24 Burst results for "Avant Garde"

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

05:14 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Lament, the loss of my youth because that was a time when I had a farmer energy I think necessarily time just the the impulsive energy to stay up for four hours a night to just make things on the internet or make things on my computer. And you know as somebody who's who is. Fast approaching the half, century mark. You know it just it becomes more difficult. To Who can do that? What if what have you found on Uber Web debt that you're excited to see goodness. Of John, Oswald plunder phonics. Right, Bunder phonics tell us again about plunder phonics hundred phonics. Is Very. Original. One of the sort of well known examples of of culture jamming but really collage EST reappropriation of sound and a time where we take the notion for granted where everything is remixed wonderful i. mean you know so that I thought the old Guy Yelling at clouds. I think it's great. But at a time when you know The eighty s when when sampling technology did almost didn't exist, he would do it with tapes. or He would do it by messing with CD's. Created remixes extensively of you know that we're more A. About an avant garde art and making something for the dance floor right Michael Jackson and and he would get sued in the process right or he could take down notices I think is is is works were. One point we're you know taking an and destroyed. Based upon. Probably epic records of these data Michael Jackson that time Michael Jackson's life. Not as a state but you know. Kind of reactionary clampdowns on this sort of thing. But certainly somebody a contemporary of the different than say a negative land and as well. They're the works of the tape Beatles. An Iowa city based kind of collage. Band as well. Like negative land working a lot in the same way in the eighties in the ninety s you can often you know not not using even real the real taste but just what they could dump between two cassettes, right? Yeah. Maybe a way that a lot of Eight such things that I no longer have access to that I don't is a twelve or thirteen year old that I will not claim have any of the the the cleverness or married of the tape. Beatles. Or John While you know the impulses there what they did was to to to hone their craft and do more of it, and then had the gumption to distribute it right up at people. In Pre Internet days on cassettes and in some cases, records and CDs. So that's all up there. And can be accessed and much of it is still a pretty amazing the way they they sort of. Screw up. A mess with the tower and and and things, and that's Because John Oswald's work early work was was was actively suppressed, right? It was for a long time heart to obtain or here, and it would pop up and down the Internet through the ninety s you know and I remember being very excited to find it. But as soon as it would sort of pop, it would it would disappear and sometimes maybe it disappeared simply because somebody lost interest in that website you know. Not because it was formerly suppressed, but but it just it became harder and harder to obtain an Uber Web has been a sort of persistent archive of that at the very least. It's something which which is the..

Michael Jackson John Oswald Bunder Iowa
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

03:09 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"In the niche by by and talking to so many individuals. I reference things that are that I'm reminded of outside of radio survivor but. The unique thing about talking to people every week on these topics is that. They don't just remind me of a youtube I watched. They always remind me of a conversation. We just had I mean the the the conversation day with with Kenneth a about Uber Web really reminded me of the conversation that we had with. I'M GONNA look it up now Sido screw up and. Not, remember the guest's name for the second time like I did in the it's hard to have that encyclopedic knowledge know normally. Wait was Jocelyn. Robinson. Robinson who was on talking about? Their project to archive historically black colleges and universities talked about this unique transition that we've made from the Twentieth Century to the twenty first century where people were not their own folk archivists. Back in the nineteen sixties in the way that everybody. Everybody is carrying around an archive of their life now, either on their laptop computer or on hard drives. End IT'S A. It's a really interesting. New World and we certainly are rated survivor appreciate the the the folk archivists of the twentieth century since they were forward thinking and. Kept a copy of things that we care about. That's Boy That's every episode it is, and because I think what? Once you start dipping your towing, you realize that it's wide in deep and. And how much there is to be remembered and preserved And and once you see it, you can't unsee it right once you know it you can't unknow it, and that's why we continue to traverse and I think I mean it seems to me that that we're not alone as we continuously learn and you know every so often. Bubbles up into the mirror mainstream recognition such as the the woman who recorded all the Philadelphia television that the Kenneth. Reference Rights and you that's a moment and. It. Like how this allows us to sort of Canada's a lot us to do with sort of a way. That's a bit more. Just slightly academic I know. But, but you know puts a bit of things to to to both a pithy summation. and to a little bit of theory if you will. With a small T.. And is very helpful. It was very helpful for me and reading the book. To. Have a fresh perspective fresh eyes on the work that I see other people doing that we are. We often get a chance to engage with another doesn't makes I'd like to do more. I just need to reserve. Those three hours at night with a nice nice classic of Bourbon. I you know. The thing is I met my youth..

Kenneth Robinson Jocelyn Canada Philadelphia
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

02:18 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"We'd have to figure that one out. So in other words. Yeah. So there's all this kind of weird institutionalization. You know if you do something wrong enough for long enough, it actually ends up becoming right uber. Web's done wrong from day one. We've got everything wrong. We never asked permission. You know we're not trait we may forget we I'm not trained I know nothing about I really know nothing about this stuff I just happened to like it I wonder. I wonder you told us about how wfan was a very important inspiration for for building stuff I wonder if we can get a little gen-x nostalgic and talk about any is there another? Magazine or pile of VHS tapes that inspired you yes. Yes. Yes. the best one Anatole I write a written a whole chapter about in the book it was a magazine. Out of the bay area. in the late seventies mid seventies too early to bid to probably for the mid nineties called Research magazine. Research publications right and it was with in Seattle and when when when. Paul was physically possible and I bought a copy of research at a book store up there in front of him. So yeah, we're. Yeah you know it's would was founded by a guy called V Vale who was the drummer in blue cheer originally a guy that that a japanese-american guy that kind of grew up in foster homes ended up working at City Lights Bookstore and started research as and what he did was very great He took the GRODY grotty grody up punk. Magazine aesthetic and he got a really good designer in there and he dressed up the off on guard in beautiful and sexy ways. Okay. So it was content like throbbing Gristle and William S Burroughs and survival research laboratories packaged like it was L. Magazine. I mean, it was really really beautiful and it just stood out. You just want to have these things and he said, well, you know what does he court always have to be so ugly mostly, it had to be ugly because there was no money but here's a guy that he hooked up with some kind of graphic designers was no real money. But..

Research magazine William S Burroughs L. Magazine wfan Paul Anatole I City Lights Bookstore Seattle V Vale GRODY
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

05:18 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"African Americans or Africans. What's going on with with the rest of the avant garde art. Oh. Steaming. It's great. It's so rich and it. Oh, it's what's really interesting is that You know I'm always trying to diversify the notion of the von Cart and there are so many great. African. American artists that are making avant-garde videos and I've been grabbing them and I've been putting up on new but sometimes because these artists is so hot, I cease and desist letters from their representatives saying, Hey, take the stuff down. We're selling the stuff like mad. A please please please take down. We can't. We can't have it out there which I respect. You know for folks haven't been made these low profile low visibility I would like to provoke them. But the last thing I want to do is take money out of pocket of folks that that that have had a struggle making that kind of money. So it's been a funny conundrum while I've tried to really. Broaden the scope scope but believe me there's plenty of other. Non renumerated. Less, accessible. For example, there's a fluxes composer called Ben Patterson Ben. Patterson who recently died was was the only black member of fluxes and a great off on guard composer that nobody who's nobody's work knows about I mean it's really weird stuff Very good. So we've been building up the Ben Patterson Arcot because that's something that really nobody's GonNa come after us for and trying to showcase. That we have, there's there's. The art is an. Is a worldwide phenomenon now we have Art Collectives, a lot of stuff from art collectives from Asia that are up there. It's just fast at this point. Again, my focus is really on on dead or nearly dead people. So I I can't the contemporary stuff I just don't have the bandwith personally, and I'm not a curator I'M A. Poet. I'm an artist or whenever you want to say I'm not I'm not trained in this stuff. So I think it needs to be done on a on a level of what's going on with younger people right now but I can tell you a dead guy like, Ben. Patterson. is treated like royalty on. How about about any public access television Are we do. Yeah. Yeah. We have. We have some of those There was a group. is so big. I can't I can't remember the name. But we have people have given us a public access avant-garde stuff. A lot of the video work that we have initially aired on public access people ripped it off the TV another thing. Another great source of this stuff is a lot of folks in Europe rip stuff off Artie TV in France or a TV. Because they play all sorts of Alvin, card old stuff and. People make VHS Reps. a lot of stuff we have on new is very poor quality because it's a wobbly VHS rips that trump teeth generations old I think it's better to have..

Ben Patterson Ben Ben Patterson Arcot Art Collectives Patterson Artie TV France Europe Alvin Asia
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

03:55 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Artist. In. The obscure and and things that are delightful you know. I tell a story in the book about. After prince died and Ken on the station blog put up all these remixes of print songs, one of his Little Red Corvette. remixed the song backwards and Ken started receiving all these kind of automatic cease and desist on on Little Red Corvette and can took the MP three down because you know he likes he's got since he's funded person he's got to play it a little bit. A straighter than I do I received no funding so I I don't have to listen to what anyone says does. So he said Okay I'll take the thing down. You know he took the thing down the season desist letters still kept coming. And they were automatic and what can finally realized was that they were picking up on the title of the blog posts that said little red corvette not so much. Even the artifact trying to scare and shakedown everybody that was putting anything having to do with prince or a little red corvette. So even when things get weird there and can you know to this day? He still gets the cease and desist letters because he left he put the MP three backup and left the post there and they still keep coming. They're all they're just automated and he just ignores them now. Him So now Kenneth You have been. Creating curated a maintaining ubi web for for basically a generation. And you say you know especially this time of year when when the academic calendars a little lighter, you know you spend a few hours and your evenings. Getting things posted and and I'm sure you spend even more time in collecting and making sure you have things find seeking them out. A. All this time later. Why do you still do it? Well like I said before it's community service. It makes the world a better place. It's my politics. You know it's my activism. I believe in free culture I believe in free education I believe cultural materials should be available to everybody. Who have so few people have access to this kind of material and the material changes people's lives on an individual basis as I talked about with the beauty of the gesture of Marcel, Duchamp you know if you just have that little key that anything can be art even that brick on the street can be art. Then the world becomes a better place to live in and to be it, and that's the kind of kind of. Underlying reason. I keep doing this. I. It's my. It's my activism. And it's my the thing I believe in most. Wonderful. Activity of questions. Oh. You know maybe too many but it depends on how Kenneth is doing because we we did we did. We did reach the. Fifteen. Minute mark for the radio edit but I'd be happy to continue chatting. If you WANNA talk a little more on. Its Quarantine. So whatever it is, I got I got nowhere to be believe according to has been a real a boon for podcasting is all I. can say Kenneth I want to. Work at it professionally. So this. Rather a directly, but it's been a boon for us as well. So we really do appreciate your willingness to shore no problems. Chat a little bit more. Kenneth Tell tells about I'm curious because I. Know, you're talking about how how the avant-garde you know as as all are in general, you know for a certain chunk of the. Twentieth Century was really like a white man, a white male you know. Whatever playground and white women? Got Got a chance to be recognized as important artists for a certain latter half of the twentieth century. But I'm wondering if Uber, Web found any. Cool stuff from like you know from from the rest of the world that you could tell us about any anything from..

Corvette Kenneth Kenneth You Ken Kenneth Tell corvette Marcel Duchamp
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

02:58 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"You know we certainly couldn't have afforded or didn't have the network to buy this stuff so. Ken Friedman It was a huge inspiration to me the kind of Catholic notion of free form radio. The idea that you could take something very high, and then sake way it into something extremely popular. It's really low and have them. Both make sense as a leveling thing was a great inspiration for Uber Web and and as I said, it's sorta queered the avant-garde away that traditional notions of the avant garde couldn't have. Couldn't have been also can has a very. Level headed and rational. Idea about copyright again I call myself a folk archivist I'm also a folk. List. Not Folk Lure Elo are he but a folk L. A. W. Okay. Dean of somebody involved with folk law is actually Seeing law copyright law the way it actually works as a way instead of the way it really is on the books and I started to kind of pull back the curtain a little bit on the cease and desist letter with that. Now, I learned a lot of this stuff from Ken who's been a folk law as forever and so yeah, Uber Win and and. One of the web streams used to be an issue of stream. So for many years even after I left the station FM, you continue to support it would web. Bye Bye. Bye streaming giving US backups I mean the the two histories of the two things are are intertwined very strongly. Yeah. Because that's I. Mean that's also commensurate with the Taiwan I think about when I started streaming online WMU was very early. In streaming in period for for broadcast radio and and and and I think they're real innovation as I. See it as well was as soon as it was sort of practical they started archiving right and and allowing you to go back in time and listened to shows that had happened. On a mass scale right up to that point it was probably again more like a full. Archiving in that individual Dj's at some college, a community station might archive their own programs are underway. Based on digitizing cassettes or something like that. And so it was up hazard certainly, I did the same thing with my own show I was really haphazard for the first six years I did it. Or. So and you had to be used on IT and maintained it right in a way. That by the letter of the law right. One might say that's not permitted but but ultimately in the folk lies, you point out. It causes no harm rarely because again, wfan trafficking in in top forty hits in the million dollar million dollar..

Ken Friedman Dean Taiwan Dj
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

04:39 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"You know and not necessarily for that thread which you may be find most interesting yourself. And you know and I came late to that right? I mean, you had maybe web counters these sort of kind of little tiny numbers that would count up. That, you can put in the nineties and and maybe you'd see up by water to every week if you were me. You know you and I didn't grow up with with that sense that we could do something get this immediate feedback you would do it, and maybe somebody likes it. I don't know. Do you think that that has any any any interplay with with why maybe? There isn't the same. Impulse to to create a nice kind of a curated archive because it's hard because you don't get the feedback. Or. Or if you had the feedback mechanism, you just wouldn't like the results. Yeah well, artists are used to getting no feedback. Nobody cares about your work. You know never you know painters put up a show maybe you got to review a little salad or something, and then then you go back underground for a long time poetry's even worse even nobody buys books nobody read some. So for me the. Long haul and lack of feedback is fine. and. Not only that an uber? Web, we host unpopular things. You know sometimes people ask me how come. You don't put the whole site into one giant. You know torrent or put them up as tourists and the problem with Torrance are that which is popular is rewarded by cedars and that which is unpopular. Is For lack of cedars. Okay. So that which is popular rises to the top and that which is unpopular sinks to the bottom and I just thought you know I want this to library I. Mean there are a lot of books in the library that never got taken out but they sit on the shelves anyway and eventually maybe somebody will take them out or maybe they're not taken out every once or ten years it doesn't make any less valuable makes them very valuable the certain populations that are interested in that kind of work. So I, you know I, I wanted a library model for unpopular culture You just go in and. The guards are such a strange thing because You know note you know. Everybody has a distaste for the. Guard you're. Not Liking twelve tone music nobody's born liking twelve tone music, right you know and so you have to have had some kind of a falling out with culture or reality to be interested in the avant-garde in the first place something in the world was really working for you. The way it was set and you go look for alternatives right? So that that was I think that happens for anybody who's interested in really weird, weird music, weird literature weird film you know sometimes, I- Hollywood just isn't quite do it for me. So that's a very few people right? It's a small it's a small small group and when I got on the Internet you know it's really hard to find that stuff..

Torrance Hollywood
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

04:04 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Commercial value. You can't sell this stuff. But I'll tell you I'll tell you conned about a sound poetry record that that that pushed the genre away from concrete poetry and sound poetry and into the avant-garde, and this is a good example So we love John. Cage right the modernist composer the. Guard modernist composer is famous piece was four minutes and thirty three seconds, which is four minutes and thirty seconds of silence and the idea again behind that pieces that you don't really have to plan anything. But if you just quiet and you listen to the sounds around you, you'll find that there's plenty of oral a, you are a l. variety in art to. listening experiences. Okay. So we love John Cage and John Cage made some really good concrete poetry and he did this really weird readings of his pieces that to Meyer sounded like sound poetry. So we took those readings a burn them from C. and he was making weird noises with his mouth around words and James Joyce and stuff like that, and and that was sort of one of the founding documents of our sound poetry section but then. There were also these other moments in which John Cage would do those weird sound poetry readings accompanied by an orchestra. Classical Orchestra and I thought well, this really isn't sound poetry and this really isn't orchestral off guard work like Schurenberg or something like that. What the heck is this thing you know and I thought Oh my God I guess I I guess it's you know these naming things became too small. Why don't we just call this avant-garde right that makes sense and so within the avant-garde, then you could have these various sections of sound of of a visual of film Etcetera Etcetera, and that was the turning point upon which the archive changed from a sound concrete poet site into a site of. Avant Garde in general I mean you know these these these things are really slippery. You can't really say this is on guard. That's not this is I mean it's ridiculous. So by building a very. Giant. Are Caused the avant-garde. Dispensing basically with with with genres of Avant Garde. A weird stuff started to flow in into into the archive that was typically outside the prospectus of the classical avant garde and that way I kind of like to think that we the Uber Web is a very impure of on guard. You've never seen an avant-garde quite like this and I like the impurity because I think one of the problems with the garde was its rigidity, its purity I mean it was it was it was really You know it was patriarchal. It was colonialist. I mean we all those kind of. references that you have around avant-gardism al I. Mean it was it was militaristic all of that stuff. You could soften innocence queer it but by adding things that normally weren't there. But still somehow we're in dialogue. With with the avant-garde uh-huh and you you, you say it Kinda pass voice things filtered in, but you're not passive about. This I mean, this is serious. I'm not passive but I'm open and I think like I'm not a historian. So it's just like folk this is folk archiving. See this theory the. That that we're all that folks. Archiving has become a folk crack this all you know we're all archivists now if you look at what's in your download folder On your hard drive with MP threes. I. Mean you actually have archived and curated an incredible collection of enormous depth almost accidentally the everyone's doing this whether it's building spotify playlist or or adding adding things to your library and Apple. Music..

John Cage Avant Garde Meyer James Joyce spotify Schurenberg Apple
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

05:11 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"And critically you did this. To understand especially from reading your book without checking in with anyone i. Nobody checked in with anybody I I mean it was the web you just put it there. And that that became a policy. We still don't check in with anybody who's hundreds of thousands of things that are unchecked in so to speak and that's interesting because I too was on the web. In Nineteen ninety-six. And you know the metaphor wild west I think gets overused in a lot of ways and of course, I think is due for some historical revisionism but nevertheless, there was a sense that people that was the way you did things on the Internet in Nineteen ninety-six you just you just did it. You didn't. Take another thought. Old. On that's the way we still do things on the Internet. Don't believe don't believe them. They were trying to control you. All right. Well, we'll tell me more about about that. I've written a whole book about that. Basically, the book called to shop is my lawyer and as you said, and basically the idea of shaw his permission as he says, I can take anything in the world and I can call it art. Right? He took a urinal Ronnie. So that's a that's a sculpture and A. Beautiful. Permission that permits anything to be something special. The most boring thing in the world now can be elevated and become something special an incredible permission. The world becomes a very rich place when everything is valued. Okay and so the notion. that. Nothing can be excluded. was something that really propelled the site kind of do champion idea. I'm just going to select it and I'm going to put it up there and I'm going to call it. Call it an important piece of art. Now the way that this all works is that there's no money exchanged. Okay. First of all, let me just start by saying that avant-garde art in general is pretty valueless. It's historically priceless economically worthless I mean particularly the stuff that we deal in which is like abstract films and sound poetry I mean you could sell this stuff if you wanted to. Okay. So that's the first thing to know is that as that I don't take money never touched money and twenty five years. I don't pay anybody I. Don't ask permission. Ask for grants. If somebody wanted to buy the site tomorrow for a million dollars I'd say you're out of luck we don't do money. And that's the beauty of it. It's managed actually work really well, everybody is really comfortable with. Things when there's no economic incentive involved. And that's that's an interesting point because it seems to me that Lou if I if I look at this arc that's happened in the intervening time..

shaw A. Beautiful Lou Ronnie
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

03:45 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"And other words it's a pretty. Large and generous Genera. And what drove you to want to compile these works on the Internet in one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, six in a world you know before we had a term called social media before even my space never mind facebook. Or. Youtube for that matter. What what drove you to want to compile these on on a website. Well. I was and I guess I sort of still am I was trained as a visual artist and my subject matter When I was younger was books, you know I would make these big books out of wood and I would carve words into them and what ended up happening was The sculptures were beautiful but I was speaking beginning to resent the time that it took to carve the wood and I was just interested in the words I. Think I really really interested in the words you know in a material way kind of plastic way not really a mate way that was so much about meaning but as about the way that the words actually looked. At this point, I had these collectors that were down in Florida and they collected concrete poetry and I'd never really heard of concrete poetry I mean, what is that? And it turns out that that's actually a way of that was formed in the mid century of working with poetry not by the meaning as much as by the government of words on a page you know and I was like, wow, this is sort of exactly what I'm interested in. and. I got really hooked on this very forgotten genre called concrete poetry and began collecting all these books of the stuff and there's a lot of it but you could go to a used bookstore and pick up a book concrete poetry for two bucks or something like that and I got this chime collection and when I first saw the graphical web in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, five, I noticed the interlaced Jif I. Do you remember those? Yes. Yes. It's a type of of graphic graphic file people like animated shifts now I guess but but where I guess to save memory. Alternating lines of it would fill in right. Like Venetian blind. Yeah. Yeah. And there were a lot of sequential concrete poems poems that kind of filled themselves in in that way. But they would go across pages and they were kind of like primitive animations and I was like Oh my God, this is all starting to make sense somehow. So I know God and I was really excited by the graphical web because I had been on links and UNIX systems before that So I began scanning some of these concrete poems and putting them up as interlaced Jeff's and wow. They started to kind of come to life and also being backlit on the screen gave concrete poetry and new life, and it was kind of dead on the page. Believe me in the early ninety s the stuff that was producing the fifties and sixties looked a little bit debt. But went back lit by the screen they started to really jump and then they kind of moved as they were kind of inter lacing. So I thought, wow, this medium was waiting for revival of concrete poetry and I am going to be the man. To build that collection. So I guess built one of the first. Archives of concrete poetry. I just can't stuff. Put it up. I. Sent an email out to some friends. You know my two friends that might be interested in concrete poetry and said, hey, check this stuff out and they said, hey, that's pretty cool. That looks pretty good. They sent the email out a few other friends and before I knew it I had A. A group of concrete poetry fans. surrounding me. So. That's kind of the genesis of the site back in back in ninety nine, thousand six..

facebook Youtube Florida Jeff
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

03:36 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Welcome survivor thanks for taking the time to speak with US okay high. For folks who haven't heard of UBE and I hope that this interview causes them to. Correct that oversight and immediately plunge in. Can you describe what is? Well, it's a website. A website remember those. It's an independent website. Remember those. It's a website written in html one point. Oh remember those. in other words, it's been around for twenty five years. It's the largest free archive for off on guard materials on the Internet It holds I don't know how many cultural artifacts in the hundreds of thousands and it's been expanding exponentially every day even even last night at expanded further. So it's it's a twenty five year work in progress. And by Oven Card artifacts, give us a sense for what that means, what what you have there on the website. I'm it starts with pretty much the old school avant-garde the old white male. Tradition is the basis of our collection from you know, Marcel Duchamp to Andy Warhol and folks like that. Of course, that's not good enough and we can't stop there..

Marcel Duchamp UBE Andy Warhol
"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

Radio Survivor Podcast

02:25 min | 6 d ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Radio Survivor Podcast

"Today we're here for the love of of the good old archives of the off on guard. We're going to be talking about an online archive of the avant-garde. This existed for twenty five years called. Yuba web and we're going to talk to the founder and real principle curator of this online archive Kenneth Goldsmith. WHO's a poet, a critic he teaches at the University of Pennsylvania and he has for over the course of a generation essentially been accumulating artifacts audio video text. Of the on guard, sharing it online, and that sounds simple but there's so much more to the story and we're we're talking to him on the occasion. Of His book, which is a memoir of creating web in maintaining Uber. Lebanon is full of wonderful stories and anecdotes as well as inspiration and to some extent instruction I. Think I think for doing the same thing his book is called do shop is my lawyer, the polemics, pragmatics and poetics Bouba Web and what people should know about Uber Web is it's it's the kind of videos or audio that find easily if you have access to a world class library a big one because it's the kind of strange artworks that are not going to be checked out on a regular things that might have been straighted back and forth. Twenty five years ago, or or people that people that may have had a a yearning to see strange videos with their friends and so the these VHS tapes might have been copied and shared so that you could see a wild art works or or strange non not commercially viable pieces of video that are still a valuable and fun to watch but that's all. It's all there on Uber Place where you can still see these things and. It's tied together with video with text, but also sound and radio play play a real role here in the Yuba web story. So we think this is if you've enjoyed any of our interviews about archives or art and sound art I mean this is definitely for you. Yeah. handcrafted websites that stand the test of time or certainly one of one of the fun things we're excited to share today on today's episode with our interview with Kenneth Goldsmith. We're really thrilled to welcome to the show Kenneth Goldsmith. He's the American poet and critic and the founding editor of.

Kenneth Goldsmith Yuba University of Pennsylvania Lebanon founding editor founder
"avant garde" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

02:06 min | Last month

"avant garde" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

"This is held in the headrest. An Industry Pucker show. We've lane episode, number, one, hundred and fifty seven. To cut it in the head Jesse Industry Talk. That incites inspirations and information to take you. To the next level. Is your host. Domes. Cut It in a headdress in industry poker show my name's lane and I really appreciate each, and every one of you is chewed it in each week to this show nephew new to it. Where was it all about well? This is the leading podcast for the hair industry, and this is a show that gives you the insights, inspirations and information is going to help. Take Your hairdressing amd Barbara. Barbara and careers to the next level and we do that by bringing onto the show every week. Leading names rising stars dish to influences, business fingers, and those from the creative fashion on media industries. Now before we head into today's podcast, just want to give a shoutout to today's episode supporters, and that's our friends. are hairdressers ultimate gear now they are the home of premium seizes combs brochures. Also stuck in essential P P. as well as biodegradable disposable town. So if there's anything that you want, these are the guys to go to a now. Really open to any questions. You may have an also a love what they do. Is it that donating a percentage of their profits to charitable causes every quarter mortgage reason why to go to hedge S.'s ultimate gear now. They have a special code for you to use when you get to the to on their website, the code that you have to. To use is literally how to cut it all in one word in you will get a twenty percent. Discount on you. Buy In. Check him, so you need to do.

Barbara
Innovation and the Clich

LensWork

09:35 min | 3 months ago

Innovation and the Clich

"Years the editor of Lens Work Publishing Brooks Jensen as an introduction to this topic. Let me begin with a little bit of inside baseball as they say. Did describe how it is that these podcasts come about. Oftentimes they're sparks from something. I read or something someone says to me or an idea. Get an e mail. Sometimes it's ideas that just bubble up out of nowhere. As I've often mentioned this happens a lot in the shower for some reason so I actually have a divers where I can jot down ideas before I forget them while. I'm still in the shower. And that's what happened this morning at phrase occurred to me out of the clear. Blue Sky jotted down. I had no idea where it was going. But I've been thinking about it all day in it's led to a very interesting train of thought. I WANNA share with you. The phrase is as a pursuit in life. The creation of art seems to be a dance between innovation an execution dance between innovation and execution. And here's what occurred to me while I was thinking about this. I've been listening to two different kinds of music of late. I've for reasons I can't explain really gotten into the piano concertos of Rachmaninoff. And I've mentioned that these are available on Youtube Etcetera. Play by this brilliant Chinese Pena's named Eugene and by sheer coincidence. I've also discovered a composer. Young woman who is very talented at composing classical music. And she's been exploring lots of other genres of music are names Nari Soul and she has been discussing of late in some of her Youtube Videos John Cage and his work. With what's called a prepared piano. He would take an open up a piano and attach things to the strings. like paper clips and whatnot and and the piano would make very funny noises and oftentimes. He would not really play music. He would just play notes and things and very innovative very creative. Very modern very sort of avant garde out there and she's been exploring some of his ideas so I I had these two things that are clashing in my brain the extreme precision and accomplishment of the execution of Rachmaninoff by Eugene Dong and John Cage and is prepared piano as explored by Nari Soul. I think these two extremes are what got me thinking about the dance between innovation and execution. LemMe ask the question. This way in terms of piano music which is a higher form of accomplishment. The extreme innovation of John Cage thinking way outside the box not only thinking outside of meter and normal harmonies and progressions but thinking about outside normal instruments. And how they can be modified in played with talk about innovation way out there so we applaud that to some degree and then at the other end of the scale is you. Juwan and her unbelievably precise playing Rachmaninoff. And the the execution that she brings to his scores are not only extremely high in terms of technical proficiency but also in terms of emotional content. So that's a very high measure of success. But can't we agree that these two are at essentially completely opposite ends of the creative spectrum? Both forms of music can bring out emotions. Strong positive and negative is zoom and both of them can be seen to fall in some sort of competition or scale of things. And which do we appreciate more? Well obviously the reason I bring all this up is because I'm thinking about this relative to photography to what's more important in photography extreme innovation here. I'm thinking of the inventive work from the imagination of photographers like Jerry. You'll Zeman or John Paul Capela Negro or Huntington Witherell or dominic rouse or the incredibly precise execution on very traditional lines. And here on thinking of Bruce Marne bomb and John Sexton and and even people like Steve McCurry. Which do we value more? The key idea here seems to me to revolve around our expectations. If we go into a piece of artwork with the assumption that what we're looking for is incredibly talented sensitive execution and we see something like the prepared piano of John Cage or the innovative of Jerry yells men or someone we might say. Well that's not what I call a picture because it doesn't look like what we expect a fine art photograph to look like on the other hand if we go in assuming that what we value. Is something really innovative? Something we've never seen before then we can look at work like. Oh maybe even Louis Balsam Robert Atoms and Lee friedlander Gary Winner. Grand and say well. That's that's not what I call a picture. But wow is that fantastic. Because it doesn't look at all like we expect a fine art photograph to look. I think it's easy for us to appreciate the fact that there are two camps. It's perhaps even easier to fall into one of those two camps without even realizing it if we're a traditionalist we're gonNA look at the innovative and the Avant Garde is being weird and certainly when people look at oh do sharp or Mcgraw eat they might look at those paintings and say that's weird. That's you know. Because it doesn't look like Rembrandt Raphael. On the other hand if greet and duchamp painted like Rembrandt and Rafael. We might look at it and say well. That's boring because it's not innovative so therefore it doesn't seem to add much to the history of painting and so we're not interested in it. Well we can do exactly the same thing in photography. How do you evaluate work when you look at it? Do you evaluate it based on its execution and how well it conforms to the cliche or do you evaluate it based on its innovation and how different and unique it is. There is a position in the Middle. Which gives me pause for concern. Because if what we're trying to do is have the best of both worlds have innovation and traditional execution for example. Then the only thing that's left is what you point your camera at that is to say trying to find something that hasn't been photographed as artwork before and turn that into your bailiwick or your creative vision. In hopes that people would look at it and say beautifully done traditionally printed man fantastic execution of something. That's never been photographed before and isn't that Nice. Do you realize that that's exactly what happened? In the early history of painting this has been discussed by lots. And lots of people. Certainly not a unique idea. And certainly not my own but basically the idea's this for generations for literally. Hundreds of years painting was of the human figure primarily religious pictures descent from the cross kinds of things but usually what happened in those paintings as they had to be set in some kind of scene and so there would be introduced in the background. Some little bit of a tree or a little stream or a building or something and with enough passage of time and hundreds of years. Painters started saying to the figure move over. We're we're more interested in what's going on in the background than we are in the human figure or the story and landscape painting was born but when landscape painting was born that way there were probably lots and lots of people around who said well. That's not what I call a painting because whereas the people this is just a bunch trees that's not very interesting so it was innovative but it wasn't traditional and it certainly didn't measure up to the kinds of execution that were expected in a portrait of a person or the painting of a of a story seen or some such thing

John Cage Rachmaninoff Avant Garde Youtube Baseball Eugene Dong Lens Work Publishing Editor Jerry Nari Soul Brooks Jensen John Paul Capela Negro Juwan Steve Mccurry John Sexton Pena Dominic Rouse Bruce Marne Mcgraw
The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

Hostage

03:44 min | 6 months ago

The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

"Our first clip is from podcast original female criminals covering the attempted murder of one of the most well known American artists of the twentieth century. Andy Warhol writer in Radical Feminist Valerie solanas befriended warhol in nineteen sixty seven through the New York Avant Garde art scene. He showed an interest in producing one of her plays titled Up Your Ass at invited her into his inner circle of artists and influencers influencers at the factory but in nineteen sixty eight. The pair had a falling out. Valerie became convinced that Warhol was trying to steal her ideas and pass them off as his own in paranoia fueled rage. She confronted Warhol in his studio armed with a thirty two caliber revolver it. She pulled out her gun aimed at Warhol's back while he was on the phone and fired before Anyone could stop her when the first shot went off no one in the studio realized what was happening Amaya. Yeah thought sniper had fired through the window. He threw himself on the ground Hughes on the other hand thought. The sound was an explosion from the offices of the Communist leanest party located two floors above them. More Hall was the only one who realized what was happening. Though her first shot had missed missed him he turned the sound and when he saw Valerie was holding a smoking gun he yelled Valerie. Don't do it no no. Oh but his words couldn't deter her Valerie wasn't discovered marksman her second shot also missed however over the third bullet struck Warhol in the abdomen hitting his left lung spleen stomach liver and sopha guess before exiting his back he collapsed to the ground. At which point Valerie turned to a Maya. He was the only bystander who hadn't taken cover making him a perfect target for Valerie. She fired twice more one shot hit but miraculously passed through Maya without damaging any organs Valerie then approached Hughes pointing the gun directly directly at him. He begged for his life but Valerie told him simply. I have to shoot you. She aimed the gun at his chest at such a close range. It was impossible for her to miss. But fate intervened the gun jammed and as has she tried to get it working again. The elevator doors opened Hughes realizing that Valerie was distracted and agitated told her to just take the elevator and leave. Valerie did exactly that Morrissey and Hughes immediately called nine nine one one. When the paramedics arrived and saw the blood they believed that Warhol was already dead no one could have survived the injuries he'd sustained Amaya had to convince them? That warhol was still breathing and that he needed immediate medical treatment. Finally the first first responders loaded warhol into their ambulance at the hospital. His heart stopped at four fifty one PM. The doctors doctors declared him legally dead but they were able to resuscitate him by massaging his heart and rushed him into emergency

Valerie Solanas Andy Warhol Hughes Warhol New York Avant Garde Writer Amaya Morrissey
New Russian weapon can travel 27 times the speed of sound

All Things Considered

00:21 sec | 7 months ago

New Russian weapon can travel 27 times the speed of sound

"The Russian military says it's deployed a new hypersonic weapon that's able to deliver nuclear warheads while evading US air defenses is NPR's Lucien Kim reports from Moscow the new weapon reportedly can fly more than twenty times the speed of sound pressure defense minister Sergei Shoigu told generals in Moscow that the new weapon called avant garde is operational as a Friday

NPR Lucien Kim Moscow Sergei Shoigu United States
The Life of Mike Nichols

The Book Review

13:58 min | 8 months ago

The Life of Mike Nichols

"Ask Carter and Sam Kashmir join us now they wrote together an oral history of Mike Nichols it's called life isn't everything. Mike Nichols as remembered by one hundred and fifty of his closest friends Sam Ash. Thanks for being here. Just thanks for having US thank you. What was was the genesis of this project? Well after Mike's Death I was at Vanity Fair and wanted to do an oral history as much as we can get away with the magazine and ask had worked as a PA.. With Mike. And I knew him mm somewhat and so I thought it best to join forces and so we did this for the magazine originally and it was so interesting and there was so much material that it just kind of presented itself as a book kind of instantly. As soon as we saw together in the magazine they must have been painful to have to cut. Had it down to magazine size well. The piece was originally assigned at six thousand. Words ran at eleven thousand and still not a word practically about his theater career hear about his time at the compass. Players is a founding member of Improv. I mean there's so much still on the table Ash you're very lucky person having worked as the PA.. What did you work on? I worked on Charlie Wilson's war. That was my first job out of college. I was so upset on hangs Julia Roberts. What was that often? Yes Oh right. Of course. It was a big movie so very often. You felt very distant from where the the real real action was taking place but still. I really feel blessed who've been able to be as close as I was. So you mentioned Charlie. Wilson's war my immediate reaction. Shen is Oh my God. That's Mike Nichols. Also the thing that I think people don't even fully appreciate now is just how incredibly accomplished. He was and for so long so if we could just kind of begin with his I think I real fame fame was with Nichols and may but before we go into each of those stop. Just take us through because I think people may be associated him with the graduate and a couple of other major projects. But let's just list some some of them so people have a sense. Well there was the great success of the Nichols. and May Elaine. May and Mike Nichols as a comedy team. which kind of transformed formed Comedy really and Mike as Director. He and Neil Simon joined forces and he really kind of in a way. Reinvented invented Simon. For Neil Simon. You know with barefoot in the park and the odd couple and as of film director his first film was the Richard Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor. Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf which frank rich other people believed to be the maybe the best reputation of a of a stage play for film ever the graduate which was second film his second film shocking. JFK transformative you know and Oscar worthy. And then there's all all the stage work Tom Stoppard's the real thing David Raves hurly-burly streamers. Yeah camelot and S- Pamela camelot idle. I mean it's kind of prodian extraordinary range of of gifts that that he I mean. He Directs Spam Lot. I I think two years after doing angels in America for HBO. I mean that's range. I don't WanNa go too much into his early life by. I think it's important to point out that this was a person who arrived here. Didn't speak English. Not as first language goes to the University of Chicago right he meets Elaine. May let's start there. What was it that made that pairing so extraordinary? What did they do? You said that they revolutionized comedy Elaine may was the dangerous genius that entered Mike Nichols life and and changed him she was kind of a combustion engine and he was the steering wheel a little bit. Steve Martin told us the first time. When you listen to those records those bits or you know the sketches? which is he said that the that I heard irony brock kind of modernity to comics situations and things that comedians did not go? Nya such as the cost of funerals was is the time of Jessica Mitford the the American way of death. And you know I mean these are weighty subjects adultery a- adultery right the previous generation of comics from the fifties where people who came from Vaudeville and the Borscht Belt Nichols and may had a theater background around. And you know both the classical repertory but also as Improv actors and by the way they're also both at analysis and brought a level of psychological acuity to comedy that really hasn't been seen before let's just a clip of them from that period some day Arthur. You'll get married and you'll have suit of your own and honey when you do. I only pray that they make us suffer the way you. That's all I pray to mothers. Okay mom thanks for calling you very sarcastic. I'm doing my best now. You call me on on the telephone I me. I'm sorry I'm sorry that bothered you and look I didn't make you feel bad. Are you kidding I feel awful. Oh honey if I could believe that I'd be the happiest mother it's true. What do you think I feel crummy Arthur honey? Why don't you call me sweetheart? That's the one bit. That's kind of in a way close to auto biography at least for Mike that was sort of his mother in a way and and he had a difficult very difficult relationship with her. Are you know after the death of his physician. Father they were really plunged into poverty into serious poverty in in New York. He I used to have to go in the olden days to the Museum of TV and radio to watch these old clips. But now I I'm imagining that. You can see all of this on Youtube. Yeah there's a lot of great stuff and Youtube I encourage people to also look up there The award for total mediocrity that they did at the Emmys when you're in the nineteen fifties so that's just breathtaking. I just actually making fun of their own mirror. You know I mean they're making fun of show business with a successful right away. They were both part of this. Very heavy kind of avant-garde guard group called the compensator in Chicago and the two of them just clicked as their manager. Jack rollins later said there. They were like ham and eggs. They were a local will hit first then they came to New York. He signed them up his clients started booking them at local nightclubs and they were hit right away and then they started going non Jackpot and omnibus and they were hit nationally. So yeah it was. It was really just like that. It was that quick. How does it get from that to? Who's afraid of Virginia? Woolf well well they had a great success Nichols and may on Broadway at the Golden Theatre was an evening with Nichols in May ostensibly directed by Arthur Penn.. You know but not really and Elaine was just sort of tired of doing it and in a way was the comedic version of of the Beatles. Breaking up people were just. I just chop fall in. You know it's tragic. Yes yes yeah. It was kind of a loss in a way They would wind up working together. Other eventually you know as a screenwriter and director but but Mike it kind of put him in in the wilderness for a while He was really at see if we rely on a little bit. When he's got that evening on Broadway with a lame the theater? They were in shared an alley with a theater where her camelot was on stage with Richard Burton and they would kind of hang out after after the show and that's how he kind of got to know him and it was. It's essentially through that meeting Richard in that alley and threw him Liz. They were the ones who hired for Virginia Woolf. When you think about the collaborators he had the people he got to work with you mentioned Arthur panel the you know lately Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor Dustin in Hoffman Jewels pfeiffer on carnal knowledge? It's just you know on and on Meryl Streep the biggest names and your subtitle is is Mike Nichols as remembered by hundred and fifty of his closest friends. Did He. Frequently form friendships during these professional collaborations was. He's one of those the people that everybody felt like they knew. And we're close to make exactly this actors and and many was writers really kind of fell in love with him. I mean we could have called the book seduced by Mike Nichols you know Natalie. Portman really wept recalling. Her work with Mike Sue now. Yeah and that was much later and the closer yes. Yes but also they did stage work together so they were totally devoted to him. I I mean Tom Stoppard. For example said I think his advice memorial you know he thought to himself who is there to to write for he so he was kind of an Avatar to all of these. She's tremendously gifted complicated. People and the friendships were very deep. And Very Real Maureen Dowd. Your colleagues said that he was a null coward figure with the Jersey Kaczynski past and unlike a lot of other people who had a really horrible childhoods he did not kind of wear it on his sleeve and he we've talked about it and didn't particularly want to spend a lot of time thinking about it and I I mean I think this is kind of the key to his career. Longevity Eddie is that he was. Somebody really always wanted to be living in the moment. And kind of looking forward to the next project even up until the end of his life when he had several things that were in progress including masterclass terrence. McNally's play that he was gonNA adapt for. HBO With Meryl Streep. Yeah I mean in a way. Our title is taken from a a model of Mike's life isn't everything but it's kind of a misnomer because it was everything to him. You know in a way I mean he could be difficult to and and some of the people in the booker occur quite open about yes. That Emma Thompson is one right exactly Thompson who who adored him. You know said we're not talking about some saint here so you know and in fact Mike toward the end of his life felt that he had been cruel to people and had betrayed others. You know but he did develop a music also about someone who sort of as much of a genius as he was you know he was also complicated difficult cat and felt like there were people to apologize to. Some people presumably wouldn't talk to you Elaine. May of course wouldn't what about Diane Sawyer and were there other people who you pursued and just said you know what no now. We did approach. Diane we wouldn't have done this actually without her been addiction you know and she gave us the same response that initially initially Sam Beckett gave to digital bear you know which is. I'm not going to stop you but I'm also not going to help you all that much. But when push came to shove and we needed the people such as Meryl Streep she was helpful behind the scenes and Elaine. She did. Give us a blurb. Although we didn't use it and the blurb facetiously officiously said well I I would tell you all I know. But they're going to pay me millions of dollars to write my memoirs something. You'll never do you know. She meant it as kind of a joke before before we go one final question what do you each of you. Thank was Nicholas's greatest work and then also so perhaps a personal favourite may be less known or just something new especially leaden. And why. Let's start with you ash. I would say probably the graduate. It's not the most original choice but I just have seen the movie so many times and I think that it it just has held up so much better than a lot of other youth movies of the time that it was sort of lumped in with that plus the the comedy albums is sort of where my original enthusiasm for him started. But you know I I think catch twenty. Two for example is a movie that has not really gotten. It's do. I think it's actually kind of a brilliant movie that was overshadowed by Mash at the time though it is I see no reason why the existence of Mash prevent people from enjoying it today not an easy novel to adapt to know and but I think him and Buck Henry and we did a credible job adapting it. Sam will I mean. It's so hard to choose. My mother would choose working girl in or Silkwood you know an but are you. Seeing your mother would be wrong. My mother never wrong But for me it's you know the stage work is kind and of extraordinary. I mean the Philip Seymour. Hoffman death of a salesman at the end of life using that was really just is an extraordinary unearth accomplishment. Really it brought him Full Circle Because that streetcar with the two original productions that changed his life really all right. I'm hoping that this interview. If nothing else forces everyone to go to youtube everyone to go and stream every single thing that Mike Nichols did that was available. He was such an incredible credible talent ash. Carter Sam cash. Thank you so much for being here. Thank you so much thank your new book is called. Life isn't everything. Mike Nichols as remembered by one hundred

Mike Nichols Mike Elaine Meryl Streep Virginia Woolf Charlie Wilson Carter Sam Richard Richard Burton Elizabe Tom Stoppard Youtube Virginia Neil Simon New York HBO Arthur Director Sam Ash Mike Sue Julia Roberts University Of Chicago
Luxury Icon Barneys Declares Chapter 11, Seeks Buyer

Business Wars Daily

04:09 min | 1 year ago

Luxury Icon Barneys Declares Chapter 11, Seeks Buyer

"<music> uh from wondering i'm david brown and this is business daily on this wednesday august twenty first luxury retailer barneys filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy last week following rampant speculation now the question is why what exactly is is causing the downfall of one of america's best known high fashion institutions will i the facts barney's isn't liquidating at least not right now. The retailer taylor is closing fifteen out of its twenty two stores and most of its outlets but it managed to eek out a seventy five million dollar loan to help it meet its existing commitments according waiting to c._n._n. It'll use some of that money to keep its flagship downtown manhattan location open the rest it will use to restructure pay employees and suppliers and maintain gene operations while it looks for a buyer the dire straits barney's finds itself in our apparent to anyone who window shops on the website. You don't need to physically walk into the elegant manhattan department store to understand what's happening. Virtual sale racks on barney's site offer deals up to seventy five percent off turning a thousand dollar jersey hoodie into a steel at only four hundred dollars and poplin shirtdress into a half price bargain and only five hundred dollars barneys has never shied away from high prices for decades. It's wealthy customers. We're happy to pay for the retailers edgy designer wear but the marketplace has changed dramatically and today high i fashioned and it's cheaper knockoffs or available in many more places including high growth rental operations like stitch fix and rent the runway there millennials millennials can try out luxury garments without making enormous financial commitments as they must at barney's and then there are the economics of hedge fund ownership and real estate. The bankruptcy courts are littered with retailers owned by private equity and hedge funds in that model barney's is no different but it was was real estate that tipped the shaky company over the edge. It was unable to come to an agreement with its manhattan. Landlord rent on barney's flagship store on madison. Avenue is said to have doubled thirty million dollars in recent months. The company owes more than ten million back rent according to bankruptcy documents but observers also say that changes in the culture and the market have left barney's behind critics say it's avant-garde fashion caters to baby boomers but not to the younger shoppers it needs that means sustainable sourcing for one and robust instagram and online presence possibly paired with show rooms all of which barney's lax axe but if barney's failed to attract younger shoppers are those the real reasons. Why is it that millennials. Jazzy consumers aren't as interested in designer clothing as as their older counterparts or maybe as a young op ed writer for the washington post grow a few months ago. Millennials are simply broke drowning in college edged and high housing costs according to the company it was nineteen twenty-three that barney pressman pond his wife's engagement ring to build the very first barney's at the time time a discount store and over the last century it became the place to go a fashion brand with unparalleled service a store like no other as c._n._n. Wrote barney's bankruptcy may have been inevitable but it doesn't mean it's not sad from one this business wars daily. Hey if you like our show share with a friend would you you can do it right for most podcast apps and we sure appreciate pitcher word of mouth through would've app. I'm david brown in the studio wearing a pair of porn blue jeans and sneakers. Pay back with you yeah.

Barney Manhattan David Brown Barneys Taylor America Avenue Writer Instagram Washington Madison Seventy Five Million Dollar Thirty Million Dollars Five Hundred Dollars Four Hundred Dollars Seventy Five Percent Thousand Dollar
The Rotterdam Film Festival: Champion of the avant garde

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:26 min | 1 year ago

The Rotterdam Film Festival: Champion of the avant garde

"Film festival has been showcasing the challenging the fresh on the unconventional treasures cinema has to offer. It has a reputation for being the most serious and of film this year is no exception. It's director says people are hungry for something which is different from the ordinary something that gives them the question rather than the answer. Joining me now from Rotterdam is a film critic Tara Judah welcome back to multiple twenty four. Tara. Everyone says it's a serious film festival. What does that mean? That's a great question. I mean it serious insofar as they take films seriously. But actually, I think there's a lot of good humor in good fun in the festival as well. This year, there's been a lot in terms of the themes around feeling so it's kind of hashtag feel I f f and the idea of that is to kind of look into how we relate to human stories through the feelings that cinema can give us absence has been a really. A big theme. So there's been a low around kind of spy themes surveillance. What happens when the state's watching knew when things on there who stories don't get told whose voices a quietened? So this year the theme really has been I guess serious. But also playful I would say there's a playful element to the festival as well. Is there any intention that any of these films our ever intended for the mainstreamers is this the Sigler celebration of of of the margins of cinema. Actually, I think the festival does really well is straddled both of those extremes. So they do have the kind of big films in the sense of Brady Quebec's new Volks looks which stars Natalie Portman, you know, there's the new Clinton e film highlife, which has got Robert Patterson, and it said, they're all some of those big headline films here. But it does also look very much to the God. And I think what the festival does very well is to champion the God. So it's moving from cinema as a mainstream form of entertainment all the way through. To it's kind of more moving image, gallery installation. And that's another thing the festival does is that it also has installations alongside the film program. What I found fascinating is it this film festival has been around for nearly fifty years. How is it managed to sustain so long? I think that's a great question. And I think some of these festivals reading they really do have a legacy and part of that is to do with the fact that they all building and identity Rotterdam really does have its own identity. Like, you say there is something about how seriously it takes cinema. But also how much it's willing to champion films from all across the world. So even though, you know, there's been, you know, obviously American films in the mix as well as fantastic remaining film. I do not care if we go down in history as Burian, and that's a really amazing title, but you know, the films that you wouldn't necessarily get to see in other places, and I think a lot of programs critics and film fans know that if they come to wrote to them they going to want to something that they might not see elsewhere. So one thing tower that if you didn't get a chance to go to them, but you fancied. Enjoying something from the festival. What would you what would you recommend we try and help out? So I would say there's a couple of films that are just absolutely must not MRs. I've I've just seen a fantastic Swedish film called CoCo de coca. And this is a kind of fairy tale nightmare, which I really do think. We'll get picked up internationally. So I think that will be a chance to see it. And it's all about the kind of cycles of grief, and how they descend into the innocence of hell, it's absolutely hilarious. But also, really frightening mixes Joan brilliantly, and I'd say definitely lookout for

Rotterdam Tara Judah Director Natalie Portman Sigler Brady Quebec Robert Patterson Burian Joan Clinton Fifty Years
"avant garde" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"avant garde" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Modern art, popular music, and avant garde novelist modern mathematics classic and modern philosophy of lots the first and the use of the letter v. Author us by the protesters against the former government which referred to the deputy. Meaning he lives. Well, what do you think about tomorrow Denard who said that when told by the law director the law department of the city Cincinnati? We can't fire these cops because it's illegal because the contract says we have to have graduated punishment one told that we can't fire these cops. And if we do we're going to be sued it's going to cost us millions of dollars to my Denard sees was such anger and disgust that. She said that's okay with her. She wants to city bankrupt before they want those cops wearing a badge ever again. She wants to destroy the city in order to save it. Well, remember this. I learned from a simple Batman cartoon, just use this. Because it is the best fanatic is a person who having once lost gold doubled their efforts. Why don't you want to get the Justice? Why do we want to get the truth remission is the mission? The revolution is the revolution. Does ban. The letter z. You can't say Z anymore. You can't say the N word if a such a bad word, why do blacks use it so much because again, that's a fallacy that I heard even back in the sixties when someone explained to me that because you are the majority race you are the racist. People the other minorities cannot be racist. That's a bunch of crap Africa. And you know, and I even went to a school that was seventy five eighty percent black. So I was certainly not in the majority. What does that mean that if I'm in those situations that I'm not.

Denard Africa Cincinnati director seventy five eighty percent
Trump says only "FAKE NEWS" is the "enemy of the people"

24 Hour News

02:57 min | 2 years ago

Trump says only "FAKE NEWS" is the "enemy of the people"

"To conduct operations against anyone trying to undermine the elections earlier today. Avant-garde Trump says she didn't agree with their fathers assertion that the media is the enemy of the people in a tweet this afternoon. President Trump Roach. Crackly said, no, he went on to, right. It's the fake news, which is a large percentage of the media that is the enemy of the people, press secretary, Sarah Sanders defense president stance, blaming the media for inflaming tensions repeatedly the media resorts to personal attacks without any content other than to incite anger. I'm Tim Maguire. The Federal Reserve's, leaving its benchmark interest rate unchanged while signaling further gradual rate hikes in the coming months ahead as long as the economy stays healthy the Fed's decision left the central bank's key. Short-term rate at one point seven five percent to two percent which is the level hit in June when the fed boosted the rate. For a second. Time this, year, in June the fed, projected. Four rate hikes this, year and private economists expect the next hike to occur at the September meeting in, a brief, policy statement the fed notes, a strengthening labor market economic activity growing at a strong rate and inflation that's reached the central bank's target of two. Percent annual gains One of, Iceland's top whaling company says it stopped hunting minke whales this year the decision, by Gert is, in response to, a new. Government regulation that's enlarge the protected area for baleen whales the owner of the whaling company says obeying the new, rule would have required sailing out further than normal to harpoon the. Whales and that to do so wasn't. Economically viable he says the temporary halt to whaling comes about a month, earlier, than expected and they'll now, focus on improving their boats for next year's whaling season in a statement the international fund for animal welfare call the, development very good news for minke whales and for Iceland but no did the country it's simply imported minke whale meat from Norway more fallout for, CBS chief les, Moonves over sexual misconduct, allegations against him AP entertainment editor Oscar wells Gabriel reports another academic facility is taking steps to distance himself from The media center at the university of southern California is named after les. Moonves says, and his wife TV host Julie Chen but the school says it, has stopped using that name for now dean willow days says in light of these sexual, misconduct allegations against moon vez the Annenberg school for, communication and journalism will suspend use of the facilities, official name the dean says. The request was made, by moon vis and Chen who is USC graduate Moonves graduated from Bucknell university, this week the, school cut nearly, all its. References on its website linking to moon viz I'm Oscar wells Gabriel Hi it's Jamie progressive's. Employee of the month two months in a. Row leave a.

President Trump Roach Federal Reserve International Fund For Animal Iceland Julie Chen Oscar Wells Gabriel University Of Southern Califor Tim Maguire Moonves Dean Willow Jamie Progressive Press Secretary Crackly Sarah Sanders President Trump Gert Bucknell University
"avant garde" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:33 min | 2 years ago

"avant garde" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some contemporary electronic music from both sides of the atlantic from new york that this is groove freaky heavy is electronic the name music of the song comes from from a trio an album called by non one keen oh tricks point never one of whom we've heard the a work fair of amount daniel of lapatin in the past and and that's the german occasional producer and pianist others nils from the albums called this garden music of delete actually began as and an that improvisation again is freaky is which is before not something that we generally attract associated coldness with electric poll from music the british but producer on this edition of known new as floating sounds points we'll get a chance real to name hear sam lots sheppard of different types and of that's coming electric from his music record old called and alenia new going back on harold this edition budd of and new sounds brian we're eno listening to in various one of their collaborations species of electronic from circa music nineteen eighty those two all pieces the way up to this really much more recent come music from by the digital non keen realm you end know there's including there's nothing another that three a composer way collaboration from fifty between the israeli years ago composer would have shy recognized ben sore as a jonny quote unquote greenwood musical of instrument the band radio being used but of course and there's a a lot gypsy of electronic brass band music that from does the start indian state with of rajastan instruments we'll also and hear some in music the case of of the from composer the electric martha violist mc martha most book of her music and starts some electro with the viola acoustic music because she for is violin the oldest and electronics her latest from release paula is matthew called no sudden ordinary i'm window john shafer hope and you'll stay it with is us for electro this edition acoustic of music new sounds that begins we'll with begin the sound of her in electric england viola with the this producer piece known is called as virtual floating points corridor we've on new heard sounds him in the past in collaboration with a leading gonella musician from morocco but here he is on his own he is sam sheppard records under the name floating points and this is from his album called alenia will hear a piece called nest poll which represents the kind of avant garde fringe of electronic dance music it would be really hard to danced almost anything on this record and in fact i don't think that's even the point there's nothing resembling a steady groove in this poll in this piece you actually get several different rhythms that that are going concurrently really interesting work from floating points and then we'll hear from from one tricks point never which is the work of daniel lopatin and a couple of colleagues he's based here in new york and he too takes the language of electric dance music but twists and fractures it and he's a composer as well and so there's there's a lot of kind of getting into the form and the structure of this music and breaking it apart and building it up in different ways we'll hear a piece from from him called freaky is that is from the album garden of delete by one oh tricks point never i this music from england's floating points on new sounds oh oh oh.

new york
"avant garde" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"avant garde" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"News the beginning of stanley kubrick's two thousand one space odyssey a big black monolith appears in the african desert leaving a group of prehistoric eight men standing there baffled that was pretty much the reaction that greeted the film itself when it premiered fifty years ago this week nobody was quite sure what to make it the critics were harsh with variety dismissively saying two thousand one is not a cinematic landmark it's hard to imagine being more wrong you see even if you don't like the movie and i don't particularly the one thing that's undeniable is that it's a cinematic landmark not only was it the number one box office movie in nineteen sixty eight young people flocked to it to have their minds blown but an international polls two thousand one routinely ranks as one of the top ten films of all time an avant garde art film dressed in hollywood money it unknowingly for shattered the future of movies as a driven blockbusters i saw it again a few days ago inspired by michael benson's terrific new book space odyssey stanley kubrick arthur c clarke and the making of a masterpiece though benson is afflicted with a friend calls the stanley syndrome he never stops telling you that kubrick is a genius and a perfectionist his book is filled with nifty stories my favorite is when the control freak director asks lloyd's of london if they could ensure him in case nasa spoil.

stanley kubrick michael benson director lloyd hollywood london fifty years
"avant garde" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"avant garde" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"I dot com vodka trump took to twitter an and said just saw oprah's empowering inspiring speech last night's golden globes let's all come together women and men and say times up ashdod united people lost their minds you don't get to do that ivanka trump debt when your father is who your father is settled down everybody juice because donald trump said you can grab him wherever you want nats okay doesn't mean avant garde believes that no it doesn't mean that she's not mortified when she hear stories of her father's behaviour alleged behavior and you'd or no the conversations that she's had with him you abbott absolutely no idea has i wish shame on everybody who went after her for for what what is she supposed to do take to twitter and say screw women everywhere you know and i think you're right the moment we start telling people which causes they can fight for are we get into some dangerous territory i'll and just because who their related to i mean come on just because your dad at has a completely different philosophy on how to treat people than you do i'm just speculating it doesn't mean that you're okay with added to eat it doesn't change your love for him either you can still love your father and support him and him handle things wildly different than you handle thing as may be it gives you even more of a voice hey i've seen their first hand i know what goes on i've seen this happen and i've seen the trail of destruction that it can leave and someone's life and i still yeah and loudly proclaim that this has got to stop burien weekday mornings at 1000 kfi am 640 more stimulating fred over two i have not been to a you'll get in foothill that is a great i am i go there just for breakfast tomorrow you would too i.

oprah ashdod donald trump avant garde twitter abbott burien