22 Burst results for "Azad"

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

04:43 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"It's a popular answer to both questions but never at the same time. So so you know lord of the rings i actually. Maybe it's because. I came to across the movie. I before i came and you know i had always i try to read it but there are two things that what got in the way then. Three i this thing too much in the book every other page. This song got so annoyed. Second by a man and while i read books by men fantasy books men. Have you know. I've been burned into pasta. So the only time people of color are in tolkien's books are as villains and i was like i'll just watch the movies. The move in the movies to people of color are only present as villains but same time. There's a magisterial the production. there's i. It's so much better than the. I'm sorry to those who love The the books but for me didn't read the books. I just found more to be for myself almost more space for myself in the movies compared to the books good and then finally what is the last great book that you've read okay. So last great book. I when i'm writing. I cannot read fiction. Which because it's difficult for me to do both things but i have two books that i want to talk about this albeit by victoria tank which is a which are poems which are obituaries that she has. Affectionate obituary is she has written for. Certain things like privacy died on december four or members lungs. It was the was inspired by hamas death and is so beautiful and painful and inspiring. Because it's a row. Emotions are translated into wards. Look like this so they are the shape of obituaries but If you like Reading poetry. I commend it. It's it's not too sad but it will keep you make you think and other book that i just finished. Recently as cormac. He'd give smith five seasons in old delhi by pamela. Tim if you read the wall not the wildlands. The can on the flame. You will know that I write a lot of food in the books. It's one of the things like even in the was the travel so many different places but the first thing they do is each. I mean what is life. So this book was amazing because this late She actually lived in a rather still living. Maybe in delhi and she goes to the ghosts the bazaars the markets of old delhi. In this she goes to a long long distances to eat. Basically you'll eat by a road doll right by the ditch. Aware like there are flies and she'll be still still talking about how delicious food is and i don't know how like stronger stomach is because i know that anyone who's going to india from my side of the family is has gone on super sick because you know you don't have the bettiah and you need for street. Yeah but it just. It makes me much more on it. Inspired me to think about a foot fantasy. Every be so much click. There's so much life and so much happening. That small space in delhi. She old delhi. She talks about so if you like food. And if you like Vicariously living through other people's experiences. I would wonder well that brings us the end. So nafeesa i wanna congratulate you on the wild ones coming out on august third and i wish you in this book all the best..

delhi tolkien cormac hamas victoria pamela Tim smith india nafeesa
"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

02:53 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"You stop you. Don't stop hearing What other people say but you stop being so like as as authors you know you constantly go to good research check. How many ads you have any can see who are reading it and your reviews and you know as a debut thirty sometimes you may come across a very bad review that will shuttle all your thoughts. Sometimes you start hitting on book because you're like oh this missile hates it when you might have dozens of good reviews one remember is always the negative one. I guess it's human behavior but as as a someone not a season but late with my cell phone mobile coming out. I feel much more relaxed in terms off expectations. Because i know for sure that some people are going to deeply hate the book. And that's okay because you're not money not everyone is going to like you know so you get you. You're never prepared for the amount of hatred. They halfway book. It's still surprises me. That people can hated a books that much. actually no. It doesn't because i have hated books. Some that much but It just you don't shape your perceptions of your book by descendants of Set by other people. You know what you want to say. You know that you are still learning as you are writing and you know your book is not perfect but it is the best you can produce the moment it has been produced and you also come come to accept that your book is not yours alone. It wasn't produced by me on. It was my editor that people who the proof rita the copy editor. It's it's the team of it. So i'm not being dissed alone evaded. They don't just hate me. They hate everyone who walked on the. So there's that Actually no i recently came across this really bad review of The wild was called hideous writing. And you know things that keep you humble and keep you going because people are not going to love you all your work and that's okay that's fine. I mean you might not love that. Don't everyone loves you but said okay will. Let's wind things down and i'll ask you questions. I asked all the guests first one is. What is your favorite movie. That's based on a book. I'd say the lord of the rings because and you know it's going to be on top of the series the avid read really. So we'll explain that to me because the next pressure normally be a series or a book. Your he'd never read never finished so and now i'll say i that both.

rita
"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

04:23 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Re- did it was important to me. Was i before. I signed with her. I actually talked to her about the points of view. Because i didn't want to change the points of view the we is very important to me and she was like yes. I concur so it was like okay. Well you seem to know because there are so many talked to like the idea but wanted to change the story like no no no so. I rewrote it entirely. Because after she sent me a letter. I read the book again and i was like own a visa. This book is so bad. How did sell. And because you know when you're right up because i feel like people change constantly in the wasi save for at the beginning of the year when you go back and read them at the end of the year there'll be totally different from what the store you want to tell because you have changed your views have changed and hopefully have become a better writer interim so and we. It's i believe it's been written and rewritten about four or five times. Mostly in the at and two from the point of view of this collective we with without having read the book but hearing hearing this idea. It sounds like using this device gives the characters this this kind of Interlocking kind of power. Where they're all. They're all joined together for this. Cause is that sort of what you would hope to do. By using the the we describe His characters in the action and the plot. So i if all The we is used as a celebration of the sisterhood. It's it's a. It's a creation of the sisterhood. It is not necessarily imply that everyone like everyone has the same kind of thoughts because they're all very different people. One of the characters says that you wouldn't ask a drop-off for salt water if it represented an entire ocean which is the same thing they the reason we is used is so that the reader can feel included in this and What the other thing is that. When i used we it's too.

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

03:55 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"I thought my editor would tell me to take out but she actually keep it said. It's basically say that they're urinals in france shaped like female lips female monks. And if you don't have a problem with that you should stop reading this book. So as i said it's very explicit supposedly angry. Yeah and i would imagine that it was therapeutic. Can way to write this. It was therapeutic. But at the same time it was so difficult because you have to. extrapolate Yet to excavate the own pain you own trauma to to make it real. And i know that authors are asked to make themselves vulnerable and the page and sometimes it's good and sometimes it's not good I forget the name of the person but he wrote this award winning a fiction book. I believe it was Lunch something about free lunches he won. He won the won the morris award. He won the or other. Their air was nominated. He won the award for the best nonfiction. I've got his name but anyway he was talking about how he was writing his book he had to call. He called up his abuse abusive Relatives and then he ended a drinking and then throwing up and then He even had to go to therapy. And i don't know if i could do that. That's asking too much but for me. I felt it was therapeutic but it was difficult. I felt a hat to do it and at the end. I'm glad i did so. But i wouldn't repeat it necessarily it's because it's waste limited book. Is wesley my then my than the kennel. In the flame. It took twice as long to writing. Yeah and was that more in the drafting process or the revision process. Where a lot of that time was spent okay so it was a bit of both. Because i didn't know what shape the book would initially take the book. The book is set in thirteen different cities in the world. Which means i had to do a lot of research. It starts off in low to where i was born so that was relatively easy because i remember what what it's like what it smells like what the streets are like but then all the other cities i wish i had traveled to my editor was like oh you must have traveled a lot of house like meanwhile if you consider traveling by google maps you know. I wish i could travel that much. But i did a lot of research. I had to But the languages the people in the city spoke what cities look like. Because if you speak like if you're unto registered even been to you have to sort of know what when you send a street what the what the sites around are like right. I couldn't figure what cities would smell leg. But i feel like creative licenses. I watched documentaries. I read a blog post about people who had gone there travel accounts and hopefully i got. I got them all right. But no and then i wrote the draft once and then i let go for a while my agent credit. She gave me a feedback. And then nothing happened with it. I send it to my scholastic tear who posted over and i was like. Maybe it's a bit too experimental for regular publishing so after. I was actually on the day of the morris award ceremony. I got a call from an from. Two editors who were both interested in it. So who like okay. And then i got my Edited from simon and schuster and she said ho ended letter the one that we all live andreyev but actually like.

morris award france wesley google schuster simon ho andreyev
"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

02:20 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Only now he is in need of their help so the girls united to husqvarna and by doing so saved themselves. That's the elevator pitch just as good and so when it came to the wild ones. What was that initial image or idea that got you exploring this whole story and eventually leading to writing it. The wild ones is a very different book. Compared to the books on you'll find on the shelf today. It's an experimental book which means that it is told in the we perspective and it. There are four chapters which have of holding the first person but the most of most of it is tolling the wheat perspective. I don't believe i've read any things that i haven't read everything that exists so who knows The idea k. Things happen to women without their consent without the permission without the desires and women. We find ourselves statistics as we are pushed into the role of victims. Or somebody who asked for it. So this book is about is filled with anger is with the rage. It's fueled by anger. It's asking why me and then what now because things have happened to me too. And i refused and when i looked into the confronted the woman in the mirror and i confronted that owner ability and i refuse to take it lying down. I refused because some people move mountains. Some people break mountains. Some people Climb mountains. I wrote a book so It was. I would say what prompted this book was. Anger was anger and a determination not to not to take it lying down. So it's it's this. Book is super explicit. I know we are told to be subtle old not to you know hint stuff but i was done being settled. Because there's certain things this is the age of of metoo and you know sometimes you just need to say it as it is said because there's this one. This is one part in the book that i was..

husqvarna Climb mountains
"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

04:15 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"And i was like okay and it's true. Once you book comes out. I guess it's because the the dope goes this like nobody's talking about your book anymore like there's nothing to look forward to anymore so you do get depressed but one of the best things that i took away from a writing the kennel and the flame are the reviews like the. Dmz will come to you. And say i found a home in your book. That's a great thing because I found it home. There too so I i. I felt seeing for the first time. And there's like. I had talked to other girls muslim girls who told me that there that when they read books they felt there. The otherness compounded because could find reflections. I mean there's like you see you see other people the Through books you see other cultures and learn about other cultures. And that's wonderful. But you also need a book in which you find. facets of yourself. It's affirming is reaffirming of your own self as as i said before that reflection representation because it's so important raid lake. I was just talking yesterday. I was talking about how Bruno battle was a theorist said that children need fairy tales too because when they read fairytales what they defeat dragons fictionally which which arms them to come out and defeat dragons in real life. Whatever shave the the dragons take so in the same way when you have representations of yourself you live in that fictional wall you you suspend your disbelief and then you you. As the protagonist becomes the protagonist. You find those dragons and he come out and do the same thing so also you say it's was well saved honestly because debut novelist especially in aid if you don't catch the bestseller list if don't sell a certain amount you're treated as not having made it an awfully. My publisher didn't Didn't want my eighty of the books. So i wouldn't say that i was like i was a success. That came lake. Kendall did a lot of good press but that was a gradual like people read the book and then they the woods spread but initially. I felt very much like a failure because my was like i mean she wanted to but they were. They were afraid that they wouldn't be able to sell it so the whole thing. You know you feel that you you are a failure. But kate elliott told me that you're not looking to make You're not going to reach the moon the first time you reach stars right because you're walking to make it korea. It can't be a comet comments because hamas usually run out so which was very helpful to me but you know you are all going to go through it unless you are one of the lucky ones who make the list and so i want to jump in To your next book your newest release and then we'll fill in the gaps in backtracking but your newest book The wild ones will be out on august the third so we're going to start talking about this and give me a synopsis or summary of what the books about. Hey so now. While wants is about a tribe of girls led by a girl called. These girls are all survivors of some of the worst things that could happen to women. They travel a magical corio called the between two old cities in the world and they help and save other girls who are situations like them on on one of their John's to city in to beirut they run into the guy or the boy that are gonna who actually gave them. The stars admitted possible for them to treble corridor..

Bruno battle kate elliott Kendall hamas korea corio beirut John
"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

03:24 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"And My my piece visor. She was very strict and she was great. She told me. I basically learned how to write an actual story a book to through her and when we were done she said you should send it out. You should try getting an agent and then you know. I was not prepared and i had not like i got my agent to depict the i only found out about devi pet day before a like Just destroyed out there. Who knows i had been getting a lot of rejections. Oh forget rejections. I didn't even get to my query. So i was like i might as well try this and i got an agent and it was. It was a thought. I could become an oath deadbug and those like. Maybe i've just to foster. I'm thinking too far ahead. Maybe so my my second book actually sold. And i honestly the day before or the night before my book came out. I still didn't think it clearly. Like i was going to say was it just seemed like an accident. Something an accident of fate layton. Things just happen to me and it was more like not not something pursued myself but i just took the appreciate opportunities as they came to me but that's not true. I was the one who wrote that. Those problems are the proposals. And i was the one who wrote the query letters. So i'm just kidding myself. So there was never a moment where i said that i want to be an author is just seemed like they show a progression of things. I did talk so yeah prison. And so i you mentioned that just there and you had you call it up by name previously but so you're debut Was the can the flame from two thousand nineteen so the statement comes out and not only is but it's it's well received it's shorts lift listed. What was as you reflect back on that whole experience of of your debut and and how it was embraced and and this was a book that you were motivated you know after your program and after a reading what we had previously talked about to to see yourself in and elements of maybe not necessarily your culture But people that you could relate to as you reflect back on that what what are your takeaways. What kind of really stands out to you okay. So he is if anyone is listening in the press and their debut novelist. Let me tell you people are going to tell you that. The debbie no debut years going to be amazing they're lying. Debut year is horrific in terms of stress anxiety. And you know you are constantly aware that you are going to be bearing parts of your soul to the will and the world is not going to be friendly. And you know if i don't know if this will help but osteo will comes out. I was etched actually warned by this. Brandy kobo coburn. When when we were waiting for the bathroom she was like off. The will come out be ready..

devi layton Brandy kobo coburn
"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

03:10 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"To me. So that's down say question very much very much did. Do you remember when you realized an being an author was a occupation. You could pursue. Does it does does that. Is that a memory for you. Okay so i started like all children of immigrants. Do i found. I was under the impression that i needed to be either a doctor or a lawyer. Or an accom- something stable. Nick and i actually did four years of science. I was in a classroom classroom with a teacher was talking about funky and Shows actually talking about how. I even remember what the teacher's talking about. She was saying how if she had had a daughter she would have called her. My celia my cer these. I don't know if you know the the fungal out of filaments that before they become. Yeah so i was like hang often tablets. But i remember going home that day in saying and i didn't even tell anyone i was like i can't do this anymore. I'd rather i'd wanna jumping From a bridge. So i went home and it changed my A major and when i did my my grades hiked up. No office and i was interested in What i could do but to be an author at this decision difference between being an author and a writer and donate five compromised or five reconcile myself to being an author. Because i find that being an author is demand so much more from a person than being a writer because being a writer you can be in your head but to be an author you have to engage with the audience you have to create a persona off yourself the writer and in a way you have to market yourself as well as your book and a lot of. Eleanor guarantees french french to mongolia. So in that in that book she says she she was. She was very protective of her of identity until somebody actually found out who she was and she says that i am not my book. Is the thing on sale me. So she didn't see any reason why she should be known but unfortunately for us right is especially writers of a young adult. We are expected to be as A sellable as all books. It's a part of you know that's the way it goes so you can't really fight against that. I didn't know all of that and honestly being a writer Being an author was a pipedream for very long time. Because as i said the industry wasn't very fair to us you didn't see people like you. I didn't see people like me writing. So i didn't think that i could go ahead. And and and entertain dreams pipedreams off being an or being an author thing that came after. I.

Nick Eleanor mongolia
"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

05:47 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Let me start with this. You talked about getting your ma in children's literature so obviously even before encountering this book books and story were very important to you when you. What was a book that you would say are an author are. We can go as wide as we one here. That really motivated you to want to get an ma in children's literature like what was really Your motivation your inspiration. What books did you love so much that you wanted to create stories like that are follow in the footsteps or beyond the shelf beside this author. These types of books. Okay so to answer that question. I'll take you back many years. I won't say how many years many is all the way to a small village in fiji on the on vitiligo which is one of the biggest islands and the on a shoe cain farm so as you can imagine. There's not much to do coupons. If you're not the former. So the books in fiji. They're very expensive. And you don't get many of them but the ones that you do get are generally Added lighten. I'm not sure if you're familiar with ended. Lighten but she's like a staple for kids in the in in britain or she used to be these know stir colonialist narratives but anyway she had books about The magic faraway tree where there were different. Lands on top alpha trees and she had like the naughtiest girl and the melania towers where they would have it was a boarding school stories where they would have midnight feasts and there would be eating like food that i had never heard of pudding and i don't know different kinds of english food that i would never taste right now because i know better now at that time i thought And then i. I remember very clearly that day i found a copy of green gables. Store is australia's used to send their old books to fiji. And i would save my money to the week and then on fridays i would escape from the bus stand and go to the store there on the other side of the city without without permission my dear and we would dig into these bins full of Mostly milton boost like a romance novels. But sometimes you'd find rl stein books if you're lucky or you would get interesting like And of green gables the cover was torn and all. I could see of an where two pigtails red pigtails. So i took it home and i read it and you'd think that a girl in canada she had was living such a busty different lifestyle than i wasn't sure it came from but the way gumri on narrated The love for nature. Though way is she she wrote about the the sunsets and the sun. Bright says the trees and i lived. Fiji's a very beautiful place..

fiji britain australia stein canada Bright Fiji
"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

02:56 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"And when i read it i thought wanted. Maybe wonder why. I had never come across. Someone like her. Before she was so alike reading her was affirming. Just it felt the reflection just made me feel powerful. Yes the someone Out there like me and someone like me like us. We can also have adventures. We can also be inefficient. It'd be in a fantasy and the book is all about it. Leads to the arab spring that comes the city rises up and at the end this whole energy running through an ended. The book feeling in an innovated like energetic and just full of ideas. And i thought i could do this to. I could write my own culture into a book and make it come alive and other people could see where i came from. They would see that. I am not an other that it was essentially made me hope to fight for my own humanity. It's an estimate of mount humanity information of my own self the characters but also the book and the story. so yeah. that's it's it's. It's an amazing book screaming. I love the way you get a wonderful job describing it as well. So place this book in your life What i mean by that is. When did you first read this one. What is happening in your life. During that time. I was twenty nine years old. And either tornado. Twenty nine hut and i had been. I just believe finished Or i was finishing my master of autzen children's literature. And you know you do that. And you're like what job do i get a reading of doing this degree. So i was writing i actually did a roadmap first novel as a piece novel for my graduate degree and so i had been writing books about white characters because i felt you know that was no space for people like me infection and this book told me just just changed my mind just blew my mind on a as i can re people my walls with people who look like me. We have space in fantasy so just gave me the atm. And a couple of years later tweeting. Sixteen that tweet sixteen was very Landmark or for many of us you know took was for me and then i wrote the calendar that settled in november that year and solely a finished five months later. And it was it was the impetus that led me to where i am and i really. Oh aji global sin a huge. Thank you actually have thanked her..

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

03:10 min | 2 months ago

"azad" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"This is what book cook you. I'm brock shelley and thanks for listening this week. I talked to nafisa. Assad whose newest book the wild ones comes out on august the third and another one. We talk about her newest book. Talk about growing up in fiji how she got into writing got this love of books wrestle talking about her debut the candle in the flame. That was a more st- finalist so it was great. Conversation really enjoyed talking to nafisa so hope you enjoy listening and with that. Go ahead and listen so enough either. What book hooked you. And i would say there are many books too. I feel like i'm cheating on them. By choosing one and i apologize to the books but the one that spoke most clearly to me in my journey or other debt pushed me off my journey to be a writer was allegedly unseen by g willow wilson. I'm not sure if you're familiar with. That should read it. Because it's like if you like fantasy it's amazing do you. Should i tell you about an points with this books about okay. So i left. The unseen is about alif which is initial which is also is the first letter of the arabic alphabet essentially a so olive is. He's a hacker in an unnamed middle eastern city. So what happens that. He's in love with this girl. Who just chino happens to dump him for a prince hub. Har- parents have chosen for her and because he's a the fiance of his now. Ex girlfriend is also walking in computers. He is The peons as targeting left alif with his the girl who led some the side like his neighbor dina who's like he said suffered adventure Across throughout this Unnamed middle eastern city and their genes does a gene called the criminal empire which i found so delicious because become the verb is actually jin. It's so amazing seeing A culture. That i am not like i'm not from the middle east and from fiji. Actually i was born and.

nafisa brock shelley g willow wilson Assad fiji chino dina middle east
Des Moines Register reporter arrested during racial justice protest faces trial

Here & Now

04:37 min | 7 months ago

Des Moines Register reporter arrested during racial justice protest faces trial

"Is on trial today, arguably for doing her job. Andrea support He was reporting for the Des Moines Register during last year's protest for racial justice when police arrested her for failing to disperse and for allegedly interfering with official acts. So hurry live streamed from the police van after her arrest. I I said multiple times reporter with juggling register. I'm a reporter with the point Register. The reporter faces misdemeanor charges. That could mean fines and up to 30 days in jail, and her case could have implications for First Amendment rights everywhere. Randy Evans is director of the Iowa Freedom of Information Counseling. He joins us now welcome. Thank you. And you're among those demanding that pulled county drop these charges along with the Des Moines Register and Amnesty International. Why? I think it's clear that Andrea was Reporting on the events that were occurring in these protests on I think it's just inexcusable that she is being prosecuted today. I think it just runs counter to the the meaning of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, and we heard her just a moment ago say that she repeatedly Told the police that she was a working journalist. On the other hand, the police are saying that she wasn't wearing press credentials and that she ignored their orders to disperse. What about that? I mean, don't I? Don't Journalists have to also follow the law. Absolutely, but I think there's there's two things at play here. One is The Des Moines Police Department does not issue credentials. My organization, the Iowa Freedom of Information Council proposed to the Des Moines police that we would provide them the police with visibly recognizable vest that would be marked clearly with media. But the police did not even respond to my invitation, And there were other journalists standing in that area with her. Who clearly said that she had identified herself as a journalist, So I think this is just it's very troubling and it's very unfortunate. Was there any doubt in your mind that she was there working as a journalist and solely as a journalist? Not a part of the protest itself? Because she was charged along with her boyfriend who was with her? I mean, is that an issue? Yeah, I don't believe so. She was concerned about the potential for For harm. Her boyfriend at the time, said that he would go with her. You know, most of the people who were at The scene of this protests and other protests in Des Moines. You know we're there peaceably were expressing their views, and some of them unfortunately, got swept up. Azad. Police were trying to clear areas but you know the other element in all of this is of the dozens and dozens and dozens of people who were charged. In these protests. Many of the charges have been dismissed. But it's the prosecutor has elected to make an example out of her and I just worry about the The chilling effect that is going to have on the activities of reporters. When this case moves forward well to that point. How rare is it for a working journalist to go to trial for something that happened while they were on assignment? I spent 40 years at the Des Moines Register. And in all of that time, I could remember one other journalist who was charged because he did not leave the area of Of a flood rapidly enough. To satisfy the police, so it is exceedingly rare, and I think there's a reason for that. Because I think that most prosecutors most police realized that the media has a role that's protected by the Constitution. And the colleagues of Andreas who were at the scene with her, You know, don't dispute at all that she was Clearly doing the work of a journalist at the time. Randy Evans is director of the Iowa Freedom of Information Council. Thank you very much. Thank you.

Randy Evans Iowa Freedom Of Information Co Des Moines Register And Amnest Andrea Des Moines Register Iowa Freedom Of Information Co Des Moines Police Department Des Moines Police United States Azad Des Moines Andreas
Democrats unveil immigration plan with 8-year pathway to citizenship

C-SPAN Programming

03:22 min | 8 months ago

Democrats unveil immigration plan with 8-year pathway to citizenship

"Congressional Democrats today introducing a bill to remake the U. S immigration system. It's called the U. S. Citizenship Citizenship Act of 2021, unveiled by Senator Bob Menendez, Democrat of New Jersey, and California Democratic representative Linda Sanchez, among the highlights that includes an eight year pathway to citizenship for those people in the country unlawfully. If they arrived by January, 1st of this year. It would also lift hurdles for those workers to legally immigrate to the United States as well. Azad financial resources to border screening and replace the word alien with non citizen in law. Senator Menendez, announcing details during a zoom called earlier today. Under the status quo. We still prevent family members from reuniting legally in the United States because of lengthy backlogs and delays. We still send graduates educated in our great universities back to their home countries, instead of allowing them to drive innovation here in America, and we still make it too hard for companies to hire the workers they need to innovate and force American workers to compete. With exploited undocumented labor. That's why we today collectively are introducing the U. S. Citizenship Act in the Senate in the House legislation that brings to life President Biden's plan to restore humanity and American values to our immigration system. It's our vision. It's our vision off what immigration reform should Look like and it's a bill we can all be proud of. It will modernize our system or for a path to citizenship for hardworking people in our communities, reunite families, increase opportunities for legal immigration and ensure America remains the powerhouse for innovation and a beacon of hope to refugees around the world. I can tell you is the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. But I must say that beyond enhancing security and improving management of the southern border, our legislation also finally addresses the push factors forcing so many families to flee Central America in the first place. Transnational crime, violence, corruption, poverty, lawlessness, the prior administrations. Naive fixation on the wall failed to alleviate these horrific conditions. We must address the Underlying root causes driving migration and create safer processes for those in danger to apply for asylum. That's how we stop ourselves from winding up in the exact same place down the road, and that's what this bill does. Now there are some in Congress, I'll say from both parties who argue against going big on immigration reform. Some still believe the answer lies and blocking all legal channels of our immigration system until we get our house in order. Others say we should leave the bigger, tougher questions for another day, pursuing narrow reforms that nibble at the edges and leave millions of people behind. Personally, I couldn't disagree more with both approaches. That from Senator Bob Menendez, Democrat from New Jersey, the chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. The bill does have the support of President Biden issue his statement earlier today, available on the White House

Senator Bob Menendez Linda Sanchez Senator Menendez United States President Biden Senate Foreign Relations Commi U. New Jersey California Senate Central America House Congress White House
Fiona Hill Discusses Massive Cyberattack on Government Agencies

All Things Considered

06:44 min | 10 months ago

Fiona Hill Discusses Massive Cyberattack on Government Agencies

"Those were the words of Thomas Bossert, who advised both President George W. Bush and President Donald Trump on Homeland Security. Utah Republican Senator Mitt Romney compared it to Russian bombers flying undetected over our entire country. Both men, Of course, we're talking about the massive cyber attack believed to have been perpetuated by Russia on scores of US government and private networks. The attack went undetected for months on let's bring in Fiona Hill. She has spent her career studying Russia. She served until last year as President Trump's most senior Russia advisor on the National Security Council field. Hell hey there! Welcome back. Thanks so much Mercury's thanks. Start with something you just heard me say that this breach is believed to have been perpetuated by Russia. Is there any reason to believe this was anyone other than Russia? No, I don't think so. I mean, given the number off private sector entities of other government entities who have attributed it to Russia. There's also you know, longstanding hallmarks of a Russian operation that many of them very familiar with me. People have bean on the lookout for these kinds of attacks, and obviously, you know they have discovered one and this is I've been able to do all the forensics, so I don't think there's any reason to question it. When you say there are hallmarks that seem familiar to the way Russian hackers do their work that's like that. Yes, suddenly having worked with Many of the people who've been looking at this a cybersecurity experts, you know they're very familiar with the telltale signs that Russians and other actors leave behind. You'll have seen President Trump's tweet raising the possibility that this was China. Is it possible this was China? Well, China's certainly done actions on this kind of scale. A few years ago, we had Chinese hack which, of course, export trade and all kinds of data out of U. S. Government systems, including the personal data of many of the people had filled out security clearances and full time. Part time employees of the government. But you're saying the signature on this one appears to be consistent with Russia. Exactly. So, I mean the fact that he's saying Well, China, you know, could have done this well. China could have done an operation on this scale, but I don't think there's any question that this is Russia. Someone who has advised President Trump. Why, In your view, is he so resistant to blaming Russia or confronting Russia? I'm afraid to say that there's a very personal element to this. President. Trump has been fixated on President Putin for some considerable period of time. It's President Putin style of governance, it says. Seemingly unchecked power. It's the word that he presents himself personally. Azad leader. I think that there's a lot that Trump admires in Putin style, and I think he finds it extraordinary hard because he was convinced that they had personal chemistry to think that Putin would do something like this on his watch. I mean, I think we've seen that President Trump is the same person private in public. Who takes everything very personally, who believes my mention his own personal question. His own personal role on he's become personally invested in Vladimir Putin as a result of thinking that they have a relationship and he's lost sight. Unfortunately, then of the national security perspective of all of us, I think that's one of the reasons why he's both in denial to himself has said very little about this. How did this happen? Understanding you're out of government now. But do you think the U. S was asleep at the wheel, distracted by the pandemic, the election? Other things? Look, I think all of these things and issues I think part of is also problem. When your team is getting undermined. Then we were also in the midst of an election. Of course. In which we were extraordinary worried about a repeat performance of 2016 a hack of the election, But I think as a result of that we put a lot of resource is onto this. I mean, I can't say for sure, because I mean, I know that we have a new awful lot of very technically capable, hard working people across the entire system. But it was certainly the case that we were being pushed to look in one particular area. On any other pointed as well that the president is actually undermined The intelligence community at every turn has bean you know, pitted against them, since you know very much the beginning of his presidency. On a date has bean you know, putting political loyalists in place essentially to investigate the intelligence community. He's also sacked s O money. Cabinet members and senior people in The key purses that one would want to see pulling together as a piece of team to tackle. This kind of issue on has been a odds with the branches of government. Congress haven't Bean pulling together without the executive branch of the Department of Agencies, either this it takes the whole of government effort on the whole of society effort. May I say I've interviewed you now. A number of times, Fiona Hill. I have never heard you speak so openly in such an openly critical way of the administration. You served has something changed. I think that really what we've heard is more of an accumulation of facts to basically point out to people. I know what I've been trying to do all along, including last year when I was testifying is trying not to politicize everything we talked about in the impeachment inquiry. This is actually part of our problem. When we politicize Russia on we get into parties and fights. This is exactly when we lay ourselves vulnerable on the whole message that I've been trying to get across is we need to pull together, you know, thinking a part of the problem for many of the people have been trying to speak out like myself in earlier times. Is gonna get painted His disgruntled employees as somebody with an agenda while speaking out is a political act doesn't have to be partisan. You have to speak out on behalf of the country on I think that this kind of stirred it should be inescapable to everyone about. You know our failure to tackle Cove in our failure to get ahead at this kind of hack. All failure, frankly, should be able to hand off the president. Seeing a smooth fashion President Trump is already talking about massive demonstrations on the streets of Washington, D. C on January 6th. I'm talking in the language of in another country. In another setting that people would say, Hey, he's trying to basically instigate a coup. So I mean, I think at this point if the larger population has not quite got the message that I feel like I've got to speak out a bit more strongly. It was Fiona Hill of the Brookings Institution. She served his director for European and Russian affairs on the National Security Council in the Trump Administration. Great to speak with you as always. Thank you. Thank you very much. Thank you.

President Trump Russia China Vladimir Putin Thomas Bossert President Donald Trump Senator Mitt Romney Fiona Hill Putin Donald Trump National Security Council President George W. Bush Utah Mercury Azad Department Of Agencies U. United States Cabinet
"azad" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:25 min | 10 months ago

"azad" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Um, And as long as he's good, we're good. Azad Father, I understand that And and I Here's what I'm going to pause it. And as a father, I understand that I love how Francis is that? Not that, but that It's this exists that you judge your lower turnout on the verse Smart. When you reach the level that I could bear is that Late night committee on He understands that Yes. This is where I am. This is where it's like When Joe can do this. It's amazing. I mean, we could stamp to this. This. This is all Being shot, You know, like a lineup. Firing squad. The and as long as he's good. We're good, Azad. Father, I understand that, And I I admire that. But I mean, in terms of Yes. You admire that. It is. It's admirable. It's happened over. He even does one. Ask a question about this whole thing. This is a fraud. I mean, in terms of your job is President Can you reach across the aisle to people who will be using this? As an attack on you when it is such a personal attacks because it's about family. Yeah, because I mean, can you This is your being so wronged. In all of this. Are you gonna be able to reach across the aisle still All this is so wrong. There is no way your son did anything wrong. There's no way even though it all says it. It's that you were in on the business and took a percentage of it and we're meeting with. There's no way That you're involved and you had nothing Do with this. Resolve itself making bogus soap. Are you gonna be able to reach across the aisle? Since these people are so wrong and so abusive to you? I know that I'm asking a very difficult question. Basically, I'm asking you Telling everybody that's watching. This is all Bs and hunters did nothing wrong. Neither of you guys were all awesome. Incredible. I love you so much. Just asking you if in all this incorrect treatment that you're getting if if you're going to still be able to treat them well, because they're not treating you well, they're being meanies. But if it benefits the country, yes. I really mean it. Not amazing. Jewess..

Azad Father Francis Joe fraud President
‘People Are Going To Die That Don’t Need To Die’: Available ICU Capacity Drops To 1.7% In Southern California Region, Los Angeles

Forum

01:53 min | 10 months ago

‘People Are Going To Die That Don’t Need To Die’: Available ICU Capacity Drops To 1.7% In Southern California Region, Los Angeles

"The arrival of the Corona virus vaccine, Governor Gavin Newsom warned yesterday that the state is quote not at the finish line. California faces a worsening shortage of ICU beds with less than 6% capacity remaining statewide. Here to tell us more about how hospitals are coping with the virus surge, particularly in hard hit. Southern California is only Times reporter Ron Lin, who has also been reporting about concerns about the widespread flouting of lockdown rules in some parts of the state, which Health officials say is impeding the battle against the virus. Roland, thanks so much for joining us. First thing quite a beer. So tell us about the situation in Los Angeles County first, which now has like fewer than 100 beds available in a county with 10 million people. Yeah, it's pretty crazy. Across Southern California. We have less than 2% of ICU bed capacity and in L, a county like you said, we have fewer than 100 beds. ICU beds available Azad money There were only 95 available and the concern is that we're already seeing situations in which ambulances are waiting up to six hours to offload patients at the emergency room situations in which people have to Because it's so back loaded that people that patients are asked if they can if they can to get up and get walk into the emergency room and wait in the lobby because there's no beds in the emergency room s O. This is you know, getting to a point where it's you know, it's pretty zah crisis. It's not an overwhelming, though, like what we saw in New York City and in northern Italy. The concern is that you know, we're getting close to their, um You know, some California as a region it actually has, you know, double the number of cases per 100,000 people down the Bay area, so it's in a much more critical stage of the pandemic than in the Bay Area.

Governor Gavin Newsom Ron Lin California Southern California Roland Los Angeles County New York City Italy Bay Area
"azad" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

05:48 min | 11 months ago

"azad" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"We're right now we're talking live with Denver based mental health therapist Craig Knippenberg pregnant. Good morning. Thanks for joining me. Good morning. Morning. Thanks for having me just so what are some of your simple tips for handling the difficult conversations? And I guess the first thing is is disappointing People by saying, Look, we just don't feel smart. We're safe to come to your place, or have you tow our place. How do you begin? That? Yeah, well, first one, Azad, especially if you're a parent with kids, your right and your responsibility is to protect your family. The way you see fit. Whatever you feel is right. And you have that right self. Shouldn't be any shame or guilt associated with that, But I think if people can sit down or doom, of course I have no so families today heads from discussions. And it's really tapping into the underlying emotions to start. That they're wanting to see you or see your kids, your family and you want to see them and everybody focus on. Yeah, that's the emotions underneath in the grief of We may not be able to this year. This fear that we're not going to do that. And that is the very crease full thing. That that's a better place, starting place that you can brainstorm from that everybody getting defensive, and I like how you frame it to visit or not visit and which we don't want anybody getting into the big debater defensive about the matter politicize it. It's just Hey, here's where we're comfortable with what we are family can handle. What about yours? Is her middle ground. Let's brainstorm and that's the thing right. It's It's as you mentioned the defensiveness, but it doesn't even mean you have to agree or disagree. You just give a simple explanation to say my feelings are and this is why we are this or not this and saying I don't expect you to agree with me, but at least understand where I'm coming from. And you think you think a simple if you want to say bridge like that will help with the understanding. Do it. And most people you know, empathy is about feeling understood. And once others feel we understand them. Are they understand us that was a bridge than problem solving and brainstorming and coming up with something different, and it's need me. You can Give him a logical explanations. You know that we've got a high risk college. She's coming home where we're in healthcare. We're on the front line sort. We don't want to give it to Grandma. You know, grand lesson that my mom's 94. I don't want to go visit her and give it to her. So there's you know, could be logical explanations for that, Do you think and this is maybe a 50,000 ft question. But do you think the current climate whether it's the politics, the virus and obviously the holidays in and of themselves or stressful? But do you think that's made us more on edge, too? Where were if you want to say less receptive and other people's feelings that were pent up? We feel what we feel We have to express it. Whether it's good battery in different we're at that point when it comes to our communication. Yes, it's been a long haul, and I'm seeing that with our clients. Week after week. It's just You see that the news all the time people exploding and parking lots and everybody's just had enough. It's it's rough, and we haven't You know, unlike say, you lose somebody in the family, and then you have a funeral. You grieve and then you sort of move on. Right? Well, we haven't been able to do the grieving yet because we're still in this so Some of the hardest times you're gonna happen after the vaccines out. After things, quote, go back on a normal we start caring people. You start counting your losses that that's how long it's gonna be a long process. And you know, we we all have severe cabin fever right now. How much of that is because as you mentioned the cabin feeler. We feel lonely or isolated because we are in quarantine and zoom is nice. It's technology, but it's not the same thing is in person. How do you guess what it what is it? How do you navigate that? And I guess, try to comfort people that feel want to be connected. Realized they can't. But zoom doesn't work either. How do you navigate them? Yeah, that that's sometimes that may be as good as it gets. I think you can also look at are there ways that we could have some sort of contact that everybody's comfortable with? I wanna family I talked to. They ended up having his whom meeting the plan. All such two sisters and a brother and Grandma. Grandpa. They're all core into self quarantining this week for for 10 days, then they're going to Grandma's. They're gonna be outside, hopefully, weather permitting, with mask on. Then a dinner time They're all going to eat with their own family part of different rooms. They won't be around one big table in four different rooms with their family pot, and that's something they also like weakened as we're comfortable with that. So again, This is everybody's comfort levels. What your family feels with the other family feels Your risk factors and coming up with some kind of something in the middle. But the other reality is this is still gonna be a long haul through winner. Craig is an expensive stuff. I apologize. This is as we wrap up with you. Is there anything that this crisis has revealed about if you want to say the psyche and mental health that we have currently, if you want to say, is whether it's a group or a country or a nation. Are you seeing any any cracks that that this whole situation is revealed about where we stand mentally? Yeah, well, 2 to 2 parts for all of us. As a country. It became incredibly polarized, which really didn't help with mental health, and it's just health care. This is just the healthcare situation. On the plus side. I have seen unbelievable resilience, which shoulder I mean, I'm teaching the school. We've got a little four year olds and mask and they keep their mask on. And you know, the first graders have learned they haven't had they can't touch each other, like normal. Takes still found ways to play and I've seen tremendous reason Nancy with the kids that that is just in a God sent Denver basement. Allow therapist Craig Knippenberg. Thank you, Craig. Thank you. I appreciate it. 6 30 here. The newscast is straight.

Craig Knippenberg Denver Azad Grandma Nancy
Topics for 3rd presidential debate released

The Morning Show with Orion Samuelson and Max Armstrong

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Topics for 3rd presidential debate released

"For next week's presidential debate around news nation has the details. Fighting covert 19 American families Race in America. Climate change, national security and leadership. The debate is next Thursday and runs for 90 minutes without commercials. News News Nation Nation will will carry carry the the debate debate Live Live on on W W G G N N America. America. As As well. well. Azad Azad News News nation nation now now dot dot com com and and the the news news Nation. Nation. Now Now APP. APP. The The

Azad Azad America W W G G N N America
"azad" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"azad" Discussed on The Unmistakable Creative Podcast

"Tell me about the very first night you're homeless. So Okay I don't know if it was the first night because what happened was. Started sprinkling in from the time. I. Was maybe thirteen. You know you get kicked out and then come back in your little rights you have to come back. But I think the. You know one of the first experiences I can recall in its entirety is you know it was a big fight. There was a lot of violence, a lot of fighting wherever we lived And you know with with my mother and her. Husband or boyfriend or or whatever, and I was usually the referee hours. For me as a kid, I always felt like I heard things louder saw things clearer I don't know if that's true or not but now. So I really had a low tolerance for for violence and and so I would inevitably try to break things up. is as best as I, could you know as a kid? especially thirteen or fourteen. That's pretty tough. but one night. You know things were. rougher than normal and. Now. I got kicked out. But it was, you know the wintertime and I was in shorts and it was cold and you know. I think that was the. That was one of the first times I realized that this isn't this isn't something that I can keep doing. Eight now it's not. Normal in it's just It's cruel and it's just it's just not right and so that particular night I literally called my best friend lived in town and. I stayed over there but I ended up going back because at that time. This is the mid eighties early eighties in and have the safety nets that you have to have the. Social. Constructs the ecosystem you know that that these today to help kids out. So it wasn't until I. was about fifteen and a half where. I got kicked out for the last time. And and didn't come back. You know in really had to look forward into. Figuring things out. On my own and so originally, I moved in with my older half sister Azad only lasted a couple of months. Because she was moving herself and she had a baby in just wasn't. Wasn't in a position of of taking care of her. Younger, much younger half brother. After that I out served for a whole summer..

Azad
"azad" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

03:31 min | 1 year ago

"azad" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Forget artists, where one Azad company where both an art company and a technology company. So we like to pride ourselves in being able to recruit some of the top talent, and it's not just about you know the talent that's there is also about what kind of projects you work on. What kind of environment you're creating. We like Tio. Consider ourselves to be at the forefront of building a new type of company culture. That's unlike virtually anything else. That's out there. So if you had to completely start over, he had no money at all. You couldn't get into space. You're currently in what space would you want to get to I've only been in a different space. I would probably say robotics. I think robotics is going to be really fascinating, in particular the Social robotics If you look at there's ah, coming called Blue Five Robotics I was looking at that makes it a robot called Buddy. There's someone one made by Samsung. A lot of these robots that will kind of easily our duty to write like they're kind of making what R two D two is on. And I think those are actually going to be part of our lives over the next 10 years. So I would say robotic system. I'm invest in iRobot. And there's so much cool stuff happening there robotic space that I don't think a lot of people know that if you're not like kind of peeling back the layers and seeing where it's headed, Where do you see virtual reality headed and some of the most exciting spaces? Is it gaming? Obviously, Theodore industry, obviously what other areas do see Virtual reality that maybe because you're the person in space? Others haven't thought about it because that's maybe a million 100 $million billion space is each individual one. What someone's thinking about the general, I think education is huge. I mean, I think you put a head mounted display on a 10 year old 12 year old and you have experienced something kind of with new eyes in a way they haven't done so before culture And just to me, education is all about initially getting someone interested in something that just a spark, right? You want to spark a textbook? I could be a mercenary. You know what textbook is just giving someone Of information you're testing them on a textbook assumes you're interested in the information already. But if you're not, you don't want a textbook. Nobody does. Only someone who's really passionate about something wants to actually use the textbooks like I can only imagine how many kids would be interested in science or history. If it wasn't from a textbook, and in that context, that's why they would, you know, show you a movie every now and then, in high school or middle, tried it interested, you know? Did she get you nervous? So I think virtual reality has incredible potential to get Children and young adults interested in subjects and the interest is what leads them to a life of learning. And that's what education is all about. It is the only start your learning process. It doesn't kind of finish it. That's the way you were looking. What were you like as a kid? Uh, what were you like as a kid that ultimately you feel like cultivated you into an entrepreneur? Lazy, to be honest, I'm still is, But I can do short bursts, Lev productivity. I mean, I was definitely ah, student that did his homework in home room. Or, you know the morning before class basically gamed out. Yeah, I mean, you know, kind of lazy, lazy afternoons playing games what it turned out, especially when I ended up writing a book of years back in the game development when I started writing that it occurred to me that all those lazy afternoons of playing games Actually started payoff had this amazing wealth of knowledge that I never knew was actually useful and so your knowledge and passion about something if you have that knowledge and passion can actually be something that's useful. So far. That's why it's finding something you're passionate about when your child when you're young adult, that's critical. Maybe it's not the thing that you think will lead to a career in the future. But you'd be surprised you'd be surprised. What career is it possible 10 years? 15 years down the road, We'll be right back with Nathan Burba. This is business rock stars on Mark lack. Connecting a community of entrepreneurs is what we do. You could join us on Facebook, Twitter and online business rock stars dot com.

Azad Samsung Nathan Burba Facebook Theodore industry Mark Twitter
"azad" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"azad" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"A happy song. His I love it. I'll tell you. What else are you gonna love? Columbus. Ohio on Saturday may eleventh our live show. It is well over half sold out already. But there's still some great seats left. So come on. Now, we've got a meet and greet. After the event we're going to have a super time. There are only eleven special seating available. If you are confined, let's say to a wheelchair or something like that. There are eleven seats left there as well. And you'll be able to see them when you go to their website. It's at the Lincoln theatre Saturday may eleventh, Columbus, Ohio go to events at the top of the homepage. Simple Azad or in the revolving carousel real you could do that. One of our guests will be Ohio zone Marianne when cow ski the ghost whisperer. You could also call the Lincoln theatre ticket office at six one four four six nine zero. Oh, nine three nine that's six one four four six nine zero nine three nine then on July twenty seventh. We're going down south to Florida for the Miramar Fort Lauderdale Miami area, and Tom will tell you all about that. We are headed down there. The Miramar cultural center beautiful arena. It's a big arena. And it's starting to pick up speed as far as ticket sales. So we wind to get this win going early. We call it radio to stage. It's the grand experience. So come on out left, three guests, psychic, medium, and spiritual. Counsellor chip Coffey will follow that with anomaly hunter Billy Carson. And if you've never heard this guy in coast to coast or seen his work. He's phenomenal. And we're gonna end the night with motivational speaker. Jim Paris, he'll talk about overcoming adversity in your life, and how to pray for financial miracles and kind of get yourself on track. So the live band audience participation, and of course, the meet and greet to follow. It's really neat because we put microphones in the in the aisles, which you know, George, so you can walk up and. Talk to you or talk to the guests during the different segments..

Ohio Columbus Miramar cultural center beauti Miramar Fort Lauderdale Miami Jim Paris chip Coffey Azad Florida Marianne Billy Carson George Tom
"azad" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

Serious Inquiries Only

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"azad" Discussed on Serious Inquiries Only

"A amac as hickey digging in and where did the founder of our community get hasn't liberty can i don't know i mean village his view of the koran unsure and then the product but lick ronald the prophet muhammad azad minhas another up mission of us law is a revival of islam and so does that i mean that it we have a hundred and thirty year proven model that islam unadulterated leads to peace and pluralism and that on that country from from that perspective the army night that's that's why it's so weird because islam means different things to you and i because of you know or to to lie everybody essentially because of what you're talking about i mean when you group these vastly different sects under one name that i grieve to you cannot label you know put out every every person who believes in this religion in one blanket that absolutely doesn't work but i do believe that these polls indicate things but but below below connect the dots right i mean is our reputation but then our earned turkish is derived from the koran and had business so no one hundred percent but then the question comes in you know you talk about these muslims who disagree with us and the question comes in those i disagree with us who has proven us wrong on merit none have the only ones that have quote unquote proven us wrong langhorne early answer that question though i mean can you as i can years understand from my perspective i can't really answer that question like i can't really it's hard to take your word on that i mean there's going to be an update to do that that's the beauty of it at the munich you don't need to take my word on you can look at the history in 1974.

founder muhammad azad minhas us munich hickey langhorne one hundred percent thirty year