yeah i have. I had a passion about it. I was needing it myself. So is very much a situation where i wanted to fix the problem i had and i was also working at two of the best restaurants in. La and their uniforms were terrible like they were paper apron. They didn't fit well. Nothing was practical about it and yet it was such a commodity like nobody thought to make it better. And i wanted to make a better and so i started with this dream or kind of north star which was make the best apron that there can be full stop period. I wasn't thinking about. Is this going to be wholesale is this can to be retailed. Dita a be. None of that was part of the equation. I was simply like obsessive on the idea of making something that worked. And i'm actually really glad that i started it that way because it helped me focus on what was important which to your point is fantastic. Product like fantastic product lifts all ships if you will if you have a great product. You're going to be successful if you're fixing a problem but if you have great marketing and not agree product like little harder to make it happen out there. Great marketing will just make a bad product fail faster. And i love that idea. You've got to start with a great product and when you first started You had what you call a grit a willingness to fail in the courage to stare errors in the i. I love that. There's a theme and all of that. So tell me how all of that connects when it comes to creating great product absolutely similar to your to your first point on the humble azam. I was always willing to talk to people but also willing to learn. That's my formula for humble enthusiasm and when you think about success it's includes a lot of failure and the failure part are where you learn the most so every time i delivered an order. That wasn't perfect. I learned something. And i was getting something from it and my willingness to stare errors in the i helped the evolution of the product because instead of ignoring people in saying no. It's not actually. It's on you like you probably just didn't wash it right. I would say you're right. We're so sorry about that. we will take it back. We'll fix it and it made all the

Ellen Dita LA Azam
Fabrigasm, a Virtual Experience for Lovers of African Textiles

Stitch Please

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Fabrigasm, a Virtual Experience for Lovers of African Textiles

"Welcome lisa back to the program. Negative good to be back. I am so so glad for us to be having this conversation today. So listen let's start with talking about fabric azam. Where did the idea for that concept. Come from it actually started with this little hobby of when i have a really good picture like my friend. I'll make up a fake like fake magazine cover and magazine. Journalism was my favorite class. At t when i would when i studied marketing many many years ago so i was always into the whole magazine thing so when i get a picture say but like i said a friend or whatever i would convert it into magazine cover put like big titles. Just kind of fun thing like coming up with the title of the magazine. This goes back years like a little hobby so with a friend. I did one for her because she had a whole gardening. You know whatever was and thinking about the fabric. And i thought about fabric azam and we'd use that word loosely back and forth just like oh beautiful fabric. You have a fabric gazza Yes we have kinda get it when they hear people you know. Oh yes yes that was wonderful beautiful fabric a fabric azam well and it's the feeling that you get. Is that like your heart races. A little bit going to become and you. Just it's a fabric azam. I mean i'm not sure that really needs that is that is all it needs lutely love that i love that so it seems to be motivated by play and happiness right because you were playing around with the idea. Magazine covers because that that was a way to that was like one of your favorite classes at the fashion institute and it was also a way to preserve memory. So if your friend you and your friend had a great photograph or something and you you put it when you put it in this almost like a magazine tribute. It's a way to preserve an honor that memory. And then it's just really fun to see and i have had fabric azam's and i think that many people who are listening to this podcast today will have. We'll have had them as well because it just turns to absolute session. That's the reason that. I have so much in my him collection because i developed very strong feelings about

Azam Lisa Fashion Institute
There is a Surge Of Coronavirus Deaths in Mexico

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:21 min | 2 years ago

There is a Surge Of Coronavirus Deaths in Mexico

"New data reveal a surge of cova deaths in mexico. The country has officially confirmed more than two million cases. An almost one hundred eighty thousand deaths from the corona virus but mortality rates. Tell an even more grim tale over the past year deaths were fifty two percent higher than in previous years. According to the financial times that puts mexico's rate of excess deaths much higher than that of countries such as america and brazil assembled woman to stay lot yet earlier this month. Mexico's president andres manuel. Lopez obrador widely known as anglo said. We are living in a stellar moment. The kovic spike is far from the country's only problem poverty. Corruption and crime are all on the rise but polls indicate that two years into amyloid term. Most mexicans are willing to give him more time. Mexico's president is incredibly popular. Sir burke is our mexico bureau chief he wanted on slide in two thousand eighteen and he still has approval ratings that most other leaders would be extremely jealous off at sixty two percent as it stands and that's all in spite of what looks like a very good handling of most things most obviously at the moment the pandemic. What do you mean by that. Mexico is a terrible record for covert hospitals are full and oxygen tanks in short supply. It's done very few tests for covid. It hasn't provided very much financial support tool for people who are suffering or being asked to stay home not to work the vaccination which is one sort of bright spot potentially insofar as mexico has lined up enough vaccines to cover its population. But it's a very very slow start. That might be picking up now. But otherwise there talks of ten years to get to seventy five percent of the population being vaccinated. I'm currently this has been a problem again from the top. So i'm low has completely downplayed the importance of the pandemic. He has refused to wear a face mask apart from wants when he flew in an airplane to go to the united states and he got covid himself the stars of this year and he reappeared and everyone thought well. Maybe he'll have changed his mind after this. But he reiterated again that he wouldn't be wearing a face mask so in the face of that pandemic response on wires his popularity still so high so he had this amazing vision for mexico in eighteen. Which is why he won with a landslide. He said. I'm going to do a fourth transformation. These big bold plan to make the country fairer and more equitable ending corruption and crime. And making sure there was economic growth where the gains were fairly distributed so that poor people go rich. The reality is slightly different from the vision so far in the two and a bit years. He's been in power. He's been undoing. The reforms of previous presidents and dismantling that system throwing out the baby with the bath water you could say. And then his new initiatives mainly they seem to fail to solve the problems that they put two and then a of third element is that he's really concentrated power in the presidency and some people say that they get things done and other people think they're more evil intentions behind that well. Let's come back to the throwing the baby out with the bathwater part. What's he'd been doing. In terms of reform he abolished prosper. Which was a very sort of lauded conditional cash transfer program for the poor he also reversed education. Reform was much more meritocratic assessment of teachers. A big one at the moment is he's trying to reverse bit by bit and opening of the energy market. That happened in two thousand thirteen so it was open to private and foreign enterprises which make electricity cheaper and greener on current. Neither congress is debating a bill which would favor cfe which is state owned electricity provider. So they're actually go first into the grid. As opposed to the cheaper electric which is often green provided by private companies. This would obviously raise prices and deti energy but it could also breach the. Us mexico canada agreement. Which is the north american free trade pact to replace after another sort of big thing has been getting rid of or proposing get rid of a lot of the autonomous agencies such as the freedom of information agency all these ones keep checks on the government and what it's doing so well he's been tearing all that down. What's he been building up. Will you say his own initiatives. Don't do what they should. He's very dedicated to fiscal discipline. That's a good thing especially in a so-called left leaning president it's also become very counter productive during the pandemic. The imf is telling mexico to spend more so far it's only spent nine point seven percents of gdp on extra efforts during the pandemic and more needs to be done and some people think this is going to need to scarring that there's going to be permanent drop in output caused by loss of jobs and businesses so the recovery is going to be much much slower in mexico than elsewhere. He's also splashed out on bizarre old-economy projects such as pouring money. Pex the world's most indebted oil company. And then he's putting eight billion dollars into a refinery at the time when no other country is building refineries and it's not clear what economic return that will be from that and you mentioned the big transformative plan was in part about ending endemic corruption and crime. How's that been going. Well either jason. That was point. Four percent dip in murders last year and he proclaimed this dip as a very significant success. But that's after a rise the before and frankly during the pandemic you'd expect it to have dropped them. In in other countries across latin america that also suffer high levels of violence that has been the case he also rejected the previous government's tactic of killing and capturing crime kingpins because led to a splintering of gangs. And you might be worth rejecting that. But there's no alternative puts in place. So i think his vision is that you alleviate poverty and crime goes down. That might happen in the long term but it does nothing to sort out the short term problem the problem of the current chapel as opposed to the ones who are still only three years old on corruption. As you could say he's set a good example so has been good political rhetoric. The stiffer penalties on bribe-taking for bureaucrats. But he's unless strengthen the institutions to carry that ford again it's more rhetoric than actual institutional change or heft. The national anticorruption prosecutors overwhelmed with cases and one government agency suggests that the number of acts of corruption actually rose by nineteen percent between two thousand seventeen and two thousand nineteen. It is as you say not a big list of happy news here. I mean when will that's ring down to the electorate. I mean how long we'll mexicans continue to support him for his failures because he really has persuaded a lot of people that he's like them and cares about the he's very popular because of who he is and his message rather than necessarily what he does. The opposition is seen as corrupt on what came before him was horrifically corrupt. And so he's seen the best of a bad bunch by a loss of people. But you know here's a classic populace and a lot of elite azam Against him they see him as a mexican version of hugo chavez. Which i think is a little bit of an exaggeration. But there's this big divides on the mix of policy failure. I'm power grabbing is is worrying.

Mexico Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador Sir Burke United States Anglo Brazil IMF Congress Canada Latin America Jason Ford
The History Of Exorcism

Oh No Ross and Carrie

05:58 min | 2 years ago

The History Of Exorcism

"Tony us and carry the show where we don't just report on fringe science spirituality and claims of the paranormal. We take part ourselves. Yup when they make the claims we show up so you don't have to carry poppy and i'm becoming an exorcist me to a and so can you at the international school system bernadette dad too. That's my for everything now. Oh are you willing to give it to bob larsen. I'm willing to rent it to bob larson. Yeah you're welcome bob. Yeah bobo what is it that. Let's see your outing a little bit of a syncopation bad about up. But i'm different. Now you repeat all right. We'll know is asking myself if that was different from what you did. I don't know i anyway. it's beautiful. Thank you and we have taken. The course work to become exercises. We've told you a little bit about it in our previous episodes but now we're in deep dive mode. Yeah man. let's get into the history of exercises so put on your exorcism hat. Your student hat last time we left off at the end of level. One course one. I know big cliffhanger yes so. Let's talk about tanger absolutely. Let's talk about christian and pre christian exorcism. Okay well this is module two of level one apprentice level. Oh okay you're making the sound like a very long journey of the exorcist. They have all these like sort of sub descriptions. When you get in there it's not very easily delineated. Your but yes so. You're talking about macho to within level one to be fair level. One is synonymous with the apprentice level. Correct so there's going to be ten modules. And as i was telling you earlier today all ten modules basically amount to exercise been around a long time. It's not a new thing. I'm bob larsen. Just summed it all up for our show for show. Thank you so much. So they're christian and pre christian extra schism part is about how there were indeed exorcisms before jesus even right before. There were such things as christians. So don't be thinking that exorcism is just this new up start phenomenon or that. Bob invented So he let us know that egypt. Persians canaanites all had x.'s rituals. Yes mostly they were incantations or enchantment. There's always going to be kind of a rough line around exorcism as posession versus exorcism as occurs. That's influencing you or maybe laid upon an object so there's kind of squishy lines around all of this. I wonder if he would acknowledge that. Sometimes people did them for health ailments that we would now just acknowledge our health elements. Yes yes. yeah. I think bob's pretty weird that little bit of god of the gaps where god when used to explain things that we just don't understand yet like lightning for example like when a lot of churches and the late seventeen hundred started installing lightning rods. A lot of people were upset. Like oh well this is going to subvert. The will of god share so then when science steps in and explains that oh actually charged particles in quick energy transfer. And hey look you know you can actually take control of that aspect of weather. Then god stops being used as an explanation right. That's what i mean. When i say god of the gaps oh god gets increasingly small and one's world view if one defines god based on what we don't know the more we know the less god is invoked to explain. They should make that at the. Bottom of the nbc. The more you know you need to invokes to explain what are bypass about about so. While bob didn't used that terminology. I think he realizes yeah. Ok some things now. We do explain with medical science or just an understanding of the natural world and very late in this game hill. Really get into mental health issues. That definitely although i think he'd draw a hardline around anything that happened. During the jesus years everything jesus healed. It was whatever she said it was the bible. Says you're walking on water. You turned water into wine or something else involving water then. Yeah that was legit because the bible is absolutely correct about everything i was gonna say. Is there any area where. Bob is not a scriptural literalist. Oh good question you know. I feel like that is always hard to define. Because some people say they are and then as he listened to them describe their beliefs. But if you look through a certain lens you'll see that at the time they were encoding. They're under yeah virgin actually There's gonna be all kinds of ringing. But i feel for the most part bob pretty literal. Yeah he doesn't have to do a lot of back flipping to defend his literal biblical azam. So one thing. He said that i thought was interesting. Is basically everybody alive. During that time was an exorcist like it was kind of taken for granted. Something anybody could do if there are spirits in this world you talk to the spirits right being and when you live in that world where everything around you is kind of controlled by the whims of the gods and the demons. You have to deal with them and placate them. So you mentioned in ancient babylon you had priests like creating a clay figure of a demon and then smashing it. In hinduism you had demons and demigods. Who were understood to attack living beings in greece. You had the oracle of delphi and they were supposedly possessed to tell the future Andy pointed to other which and shamans and various cultures that have had the equivalent of these beliefs

Bob Larsen Bob Larson BOB Bobo Bernadette Tony Egypt NBC Azam Bible Delphi Greece Andy
Republicans see bright spot in voter registration push

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Republicans see bright spot in voter registration push

"Democrat Joe Biden may be leading in most presidential polls but Republicans are pulling ahead in new voter registrations Republican Party leaders are celebrating their progress in signing up voters in key battleground states like Florida Pennsylvania Arizona and others Democrats appear to have hit a stumbling block with the decision to scale back in person voter registration drives during the pandemic with events like street festivals in college gatherings canceled the Brennan center for justice says registrations are thirty eight percent lower than they were during the comparable period in twenty sixteen and that disproportionately hurts young urban and minority voters a trump campaign director says for them the best thing for voter registration isn't doozy Azam for a candid it and the infrastructure Jackie Quinn Washington

Joe Biden Arizona Director Azam Jackie Quinn Washington Republican Party Florida Pennsylvania Brennan Center For Justice
"Framing a Different World" Week

Feedback with EarBuds

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"Framing a Different World" Week

"This week's theme comes to us from Liam Dodd and is called framing a different world. Here's why Liam chose this theme. He says. My Name's Leeann Dodd. Theme Cherries is framing a different world. A chose this theme because I think all of us can benefit for hearing from those of unique expertise or experience is able to provide a new ones new perspective on the way we drive society with each other or just very peaceful. And here are the episodes chosen by Liam for the team along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode of the week comes to us from the Ezra Klein show and it's called Contra points on taking the trolls. Seriously it's eighty one minutes long. Here's the description. Youtube is weird. Tomorrow's politics are happening today. Next episode comes from it could happen here and is called the second American civil war. It's forty eight minutes long. Are you worried about the possibility of the second American civil war in episode one of it could happen here Robert Explains why 2016 was the first time he started to seriously worry about. The next episode comes to us from Length Uzi Azam and is called sounds. You can't hear babies, accents and phonemes. It's nine minutes long. Why does it always sound slightly off when someone tries to imitate your accent why do tiny children learning your second language already sound better than you even though you've been learning at longer than they've been alive what does it mean for there to be sounds you can't hear. The next episode comes to us from the dream podcast and his called magnets. How do they work? It's forty one minutes long. Here's the description. The road to wellness is paved with particles and protons. And the last episode of the week comes to us from Fox mulder is a maniac and his called synergy. It's forty nine minutes long. Oh boy it's the one where a cosmic planetary alignment turns agent moulder into a crazed sex offender. Don't miss this episode. Those are the episodes chosen by Liam. For this week's theme framing a different world.

Liam Leeann Dodd Ezra Klein Uzi Azam Youtube Fox Mulder Robert
How to 10x Conversions on Your Order Form

Marketing School

03:27 min | 2 years ago

How to 10x Conversions on Your Order Form

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today or go to talk about how to ten x conversions on your order form. So what do we mean by order for him first and foremost Neil order form sting bite your checkout process whether you're selling ecommerce products or even assassin description it doesn't matter what you're selling your order form isn't where someone Azam's their car or picks a plan if you're in software it's more. So they're on the page where they're putting in their credit card details that paid they're clicking charge me or start my free trial or that page when they're cooking on complete order a complete checkout whatever it may be that's. What we mean by order form. So the first recommendation I have for you, I had a guy on the podcast last week. His name is guy has is his guy. He runs a company called Intel Mayes and he was just telling me across his platform, their personalization platform. They do a lot more than that but overall forty, six percent lift in conversions and what they do. For example, let's say you're trying to buy a dress and Yulon order form. So for example, let's Neil. Nine both women. All right. Maybe I'm Chinese and they think I like red dresses or whatever I just making things up right now but the keeping this at your persona and they'll be like, hey, that. Just looks really good on you or maybe that just looks beautiful on your right little language like that I'm making it super simple right now but they can hyper optimized for each person. The key takeaway here's you need US televised. That's an extreme example where if you have a lot of money you spend on that but if you're able to personalise on the order form, you are able to lift conversions even a little bit. I'm just giving an extreme example and then the other thing you can do all the little small tweaks from testimonials to having logos to testing the copy like start my free trial or anything benefit based like if I sell a premium version uber suggests. I. May End up trying out call to actions I get started or more. So related to the product like grow my traffic or boost my rankings, things like that. So little tweaks what you'll end up finding as they can really drastically make a big difference in your conversions if you add them up and those on the free trial badges, money back guarantee badges if you add a lot of them up and you can check out just look at the big companies that have checkout pages or order forms look at some of the things that they include you get ideas from there. You can also get a lot of ideas from conversion accelerate the excel dot com as well as conversion rate experts. And one other thing you can do, you can use a tool like often monster you can put an exit pop up on the order form page. So if they're about to abandoned while you might as well try to pick that abandoned up because they're about to leave. So simple enough to do one key thing is I think with a lot of pages you start to see a lot of bloat on one sites 'cause you're listening. To this podcast, we're always talking about new tools and a lot of these tools require you to add pixels of the site but that bogs down you want to make sure your checkout page is not bogging people down as if it's really slow as bad experience for people, they are gonNA leave just because you have all the bells and whistles it's good for you but not necessarily good for conversions at the end of the day. And look at your competitor is the ones that are also begging that'll give ideas of what's working for them on their order foams. Well, yeah. Just to go a little deeper on the conversion xl recommendation for Neil. So they actually have a lot of examples of order

Neil Patel Azam Marketing School Intel Mayes Eric Su Yulon
What It Was Like to Interview Wil Williams

Inside Podcasting

05:24 min | 2 years ago

What It Was Like to Interview Wil Williams

"Welcome to inside podcasting the show in which creators discuss their craft I'm your host Sky Pillsbury? This is a post show episode in which I will speak with a special guest about last week's interview. If you haven't heard that episode in which I talked to podcast, critic and Creator Will Williams, I recommend you go back and listen to that first, and then come back and listen to the post show. Today my guess is Ariel Nissenbaum Latte. Welcome to the show aerial. I am excited to be here. Thank you so much for having me. You texted me asking to be on the show. I responded within ten seconds. Is that right you did did it was so sweet? And I could feel your enthusiasm Azam coming through my phone. I'm so glad an awesome moment. You never know like Don't really have the bandwidth or Don't have the bandwidth down. Nice so you do like one hundred different things in podcasting and so I'd love for you to introduce yourself then. Maybe you can also share with our listeners where you are right now. Yes, says it's unusual. Place I'll do that first so that the people know why. There are some strange sounds going on, so currently I, am at a farm in two harbors Minnesota. Minnesota, which is somewhere near Duluth, which is on Lake Superior, it is beautiful here I'm on a farm because I'm wolfing, which stands for a worldwide organization of organic farming I'm on my way across the US on a road trip and I thought this would be a fun stop, so if you hear chickens or pigs or dogs or cats or children that what's going on. This makes it so much more impressive that you said. Yes, excitedly to my invitation to come on this show. So I started ear. Buds podcast collective, which is a weekly email that sends a theme and five podcast episodes on that theme. Each week is curated by different person I also run a podcast. A companion to that newsletter called feedback with earbud sort of similar to what you do. Sky Inside podcasting newsletter and podcast, and then I also run another podcast called counter programming Sheron an Arielle. It's a distraction casts started during covid nineteen, and we talk about anything having to do with the word count or counter, so Count Dracula step counters, kitchen counters, anything you can imagine. We're also taking suggestions. I also work for cast box. Do Marketing and business development for them? They're podcast APP and then I help with the outlier podcast festival, and then I do anything that pops up. That has to do with podcasts because I love podcasts. It is very very impressive aerial. I'm so glad that you introduced yourself. Because I'm not sure I would have remembered everything so much, so I will also add on the sound front that the city that I live in chose today to pave our street, and so in addition to sounds of cows and pigs and children on areas, and you might hear on my end paving machines, going up and down and beeping, and doing all manner of things just really like twenty feet away from me, although it sounds pretty quiet at the moment, good, Luxemburgo is in charge of editing this. Exactly okay well, let's get to it We are here to talk about last week's show aerial. What? What did you think of last week's show yes? Oh, I know, will for a long time on twitter, and on other social media platforms, so to hear will chat about her work was really enlightening I. Have to admit that I am not the biggest consumer of audio drama slash audio fiction, and so listening to will talk about it was I opening for. For me I learned a lot, and then I learned a lot through you as well, and I imagine it was kind of some new materials you is that right absolutely and I mean that's one of the reasons. I I wanted to talk to her. Was that like you? I haven't listened to as much fiction, but also I think that someone who's making a fiction podcast has a really different the they're coming from a different creative place in some way. And there's obviously other things that are involved casting and you know working with actors is a completely different ballgame, so I was really excited to talk to her. For for that reason as as well as others mean actually I'll just go ahead and say it another reason why I was. Fascinated by what she was doing. Was that like me? She writes about podcast and. You know like Kerr. I decided to take the plunge and make a podcast and when you're writing about them there is this funny thing where you feel like. Is this supposed to sound like no what I'm doing or am I gonNA? Make giant mistake. And there's a little bit of risk I think with her situation. It's more risky than just doing an interview. Show that require scripts and. Things of that nature, but it was still I could still identify with her feelings of. This is a little risky. This is sort of putting myself out there in a way that I haven't put my out myself out there before and so. I felt a kinship with that and was excited to have her on the show for that

Minnesota Azam Kerr Sky Pillsbury Ariel Nissenbaum Will Williams Twitter Lake Superior Duluth United States Luxemburgo
He Could Go All.. the Way!

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

06:16 min | 2 years ago

He Could Go All.. the Way!

"Hello and welcome to misinformation Trivia podcast for ladies, Jesse Love Goo Trivia and stick annoying teams as we are your hosts I'm Lauren and I'm Julia Hey Joel High Lord. We're we're still in pandemic mode while we're recording this. Yup We're recording a bunch ahead of time, so you know who knows where we are when this comes out, but. Yeah so in recent weeks in in our current time line where we are right now. It seems that the only like sports thing that has happened in the last I. Don't know four to six months. NFL Draft Oh. People were so excited for the draft. It was finally sports thing is. That is live that we can watch. That means something, and it was just so much like it was basically like zoom screens, and they would show like this. Is this draft persons at their house in this draft person at their house and you know. Maybe they got the call, and then they stood up and cheered, and they were on the camera, and that was like people were so excited, just three. Sports. Just want the, and it's not even playing sports show Yeah Rama's of eventually. Yes, going to be able to play sports. Yes, and I talked with our friend Tara Shout Tara. The other day and she was like I'm so excited I'm so excited and looking forward to tonight. And I was like why she said because the bills are gonNA. Release the schedule for the fall. I was like Oh my God so. Late. So I'm trying to do my best to help. Bring some more sports related content to fill that D- to fill Azam because clearly there. Actually I was inspired from a couple of weeks ago and we talked with Father Brad. And he was talking about the new. Orleans Saints, an this. This one play at our liens superdome that really re revived the city Yup and it really made me think and so today we're doing. He could go all the way. This episode is on famous plays in football history I love this. This is great sell. The things going to be talking about they do come up. Trivia they are frequent references, I know that there's a lot of people out there that don't like sports, and then you go great a sports ball question by up like guys. It's fine. It's fine to like pop culture. Yeah, I like sports. It's fine to be a nerd. Whatever like whatever Ya is not a high Falutin. Thing the way that some o pretend that it is and we don't pretend that it's. You know. Oh, my Gosh! No, it's not sit. Nothing is sacred in trivial so anyway. Little Tangent, no, it's totally and you know what not for nothing I'm not somebody who watches sports on a regular basis, but I can appreciate it because you know what sports is just storytelling. It's another version of storytelling. It's a war. It's a battle. It's a battle of wits. It's a battle of strategies. It can be really engaging in. into thread to have in common with people to say like it's uniting about Buffalo. Bills Fan. You're all high liven rock down the street. Same thing like if I'm Pittsburgh and I. Somebody runs through a stop sign and I go to yell at them, but I see that they're stealing. I much less likely to flip out so. Wow, that's something I learned about you actually. Good I'll. Sure to keep that. It's something we all have in common common thread. ETC, so the thing is when you talk about. They come up a trivia. They are commonly referenced There are some of these things have had like big impacts on the sports, world and broadcasting, and that kind of thing, so oh, yeah. We're GONNA stay with the NFL. And I'M GONNA. Go in chronological order so the first one I'm talking about is called the Heidi game. This is November seventeenth, nineteen, sixty eight, and it was the New York jets versus the Oakland Raiders so. Kind of starts out your run of the mill Sunday. Football game between two rival teams, the jets and the raiders it ends up being notable because of its very exciting finish. Oakland ended up scoring two touchdowns in the final minute of the game to win the game, but the game got its name for a decision made by the Games television broadcaster NBC to break away from its coverage of the game, the East Coast to instead broadcast the television debut of the film Heidi causing many years to miss the raiders comeback

Orleans Saints Brad NFL Oakland Raiders Football Jets Lauren Tara Oakland Azam Bills Heidi Buffalo Pittsburgh NBC East Coast
US consumer spending sinks by record 13.6% in face of virus

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:52 min | 2 years ago

US consumer spending sinks by record 13.6% in face of virus

"Aniela let me start with you and With the caveat that we're GONNA have Nancy Marshall Genzer here in a minute talking about personal income. I want to get your take as the trained economist in the room on the on the thirteen point something percent drop in consumer spending in the past month and I want you to frame it in terms of well. Consumers are basically this entire economy. Now what do we do right? The consumers are the engine of growth for the economy but the consumer has been staying at home. Many of us are under lockdown orders. That are just now starting to ease and so what we've seen. Is this phased in transition from a near lockdown of the national economy in April to a phase reopening That's happening in stages in so consumer spending is under the weight of that lockdown in terms of. Well there's nothing to spend our money on besides basic goods But also Some fear about re reengaging with the economy without social distancing protection and so the key to the recovery will be that consumers feel healthy both physically and financially to get back to spending at their normal levels. And we're GONNA talk about that a little bit with with Marshall Genzer Minute Gina As sort of along those same lines Fisher J. Paul did a thing today with Ellen blinder at Princeton Sort of a Q. And a. It was. It was a very nice little chat with those guys who've obviously known each other forever. But one of the things Alan blinder said. He's a professor of economics at Princeton. He said look. You guys are crossing some red lines in this crisis and Powell came back and said. Yeah you know what? I'm okay with that because this is different. I thought that was a remarkable thing for the guy running the American economy to say remarkable. You know basically said emergency unlike anything we've ever seen before if we didn't cross the red lines we'd have to explain ourselves to the American people and say why. Why didn't you do everything you possibly could do to save. The enemy was a remarkable statement. I think it's it's really interesting coming from pal too because he has historically been particularly concerned about crossing. Some of the red lines at the Fed has crossed one of them for example is fine municipal debt. You know. That's that's something Derek opt to start doing. It's something that he's been asked about four in asked he was always very quick to say. That's a lie. Don't Cross picking winners and losers This crisis Bonilla's so Senate Majority Leader Mitch. Mcconnell said today just sort of on those along those lines of this being you know an unprecedented crisis senator. Mcconnell said today you know the next relief bill whenever it comes Is probably going to be the last one you buy that now. Not at all because we're still in the early transition of the of the economy. The second quarter is supposed to bear the brunt of the economic toll of covid nineteen remember. We've already seen a five percent decline and US GDP just on basis of two weeks of a shutdown in late March. So imagine what the second quarter is going to look like and you know. Much of the stimulus has come at a time when people can't spend because they're at stale they're staying at home so I expect that there will be more stimulus. We may see some some green shoots of recovery in the second half and it's likely that we will but that's going to be in the midst of an uptick in bankruptcy says firms struggle to make this transition and some longer term effects in terms of the forty million people who are now seeking or have Unemployment benefit so. There's a long red to recovery and I don't think we get it. We get out of a relief effort from the from the government that quickly so junior. You did a piece of honestly and I apologize. I don't remember if it was today or yesterday about the shape of this recovery in the line stuck with me is v stands for very unlikely which I kinda love. Let's riff on that. Green shoots thing What do you see out there that gives you hope if anything right so I think if there's one hopeful take away from that road it's that we're not in for an out so it's very unlikely the growth just fell off a cliff and it's just gonNa stay low forever and that's it because what we're seeing is that activity is picking up in an starting at certain improve as we kind of get used to living in this world at a one thing that's important to note? Is that activities picking up in places that have reopened not really markedly different way than it is in places that have reopened more fully at While to sign of green shoots. I think it's also reason to be modest in our expectations. What's going to happen? As we reopen doesn't seem like he blurts pouring back into their lives with unbounded doozy Azam. Here nearly you by that. And what green shoot do you like it if any well I? I think it's the preconditions that we were. In prior to the pandemic. It's important to remember. This is a a biologically triggered downturn that the economy wasn't broken Going into the outbreak in the pandemic and so there are several things that were already in place like a healthy banking system that can support some pretty intense and aggressive fed action through the banking system. That wasn't the case in during the financial crisis the banks were the problem. We've also seen consumers have relatively healthier balance-sheets than they did during the financial crisis in terms of them out of debt relative to their income. So some of those conditions will help with the economic toll. But right it's going to be. I think a slower road than a V. shape And it's going to be based on biological and medical advancements not just reopening alone

Mcconnell Nancy Marshall Genzer Alan Blinder Princeton Sort FED Marshall Genzer Ellen Blinder United States Professor Of Economics Covid Powell Princeton Derek Senate Bonilla Fisher J. Paul Senator
Using Nature and Animals to Manage Anxiety

The Psych Central Show

07:03 min | 2 years ago

Using Nature and Animals to Manage Anxiety

"Richard. It's great to have you. A lot has been talked about the connection between mental health and nature mental health and animals. And I kind of want to start off in this place. I'm a big fan of social media loved or hated. It's probably here to stay and one of the things that I often see on social. Media's this meam that says the best antidepressant is a walk in nature and I know that you don't feel that nature replaces medical science. But you do feel that a walk in nature has real real support and real help for people who are suffering from depression. Can you talk about that for a moment? And that's new. When I wrote last child in the Woods College in two thousand five. This was ignored the impact of the natural world on human wellbeing on on health on cognitive functioning all of that pitted been in basically ignored and I could find maybe sixty studies because many of them were about the growing disconnect between children and they're for adults to and nature and some of the some of those studies dealt with the benefits and some of those studies with mental health and physical health. That is a drop in the bucket. Compared to how much money is spent researching just about everything else and it struck me that something. So large as the impact of the natural world experience on human health and wellbeing have been ignored. How could that be and as I looked into it? I was working with some neuro scientists. Them they were studying brain architecture development and young children and they were looking at all kinds of things and how that affected brain architecture development everything from parent child attachment to add daycare too dangerous neighborhoods in all of that and those things they were. Aim literally shapes the brain. You Early Childhood and I asked them on. Have you ever thought about how the natural world helped shape the brain young children experiences actual contact with the natural world? And they look at you with a blank face and they said what's nature and I understand that that science has difficult time defining nature. But you know I said to the neuroscientist. This isn't rocket science or and it isn't brain surgery. Come up with a hypothesis and tested hundred. Twenty trees pray or whatever. They still had trouble so I decided that was one of the reasons why this was so under. Studied is the blind spot in science about nature the rest of nature which we are part the second reason. Where does the research money come from? What till can you manufacturer? What thing can you commercialize out of that? Now there are some things I mean parks and outdoor hiking organizations things like that. There are some but for the most part people don't think about cert- certainly funders. Don't think about this as something that they can get something out of by funding. That's changing today. If you go to the chill nature network which you mentioned your introduction. We have a research library here that we built and it is for anybody in the world is free. And there are now probably. It's just tipped over one thousand studies. We have abstracts for him links to the original studies when they're available so it's gone from about sixty two over a thousand in about fourteen years after not existing before. I think that it's interesting. That one of the things you said and this really plays to the pessimist in me is. We don't want to tell people to go for walks because there's no funding for it and you can't make money it you know. We can't prescribe one. Walk a day or hug your dog every day that that's not something that you can fill at the pharmacy and this is kind of cancer. Balanced against the medication is important. Look at the advances that we've made with cancer by coming up with better treatments etc but I would even argue that taking somebody who is suffering from cancer and completely isolating them taking away their friends their support systems their animals and even a window would put them in more of a bad way than they already are. And I think that's what you're saying and you've talked about in your work. How animal assisted therapy is becoming one of the biggest healthcare trends and I don't think that's a bad thing but you also talk about the controversy surrounding it and then you back it up with science. Can you talk about animal? Assisted therapy for a moment. Because I I just find it absolutely fascinating. That people wouldn't respond to this favorably but I also understand that this is our culture. Everything is good and everything is bad seemingly at the same time I think it's more nuance than that. I think that most people understand that their dog helps them. You know most people get get it at this level and in terms of organized animals therapy whether it's dogs or or wine therapy with horses or going outside and connecting with wild animals. No matter what that is people necessarily understand that it's the science is coming now and the science is really interesting though that some of it is controversial but nobody. His watched a kid with disabilities in an equine therapy. A Horse therapy course assisted therapy. Setting cannot be not moved. It's very moving to watch this. One person who works in this field told me that her mother was bringing her child who is autistic to animal assisted therapy sessions which involved horses and he would ride horses with a helmet and somebody would lead the horse and he was. I think about nine years old and he had not talked ever and one day when they didn't go when they were supposed to to the horse. Therapy Her son walked into the living room and said there were horse. First Time she had heard him say a word so there are moving stories like that I talk about a woman another woman who is on the autism spectrum and she tells quite a moving story about not only how her service whose name is Cobo has her but how she has learned to help Cobo using some of the same techniques to Kobo. Us to help her so often. What is occurring is a kind of mutual. Azam is not one way. I don't want it to be seen as just what we get out of our relationship with other animals my promote something in the book called the reciprocity principle which basically holds it for every bit a healing that they give us hamels whether they are domestic or wild animals. Give us we need to give back to them. The same we need to protect them as they protect us.

Richard. It Cobo Woods College Azam Hamels Kobo
Trump: COVID-19 task force not dismantling, just refocusing

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 2 years ago

Trump: COVID-19 task force not dismantling, just refocusing

"As he tries to balance and doozy Azam for re opening the nation with the reality of rising virus infection rates president trump has reversed course on plans to wind down his coronavirus task force it's already been meeting less frequently than before the president acknowledges his administration suggested yesterday that the task force might end by Memorial Day did not go over well I had no idea how popular the task force is suggesting its focus will shift toward rebooting the economy and developing a vaccine the flip was emblematic of an administration struggling with competing priorities averting more death and economic suffering former CDC chief Thomas Frieden told a house panel this morning the virus fight is just starting it will be tragically at least one hundred thousand deaths from code by the end of this month Sager Meg Downie Washington

Azam Donald Trump President Trump Thomas Frieden Sager Meg Downie Washington CDC
Public Enemy Fire Flavor Flav After Bernie Sanders Rally Spat

Dan O'Donnell

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Public Enemy Fire Flavor Flav After Bernie Sanders Rally Spat

"Well traditional media takes this into Z. Azam for Bernie Sanders online takes the enthusiasm at rallies when they're getting free rage against the machine concerts or whatever it is Public Enemy I saw Bernie Sanders managed to break up public enemy flavor Flav and Chuck D. were fighting over whether to support Bernie Sanders and I kicked flavor out of the group are looks like the time on that giant clock he wears finally wore out

Z. Azam Bernie Sanders Chuck D.
The Dumbing Down of Android

All About Android

02:54 min | 3 years ago

The Dumbing Down of Android

"Let's week on the show. We were talking about how android eleven developer preview maybe imminent because we will jump the gun and made a page live and then removed. And we're like oh but it's not gonNA happen like really really sign. That would be a month earlier than they did it the year before. I'm sorry clearly the day after the show as Google sometimes likes to do They went ahead and released android eleven developer preview one so this is the first of course as the name implies the first developer preview. This is not I would say a build of android that you as a every day user would be know advised to install and rely upon although in my experience installed it on the. Pixel three a that. I have here Immediately once I heard the news it did require some. You know some eighty being an and stuff. There's no way to opt into those days. The Beta easy update Beta that they've that they've implemented and that's not on this version yet. So and that's kind of like a nice speed bump to say hey. This is super early so only those who really want to make it happen right. You can do it. Are you ready to put it on your four yet android? Eleven on the Pixel three a has been pretty pretty UN. Like unbuckled right. You know for the most part. I haven't really seen things good. Yeah so I mean how does that? Compare to other pre preview. Ones like it's been one is usually buggy right. Yeah I mean usually is but I feel like hopping around on this phone. Now Mind you one thing that. I don't have on here like an insane list of APPs that I have installed on my. That was going to be my next question. Is there a Goto aptitude normally would test out on jeff preview just to see how stability is or I mean? Are you just sort of playing around with talk? That's a good question. I haven't I haven't done that There have although I will say to basically will today's recap that showing off. I have running on here and it works perfectly fine so okay. Your mileage may vary but So far I'm having a good result. So what are you gonNa find in here Well Actually Dunkin have you installed or or messed around with the developer preview. It all now I am. I managed to Jason. How mind three point my pixels. Oh Oh Amy. I really appreciate that. Yeah I thought you'd like that I have devised some of the other guys have put it on it it. It's interesting to see it so I really. It's giving us really good insights however it also needs to be taken with lots of salt. This is so early. There's probably simony scraps of carried from faces that have been thought of plan but maybe not delivered that even more than previous years we need to temporarily doozy Azam with a little bit of

Developer Google UN Azam Jason
Learn About Sex Therapy From a Licensed Sex Therapist

The Psych Central Show

07:13 min | 3 years ago

Learn About Sex Therapy From a Licensed Sex Therapist

"Lori. Welcome to the show. Thank you for having me gave. This is fun. I have been really looking forward to this for a while because wall. All sexes everywhere in our culture productive conversation surrounding sex isn't everywhere in our culture. We have the salaciousness of sex raid. Read the actual mechanical workings and understanding and Dare I say intimacy of sex is severely lacking in our culture conversationally. That is so true. I mean while we are kind of porn saturated sex-saturated culture. You know what is missing from. That is the intimacy the connection in between two people that is not being talked about let alone understanding the differences between people and their bodies. We don't have very much information about uh-huh and where do you go and get it well and you can go on the Internet and get it and you run the risk on one hand. You could run into an article written by you. Ah which which has great information and will help you be more intimate with your partner and be a better lover and have better sex. You could also run into an article that shames you for wanting to have sex or you could run into an article that just gives blatantly misinformation which of course if you try. It isn't going to work it's going to make you feel bad and then of course there's everything else under the sun right as a sex therapist. How do you feel about all of that competing information because on one the hand like you said we talk about sex constantly but on the other hand we don't have productive conversations about sex and sexuality? That's why I think that would when I talk to people about sex and when I go in lecture what I'm saying Mr be brand new information and so that tells me that the competing repeating information out there is not necessarily hitting people in a way that helps them improve their actual working in the bedroom. And so what I. Reid is discouraging to me. There is so much misinformation like things like put on the Internet to have a better orgasm. Strengthen your muscles and that's by in large not true so people are misdirected and there's very little that talks about to have good sex. We need to feel that the sexual connection between that's in our partner is secure. And there's all kinds of different types of sex rate the type of sex that for example I might like could be different from the type of sex that my partner likes and neither one of us are wrong. There's not a correct way to have sex in an incorrect way to have sex. There's a lot of preference correct. That's that's true and many people. This is where they get hung up in their sex life. You know one person wants sex more frequently than the other person or one person wants to do something a sex act that the other person feels is wrong or you know moral or Isky. This preference issue is a big plays Claes that couples stumble in terms of getting on the same page with each other and it can become part of a power struggle that really separates them from even even hearing it. But you know we're so threatened by hearing what our partner wants. That might be different than what we want. We can feel like Oh you know my partner is GonNa think I'm frigid rigid or I'm a bad love or not area invented. We really worry about that kind of stuff. And then it's shutdown good conversation that could be productive active. I think one of the biggest. I'm going to say lies. That is out there is that couples should orgasmic at the same time that having an orgasm awesome together is the goal. Because that's how you see it in television and movies etc and I learned in preparation for the show. And because you know I'm over or forty that that is so incredibly uncommon that likes to never happen but most people feel that they must be doing it wrong if it doesn't happen even though Oh that's just biologically unsound or or it's a typical right. That's right it is very atypical. And couples come in. They want that as a goal all and they feel like they've failed if they're not having simultaneous orgasm but it is a blue moon that that happens. I think the other big myth that is out there learn how to reflect. Couple is that the movie clip looks like it's a ninety second event. She had her back up against a rough trie. Nobody nobody touches her clitoris and somehow or another she has a wild or gather right and that just is not true. Most women do not orgasm through sexual penetration talked only gave seven percent of women have or gas and true sexual intercourse and a lot of women. Come in and say you know I'm broken. I'm not doing it the right way. I I can't do it. The real way and their partners feel so inadequate. I can't get her they're just through sexual intercourse. And can't we make that a goal. Oh and what's wrong with me. Am I not big enough. What's the problem? I mean the movies and the media showed US something that is utterly fall so as a sex therapist people or coming to you because they have a problem in the bedroom but what. You're realizing that they don't actually have a problem in the bedroom. They don't understand how sex works yet. It's risen to the level of seeking professional. Help to fix something. That was never a problem anyway as a sex therapist. How do you handle that because I imagine they just telling them? Oh no you're wrong. It doesn't work that way. Isn't going to undo what is probably their entire life's experience of how all sex works. You're right I mean. Many Times people enter a sexual relationship with a lack of information. They really don't have the goods that bit. Tell them about their own body. What's supposed to happen? What happens in their partner's body if there's a gender difference? It's very hard to put ourselves in the other person's plight lights and we don't know what their body feels and so we're kind of working in a mystery. Last night I sat with a group of women who are low libido and we're running group in our clinic for this and one of the women took her about forty five minutes to resort Azam and she needed a lot of stimulation and she needed her mind to get engaged and she wanted her husband to be seductive. I said what you are experiencing now is really normal. I know you're disappointed but I gotta I tell you you are dead center with what most women experience. So she didn't know what other women were experiencing oftentimes again one more issue with heterosexual couples. Is We compare ourselves with another gender and we say you know what's happening for you how you can get around so quickly and it takes me not so long. But it doesn't take her long. It takes her not long compared to other women in my take her long compared to her male partner but what she's experiencing normal so a lot of what we do. Is We do normal. Is We do talk about it and certainly you know there are fixes and things things that they can do to help get more on the same page

Partner Lori. I. Reid Azam Claes
Site Reliability at DEV with Molly Struve

Ruby on Rails Podcast

07:57 min | 3 years ago

Site Reliability at DEV with Molly Struve

"Bali street is lead site reliability engineer at Dev the company company that runs the blogging website. Dev Dot to during her time working in the software industry. She's had the opportunity to work on some challenging problems. These include scaling elastic elastic search. Starting my sequel databases in creating an infrastructure that can grow as fast as a boomerang business when not making systems run faster. She can be found fulfilling her need for speed by riding and jumping her show horses. Welcome to the PODCAST. Molly thank you so much for having me. I'm excited to be here. Azam I- Somali. What is your developer Alfred Origin Story? So I kind of have a little bit of a roundabout story I started coating when I was in high school and then ended up going to college and when I got to college I actually thought you know what I'm going to be a software engineer. My Dad was an electrical engineer. And it kind of felt if not right so white enrolled in the software engineering one. Oh one class basically and has. I'm taking this class. I have a neighbor and he's taking the intruder the aerospace class and every day. He comes running over. He goes. Guess what we get to build. We built a racket or we get to build a parachute shoot and I got myself. Wow that sounds way more exciting than typing on the keyboard so I ended up switching into to the aerospace glass. I got a degree in aerospace engineering. Which I would not trade for anything? It was so much fun But then from there you're I actually went into the family business of trading options on stock market. So I did that for two years and as I was doing that Hall of that exciting stuff was going on in Silicon Valley. FACEBOOK was starting instagram twitter. All those companies were really just getting going and and I looked at my side. Wow they're really building stuff that's changing how we interact with each other and that sounds way more exciting then betting which way the stock market's going to move so I quit my job which was a pretty bold move considering it was the family business. I was Biz. Basically guarantee not jobs the rest of my life and I spent three months Teaching Myself Web development with the Michael hurdle to`real and basically that's kind kind of what got it all going. I got an internship after that at a small startup and kind of the rest is history. That is an incredible story and so exciting that you got started. With the hurdles who to`real I think a lot of listeners are going to relate to that story a lot so molly you're I site reliability engineer on the show which is really exciting can can you actually unpack without role entails definitely so a site reliability engineer which you may also here as referred to Sr e in my opinion my definition. Because there's a lot of different definitions and it really kind of depends on what company you're at. My definition of a site. Reliability engineer is a developer whose primary focus is on the reliability stability and scale ability of a website. It's also developer. That kind of has the ability to really step back and take a look at the big picture like the overall architecture. Sure of a website so a lot of times as a software engineer. You're just kind of your in there and you're getting a future build and you might be an controller. You might be a model. You're you're in a little piece of code and you're just focused on that piece of code as a site reliability engineer. My job is to step back and look it out. All all the code pieces fit together and how they interact with all the other pieces of the infrastructure databases servers things like that. And so oh you kind of have to have that ability to really get that that big picture in order to help you do your job. Another thing that I think is also super. Were helpful to anyone in the field is a lot of us. Have some sort of additional knowledge pass just web development or pass jus- this coating for example semes- horry's are really good with certain databases. I happen to be really good with elastic. Search and rescue those are kind of my strengths. other SRA's might be have strengths on the operation side working with Lenox or some other rob rating system. So I think kind of that overall the site reliability and jeers a developer but with just a little bit of extra kind of knowledge college and perspective on top. Do you find yourself in the code base. A lot or there are other tools that you're utilizing ordered to know whether or not the code is you you know really able to take load handle performance. What is the day in the life? Look for you. Yeah so that's a great question I am in the code base a lot Especially at my new job at Dev were really just kind of getting going with site reliability and so a lot of that means making the code reliable reliable and stable Once you get kind of past that point again that code in our reliable stable you know place then you kind of you look at things like the databases infrastructure etc But in terms of determining whether something's reliable whether it scale walk Cetera you definitely have to set up a good moderate infrastructure around it and so that's honestly one of the big products I'm working on a death is is setting up a monitoring infrastructure. So I can get a clear picture of what the application is doing. What happens when we get a big surge of traffic? What happens ends when we run this job and it kicks off a ton of other jobs? How does that affect the database? So if you don't have those monitoring tools than as an essary it's it's it's really hard to do your job because you can make a guess at what you think is going to add to the performance or improve performance but unless you really close that feedback loop and get that feedback that says okay. This is improving performance. It's it makes very hard to do your job. So monitoring is definitely a big part of of my day to day the and one in currently setting up at at debt. which is it's pretty exciting? Once you get it all set together. The insights you can get for Mitt are in my opinion very exciting to see see already offers some excellent advice where you said that a lot of SRA's have specialization whether it be elastic search. Res- like yourself. Maybe it's hosting devops anything like that. If any of our listeners would be interested in a career path into site reliability. What do you recommend they take the first step so what I like to tell? People who are interested in Missouri is become a developer. I spend a couple of years years really honing your coding skills your software development skills and getting familiar with different databases. Like I said My. My definition of a necessary is a developer. Who's got a little bit more up the big perspective the you know possible specialization database this etc.? So because of that the way I view in `sorry I think you really have to have the solid foundation of coating before you can move into necessary focus role so I think it's good for people who wanted to start as a back end. Death and religious get familiar with the technology is get familiar with codeine and then after a couple years of that really laying that solid foundation then shift towards you know something more. SRA

Reliability Engineer Developer Software Engineer DEV Molly Engineer SRA Silicon Valley Facebook Codeine Semes- Horry Missouri Michael Instagram Mitt Lenox