35 Burst results for "Aviv"

The Digitizing Process - Natalie Monbiot of Hour One on Virtual Humans Automated Video Production and More - Voicebot Podcast Ep 219 - burst 04

The Voicebot Podcast

02:06 min | 3 d ago

The Digitizing Process - Natalie Monbiot of Hour One on Virtual Humans Automated Video Production and More - Voicebot Podcast Ep 219 - burst 04

"On starting poi- is very much human would not making humans up with starting with real human being and then with digitizing them in order to be able to Create endless amounts of content featuring that pass in with the commission in the case of taryn So a describe what we did say the process was we got her in studio and she had a couple of different looks because she wanted high as she calls at. Ai clone to have some flexibility a couple of different ways of different presenting different types of content. And so we go to rent a studio with the green screens Team production team in tel aviv. A video conference in and direct shape and the goal of that is to capture about three to five minutes worth of quantity footage and with that vintage which essentially becomes the data that we can then use to create a digital character. So that's what we did answer the following the shoot Actually if you go to terrence youtube page You can see the proof of concept video on. They're also making a video of what the process was like actually creating higher character so it's a really simple process that we just use a normal Normal video calmer normal studio. Everything's quite normal. We have a few things like lighting in the have we have you know try and minimize reflections. Just little things like that and What we do is we have like a methodology that we guide passing through such as to bury still talk a little bit more Character and expression various degrees of Expressive essentially so that we can capture that full range of facial expressions so that we have this data she disposal when we want to generate new content.

Taryn Ai Clone Virtual Human Digital Human Avatar Online World Creative Process Video BOT Green Screens Team Tel Aviv Youtube
IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

The Promised Podcast

02:02 min | Last week

IDF Paratroopers Head to Europe to Jump for Hannah Szenes's 100th Birthday

"We learned this week that next sunday as we recorded on july eighteenth another delegation of one hundred fifty or so idea of soldiers code-named the lightning of the heavens will leave israel on a mission marking. What would have been the hundredth birthday of hannah. Censh- mayor memory for blessing. Hana sanish the budapest born poet and soldier in these secret british special operations executive who on march fourteenth nineteen forty four. When she was just twenty two parachuted with others into yugoslavia where she joined a partisan group and was soon captured by nazi soldiers at the hungarian border and then tortured and murdered by firing squad on monday. To a f- hercules transport. Planes will fly over the forests of eastern slovenia. Where sanish made her last. Jump and one hundred soldiers mostly from the idea but also hungarian. Slovenian and croatian soldiers were reenact sandwiches. Jump the purpose of the reenactment. According to colonel yuval guys the commander of some hueneme the idea paratroopers brigade is to strengthen the ties between the idf and local countries and to try to recreate the heroism of the shoe paratroopers and quote the name of the mission. The lightning of the heavens is taken from his most famous poem. Highly colicky sorry. I walked the case. Aria which goes my god. My god may these never end the sand and the see the rush of the water the lightning of heaven. The prayer of man among the soldiers travelling to slovenia is one who was called up for reserve duty to serve as an educational officer for the mission tel aviv university professor of jewish history. Lieutenant colonel seem Golden husan lieutenant. Haddara golden may refer blessing was killed at twenty three in the two thousand and fourteen gaza war and whose body has been held by hamas for the seven years since and again like mariam said it would take hours months even dissect and elucidate the historical religious and political currents that converge in. This baffling act of symbolism

Hana Sanish Sanish Colonel Yuval Paratroopers Brigade Slovenia Hannah Yugoslavia Hueneme Israel IDF Mission Tel Aviv University Golden Husan Haddara Golden Gaza Mariam Hamas
Tens of Thousands Attend Pride Parade in Israel's Tel Aviv

WBZ Midday News

00:49 sec | Last month

Tens of Thousands Attend Pride Parade in Israel's Tel Aviv

Could This Be the End of Benjamin Netanyahu's Political Career?

BBC Newsday

02:01 min | 2 months ago

Could This Be the End of Benjamin Netanyahu's Political Career?

"Of Benjamin Netanyahu beyond wise to strike him off, But it looks like a key Israeli opposition party has backed Unity government, excluding Mr Netanyahu, Man in question is the ultra nationalist leader Naftali Bennett, who announced that his party would join talks to form a governing coalition with the centrist Party leader Yah Lapid. Mr Netanyahu's reacted saying the proposed deal would weaken Israel. Oh, in ultimate is senior correspondent at the 24 news child in Tel Aviv and joins us now. Oh, and thanks for coming on I mean, most people if they know about Bennett, they'll know that he has more in common with Netanyahu, uh, with the anyone else s. So why is this happening now? And will it work? Do you think It's happening now. Because over the course of two years, Benjamin Netanyahu has lost more and more pieces of the Israeli right. And there are hundreds of thousands of Israelis who have gone to the polls again, most recently in our last elections and have said they are right wing, but they would rather have a government that is dominated by the center left then have Benjamin. It's now return to power. A number of political parties went to voters and said, You have two options. Option A Netanyahu staying in power Option B, a center left government even though you voter are right wing voter and hundreds of thousands of Israeli right wing voters opted for option B on so that basically led those parties to become a balance of power and then cooked up with the center left. And put themselves in a position on the cusp of ousting Israel's longest serving prime minister. Right. So you suggest that this has been going on for a while, anyway, a sort of Ah, drift or removed. But hasn't he been able to present himself as Mr Security? That's who he's always presented himself as we've heard his comments, saying, Who's going to look after the settlers? That kind of thing? Doesn't that count anymore? Accounts among the large spar thought that Israeli voters and again don't forget this coalition if it's formed, has a very narrow majority. And Netanyahu still in every single poll has a plurality of the votes when the public's asked who they want to be prime minister, But it's not enough. It's not enough for him to get a majority in the

Mr Netanyahu Israeli Opposition Party Unity Government Benjamin Netanyahu Naftali Bennett Centrist Party Yah Lapid Netanyahu Tel Aviv Israel Bennett Benjamin
Israeli Warplanes Pound Hamas Tunnels as Conflict Enters Second Week

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:58 min | 2 months ago

Israeli Warplanes Pound Hamas Tunnels as Conflict Enters Second Week

"Is royal has launched dozens of further air strikes against gaza this morning. Reckon the by locals. As among the heaviest bombardments the clave has ever sustained. The rights followed further rocket. Salvos launched at israel from inside gaza overnight. It has been traditional at moments of heightened conflict between israel and palestinian authorities for the united states to insert itself as depending on circumstances mediator broker or banger. Together of heads. Us president joe biden must now judge whether the united states usual reflexive support of israel plays quite as well within his own party as he could want. Assumed it would join with more on this by scott. Lucas junked professor at the clinton institute university college. Dublin Scott first of all the bigger question does the united states. Still say itself is the empire here will. Certainly there is a public part of the biden. Administration's approach which says we're very much of the effort to try to do something to reduce the killings and the violence. So howdy ahmar. Who is deputy assistant secretary of state for the middle east when out to tel aviv on friday. And he's in discussion with Israeli arab in palestinian officials but notably will not be having any contacts with any officials from hamas who of course is the ruling authority in gaza but the primary approach of the biden administration the so far and this has been reinforced. Only yesterday has been to provide cover for israel you know. However the biden ministration sees itself. The reality is this first of all in the united nations on three occasions. The security council has reportedly wanted to issue a statement calling for a ceasefire on three occasions including yesterday. According to diplomats the united states was the only country out of the fifteen council members that held out against such a statement

Gaza Israel United States Clinton Institute University Dublin Scott Howdy Ahmar Joe Biden Biden Lucas Biden Administration Scott Tel Aviv Middle East Hamas Security Council United Nations
Biden Says He Is Working Toward Sustained Calm in Israel-Palestinian Conflict

WBZ Overnight News

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Biden Says He Is Working Toward Sustained Calm in Israel-Palestinian Conflict

"Israelis, saying both deserve to live in safety and security. The president spoken a pretaped video message ahead of Muslims. Ead celebrations also believe Palestinians and Israelis. Equally deserve to live in safety and security and enjoy equal measure of freedom, prosperity and democracy. Foreign leaders are also responding to the violence. CBS is empty as to IAB isn't tell Aviv neighboring Jordan says he's leading a diplomatic effort along with European and U. S allies to get Israel to end its bombing campaign of Gaza. But Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says no chance The U. N. Security Council and Arab diplomats have convened emergency meetings now to work on a way to stop these clashes. Mandatory evacuations are underway in Southern California as a

IAB Israeli Prime Minister Benjami Aviv CBS U. N. Security Council Jordan Gaza Israel Southern California
Media Demand Israel Explain Destruction of News Offices

Buck Sexton

00:47 sec | 2 months ago

Media Demand Israel Explain Destruction of News Offices

"And Hamas militants and Gaza shows no signs of slowing down, with both sides continuing to trade airstrikes, causing destruction and death A massive barrage of rockets fired towards Israel's second largest city of Tel Aviv, Israeli military preparing their response Israel was targeting the Gaza Strip from the ground and the air they did hit a building that houses international media offices. The Associated Press did release a statement. At the event, saying quote were shocked and horrified that the Israeli military would target and destroy the building housing, a piece bureau and other news organizations in Gaza. They have long known the location of our bureau and new journalists were there. The occupants were notified ahead of time. Israel spent much of the day showing Gaza with artillery units and striking from the air factions inside Gaza did target tell Aviv before the barrage boxes Trey Yingst and President Biden

Gaza Israel Hamas Tel Aviv Gaza Strip The Associated Press Aviv Trey Yingst President Biden
Israeli Airstrike in Gaza Destroys Building Housing Foreign Media

TEAM LALLY REAL ESTATE

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Israeli Airstrike in Gaza Destroys Building Housing Foreign Media

"As an Israeli airstrike levels of building in Gaza City that house the local offices of The Associated Press inside Gaza, a 13 story building that houses international media outlets. Was completely destroyed by the Israeli air force. The idea provided little evidence to support a claim that Hamas was operating from this location. All of this comes as earlier in the day we saw factions inside Gaza, targeting the second largest city in Israel. Tell Aviv multiple times. Mama says This was in retaliation to the overnight killing off 10 people, all from the same family. Eight of the dead are Children. Fox is Trey Yingst.

Gaza City Gaza Israeli Air Force The Associated Press Hamas Israel FOX Trey Yingst
Biden Admin Has 'Communicated' With Israel After It Destroyed Media Building

Ken Broo

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Biden Admin Has 'Communicated' With Israel After It Destroyed Media Building

"U. S response to today's Israeli air strike that destroyed a building in Gaza, where the Associated Press And other journalists in the region were located. A P officials say the location was evacuated just beforehand. They were nearly avoiding. Ah, loss of life. Their ABC is chief national correspondent Matt Gutman is near Tel Aviv as Hamas vows not to back down in Gaza buildings pulverized bulldozers clearing little hills of rubble. On the conflict widening in Jordan. Hundreds of pro Palestinian protesters spilling out towards the border with Israel, warning shots fired to keep them from crossing and along another border, with Lebanon, protestors setting a fire and actually penetrating the border fence. One person killed in those clashes. White House press secretary Jen Psaki Ripper recorded it that the United States has communicated directly with the Israelis to ensure the safety and security of journalist and independent media. And that is their paramount responsibility, and that's the latest

Matt Gutman Gaza Associated Press Tel Aviv Hamas ABC Jen Psaki Ripper Jordan Lebanon Israel White House United States
West Bank Erupts in Protest Amid More Israel-Hamas Fighting

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:06 min | 2 months ago

West Bank Erupts in Protest Amid More Israel-Hamas Fighting

"We continue to follow this violent fighting between israeli defense forces hamas today violent protests erupted in the west bank and calls for a ceasefire being largely ignored again tonight. There are reports of civilians including being caught in the crossfire. Our nbc news chief. Foreign correspondent richard engel reports tel aviv for us. Tonight with new airstrikes tonight and tank and artillery fire. Israel says it's targeting hamas and destroying a network of tunnels in gaza. The islamic militant group is using to hide and launch two thousand rockets at israeli towns and cities over the last several days. But it's not only tunnels being obliterated. This was a bank is worth says was used by hamas more than one hundred twenty palestinians have been killed so far including at least thirty children were buried together today venturing outside gaza twenty-two-year-old law student. Kerama says the devastation is worse than she imagined. We feed like whatever we do. Whatever we build we'll get destroyed once again if we had hope for the future. They just can't. It could get much worse. Israel has deployed thousands of troops to the gaza border primed for a ground assault but israel for now has held off an invasion instead relying on its iron dome missile defense system to intercept rockets but some are getting through falling indiscriminately and killing. At least eight israelis million in israel had been rushing to bomb shelters but because of the children are traumatized. We have been in the shelter for a week and now the fighting is enraging palestinians. outside of gaza deadly clashes broke out in the west bank and for the first time in years palestinians with israeli citizenship are joining the fight with vigilante attacks from both

Hamas Richard Engel Gaza Israel Kerama Nbc News West Bank Tel Aviv
Israeli Ground Troops Carrying out Strikes Into Gaza Strip, IDF Says

Lance McAlister

01:10 min | 2 months ago

Israeli Ground Troops Carrying out Strikes Into Gaza Strip, IDF Says

"Five of hostilities between Israel and the Palestinians tonight. It has risen to a new level. That battle heating up is Israeli troops are now attacking on the ground in the Gaza Strip What appears to be a new counter attack by Israeli defense forces tonight, Israelis living along the border of that Mediterranean Sea coast Palestinian land told to leave their homes and go to safe locations in what appears to be a ground force of sold on Gaza by Israel. NBC's Matt Gutman. In Tel Aviv where Hamas is aimed a number of rocket attacks. Most of the people who we've spoken to you here frankly, they say, Okay, we've gotta attack Gaza got to put an end to Hamas. We've gotta retaliate. There's ah, smaller subject of the people with whom I've spoken to say, OK, way need peace. We need to come to terms with these people. This'll can't happen anymore. But that is really the unifying understanding here is that this seems to be an untenable way of living just that nobody can seem to claw their way out of it. The Israeli prime minister promising Moss will pay a heavy price for its rocket attacks on Israel. Andy Field,

Mediterranean Sea Coast Matt Gutman Israel Gaza Hamas Gaza Strip Tel Aviv NBC Moss Andy Field
Understanding the Israel-Hamas Conflict

WSJ What's News

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Understanding the Israel-Hamas Conflict

"In israel. The death toll is rising as fighting between israel and hamas intensifies last night israeli. Prime minister benjamin. Netanyahu said that he would be sending in the military and border police across the country to restore order as communal violence. Spread within israel's borders at the same time among those in the midst of the violence are arab israelis are the descendants of palestinians who remained in israel after the nine hundred forty eight war that established the country. We want to take a closer look at the genes of this. Most recent conflict the efforts to quell the violence. And how all of this plays into the overall security of the region joining me from tel aviv. Is w j reporter. Felicia schwartz felicia. I'm glad we could connect with you fall for horrible so felicia over time. We know there has been tension between israel and hamas. We've seen three war since hamas seized control of the gaza strip in two thousand seven. The most recent tension dates back to the spring of twenty. Eighteen came after president. Trump recognize jerusalem as israel's capital. Explain to me what's happening now. That's prompting this violence that we're seeing today so among us decided to become a part of these long simmering tensions in jerusalem that sort of exploded around ramadan this year and around the same time. There is a looming decision on a court case about whether to evict palestinians from a sort of strategically situated neighborhood in east jerusalem. There were demonstrations there. They spread to the mosque. One of the holiest sites in islam. Israeli police had pretty heavy handed. Response there to some people who are bringing rocks and fireworks to the compound and there were these very violent confrontations between police and worshippers. Police were using stun grenades rubber bullets. There were a lot of injuries. There

Israel Prime Minister Benjamin Hamas Felicia Schwartz Felicia Netanyahu Jerusalem Tel Aviv Gaza Strip Donald Trump Israeli Police
Israel, Gaza, and Fears of War as Violence Escalates

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:42 min | 2 months ago

Israel, Gaza, and Fears of War as Violence Escalates

"The united nations has wound that the violence in israel which began on monday could become a full scale war at least sixty five people in gaza including fourteen. Children and seven people in israel have been killed in fighting which started after weeks of tension east jerusalem between israelis and palestinians. I listen kaplan. Summer is the journalists for herat. She's on the line now from tel aviv. A good morning to you alison. Thanks for joining us. Can you tell us what's the latest on the ground. Yes so overnight One thousand one hundred and sixty rockets were fired at israel not for night but since the outbreak of several hundred happened overnight Many many israelis the bulk of israelis in the center of the country spent time in in their Bomb shelters including me And what what really. Shocked israelis was The amount of violence on the streets that occurred overnight in the city of loyd The previous night there had been outbreaks of violence by arab residents against some jewish extreme nationalists. Game into town. End where we're attacking arabs in return and also in the city of dot com which is right next to tel aviv Similar things occurred in arab man was pulled out of his out of his car and beaten severely But what people are really warning is the fact that wrecked hit on a building in the city of ashkelon On a apartment that had sealed room it had a bomb shelter. Um still manage to kill a five year old boy which which everybody is mourning.

Israel Tel Aviv Herat United Nations Gaza Kaplan Jerusalem Alison Ashkelon
Conflict Between Israel and Palestinians Continues to Escalate

BBC Newsday

01:41 min | 2 months ago

Conflict Between Israel and Palestinians Continues to Escalate

"In Israel have appealed for calm after a wave of street violence between Jews and Arabs. Israelis that's being triggered by the conflict with Gaza President Reuven Rivlin described outbreaks of writing as senseless civil war. Video of an Arab driver being dragged from his car and beaten by Jewish extremists in Tel Aviv has calls particular outrage in Gaza. Palestinian civilians have started marking eat with Israeli drones and warplanes still flying overhead. At least 67. Palestinians and seven people in Israel have been killed since fighting began on Monday from Jerusalem. His Jeremy Bone For Palestinians. It felt like the longest and most difficult night in Gaza since the last war with Israel in 2014, BBC colleague who lives there, said the sound of explosions from his radio's strikes. Times drowned out the sound of press to Mark Eedle fitter, the festival that marks the end of the month of Ramadan. It was also a difficult night for his radio civilians within rocket range of Gaza who have bean in shelters. Communal violence has spread to towns in Israel with a mixed Arab Jewish population 20% of Israeli citizens. Palestinian Arabs. This week is showing again how tension in Jerusalem can ignite violence. It's also shown that the conflict between Jews and Arabs is as bitter as ever with a new generation. Feeling anger, grief and hopelessness on for some hatred.

Gaza Reuven Rivlin Israel Jeremy Bone Mark Eedle Tel Aviv Jerusalem BBC Ramadan
Israel Steps up Gaza Offensive, Kills Senior Hamas Figures

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:56 min | 2 months ago

Israel Steps up Gaza Offensive, Kills Senior Hamas Figures

"I'm anthony davis israel on wednesday pressed ahead with a fierce military offensive in the gaza strip killing as many as ten senior hamas military figures and toppling a pair of high rise towers housing hamas facilities in a series of s strikes. The islamic militant group showed no signs of backing down and fired hundreds of rockets that rayleigh cities in just three days. This latest round of fighting between the bitter enemies has already begun to resemble and even exceed a devastating fifty day war in two thousand fourteen like that previous war. Neither side appears to have an exit strategy but there are key differences. The fighting has triggered the worst. Jewish arab violence inside. Israel in decades and looming in the background is an international war crimes investigation. Israel carried out an intense barrage of airstrikes just after sunrise striking dozens of targets in several minutes that set off bone rattling explosions across gaza. Strikes continued throughout the day filling the sky with pillars of smoke at nightfall. The streets of gaza city resembled a ghost town as people huddled indoors on the final nights of ramadan. The evening is usually a time. A vibrant nightlife shopping and crowded restaurants. Gaza militants continued to bombard israel with nonstop rocket fiber throughout the day. The attacks brought life to a standstill in southern communities near gaza but also reached as far north as the tel aviv area. About forty five miles to the north for a second straight day. Gaza's health ministry said the death toll rose to sixty five palestinians including sixteen children and five women. Islamic jihad confirmed the deaths of

Hamas Israel Anthony Davis Gaza Strip Gaza Gaza City Tel Aviv Islamic Jihad
The 3 Biggest US Airlines Are Suspending Flights to Israel

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

The 3 Biggest US Airlines Are Suspending Flights to Israel

"The rising violence between Israel and the Palestinians is disrupting U. S. air travel to the troubled region the top three U. S. airlines that fly to Israel have suspended those flights amid the escalating violence the worst season since twenty fourteen American United and delta airlines have suspended flights for at least the next couple of days with the main airport in Tel Aviv receiving rocket fire and Israel targeting the Gaza Strip representatives say the airlines are monitoring the situation for when they might resume those flights I'm Jackie Quinn

Israel American United U. Delta Airlines Tel Aviv Gaza Strip Jackie Quinn
40 Killed in Airstrikes, Rocket Attacks As Unrest Spreads Beyond Jerusalem

BBC Newsday

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

40 Killed in Airstrikes, Rocket Attacks As Unrest Spreads Beyond Jerusalem

"Israel and Palestinian militants in Gaza have exchanged their heaviest bombardments in years, with both sides escalating their attacks on urban areas overnight. The Palestinians and Louis Barajas of hundreds of rockets towards tell Aviv and bash ever in an apparent attempt to overwhelm Israel's missile defenses. Israel has carried out hundreds of air strikes on Gaza. At least 35 Palestinians and five people in Israel have been killed. Since Monday. The United Nations Middle East peace and boy has warned of a growing risk of full scale war.

Israel Louis Barajas Gaza Aviv United Nations
Israeli Bombardment Escalates as Gaza Death Toll Rises

Todd Schnitt

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Israeli Bombardment Escalates as Gaza Death Toll Rises

"In the Middle East and the death toll for Palestinians and Israel. Eli's continues to rise. Israel launching 500 airstrikes and what it said were Hamas and Islamic Jihad. Military targets Israeli missiles leveling an apartment building in Gaza smoke soaring skyward, sources telling ABC News the building had been evacuated a drone surveying the scene to make sure people were out. Theo. Gaza Health Ministry reporting 32 dead, including 10 Children in Ashkelon, near the Gaza border. Rockets ripping open buildings. Three Israeli Women killed in central Israel 19 people wounded ABC is Chief national correspondent Matt Gutman and tell Aviv

Israel Islamic Jihad ELI Gaza Health Ministry Middle East Gaza Hamas Abc News Theo Ashkelon Rockets ABC Matt Gutman Aviv
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"They cannot read it officially but but state managed to get the with the internet or even before that no no weekday Internet. That made a huge. I mean you can you know send a pdf of that book to anyone. But we opposed to was one of. I think the most exciting moments of my life was last year I went to Germany need for a concert of a very very beloved Iranian singer and there in the audience I all of a sudden met. I mean I so oh I knew how he looked like the one of the poets. Here which in my introduction. I say that. He is my favorites in maybe Moussavi and and he was standing there and he he knew that I translated his poetry and I introduced myself and there were standing hugging crying and it was so in other poets that I've been in touch with of very very moved by the fact that they're poetry was translated into Hebron a one of the amazing things. was that after it was published. I started receiving. I wouldn't say hundreds but many any dozens of manuscripts by Iranian Poets both from inside Iran. And outside begging me to translate. They're working to Hebrew. Why because it is also way of resistance because the the of course the poets they choose our political in the writing and The enemy of my enemy is my friend sort of Logic so translating into Hebrew and to avail to make it available for Israel audience which is the greatest enemy of the Islamic republic. We've considered to be a very radical political act in Iran today. Let's any any opposite reaction saying you know we are dissidents. We don't like the Iranian regime but still no reason to suck up in inverted adverted. KOMO's to to the to Israel designers or whatever now I never heard of in fact what of course I couldn't be in touch directly with all the poems but but I I was very concerned that it might. That might be doing it because there's no way to ask for their permission to and all of those who who were in contact with told me reading courage me until we go ahead those you chose would all want them want you to do that. Let's talk about one last poet who cannot speak for herself through high falls on. What does she bring to Iranian poetry? As a woman I mean she was considered iconoclastic kind of classic. She died tragically. Yeah wow she's I mean. We have like a few minutes. Full Farrow is. Yeah I mean She died before the Revolution of course very tragically in a very young age difference in a car accident but until her death again in a very very young age she made not just one revolution she made several revolutions in July two the eight at a young age she was very outlets only eight. I mean she was. It wasn't just her poetry that was so at -rageous I mean she wrote about Sexuality Feminine Sexuality in such a way that no I mean that left everybody completely shocked flushing blushing. And she's excellent so she did it brilliantly but she lived very outrageously she had a child outside the marriage she had an open affair with at the time who was at the time the greatest Filmmaker rain filmmaker who by the way also had an NFL. We'd ideology Bobby Coffee. Because translated into English I noticed that she also talks about the Dalai flour. Yeah I This guy had something for women poets and good ones to blame Golani. That was. That's his name. So she I mean she is is an icon in and she was also feel maker fashion icon. I mean she. She had his own shoes. I mean nobody compared to her Afterwards and I mean since that can we talk about one of her poems. I was thinking of. Yeah I pity the garden thought it was an anti war poem. Yeah is that well it. It said a definitely I mean when people turn their gardens into storage for ammunition than But it's it's anti-war and it's I think it's about the craving for something is that you cannot always articulated. Collate it what it is that you're waiting for but you know that it is not a reality that you live in your waiting for something as and that that a change should appear somehow in that. It's a sick sick reality. Of course it's a very political point because The father the mother the brother and the sister that she refers to in that poem all present different political sectors or sections in the then Iranian Fear so it's definitely very very poorly which is a little bit like the colonel too because all of the children have exact loins from it. Sure I I assume you again in foresee or we'll do the Hebrew afterward. So that's I pity the garden. That's the personal trash. That's a wonderful wonderful dylan. Barry Book Jimmy Susanne. That's the name of the Kissy. Buffet could goal her niece. Kissy Kissy Buffet. Remo he ernest Kissy Nemi Hall had Boulevard Kibaki Trudeau at Mira Kick Album Bakshi Zero off-topic Veronica Kazan book. Cheer Dora Oron as hot to SABs that he me Chevette. His cyborg Chenggong cheesy major media. Dust Kita Anza voluble chip roussy. Das- D- I know that's the beginning. I think we have to admit that Persian is also beautiful language as it was. It's a language that was born for poetry. There's no doubt house. I don't think I have anything to add to that other than to say that everybody should read or Illinois in Hebrew. If you can and you also have two of them Translated translated into English. The two books we've been discussing are the poetry collection. These are strange times pretty one and the novel the colonel early. Thank you being on the show for being on the thank you very much. And thanks to His Eminence. Demure are sound engineer to Georgia Foscarini. Andy Tisha them or producers into the van Leer Jerusalem Institute for their generous support and now a request many or most of you. Listen listen to us on the apple podcast APP. We'd like to ask you to please consider writing a review. Just go to the ratings and reviews section and write us one we like critical reviews stellar color reviews any kind review kind of do you too can support us by going to our website..

Iran Israel Sexuality Feminine Sexuality Germany KOMO van Leer Jerusalem Institute Moussavi Andy Tisha Farrow NFL Buffet Bobby Coffee Kita Anza engineer Hebron Dora Oron Georgia Foscarini Golani apple
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

13:34 min | 1 year ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"I feel like we're already by the weights. Not even his real name is really was. Elliot's fan diary. That was yeah sunny mighties Nehemiah. She just considered to be the father of modern Persian poetry. Not so much because of political reasons although there is some of that as well but because he was the first to break the very very strict frames of what was considered to be good and proper poetry which is The right thing and yes yes. And he opened it up in the structure and in the content and therefore allow the whole whole new genre new generations of poets to express something to make to turn the their poetry into something something much more personal any very interesting dialectic process actually from that Very intimate its place to say something even more significant amount society and large. That's her interesting. Because that's the feeling that I got reading. You're not the novel you translated the kernel which I feel like is very very very intimate internal monologue but so much about the state would you say. There's an overlap there. Oh absolutely and The author of the Coronary Mahmoud Nolato Body in which who is considered to be the greatest Iranian novelist that he is leaving. Today he came from theater and He is done also some poetry and That's I mean I think that it's the essence of the greatness greatness of Iranian good literature. Exactly what Dole out over these doing in that novel took turn the very very intimate and personal into a very very blunt criticism political criticism. which by the way was never published? That was never published in Iran itself. Enforce it was censored keeping in mind that nobody still he still lives and writes in Iran. Itself makes it even more courageous. I WANNA go back first to Nina and his stylist stylistic changes and those changes they introduced and others followed. How much of a challenge? Was It for you as a translator. I mean did you try to stick to those stylistic innovations I mean how faithful where you how conscious way you you of the stylistic amount of all that translating poetry in large is an incredible challenge I mean it. Pros has its own challenges translating prose but poetry in some ways it made it easier actually because for example I would never dare ear to touch the poetry of the great classics such as half as Elmar High Yom Gelatin Roomy et Cetera. Because because they're the structure is the essence and if you cannot bring the structure in its entire in its holiness into Hebrew than you lost the not just the beauty and the aesthetics but also the essence so what a tragedy. They really feel the sadness that you know. Everybody to learn Farsi Jester. Enjoy classical court because there. There's nothing like it so modern poetry's easier in that sense because it's it doesn't seats a new as heavily and you can actually do something with it. Then you have other methods to translate the aesthetics of it into Hebrew but there is a different technique of Cunene huning into what. It's a very interesting process to it's like you know in the old Radio Oh yeah the dial that you you search and search and search and at one point you say okay now. I can hear it without the noise around. When you fall on that frequency then you can translate into the other language but it's actually made the Work of translation is your I think the new form of of Far silly give you more leeway yes yes definitely. We really want to talk about some of the poems themselves and I I mean we. We did read a lot of the book but I just have a few questions about the first few by a shallow. I mean one for example is the first one is called dead end in English and it says God must be hidden in the basement. These are strange days. My pretty one which also gives the title of Your Book. It's all my first thought of course was very literal. Because I'm not a poet I thought which days are those and uh-huh do you think he was really referring to a particular time or is this a metaphor for some bigger universal theme. I feel free to read inspired to falsely if our say would love to amateur. I'm louise a good example for a poet that was persecuted both by the Shah and By I the Islamic Republic in that specific poem was written at the very early days of the revolution after the revolution so I think he was talking about a particular moment in time but then it could have been easily written before the revolution as well because he was in this sellers. He was tortured there and he was imprisoned and they were dissecting affecting the smiles off of the lips in the times of the Shah as well. But then you know a sad of a poem as it is I think that there we something very comforting about this repeating line. These are strange days which implicates somehow that. This is not the Way of nature that that this is deviation from the the the the way things should be that's the strangeness of it and that's the the normal order of things is something different. I find some comfort in that cystic. Would you like to read us. This is actually maybe not the entire thing because it's it's but yeah maybe enforcing me nothing. Yeah we hear all the time over here this is that in bombast. That's the name of the poem by Amateur. Do the Don I throw me beyond Mabo. Docu giftable she do staffed. Ram Dealer throw me began. Who's the Garda Caribe Kazini Asia Clark? Enormity regular band does your name is on and screw that pass through your horn in homeboy at the cat. That Imam Best Ketchup each ceremonial or tash raw. Besides Boris through the share foods. On Me Dr and Bandy she Dan Cutter macron gotTa Caribe. St- knows any so that just a taste of You know what one of the things that always fascinates me about Iranian cultures. This duality you know on the one hand as you said earlier wearing your hat Iranian it is the cradle of civilization Asian that is how it's perceived by many people in Iran and on the other hand there has been quite a lot of foreign meddling and influenced and not just meddling with direct mailing by the great powers but also influence and in the introduction Chow says that a lot of the poetry poetry in the early twentieth century was influenced by developing political developments in Russia next door. And also you know how you know. Iran Iran in the turn of the twentieth century opening up to the Western world to an extent. And all that word. How do you think this duality crops up in in the poetry that you've reviewed for this collection that duality I mean opening first of all it should be said that Iran at no point? It was a shock down to the outside world. It's not it any has never been North Korea for example. Not even today so there is a lot of Influence in both ways but also this has been always a way of resistance distance by itself because for example today making dialogue with Western culture for example is a way of resistance for younger the people the younger generations in Iran. There's a wonderful film called. No one knows of Persian cats and it's all about the underground the young culture in Tehran. Today and you listen to those bands all working on the ground making and wonderful keep hop rap any coat any Western form of music that you can think of but they feel those structures with very political Iranian content. So it's not a one way. There was at some point a very. I mean among Sir intellectuals the prominent intellectuals in Iran in the sixties for example there was a fear of Westernization And I don't think it was ever about that. He was about you. Know looking outside enriching yourself and your tools and then pouring pouring Iranian very raining content into it. I think that that's an interesting point that That Iran is has always involves sort of mixture of cultures in one of the cultures that it's involved including linguistically as Arabic and one of the poems. I'm going to skip now to tell me if I'm pronouncing it completely wrong for federal flood full-fat all set. I almost got him. Do you have footnotes in there. which is another interesting thing? You note a lot of this to help the reader understand the references and when in one of those footnotes you explain about the Shawahma Shannon Right. Yeah and you explain. The shadow wrote a pure Persian almost without Arabic so to what. What is the intermingling of the Persian Arabic language? And and then how does it influence a culture. Because I think that's another good dimension of what you guys were just talking about not only the culture. It's a huge political issue today in Iran huge ever since the revolution because it's LOM is essentially in Arab exactly exactly and with a slam conqueror originally so each each. If you take what you know the Iranian alphabet is The Arabic alphabet. We have four additional letters in Farsi. That do not exist assist in Arabic basically you can take an Arabic text and read it even without learning how we can pretty much understand it. I would say more than seventy percent of spokane Farsi today is a words from Arabic roots but ever for for centuries Tories this has been an inner Iranian struggle with that Arab elements not just in language but also in culture etcetera and and if the Islamic republic tried to put the Islamic identity above the Iranian one then the the backlash or the the resistance to that was also made and still is made in cultural methods a- as well and it's really interesting to see how contemporary poets go back Writing Poems using strictly pure Iranian Manian Awards the names all of a sudden you see new generations of kids with names from the Shana may which we had never heard art before when we lived in Iran and all of a sudden in every way that Iranians today those who oppose the current regime can express their loyalty to the Iranian culture as opposed to the slummy culture which is connected of course with the Arab identity they do it and of course plus also in literature and is that an indication that people who are critics of the current regime view them as somehow foreign influence. Our arporn influence. I don't know you tell me I mean. Do they see it as somehow foreign to. Who Rolls Royce of course of course for those people Iranian nationalist especially the monarchists? The Arab conqueror of Iran or the Islamic conquer of Iran was the conqueror of the barbarians of the greatest civilization on on earth and that is to some the eat it explains to great extent austerity that still Iran Iranians have today towards the Arabs. which is incredible? The you would see levels of pure racism freely against Arabs because of that thing never forgot that take their barons from the Sahara desert concord dot great Civilization.

Iran Shah Coronary Mahmoud Nolato Body Elliot Sahara desert Garda Caribe Kazini Asia Clark Dole Tehran Nina North Korea Ram Dealer Mabo Boris Russia St Ta Caribe Bandy Chow Dan Cutter
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

12:38 min | 1 year ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"To US please give a little goes a long way? Our guest today is only noise. She is an editor at the independent Hebrew website. Local call a political activist and a translator Farsi poetry and prose. She is a member of the executive board an activist with the Ballad political party. She's translated five books. Three novels one book of poetry and another one on the way which may be. You'll tell us about and we'll be focusing on her. Most recent book a collection of Persian Asian language poetry called these are strange times pretty one published by Kotov web publishing in two thousand seventeen and we will also maybe talk a little bit about the colonel published by Hogle books in two thousand twelve which is a novel and we should also note that two of her prose translations. My uncle Napoleon and the colonel have also been translated into English Orleans Orleans. Welcome to the show. Thank you hi to be here. We don't have too many translators on the show and you are a translator with emission. Can you explain why you've worked worked so hard to translate so much of modern Persian literature into Hebrew tells you how I got into that business of translations Years ago I was searching on Google. I don't remember exactly even why I was searching but I typed the words Farsi. RC literature into Google and Google replied. Did you mean Russian literature which I thought he burning was in Hebrew and I thought where Google it doesn't have a sense of humor. It's he's not joking he just really honestly. Doesn't know the concept of Farsi Literature. Maybe if Google was sheesh that isn't good but then I thought that it's It's truly absurd that a culture are of thousands of years which is for me. The cradle of at least eastern civilization has almost no representation in the Hebrew language. Certainly not contemporary Farsi Literature. So I thought somebody should start doing that and I did clearly really I mean it. Has You know political ramifications and the reason that was such scarcity was political so in Adapting of the body of Iranian Persian literature in Hebrew in selecting those even in the process of translation whether any like you know key elements that you thought were particularly relevant for Horita. This was really since it was the political mission for me since the beginning because they think that It is a political reality. Orator reflection of a political reality the end the marginalization of Muslim and Arab culture in Iran in Israel the choosing and being the first translator of Contemporary Very Farsi literature into Hebrew. There was a significant question. Of what do I start with. Do I start with the classics. Do I start with poetry. Start with pros was what sort of pros and my choosing might more process of choosing was Directed by my identity both does Uranian and as as an Israeli as an Iranian. I thought that the best it was a question of quality I mean I wanted the best best literature to be translated into Hebrew as an Israeli a wanted very much things that in some sort would be relevant to these really reader so that combination of these two guidelines Sort of dictated the since you raise that you have Iranian part of your identity. Maybe explain a little bit. How do you know Farsi so well? What is your Iranian background? I was born and raised in Iran. We immigrated to Israel at the very beginning ain't GonNa the Revolution in nineteen seventy nine. I was nine at the time but I grew up in a very proud national Iranian family. My parents made sure that my brother and I read Farsi throughout the years. I maintained not only A good level of Farsi but also very very solid Iranian identity. How does your family owned up in Israel northern Los Angeles like the rest of them or Vancouver you know sometimes people ten to reconstruct retroactively their life stories so today I asked my parents they will tell you? Of course you are always good Zionist and we all we always knew that we would end up in Israel. I'm sure that had it not not being for the revolution we would never have ended up here but we we had had some family at the time in Israel already and if we just made more sense and I'm really glad that that was the choice of my parents and naughtily well as you point out there. There isn't a Persian Jewish community in Israel. Why was it that all of that time? There was no translation of Farsi language literature into Hebrew. I mean for you to be the first and I think your first. Two novels were both published published in two thousand twelve. That's a long history of Israel without any person literature. How do you explain that? I mean it was it. Was it political conscious political suppression or. Just nobody but he got around to. And we've got to bear in mind that it was an Israeli around became fierce enemies only in the late nineteen seventies so even before that when the souls you know so called Golden Age of Iranian relations with Notre insatiable to ever when you put it that way. It's certainly sounds astonishing but when you bear in mind it's not only I mean there is not such a small Iranian community in Israel. But if you bear in mind that almost half of the Jewish population population in Israel or from Arab origin and how many translations of from Arabic pros into Hebrew. Do you know of love. So it's not so surprising in its within the broader context the political context of suppressing any link to to the culture and identity of the origin countries The the Muslim Arab countries that was part of the of the inner explicit deal that Zionism did with made with the Mizrahi communities in Israel that you can come inside inside but then you will need to work very very hard to prove to us that you're not one of them because you look like them share their language and he story story memory in culture etcetera so that became is likely project to suppress Their native identity and in culture. And that's the result but then they get the image in Israel of having no culture primitive exactly catch twenty two okay. Let's shift the focus from Israel to Iran and in introduction through. These are strange times. You're right that out of all the arts. Poetry has been the most influential in shaping modern Iranian identity. Can you explain how not not just I mean Iran is now. I will speak as An Iranian nationalist. She's putting on her other hat right now as we speak but I mean Iran is a country that really truly briefs Culture. It's all about it's always been about culture and that by the way this. This is why Iranians have an identity that does not depend on any current regime. I mean regimes come and go so outdated update very long history of Iran but the Iranian identities based on its culture primarily and of all the cultures in Iran is Mastering all of them but poetry is Ju- of the crown. I mean it's so what if you go to through the remotest of village in Iran and you speak with complete an alphabet who doesn't cannot read or write he will cite by my heart. Hundreds of Lines from the classical a uranian poets. So this is the manifestation and of the Uranian Identity more than anything. So it's an oral and written tradition. Yeah absolutely in the introduction. You know that many of the poets especially the ones you chose. I don't know if you focus particularly on these but many of the poets over the years have been bander imprisoned. Some cultural figures have paid with their lives. I guess we'll talk about about them but from asthma shampoo to four referral Huzzah. You'll tell us if I'm pronouncing them currently well. I guess I have a couple of questions but I'll start with one And do you think that living under oppressive regimes whichever one it is somehow gives rise to a particular focus on you know great culture and the need for this outpouring because there's such heavy political repression or is it. The opposite does that kind of political repression and and very oppressive regimes stifle culture. Could it have been more if there were more more permissive regimes. That's a great question. I didn't think about it that way. I mean I wouldn't want to sink that Political oppression is needed in order to create a great arts in general or literature. Because it's then it says something very very sat about human nature but I think it's true mainly and you conditions even more in the Iranian cinema which to really became magnificent. After I mean there there were some really good Simmons. There was some really good semi before the revolution but after the revolution and one of the things that happened was that since they were not allowed to show love stories you know intimacy exposed opposed women et CETERA. Then they needed to focus more and more on the deepest of roots of social and political problems and then it created a new level of quality for the Iranian cinema. And I think that to some extent this is true also also in poetry but then I mean Iran has always been. I mean it has never experienced a truly open open democracy so we cannot. We know what would have been if you can rest assured that I asked the same question. An interview with Lisa Resolve Ski. Who writes about Russian culture and we had a very similar similar kind of non-decisive responsible? Because of you know similar reasons I'd like to ask about the nature of repression. I mean during the shod in monarchy she and later with Islamic regime this very radical change of regime did it change anything about the nature of repression and therefore the nature of resistance to it as appears as emerges from the poetry. It's so sad you know one of the only things I mean. Iran change obviously dramatically Matichon after the revolution. One of the things that did not change is the oppression in not just the nature of it but also the mechanism of oppression. One of the things that survived in its complete is The suck the security the secrets it's security services that's were. I mean the same mechanism. Sometimes the same people who imprisoned and tortured political ACL Objectors in during the Shah's regime continue to do so after the revolution is will and it wasn't as this. I mean I think that today it's more dangerous for people to by the way. Some of the poets that appear in in. That's a book have been imprisoned both by the shy n by the republic so in some ways the continuity here is the culture in the poetry Gasa. So let's talk about the origins or some of some of the greatest influences on modern rainy in poetry. And I want to go back to the name. That comes up in every discussion about this. which is in both the your introduction and the introduction by slowly Sony shop so tell us about the father of modern Iranian poetry NEMA NEMA Yoshi I call him name?.

Iran Israel political repression Google Uranian Identity Kotov US editor executive Napoleon English Orleans Orleans Uranian Shah Horita Los Angeles Vancouver Mizrahi Sony NEMA
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Jews a meeting there right when we moved to New York into Tel Aviv you have these people who create a New York style lower east side style coffee houses you have Tel Aviv in Jeff style of coffee houses and it doesn't die with any decisive moment. That didn't happen something like that. Suddenly Jewish culture was obliterated from the cities. You don't have the sense of World War Two as the end off Europa but it's more subtle. You know it's still there. It's still there in the a sense that this particular wall again. We don't want to be nostalgic about it up. Oh failed which I mentioned. He says it in the most <hes> you know is he loves coffee houses and what he says explicitly that one of the reasons why he was attracted to them in Jerusalem Tel Aviv was because it reminded him of furor but says don't be too stodgy about it because because these people were refugees right but then it it really ends in the sixties and seventies because this sense of Jewish culture there is really dependent on the Migration Asian and you know people in Tel Aviv and in New York become too much in the place itself in New York. They move away. They leave in the oppo aside the huge apartments. They don't need coffee houses anymore. Yeah yeah in Tel Aviv went went in Haskell casino this whole generation. Shen they suddenly you see a change in new generation of Israelis who maybe don't need. Maybe we're not wondering anymore. We don't need these places of refuge right. I I mean yeah. That's definitely part of it. That's shocks on that. Note guys think about that. Professor Sharp pinsker has been talking about his recent book rich brew. Thank you so much for being on the show. Thank you very much pleasure and thanks to the Muslim era are sound engineer and to Georgia Foscarini anytime show them our producers and to the Israel Institute for their generous support now a request many your most of you listen to us on the apple podcast APP and we'd like to ask you to please consider writing a review just go to the ratings and reviews section and write us the good bad ugly we take all kinds of critiques yeah you can support us as well by going to our website t. l. v. one dot. FM Slash Tel Aviv review and subscribing on our Patriot campaign checkout archive. We have over five hundred interviews news and please also consider liking us on facebook. <hes> our page is called the Tel Aviv review podcast ideas from Israel and follow both men Gilaad on twitter join us again next week for another edition end of the Tel Aviv review and until then good bye.

Tel Aviv Jerusalem Tel Aviv Israel New York Professor Sharp pinsker facebook Georgia Foscarini engineer Israel Institute Jeff apple Gilaad
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"<hes> international context reading lolita in tel aviv and i enjoyed very much working with professor over banjo who's the specialist on kurdish affairs ars and a culture here in israel on reviewing the first <hes> english language book kurdish novel reading lolita in tel-aviv is a a funny slogan but basically it's breeding regional and international literature and reviewing it from an israeli perspective with focus on minority languages in the middle east with right with a focus on minority lame to them. I'm excited hopefully to offer for issue issue for <hes> some writing on modern syrian <hes> culture and also its relationship to israel so that's very original. I think compared to other their reviews in in the approach that i really like about <hes> a magazine is that we're not trying to reinvent the wheel i mean we are trying to offer <hes> the international audience glimpse into israeli culture but we're not trying to create it out of nothing and for this purpose we partnered with several hebrew language literary magazines and intellectual magazines unlike the tel aviv review of books that fill the void that needed feeling feeling are quite a few that we could choose from which is great and we're basically choose pieces with an international appeal over berlin international potential and we translate them into english and it works beautifully because even in the technical sort of exercise we are merely by virtue of translating pieces from the hebrew regardless of the content which has ultimate caused regardless of the content. We're we're offering our readers agreements into these letters. I can yes what he's really interested rested because speak on who had no personal connection to israel provide boost up twelve years ago. I'm always struck by one hud very very strong opinions. Many people outside israel have about his role and on the other hand very limited scope of information about a draw from and certainly about context what we can do is to use that academic series and sometimes. I feel a bit. It's a comfortable with but works will is to privatize the play golf. Properties is set to give more context more feeding adding.

israel tel aviv professor berlin twelve years
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

05:36 min | 2 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"That's whatever's is, that's why it's a politics that we have to oppose even if we support the national liberation of juries, or Palestinians or whoever, for Kurds. But, you know. Terrorists to reform and become thesis state actors can few pools the IRA or even a vacant? We're not taking ES. They have to I be defeated. Yes, but you raise the issue of asymmetric warfare, when, when we have a, I tech army, like the American army, or the idea of fighting against a Motech insurgency, like the Taliban or HAMAs, and so far in modern history, the high tech army doesn't win. That is a major problem because some of these wars, the high tech army was the right should have one was. Right. Was fighting on the right for the right cause. And that forces us to think about asymmetric warfare as a politics as well. A military, even a bigger problem is the fact that terrorism makes boundaries disappear warfare and civilian life. The militants are so embedded in a moment, civilians, that really makes the whole notion of military intervention puts it in completely different life not completely different. The issue is still. How do you have you fight? In ways that minimize civilian casualties. Have you fight in ways that minimize the risks that he were imposing on, on civilians? And this is. This is an argument in the US army, and in the idea, and the crucial question for this kind of war. The crucial moral question is what risks do we ask our soldiers to accept in order to avoid to reduce the risks? They impose on enemy civilians who are being used as cover by enemy soldiers or militants, and that's a very, very hard question. And, and it is comes up in internal debate. In the army's crucial army that are fighting these kinds of wars are the US army, and the Israeli army, and these, these armies are debating this question. Can I? Let me give you an example, from the American war Afghanistan. Which I was told I was given this example by Colonel, but just back from Afghanistan at the army war. College in Pennsylvania. And this was right after general mcchrystal had announced the new rules of engagement for American soldiers in Afghanistan. So imagine this happened often an American army unit gross fire from the roof of a small apartment building in an Afghan town. The Taliban is on the roof. They don't know who is the building. What do you do Colonel said to me in the old days before the new rules of engagement, the soldiers would just pulled back and call it the air force, and blasts the to attack the Taliban on the roof? And destroy the apartment. The new rules of engagement say you can't do. So what are the alternatives? Well, you can cry to get a scout into the building to see if there are families in their if it's empty then you could call in there for. Or you could try to get soldiers onto an adjoining roof who can fire directly at the Taliban on without injuring people in the building. But both of those are more risque for your here's whereas calling the strike doesn't isn't risque for any of your soldiers, but very risky for civilians, if there is a billions in, in the building, and the new US rules of engagement at that time. This is twenty eleven. Required. The soldiers to take the additional. And the same argument, and there was protests. The New York Times reporters spoke to soldiers on the ground who said, we don't wanna fight under these rules. They make it to danger, some soldiers said that other soldiers this was the right thing to do in the same arguments go on the Israeli army, and that question it's not an easy question. Because the Solters our kid..

American army Taliban Israeli army Afghanistan general mcchrystal US Pennsylvania HAMAs The New York Times
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

06:16 min | 2 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Regime in Venezuela called itself socialist, but it, it wasn't. It was a left populism, which is very much like right up Eliza. They give money to the poor which is what makes them popular and they keep giving money to the poor until the money runs out, and then they print money and that reduces inflammation, and then they can't rule out repression and that's the history of populace regimes. And that's not what socialists. So she would diversify the economy, strengthen the working class, they would they would try to create a sustainable welfare state. That's history. So full democracy and western your, which is one of the great achievements of the post World War, Two period. Socialists, south from Democrats from Scandinavia to across western Europe, created probably the most recent political social were James in human history. Now, they're in trouble. They need defense. And I think a lot of less politics, these days is defensive. Brunswick through another point that you elaborate new book, that he called the default position of the left of having focused predominantly on domestic leftist policies, and neglected foreign policies. But unfit to really into twine they should take western Europe. And the motion plan was decried by someone the left as imperialist intervention. But at the end of the day, this intervention is what has enabled European countries and establish as say modal leftist. Gene. What do you say to those people who want as a result of this default position of the left? Be the default position very old and in the scribe and get in the book I start with the biblical prophets. Who told the people of Israel? This is God's message if you do Justice. If you saw oppressing widows and orphans, if you stop grinding, the faces of the poor, if you stop worshipping idols. I will stab wish you in this land ever, and I will defeat the Assyrian about balloons, and all you have to do. Is several Justice at home. In order to be a light unto the nations. All you have to do is sit still and shine. And that, that is, I think that message from Isaiah is, is what meant most leftist believe, let we are best at domestic. And always have it. Stop grinding the faces of poor. That's the beginning of less politics. And. Most left this really believe. That if you create a Justice -iety at home, then you have done. Of what you have done is a great benefit for humankind, because they will see your accomplishment, and will want to imitate it and you will be a light unto the nations. I think that's a that is a standard left position. But it knows the problem of that deal. You are living in international society. That is a knock dick unstable, and awesome very dangerous. And so you have to be able to act outside your own border. Not society. I would argue because if you look at it inequality at home. And sense of prevention because of domestic policy is reads America first move. Right. They say we don't get the services and the money and what we should be getting as citizens of very wealthy nation. Even don't say explicitly. This is really the mechanism behind it. You know, think about us before you think about other people elsewhere. So there is some mileage in that default position to say that way to ensure a strong international presence for wealthy nations such as America is to ensure that there is popular support for it at home. And the way to do it is to cater to the needs of people. And that's one of the issues now in the debate over global. Was action. And is you have to regress leads of your own Selo citizens, and there is a sense, which they come first, but. We live in an interconnected world, the existence of strong trade unions, for example, in Mexico, or China would be a great benefit for the American economy. As well to the people of Mexico and China, so we have interests abroad. We also have interest at in a stable world. Order in a less dangerous world, especially in eight. When weapons of mass destruction. We need an international system, and we need to be working.

Europe Eliza James America Venezuela Mexico China Selo Israel Scandinavia Isaiah dick
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

05:52 min | 2 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"We can understand why the Neo cons many who were extracts is would have supported would have supported the second because they had the first still in their hands. But those that. It's the poles who have to establish communism in Poland. And it's the Iraqis who have to establish democracy in Iraq. And a foreign army is not the appropriate instrument of that kind of political transformation to juice say that only the urgent call to stop massacre. That's already undergo. Or is about imminently about to undergo only this is the moral obligation to intubate that any of the mall, south defenses, the classic and self defense can involve as in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven preemptive, self defense and defensive others is also those are. Self defense and the defensive others self defense when you are attacked defensive others, when they are being attacked. Those are think the crucial justifications for the use of force. The problem with militants mention is that as, as you're saying that it's normally a unilateral and is sponsored. I think that in this respect focusing down from a leftist decision could play into the hands of right wing, critics of because it's the left salt spots the left, what the soft spot of the life of the blind spot because it's a week for left is than. This regard other aspect of leftist, international attitudes such as consideration multi-lateralism, things like that, that the left can pursue with fewer qualms, I would say. It's a bit. Like if you were a right wing commentator saying that the right has a problem that made problem override is inequality, socially quality, and that's right. I mean, I think everybody accepts that but they say question priority, right? I mean, we are we accept that inequalities problem, but we bring in the values of the merits to offset that. We'll send to that puts an okay. Leave Mitterand avenge Cyprus second, and as left this, that sun a break, and that's construct. And let's promote and both Stor. International system that is based on consideration of them. Wouldn't that be a better way for? Yeah, it would be if it were possible, and when it becomes possible, I hope people on the left will support it, but. We have to go back to the questions of when the Vietnamese went into Cambodia and shut down the killing field. There was no one else who's going to do that. The UN would have voted against in intervention, which means voting in favor of continuing the massacre. If there were you win with a force of its own capable of intervening in timely way in the right places. Yes, we would certainly support that. So, in fact, in Rwanda, there were five thousand U, N, Krupes, and the commander of those troops cabled to the secretary, Joe and said. With small reinforcements. We can stop the massacre. And the Security Council who fuse to authorize him to do that. And his troops stayed in the barracks while eight hundred thousand people will will murder, so. Yes, if there is a u n force capable of the me that would be better than Abell Belgian or French, or American force, but unilateralism is right now need an option that we have to live with, because the present an alternative isn't that defeat this approach for a leftist. I mean you. I'll roll that. This is too big. And how we can make society betta will progressive while you're giving up on reforming the UN, for example, setting up another multilateral organization, bowl, maybe expanding mandate of NATO, for example, to cater to those needs. I think that in cases where it's possible to put together a coalition as in Kosovo costs of was essentially NATO intervention. And Kossovo today is a NATO protector essentially. Yes. I think that's better than than American interventional though. I'm frayed native wouldn't have acted if America happened decided to support an intervention..

Joe NATO UN Poland Iraq Cambodia Rwanda Kosovo Security Council Abell Belgian America Kossovo murder secretary Krupes commander
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Now they had strategic and Chris, I'm sure. But that stopped the killing there is no such thing in politics, as a pure, moral will. Motorists are always mixed. The Indians intervened in East Pakistan, helping to create bumble debt, stopping a terror campaign by the Pakistani government that had produced millions of refugees. They also had through teacher interest, but they stop the terror. Pens, Ania overthrew, brutal regime of Idi Amin in Uganda. Another intervention that I'm sure had strategic purposes. But they overthrew a brutal regime. I don't expect anywhere even in non-imperial pelvis. I don't expect a purely moral politics, politics is, is always, motivational lead. Mixed. But there if. But if we get certain results that are morally important, like stopping the massacre, then we can live with the fact that the Vietnamese then set up a satellite regime Cambodia. Okay. That's better than a murderers who she. Then I mean. If to take it back to again, Erica. But even when it's not an urgent, call such stopping massacre, but it would take the invasion of Iraq in two thousand three that on papers seemed like. Tiny moral mission to bring the city. To a country that suffered from brutal pression on the terrible tyrant. And. The problem is always the reality is just too complicated. And I mean there's. What do you do? One defining your own moral philosophy when it's just that, you know, the very dog aspect of politics, always that haunt. I mean I'm my second sympathetic to those doubts exactly. For those reasons. I mean, you just never know what's lurking behind the corner. But you have to learn something from history of stopping a massacre is reason of good reason for sending an army, of course, a border regime change is not a good reason. The model that we should have thought of immediately, the, the parallel is the Red Army in nineteen nineteen marching on Poland to create a communist regime in Warsaw. American army many years later marching on Baghdad, to create a democratic regime. In, in Iraq..

Iraq Red Army Ania Idi Amin American army East Pakistan Pakistani government Chris Cambodia Uganda Baghdad Erica Poland Warsaw
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Please consider giving Tel Aviv review depends on your support. I'm your host get out Halpern. And my guest today is a professor of Middle East. Studies at Tel Aviv university. He is the author of the shape of shakes myth gal phase and tribal leadership in modern, Jordan. It was published recently in English by Stanford University press, professor Avalon. Hello and welcome to the Tel Aviv review. Hello, so myth gal. Fires is that. How you pronounce his name several ways you can the way he put on his own gal gal that the bedouin way. Who was he and why does he deserve bail? Graffiti when Mikhail was one of the greatest shakes of Arabia in the twentieth century. He was the leader of big tribal confederacy, which lead in the areas that. Now, Jordan, the Hashemite king of Jordan. He was very influential leader who was to power in the late nineteenth century early. Twentieth. Century played an important role in the first World War in the twins to Jenin four as an ally of Ottoman empire, by the way, then he played a very important role in their starving of Jordan in nine twenty one under the auspices of the British empire, and then he led his tribal confederacy for nearly fifty years, and he lied. I didn't ninety sixty seven even today. We can see his legacy in Jordan his descendants. They play poem in troll into politics to stay here. For instance, his grandson is now, the president of the Senate upper house. So when you thought about writing this book was it because there was virtually no one else more important in the formation of Jordan other than perhaps some kings or members of the Royal family. There are several things why such right about infest of all there is. Nearly nothing written about tribal leaders in the Middle East and those people were willing potent figures, and they played a very important world for centuries in many ways still do today. So I want to feel that lacuna and also Mikhail attracted me because I stumbled on him in the archives in the central tiny arc of Jerusalem. The very early stage of my democrat. He had very interesting relationship with the Jewish Agency in Palestine, thirties and forties. We'll get to that. In. I realized that a lot of historical material about him usually the problem with writing about tribal leaders of his Tuchel is that they did not invite. So that didn't leave any historical records. But he was someone who happy because it was so influential and powerful he trusted many writings, and there's a lot of stock records about him written by British officials Zionist officials Americans and many explorers who visited his camps..

Jordan Tel Aviv university professor Mikhail Tel Aviv Middle East Halpern Stanford University Jewish Agency in Palestine Arabia Senate Jenin Jerusalem president Royal family fifty years
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

08:33 min | 3 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"This is GAL B one one. The Tel Aviv review. Hello and welcome to the Tel Aviv review programme dedicated to the word to the thought and to debate Brought to you by the Van, their Jerusalem Institute, which promotes humanistic democratic, and liberal values in the social discourse in Israel, I'm Dahlia Shenlin an armed lot Hope every week we'll be talking about books and research and other things that have called her attention. Our guest today is Oreo severe tease the scholar of Islamic law. Theology and politics is the head of the Department of Arabic and Islamic studies and of the religious studies program at Tel Aviv University. In addition to his work because the scholarship, It is a former journalist and the author of bestselling novel and 5 bucks where young readers were. We talking about His latest book called scientific and political freedom in Islam. A critical reading of the modernised apologetic School published by Rao pledge in two thousand seventeen. And we'll be asking whether religion, science and government can ever Coexist specifically, but not exclusively. In the case of Islam, Professor aureus of you tell when welcome back to the Aviv review your Metro, having the. So at this caller Islam, my question to you is, is it really a uniquely Islamic question what makes this a specific topic of inquiry in Islam relative to say a chase question about religion and systems of government or the same question in Christianity? And all of us to the question of religion, science is not unique to each Tom, and because religion represents an absolute truth. And science is about exploring new truth or exploring truth that something that has not been achieved yet. So all the stayed. This is universal question, But I think the two things we can say about Islam in my book pretty much is my my my expiration of the topic, pretty much derives from them. A There is a scientific up in the Muslim world The over in modern times. The scientific contribution of Lissom societies has been very, very modest, I should say. And the second point is that there is something which is unique to Muslim societies. I think which is that the mainstream religious establishments and mainstream religious callers appear to have managed to come up with a way of reconciling religion and science, which is possibly more sophisticated and more widespread than parlours in Judaism in Christianity in us was So basically the question I was asking if As Troon these true, then How does that make sense? But tell us about the history of Islam and science because as you point out throughout that history, this phase where you say this logic world has not contributed that much to science is actually a more modern development. And in earlier stages, Islam did have a particular relationship to science can take us. Some of that Italy's slum never had the contribution to science Muslim societies had must two signs of Meet the question of the science people just science, absolutely and people who are religious, who and religiously Muslim, they contribute to the greatly to science at a time when the Christian Walden and other world civilizations were not as developed and humanity owes a great that two Muslim scientists and selected emerge from those Muslims as opposed to Christians or Jews in that time. Is there any particular reason or adjust was an Well, this is very much debated, but I have to say it for contemporary Muslim scholars. This is the point though, was I alight? There was a time in history when Muslims wall, the ones who contributed most to size. Therefore, the problem is not with a slump. Obviously the problems Nova's Tom Christianity, Judaism. The problem is with the way people interpret them in the way that practice them, that what we should point two is something that changing our world over the last three hundred years. Largely in the Western Wall than that is that religious establishments are no longer are no longer in a position where they can monopolized truth and monopolize science. And we see a very obvious correlation which by the way Muslim scholars, the ones I'm dealing with in my book also recognised. They also acknowledged the correlation between the secularization of the West and the great scientific and technological advancements that we are enjoying. So. All the itself recognizes that in the West, The West owes its great advancements to the fact that it secularize This is what the greatest Muslim scholars of all time. The ones I'm dealing with that they recognised We're talking about a period that saw the somewhere in the 19th century and has lots of unt until today. In a time when of course there were two during all that, you know, creating oldest intellectual debate in the shadow of the great prominence of the Christian or post-Christian World western powers at cetera. Was this debate polemical in any way were the engaging in it just because there were facing the the Christians, They were engaged with it because they were terrified. And let me tell you what they will really terrified about it. Often imperialism is is the thing that's mention? No, They were not terrified about imperialism. There were terrified about death. Let me explain what I mean for some why I am way. In other words, they seldom afraid of dying. I just don't want to be there when it happens. The wealth. Yeah, well, he said Mullah many things that we did. Here's the thing for some one leg Mohammed Abdel for example in in the sense, the founder of Islamic modern is for someone like him. It was obvious. It was absolutely obvious that there is got. That Hamann was the prophet of God, and that the Coombe is the book of God, and therefore that there is enough to live And there is Heaven and he's going there because he's done all the right things. And then at some point in his early life, he learned something which is shockingly learns that there are people to think very differently. This can live with. But those people think very differently. Those people will thing the two plus two six They're the wind while superior thou far more advanced and they have become. So only after they became secular, He recognizes acknowledges that they owe their advancement to becoming secular. And therefore you can see what follows. He needs to answer a simple question. Could it be that for us, Muslims to also become more advance. We must also secularize. This is a very, very troubling notion because what he's about to lose is not just about the Japan independence. Almost him independence. It's about the afterlife, which as we all know is much longer than this life. So there is a. Lot at stake here, And therefore he needs to devise an answer which would either concede that indeed, to become secular, to become doubt. Face person is the only way to march forward in modern times or to suggest something else any he does in what he suggests an and this is still very dominant in the most Wall today. This is mainstream thought is that Christianity is a singular experience. The Christian societies all unique because of certain limitations they have because of So then characteristics of Christianity. Christianity and science uh. Not comments you right, they cannot live side-by-side, And he slum is different. Islam is the friend of science in slum is the friend of technology Islamise everything Christianity is not therefore the problem of Muslim societies. The reason why there are not scientifically advanced is not that they all Muslim, but the not truly most. And here Hamad Abdel makes the very famous statement, which by the way, has all famous state Smith, I could never find a reference to. He says, I was in Europe and everywhere I saw a slum. But I did not see Muslims. I returned to Egypt everywhere as so Muslims. But I did not see Slump. And the idea is actually very simple. Aim being scientifically and technologically advanced the Western as a more Muslim than the Muslims themselves. Though for the problem of wisdom, society is not the they are Muslim, but the not Muslim enough, The truly Muslim and the way to become truly Muslim is to become scientific. Technologically advance which Islam not only allows, but in fact commands. I think this is an interesting segue into understanding the really the core

Tom Christianity Tel Aviv Mohammed Abdel Tel Aviv University Rao Department of Arabic Aviv Israel Europe Dahlia Shenlin Egypt Italy Jerusalem Institute Christian Walden Van Professor Japan Mullah Hamann founder
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"This is gal b one one hi this is glud and dahlia we have a special request to you on more listeners we deeply appreciate your interest and now we're asking for your support in an atmosphere a fleeting headlines tax scepticism and a perceived cheapening of the public discourse we firmly believe in the audiences appreciation of deeper learning and deeper understanding we know you do too at the tel aviv review we love to bring guests who represent a variety of perspectives on the serious work being done in and about our region but we aren't exclusively restricted to israel and palestine in the middle east rather we cast our net wide for cutting edge research and literature on global issues to put our own into perspective the tel aviv reveres the only rarely pulled cost that offers indepth insight into a dear ism culture were the broad political range a no limitation on the variety of topics will ever think but we need your help we don't want to limit access to us show and more importantly would like the show to survive your contribution you will make all the difference believe us we're not in it for the money i'll shoestring budget covers just production and professional costs that's why were launching this appeal announced can you yes you to sign up to donate very modest sums of money so modest you'll be embarrassed if you don't trust us on that it's really easy just go to our website www u dot tel aviv review dot org that's one word tel aviv review dot org and you'll see a donate button thank you so much we look forward to providing you with many more exciting interviews in the future.

aviv israel palestine middle east
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The tel aviv review hello and welcome to the tel aviv review a programme dedicated to the word to the thought and to debate brought to you by the van their jerusalem institute which promotes humanistic democratic and liberal values in the social discourse in israel i'm dahlia shenlin and arm get on how peng every week we are we talking about books in research and other things that have kotaro attention our guest today is dr konare at la hug she's a senior lecturer in the uh women and gender studies program at tel aviv university today we're we're talking about a new book it's called a table for one rescheduling single hood and time it was published by manchester university press just recently in 2017 cannot loudon hello and welcome to the tel avi review hello welcome thank you so you'll study focuses on the temporal aspect off female singer who women are referred to as still single the refer to as old spinsters and of course the ubiquitous his presence off the biological clock why is it important to focus on the temporary aspect and what light does it really shed porn your analysis i think that in general single hood is too large extent still very under theorized in understudied and i think that's one of the biggest challenges for a single hood scholars today is trying to debunk the stereotypes and stigmas that single persons are subjected to an an every day basis and also in the next essential framework has well and when i began my study i actually was thinking of researching single hood and social emotions of trying to understand single hood in relation to shame and humiliation and jealousy and anger and happiness but the more i dwell into the textual analysis the more i read about single hood i.

israel senior lecturer tel aviv university jerusalem institute manchester university
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"World or at least in moments that you wanted to try to convey well i was told by a scholar that this was an exercise in in meta fiction and i he thought i pretended that i didn't know what that was when asked what that was asked what that was a rarest to say exactly and i'm not either i think it's sort of writing consciously about the writing process within this story at least you didn't say now i'm writing which i can't stand personally but right right but it's again about imagine worlds from the world in which we find ourselves writes that the main character is in tel aviv during a sandstorm and an imagining his wife in china of its in romania visiting her grandparents graves and great ships in time and place and sensibilities and it's not just thinking in the third person thinking in many different third person's yes narrators jump yes yes does that get confusing for you during a writing it must it is over doesn't translate onto the page well i think it doesn't away but it's an interesting confusion because in many ways i think it is how we experience life if you know you're the kind of person who goes around in tries to understand who the people are around you and also keeps us on the edges of a seats and it reminds us that life is so dynamic especially in israel i'm in one day so different from the next you never know what's going to come next analysts here i mean i'm one person i mean you have characters has sort of jump into that story for just a fragment of a sentence him but it it reminds you g that person that i might not have noticed who's just a teeny little part of my life is a full human being even if i only see one little tip than us burden did you experience any critics are reviews will reduce trying to compartmentalize you you know writing about israel and having moved to israel.

china romania israel one day
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Cbs implicitly i haven't been aware of it and it was pointed out to me yet it's something me back compartmentalize so i'm very very aware of the conflict and think about it a lot but i'm just not brave enough to tackled and fiction or maybe i don't want to merge this fiction with reality i'm not sure it has to be but i'm not saying yeah sure sure i have to say you reminded me of the british film director stephen frears i'll tell you why years ago when to one of his movie talks i think it was the film festival in jerusalem and healthy of his selfdeprecating english after all it was iit yeah was steroid switched on the camera and lo and behold there was the film i feel that when we're trying to analyse you'll rioting uaw almost like taking the step back and talking about it also from a detached that are distanced perspective just like your characters perhaps i'm trying to think why that is why you treat you writing in a very matteroffact way which is something i have to say i'm not used to big epiphany coming guy hoping to get an some sort of insight into the creative process i'm not necessarily saying this is a criticism can you take us true your creative process i mean just pick the story at random sure perhaps swiss one that russia is is wonderful first of all i don't know it selfdeprecating to say i turned on the camera and there was the movie because i love the net analogy that stories often right themselves and i think there is a great truth to that and maybe that's what stephen frears men right i just turn on the cabin there was the move it here so i like that in terms of the with the impetus for a story again sometimes it starts with the setting sometimes with a with a mood an atmosphere swan street is a good example i was living in boston tell us about the it's story so it's about a new immigrant to america who instead of settling in and starting a new life you moves into a bed and breakfast and refuses to leave so it's this idea of sort of the temporary versus permanence and it was based on an encounter i had with the russian jewish immigrants in boston.

Cbs jerusalem uaw russia boston director stephen frears america
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:02 min | 4 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"It changed the way i i saw the world we have to know which seen i know and i can't remember salary shows going in every member sure it wasn't the dream sequence where he has like a dream please falling into sleep in the dream that's what i remember from the castle i just i remember that afterwards i didn't see the world the same way again that's okay i get the impression that left me with what about uh talked earlier about uh the jewish american leon the jewish cannoned i'm trying to think were isro fits into shoora to the all some references in the booster is robot actually unlike dolly i didn't feel like it was using a jewish atmosphere did not say they i asked the question here as i say because i think there's a lot of us the okay but that's how we for i thought that if i didn't know your stolen when i read i mean your identity and win read the book a wouldn't be able to feel that was particularly jewish but if you'd like to expend more on on the issue of the jewish identity of fuel characters of youth themes but also flesh out where israel fits in sure sure so i think the characters they are many of them are jewish many destroys actually set in israel and many of the characters are aware of some kind of collective past and they like referencing that passed in ways easily not very arrogate ways 'cause i feel myself i know so little about things jewish but just ways to connect them to the past and to have a conversation with that past so in the stories that are sudden is rather not trying to convey a particular idea or a message but some kind of atmosphere so what there's a story said in tel aviv and what conveys tel aviv from me is actually something that i observed recently an ancient man being pushed in a wheelchair by an equally ancient man and there is something about that i felt conveyed tel aviv but it's not necessarily the jewish experience but maybe the jewish experience because again there's this idea of you know two friends i'm taking care of each other but that's again going very let's stretch but do feel that uh moving to who's road train.

israel isro
"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"aviv" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"This is is gl b one one meant tel aviv review plo and welcome to the tel aviv review the program dedicated to the word the fought and to debate brought to you by the van their jerusalem institute which promotes humanistic democratic and liberal values and the social discourse in israel i'm dahlia shenlin speaking to you from new york city still without your co host gilaad halpern every week we interview people producing research and books that make our lives more interesting today's guest is michael wahid hannah he's a senior fellow at the century foundation he's also an adjunct senior fellow at the centre on lawn security in new york university school of law michael hannah welcome to the tel aviv review thanks for having me together with your co editor tenacity combined s who is also a senior fellow at the century foundation a you've just published arab politics beyond the uprisings experiments in an era of resurgent authoritarianism by the century foundation press it's a collection of over twenty articles dealing with this very complex issue we're gonna be talking about every single one of them while just kidding but this is obviously key issue all the time for you know kind of on everybody's mind for the last number of years so let's start out with something sort of general each country so different and you cover a number of these countries some stabilized into sort of newly authoritarian systems like egypt others are on the verge of being failed states like syria can anything be said that characterises the arab revolutions that is common to them or most of them.

plo israel new york city senior fellow syria aviv jerusalem institute michael wahid new york university school of michael hannah editor egypt