14 Burst results for "Ayman Clinic"

"ayman clinic" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

04:25 min | 8 months ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"A trip. Maybe it's a relationship. These almost like goals. Would you say column goals. But i don't like that word and that's a whole different thing for me. I i honestly would say right as your attention. So what would you like to witness or experience. Okay let's say in the next you can do it the next week or if your mind says no. This is a year thing. Write it down okay. And then so. That's your intention is already in your awareness. You've already thought of it right. It's already there then. What you're gonna do is spend your life honestly your life getting into the frequency of love and the more you can put yourself in the frequency of love the quicker these things that you intended. Come into reality the what happens. This is the reality especially if you have entrepreneurs here people listening is the reality is our life is our life and we wake up and then someone says something that triggers us and then we get annoyed or the computer breaks down and then we're like in a spiral or an employee does something then we're in a spiral in it's like you're bumping against this thread of attraction so every time this is my biggest practice is an. I always say this to my team into every friend that i had that will listen to them. Like your frequency is more potent than your strategy. Frequency is more potent than wow okay. Yeah i did. Yeah i thought that during sole writing is like not watch your frequency because the you know the universe knows your intention. The new universe hoosier goals. Or the things that you're wanting to bring to fruition in the world washer frequency every minute of every day and so whenever i feel the urge to get triggered under the urge still bad for myself at the urge to be mad or whatever that urges was bringing it i constantly go back into my breath and then i think about something that i love or i think about something. I'm grateful for. And i try to get back into the frequency of love I love this. This is great okay. So i hope that everyone heard that assignment will take it schedule right now just five minutes after you're done listening or watching us and just five minutes and whatever comes to your heart like dinner said don't worry about whether it's a year from now or five years from now is just that thing that you want to witness or experience. I love that five of them. Come up with five of them. Do it right down right down. Today's day. let's see what happens. This is literally so exciting. Okay you know talk about. Adhd all the time. And i'm often asked okay. Where do i go to figure out if i have. Adhd and i've given you plenty of resources but you often want to know how it was discovered adhd and the answer is i went to the amen clinic. And there's one here in southern california but they've got locations. All over the united states doctor clinics are devoted to figuring out understanding the brain not by asking questions like most doctors do but by actually looking at the organ. Now listen if you're experiencing lack of focus or if you think that maybe of adhd that's one reason why you want to check them out however if you're having mood or irritability or anger issues any of these things are likely the result of something that's going on in your brain. Maybe you had an early childhood brain trauma or maybe there's something going on genetically and wouldn't it be nice to know that's what i loved about going to their clinic and actually being able to see a scan of my brain and get to the root cause of what was going on by looking at this brain spec damaging and they're one of the few places in the united states where you can have it done. I'm really excited that they've got locations in ten major cities you can go and get your brain scanned and not just know if you have. Adhd or whatever else is going on but like know specifically what type of adhd you have a wire experiencing anxiety or why you're having depression and how to treat it. By knowing what type of adhd i had the ayman clinic professionals were able to help me put together a treatment plan. And if you've ever followed me on instagram you've seen the before and after of my brain scan like there's no denying how different my brain is today and how much healthier i am because of the plan that i followed for them anyways. I'm really excited to tell you guys that they have put together a discount for my listeners. This has never been done before. And i'm so excited that we've been able to work this out you now.

brain trauma united states southern california ayman clinic depression
"ayman clinic" Discussed on Rich Bitch

Rich Bitch

05:57 min | 11 months ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on Rich Bitch

"Is really just about understanding and having compassion for your unique brain having compassion for the fact that your brain is different and different is awesome and realizing that how we process information is just different than the neuro typical brain. It doesn't mean there's anything wrong with us. it's not a weakness you're not broken. You're not stupid. You're none of those things that you have probably told yourself. I mean the amount of times that. I have come on crying from school when i was little telling my mom. Something is wrong with me like something wrong and the teachers would tell my mom. She's extremely social. She's very kind. She's very emotionally intelligent but she just doesn't have great comprehension and she doesn't have great follow through and i would just feel so discouraged and i felt like i was stupid and i know that i'm an intelligent woman and i know that i'm smart so it was very confusing to feel so intelligent and have this confidence in myself to be capable of things but then on the other hand feel like i couldn't finish the tasks and i couldn't comprehend the book or the movie or the test like the other kids did in school so it's been such an interesting journey and i'm really excited to dive into it more and to share with you. Everything that i learned again. I went to the clinic. Dr daniel amen clinic in orange county six months ago and i got my brain scans. My brother came with me. he got his brain scan. My mom came with me. she got a brain scan. Clay got his brain scanned as well. Klay does not have add. He is super focused. Of course god bless his soul. I feel like. I also need to do an episode with him about what it's like to be the partner of somebody with add. I'll bring my mom on an auburn clan. And so when i got my result back from the clinic which if you have not gone yet and you're considering going. It was a phenomenal experience. Dr daniel eamon is going to be on. the podcast. soon interviewed him a few months ago and it was frigging awesome. I'm so grateful for his work and his books and you know. I had a feeling i had so i didn't have to go take this test but i did want to invest in this opportunity to go take this scan and it was around three thousand dollars so yes it is an investment but i really wanted the confirmation and i wanted to make sure that everything else was healthy. My brain you know. Mike went to really look at his concussions. As an athlete their scans can help with everything from dementia memory loss concussions headaches autism if you are dealing with any of those things where you have a loved one who is. I highly suggest finding ayman clinic near you. They have a few locations around the united states. Now so yes. It is an investment. But i argue that. It's one of the smartest investments you'll ever make in your life knowing what's going on in your brain is critical to having a happy and successful life. I'm looking at the locations. They have right now on their website and it looks like they have washington seattle san francisco orange county new york dallas los angeles chicago and atlanta to me. It's never a waste to invest in your health. Now if i was promoting a gucci bag that was three thousand dollars. Is that a necessity. I don't know maybe it is for you do you do you. It's your life okay if that brings you joy than yes but for me. I'm not really gucci purse girl. I'm more of a let me go. Take a brain test at the clinic. Kinda girl and you know. Some girls want to interview matthew mcconaughey on their podcasts. And i mean yeah. He's a haughty with the body. But i wanted dr daniel amen on my podcast and i screamed like a thirteen year old girl at an instinct concert when he said yes. I literally ran around my house. And i was like. Oh my gosh nervous. When he jumped on zuma was like oh my. Gosh i'm sweating. Oh my gosh. oh my gosh. And i showed him my brain and he was like. Oh my gosh yes you have severe. Add but it also looks like you're super creative and you're definitely an entrepreneur. I was like oh my gosh. I'm not broken. So yeah when i got my result back i wasn't surprised and it was a moment of relief. I started crying because they realized that. I'm not broken. My brain isn't broken. I'm not stupid and realizing that there are so many advantages to having. Adhd when you are an entrepreneur such as loving novelty and new things and having a lot of energy and passion and being hyper focused on something. I'm realizing that. Those are all great qualities to have and entrepreneurship so instead of me beating myself up about it for the rest of my life and thinking that i have something wrong with me. I've really had to change the narrative and tell myself that this is a superpower. And i'm gonna figure it out and i am going to do all of the natural things that i need to do in order to cope with this and work with this because i'm sick of the story of well i'm just too much people or i'm too obnoxious or i'm too energized or i talk too fast or talked too much and these things that i was so insecure about growing up and now those are some of my favorite qualities about myself. I love my spontaneity. I love that. I crave novelty. I love that. I think the big picture i love that i'm brave enough to take the crazy risk. I love that i'm witty. I love my brain moves really fast. Even though yes that comes with anxiety and overwhelm i love that i love uncertainty. And i'm not afraid to start things and to try and i love that i can adapt to new environments because i do love novelty and i love that as a kid. I changed the furniture in my room and the color of the walls every few weeks. Because i needed a new environment. I remember being eight years old. And saving my money from dog-walking babysitting lemonade stands. I would save my money and ask my.

daniel eamon Mike atlanta gucci Klay three thousand dollars new york six months ago united states matthew mcconaughey washington seattle Clay los angeles chicago orange county daniel san francisco few months ago around three thousand dollars eight years old
"ayman clinic" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"It's changed the way that i prepare in the evenings. It's kind of changed everything and it's allowed me to feel much sharper and that brain fog. That used to think. I was feeling in the frustrations that i would have before had my diagnosis. So many of those frustrations had lifted. Because i understand a. Wow i can set myself up for success whereas in the past i didn't know what was going on so i would just get frustrated with myself and i would try to discipline myself through it. If that makes sense. I would try to just focus harder. Which doesn't work like. I needed a completely different environment in when you look at the blood flow of someone who has adhd and someone who does not like when. I compare brett's brain my brain by the way if you go to my instagram okay. Click on the highlights. There's a highlight that says adhd and under those highlights. You can see the difference in my brain scan versus brett's brain scan when we're focusing and just seeing those two scans. I wanted to cry. Because i felt so. I don't know the word is validated. That's the word like see. I'm not crazy see. This isn't about me making up excuses. This isn't about me trying to be annoying or passive aggressive or this isn't about me being self centered or not trying hard enough. This is how my brain works. I can't help it so it's like telling somebody who doesn't have good vision like just focus harder. We'll that doesn't help so my diagnosis was a very even at this age. And my dad got his diagnosis age. Seventy five it's powerful. Knowledge is power and especially if you do something with it and so i have read as you know every book that can find an adhd. I have had made the experts here on my show. And i enjoy helping those of you. Who either have. Add adhd or a child or a spouse who does or maybe. It's you personally to understand that there are strategies you can put in place that make it so much better but thinking about your brain. Health is number one number two is being kind yourself and understanding the disorder that there are seven different types. Although i know that's a controversial concept but it just makes sense like why are we trying to say that there's one type obviously there's more than one type of adhd meet somebody who has autism. There's more than one type of autism spectrum for almost every disorder and there's certainly a spectrum for adhd in addition to that it is also understanding that there are certain types of do better will benefit from finding the right dosage in the right medication. I personally at that time. Because i would fall asleep at a stop light. My general practitioner assumed that had narcolepsy. So i was taking medication for narcolepsy. The ayman clinic recommended that. I do a sleep. Study during the sleep study. They realized i didn't have a sleep disorder. I had a bad habit about habit of not going to bed until very late and then waking up very very early not getting proper sleep not getting enough sleep not getting enough deep wave sleep and therefore if i sat idle for more than thirty seconds. Yeah i wanna sleep in less than thirty seconds. And that wasn't narcolepsy. That was poor habits. So right away. The clinic took me off the medicine. I figured it was called for narcolepsy and then we started experimenting with different types of medication. Because of the type of add. I have again certain. Types of add medication might exacerbate your anxiety or depression for some people. They experience symptoms and side effects from being on medication. I experienced nun literally none. I don't have the dry mouth shakes nothing. I take a low dosage of outer all and i take supplements every single day that are specifically derived for brain health. And that really makes a huge difference in my cognition when we travel. If i've ever forgotten my supplements and if it's placebo effect but man i feel it. Same is true of my medications. Like i do take it every single day. At first i took a higher dose in. I would take it just during the weekdays. And then i wouldn't take it on the weekends and eventually i leveled it out whereas like i could take a lower dosage and i just take it every day to kind of maintain that level. It's a slow releases of the called. Our time released capsule and i take it first thing in the morning and no side effects that fall asleep in less than four minutes as i can see on the stats on my or ring but it was also important for me to get that diagnosis. Because it really did help. It empowered me to be more aware of the systems. That i need to be my best instead of apologizing to my staff that i am this way. I helped them to understand how they can help me be better for them instead of apologizing to my husband and just trying to fight my way into being whatever to remembering certain things instead we can work together and create systems where it doesn't drive him crazy but it's the system that i need in order to remember certain things it's allowed us to have a deeper understanding of how our brains work differently and to respect each other so oftentimes like if i'm trying to have a conversation with britain. He might be doing something on his phone. I stopped talking and that used to drive him crazy. Like finish your sentence. And i'd be like well but you're typing on your phone. He's like i know. But i'm listening.

more than thirty seconds less than thirty seconds instagram less than four minutes one type seven different types ayman Seventy five brett more than one type two scans single day first disorder number one number two
"ayman clinic" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

10:45 min | 1 year ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Anything in the news, because the news won't tell you the truth, they're just going to try to scare you and try to support the narrative. News media that used to be adversarial. The news media that used to be independent is now a tool of the government and people who used to Be in there earlier days, protesting and and living up to, you know, saying, Hey, I don't want government control. I want accuracy. I want truth. They didn't They challenged authority in a good way. Where you you, you research stuff on your own instead of doing that now. The new hip Right now, The new hip is to just suck in everything the government says and crave more control. That's the new hip. Oh, please tell me more. Let me doom or what should I do? Should I can I go out, huh? Can I can I Um yeah, So anyway, bottom line, If if the people are pissed at me, it's amazing to me. They're pissed at me because they crave. The control of government. They crave the coddling of the government. They feed They cower in fear. They don't love and value their freedom. People. It does. It really doesn't bother me. That you don't like me. It really doesn't. It's unlikely I'm ever going to come across. You 303713 talks 7138255 No one actually could dispute what I say at all. You know, I said Well, in that case, your return. It's not. It's not really what you're saying it is following the science What is? Yeah, That's true. That is we're following the science. The science of the PCR test is that It is. It is very accurate, by the way, as far as the presence of virus I like that. Okay, I do. I'd rather people be more careful than less careful. So what I'm saying is sensible. But PCR is giving the impression that more people actually have the disease, the infection that actually do You see, they amplify the cycles of testing. If you show up in the 1st 20 cycles, you could be sick or you're definitely the 1st 10 cycles. Your infectious. The 1st 20 cycles tend to 20. You could be infectious, contagious. After 20 cycles there, traces of the virus unlikely You'll ever give it to anyone, nor will you get sick yet it's called a positive case. So in New York, where Mer Coma Adolf Cuomo is, um, you know, just loves and Newsome and California just love this control. Those people are not following the science because those cases Are not infectious 85 to 90% of all PCR tests are not infectious will never get sick. But every day, the media tells us how many cases there are. Why is that? Why? I mean, honest to God. Why doesn't one person in the media question that? Okay. I mean, I'm not saying we don't have a problem. We do the flu's a problem Cove. It's a problem. But but 85 to 90% of all people tested by PCR are not infectious, will never get sick when they show positive. And the other tests. They're just don't even bother with him. I swear to God don't bother with the other tests. I love PCR tests, but again, I love them to be safe, but unfortunately the government is using them. To give a false narrative of our country. I all and then the woman called her. Well, Tom, I got sick and I got really sick because I said most people don't get sick. I'm talking about the people who test positive. Not people who get Cove it. I mean, if you get CO Vered, you could get very sick. But if you do, you're in a minute minute minority. So that woman that called and had heart palpitations is really pissed off at me. Because I said that, But it's true man. You are in a minute minority. So tell me, Should we prop you up on a pedestal and closed the country for you and a few of you? Of course not. Of course not. Life has risks. It's the way it is. There's life and there's death and there's risk worth taking. And there's risk not worth taking. Who said everything's guaranteed to be 100% safe. If the government honest to God cared honest to God care, they don't Because if they did, and they want to control behavior, you should penalize people who are overweight because they're the ones who get the most sick. Statistics show that I there's no lying. No exaggerating, and next to wait is The end of feeling, um, disease of the inner lining of the arteries, which is systemic inflammation, though, show the worst reaction to Cove it and people with vitamin D deficiencies and zinc deficiencies. Yet the government has never won once mentioned. Hey, it's a good idea to lose some weight. It's a good idea to take vitamin D. And zinc. Instead, they say, Wear a face mask, which is okay but But why not really give good at what you have You ever heard one ever heard one time? Any recommendation from our government or the C D. C on wellness ever. Have you? Have you ever know it's all about wearing face masks and cowering in fear and God Damn it! I am tired of it here from you anymore. I'm just sick and tired off people who are willing to give up their freedom. I'm sick and tired of it. I did, and by the way, this comes from a physician of love and concern. Because you need to wake up. We do not have a real pandemic. By the way, we don't we just don't we have a serious situation that has to be dealt with with focused protection for those in danger. And we have to stress wellness, not cowering in fear and shutting everything down, but becoming the healthier nation. It is amazing how? How, how we are so willing to give up our freedom. This is a snapshot of the future and thank God I'm 67. Because this country I shudder to think what it will look like in 100 years. Laurie, Welcome to the show. I hope you don't think I'm better. I'm really not. I actually love people and I love helping people. And if you just look at my motives I do Hey, this is Laurie. Yes, Laurie, How can we help you, dear? I'm calling about some claims that we filed with Atmos Healthcare. We submitted our people work on September 3rd and It's still sitting in review, and it may seem a little early to you to call, but it's been over three months. No, that's a long time. What are they not covering? Well, they won't give us the response. They reviewed some of which there were four of us in our family that the minute claim they've reviewed one or two of them. They paid partial out of network benefits. I've called three or four times. No asking. Can you please expedite this? Can you call the claims? A gesture? Can you call the review Department? Hey, Laurie. Laurie were all of these claims out of network Dear Yeah. And what were the claims? We visited the even clinics in California. And what was that for? The brain scan technology. And is it normally covered if it was in network? I don't know. They gave us the super bills that we've submitted the documentation. I don't know. A portion of it is covered because we also had blood work done, And actually, they're the ones that recommended We take vitamin D three upper immunity for the Covic. Good glory. What is the brain scan for? What was it for? It's identified areas where there's possibly traumatic brain injury and three out of four of us have, um I have the evidence of traumatic brain injuries. Actuary. Were you all in a car accident at the same time or how? How does an entire family think they have that? I'm just so curious? Okay, so it doesn't matter whether we think we have it. We have symptoms that would be related to that. But that's a fair question. Laurie, What do you think it stems from? Um, according to Ayman Clinic, there was some kind of head trauma. Uh, well, for instance, one of my sons was when he was 16 years old hit in the head by another playmate with something that had like a PVC pipe in it. That could have caused dramatic by the way. Let me just explain something. The Amen Clinic are you talking about? Um Dr Aim in the one on public television. Yeah. I love that guy. I absolutely love that guy and I love I love his recommendations, and I love everything about him. But This does sound suspect and that's what I think is going on here with. I'm going to tell you what I think is happening. Hold on. We got more coming up. Just hang on. When you hear that hunger, college and then.

Laurie California Ayman Clinic Mer Coma Adolf Cuomo Atmos Healthcare C D. C Tom New York Newsome Covic
"ayman clinic" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"You guys had a few years between the two Super Bowl appearances, so some different guys kind of came in. But when you look comparing contrast, those teams And the best teams that you were on during your time. What kind of maybe it's an intangible thing. What? What do those teams have that so many teams in the NFL seemed to lack because not everybody gets to win a Super Bowl? Not everybody, please into Super Bowls. What did those Washington teams have that others didn't Well, I think maybe on paper um you know, you hit the nail on the head. I don't think we were In both those Super Bowls that you're you're talking about the Broncos in the strike shortened season and then against the bills when the Buffalo Bills have gone do All intensive purposes should have won the 1990 91 Super Bowl in the Scott Nord Mr Field goal against the New York Giants. On Ben would end up going on to three more after that Great great football teams, led by Jim Kelly. And on paper, probably one of the best Runs of any team in the NFL history. But the game isn't one necessarily on paper. A lot of times it's one on the bulletin board and what you don't read about yourself. And what other people tell you that you're you can't do, and What our team always was Coach so well by Joe Gibbs and understanding that a maybe we're not the flashiest and we're not going to be the you know, the ones that are gonna Thank you. No. Campbell soup commercials and things of that nature, but collectively as a group We understood what we had to do. And we understood what what it took to be a pro and what it took Tolo play on a 16 game schedule and have everyone on the same page and understand whether it be from our walk throughs on Wednesday to our actual Game plan on Sunday. That's where that's where we I think have the advantage on lot made a lot of smart, smart guys. Guys that played a lot of years. Like together for a lot of years, and the chemistry that we had was overtook. Maybe any of the you know the talent that other teams had, and I think we were very, very fortunate to be Mia individually and collectively to play for Joe Gibbs and what he meant to US and Richie Pet of owner, defense coordinator Wayne Two Beers, special teams coach Dan Rather your strength coach. All those guys. Such an impact on What we couldn't couldn't do and how successful we were had largely to do with the game plan that were given to us and us being smart and and going out there and executed the best we can. Mark rip in my guest, and I'm thoroughly enjoying our conversation. And you're bringing up some of the great coaches and players that you had the pleasure of working with and And we're having this conversation and and I just can't help but think you know, watching this this documentary that you're in quiet explosions. Um I mean, there, there had to be a time. Where you were. Worried a little bit about what your post football playing career was, like. Tell us a little bit about, you know, quiet explosions. The documentary but also your journey. How beat up were you? You know how beat up was your brain after you called it a career and and you know, how were you able to kind of recover from some of that? Well, I think they think the one word is compromised that each player uses and some more soul than myself, but each one of us our brains were compromised. And in playing the game, those physical it's there's no You know, you can't sell it short about what it is. That's what the game of football is a physical game. What they're trying to do now and eliminate some of the, um uh, the post concussive or He's um Cumulative effect of hits. It. Players take throughout the course of the week is that practices without pads on and eliminate some of the fifth physical contact helmet to helmet contact specifically that the cumulative effect of those Has a great impact on guys and guys that I know today and guys that aren't the same when when I played with them and where they're at now. I'm now unfortunate because this quiet explosions Um, some of the opportunities that not only players, but civilians and anyone that's been through a TV I traumatic brain in incident, or, um, Uh, possible CTE or any neurological, um, illness. They have an opportunity now through this. Taking a look at this documentary have with with these doctors and some of the specialties that they specialize in the to help the brain, the healing of the brain, and that's one of the things I think that So important and also important for players today that they're getting a whole week. Brain can heal from a game on Sunday, not have that contact throughout the week and then go back on a The following Sunday and at least try to give the brain a chance to heal throughout the week, So there's many, many different variables and different things that people can do to help. Would have TV eyes or, um, narrow neurological. Disorders, and one of them is that the document it'll covers. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is called H Body, which obviously is there has been used in very successful like Myself went in to see Dr Bob Sammons, who's with the group. Out of color out or actually, and I did some work with transcranial magnetic stimulation, which is to fire some of the neuron maybe have died or or whatever through through sports and Your injuries. There's others that especially the Main character in this, um Documentary Andrew Marr, who was a dear friend of mine, a Green beret and was head of the bomb squad over in Afghanistan and the amount of trauma that his brain suffered. And to come back and and go through some very, very difficult times. You know where he didn't didn't know if he wanted to be around anymore, And he's got a family of seven to care for. And basically to be is just being told that Hey, the only way you're going to survive take these opioids and Find out that maybe that's not necessarily the case. So he got with Dr Mark Gordon. And there's a very sophisticated blood test that you can take the chose a hormonal, different deficiency in your body. It can get you up to speed with natural ways instead of opioids, and, um, things that doctors give you now to try to take care of some of the depression and another anxieties you're going through. So Dr Gordon is instrumental, Um You know the function functional brain scans by Dr Daniel Amen from Ayman Clinic. Anthony Davis, who they call the Notre Dame killer back in the early seventies. Um, just you know, he his from his playing days He was suffering through depression, and he did some functional brain scans and all these characters in this documentary Ryan had some sort of injuries. Was a pro surfer Shawn dollar who had broke his neck. Um There was a winner of the survivor, then, uh, driver again that was a Marine and and went through some very difficult times. And he's on the recovery. Um, Julianna Heart find Sebastian. Responding. Has a firefighter from the 9 11 New York City. Um, all the you know the things that he's going through the You know through that 9 11..

football NFL Joe Gibbs depression Dr Mark Gordon special teams coach Washington Buffalo Bills Jim Kelly New York City Tolo Dr Bob Sammons Andrew Marr Broncos Dr Daniel Amen Shawn dollar Campbell Ben
"ayman clinic" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

07:05 min | 1 year ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"And we have great guests. We just had Joan London on that was Super Fun and del Brennan wrote the end of Alzheimer's but you know brain warrior, the whole idea is. A war for the health of your brain, you need to be armed prepared in wear to really win the fight of your life because when your brain's outright everything sufferers. Are there certain foods I mean besides the obvious stuff like processed foods and gluten gluten and sugar is there anything particular that you think is really harmful for brain house Anna's or any real end? What are the top three foods besides blueberries in salmon that are really able to increase your brain house so the one that surprises people is corn. is almost all the corners raised with US decides sides and even if it's not. When Korn falls to the ground, it kills all of the weeds around. So, Orrin is just got very bad fatty acid profile and. You know, yes, we killed the Indians killed us by giving US court. So I'm not a fan of corn and soy the are very high in omega six fatty acids mcgann pro inflammatory as far as good foods besides blueberries salmon not and seeds, and you just really want to think of colorful fruits and vegetables. and Avocados are loaded. They're also very calorie dense. Careful not to overdo it. Now. Absolutely how `bout in terms of I was Gonna ask you something but I got the Sarah. We've talked about the Sarah Bellum us the front of your head for coordination in stuff like that. 'cause you're saying in this kind of rewind in bright minds, the be blood flow, and that's why people with add or anxiety depression have to be moving. You know that's to get the blood flow going. Is. There is there. Is there anything about that with the coordination or it doesn't have to be as long as you're actually moving to get your blood slow? Is there something else in there that talks about the coordination portion that helps with your keeping you alert you're talking earlier but that You don't have to run in just a minute to the Sarah Bellum in the back bottom part of the brain gets back bottom. Yeah. Coordination. But also thought coordination how quickly. You can integrate new information. So it's just so important it's low and autism and low and add. That's why you know these coordination movements and one treatment that surprises people actually surprised me is horse therapy. Is that when you get on a horse, you have to you so many muscles to stay on. The IT turns out to be good brain exercise. Now, of course, if you fall off, that's very. has a very bad for your brain but how many people have a horse? Not Very many right. So is there anything other than and Oh? Yeah, you're talk- talked about the hyperbaric. Oxygen Chamber can help. It's your brain. And more and more hands. So? Lowering. He actually had a patient. House was shot. And was really really anxious welcome in the middle of I'd panic and remember what I told her. She just ran her hands under warm water and it settled her down because it triggers a relaxation response how? when you warm your hands, it increases blood flow. To your hands and that's triggering this thing called a para sympathetic response. You. Know when you get stressed your hands get cold. Right warming is telling the rest of your nervous system it safe going to be okay. We don't have to be freaked out. So quay for people to lower their anxiety especially time like this is just to put their hands under warm water dead. Going go on your SPA or your A hot bath. All right end and the other one's hyper-baric oxygen. Chamber what is that most people don't have access to that I get it. But what does that do? What? How does that help brain health? But we use it a lot we haven't in, Egypt. Clinics. When you go under pressure with increased oxygenated increases, blood flow to the brain, and there's actually some evidence of increases stem cell production. As. Well. And are your clinics currently open or they're not open with everything? That's the whole time you open mental high central service and a lot of the work not the scans obviously. But a lot of work is done virtually and we still see people from all over the world. But now that we're able to do it virtually you know people can make an appointment there nearer a clinic or they can drive to the clinic then come and we do a lot more than scans. My a relaxed some of the telemedicine rules so that we can even prescribe medication if needed through our video conference appointments. Oh. Wow. Okay and I WANNA ask you one last thing I'll let you go. Okay. What do you think of one? What did you think of peptides? It's a new I feel like it's a new wellness trend right now you see any do you have any opinion on how it can help improve brain health at all or not? Yet? I just I don't know enough research about it. I know some of my friends functional friends are doing it. Yeah. I've just not seen the research. I tend when there's something new side suspect of course. During weight and go is this going to be real or not real And then. Just learn more about it I just don't know about. Night. All right. Let's Barrena while I. Appreciate Your Time. Thank you so much for sitting with me today and talking talking and give me such insight on on your brain on the brain and how do people find I mean besides the book Dan of mental illness how else can people find out more information or actually I want everybody to go and do the Quiz Free Quiz on assessment dot com right as the website is brain health come brain health assessment, dot com, and they can always go to Ayman Clinic Dot Com.

Sarah Bellum US Ayman Clinic Dot Com Alzheimer Orrin Oxygen Chamber Korn Anna Joan London del Brennan Egypt House Dan
"ayman clinic" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

Habits and Hustle

08:43 min | 1 year ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on Habits and Hustle

"Is genetics what what's in your family because just to be vulnerable to that genes on a death sentence should be a wakeup call to get healthy the ages for head trauma. A major cause of mental health problems that nobody knows about because most of. Never looked at the brain and how would you know if that? Accident you got thrown out of the car three years old. mattered. If you didn't lock and the literature head traumas clear I didn't make this up Ed. Knows head injuries or major causes of homelessness depression, suicide panic attacks eighty learning problems, and so a strategy is always protect your hat and so when my kids WanNa, go snowboarding unlike now bad idea because you're more likely to have a concussion when they wanNA play tackle football, it's like. It's not gonNA have. Ed's. My youngest is now sixteen and I have grandbabies from two to town and I adore but they're not playing football. You know I think that. You know neglect. Or Abuse. On how you define it but. On. Average kids have a concussion every year they play football the you should never be okay with them. The tea in bright minds who's toxins alcohol is not a health food. Marijuana's not going green. Both of those are two brackley toxic to brain function but there's a whole bunch of other things that are toxic general anesthesia's toxic. I. Some brains the products. Are Nets. Deck can be boksic sixty percent of the lipstick sold. United. States has lead in it. So I call it the kiss of death. Were in this pandemic. And people are lathering their bodies with these antiseptics which are just. Talks. and. You know I'm a fan of green products because you know the south can kill Kobe but you don't want all the other things you can't pronounce on your skin because whatever goes on your scalp now exactly in your body and affects your body. Yeah. You said a couple of things. You just said the ferrets in that you mentioned because I don't think many people. Sort of that one is that how do people get tested for that? So to measure of iron storage in your body and I can normal blood tests. Can you go to any own test Bertam level and people who are low? Anxious add tire. Can't sleep. People who are high. Premature aging. So if you're allow you need to take our. And read made is probably okay. You know sustainably raised red meat and. If. You're high you need to donate blood. So, always heights runs in my family. So I donate blood twice a year and it keeps it allow. And you when you said for implement a couple of the got your you kind of touched upon it with gum disease. But the other thing is, what's what's the correlation between Gut Health and Brain House? They're completely connected. Right if your gut is not right say had a lot of antibiotics when your child because y'all lots of ear infections and it really damage the microbiome, a hundred, trillion bugs in your gut. Then you may be chronically anxious the rest of your life because you have an unhealthy microbiome in your gut. So just think of the microbiome has. A population were all of us have about one hundred, trillion bugs in our gut nee make transmitters they detoxify our food, they help us with digestion And if they're not healthy, you feel terrible emotional. Functional Medicine Doctors Star. By improving the health of your gut which you need to do with your diet. No people heard probiotics long people haven't heard prebiotics that's actually eating fiber to feed the probiotics. You gotTa Take Care of the bugs in your gut feeding them right and stop poisoning now alcohol. microbiome. Yeah. I. Mean I feel like is becoming much more known about the got health's at the brain, the brain gut connection but you know it's interesting about you is I feel like you're like a combination of functional doctor and and Brain Doctor Right? Because you do a lot of the same things that a functional doctor would look at. It. Goes to clinic of yours. Is that what happens they take an overall you said overall saying where they talk about your lifestyle, they go through the gut, the digital do like any type of blood test to find out about got there or is that? Take a test like that. There are no not a blood test but a stool test. valuated dramatic bio and I think. That it Ayman Clinics we've made three big innovations and the first ones imaging if you don't. Know Stop Lying the second one was natural ways to heal the brain really become expert at. Diet supplementation, and the third thing is we do it in a bright minds functional medicine context your thyroid's now right. You're not going to be right in your mind if. You're overweight or you have diabetes your brain's not gonna be healthy. If you have sleep apnea, your brain won't be healthy. So I really think of going after all of the bright minds risk factors and that's actually part of all of our valuations and you know it's something that evolved over the last thirty years thirty one years. Now we open Damon clinics and it's You know it was medication psychotherapy nerve feedback which Dan went to quantitatively EG specked. Oh, some of the medicines heart, the brain we added supplements if your thyroid's now right your brains now, right if you have lime disease, your brains aren't going to be right and so we're time we just added the functional medicine component. So. But what happened what for people? Who Don't who who don't live close by of your clinics? Right? Because you have, you have a bunch of them. A lot of them are you have some Atlanta New York Costa Mesa at the place in La Let's go over because I want to give people ways that they can kind of help themselves when they don't have access to senior great clinics. So wait finish the other principals. So you said you kind of talked bright what his mind stand for. M. I N. D. S. so. Is the AMAS mind storms. It's abnormal electrical activity in your name, and that's where nerve feedback can be helpful is calculated giant Diet and be helpful Is Immunity and infections for fabric with what's going on now covid nineteen. The. Herpes Infections Epstein Barr Infections Toxin Plasmas in got from cats a parasite. All of these things can damage your mind. So getting your immune system, right. And treating infections when possible is critical in the book, I tell people this is how is a lab? owner. I mean, there's just no surprise I try to get people. Actually simple as can be. the end is near hormone deficiency. Or abnormalities high or low thyroid higher low testosterone. How do you balance your hormones? Because you.

football Brain House Ed gum disease Ayman Clinics Marijuana Premature aging Nets Kobe testosterone AMAS Damon N. D. S. Dan La Let Atlanta New York Costa Mesa
"ayman clinic" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

15:25 min | 2 years ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"This is K. away the home of coast to coast AM and the voice of Colorado all right so we're talking I mean the cake the central case we did not give the a final adjudication of what happens to Harvey Weinstein sorry pervert Weinstein I kept having a problem when I was reading the book to get conflating the two in my head why I'm surprised in a way that Harvey Weinstein did not attempt some sort of brain defense same here yeah he tried everything else but this is Herbert Weinstein in the brain defense book that Kevin Davis wrote me and it so we just got a couple more callers left but did you want to make a comment on where we were at the bottom of the hour for a minute yeah don't worry about it because we're we're moving pretty fast let's keep moving just we get everybody in first time caller line Mike is in Nebraska on coast to coast might yeah hello I thank yeah I had that when I was a year old I had pneumonia and they gave me penicillin which I was turned out to be allergic to it we all had the fever was a hundred for whatever yeah they they thought I almost died but just the effect of all of that yeah so but you know I'm still a burglar kicked found someone I've had money a few times it says here the color of my color she did it that you're bipolar is that related to that but you know that's kind of my question I I've been diagnosed for over forty years with that you know I've had a lot of difficulty accepted not yeah it's been and what a lot of very difficult but do you don't think that you're bi polar pardon me you don't think that you are bi polar or you know that you are you just don't want to accept it all right I actually went out to you guys crack heard the Ayman clinic yes and yet last November they you know they did the stands I went through the whole program there and from what they could see I have bipolar so you know it was it it was kind of reassuring you know at least this year from that regard thanks man you got a thought on this well agas right question would would be you know have you felt some a fax throughout your life that this the Monia which may have compromise your your brain in in in some way whether it's bad to bipolar disorder or not I I couldn't say it because I'm not really that hold it in there but but I'd be just curious whether he felt that it affected your behavior certainly people with bipolar disorder can experience behavioral you know issues and again if you wanna relate this to the brain to sense it's all about you know creating a system in which we can understand people with brain disorders and also whether our criminal justice system can find a place where they are treated fairly and compassionately yeah that's actually where I go this Mike I'm curious do you do you think of times in your life when you did things which afterward you really didn't have any memory of I would not say if that is the case well that's good though yeah you know I I mean I I do remember I do you recall what you guys were talking about earlier about the the the years between seventeen and twenty four and those particular particularly difficult time I was in the navy yeah it it the hours I work yeah back to going to a whole lot of no no no I get it so I mean that's where is it things to start to add up really wrong if you've got a foundational issue like the one you mentioned I don't know that that we can be very helpful beyond that but I hope that at least talking about it helps make it clear and I know that from other people I work at it media there's a lot of people who are bi polar who are in media the very attracted to working in media so I've had a lot of experience with working with people who are bi polar and this thing that you say about a difficulty accepting the diagnosis is really half the battle because some of the meds that they will give you we may make you feel less like you in the sense of what you think you are but it's very different on how other people may be experiencing you and that's the difference so I hold that hope out for you that that if you can stay with that program for a while until you get accustomed to it I think you find that people will react to you differently if is this diagnosis is indicating that your bi polar that evening those two things out the best way you'll be able to tell that it's working is not necessarily internally but it's how people reflect back to you on on your behaviors Danny is in Dana point California on a wildcard line on coast to coast Danny R. yeah you know I I just calling to ask a couple of years ago I thought I had a maybe a ministro gore band you know some about policy and just because violence was pushed on toward the right and I when I when I went to the hospital they did a MRI the they did a full scan on my entire organs perhaps they you know they thought it would be something malignant and in fact the it was everything was B. nine and the she said to the neurosurgeon came back in the in the evening after all they are being checked that checked out and they they said they found seventeen lesions into my brain and to mention my spots and the day after their neurologist came to see me and he said that they found a in the MRI a governor small formation and in the brain stem that with the cost of capital raised and one of them bread and that's what created the act a problem with the number on the side of the of the mouth and look like has the most you know but eventually came back and everything was B. nine and then they told me I would you know to get checked six months later just in case and I never did and I was just wondering if perhaps this would create any problems in the future or census find now is gonna stay finances and worry about it but remembering that Kevin's not a doctor I wouldn't want him to it wouldn't put him in the position of having to make a a sort of diagnosis or prognosis for that matter but I think that's a very I hope that you will follow through on my when I if I catch a subtext from your voice it's maybe you should be following through that if you're bringing it up to question it I don't think most people say no I don't follow through I think you should follow through I hope you do my let me grab wall in Allentown on a wildcard line on coast to coast AM wal Mart but but it's always good to talk to you once again into you you had a question for Kevin Davis well one of my old the college **** browser only she told us that the Sigmund Freud the famously said that there's no such thing as perfect sanity amen I suppose you could also corollary to that would be that there's no such thing as absolute insanity not won the previous caller mentioned child abuse and its famously known that Hitler was a real very violently beaten and abused by his father right Hitler was very empathetic toward animals she was a very game he couldn't stand the sight of blood okay you might be a member of the soul there is a Yankee who are you yeah but remember some of his yeah he was sympathetic to animals but a lot of his other theories were wrapped up in very odd the things I had to do with vegetables and body smells and all sorts of stuff it it isn't quite a pure line from there to Peter but it's it's a compelling thought I guess Kevin were you with any of that well you know look we we all know people who behave badly people who are morally adrift people you know I mean that that's what worked for her murderous what's really it issue and what really is the foundation of this the brain defense is legally how do we deal with this yeah legally culpable you know for the acts that they commit yeah and and and and and should we hold them responsible for what they do and should be considered whether they've been beaten you know have eighty principe in interesting issue because you know I've covered the our system for for many many years I've sat through many trials in one of the things that I've observed and is how lawyers try to humanize people who commit very inhuman acts how do we do that how do we explain you know murderous behavior how do we consider a person's upbringing should we whether it's mental illness whether you've been beaten as a child whether you are a drug addict whether you are an alcoholic I mean these are perennial questions I think that we grapple with you know that that the justice system grapples with every day that's a great point in a central theme for the brain defense we have time I think for just under I think we'll get three and let me go to Mike on a wildcard line in Denver on coast to coast go ahead Mike all right good morning thank you for taking my call Ian and happy early birthday by the way if you Kevin odd big fan of your work I had a couple of comments on euro science so neuroscience is actually a lot based on the how we perceive the study of how we perceive not only that the past events but the present events and it's we had a very interesting case out here in Colorado I'm sure you would recall the the Aurora Colorado movie theater shooting James Holmes was act that they shooter was actually studying neuroscience and shoots medical campus he and he intricate person and he made this decision to go obviously can match mass shooting and I think it's interesting how neuroscience tied into this whole equation because he was obviously very well versed in that and he obviously played the insanity defense and was unsuccessful so I'll let you know I really appreciate your work and and you've taken out a full for our show to to cover this because it's very it's a very important topic and I just want to get your kind of thoughts on I've already talked about the need to add you to the longer you might interesting point Mike I want to bring that up and just get to right away so Kevin thank you Mike that you know here's a guy who studied neuroscience did a horrible crime the mass shooting and did then attempted the insanity defense it almost seems indicative of his own mental acuity that he was trying to tie those things together somehow you know thanks very calm I could picture teletype I thought that was such a fascinating case but for the very reasons he described you know waited a premeditated act you know again if we're gonna go back to legal definitions it doesn't fit the insanity defense right right so it's for something in between you know you know many states offer the possibility from further called guilty but mentally ill which ensures that a person will be held accountable but told a credible and also detained and and and receiving mental health treatment right that sounds like a case for guilty but mentally ill you know that there are you know in between ten and ways to compromise you know for that you know again you know someone who commits mass but not like that right the first site you think is that person's crazy right you know for lack of a better word and and that to demand anything about that no no no no I think we're on the same page and that that's that's our reaction and I think especially in the case of people who perform these elaborate suicides whether it's going to be death by copper at their own hand but they're going to bring a lot of other souls with them before they pull the trigger the final trigger all right I mean if you search you know despicable acts that's hooked UP Curtis people in families and communities you know the substance told that these acts you know build a create hello this is society we want to hold people accountable we need to absolutely and you don't see too dangerous and it's in one of the things about you know the brain defense is that okay so if you refinance sorry judge finds that a person you know has this this this brain defect what rather than let them go free should we detain them and imprison them because they could be in the future date Christmas I mean that's the other side this is protecting the future not just for the past act right that if we think especially if we think that to them in the wild beast model that taking somebody's life is like you know taking an O. Henry bar off the counter they don't care you know it's not that they don't even see that as being different than we have to be pretty well that's actually the perfect lead in for this one I think it's.

Colorado Harvey Weinstein Herbert Weinstein
"ayman clinic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

15:28 min | 2 years ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"All right so we're talking I mean the cake the central case we did not give the a final adjudication of what happens to Harvey Weinstein sorry pervert Weinstein I kept having a problem when I was reading the book to get conflating the two in my head but I'm surprised in a way that Harvey Weinstein did not attempt some sort of brain defense same here yeah he tried everything else but this is Herbert Weinstein in the brain defense book that Kevin Davis wrote and it so we just got a couple more callers left but did you want to make a comment on where we were at the bottom of the hour for a minute yeah don't worry about it because we're we're moving pretty fast let's keep moving just we get everybody in first time caller line Mike is in Nebraska on coast to coast might yeah hello I thank yeah I had that when I was a year old I had pneumonia and they gave me penicillin which I was turned out to be allergic to it yeah I had the fever was a hundred for whatever yeah they they thought almost died but just the effect of all of that yeah so but you know I'm still a burglar kicked found someone I've had money a few times it says here the color of my color she did it that you're bipolar is that related to that you know that's kind of my question I I've been diagnosed for over forty years with that you know I've had a lot of difficulty accepted not yeah it's been and what a lot of very difficult but do you don't think that you're bi polar pardon me you don't think that you are bi polar or you know that you are you just don't want to accept it all right I actually went out to you guys try to herd the Ayman clinic yes and yet last November they you know they get discounts I went through the whole program there and from what they could see I have bipolar so you know it was it it was kind of reassuring you know at least yeah this year from that regard thanks man you got a thought on this well and I guess my question would would be you know he felt a fax throughout your life that this the Monia which may have compromised your your brain in in in some way whether it's bad to bipolar disorder or not I I couldn't say it because I'm not really that gold in in that but but I'd be just curious whether you felt that affected your behavior certainly people with bipolar disorder can experience behavioral you know issues and again if you want to relate this to the brain defense it's all about you know creating a system in which we can understand people with brain disorders and also whether our criminal justice system can find a place where they are treated fairly and compassionately yeah that's actually where I go this Mike I'm curious do you do you think of times in your life when you did things which afterward you really didn't have any memory of I would not say if that is the case well that's good though yeah you know I I mean I I do remember I do you recall what you guys were talking about earlier about the the the years between seventeen and twenty four and those particular particularly difficult time I was in the navy yeah it it stopped hours I work yeah back to going to a whole lot of no no no I get it though I mean that's where is it things to start to add up really wrong if you've got a foundational issue like the one you mentioned I don't know that that we can be very helpful beyond that but I hope that at least talking about it helps make it clear and I know that from other people I work at it media there's a lot of people who are bi polar who are in media they're very attracted to working in media so I've had a lot of experience with working with people who are bi polar and this thing that you say about a difficulty accepting the diagnosis is really half the battle because some of the meds that they will give you may make you feel less like you in the sense of what you think you are but it's very different on how other people may be experiencing you and that's the difference so I hold that hope out for you that that if you can stay with that program for a while until you get accustomed to it I think you'll find that people will react to you differently if is this diagnosis is indicating that your bi polar that evening those two things out the best way you'll be able to tell that it's working is not necessarily internally but it's how people reflect back to you on on your behaviors Danny is in Dana point California on a wildcard line on coast to coast Danny arm yeah you know I I just calling to ask a couple of years ago I thought I had a maybe a ministro gore band you know something about policy and just because violence was pushed on towards the right and I when I when I went to the hospital they did a MRI the they did a full scan on my entire organs drops they you know they thought it would be something malignant and in fact the it was everything was B. nine and the she said to the neurosurgeon came back in the in the evening after all they are being checked that checked out and they they said they found seventeen lesions into my brain and to manage remote spots and the day after their neurologist came to see me and he said that they found a in the MRI a governor small formation and in the brainstem but with the cost of capital raise and one of them bread and that's what created the problem with the nerves on the side of the of the mouth and okay because the moto you know such a venture it can match and everything was B. nine and then they told me I would you know to get checked six months later just in case and I never did and I was just wondering if perhaps this would create any problems in the future or since is fine now it's going to stay fine and then worry about it but remembering that Kevin's not a doctor I wouldn't want him to it wouldn't put him in the position of having to make a a sort of diagnosis or prognosis for that matter but I think that's a very I hope that you will follow through and I when I if I catch a subtext from your voice it's maybe you should be following through that if you're bringing it up to question it I don't think most people say no I don't follow through I think you should follow through I hope you do my let me grab wall in Allentown on a wildcard line on coast to coast AM wall darknet products always good to talk to you once again and to you you have a question for Kevin Davis well one of my old the college **** browser only she told us that the Sigmund Freud the famously said that there's no such thing as perfect sanity amen I suppose you could also corollary to that would be that there's no such thing as absolute insanity not won the previous caller mentioned child abuse and its famously known that Hitler was a real very violently beaten and abused by his father right filer Hitler was very empathetic toward animals she was a very game he couldn't stand the sight of blood Hey you might be a member of the soul there's who are you yeah but remember some of his yeah he was sympathetic to animals but a lot of his other theories were wrapped up in very odd the things I had to do with vegetables and body smells and all sorts of stuff it it isn't quite a pure line from there to Peter but it's it's a compelling thought I guess Kevin were you with any of that well you know look we we all know people who behave badly people who are morally adrift people you know I mean that for for her murderous what's really it issue and what really is the foundation of this the brain defense is legally how do we deal with this yeah legally culpable you know for the acts that they commit yeah and and and and and should we hold them responsible for what they do and should be considered whether they've been beaten you know have eighty principe in interesting issue because you know I've covered the our system for for many many years I've sat through many trials in one of the things that I've observed and is how lawyers try to humanize people who commit very in human acts how do we do that how do we explain you know murderous behavior how do we later a person's upbringing should we whether it's mental illness whether you've been beaten as a child whether you are drug addicts whether you are an alcoholic I mean these are perennial questions I think that we grapple with you know that that the justice system grapples with every day that's a great point in a central theme for the brain defense we have time I think for just one I think will get three and let me go to Mike on a wildcard line in Denver on coast to coast go ahead Mike all right good morning thank you for taking my call Ian and happy early birthday by the thank you Kevin big fan of your work I had a couple of comments on euro science so neuroscience is actually a lot based on the how we perceive the study of how we perceive not only that the past events but the present events and it's we had a very interesting case out here in Colorado I'm sure you would recall the the Aurora Colorado movie theater shooting James Holmes was act that they shooter was actually studying neuroscience and shoots medical campus and he intricate person and he made this decision to go obviously committed match mass shooting and I think it's interesting how neuroscience tied into this whole equation because he was obviously very well versed in that and he obviously played the insanity defense and was unsuccessful so I you know I really appreciate your work and and you've taken out a full for our show to to cover this because it's very it's a very important topic and I just want to get your kind of thoughts on are you talked about the insanity defense well I've got you might need just a point Mike I want to bring that up and just get to right away so Kevin thank you Mike that is the you know here's a guy who studied neuroscience did a horrible crime the mass shooting and did then attempted the insanity defense it almost seems indicative of his own mental acuity that he was trying to tie those things together somehow you know thanks very calm I could picture come with I I thought that was such a fascinating case but for the very reasons he described you know he committed a premeditated act you know again if we're gonna go back to legal definitions it doesn't fit the insanity defense right right so is there something in between you know you know many states offer the possibility for further called guilty but mentally ill which ensures that a person will be held accountable but tell the credible and also detained and and and receiving mental health treatment right that sounds like a case for guilty but mentally ill you know that there are you know in between ten and ways to compromise you know for that you know again you know someone who commits mass murder like that right the first site you think is that person's crazy right you know for lack of a better word and and right and not to demand anything about Matt no no no no I think we're on the same page and that that's that's our reaction and I think especially in the case of people who perform these elaborate suicides whether it's going to be death by copper at their own hand but they're going to bring a lot of other souls with them before they pull the trigger the final trigger all right I mean if you search enough despicable acts that hurt really hurt people in families and communities you know the substance told that these acts you know build a create so this is society we want to hold people accountable we need to absolutely and you don't see too dangerous and it's in one of the things about you know the brain defense is that okay so if you refinance sorry judge finds that a person you know has this this this brain defect well rather than let them go free should we detain them and imprison them because they could be in the future date Christmas I mean that's the other thing this is protecting the future not just for the past act right that if we think especially if we think that to them in the wild beast model that taking somebody's life is like you know taking an O. Henry bar off the counter they don't care you know it's not that they don't even see that as being different than we have to be pretty but that's actually the perfect lead in for this one I think it's our last caller wildcard line Steve in LA on coast to coast for Kevin Davis go ahead Steve hello I thank you for taking my call and I believe you guys are spot on.

Harvey Weinstein Herbert Weinstein Kevin Davis
"ayman clinic" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

13:41 min | 2 years ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Right so we're talking I mean the cake the central case we did not give the a final adjudication of what happens to Harvey Weinstein sorry pervert Weinstein I kept having a problem and I was reading the book to get conflating the two in my head why I'm surprised in a way that Harvey Weinstein did not attempt some sort of brain defense my name here yeah he tried everything else but this is Herbert Weinstein in the brain defense book that Kevin Davis wrote and it so we just got a couple more callers left but did you want to make a comment on where we were at the bottom of the hour during my neighbor yeah don't worry about it because we're we're moving pretty fast let's keep moving just we get everybody in first time caller line Mike is in Nebraska on coast to coast might yeah hello I thank yeah I had that when I was a year old I had pneumonia and they gave me penicillin which I was turned out to be allergic to it we all had the fever was a hundred for whatever yeah they they thought almost died but just the effect of all of that yeah so but you know I'm still a burglar kicked on someone I've got the money a few times it says here the color of my color she did it that you're bi polar is that related to that but you know that's kind of my question I I've been diagnosed for over forty years with that you know I've had a lot of difficulty accepting that yeah it's been and what a lot of very difficult but do you don't think that you're bi polar pardon me you don't think that you are bi polar or you know that you are you just don't want to accept it all right I actually went out to you guys chri heard the Ayman clinic yes and yet last November they you know they did the stands I went through the whole program there and from what they could see I have bipolar so you know it was it it was kind of reassuring you know at least yeah this year from that regard thanks man you got a thought on this well and I guess my question would would be you know have you felt a fax throughout your life that this the Monia which may have compromised your your brain in in in some way weather expected bipolar disorder or not I I couldn't say it because I'm not really that hold it in there but but I'd be just curious whether he felt that if affected your behavior certainly people with bipolar disorder can experience behavioral you know issues and again if we want to relate this to bring defense it's all about you know creating a system in which we can understand people with brain disorders and also whether our criminal justice system can find a place where they are treated fairly and compassionately yeah that's actually where I go this Mike I'm curious do you do you think of times in your life when you did things which afterward you really didn't have any memory of I would not say if that is the case well that's good though yeah you know I I mean I I do remember I do you recall what you guys were talking about earlier about the the the years between seventeen and twenty four and those particular particularly difficult time I was in the navy yeah it it's the hours I work yeah that they're going to hole out of no no no I get it so I mean that's where the things just start to add up really wrong if you've got a foundational issue like the one you mentioned I don't know that that we can be very helpful beyond that but I hope that at least talking about it helps make it clear and I know that from other people I work at it media there's a lot of people who are bi polar who are in media they're very attracted to working in media so I've had a lot of experience with working with people who are bi polar and this thing that you say about a difficulty accepting the diagnosis is really half the battle because some of the meds that they will give you may make you feel less like you in the sense of what you think you are but it's very different on how other people may be experiencing you and that's the difference so I hold that hope out for you that that if you can stay with that program for a while until you get accustomed to it I think you'll find that people will react to you differently if is this diagnosis is indicating that your bi polar that evening those two things out the best way you'll be able to tell that it's working is not necessarily internally but it's how people reflect back to you on on your behaviors Danny is in Dana point California on a wildcard line on coast to coast Danny yeah you know I I just going to ask a couple of years ago I thought I had a maybe a ministro gore band you know some about policy and just because violence was pushed off toward the right and I when I when I went to the hospital they did a MRI the they did a full scan on my entire organs perhaps they you know they thought it would be something malignant and instructor it was everything was B. nine and the she said to the nurse surgeon came back in the in the evening after all they are being checked that checked out and they they said they found seventeen lesions into my brain and to manage remote spots and the day after their neurologist came to see me and he said that they found a in the MRI a governor small formation and in the brainstem but with the cost of capital raise and one of them bread and that's what created the a program with the nerves on the side of the of the mouth and look like as the moto you know but eventually came back and everything was B. nine and then they told me I would you know to get checked six months later just in case and I never did and I was just wondering if perhaps this would create any problems in the future or since it's fine now it's going to stay fine and that's on the worry about it but remembering that Kevin's not a doctor I wouldn't want him to it wouldn't put him in the position of having to make a a sort of diagnosis or prognosis for that matter but I think that's a very I hope that you will follow through on my when I if I catch a subtext from your voice it's maybe it should be done following through then if you're bringing it up to question it I don't think most people say they don't follow through I think you should follow through I hope you do my let me grab Walt in Allentown on a wildcard line on coast to coast AM wall carpet products always good to talk to you once again and see you you have a question for Kevin Davis well one of my old the college **** browser only she told us that the Sigmund Freud the famously said that there's no such thing as perfect sanity Hey man I suppose you could also corollary to that would be that there's no such thing as absolute insanity not won the previous caller mentioned child abuse and its famously known that Hitler was a very violently beaten and abused by his father right it was very empathetic toward animals she was a very game he couldn't stand the sight of blood today you might be a member of this role is there is who are you yeah but remember some of his yeah he was sympathetic to animals but a lot of his other theories were wrapped up in very odd things had to do with vegetables and body smells and all sorts of stuff it it isn't quite a pure line from there to Peter but it's it's a compelling thought I guess Kevin were you with any of that well you know look we we all know people who badly people who are morally adrift people you know I mean that for for for murders what's really it issue and what really is the foundation of this the brain defense is legally how do we deal with it yeah the brutally culpable you know for the acts that they commit yeah and and and and and should we hold them responsible for what they do and should be considered whether they've been beaten you know have eighty principe in interesting issue because you know I've covered the our system for for many many years I've sat through many trials in one of the things that I've observed and is how lawyers try to humanize people who commit very in human acts how do we do that how do we explain you know murderous behavior how do we later a person's upbringing should we whether it's mental illness whether you've been beaten as a child whether you are drug addicts whether you are an alcoholic I mean these are perennial questions I think that we grapple with you know that that the justice system grapples with every day that's a great point in the central theme for the brain defense we have time I think for just one I think will get three and let me go to Mike in a wildcard line in Denver on coast to coast go ahead Mike all right good morning thank you for taking my call Ian and happy early birthday by the way if you Kevin big fan of your work I had a couple of comments on euro science so neuroscience is actually a lot based on the how we perceive the study of how we perceive not only that the past events but the present events and it's we had a very interesting case out here in Colorado I'm sure you would recall the the Aurora Colorado movie theater shooting James Holmes was act that the shooter was actually studying neuroscience and shoots medical campus and he intricate person and he made this decision to go obviously committed match mass shooting he and I think it's interesting how neuroscience tied into this whole equation because he was obviously very well versed in that and he obviously played the insanity defense and was unsuccessful so you know I really appreciate your work and and you taken out a full for our show to to cover this because it's very it's a very important topic and I just want to get your kind of thoughts on I've already talked about the need to add you to the longer you might need just a point Mike I want to bring that up and just get to right away so Kevin thank you Mike that you know he here's a guy who studied neuroscience did a horrible crime the mass shooting and did then attempted the insanity defense it almost seems indicative of his own mental acuity that he was trying to tie those things together somehow you know six Republican fixture comes I I thought that was such a fascinating case but for the very reasons he described you know he made a premeditated act you know again if we're gonna go back to legal definitions if it doesn't fit the insanity defense right right so is there something in between you know you know many states offer the possibilities of further called guilty but mentally ill which ensures that a person will be held accountable but told a credible and also detained and and and receiving mental health treatment right that sounds like a case for guilty but mentally ill you know that there are you know in between ten and ways to compromise you know for that you know again you know someone who commits mass murder like that right the first thought you think is that person's crazy right you know for lack of a better word and and.

Harvey Weinstein Herbert
"ayman clinic" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

14:28 min | 2 years ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Right so we're talking I mean the cake the central case we did not give the a final adjudication of what happens to Harvey Weinstein sorry pervert Weinstein having a problem and I was reading the book to get conflating the two in my head but I'm surprised in a way that Harvey Weinstein did not attempt some sort of brain defense here yeah he tried everything else but this is Herbert Weinstein in the brain defense book that Kevin Davis wrote and it so we just got a couple more callers left but did you want to make a comment on where we were at the bottom of the hour during my neighbor yeah don't worry about it because we're we're moving pretty fast let's keep moving just we get everybody in first time caller like Mike is in Nebraska on coast to coast might yeah hello I like yeah I had that when I was a year old I had pneumonia and they gave me penicillin which I was turned out to be allergic to it we all had the fever was a hundred for whatever yeah they they thought almost died but just the effective all about yeah so but you know I'm still a burglar checked from someone I've had money a few times it says here the color of my color she did it that you're bipolar is that related to that you know that's kind of my question I I've been diagnosed for over forty years with it you know I've had a lot of difficulty accepting that yeah it's been a lot a lot of very difficult but do you don't think that you're bi polar four nine you don't think that you are bi polar or you know that you are you just don't want to accept it all right I actually went out to you guys chri heard the Ayman clinic yes and yet last November they you know they get the stands I went through the whole program there and from what they could see I have bipolar so you know it was it it was kind of reassuring you know at least yeah this year from that regard maybe get a thought on this well Agnes right question would would be you know have you felt some a fax throughout your life that this the Monia which may have compromised your your brain in in in some way whether inside to bipolar disorder or not I I couldn't say because I'm not really that ruled in in that but but I'd be just curious whether he felt that affected your behavior certainly people with bipolar disorder can experience behavioral you know issues and again if we want to relate this to the brain to sense it's all about you know creating a system in which we can understand people with brain disorders and also whether our criminal justice system can find a place where they are treated fairly and compassionately yeah that's actually where I go this Mike I'm curious do you do you think of times in your life when you did things which afterward you really didn't have any memory of I would not say if that is the case well that's good though yeah you know I I mean I I during my I. do you recall what you guys were talking about earlier about the the the years between seventeen and twenty four and doesn't particularly particularly difficult time I was in the navy yeah if the hours I work yeah back to going the whole lot of no no no I get it though I mean that's where the things just start to add up really wrong if you've got a foundational issue like the one you mentioned I don't know that that we can be very helpful beyond that but I hope that if he's talking about it helps make it clear and I know that from other people I work in media there's a lot of people who are bi polar who are in media the very attracted to working in media so I've had a lot of experience with working with people who are bi polar and this thing that you say about a difficulty accepting the diagnosis is really half the battle because some of the meds that they will give you may make you feel less like you in the sense of what you think you are but it's very different on how other people may be experiencing you and that's the difference so I hold that hope out for you that that if you can stay with that program for a while until you get accustomed to it I think you'll find that people will react to you differently if is this diagnosis is indicating that your bi polar that evening those two things out the best way you'll be able to tell that it's working is not necessarily internally but it's how people reflect back to you on on your behaviors Danny is in Dana point California on a wildcard line on coast to coast Danny R. yeah you know I I just going to ask a couple of years ago I thought I had a maybe a ministro gore band you know some about policy and just because violence was pushed on towards the right and I when I when I went to the hospital they did a MRI the they did force general my entire organs drops they you know they said it would be something malignant and in fact the it was everything was B. nine and the she said to the neurosurgeon came back in the in the evening after a whole day of being checked checked out and they they said they found seventeen lesions into my brain and two meningioma spots and the day after their neurologist came to see me and he said that they found a in the MRI a governor small formation and in the brainstem with excessive W. Rees and one of them bread and that's what created the at a program with the nurse on the side of the the mouse that looks like has the most you know but eventually came back and everything was B. nine and then they told me I was you know to get checked six months later just in case and I never did and I was just wondering if perhaps this would create any problems in the future or since it's fine now it's going to stay financially and worry about it but remembering that Kevin's not a doctor I wouldn't want him to I wouldn't put him in the position of having to make a a sort of diagnosis or prognosis for that matter but I think that's a very I hope that you will follow through on my when I if I catch a subtext from your voice it's maybe you should be following through if you're bringing it up to question it I don't think most people say no I don't follow through I think you should follow through I hope you do my let me grab wall in Allentown on a wildcard line on coast to coast AM wall Dr products always good to talk to you once again and to you you have a question for Kevin Davis well one of my old the college **** browser only she told us that the Sigmund Freud the famously said that there's no such thing as perfect sanity amen I suppose you could also corollary to that would be that there's no such thing as absolute insanity not won the previous caller mentioned child abuse is famously known that Hitler was a real very violently beaten and abused by his father right to work further it was very empathetic toward animals she was a very game he couldn't stand the sight of blood okay you might be a member of the soul this is right who are you yeah but remember some of his yeah he was sympathetic to animals but a lot of his other theories were wrapped up in very odd things had to do with vegetables and body smells and all sorts of stuff it it isn't quite a pure line from there to Peter but it's it's a compelling thought I guess Kevin were you with any of that well you know look we we all know people who he hates badly people who are morally adrift people you know I mean that for her murderous what's really it issue and what really is the foundation of this the brain defense is legally how do we deal with this yeah legally culpable you know for the accident they commit yeah and and and and and should we hold them responsible for what they do and should be considered whether they've been beaten you know having a difference at the end interesting issue because you know I've covered the system for for many many years I've sat through many trials in one of the things that I've observed and is how lawyers try to humanize people who commit very inhuman acts how do we do that how do we explain you know murderous behavior how do we consider a person's upbringing should we whether it's mental illness whether you've been beaten as a child whether you are drug addicts whether you are an alcoholic I mean these are perennial questions I think that we grapple with you know that that the justice system grapples with every day that's a great point in a central theme for the brain defense we have time I think for just one I think will get three and let me go to Mike on a wildcard line in Denver on coast to coast go ahead Mike all right good morning thank you for taking my call Ian and happy early birthday by the way if you Kevin big fan of your work I had a couple of comments on euro science so neuroscience is actually a lot based on the how we perceive the study of how we perceive not only that the past events but the present events and it's we had a very interesting case out here in Colorado I'm sure you would recall the the Aurora Colorado movie theater shooting James Holmes was act that they shooter was actually studying neuroscience and shoots medical campus he and he intricate person and he made this decision to go obviously coming match mass shooting he and I think it's interesting how neuroscience ties into this whole equation because he was obviously very well versed in that and he obviously played the insanity defense and was unsuccessful so you know I really appreciate your work and and you've taken out a full for our show to to cover this because it's very it's a very important topic and I just want to get your kind of thoughts on I already talked about the need to add you to the longer you might he's just a point like I want to bring that up and just get to right away so Kevin thank you Mike that you know here's a guy who studied neuroscience did a horrible crime the mass shooting and the dented tempted the insanity defense it almost seems indicative of his own mental acuity that he was trying to tie those things together somehow you know thanks for calling Mike at six recovered I I thought that was such a fascinating case but for the very reasons that you described you know waited a premeditated act you know again if we're gonna go back to legal definitions it doesn't fit the insanity defense right right so is there something in between you know you know many states offer the possibility for further called guilty but mentally ill which ensures that a person will be held accountable but told a credible and also detained and and and receiving mental health treatment right that sounds like a case for guilty but mentally ill you know that there are you know in between ten and ways to compromise you know for that you know again you know someone who commits mass murder like that right the first site you think is that person's crazy right you know for lack of a better word and and right and not to demand anything about that no no no no I think we're on the same page and that that's that's our reaction and I think especially in the case of people who perform these elaborate suicides whether it's going to be death by copper at their own hand but they're going to bring a lot of other souls with them before they pull the trigger the final trigger all right reserved you know despicable acts that's hooked UP Curtis people in families and communities you know the substance told that these acts you know build a create hello this is society we want to hold people accountable we need to absolutely and you don't see too dangerous and it's you know one of the things about you.

Harvey Weinstein Herbert Weinstein Kevin Davis
"ayman clinic" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

12:34 min | 2 years ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"All right so we're talking I mean the cake the central case we did not give the a final adjudication of what happens to Harvey Weinstein sorry pervert Weinstein I kept having a problem when I was reading the book to get conflating the two in my head why I'm surprised in a way that Harvey Weinstein did not attempt some sort of brain defense here yeah he tried everything else but this is Herbert Weinstein in the brain defense book that Kevin Davis wrote and and so we just got a couple more callers left but did you want to make a comment on where we were at the bottom of the hour for a minute yeah don't worry about it because we're we're moving pretty fast let's keep moving just we get everybody in first time caller line Mike is in Nebraska on coast to coast might yeah hello hi Mike yeah I had that when I was a year old I have pneumonia and they gave me penicillin which I was turned out to be allergic to it we also had the fever was hundred for whatever yeah they they thought almost died but just be effective all of that yeah so but you know I'm still a more politically found someone I've gotten only a few times it says here the collar on my caller she did it that you're bi polar is that related to that but you know that's kind of my question I I've been diagnosed for over forty years with it you know I've had a lot of difficulty acceptance and yeah it's been a lot a lot of very difficult do you don't think that you're bipolar pardon me you don't think that you are bi polar or you know that you are you just don't want to accept it I actually went out to you guys put her the Ayman clinic yes and yet last November they you know they get the stands I went through the whole program there and from what they could see I have bipolar so you know it was it it was kind of reassuring you know at least from that regard have you got a thought on this well I guess my question would would be have you felt some a fax throughout your life that this the Monia which may have compromised your your brain in in in some way weather expected bipolar disorder or not I I couldn't say because I'm not really that hold in the next but but I'd be just curious whether you felt that affected your behavior certainly people with bipolar disorder behavioral you know issues and again one of the latest to the brain to sense it's all about you know creating a system in which we can understand people with brain disorders and also whether our criminal justice system can find a place where they are treated fairly and compassionately yeah that's actually where I go this Mike I'm curious do you do you think of times in your life when you did things which afterward you really didn't have any memory of I would not say if that is the case well that's good though yeah you know I I mean I I do remember I do you recall what you guys were talking about earlier about the the the years between seventeen and twenty four and thousands particularly particularly difficult time I was in the navy yeah okay it is the hours I work yeah back to going to a whole lot of no no no I get it so I mean that's where the things to start to add up really wrong if you've got a foundational issue like the one you mentioned I don't know that that we can be very helpful beyond that but I hope that at least talking about it helps make it clear and I know that from other people I work in media there's a lot of people who are bi polar who are in media the very attracted to working in media so I've had a lot of experience with working with people who are bi polar and this thing that you say about a difficulty accepting the diagnosis is really half the battle because some of the meds that they will give you may make you feel less like you in the sense of what you think you are but it's very different on how other people may be experiencing you and that's the difference so I hold that hope out for you that that if you can stay with that program for a while until you get accustomed to it I think you find that people will react to you differently if this this diagnosis is indicating that your bi polar that evening those two things out the best way you'll be able to tell that it's working it's not necessarily internally but it's how people reflect back to you on your behaviors Danny is in Dana point California but a wildcard line on coast to coast Danny yeah you know I I just going to ask a couple of years ago I thought I had a maybe a ministro gore band may know something about policy and just because violence was pushed all the right and I when I when I went to the hospital they did a MRI the they do force general my entire organs what I'm saying yeah they thought it would be something malignant and in fact the it was everything was B. nine and the she sent to the neurosurgeon came back in the in the evening after all they are being checked that checked out and they they said they found seventeen lesions into my brain and two meningioma spots and the day after their neurologist came to see me and he said that they found a in the MRI a governor small formation and in the brainstem that with a cluster of capillaries and one of them read and that's what created the app a program with the nurse on the side of the the mouth they look like as the moto you know but eventually came back and everything was B. nine and then they told me I was you know to get checked six months later just in case and I never did and I was just wondering if perhaps this would create any problems in the future or since it's fine now he is going to stay fine and then worry about it but remembering that Kevin's not a doctor I wouldn't want him to I wouldn't put him in the position of having to make a a sort of diagnosis or prognosis for that matter but I think that's very I hope that you will follow through on my when I if I catch a subtext from your voice it's maybe you should be following through that if you're bringing it up to question it I don't think most people say they don't follow through I think you should follow through I hope you do my let me grab Walt in Allentown on a wildcard line on coast to coast AM wall dark but it's always good to talk to you once again and to you you have a question for Kevin Davis well one of my old college **** browser only she told us that the Sigmund Freud the famously said that there's no such thing as perfect sanity amen I suppose you could also corollary to that would be that there's no such thing as absolute insanity not won the previous caller mentioned child abuse they mostly known that Hitler was while only being an abused by his father filer it was very empathetic toward animals she was a very game he couldn't stand the sight of blood okay you might be a member of the soul there's who are you yeah but remember some of his yeah he was sympathetic to animals but a lot of his other theories were wrapped up in very odd things had to do with vegetables and body smells and all sorts of stuff it it isn't quite a pure line from there to Peter but it's it's a compelling thought I guess Kevin were you with any of that well you know look we we all know people who behave badly people who are morally adrift people you know I mean that but before her murder well what's really it issue and what really is the foundation of this the brain defense it is legally how do we deal with this yeah regally culpable you know for the accident they commit yeah and and and and and hold them responsible for what they do and should be considered whether they've been beaten you know have eighty principal interesting issue because you know I've covered the a system for for many many years I've sat through many trials in one of the things that I've observed and that is how lawyers try to humanize people who commit in human access how do we do that how do we explain you know murderous behavior how do we later a person's upbringing should we whether it's mental illness whether you've been beaten as a child whether you are drug addicts whether you are an alcoholic I mean these are perennial questions I think that we grapple with you know that that the justice system grapples with every day that's a great point in the central theme for the brain defense we have time I think for just one I think will get three and let me go to Mike got a wildcard line in Denver on coast to coast go ahead Mike all right good morning thank you for taking my call Ian and happy early birthday by the way thank you Kevin big fan of your work I had a couple of comments on euro science so neuroscience is actually a lot based on the how we perceive the study of how we perceive not only that the past events but the present events and it's we had a very interesting case out here in Colorado I'm sure you would recall the the Aurora Colorado movie theater shooting James Holmes was sacked the day shooter was actually studying neuroscience and shoots medical campus he and he intricate person and he made this decision to go obviously can match mass shooting he and I think it's interesting how neuroscience ties into this whole equation because he was obviously very well versed in that and he obviously played the insanity defense and was unsuccessful so you know I really appreciate your work and and you're taking out a full for our show to to cover this because it's very it's a very important topic and I just want to get your kind of thoughts on already talked about the need to add you to the longer you might interesting point Mike I want to bring that up and just get to right away so Kevin thank you Mike that you know here's a guy who studied neuroscience did a horrible crime a mass shooting and then attempted the insanity defense it almost seems indicative of his own mental acuity that.

Harvey Weinstein
"ayman clinic" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

04:23 min | 3 years ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

"Eh from youth to pro and I would say the same thing in any <hes> head combat sport my sport of choice was soccer and there was no conversation about head injuries and soccer unless you just it's obviously got laid out and you were obviously concussed which means you lost consciousness by the way it doesn't require loss of consciousness to have a concussion. That's the biggest misnomer but in soccer particularly you take a full volley off of somebody that's you have you know six to ten feet away or you take <hes> a sky bald punt from eighty yards away and the amount of force to the brain is about eighty pounds uh-huh <hes> per square inch verses and he gets slugged and octagon. It's only about thirty pounds per square inch wow so when yeah so when you think of Dr particularly in the position that was playing which is like Senator Defenseman. It's our job is to make sure that we're getting the ball out of our defensive third into the attacking third so my job is to head as many ball back into the offense of position as I could so I was taking twelve to twenty of those a- game and so when I got my brain scanned three years ago the guy who was running this <hes> Ayman Clinic he said you know I've seen fifteen thousand scans and I've never seen it scan looks as bad as yours with the brain functions as good as yours. So what are you doing doing and I said well. I think that's a compliment to do because my brain on scan still really looks pretty lousy but it's because I've done a lot of practices that build in kind of like ancillary support neural networks and so I just laid out everything I put in the concussion repair manual and they weren't doing a good number of that and so that's a hyperbaric oxygen transfer magnetic stimulation up to neuro peptides and stem cells he the we have technologies to get the brain better. We just don't have the science scaled out all the players that need them because it's a cash cow and the players suffered the worst. Yes there's these great multi-million dollar contracts and you have more and more more pro athletes opting out of those because of having their last injury and because not wanting to end up like a vegetable which is good because you see now we see the long term ramifications and what is the C. t. e. or trump chronic traumatic traumatic encephalopathy early onset dementia with with guys as early as in their thirties or even what what happened with journey with junior sale I understand he had one of the most severe cases of this. What what happens with the again I'm just going off of what I had read but the ringing in the ears and the forgetfulness and how much of that is attributed to these concussions hundred percent sure as I'm concerned you know like somebody in retrospect if they've got me on the? Witnessed and they would probably poke holes in that logic but I would say okay well. Let's look at his skin. Yes there was evidence of chronic traumatic and step up the yes there was evidence of early <hes> degenerative condition and what happens downstream downstream from that when the brain turns off to can't tell the rest of the body how to function so you get this hand hypo pituitary as you get downstream effect of really low hormones she don't have much testosterone didn't have as much neuro chemistry. You don't have as many <hes> <hes> of the same kind of like neurotransmitter load that builds our motivation that bills are mood <hes> that we had before so you have to chronic depression chronic insomnia <hes> a motivational needing to require more earn more pharmaceuticals to try and feel good again and those have downstream negative effects over time what's worse stuck in this kind of feedback loop and then there's the sense of hopelessness and you go to see the doctor and he just tries to put you on more pharmaceuticals Sudoku and you're like wow this isn't sustainable process and it feels hopeless for many people in that position. What what's worse is is the N._F._l.? Worse or M._M._A.. For the brain <hes> you know as an organization. It's really hard for me to say because I don't know those organizations intimately <hes> from the inside out what I do know and you.

soccer combat sport Senator testosterone thirty pounds per square inch hundred percent million dollar eighty pounds eighty yards three years ten feet
"ayman clinic" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"ayman clinic" Discussed on Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

"His life in six months that that is really pretty sure nearing one thing. Again, you keep throwing out these little nuggets that I find so interesting starting the day putting feet on the ground and saying this is going to be a great day like these. The I call them soft things, but they're so powerful one thing you talked about that. I absolutely love is. I forget the exact as us, but basically to bathe in happiness to just drink that in one why is it important? And then to how do we actually do that? Well in my new book feel better fast and make it last which I'm really excited about is. There's an exercise and feel better fast. It's about flooding off five of your senses at once with happiness. I mean, that's why you have senses it brings the world in why not bring it in and a happy way rather than in terrifying way. So their visual things like images of nature, although on my phone, it's like here my favorites. And I can just go to it. And it makes me happy because it triggers happy memories. For me listening to sounds of nature, like the rain or the ocean or certain music like for me. It's good vibrations. From the beach, boys. What are the sense? What are the touches? What are the tastes, smells that can trigger happiness? So vanilla of all things honeysuckle jasmine have been found in scientific studies to trigger-happiness. It's really interesting. And if I remember right there's something about smell. It's the one sense that doesn't go through like a relay station in the brain is like processed directly right to your limbic, brain and so-, smells will trigger either intense happiness or sadness, really interesting. All right. So before I asked my last question tell these guys where they can find you online. And then I have a modified question for you. Ayman clinics dot com is a great place. We also have brain MD health for supplements to take the brain health assessment brain health assessment dot com, and they can find feel better fast..

Ayman six months