20 Burst results for "Ayn rand"

Fed Up With Facebook and Twitter, Some Conservatives Turn to Parler

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:34 min | 2 months ago

Fed Up With Facebook and Twitter, Some Conservatives Turn to Parler

"In recent months. In years we've seen mainstream social media. Companies like facebook and twitter. Step up their efforts to moderate content on their platforms in some prominent conservatives have said many of those measures unfairly target them and censor their viewpoints on the internet. They've increasingly responded by telling their followers to join them. On another social media platform it's called parlor and its billing itself. As a sort of libertarian. Alternative to twitter or puerto jeff horwitz has been looking into parlor and he joins me now to talk more about it. Jeff things being here certainly alright so for the folks who have been leaving book twitter. Can you just remind us what are their concerns with those platforms. Don't like content moderation very much or at least the way that the platforms are doing it. We should say and this kind of all boiled over the with the election the idea that the platforms would be one fact checking claims about voter fraud. That didn't really pan out but it'd be fact checking them at all and to be labeling the president's own speech and in some cases even restricting the spread of it really got people riled up and so many of them have been turning to parlor instead. It's sort of billing itself as this libertarian version of twitter but what exactly does parlor differently. That sort of appeals to these groups so the first thing it does is it does not moderate content except in very rare circumstances. The team does volunteers right now. So you know whether it even does it under. Those circumstances is kind of tb. Rules are no threatening to kill people and no committing illegal acts by means of the platform. Those two things are out aside from that. You wanna share nude sell fees by all means you want to use ethnic slurs. Go right ahead and this is intentional. Design the back of the hat form. It was launched with the expectation that there would be sort of this radical liberty approach and that even hateful speech would be tolerated and the thing that is sort of really different as well is that the platform doesn't push content at all so facebook and twitter and youtube. They all operate by recommending the best content when we think about things going viral it's usually because the platforms recognized that users responding in such a way that it was gonna meant the content was going to have great interest and then pushed it out to a whole bunch of people. This plant doesn't do that at all so you follow you. Follow you see their posts in reverse chronological order. And that's that so if the platform doesn't determine what people see what is doing that so on parlor. The interesting thing is that they've basically left all of this up to users. It is a user's responsibility to label sensitive about would be pornographic or extremely violent or hate-filled content if they post it and it is also used responsibility to use filters to determine whether they're going to see that so instead of trying to make sure that you know bad stuff doesn't go around the platform which is what the mainstream platforms tend to do what parlour is trying to do is making it so that you don't have to see it if you don't wish to and you giving users more control on that level so again it's just based on putting decisions that have typically been done on the platform level pushing it down to the user level and you mentioned the backers of parliament. Who's behind this. So rebecca mercer is the funder that got it off the ground. I mean everyone involved. Is i think has some very solid libertarian credentials executives with sort of ayn rand ian objectivism credentials or you know sort of bitcoin. Devotees rebecca mercer is the sign of robert mercer. Who is extremely wealthy hedge fund manager. Who has both funded. A whole bunch of very libertarian slash right meaning causes and also was involved with the cambridge analytica situation back in two thousand sixteen so he was funded dot company. Which was we all know. Got into a great deal of mass. Based on their somewhat dodgy business practices and as well obtaining of facebook data in ways that were blessed than orthodox. Got an end. Just how popular is this. Gambit of their how popular is parlor so parlour has gone from around four and a half million users before the election to well over ten men had been around for over two years at this point so they were really actually very slam trying to keep up with the traffic and it certainly didn't hurt that. You had some very high profile folks. Dan bongino the facebooks. Most popular radio hosts very right leaning. Talk show type actually. Owns a stake in the thing and has been pumping this on facebook as well based on the idea that people are irritated about facebook. Showdown groups and You know the stop. The steel effort that they sort of crackdown on and so it's kind of been on the platform itself. It's been getting pushed pretty hard. And that's been a big part of their growth. And i guess the question is does this platform present a competitive threat to the mainstream social media companies. Like could it actually compete with facebook and twitter too early to say. I think that there is a lot of skepticism. I mean people always say they don't want you know anyone else telling them what to thank telling them what to read or recommending content or censoring that they say that however the the history of the mainstream platforms basically was of people who had roughly those ideas themselves who were very much first amendment devotees even though they ran private platforms in the first amendment. Doesn't really apply in the full sense. They really wanted to keep it open for everybody and the problem is is that life gets in the way a and really vile stuff makes other users feel uncomfortable crimes get committed. There's kind of a reason why these platforms have cracked down over time. So i think it's sort of to be determined whether people who are leaving facebook and twitter because of their concerns that conservative viewpoints aren't going to be are being treated fairly are going to like being on a platform where like nude sell. Fees are totally cool. Are a wall street journal. Reporter jeff horowitz. Things reporting thank you.

Twitter Jeff Horwitz Rebecca Mercer Facebook Ian Objectivism Robert Mercer TB Jeff Dan Bongino Youtube Rand Cambridge Jeff Horowitz Wall Street Journal
"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:35 min | 2 months ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"They use sharia law. They have no respect for individual rights respect for property and the only reason they have any authority is because they have guns in they have power and they have force and they do it badly. There's nothing civilising about the courts of somalian and and they write about pirates and because they've you force they don't view forces something unique that must be extracted from human life. And that's why anarchy has to devolve into violence Because it treats forces. what's the big deal negotiating over. So we were a lot of high level philosophy. But i'd like to touch on the troubles. The chaos of the day a couple of things and i really trying to find a hopeful path. Way out so one is the current pandemic or in particular not the virus but our handling of it is. There's something philosophically politically they. You'd like to see the you would like to recommend you would like to maybe give a hopeful message. If we take that kind of trajectory might be able to get out. Because i'm kind of worried about the economic pain that people are feeling that there's this quiet suffering Agree with you completely. There is suffering. it's horrible. I mean i know people you know. I got a lot of restaurants i would. One of things we love to do is is eat out. My wife doesn't cook anymore. we don't have. We don't have kids in the house anymore. Says she doesn't have to go out a lot. We go to restaurants and because we have our favorites that we go to them a lot. We get to know the owners of the restaurant there. And it's just heartbreaking. You know these people put they life. You know the blood sweat and tears. I mean we blitz with his into these projects restaurants super difficult to manage most of them copan cooked anyway and the restaurants. We go to a good restaurant. So they've done a good job and they offer a unique value and they shut them down and you know many of them will never open you. Know something like the estimate fifty sixty percent of restaurants. Some places won't open these people's lives these people's capital these people effort. These people's love talk about love. Love what they do it particularly if they're the chef as well and it's gone and it's disappeared and what are they going to do with their lives. Now they're gonna live off the government. A politicians would like them big on stimulus plan so he can hand checks to people to get them used to living off of us rather than it's disgusting and it's offensive and it's unbelievably sad and this is where it comes to this. I came out of the people. I mean this idea. The objective is don't care. I mean i love these people who provide me with pleasure of eating wonderful food in a great fireman. Something inspiring about them to like when i say late restaurant. I don't know. I wanna do better my my own stuff. Yeah exactly it's it's it's diminished buying. Anybody who does it is excellent. I love sports and because it's a one realm in which you'd still value and celebrate. Excellence i but i try to celebrate. Excellence in my life. So i you know i try to be nice to these people and you know with covid which we went. Mortar restaurants believed i. We did more takeout stuff. We made an effort particularly the restaurants. We really loved to keep them going to encourage them to put.

"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:44 min | 2 months ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"And i have a police force and judiciary system that backs my vision and you have a claim against my pocket if a claim against puppy. And you have a police force and your judicious them that backs your claim who's right so the our definitions of property different. Yes i different issues about the acclaim on the property is different so what so so so. We just agree on the definition of property. But why should we agree. Your judicial system is as one deficient property. Might dishes system is not you. You think that there's no such thing as intellectual property rights and your whole system believes that. Yeah and my whole system believes there is such thing so you duplicating my books and handing out to all your friends and not paying me a royalty. Yeah and i. i think that's wrong. It might judicial system in my police force. Think that's and we both living in the same geographic area so we have overlapping jurisdiction. Now that would say well go she. Why should we negoti. My system is actually right. There was such a thing as intellectual populates negotiation. Here you want and you should either pay a fine. Go to jail yet. But why can't a because it's a community is multiple those multiple parties and it's like a majority vote. They'll they'll hire different forces that says yawns is is onto something here with the definition of property. It will go with that. So anna kissed democracy in in in a majority wall sense while think so i think anarchy so promotes like emergent democracy right like oh it doesn't it i'll tell you what it promotes. It promotes emergent Strife and civil war and violence constant uninterrupted violence because the only way to settle the dispute between us since we both think that we are right and we have guns behind us to protect that and we have a legal system. We have a whole theory of ideas is is. You're stealing myself. How do i get a back invade you. I take over and who's going to. Who's going to win that bat. The smartest guy no guy with the biggest guns seaver. The advocates say that they're using implied like the state uses implied Four thirty doing violent because they they take the status as today and they refuse to engage in the conversation about what a state should and could look like and how we can create mechanisms to protect us from the state using those those new. Look this my view of anarchy is very simple. it's ridiculous position it's infantile. I mean. I really mean this in sorry to mike albert and and all the other freezers very very smart animals because atticus is never. You won't find a dumb anarchist right because dumb people know it wouldn't work. You have to have its app so you you have. How i q vienna sure. They're all really intelligent. Intellgence new reason is that you have to create such a mythology new hit. You have to create so many rationalizations any joe in the street knows. It doesn't work because they can understand what happens with to people who are armed in the street and have a dispute and there's no mechanism to resolve that dispute. Yeah that's objective that seven. This is what gets the objective. That's objective the.

anna mike albert joe atticus
"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"And i can't the very few billionaires. I don't love in a sense that i appreciate everything they've done for me. People cherish and love. They've made the world a better place. Why would it ever cross my mind that they make me look bad because they richer than me or the. I don't have what they have. They've made me so much richer. They've made inventions that used to cost millions and millions and millions of dollars accessible to me. I mean this is a supercomputer in my pocket now but think about right. What is the difference between. And i'll get to the essence of you a minute but think about what the differences between me and bill gates in terms of. Because it's true that was a welcome closer to the homeless person but in two in my day to day life. I'm closer to bill gates. You know we both live in a nice house his nicer but we live in a nice house. His big but mine is plenty big. We both dwight 'cause his his nicer but we both drive cars. 'cause years ago what caused we both can get on a plane in los angeles and fight in new york and get about the same time will be flying private. The only differences mike private plane. I share with three hundred other people and his but it's accessible. It's relatively comfortable again. In the perspective of fifty years ago one hundred years ago it's unimaginable that i could fly like that for such a lo fi relive very similar lives in that sense so i don't resent him so first of all. I'm an exception to the supposed. All that people resent. I don't think anybody. I don't think people do resent unless the present and this is the key people are taught. And i've seen this in america in this is to me the most horrible shocking thing that has happened in america. Over the last forty years. I came to america so i mean immigrants that came to miserable in one thousand nine hundred seven and i came here because i thought this was the place where i could wait had the most opportunities and it is it most opportunities and came here because i believed it was a certain american spirit.

bill gates america los angeles new york dwight
"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:54 min | 2 months ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"You're not gonna make the big leaps forward without a holistic view of what it is you're trying to achieve. And maybe that's the question what is intelligence asks the kind of questions you have to ask to make big leaps forward to really move the field in a positive direction and it's the people who can think that way who moved fields move technology. Move anything anything is is is everything is a jessica said is painful because underlying that kind of question is will. Maybe the work. I've done for the past. Twenty years was Was a dead end and you have to kind of face that even just the might not be true but even just facing that reality is is just. It's a it's a painful feeling absolutely but it's that's part of the reason why to pointed joy the work that you do right so that even if it doesn't completely worked out this year's right needed was not a waste because you enjoy the process and if you ll on as as any entrepreneur knows is right if you learn from the waste of time from the hours from the mistakes then you can build on there and make things even better rate in so the nixon years a a a massive success can we Another impossible task so you did wonderfully talking about the other impossible. Task of giving a world wind overview of the philosophy of objectivism philosophy vine around. Yes oh luckily. She did it in an essay she. She talks about doing her philosophy on one foot. But lemme integrated with the literature and with a life a little bit. She wanted to be writer but her goal. She had a particular goal in her writing. She was an idealist right. She wanted which tree the ideal man. So one of the things you do you want to decide is what is an idea man. You have to ask that question. What does that mean. You might have a sense of it. You might have sown glimpses at glimpses of it in other people's literatures. But what is it. So she starts reading philosophy to try to figure out what if say about the ideal man and when she finds our fighter in terms of the view of philosophies of man and she's she's attracted certainly when she's young nietzsche because nietzsche at least has a vision of of of grand. Your man even though his philosophies very flawed and has other problems and contradicting many many ways but at least he has that vision of what is possible to man and she's attracted to that will mandic vision that idealistic vision. So she discovers in writing and particularly radio shrug but even in the fountain that she's going to have to develop philosophy. She's going to have to discover these ideas for herself. Because they're not fully articulated anywhere else. They glimpses again of it in aristotle in in in egypt but they're not fully fleshed out so To large extent she develops a philosophy for very practical purpose to write to write a novel about the idea. Man in in in fact is manifestation of that by the way. Say interrupt as little aside. She does when you say man you mean and the because we'll bring this up often a she does. Maybe you can elaborate of how she specifically uses man and he the work. We live in a time now. Are we january or she did that in in in the sense that everybody did it during her period time right. It's only in modern times where we do heap slash she right. It is starkly when you said he. Human human being listed particular context implied that it was a but in this case in this case in this one sentence.

nietzsche writer jessica nixon egypt
"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

05:35 min | 2 months ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"He i think he's admitted to being a marxist he is he's movies sidley reflect marxist theme is a huge fan of the fountainhead. And his actually his dream project he said in public. His dream project is to make fountain now all he would completely change it. Yes movie directors do and he's actually outline what is scripted looked like it would be a disastrous for the ideas of but he loves the story because they him the story about artistic integrity. Yeah and that's what he catches on and what he hates about. The story isn't individualism. And i think that his movie ends with howard. Walk joining some kind of commun- of architects. That do it for the love and don't do it for money and interesting. So yeah so you can connect with you without the fuss in before we get into the philosophy staying on ayn rand up so of my own personal experience. I think it's one that people share of experienced this with two people in nature. But when i brought up iran when i was in my early twenties the number of i rolls i got from sort of like advisers and so on that of dismissal. I've seen that later in life about more more specific concept in artificial intelligence in technical where people decided this is. This is a set of ideas that are acceptable and these ideas are not and they dismissed iran without giving me any justification of why they dismissed her. Except oh that something you're into when you're nineteen twenty this same thing people say h well. That's just something you do when you're in college and you take an inch shorter philosophy course. So i've never really. Anybody cleanly articulate their opposition to ayn rand in in my own private little circles. So maybe one question. I just want to ask is why is there such a opposition nine ran and may be another way to ask the same thing as what's misunderstood about iran so we haven't talked about the philosophy so it's hard to us right now we can guarantee if you think that's the right way to go..

ayn rand iran howard
"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

04:35 min | 2 months ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"What is my argument about. If i don't really have a good argument about them and then do. I know what i know so in that sense. It's always nice to be and pushed and oriented. The you know the nice thing about objectivism is everybody's doing that to me all the time because nobody agrees with me on anything. So i'm constantly challenged. Whether it's in by hoffman. On metaphysics and interest rate on the very foundations analogy and ethics everybody constantly and in in politics all the time. So i find that it's part of you know i prefer that everybody. There's a sense in which. I prefer that everybody agreed with me right because i think we live in a better world. But there's a sense in which disagreement makes it at least up to a point makes it interesting and challenging and forces you to be able to rethink or to confirm your on thinking to challenge thinking. Can you try did you. The impossible task can give a world wind to i in rand. The the mini size van ran. So i ran the human being iran. The novelist and i ran the philosopher. So who was ayn rand sure. So he'll life story is is one that i think is fascinating and but it also lends itself to this integration of all of these things. She was born in petersburg russia in nineteen zero five to middle class Family jewish family they. They owned a pharmacy father on the pharmacy and She grew up. She grew up She was a very She knew what you wanted to do. And what you wanted to be from a very young age. The age of nine. She knew she wanted to be a. She wanted to write stories. That was the thing she wanted to do. And you know. She focused her life after that on this goal of i wanna be a novelist i wanna right. And the philosophy was incidental to that in a sense at least until some point. In her life she witnessed. The russian revolution literally happened outside. They lived in saint petersburg. Where the i kind of demonstrations and end of the revolution happened. So she witnessed it. She lived through it as a teenager. Went to school under the soviets For a while they they they were under kind of the in on the black sea with a opposition government was willing and then they would they would go back and forth between the commies and the whites but she experienced what communism was like..

saint petersburg iran ayn rand rand hoffman russia
"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

02:39 min | 2 months ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"The following is a conversation with iran. Brooke one of the best known objectives philosophers and thinkers in the world. Objectivism is the philosophical system developed by ayn rand that she i expressed in her fiction books. The fountainhead and atlas shrugged and later in nonfiction essays and books on is the current chairman of the board at the ayn rand institute host of the european brooks show and the co author of free market revolution. Equal is unfair and several other books. Were he analyzes. Systems of government human behavior and the human condition from the perspective of objectivism. Quick mentioned be sponsor followed by some thoughts related to the episode blankets and by us for reading through summaries of books express. Vpn vpn. I've used for many years to protect my privacy on the internet and cash app. The app i use to france please check out the sponsors in the description to get a discount and support this podcast as a side note. Let me say that i. I read atlas shrugged and the fountainhead early in college along with many other literary and philosophical works from nietzsche heidegger. Kant locke foco wittgenstein of all the great existentialist from kargbo guard to komo. I always had an open mind. Curious to learn and explore the ideas of thinkers throughout history. No matter how mundane or radical or even dangerous they were considered to be on rand was and still is a divisive figure. Some people love her. Some people dislike or even dismiss her. I prefer to look past what somebody considered to be the flaws of the person and consider with an open. Mind the idea she presents. And you're on now describes and applies in his philosophical discussions in general. I hope that you'll be patient. And understanding as i venture out across the space of ideas and the ever-widening overton window pulling at the threat of curiosity sometimes saying stupid things but always striving to understand how we can better build a better world together. If you enjoy this thing subscribe on youtube review it with fast charging up podcast follow on spotify support 'em pitcher on a connect with me on twitter at lex friedman as usual. I'll do a few minutes of ads. No and no ads in the middle. I try to make these interesting. But.

ayn rand ayn rand institute Brooke iran komo chairman france youtube lex friedman twitter spotify
Thoughts and Prayers Are Costing Us a Fortune

The Scathing Atheist

03:28 min | 6 months ago

Thoughts and Prayers Are Costing Us a Fortune

"Our lead story tonight after much hemming and Hong about the downsides financial accountability in government, the trump administration reluctantly agreed to release a Herschel accounting of whatever happened to those billions upon billions of dollars entrusted to them under the Corona Virus Aid Relief and Economic Securities Act and confirmed every terrible thing. We assumed about the administration's stewardship of our money, including the fact that they didn't give two shits. If you found out how crooked they're stewardship of our money has bet. But to be fair unless your doctor evil. You'RE GONNA be way off on the numbers. Terrifying Republicans actually argued that oversight of the giant Relief Fund to make sure the money gets distributed responsibly would be an irresponsible west of government mony. Exactly now we don't have all the details because these numbers were released in such a way as to ensure that plenty of outright theft could still happen. Only recipients who received over one hundred and fifty thousand loans were listed, and all we were given was a range so given how much information was made public, if the administration straight up pocketed half of it, we wouldn't know about that yet, but even what we do know is plenty to raise eyebrows like for example. Find out when we get trump's tax returns. Yeah, right right now as soon as the audits over for example, a couple of things to already piss you off. The number of businesses directly connected to members of Goddamn Congress and the trump administration that were approved for loans, or for the fact, that is not the line ran. Institute got sticking. Out of the deal, but the number that really leaves off the page me is the nearly ten billion dollars that went directly into the pockets of clergy. Okay to be fair America's biggest export is being wrong. No. Meat Supply. What you mean. Whatever? I. Say the Ayn Rand Yassin. toot, except in a government bailout apply for government. bailouts lasts yes, just weeping as they did. A hard one. Oh I bet it wasn't for him though because they never meant what they said, anyway in all according to estimates from American atheist, churches receive between six point, two and nine point seven billion dollars minimum. Right now we don't know 'cause. They only released ranges, but keep in mind. The any church got one, hundred, forty, nine, thousand, nine, hundred and ninety nine dollars, or less, isn't on the list. In addition to that another four point eight billion went to private schools, predominantly Christian wants, and you know according to Bucket Supreme Court. That's the same as the church when they want it to be. You there's a bunch of those churches at one, forty, nine, nine, nine nine. teed. Yeah exactly so as American atheist, President Nick Fish pointed out quote in two months. The trump administration has given churches and religious schools more than double the CDC's annual budget and quote. So you know when it comes to corona virus mitigation, the most expensive ticket item right now might actually be thoughts and prayers.

Giant Relief Fund Hong President Nick Fish Bucket Supreme Court Ayn Rand Yassin. Goddamn Congress Theft CDC America
The Mind Financing The Future

The Portal

06:19 min | 9 months ago

The Mind Financing The Future

"When powerful people use their advantage to engage in new involuntary transfers of wealth safety or freedom from those too weak to defend themselves. The winners are almost always forced to create an idealism as a cover for their siphoning in simpler terms. These idealisms are actually cover stories or bespoke fig leaves which almost exactly fit. The extraction are taking that they are tailored mask once. This is understood. We realized that to test this theory. Each wave of idealism would have to be matched to a highly specific effective confession for an injustice that pervaded the era in which it was found. This concept of idealism as disguising theft is of course an upsetting cognitive shift get is therefore naturally initially difficult to come to see the waves of idealism that characterized each era that we have lived through not as the best of our aspirations for a better world but rather as the photographic negative of the greed of our own ruling classes for example. The idealism of United States competitiveness was everywhere in the nineteen eighties and early to mid Nineteen Ninety S. At that time it seemed to be about the need for all Americans to pull together and get back into fighting shape as a country looking below the surface however it was not really about the need of managers owners and workers to pull together through shared austerity to reinvigorate American industry. Rather it was a false idealism. That instructed organized American Labor to give up hard won gains that were then not matched by comparable sacrifices from the other groups. Once the United States Labor had been sufficiently humbled in attenuated in its power by the Mid Nineteen Ninety S. The drumbeat of patriotic competitiveness gave way to the post National Davos idealism of a world without borders singing the praises of Financial Inclusion Trade Immigration and philanthropy with the Maudlin sediments of nine hundred eighty five. We are the world as its anthem. The purpose of the Post National Movement was not to include those overseas but instead to allow the wealthy of the industrialized world to break the bonds with their fellow citizens of the working class and to access cheaper labor. Pools abroad using far-flung supply chance likewise the idealism of so-called constructive engagement with governments like communist China's would be seen through this lens as the rationalization for ignoring issues of human rights and strategic risk in such a way as to benefit economically in the short-term selling out American interests in the long-term meanwhile back home in the states the techno Utopian perspective that arose dominate. The Bay area of California held. That information just wants to be free and that now. Transparency is king because privacy is dead perversely as you would expect in this theory. This hippie dippy sounding digital vision is exactly what ushered in the surveillance economy as the platforms became not windows but half silvered mirror through which the social media barons learned every intimate detail about their users. These startups turn techno behemoths. Turned the most intimate personal details of our private lives into their proprietary business. Data which was as far from free or transparent as one could possibly imagine the idealism of gender and identity to fits the exact pattern second wave feminism seemed to be about recognizing the intrinsic worth of women in the workforce but it may also be seen as an employer dream to push out the labor supply curve in such a way as to make the previous single breadwinner household require a second income just to keep pace the politics of identity which caught fire in the wake of the twenty ten. Colorado Senate upset are explained largely by economists. Pm Alana's theory. That identity is the cheapest substitute for the Labor Voting Block which demanded far more significant economic concessions. More bizarrely the strange media ritual of pointing the finger of Islamaphobia at anyone who dares ask about a mass murderer in which the killer triumphantly shouts of the hawk. Bar Emits. Bloody and sadistic mayhem may well be about protecting transfer. Payments from oil-rich monarchies while the official admonition to see the Niqab hit job burqa and clitoridectomy predominantly ethnic differences or symbols of female. Liberation is so absurd to go along way towards establishing the need for some theory. Is this to fill the space. The left-leaning idealism of making housing affordable for all that too many bad loans inflated the housing bubble while the right-leaning Ayn Rand Ian Idealism of self regulating markets practiced by Alan Greenspan allowed the banks to privatize gains while socializing the risks losses. The giving pledge to May well be an attempt to keep governments from clawing back unpaid taxes from carefully sheltered fortunes or establishing wealth and asset taxes in a period of radical inequality. In this sense it can be seen as something of a bargain if I promise to screw over my own children for charity. I hope that you will leave me alone and unquestioned to enjoy my vast and carefully sheltered wealth while I'm alive and as we have just seen with the Biden endorsements from Speaker Nancy Pelosi Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and former Senator Hillary Clinton. The metoo movement appears to be less about sexual assault and more about adding a tool for extra-judicial vigilantism which can be wielded selectively or kept sheath according to taste suffice it to say that. Hashtag believe all women has now given way to hash tag believe convenient women so you may ask. Why bring this up now? Well in my opinion what we need now is someone who is not part of any of the official idealisms. Of course that would have sounded quite weird in isolation if I had simply said that we need an anti Utopian to lead us. Wouldn't we want someone envision a dreamer doer hybrid two point the way? No we want someone who is not signed on for any of these horrible anti patriotic charades from either party. Someone who never believed in free trade free markets nationalism housing for all deregulation competitiveness etcetera etcetera. We need someone who is not closed with Jeffrey Epstein who does not possess significant financial relationships abroad. Additionally someone alienated by both the hardline pro-life pro-choice perspectives. Would be perfect for where most Americans are today since the time of Nixon. We've been in an era of predatory idealism with our best impulses used against us from both right and left. It is now time to get back to the hard work of cleaning up from two disastrous generations of failed business people politicians reporters in professors and perhaps most importantly we need to flush our dependence on near totalitarian communist China out of our system before it is too late

China Official Ian Idealism Mid Nineteen Ninety United States Labor United States Jeffrey Epstein Post National Movement California Theft Colorado Ayn Rand Alan Greenspan Alana Nixon Islamaphobia Senator Hillary Clinton
"ayn rand" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

12:34 min | 10 months ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Venture Stories

"You to our panelists. We have joining with us. Eric Torn Bud Jason Crawford and you're on Brooke and they're going to discuss some of the ideas we've raised today about the ideas that can destroy or save silicon valley and the bring their own expertise to this topic. I'm I'm thrilled to hear the conversation. So why don't you guys take it away? Chur everybody Americ- Tornberg co-founder of village Global Ondeck goebbels a venture capital firm venture capitalist and entrepreneur in Silicon Valley into me to have this conversation with with these guys and let's start with random silicon valley. What do we wish that? Silicon Valley truly understood about rand objectivism. What do they get? What do we fail to appreciate so I stopped by the fact that I think? Silicon Valley has appreciated large extent. So I talked about this a lot of the people who founded Silicon Valley with the very least inspired by Ayn rand in in in the business activity in kind of approach and the energy and the passion that they took and I think some of the confidence they had in founding. The valley spoken to many many entrepreneurs maybe of the earlier generation more so than the younger generation who are passionate about brand and and she helped shape their lives but I think there are few things one is I think that the Heroes Right. The productive capacity the ability to change the world to production. Using your mind. There's a WHO warwick activity and and that is that it's model activity that they are. Malo does not just kind of business. He was with Malo Heroes because they are. They are making the most of their life pursuing a passionate love what they do which is a beautiful thing to be able to do what you love to do. All of our lives. So it's it really is that they are Malo Hugh us and I think the thing is that you know that you and I think they know this implicitly that the source of all this innovation and successes is not just a passion and they will and so the reason and to value that fully end to fully express that that it is reason and their own personal values that make them Roy who woke individuals. I think if Silicon Valley understood that and therefore a subsidiary to that understood that what they require therefore is the freedom to use their mind and to pursue their passion. Then I think we live in a different world. What would rans commentary about Silicon Valley today? You know we've seen in the last decade last fifteen years. Silicon Valley go from the darling that enabled Obama enabled the Arab spring to the devil that has enabled trump facebook controversy uber etc. Would Rans commentary be today or call to talking about okay? Speaking her and I don't know I'll start with brand would say stuff that I could never imagine. She was genius. I'm not I think would be first of all what made Silicon Valley galling what made so it could values massive thing to be admired. Had another string Obama. It had to do with this like this. Is My iphone as usual. And all the amazing now we seige rate we forget that. Silicon Valley started with HP and with with Intel and with with apple and the whole Internet. And that you know the problem war today is less silicon. Valley's change though. I think it has a little bit changing. It's that the world doesn't appreciate the extent to which Silicon Valley a shaped your world shaped Alexa completely different today than they were thirty years ago. Just think about the things you did it on a day-to-day basis it. Where you went for information. How how you interacted with Computers Director? With what kind of jobs people have changed all of that is Silicon Valley? Silicon Valley should be put on the hill now because in politics because impact they'd had an individual lives and it's been overwhelmingly positive. Impact extent that people can relate to this technology so then the question is why is why turned against Silicon Valley and the world stood against again not because of the politics not because of trump now because of all of that now because Uber country. Quite how many people's lives not impacted by UBER? I mean we're all better off those of us who travel at least all better off. No it's because the wool does become less admiring of success. The world has become. I think is therefore not Silicon Valley to less appreciative of productive. Ability of of people. Don't see the connection between their rise instead of living the quality of life and all the value that the values produced for them and all of these focus on is on these things that are problematic completely evade completely ignored the massive benefits. So they can rally is being the world has become well trysted more collectivistic and more controlling using it added that I think it's self has become more apologetic and less sort of moral justification for its own heroism. As you said earlier I think part of what's going on with the height of public sentiment and the media seeming to turn against kind of tech in general is just that check one. It won the world. You know the top the top companies today top most valuable companies the world. Our company is Software is beginning to hitting the point where tech companies are not just creating computers and writing software. But they are. They're taking over every industry right. So Uber is not a software company Transportation Company. That's beating out other transportation companies with better software. Flexiport company I used to work for is a entering the freight logistics business and beating out other logistics companies with better software. And this is what Marc Andreessen predicted is almost a decade ago when he wrote this thing he's a softwares eating the world and that is exactly what has happened and so in general you always see. Public sentiment turned against a thing once it becomes a successful and powerful when the underdog. Everybody roots for you. There was a great article somebody wrote. I forget. The name of the author talked about how media is like a clock and it starts at midnight. You're popular and then as the clock turns around you know like you're on the ascendancy and then around a six o'clock you're the devil and they should completely turn against you and then you fall and then maybe you get to midnight and they or rebirth. But I think that's what's happening. The clock is all of tech not just one. Company is swinging around six o'clock. We've tech has taken over the world and in mostly a good way But anytime you get that big the narrative is you have power and thereby or I. I can't imagine Steve Jobs apologizing the way marks is completely different generation. Right and again. I think it has to do maybe with Iran right if I wanted to be positive about this. There was that founding generation Silicon Valley that may be drew inspiration from grant from other sources. Well then I think was much more confident that much more certain about the value that creating the benefit. They were quitting unwilling to defend themselves. I think even they should have been even stronger in their defense but suddenly the Zuckerberg's people in Google today even Pezo's away from the limelight and hiding some corner or some Caribbean island with With a certain element that he doesn't WanNa get involved right but he's certainly not out there defending Amazon and look. If there's any company that should be easy to defend because it's changed lives in profound ways right now it should be Amazon. But yet that isn't at the forefront because partially because. I think it's not just partially. I think the valley really was hit hard by what happened to Bill Gates and Microsoft when the government would have to get changed some of the the the attitude of everybody. Michael crushed many got crushed in a central standing up. I mean there was the famous Senate hearing where they go in front of my spending on lobbying it had no presence in. Dc did nothing. They motor was you. Leave us alone will leave you alone. And they didn't want to be involved in politics and then all it hat stands up and says you guys got to build you and you've got to be here and you gotta spend money you've got to bite me and all my friends and Microsoft said No. We're not interested and they got crushed that I think it's for that I think a Lotta people attributed for so when Google was founded. Google was founded about the same time as this was happening to Michael who go made a conscious decision for very early on. We'RE GONNA pay off everybody. Wait a by everybody out. We're going to give the Democrats are going to get. You're going to get involved in this political thing and I think that we can step position. They don't have that self esteem. They don't have that confidence and they're afraid of it right because they know what happened to Bill Gates and Microsoft got so I see one of the challenges of today. In for a while now reconciling Gal terrorism and meritocracy think we all the way back to Christianity Christianity sort of the great inversion of evaluation of allegation of strong devaluation of the week. I will be last shall be first. Make sure on earth seeing the problems with that image Willpower Success Mary achievement and ran the spiritual successor to she. Hey It's twenty twenty you. An ran was a long time ago. Libertarianism is less popular. Whatever people don't even know directive as a means in today's culture mainstream culture? So why is that? Why is it holy unpopular today? Why they lost the Culture War. Who is the spiritual successor to Iran? How do we? How do we get meritocracy back on track at least arena with with the Galaxy and UNPACK got? Some is a sense in which continues the path of Nietzsche this sense of which she takes in a completely new direction completely different direction. She replaces this. I give the will and emotion if you will with with with reason and morality morality based on reason which I don't think Nietzsche could really conceive of so there's a vast offensive between the two and I'm not convinced that you're right in terms of popularity being being at a low point now again is. There's a difference between objectivism libertarianism. But I'm not convinced that because I don't know the when it was great so I I think that what you're seeing with objective is what Iranians ideas with a view of the world is. It's slowly increasing. Now We'd love to see that but it's a slow steady increase and yes we have the illusion that it's more powerful than it is. Let's say with a tea party where everybody's holding up signs of WHO is John Up. But they didn't have a clue what we're talking about really so the number of people who actually get it. Great who actually embraced. These ideas are committed to these ideas constantly growing but at a slow pace and hasn't hit that you know that inflection point that in Silicon Valley you talk a lot about and maybe hopefully we'll see that inflection point happening in our lifetimes I don't know but it's it's not that has not diminished at the same time. What's happening so you've got this the political world the conventional the world in which we all live out there is the to me which we would expect right because they're no good ideas. Good ideas are still being at the mall. So while objective is increase the rest of the whole of the chew of any faster than we're growing and we don't have we don't have that influence and I over other than continue to do what we do and maybe new things but trying to expand to each and trying to get people a greater understanding of these ideas. I don't know how you shortcut that. Yeah and how you? How how?.

Silicon Valley Microsoft Bill Gates Google Iran Ayn rand Obama Michael Malo Americ- Tornberg Global Ondeck Marc Andreessen Eric Torn Bud warwick Steve Jobs Brooke co-founder facebook Roy Dc
"ayn rand" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:55 min | 1 year ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"I came here to be heard in the name of every man of independence still left in the world. I wanted to state my terms. I do not care to work or live on on any others. My terms are a man's right to exist for his own Satan. Hello from Wonder Media Network. I'm Jenny any Kaplan. And this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today's Beautiful Mind is a controversial twentieth century writer and philosopher who's had an outsized the impact on various American political movements. Well into the twenty first century. Let's talk about Ayn rand. A Lisa Rosenbaum. Tom was born on February second. Nineteen O five in Saint Petersburg Russia to an upper middle class Jewish family. Her father was a prosperous pharmacist. Eliza the eldest of three children was tutored at home as a child and later enrolled in a progressive school where she excelled academically. She had a much harder time. MM socializing with other students and was fairly isolated following the Russian revolution of nineteen seventeen when the Russian monarchy was overthrown by the communist this Bolsheviks Elisa's father's pharmacy was confiscated by Communist authorities. The family was deeply affected by this and eliecer resented the event for the rest of her life a Lisa attended Leningrad State University where she studied history after graduating in nineteen twenty four. She started a degree at the State Institute for Cinematography and screenwriting and got the opportunity to move to the United States. She left under the pretext of learning learning about the American film industry. Bring back dot knowledge to the Soviet Union Alisa Rosenbaum arrived in the US in nineteen twenty six and immediately changed her name to iron rand. I lived with cousins in Chicago for her first six months and then made her way out to Hollywood. Ali would once in La a chance encounter with producers cease. Ob led to a job as an extra one of his films. Eventually she turned this into a job as a junior screenwriter. Well working for de Mille. I met actor Frank O'Connor and the two were married in nineteen twenty nine soon after where I was hired to work in the Wardrobe Department at our Ko radio pictures within the year. She was head of the Department at night. She diligently wrote stories plays and film outlines. I I play. Night of January. Sixteenth was produced in Los Angeles in Nineteen thirty four. It was an ode individualism in the form of a courtroom drama after running successfully in La. I and her husband moved to New York City to oversee oversee the plays production on Broadway where it also had a successful run first novel we. The living was published the two years later in nineteen thirty six it's a semi autobiographical romance focused on. How Soviet to Tell A -Tarian ISM subjugated the individual an individual interests to those of the state? The combination of overt romance philosophy combined Miss Single Work of fiction was a winning formula. Ironwood us again and again in in her novels in nineteen thirty six and also started work on the first two major novels published seven years later in nineteen forty three. The fountainhead is the story of genius architect who blows up public housing project. He designed after it was altered against his wishes by government bureaucrats. He He subsequently put on trial and eventually delivers a lengthy speech. His defense in which he argues for individualism over collectivism and egoism over altruism truism. The jury acquits him on all charges. The fountainhead received a majority of bad reviews from literary critics. But its popularity spread by word of mouth and it was soon a best seller. I sold the movie rights to Warner Brothers and wrote the screenplay herself. There's this Howard roar. It was great talent but unwilling to compromise his ideals that any right in nineteen forty five. I began sketching out. What's generally considered to would be her? masterwork atlas shrugged based heavily on concepts already discussed in the. FOUNTAINHEAD atlas shrugged. Imagines a world on the verge of economic collapse in which collectivists have exploited the most productive and creative citizens to benefit the undeserving and laziest members of society. A band of elite producers led by Hero John Galt essentially go on strike to force the government to recognize their economic freedom and greater value to society the heroes then watches the national economy and the social system are destroyed because of their absence. I'm called her. Philosophy laid out in the fountainhead and atlas shrugged objectivism awesome. She described it as he has to hold reason as an absolute by which I mean that he has to hold a reason as he's only guide to action and that he must leave by independent judgement of his own mind that he's highest moral purpose is the achievement of his his own. Heavens and that he must not for other people nor accept their right to force him that each man end must leave as an end in himself and follow his own. Rational self kinder's atlas shrugged was an immediate bestseller though. It was thoroughly attacked by critics from across the political spectrum for its perceived immorality selfishness and general misanthrope. He I fame grew along with the popularity of her novels us and she spoke at universities and appeared on TV. Shows like sixty minutes. I developed a large following particularly among Libertarians. Say Fair Capitalists Capitalists and publish newsletters about her beliefs and the tenants of objectivism still. She was constantly frustrated by her inability to gain acceptance from academic philosophers and other serious intellectuals. I died in New York City on March. Six nine thousand nine hundred eighty two of heart failure at her funeral a six foot flower arrangement in the shape of a dollar sign was placed near her casket. After her death. I ns work continued to have a major impact on society. Many historians and political scientists believe that her works contributed to the increased popularity of libertarianism. UNISOM in the United States during the nineteen nineties and two thousands starting in two thousand nine I and also served as a major influence on the tea party movement. It's it's for these political influences that China's mostly remembered today as always. We'll be taking a break for the weekend but tune in on Monday for the story of another another beautiful mind this week of Encyclopedias. Amanda was brought to you by audible right now for a limited time you can get three months of audible for just six ninety ninety five a month. That's more than half off the regular price just go to audible dot com that's eight. Ud L. E. DOT com slash encyclopedia media or text encyclopedia to five hundred. Five hundred. If you WANNA learn more about nine rand you can listen to both the fountainhead and atlas shrugged audible again right now for a limited time you can get three months of audible for just six ninety five a month visit audible dot COM Slash Josh Encyclopedia protects encyclopedia to five hundred. Hundred now special. Thanks to lose Kaplan my favorite sister and co-creator talked on.

Los Angeles Ayn rand United States Lisa Rosenbaum Kaplan New York City Wonder Media Network writer Leningrad State University Bolsheviks Elisa State Institute for Cinematogr Warner Brothers Chicago Saint Petersburg Russia China John Galt Eliza Tom Frank O'Connor Ud L.
"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

"The show. Where should they go they should go to overdo? PODCAST DOT COM our internet website up there. We have links to the books that we read in are going to read. We have old episodes. We have episodes that we think are good for new listeners. We have a link ktar patriots fan page view on. Give some money at this point. I'm just going to say if you get on Patriot and Recogni. You recommend that we read atlas shrugged. We're you're going to ask you for another book. I don't see the point in doing this episode again but You know. Give me some space from the fountainhead. On had maybe I'll feel differently next week. I think will be the secret river by Kate. Grenville with My lovely wife. Laura guesting on the show We should have the recipe on that one. No no specific plan was to keep you off that one so you could take curb your son. I can't be on my own podcast any more Geez. No that's why we did it and then we'll have the rest of the December schedule coming coming out soon So folks can keep an eye out for that. That's it all right. Everybody Hell you second handers out there until we talk to you next week. Please try to be happy Yeah that was a Hickam podcast. We get you a chair or some. WD Can the show by wd forty for care got WD forty. Can you put it on that share ear. Please welcome to Overdo. It's a podcast intro. We've already talked about the squeaky chair in the interim..

atlas Grenville Kate Laura
"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

"Do you know what I'm saying. Oh I know exactly what you're saying and especially because it's also the people getting ahead in this book are like White Dudes also put together But it just it M- Um Yeah it is just but for the people with the opportunity to take advantage of it It just strikes me that there's not by the nature of being a story that has to be told like there can only be one Howard work in the book for her to make her point but that to me highlights a problem problem in the philosophy. It relies on individual movers. And like we're not out here on our own own. We're not selling book book. Full of Howard roadworks would be. ooh I mean there is a there is already a really long stretch. Where Howard and wine and are ostensibly having a conversation between the two of them read exactly like one long monologue because it is to people with the same viewpoint agreeing agreeing with each after fifteen pages and go back to what you said about appealing to younger readers like or teenage readers? Idealistic readers can also see it appealing to it can calcified by and become a resentment of like I did work for what little stuff I do have And it appeals to VAT sense also right. Yeah that that that's part of what drives the second handers record of the individualist. is they see. They see true greatness. They evaluate themselves next to it and find themselves wanting and their reaction to it is to not not to aspire to something better themselves but to tear the other person down the lesson of the book. I guess okay okay. Okay so like we did a service. Why this book became the the book like that has gone on to be? I think a good job and it is not. She is not a bad writer. I don't think the time most of the time show me and she. She has a things she is setting out to do. And that makes the book very long and very repetitive in spots but also also she I think Keating's sort of tragic arc is my act honestly my favorite. Because he comes the closest to being a person yet towns. I guess human. Yeah and it's really his downfall is this is portrayed as very gradual but also like very inevitable And it's I don't know it. It is a like he he could maybe had he taken a couple of different. Paths have sort of escaped this fate that he finds himself in where he testifies at the trial. For Howard blowing up the building and ran says he was supposed to be a blockbuster witness but he has so little presence like after he leaves. It's as if no one at all had spoken. Because that's that is keating is his cellophane ain't call me right. hisself is defined by By how other people see him and if other people don't see him in art impressed pressed by him then he doesn't it's like he doesn't exist it honestly to sounds like it'd be really easy to see yourself if you're honestly reading this book so you'd find versions of yourself in Keating but if you read this book and you just see how like you see yourself at Howard roark. I don't trust you please. Don't yeah well that's that's another. There's a same guardian. Yeah article that I then. I referenced earlier actually that talks about the two big groups of people who are influenced by Ayn Rand and her philosophy is American conservatives and Silicon Silicon Valley Tech Bros and so they it is a it is a field of dudes who believe themselves to be Howard rocks and look at how that's going for everyone going great okay. That's the fountainhead. Everybody thanks Andrew. Yeah you're welcome. I hope you all wanted to mush politics stuff. Sometimes I know people come to this to escape politics. Sometimes that I'm happy to give people all that escaped to an extent but there's really no avoiding no talking about it in this because we are if you are an American in today you are surrounded by what became of this philosophy. Yeah this what what is it. They did some stuff. They did some survey in the early nineteen nineties of like the Library of Congress being like what is the most important book in your life and number one was the Bible and number two as atlas shrugged. I was like okay. This is.

Howard roark Keating Library of Congress Ayn Rand Howard Andrew
"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

12:58 min | 1 year ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

"Of in his favor sort of against him. I don't know there's there's there's a lot of stuff that I read a while ago at this point in time a little foggy on let's get to the. The final event in the book is Peter. Peter Keating pushing forty years old is down out. His firm is shrinking. His life's almost over his forty year. So I just I just mean time has yeah. His time as time passed in his time has come and gone because he was only ever leaching off of other people and didn't have anything to offer himself and so once especially once to a decided that he had gotten what he needed out of Peter. That's kind of it for your career. Like he's seen his old fashioned Shindig bad. There's this government housing projects that they're trying to build and they've got a specific dollar amount that they're trying to do you know make units sell rent four. It's a it's ten dollars or fifteen dollars a month I think which this is is like nineteen thirty something okay like during or just after the depression so I don't know how that translates but translates now but anyway they've got a specific dollar amount? They WANNA hit. They've tried all kinds of architects and can't find somebody who can do it. And so Peter pull strings with two we we as like. Hey I really really need this to five. You're GonNa bring me something that will get the job done like great. It's yours so peter goes to Howard and this is the first time the two of them I have met in a long time Howard is essentially unchanged and meanwhile peter has aged visibly and as as non-use oh great great Howard says okay? This is this is the way I can collaborate with you. Is the building gets. It's built just as I want it. No surprises no anything. And then you are the person who does like the people end of things and you get to put your name on it. You get to claim full credit for. I don't care about that I get to do the work and like express myself and Peter in a moment matt what is presented as a moment of lucidity is like actually. You're getting the better end of this. I feel and Howard is is genuinely impressed that Peter can can see that sure from his his second hander point of view so this is all this is all going fine and Howard and wine and decided they were GonNa go on like a yacht vacation for three months just conveniently were Howard isn't GonNa work at all because how has been working a lot yet. Mandala work for the good work that he does is the ideal man. He's got working hard. And then by the time Howard gets back of course other architects have gotten their hands on this building and they've added superfluous stuff and Peter even though he tried honestly to to not let this happen. His contract was not respected People were like hey come on what who are. Who are you to say that your vision is perfect and it can't be added to like it it's presented as this This ugly side of of collectivism where nobody is like. Nobody is held to account. Nobody isn't it is no. It's nobody's responsibility to make sure this building gets done because it's everybody's responsibility and so there's like nowhere where the buck stops and so what ends up happening is this monstrosity and Howard decides. I don't WanNa see my work bike. Defaced like this and so what I'm going to do is I'm going to blow the building up and so we literally blows blows the building And there's a big lawsuit about this. There's this whole sequence where this where wine and discovers the limits of his powers over public opinion and also that too is also eaten the paper out from under him because he tries to defend his friend Howard and can't like a unique newly-formed Union. Oh strikes and there's a strike going on for two months and circulation is going down and the the board of of people's like hey we have to compromise with this union and so why and finally snaps and relents and this is his this this is where he is different from Howard work never and ever compromises. No compromise never ever sold out galaxy quest. I never give up. Never surrender. There is there is a version of our Howard work. That is the indie musician. Who never sold out right? Like he is like he never signed a big like big label deal. He's neutral milk hotel guy or something. Yeah he's happening and he just like won't compromise in his vision whereas like you know Ulysses Listen Paul McCartney and wings and you're like Interesting ally money on public Kardashian WEANS. I'm I'm what I'm saying. Is John Lennon this hour rourke and follow McCartney That's Miami John Lennon did some stink. Also maybe Ringo is our our rourke ease uncompromising now ringo is collectivism because he had that big that he did after the Beatles broke up like they all played on individually and wrote songs for him but they didn't all appear on the same track so yeah Ringo and his all star band or actually avatars of collective is okay. This is good. I like those any who he rand. And the Beatles a new book coming to Amazon Self Published by Andrew Undercutting Hammond Craig getting but so bombs this thing he gets in trouble thing he gets in trouble and then the end of the book. Is this big scene where he talks about individualism and how it's great and he moves the jury so much that they acquit him really. Yeah so it's not even like a tragedy of like society bringing this man down. He does he try he triumph. It's like an Rocco's every because every man even even the lowest man man even even your Peter Keating's occasionally has this like flash of knowledge. Where they they understand what it could be like to be an individual well? It's like how rocky rocky won the Cold War and rocky four by punching a big blonde man and then like speaking passionately to a crowd of Soviets. It's it's unbelievable or is it. Where is it if you put at the end of the Howard Gets Dominique? Does he and Gail L. Winans like last meeting with Howard because he so ashamed of the thing that he did is to give Howard. Did this commission for the wine and building Which is going to be positioned on one a bit of health kitchenware widened by came up from? It's GonNa to be the tallest skyscraper in New York City. So he went asked skyscraper. Anyone bills in New York so he wins the girl he wins the building So as we close Andrew True I wanNa know two things why we've talked a little bit about this but now that we've gone through the plot like what in Nair do you think really kind of set rand up to go on. This objective is journey and wide appeal to people. And then why do so many people may be bounced off this book. We've got a lot of notes from folks who are just like man. I tried. No thanks or you can't wait to hear you say about this one in a way. That clearly communicates that they did not like this book. I mean it's just to get to the most basic level like it's extremely long. Okay just and so I could see how while you're looking for that it is. It is that you're not looking for that. Well that's too bad because it's still still that okay But just too. So here's an idea. Here's the thing here is something that Howard orcas talking about talking about the government housing projects. And what they mean and how he doesn't have anything against the poor basically but like cured. I Dunno let let let me just read it and let the book speak for itself Nobody can afford a modern apartment except the very rich and the poppers. Have you seen converted Brownstone in which the average self supporting couple has to live. Have you seen their closet. Kitchens and their plumbing. They're forced to live like that because they're not incompetent enough. They make forty dollars a week and it wouldn't be allowed into a housing project but they're the ones who provide the money for the dam project. They pay the taxes and the taxes raised their own rent and they have to move from a converted brownstone into an unconverted one and from that into a railroad flat. I'd have no desire to penalize a man because he's worth only fifteen dollars a week but I'll be damned if I can see why a man worth forty must be penalized in penalized in favor of the one. WHO's less competent So I could see either side of of that like trump coming to it as a young ish reader. Yeah I can see you like a reader like not nodding along with that and be like yeah like you know people get all these handouts and maybe we should all just be we should all get stuff based on how hard we you try and how much we contribute. And that's especially that that's a very American sort of sentiment is like. It's the dark side of the American dream thing where anybody can pull themselves up by their bootstraps where it then follows. The unspoken second part of that is anyone who does not appear to have been pulled up by their bootstraps. Just doesn't want it enough. Yes correct and so this this speech of but but on the other side of that this. The speech of rooks assumes that there are absolutely no external system. No systemic anything. There is no reason why one person would make fifteen dollars a week and another person would make forty dollars a week except for their own innate ability and their own like worth and incompetence yeah it has nothing to do with the accessibility of good job or the accessibility of good school or food. Or whatever or whether or not whoever you are has been determined by people in power to be less than good good And you have been red line out of neighborhood or whatever it might be. Yeah it doesn't. It doesn't stand up to scrutiny scrutiny. For me when you actually look at like what people have done specifically in this country even like apply it to specifically American communities in politics. It just doesn't seem to lineup but I see the nugget of truth in that which like why not. Why not help the person who is having trouble affording putting the thing that they have to like? Yeah it's like she. She is interested in a in a way. She's interested in a more just society but that also is being like rested on assumptions. That I don't think hold up to literally any scrutiny. All and that's I think that's why it would capture younger people more because it's the kind of thing that sounds really good and really like common sense until you think about it. From from the from the perspective of some of more lived experience or different lived experience. Like just if if you are like a middle class white kids like I. I was back when I was sixteen. Seventeen but yeah I could in my experience of the world has been been one where most people seem to be on an even footing because everyone around me is white and this is like we all none of us have have to deal with any particular handicaps because we all have the same background but.

Howard Peter Keating Andrew Undercutting Ringo John Lennon New York City Beatles Rocco Gail L. Winans rooks Amazon Paul McCartney New York Kardashian Ulysses rand
"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

13:27 min | 1 year ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

"You don't have to be to clear about it. Use Big League. Vague words Universal Harmony Eternal Spirit divine purpose nirvana paradise racial supremacy the dictatorship of the proletariat internal corruption NPR. That's the oldest one of all the far has been going on for centuries and men still fall for it yet. The tests should be so simple. Just listen to any profit and if you hear him speak of sacrifice run on run faster than from a plague. It stands to reason that we're there sacrifice there's someone collecting sacrificial offerings where their service their someone being served. The man who speaks you of sacrifice speaks of slaves and masters intends to be the master. But if every here a man telling you that you must be happy that it's your natural right that your first duty is to yourself that will we'll be the man who's not after your soul. Oh no I'll be the man who has nothing to gain from you. Andrew has our tagline been secretly randy in the whole time was that are the end of the is trying to be happy just objective is no. It's not easy it is do do with it what you will. But that's that's those two passages are among the many passages where the world view of the fountainhead is distilled okay into into a couple of paragraphs and just talking talking a lot. About how like the pursuit of of the self is the best thing anyone can do. And so there's always a gap though when you start to ask okay. What happens when literally okay so this one person can exist in the system and be gestured to it because has the system exists around them exist in opposition to it but what does happen one literally? Everyone starts acting this way so there so the cover of the fountainhead of at least multiple editions is a man dunking glowing basketball of ideas into a skyscraper. And I WANNA I wanNA know is what happens if we all try to dunk our ideas in the hoop at the same time. It won't work. Physics won't allow it. Yeah like there is an appeal to libertarianism. But then you ask them okay but like who maintains the roads and they're like well just like the market will do it. The market will handle it and boy hope we never get to to a point where that theory actually has to be tested. I feel like we are to re close. Yeah already so what you alluded to some sort of case that rourke gets involved in what is going to give you the the Ark of of Howard work after this is he does begin very slowly to get work and to kit recognized and he is. He is offered a couple of of of multi-floor buildings in New York City. And he is you know. He seems like he's on his way up and he's doing it his own way. People are recognizing the value in what he's doing and and great things are going great but to eat sets them up to take a fall like he to he talks to one of his adherents and tells thousands. Okay go to this Guy Howard work. Tell me what I make like temple to. All religions and that he is allowed to have like full all creative control and like. Here's exactly what to say to him to appeal to you. Know his his echo and and everything so Howard takes the job he's like this guy doesn't really seem like he totally buys the rationale for this thing that he's asking me to build but okay I'll do it things called the stoddard daughter'd Temple These daughter Temple is publicized. Publicize publicized and then once it opens to e leads the charge to you decry it as a blasphemy. Because it's it's this like radically modern structure. It's got this like big statue of of a naked woman in front of it and it's supposed to be this celebration of of humanity of man and the book talks a lot about what's that you get when you look at a skyscraper is like you being an off man and his achievements in the stuff he can do but to you sang. Hang on this is this is bad. This is against every religion. I can't believe that Howard the Sky Howard work did this to my good buddy And isn't that awful. Yeah so all the work dries up for Howard after that and he's he needs to take a job like on a quarry like getting rocks out of the ground. Oh Gosh and this corey just happens to be owned by guy. Franken food related to Guy Franken in some way and it's a place where Dominique go sometimes sometimes for summers and so that they meet their when Howard is working in a corey and Dominique is summering and there is I'm not gonna I'm definitely not going to get into the language of it. There is a there is a sort of relationship that buds between them and they have a sexual encounter that is is described in the book as rape a couple of times And it's I don't even I wanna say that it's a gray area but like they do enter into a consensual relationship later and also when when it is happening the book sort of implies that she is fine with what's happening but she herself does later describe it as has it rape. Yeah and so. That's tough. And that's a controversy. I don't know if you had anything on that. Yeah I did so rand. Reportedly referred to the scene if it was rape it was raped by engraved invitation. which I think is like both a literal and metaphorical comments? She's making I think there is some sort of like engraving thing that happens in the book. All right so real does she like carve something on rock or invite him into great thing. There's like a there's a marble bowl mantelpiece in the house that she deliberately destroys to create a pretext to get him into the House and replace the the marvel at something else And and so this was critiqued. Like like famously. In a book that Susan Brown Miller wrote called against our will That was critical critical of not just Iran but a whole host of twentieth century thought that was had rape culture kind of embedded in it and I did not care for Rans Portrayal of women. who were you know suffering humiliation at the hands of men And like people have wrestled sold with whether or not this is that because of their own feelings about the book and like a desire to have it not be rape makes it easier to take I think for fo L. and obviously for a whole bunch of people like there there there is fun and there is like sexual attraction in creating with a partner. You trust a sense of not the safety or like non consent but it's like a consensual non consent and so I could see where people talking about. This could try and throw it into that gray the area but it also gets very close to another gross gray area where it's like. Oh she wants it so it's fine. This US like act actually. She secretly wants us. And so it's fine that it happened so the article I referenced. Earlier from the Washington city paper was called internal affairs how I and rand and followers rationalize welcomed rape by Amanda has this is back in twenty ten it opens with the recession has been good Ayn rand interesting way to start an article. I've felt I felt a lot of stuff about the tea party. Move and and I in rand like specifically heard fears about what happens when the state gets too big has at that. At at that point Democrat like Obama had just one Democrats had majorities in the house they had they very nearly had for a little while like a filibuster proof Senate majority orange in the Senate which means they could do stuff without having to consult with the other party at all but for you non. US people always want to add a little bit of contracts for people who don't who aren't bathed in our dumps but hess's articles is actually pretty good because it interviews a lot of people and particularly women who read the book when they were younger and talk about like their experience reading it And one said like I know that many view ah a rape scene. I definitely didn't see it that way when I was younger. There elements of non-contractual consensual sex. In that scene I was aware of Dominique's feelings towards rock and to me she internally Turnley agreed to it I guess. In a way that a lot of females as you were saying Andrew Enjoy Rough sex and want domination behind closed doors and quote But then others talk about like. Yeah I read that book in My teens when I hadn't really read anything like it and it was kind of titillating from pornographic perspective. But if I looked at it today I I would hate it. Because it's rape lecture And anything that I read about the potential Snyder of this book was definitely like what are are you GonNa do with this relationship that is really busted and definitely founded on a really awful sequence. I I don't want to linger on this too long. Because it's understandably a SU super sensitive topic and I also you know. This is one of those places where I really they don't want to get things like quote unquote wrong. Yeah that's very note. I mean it comes up a lot when people are talking about rand's body of work and whether or not the women in her books folks are like like someone wrote about atlas shrugged and was interested in like a pro feminist character in that book And just talking about the characters. Is this this. Conversation is part of that scholarship. So I think it's worth bringing up certainly as a as a warning for anybody going into this book but yeah I think we can kind kind of move on except to say that then. This is a relationship that continues during rourke slow point working in the quarry not well so okay they both go back to New York City separately after this rock because he does get work again and Dominique because she just lives in New York yeah when she like actually so she doesn't know that Roy is an architecture doesn't know that he's done anything that she would know about but she he does find this out and then she decides that she's going to do everything she can to like destroy his career and like basically teams up with too easy to do you this okay. I think this is everybody's motivations especially in the second half a block it's just really hard to parse out but I believe it it is that she doesn't want to lie. She knows that these buildings are like an extension of him and she doesn't want tell like have him display himself. Elf's owed like nakedly in front of just just anybody like including people who aren't like worthy of him as she wants him may ass. Yeah the again I feel like. We're encountering limits of the philosophy of the character of Asian. Okay sure okay. So then we meet gale wine and and he's a newspaper boy. I mean talking about it'd be friends. And and Howard is on the up and up again like Howard. Does it a job for wine and like the wine and papers start kind of talking him up a little bit and but two we also is like from his position as like an op. Ed calmness basically at the banner undermining wine and by over the course course of many years recommending like adherence of his for different positions at the paper and like getting them hired and sort of pulling the rug out out from under wine and a real best buy like dominique ends up deciding that she doesn't want to be with Howard. Our like Howard is doesn't want to be with her and so dominic decides that she wants to punish yourself so I he marries Keating and she marries wine and but then actually wine and turns turns out to be like a not entirely terrible guy and then wine and decides that he really likes Howard works architecture and hires him them to build them a house. And that's what Howard and Dominique. They meet again okay. The Oh the actually the the incident that drives them apart apart in the first place. Is the the solder temple lawsuit where Brooke get sued for this temple that he does bill out tricked into into building and Dominique.

Guy Howard rape Dominique Ayn rand US New York City Andrew rourke Big League basketball NPR rand Temple These daughter Temple Senate Guy Franken corey Obama randy Washington
"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

14:38 min | 1 year ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

"So and then there's this Newspaper magnate called Gale Wind. Who Rose up from nothing in Hell's kitchen and now runs this? I guess think of it as kind of a New York postie sort of paper. Oh Oh very popular and it's it is very it's always chasing the trends like there. There's this anecdote where like very early on when he was writing this paper wine and ran like a contest like trying to get people to donate either to this scientists who is trying to do good work or like this unwed mother who had a had a like a SOB story basically and like people donated nine bucks scientists and like thousands of go to the to the unwed mother with the SOB story. So he's he's he's chasing all this stuff that is sort of portrayed as cheap human interest okay and also his. His Hobby is to find people who are doing exceptional work and like prove that they can be bought. Basically Oh neat. That's yeah though. It's super cool There's a woman named Dominique Franken. Who is the daughter of Guy Franken? Who is the guy who runs the firm that Peter Keating goes to work at okay with his gifts great job? Yeah sure we'll get back to kidding in a bit I guess and she. She works at the banner. She writes a column. It's mostly about like architecture criticism and she all the characters in this book exists on a spectrum where on the one hand you have the individualists and on the other hand you have what she starts referring during two toward the end as the second handers people who can thrive on the work and effort and inventions of others. There's the title of the book was Secondhand lives which was a thing that she coined. Yeah so the. The people like Howard Work of of course is the ideal L.. Individualist never wavers never never doubts his own rightness and then other people like Dominique is in the individualists camp wine and actually is in the individualists camp like the both of these characters have flaws that keep them from being as idealized as work and then like a two is according to her notes and I thought this was an interesting way of putting it to he is a second hand or who knows. He's a second hander and acts acts accordingly Keating is a second hand. Who doesn't know? Yeah that that's what he's doing. This is just a D.. Alignment chart a little dope. Can we make a super libertarian. DNC that's all based on like Randy and precepts. I'm no I'm worried about about the parts of DND. That already are like I know. They're in there like witch God's in the Pantheon are randy and devotees. I don't really want to think about it. Paladins are not Paladins so those are the those are the four main characters and you get like references to each of them. Does that four or five. That's five out of five people you Howard. Well don't count because he's an ideal man he's about the force of nature. I Guess League get these people who are defined relative to Howard and those are the people who you spend a lot of book. I did make some notes briefly on like wear these characters came from and again this shirt. It's back her being originally playwright by trade. I'm kind of I didn't know that going into this episode. That's kind of NEAT So work is the ideal man and in her notes and in the scholarship on the work that he is at least partially inspired by Frank. Lloyd Wright And Not by necessarily Sara Lee right the man but by right as like his career and his symbolism as this uncompromising compromising modernist he. There's a quote from that. A biographer of right had when asked about out his difference between him and Rourke saying I deny the paternity refuse to marry. The mother is what I had to say about our work. Yeah it's pretty great. Peter Kenyon apparently is not based on any single person but rand did Like tell a story about a neighbor. She had who like only wanted things so that she could have social standing over her over like like other people that she knew yeah to Keating finds his worth in like reflected praise of of shirts. Yeah essentially there is nothing in him without that he is he is now a person literally could okay to he was inspired primarily by a British democratic socialist named Herald Laskey who was involved in? I guess that's it's true. Churchill's governments was part of the Labor Party. Even though he wound up getting disavowed by the Labor Party for being too Marxist She went went to lectures. That laskey gave as like research for two E. A wind is a riff on William Randolph. Hearst to thirty yeah yeah And she in some of the note to talks about him being kind of nutrition and having a like the Niche Ian like like need to dominate philosophy like you are either in charge or you are subjugated which his his deal like relative to that in. The book is He is. He's basically the closest any other character gets to being Howard to the point where once those characters finally meet like two thirds or so of the way through the book they are finishing each other's sentences a little bit And it's it's very. It's almost romantic. Almost like their their her affection for each other but Winans like a central essential mistake. Is He believes through. His papers offers that he influences public opinion but when he decides to start championing rourke in this specifically okay. We'll talk about he discovers that like as long as he was giving giving people what they wanted to read he was popular with people. Sure and then as soon as he stopped doing that his power to influence public opinion tries rise up pretty quickly because he's just he's a close follower of it he can see trends and he's very good at that end of it but he's not he's not creating yes staff like he thinks he is I think of her notes she had like originally planned to have a bunch of Nie g quotes in this book. They're not in the book right. They're not like Nietzsche quote meeting the exception. I could not no I think like I mean like on the leg section two. Here's a quote. I think that was in drafts. When she was like working working through her relationship to NICCI each in philosophy and ultimately found it wanting and then like put it through this dude And then Franken is not based on a specific. Yes Dominique Is Not based on a specific person. Ran said it was. She was similar to herself in a bad mood I'm not quite sure what that means but also said in the notes that I read that show yeah like the ideal woman for Howard roark. Yeah she is is defined as wanting the ideal man and all that I read about her which it which and like wants the ideal man believes in the ideal man but ultimately believes is that he will lose because the world cannot handle him or will tear him down. Yes right okay which basically sounds like these things are just things the characters say later the this is not. It isn't not what they just out and say like Dominique is man. Okay all right. Do we need some plot. Set Up to get to Dominique. Feel okay so the first part of the book is tracing the twin career paths of Howard Rourke and Peter Peter King Makes Sense Peter Keating gets a good job at a Guy Franken's firm and through sort of manipulating people apple and occasionally leading Howard. do his work for him. Because Howard can't see a job poorly done and just leave it. But he also doesn't watt credit for it because he doesn't want anyone to know that he's associated with any of this architecture that he doesn't like okay He Moves Peter Rises up really quickly through the ranks at this at this place and eventually gets this really big commission and becomes a partner at the at the firm. And it's I just like doing really really well Howard goes to work for this sort of disgrace past his prime modernist architects Sir named Henry Cameron And there is very little work. But Howard like the Cameron is the only architect attack to whose work Howard sort of admires. Okay because he was he is also sort of one of the individualist and of the spectrum. So Howard is just just barely scraping by while Peter sometimes with Howard's help gets these huge commissions and we're just seeing what like society values. Tell us what it does not okay Keating's rise and I also think like to ease ability ability to point out a chaser and like exploit that brings Peter into to ease orbit At which point he becomes sort of sort of dependent onto he like he. He is a character who is he. This is the way he's described. The book is like once you become like a friend of his and you have his like approval and you know that he thinks well of you because he's just such a a big deal in such a swell guy that you like become addicted to that and unable to function without Eto cool. It's like this disease of collectivism. Almost where you like become so wholly dependent on this other person for your sense of self worth that. Even though Peter has flashes where he recognizes individualism awesome and he knows like where he could have taken a different path like he he ultimately always ends up subjugated to the public hard to to to you know and so this isn't like working for other people are working on other people's behalf. It's working like own. It's not it's working explicitly out of your own self interest and at another person's like behest like it's different from like working to help people to help someone and right it's working because you like the praise they give you or the people they can connect you to yeah. He does make a lot of very explicit speeches about charity and like Char- charity and altruism are. Doing good for others is in the world view of the fountainhead like charity and and altruism like people do those things not because they want to help but because they want to be seen helping well and that's not I mean there's also a thing in in actual world outside of it. Yeah there's there's a whole like there was just a story going around Couple of days ago. About like Jeff Bezos who has fought every tax hike. Anybody has ever even whispered about. Within one hundred mile radius of him giving like some fraction of his billions and billions leads of dollars to like aid homelessness bunch like preconditions and stuff attached to it and that raises a bunch of questions about what happens when these individualists start to take over functions of the state and stuff. That ranch doesn't really get into nope. I don't know if she I don't know maybe she just didn't foresee things getting to the point where they are or I think that's convenient it. Sounds like there's just like unanswered Food Co. questions and that that those are the things that trip me up like if everyone's acting in their own self interest like what about jerks like that I get that jerks can take over collectivists like systems too. But if we're all just working on our own time I'm like what I feel like. It is being disingenuous about the fact that we are actual social animals who have to exist in the world together. Her is my. That's my immediate reaction but maybe this book could change my mind. I don't know so. Here rourke on charity in on helping others men have been taught that their first concern is to relieve the suffering of others but suffering is. A disease shouldn't come upon it. One tries to give relief and assistance. It's to make that. The highest test of virtue is to make suffering the most important part of life. Then man must wish to see other suffer in order that he may be virtuous such as the nature of altruism. The Creator is not concerned with disease but with life yet the work of the creators has eliminated one for disease after another in man's body and spirit and brought more more relief from suffering than any altering could ever conceive. So there's the argument. I guess for Big Pharma I get all my guy. It's like. Capitalism has has fixed more diseases than than charity and collectivism ever could why. Oh No are you you. Are you a libertarian. I don't know what I am this. Oh God and then here here is to eat during his multi-page like Super Villain speech to Peter Keating as he's.

Peter Keating Howard Howard Rourke Dominique Franken Guy Franken Peter Peter King Howard Work New York Gale Wind Peter Kenyon Howard roark Labor Party William Randolph Lloyd Wright Randy Herald Laskey Sara Lee Jeff Bezos DNC
"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

13:57 min | 1 year ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

"When I look at the character list of this book I definitely we see a playwright in the like the relationships and how Clearly the conflicts are drawn. So I'll be interested to hear about that. There's an afterward afterward Written by Sky Leonard P cough. Who is the person to whom she entrusted the objective movement After she died And he includes a bunch of her notes about about writing the book. 'cause she wrote it over the over a period of five years and it was rejected by a bunch bunch of publishers before it was finally published. Yeah but yes she. She sketches the characters out in a sort of dramatic personae Fashion Churchgoer. They are really like their their core beings are sketched out. Really early on and there is not a lot of characters do have arc's but characters are also like themselves the hallway. Yeah she is she is decided what each character represents and that is borne out through through this entire brick of a book. Okay cool servers. Novels called we the living which is semi autobiographical about living in Soviet Russia anthem. which you mentioned gend is about like a dystopia future of totalitarian collectivism Google Then she got really politically active in the forty S. She volunteered for Wendell. Willkie Wilkie Campaign Who ran against FDR in nineteen forty? He was like the only interventionist. Republican candidate which is interesting and he kind of solved? He helped them either. Came out of the convention or like solve them for mango brokered convention or something. Anyway she fell in with a lot of Republicans that nate electricals that were excited about the free market capitalism. We've been talking about And then she wrote this and then in nineteen forty-three even though she'd been working on on it for at least seven years apparently took a bunch of benzedrine to finish the book because she was on deadline among among us we've played college They did make an adaptation of the book into a film like she wrote the screenplay Not Very recently after it was written Ever published rather forty five. I five right yeah. She apparently disliked that film. And I read an article the other day. That Zack Snyder is working on. A new adaptation released. The Snyder cut of the fountainhead. Ah She early renders of Ayn Rand and how we're not look but I'm so excited to see Jim Carey. Play Howard enroll my God. You'RE GONNA have to see g out his mustache she got involved in the Like all of the Hollywood anticommunist communist stuff. She was a friendly witness for the house. UNAMERICAN activities committee For me it was just interesting to know that she got involved in politics. During FDA FDA the era of FDR and the beginning of what we now think of. As like I don't mean this pejoratively but the welfare state like a government mint who used its own powers to like lift the economy out of the depression by a government that saw a system. I'm that had been broken and file like capitalism and a lack of concern for workers now to be fair to Ayn Ryan Ryan Implode Statement. I know right but I think it is important to understand where her like live. Experience comes elite in her like formulating this viewpoint because she at like age twelve or something sees the communist party like literally come into her house and and take stuff. Yeah completely because because the state has decided you know we we know what is best for everybody and we are going to radically luckily redistribute wealth and possessions to make sure that everybody has the same thing and on paper that can be an interesting idea but in practice so many Socialist and communist governments have have just been corrupt and they also do bad stuff like once the rubber hit the road. Those those governments. I have not have not done great. So she's I mean she's thinking specifically about like Soviet style communism and then also what is happening around this time in Nazi Germany. Yeah Ver- where they're saying like for the good of the race. We need to do several atrocities. acities you can. You can see where the anti statist belief system comes from and then it gets married and or expressed through through a pro capitalist viewpoint perhaps catalysts and then pro America we can we can read. I don't know if you want me to get into this later. If we should just do it now like there's a point point very toward the end where suddenly it becomes about America country. Oh No really in a way that in a way see that is not surprisingly like sort of jingoistic or very your eldest. I'll just here. We go reader judge for yourself reader. Judge for yourself a now. Observe the results of society built on the principle of individualism this our our country the noblest country in the history of men the country of greatest achievement greatest prosperity greatest freedom. This country was not based on selfless service sacrifice renunciation or any precept of altruism. It was based on a man's right to the pursuit of happiness his own happiness not anyone else's a private personal selfish motive. Look at the results. Look into here own conscience and listen. I know that this is what America aspires to but to frame the creation one of America that way while also not talking about stuff like I don't know slavery or indigenous people is seems like not ideal can I also so you can I also Who not only is it like we? This country was built on sin but also WE THE PEOPLE IS A. That's a pretty important American phrase not I the man or the woman to start in. Have you seen John Hancock signature. It's it's pretty big pretty big comey. That guy's not thinking about individuals fair enough of all the items reviewers not really mad about this. I do WANNA get into the into the recap because people. I personally very interested to know it is in this book but let's quickly just say that atlas shrugged comes out in nineteen eighteen fifty seven which is about when a bunch of artists and intellectuals leave a welfare state and things go haywire about like what happens happens if all of the people who practice objectivism like rise up? Essential Kenny Chum. A book I have not read. So I'm I think there are some. That book was less well received critically. But I think has gone on to have as you said like Paul Ryan was handing out copies of that book because it was a little bit more even than this book. Codified version of the philosophy But let's talk about the fountainhead head. And what who is in a and what happens so that we can know in case anyone asks us later. Okay so the. FOUNTAINHEAD is a really long book. That takes place mostly in the nineteen twenties and thirties so we are talking like pre Great Depression into the depression and then getting into World War Two a little bit. Okay though this stuff that that mostly serves as a backdrop to what is happening like the book is at no point. Is Anyone in this book. Like set off to war or what. Okay sure okay. Or is anybody like talking about Hitler explicitly or or anything like that. Okay even though it's being written can after the fact Howard work in Peter Keating to students attending the Stanton Institute of of Technology Stanton Institute is not a real institution it is a fictionalized. MIT or it's thought to be. Howard has his attended for three years but as being expelled and Peter is graduating at the top of his class and has his pick of several several like plum career opportunities to go and sounds good? Sounds good him. Howard is is being been thrown out basically because he refuses to conform? I mean this is. You're getting this from right off right off. The Bat. Like Howard work is a modernist architect. Okay Okay and what is. Being preached in practice at the school is more of a black. It hearkens back to classical architecture renaissance architecture just basically basically columns everywhere just think of Howard. Work hates column so bad and he's always complaining about people putting columns on buildings even though they're not holding up anything and can we really. Can we just get past the Parthenon and like do some new staff. Okay cool this. This scandal is is that the the college elders and so they throw him out on his but okay but Howard is is boarding with Peter and Peter's mom and so they like like no each other and talk sometimes and and Peter is he respects Howard and thinks he does does good work but like thinks he should just go along to get along a little bit more and Howard thinks that Peter does not completely terrible arable work when he is not just like copying stuff that has been done by others in the past like? That's the core thing is like Peter Stories. A borrower of ideas and society rewards him for that Howard is an individualist who has his own ideas and wants to go his own way and society punishes punishes him accordingly. Yeah that's that classic You know odd couple set up so the book is split up into parts based on like the individual character so the first the first bit of it focuses is primarily on Keating in his work And then it focuses on this guy named Ellsworth toohey who is a socialist and humanist who serves as the books main antagonists. What does does what does he do? Is He. Like He's A. He's like a newspaper columnist and people really respect his opinion and come and seek him out and eventually he becomes sort sort of a kingmaker and he uses this power as a kingmaker to elevate mediocrity like mediocre plays mediocre architecture mediocre everything and try and make it so that the public cannot distinguish great work from mediocre. Were owed hello everybody equal. Oh boy and everything is average does he. Does he express it that way. Or is that you yes. He is a bleak about it at the start but by the by the time you get into the last V this book everybody's just doing these incredible 's villain monologues analogues about all their motivation. Like I'm rand wrote this and Zero Atlas shrugged and she wrote some other works of fiction as as well but like after atlas shrugged she mostly was like okay. I'm done with fiction. I'm just going to write books of about my political beliefs now and you can. I think you could see she. She did do pre a lot of research on on architecture. As part of the writing process for this book like there is of an earnest. Honest attempt at at making it accurate and making it be about that but it also is so totally not about that like it is about this the these viewpoints of hers using architectures kind of a proxy one of the there were two contemporaneous. Newark Times reviews one that one that loved the book and one that hated the book and the one that loved it said Sh. She has written him in praise of the individual and has said things worth saying in these days and then the negative one was like. This isn't a very good book about architecture Sir. There is no denying phrase the vigor Ilan and general enthusiasm that have gone into the making of this book the performances amazing like that of a contortionist or a human cannonball it entertains without making good any sound claims to being art to take all the strange goings on in the fountainhead. Seriously Be Difficult indeed it does it does praised the depiction of architecture at least the feeling for architecture which probably came came out of the research. And also there's some anecdotes about her coming to Manhattan from Russia and Being Dang look what people made him like that all right that reviewers and stuff there have you also get like some of the characters Asian problems like so often characters in this book are just like viewpoints talking sounds like at each other a little bit and characters acting really strangely without like clear motive a lot of the time so you got into.

Howard America FDR Peter Soviet Russia Peter Keating Zack Snyder Ayn Rand Leonard P communist party Google Ayn Ryan Ryan Germany John Hancock Wendell nate electricals Zero Atlas Newark Times
"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

15:48 min | 1 year ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Overdue

"To enjoying any well told tale. They will not shy away. From spoiling specific story beats when necessary. Plus these are books. You should have read by now overdue. It's a podcast about the books you've been meaning to read. My Name is Craig James Andrew and you know what I'm thankful for. was that books and friends. And that's what we're here do. Every week is talking about books and talk about our friends. I am not thankful for friends friends because to have friends would be too much like collectivism and I hate that now. It would be too much like getting a group of people together to do anything and so I hate it now. Oh so you are thankful for only your ideas forever. I'm thankful for the the ideas of anyone who stands up and things for him or herself but mostly himself okay but yeah particularly me. Well I am a genius and I must be allowed to practice my art wall. Great podcasting great So on this podcast Gal you do a bad podcast. I will blow it up with dynamite. To preserve my artistic vision will mean the unwashed hordes we have formed a podcast collective collective to balance out your podcast. Her of high ideals and ideas for this episode they were all silent behind me because I to migrate man with great ideas ideas secretly and I will rise above them So every week on the show we talk about a book that one of US usually hasn't read before but for this month we've read a few books in remember November that we have read before so Andrew. What book did you read? And I'm just realizing that if you come into this not knowing this that previous run. It's GonNa Sound Pretty Weird but I read the fountainhead. By Ayn Rand so all of what you will now know for sure as a bunch of goofs Were informed by the book that we discussed this week. And what we do. If you haven't listened to show before is one of US tells the other one about the book we usually have not both oh threat for the episode so I have not read it and Andrew's going to tell me what happens in it. And what he thinks about it and I'm GonNa React 'cause we have to fill in our that's how it goes sure do This was a pager on recommendation. From Allegra thank you Allegra. If you WANNA make patron recommendations go to Patriot dot dot com slash overdue pod for more information but Andrew. You had read this book before. Read this book before now did before we get started. Allegra have a note. Oh that went with the. Oh yes I have it here. Two can would like to frame the discussion with that. Oh yes this was. Okay mistakenly It was initially set in about atlas shrugged and then Allegra wrote back and said no accident. fountainhead sorry I read this many years ago and really enjoyed it but was too young to pick up on any the of the subtext for me. At the time it was just a well written book about an architect. I'd like to revisit it especially in this political climate but I'm hesitant to be seen seen reading an Ayn rand book here to take on the challenge. I think you would have a really interesting discussion. That was it. That's all so where to start. I guess we should start not with. Why A and when I read this book the first time because I think that that will come in for a bit later? Let's talk about why somebody would be hesitant to be seen reading Ayn rand even though Iran two was a Russian American author who emigrated over here sort of after the communist revolution. Yeah uh-huh she has is sort of founded and it's been carried on by a few people this this philosophical movements I guess called objectivism. which is all about like only what you can see with? Your eyes is real. Like there's no such thing as a gut feeling or higher power or gods or any of that the four pillars from the Ayn rand website our reality reason self interest and capitalism and those things kind of function function in relationship to each other and sort of one leads to the other if you follow her train of thought and the logic Gov objectivism and so I think among philosophers. I don't think her ideas found a lot of purchase and and they're part of that is because I think people sort of found some of the stuff's us saying derivative of NICI and some others But one place where her ideas particularly alertly the self interest and capitalism bits of the ideology has really taken root is in American conservatism. I mean she was a big booster of like Barry Goldwater nineteen sixty four campaign and you can trace a line straight through from that to like the Reagan presidency all the way through to like the Paul Ryan an Obama Era Republican Party and then of course to now yeah yeah with widsom inherent contradictions some inherent contradictions which we can talk about a bit too. And there's a reason why those two pillars hurt our. I mention them specifically but but it's it. It is filtered down to now into our current politics as this belief chief that people should be free to do whatever they want and by people they mostly mean businessmen because the free the market is the best way to solve any and all problems and because of markets are populated by rational actors who only act in their self interest and can be counted upon to act in their self interest. It is a self policing system and the government should get Out of it and not tell anybody what to do. Yes it is a world view that puts all human activity through the Lens of the market essentially because it is the best way to ensure that you act in your own self interest in that your own self your ability to act in your own self interest is protected There's something here under the capitalism page of the Ayn rand site that says the ideal social system is laissez faire capitalism and advocates for for a quote complete separation of state and economics in the same way and for the same reasons as the separation of state and Church so again. Like if you need a frame of reference yes I think I actually distills like a good part of the of the world view. Is that like human action and your ability to to take it should be separate from what the state can and cannot do to enforce. You is the belief she took some positions that are sort of a counter to modern American conservatism. But I do think they're compatible with version of libertarianism. That is just about the government not being involved young. What you can and can't do like she was that's fine with abortion? She did not like homosexuality but she did say that there shouldn't be laws about it. Yes yes yes And there are a couple of things but but just yeah things that because the The like Evangelical Block is so influential in modern conservatism tatum. Those bits don't get imported along with the the free market capitalism. There are like Reagan on very or even Nixon on vary like political reasons. To align this type of conservatism with social conservatism social meaning like on on social issues and civil rights and things like that not economic issues and yeah so if you actually like try to get into a conversation with her about that should probably like get angry at you for all of the big government things that you're ostensibly. Small Government Party is doing There were like there. Were some like I found on slopes an article about how when she had like retired She actually like took like social security payments when she was older and she was not like thrilled about that. Uh She did do. The slopes article was hilarious because it went back and found a randy in justification for it as like taking back with the welfare fair state had stolen from you. Just I couldn't even but that's where it was where people who have these really strong and strident beliefs. leafs really lose. Me Is not when they when they later do something that runs counter to their earlier beliefs. You know we all everybody's his views change over time perfectly natural and healthy thing to do but when you start saying no actually. This is fully compatible with the values that I've been espousing in my entire life. And here's why that's where it's like. Well how intellectually honest is is this entire thing. So that's a good primer like very top level primer and objectivism Andrew. Thank you I WANNA do like a quick sketch of rand and a little bit of her. CV and then we'll get into the book and then hit what ever else comes up. Sure well just real quick. I wanted to do that thing about conservatism. I both because of oceans note but also that gets to to UAE. I read the book. Oh yeah okay I mean. It's it's adherent there. There are several waves of randy in adherents There's this really great article article in The Guardian by Jonathan Freedland published in April of two thousand seventeen about like different phases of the movement and different followers followers. But just to give you a sense of like how influential this is an American politics. Alan Greenspan who ran the Fed for two decades decades was a very close friend of Iran was at her funeral and nine hundred eighty two. He fell into he fell into the Salon Group group that head kind of formed around her as she was writing Atlas shrugged right so this book comes out in forty three it is successful and then then she builds on that success and is like then starts making objectivism hand in hand with these people who are like these are good ideas and Greenspan is one of them. And then you get to Paul Ryan who is speaker of the house up until early this year and then he stopped being speaker of the House for some reason our member. uh-huh he'd he'd infamously gave out copies of atlas shrugged as like Christmas presents to staffer. Yes yes and one of the reasons why I think this this viewpoint and like ranch works in particular captured young. A young people is because they really aggressively like the Ayn Rand Foundation or whatever organization. This is really aggressively goes after kids in particular like like there. Is this longstanding essay contest that they've been running. Yes and that is why I read the fountainhead originally originally because they've been doing this essay contest for how many years it's been since I was in highschool lakes for many decades. This is sixteen years ago for me that I was reading reading this. But there's a shortage book called anthem that she wrote that is offering a cash. Prizes to eighth ninth and Tenth Graders Chrissy read it and then write an essay. The fountainhead is for eleventh and Twelfth Graders and then atlas shrugged is for Twelfth Graders and then college it's Yep Yep Both UNDERGRAD and graduate students. And so it's really they are. They are making this concerted effort to introduce these works to people at a time in a lot of people's lives where you are like forming core political beliefs. And you are. I mean you're just trying to make sense of this world that you now have to be an adult in so I have. These books are very. They are nothing if not confident like editor. A fairly uncomplicated. View of what is right and wrong in a way that I think is appealing to people who just are trying to trying to understand. Stand the world around. There's an article that I want. I'll return to later when we get to a certain scene in the book but there is a Washington city paper article from I think twenty ten that interviewed the creator of the Atlas Sphere a social networking website for objective assists. And the guy. Joshua's Eder said that it's not unusual or it happens all ages but I think it does happen more commonly among young people. This is when people get into rand. Her books appeal to youthful idealism. To people who are at the point point in their lives when they're trying to figure out what's important and I think we'll talk in this book about the what I think and you'll correct me from wrong is like what it is to like. Stake out an ideological view and feel like you're right and then the world you have to confront a world that is in his not welcoming of that and like. That's the thing that teenagers do every day. And then what rand is doing is like taking that basic human interaction and like make mistakes very very high. Can I do a quick bio sketch. And we'll get into the book Andrew. Yeah make sure. We don't miss that part. I I just wanted I wanted to. I know that's pretty like US politics heavy and in particular. I think that's why. Yeah yeah but but like yeah. I wanted to provide that background and and why Hugh have probably heard about Iran before. Yeah and why she's become both a she's it's her name has become become idiomatic. Like it is. It's a punchline on the simpsons just to say Ayn rand at like you know well people talk about Randy the NBA. It's a lot and this is what this is what they're talking about. It's not just people being randy by Iran. Okay let's get Randy Elisa's Rosenbaum bomb. Iran was born in one thousand five hundred ninety two as you said before lived in Saint Petersburg Her family fled after the October Revolution. she she did go to college was purged from College. After like a bunch of people like students were not allowed to finish and then later were. I don't really understand that part history enough And around that time is when she chose her pen. Name Rand There's some dispute over. What the sources were eye of rand perhaps APPs being from How one of her name's appeared in Surreal Eq? And then I neither being a Finnish or Hebrew word They moved to the US In nineteen twenty six or she did rather Got Involved in American Film Rolling Writing screenplays wrote some plays that got produced in the thirties..

Ayn Rand rand Craig James Andrew Ayn rand US Iran Allegra Ayn Rand Foundation Paul Ryan Reagan Randy Elisa Alan Greenspan leafs Barry Goldwater UAE Atlas NICI Small Government Party
"ayn rand" Discussed on Reason Podcast

Reason Podcast

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"ayn rand" Discussed on Reason Podcast

"And we each it was a team that one would never conceive an advance as part of the spontaneous order in action. But I loved what where we were. But we knew we there was a lot to do. And we were beginning to chip away. And I I would even give you a comment that I used to do some speaking in my early days in in Los Angeles and beyond when I was at kindle manderson. My law firm, and there was. Several times when I was introduced to speak about the return ideas. I was in introduced as a librarian people's couldn't pronounce the word, and even once, but my favorite mispronunciation was there was one time literally where I was introduced as somebody who would talk to the audience about libertine ideas. So it's come a long way. I never really felt. I I don't think I hit any allusions that there was a lot of work to be done. But that we had a great product to sell meaning this bundle of ideas that took liberty seriously. And that's still you know that job remains high. It's a high priority. Maybe now more than ever certainly as much as ever in these perilous times that we're living in. So there is an early story. And I know that. Pool has mentioned this as as well as you and Tibor and in previous discussions where you guys interviewed in th-annual, Brandon who at that point was a well known psychologist and individualist he had had a public break with Ayn rand was a big deal and libertarian ideas reason is named by you know, in in Oman to rand and the the philosophical principle of reason and rationality and all that. But you had a moment. Thursday, a story about interacting with I rand in the early days of raising canoe set the set the stage for that. Well, I'll be happy to do that. So I mentioned to put in context we interviewed. We carried an interview with band and early on after we took over reason from landing free Vander, the title the cover the cover story was breaking free. And we published the first. Public statement that Brandon had given after his split several years earlier with Iran, and that was good news and bad news. Because the there were a lot of people around was very powerful intellect and influence, many, people course without shrug, and in particular, but she could be very difficult to even people that admired her in and took her idea seriously, including to poor who was kind of excommunicated the famous rand way because he asked her a critical question. Good question that he was interested in her answer. And she took it the wrong way. And it wouldn't communicate with him after that. So we had all these those. So there was a pro the ran side of the debate. And the pro brand inside the bait. And then we published the interview with Brandon and that led to the question that you posed the incident with Iran after we published the interview with. We mailed we we mail the promo to the Brandon's mailing list. Called academic associates, and we picked up five six thousand subscribers which really transformed reason put us on the map Vitas more serious than any libertarian magazine ever at that point. And we were we felt on our way we had a few more bumps in the road that we learned about. But one of the things that we did is that we few a couple of years later, we about year later, we we have planned to put out a special issue devoted to on rand in her ideas..

Brandon Ayn rand Iran Vitas kindle Los Angeles libertarian magazine Vander Oman Tibor