24 Burst results for "Ava Duvernay"

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:26 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"To be in production walk and then we were you film. I think it took you like thirty days to film that movie which is kind of nuts right. I mean to make a whole feature. Yeah took you thirty days feels like oh it just took you thirty days or you had only thirty. Hey maybe that's what you had. That's what i had like thirty one or thirty two days or something like that so to make that work you have to probably spend twice as much time like every minute of the day right like planning that out in super detail. Yeah yeah a lot of heavy prep and really important to have people around you. Who know what they're doing. The challenge with a period piece as one can imagine listening is. If i'm making a movie about now. I can go out. Find a location and if there's a scene in grocery store. I just walked into the grocery store and i shoot. Yeah if i'm making a movie about you know the sixties. I've gotta find a grocery store that still looks like the sixties or change into the sixties every single thing. That's on the shelf to look like the sixers and every actor has to be dressed like they're in the sixty so i can't put clothes off the store a everything has to be made and rented and so that's why period pieces cost so much and that's why the twenty million goes quickly because every every street light sign shoe car. Everything has to be period so the way that this film came about. I always trace back to that random flight. That david hat on the film before. And i know that that's not rand for me. That's a part of the design of why i am supposed to be doing what i'm doing and how things fall into place believed that everything's for a reason and so that that set was really intense with a spirit of this is meant to be even when selma came out. It was an is a widely praised. But you were not nominated for best director. And i know that this is kind of a sense of question but did it matter or you hurt by that. I wasn't hurt by not getting best director. And i'll tell you why. I was hurt by david. Getting best actor nomination for him not to be nominated. That was i. Remember the moment Just that was the moment where i was really have to wind knocked out of me. Yeah the reason why wasn't hurt by getting best director is because statistically speaking there was no way for that to happen and people are like what are you talking about. I just i worked in the industry. As a publicist. I've done oscar campaign and it's a campaign. it is a campaign and it is a very specific route to the nomination. And it just wasn't going to happen. I do not know at that. Time did not know any of those people and they did not know me the academy electors the directors branch right. I did not go to film school. I did not interface with them. I did not live in the same places. I did not speak the same film language. I i know them and they didn't know me on top of that. No black women director get ever been nominated in. The history of academy which at that point is many decades. So that's against me. So when i say no i wasn't. I wasn't pushed out of shape about it people to remember what the times were. There was no precedent for to ever happen so i was not delusional enough to think. Oh i'm gonna be the one. I'm curious about what you think makes a great director. D do you think that great directors are great because they can get actors to give them their best. Work is at a definition of what makes director strong. No i don't think so. Because i think i mean i think that's a part of it but i mean you can have a great actor give a fantastic performance in a film. That's leaks not working. We've all seen that For me it's a film that i can look at a film and say oh. That person got their vision out like they right. They told the story that they wanted to tell. Like i made a phone call to reclaim time. I look at that film and for all of the beautiful experience. Czyz that i had on it and for the beauty that i think is in the film. It's not my film right. It was the first time. I made a film for a massive studio and went through a process. Kind of like group filmmaking. You know what. I mean like a lot of people with a lot of opinions. We have a lot more power than you do. And ultimately you compromise and you get to the end and you say okay. I think this will be okay and sit back and say okay. That wasn't quite what i meant. Not quite what. I started out wanting to do and that that was okay. That's what that experience was for me in my career. So many directors go through. There are some there. There are many people around the world that continue to hear from about the film. You know in ways that are nursing unnecessary and beautiful. But i look at the film and i remember the process and it was a process. That wasn't all my process. So i think that you know the successful films. The film that the filmmaker can say that's more. That is more of what i had in mind. That is then. It's not and the closer you can get to that being kind of one hundred percent is now you're in freedom land and that's what i experienced on. I will follow because no one cared middle of nowhere. Where because no one cared selma because really cared. They cared but they really let me have that that it was still yours right. Yeah i thrive in smaller environments. And so after that went onto the thirteenth to do when they see us in spaces where i could get one hundred percent of what i wanted out out and so that's my deficit. Is i kind of have to. I have to have room to move and can't really make movies by committee. I can make movies with collaborators. I can hear you know insight and criticism and ideas. I can't really like give up parts. I can't it's hard for me. Could you imagine working.

twenty million thirteenth twice david thirty percent thirty one one hundred percent thirty two days first time selma thirty days every single thing one hundred oscar every actor sixties sixty sixers
"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:12 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"Manage that. I read an interview gave And you talked about after you won. Best director sundance. This was your quote you said. There was no golden ticket that unlocked the riches of hollywood for me. There were no studio meetings. They were studio calls. They were offers to do things. I mean you had one this incredibly prestigious award and you didn't return to la with like an inbox just jammed with offers. No no i didn't. There were some things that came through. I got an opportunity to make a short film for a fashion brand and while very different than the trajectory of my white male counterparts who had won the award years before me who basically slid into movie deals. I found myself making a short afterward for brand. I was before it got to make something on someone else's money and i loved what i made the peace for product called the door. But it was much different than you know. One of my fellow filmmakers at sundance. Who won the screenwriting award that year. Who within six months Had a deal to direct the same drastic park. You know there were differences but You know kept going. We can you do you. Were not originally meant to be the director of the film that that really Became the first major film that you you directed terms of budget. Which was selma. You originally not meant to be the director of that film right. No i think eighth the eighth seventh or eighth or something and not like seventh or eighth director that they called six or seven director. Who was actually had a contract to make the movie like that. Many people had dropped out and part of it was because the budget was so small right. Yeah the vegetables so small twenty million dollars or something million dollars. Imagine i mean. I just told you what i was making films with. Four so imagine someone says twenty million dollars to make a film some like. Are you crazy. Yes i can do i can do. I have no idea. But i promise you i can do. And of course that opportunity only came to me because of david who called you because he ridge or screenplay on on an airplane. When was in your film middle of nowhere. He was cast in selma and had what happened. How did he get you involved in in some of the director. Who left the film before because of budget he had always knew and his mother rest in peace had been very much champion of him playing dr king. He always knew that. Somehow he's gonna play dr king so he is something that's been with him for many many years so the king movie is moving around town. He thinks the story is that he auditioned for it with another director and didn't get it and when the director before auditioned him he was cast as dr king but when that director. I don't know why pretending like it's it's literally daniel. Okay i mean what the heck why we can go right. There's a y'all google now guy names. So when lee daniels left the them basically david being scrappy the same scrappy guy. That's gonna take a stranger on the plaintiffs steak dinner to advocate to invest in a film for a woman. He doesn't know and in films not in yeah said just because the directors left. I can't still play dr king. So he says to the producers. I can find another director. Who will do it for twenty million dollars. Can you consider still making the film. And i can still by dr king so cut to this woman he just worked with on this film one sundance. He says to me. You're going to need to rewrite this film and make it for twenty million dollars. Would you consider doing it. I never saw myself making a civil rights drama. It's just a. It's a kind of movie that i would never watch. And he said what could you make one that you would watch. And i thought that's interesting and having not a lot of options on the table at that time and having that challenge from him i started become. Harry attracted to the idea of doing it. And so i said i will take a swing at the script and i will try and the whole deal was if i could write a script that can be made for twenty million. That was good. They would make you had to rewrite the entire script. And from what i understand. I mean the. The king family owns the rights to his speeches. You couldn't you had to recreate his speeches without using the same words. The king family doesn't have rights to his speeches. An estate the estate has the right to the speeches in the estate had already given the rights to the speeches to another filmmaker who was much more famous than i was. Because nobody knew who i was. You know who. It was stephen spielberg. Look at this guy. Well researched yes steven spielberg at the rights to the speeches in film at that time and So in order to tell the story the way around it was to approximate or to rewrite. Dr king speeches easy. No problem right. How did you do that. I don't know i. I remember writing it. I remember doing the story. I which needed to be changed from something. That was a lot of kind of trying to have political intrigue. It was a lot of stuff with the president and to really imbue it with a sense of black people on the ground and selma. The film was called selma. Not president johnson right so it was about taking what i'd learn as african american studies majors. Ucla would i learned as a daughter of my father who is from lowndes county alabama Which you know sits right. Two minutes from selma what i knew about. All of my summers. Growing up visiting my father's family in alabama in the summers and this poor all of that into the screenplay and then afterward i tackle the speeches and i remember submitting it and getting a really fast answer back. We're going to run a budget on it but this is fantastic and if we can get this down to twenty million you're going.

stephen spielberg steven spielberg twenty million Two minutes twenty million dollars six daniel david sundance seven hollywood google One dr king Four Harry million dollars seventh Ucla johnson
"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

05:49 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"Com slash host. This message comes from. Npr sponsor wise and a one to one tutoring alternative to online classes. Where you can learn face to face online. Get help with tackling new subjects and career skills or just catching up weisan lists thousands of personal instructors in over three hundred subjects available for live individualized lessons with their online learning platform. Heads w y z. a. N. t. dot com to find your perfect instructor. Love it or your first hour is free because it wise aunt we take learning personally. This message comes from npr sponsor e-trade. A bald. eagle isn't bald. A shooting star isn't a star and e-trade isn't just trading. There's lots of ways to put your money to work with e. trade from saving for retirement to starting to invest and they have a team of financial professionals to give you support. So you can be confident. Your money is working hard for you to get started today. Visit each trade dot com slash. Npr for more information e-trade securities llc member setback. Hey welcome back to how i built this from. Npr ause so it's two thousand twelve and abe devante has submitted her latest film. The one with david yellow to the sundance film festival and by the way. It's not the first time she submitted something to sundance. She's done that several times before and been rejected every time but this time with the film middle of nowhere i got in and got into the top category dramatic competition and ended up winning. You won best actor. Well i think even up until that point like you were running a publicity company and you really good at it and you were really successful and but winning best director at a film festival like that. That's working at the top of of of your craft like did you. What did you remember thinking when that happened. I remember thinking that. I should think about trying to really do this fulltime. I would think so. Yeah so i remember thinking. Wow this is i cannot believe. I've won this in that. If i'm ever going to do this. The time is now to to try to strike out and do this time. So i can be lynn shelton and maybe make a film a year that i don't have to pay for and that was truly. I thought gosh. I could just support myself on movies. That's the first time. That idea came to my head. And i remember giving myself six months to wean myself off my business and give my clients to other pr firms and just kind of transition the business into being more of a film distribution entity because at that point i had distributed two of my own films and i thought if nothing else if this fails i know i can distribute films other filmmakers if my films don't continue on i can help other people's films continue on so that's how my filmmaking and our business of a race started to become really intertwined. It's so interesting that i'm sure. At that time. There were people who interviewed you and were surprised to learn that. You weren't a fulltime filmmaker or that you were the publicity company but when you think about it like what you were doing as a publicist was shaping stories and telling stories and that's what you do as a filmmaker so actually as you explain your evolution from one to another it makes total sense because they're actually slightly different versions of the same thing. Yeah for sure. It's crafting story Yeah i agree the main thing about being a directorship Vince people or inspire people to wanna do the thing that you need done and through it all talking to actors which is a big part of if you ask any director young director. What is the piece that they're scared of. Almost all of them will say talking to the actor but it is your job to talk to the actor and get out of that other human being with their own history. Mind and thoughts and heart. What you think will service the whole project so talking to the actor. I mean it's not like talking to grandma like these are the actor has their own like some of them are warm and fuzzy and some of them aren't but for me publicity. Prepared me to talk to the actor to deal with actors to be comfortable around. I think of a director as like a ceo and a o. Same time like you are running operations but you are in charge and responsible for everything. Yeah i think. The i think of the director has the mayor of a small town because a film has every element of a small town. I mean a fire department. A hospital the medic. You know what i mean. The some people were construction. The some people working with the food. There's someone that's in charge of the bathrooms. Someone that's in charge of the stuff that's going to come after the visual effects color the actors the i mean it is literally you know. It's it's dozens of departments of everyone doing their little piece. Just like in a town like everyone has to know what we're doing but also feel i like people to feel free to contribute beyond their role. If you have an idea say it..

two six months lynn shelton first hour david yellow first time sundance today over three hundred subjects dozens of departments sundance film festival Npr llc one each trade a year t. dot com thousands of personal instruct of ways npr
"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:24 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"The script on the rest of the flight. Give back to the.

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

12:57 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"It was just something that you really enjoy it. And it was a passion. I've really enjoyed it. It was a passionate the reason why is because there was no precedent for sustainable livelihood as a black woman filmmaker as recently as two thousand twelve. I'm i'm seriously telling you this is not humility or saying golly gee so i never thought like literally i could look at no one to say. She is making a full living in supporting her family alone on making movies as recently as two thousand twelve i. It was a woman named gene appearance. Would who was formative in that. I knew her personally. Newroz rounder at work. I was a publicist on a couple of things and she was actually she and her husband. Were pretty instrumental encouraging. Me and my script writing early on. I was they were my clients but there were two of them and they were black filmmakers and she had made a great film called eleven basketball and they were out pitching their things and making work but yet and still you know for many years in between the films that they were making and she was the only one i knew like one person so for me what i could see was a woman named linda. Shelton white woman out of seattle was filmmaker who made very tiny films that were so could and she somehow made a film almost every year and i thought oh maybe i can be like lynn shelton and make a little film. Every year that goes to festivals like. She gets to travel with her film. There's a review in the paper. It's nice i. I wanted to be like her still thinking. I will have to have a job. I will have to have a job. That was the extent of it. You went on to make a documentary about the good life cafe where you had performed back in college and then i guess right after that you you start to work on an entirely different kind of film a narrative which was based on your experience of taking care of your aunt anthony's who was who'd been sick with with cancer A few years earlier right. Yeah yeah she had had a recurrence of her. Breast cancer was like a stage. To the first time she had a Surgery and then came back six years later which was the cruel part of your in five years. You're out of the woods and then like six year came back at a stage. Four and i remember 'cause we moved into a house together after she got diagnosed. I gave up my apartment. I moved her out of her apartment and we moved to an apartment near the beach in an area that she always wanted to live in long beach because at that point she was basically given a death sentence. A certain amount of time to live. I want to make sure that she was in a place that she found beautiful and enjoyed and so the film basically tells a story of a young woman dealing with the loss of her her beloved aunt. And you named it after. I guess you named after the youtube i will follow. So what what. Tell me about that connection. The connection is that denise. My aunt was a big youtube fan and really passed on that love of them to me. I remember you know she. One of the things about her is that she loved things that people in her family and in her community didn't necessarily have access to to love. I won't say that in love it to sit in here. They didn't know it. I think they would have loved it if they would've had access to it and felt like it was something that they were exposed to but she exposed herself to it in somehow she loved rock and of course she loved all black music too but she had a broader palette anyway within that she loved you two. She took me to my first amnesty international concert crap seats because she didn't have any money in a concert hall. Think it was the coliseum and you comes out and she said listen to this song amtrak all white people and like this is very white environment. Okay and i was not used to that. She worked on up there. We're in there and she said listen to this song. It's about martin. Luther gay pride because like it's martin luther king. They're playing martin. Luther king like yeah listen to it and listen to it get emotional occupy right now thinking about it so bano in the hedge and larry. They're up there rocking out to pride. I'm trying to catch the lyrics. I'm trying to. And i start to hear the story. And i started to put it together and i was like i think i think i think this is about martin luther king and that was it hook line and sinker. Can't tell me nothing about you to love him. Love him love him so the title of the film which is about my last year. Living with my aunt denise before she passed is entitled. I will follow which is a famous utusan and from what i understand eva. The the film was self distributed right and am curious about this idea because i think a lot of people who are not in the film industry. Don't quite understand how this works so when you say you are self distributed. Does that mean that you are literally sending it out like sending out the films to theaters to screen like what does that entail. Yeah with liken it to someone who bakes a cake in their kitchen and then has to somehow get it on the shelf of the rosary. Store your lady. Who makes cakes. But how do you get it in the walmart. Yeah so that's distribution and so independent film was a homemade cake and theaters are walmart's big chains walmart's now it's got to be much easier for that homemade baker to get their goods in a small local bakery small independent theater. Yeah so that's what we did so we would go to them and we would talk about the film and try to get the film in these theaters and there's a lot of segregation in those theaters. A lot of It's another part of the puzzle of hollywood. That's very close to people of color particularly black people. 'cause they're not owned by us and you have to trust and hope that the person that you're pitching story to sees the value in story so if i'm pitching Story about a black woman who is dying of cancer and her niece and they both love you to in. They're just talking about life or death issues in the house. Which is what. I will follow us. Few don't think that you have an audience for that. If you're not sure how your audience will take to it then. You won't book because you have seats to sell right business. And so that distribution is we take this film and we somehow get into the local bakery into the bigger chains and so that was what we did store by store cake by cake hand to hand and so one of the things we tapped into was all the beautiful black film festivals around the country who had supported me as a filmmaker early on with the short films. Early documentary I went to them and said look. You're the only person i know in boston boston. Black film festival urban world in new york. I don't know people out. But i know you. Would you help me get this film out which you helped me. Present this film and so start to put together a coalition of black film festivals that not only supported my work outside of their festival because they had lists of film lovers blackcomb lovers. They had relationships with theaters where they show their festivals. They had marketing apparatus around the festival. So i was able to convince those festivals to pull the trigger on their marketing apparatus. Festival was not in session and to split the prophets of whatever. I made at the box office with them. And so that's how. I created the african american film festival releasing movement which we call the firm and basically a firm becomes like this sort of independent distribution company. I think they're sending out indie films to theaters and festivals and later of course which will get to affirm becomes array. Which is would it's known as today And that was covered on cnn. And you know new york times and this new way of distributing black film in a very kind of crass rooted way eventually you know not stopping knocking on doors. I'm eventually you know eventually got us into amc theaters. Yeah but yeah also accepting and really thinking about where other spaces where we can show film. Why can't i show film at the museum. They have a screen. Why can't i shall film at the university. Why can't i show him film at the you know black women sorority rotary club. Whatever so started to count those screens. That film i will follow ended up getting some pretty great reviews. Roger ebert was basically telling everyone to go see it. I think he said it was one of the best films he'd seen about the death of a loved one. And then after that you start working under her next film called middle of nowhere. And i wanna ask you about about funding for that because as as i understand it you were financing these films with your own money like i will follow you. Use the money saved for downpayment house so when you started a torque middle of nowhere did you. Did you also sell finance or did you try to raise money. Yeah the second one. I use profits from the first one plus my landlord in my office building said oh i have some friends who might invest and so he collected twenty thousand ten thousand fifty thousand from some people. He knew that were doing pretty well. I mean like not film people just people who had extra twenty grand despair and we put together like two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in made middle of nowhere. That film was also the first time you worked with david yellow. How did you guys meet as you come together. Well this is a very rare example of meeting a phone call from an actor. Saying i've read the script he called. You have the blue one day. I knew who. He was as an actor but he wasn't huge. At that time. I mean i knew he was because i know all the black actors but he had been like he had had a small part. One scene in lincoln spielberg's lincoln. You know he played like the bad guy in planet of the apes you know. He had had like small roles in good films. Yeah he had been on a plane to do looping which is additional dialogue recording eighty are on planet of the apes he was flying from. La to toronto to do. Eighty are in sitting next to a man so strange who says oh my gosh is this you. The man opens his laptop and he's been watching on his laptop. A show that david was in in the uk called spooks spy. Show and david psycho. Yeah that's you know. Thank you thank you get to talking in the guy in about a half hour and says can i ask you. Ask you advice onto something. That's come my way this weird thing that's come is like i have nothing to do with entertainment industry. But i've been asked by my friend to invest in this independent film. Should i david psycho. Bad idea never invest. Don't invest in a film. You know who is he sees he said. Yeah it's by this woman display women. I thought you might know. Her name rene just a week before he had seen me on. Cnn talking about a firm which was our distribution thing. He said i just saw her on. Cnn he said. Can i read the script. So the guy gives them the script. He reads.

Roger ebert youtube twenty thousand eleven basketball walmart Shelton lynn shelton five years middle of nowhere linda new york david yellow two martin uk toronto amtrak seattle second one six year
"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:55 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"That real people made movies that they did not appear right also. I think the big piece of the puzzle is and this is a big piece of it. I don't think i've ever articulated. But i've i've thought about for myself. I had no dreams of the outcome other than making a movie like that was. It wasn't let me make a movie to get famous kid academy award to be rich to be famous right. That was not in my head and the reason why wasn't in my head is because There was nobody doing that right like there was say nobody but there was nobody that looked like me. There were very few black women making films. At the time there were a couple i knew by name and i'd seen that they'd made a film but no one had gone on to great fame and acclaim and all of the things so i think one of the core pieces of the journey was it started from such a pure place just wanting to make a movie and to tell a story. It was all about that and it wasn't about the outcome or the things that will come after. I think now these days it takes a lot more because you can see we're out there. There's there's a good number nice number of us he's going to be like shonda or isa and what did they do. And how can i get to that level and do those things. I didn't have that. So i think about it. I remember when i was twenty one and i I was an intern. Npr never been done any radio in my life. I didn't know anything about it. Listening and And the way i learned how to do it was like by cutting reel to reel with a razor blade and doing it really badly and overtime. I learned how to do that right. The technical side. How did you start to learn the technical side of making movies. Well that's that's a good question you know for me early on. I had to embrace what i did know how to do. Not be intimidated by what i didn't know how to do. And i had been around enough. Filmmakers as a publicist to see that not off. Filmmakers were technically proficient that the core of what made a great filmmaker. Did you know the story. Not did you know the lynn's did you know you know the technical aspects but there a lot of filmmakers out there who are story in performance focused and less technically focused. I thought the most important thing is story. And all these people around me or supposed to know that stuff. So if i can write the story than i will be the leader of the story because it came out of my mind and no one will know more about it than i and from there. I made sure that. I surrounded myself with people who did know their jobs and one of the things that i learned from running my own business was to never be shy about saying i don't know and that that especially for women and for women of color black women you know To feel like he won't be taken seriously. If you don't know everything you know To feel like you cannot ask a question. Were all things that i had to combat but the reason why i felt entitled to do it is because i saw white white men do. Let's see why guys all the time don't know what their shelter doing but you know what they do have confidence get out there and say i want to figure it out and i'm sure i'm sure i'll be okay shocking. Figure this out and so especially when you're independent filmmaker you really putting together small crew crews of people who will work for whatever money you can give them and so there's a lot more grace there because everyone's kind of learning together so that's what i did in the early years. Hugh made your first film. I think it was for short film saturday. Night life in two thousand five And it's twelve minutes. I haven't seen it. I ve been looking for it. It's hard to find ways to make things disappear well. Well let's talk about it then just for a moment Tell with from what i understand. The story was when you were a little girl. Your mom address you up and in listen to people Compliment and your sisters is. That was a film about the film was about. Yeah i told my mom. I wanted to make a short film in. Try to make something. I'd been taking kind of these extension classes at ucla Film extension classes. Where you would you know the weekend courses on two days to talk about how to make a short film that kind of thing and so decided it was gonna make a short film. And i was asking my mom. I need to figure out a little story to tell. And she reminded me about this which is basically that she when she before. She met my dad when we were little. She was really really struggling as a single mom struggling with money struggling with her confidence everything the way that she would cheer herself up was she would dress us up. Greece's down now the greasing down is important so our skin shine so vassil lean on their little brown faces in arms and chubby legs. Put us in our patent. Leather shoes are matching dresses. Because me and my two sisters so there were three of us do our hair take us in the car and hardly any gas to the alpha beta with was grocery store and we would go there and she would justice all up just to get a cup of noodles or a bag of chips or whatever she could afford and she would do. That makes me emotional. She would do that because she knew that her girls were so beautiful that someone would say. Look at those girls. They're so pretty. You're doing a good job and she by her pack gum or bottle of soda or whatever it was. We'd get in the car we'd split it in. We drive home. Get ready for bed and just go to school the next day but that was something that she did because she could get someone to say. You're okay you're doing it and to see her. So that's the short. It was a single mom who woke up. Who's having a hard time. She just up the girls who took him to the store and it was the things that were said to her in the store and she drove home. And i had no idea what i was doing. All i knew is a new how to hustle up getting a grocery store. We gotta store to let us shoot in and I think i made the whole thing like five grand or something. But i made it in. You're not pitching this to the grocery stores a student film right. You were just saying. I'm making a film or do you remember how was a grown woman with a pr firm a win. I made it in. Had no clue how to edit it together. I remember. I showed a friend of thought about this since it probably happened. I showed a friend of mine who made independent.

twelve minutes Hugh three two days saturday Greece two sisters isa first film shonda twenty one one next day single mom ucla life in two thousand five one of the core pieces five grand noodles
"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

02:27 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"Like this and so that really catalyzed the idea of of china make some films when we come back in just a moment however made her first twelve minute movie and how a chance meeting on an airplane would change the trajectory of her career. Stay with us guys. And you're listening. To how i built this from. Npr.

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

06:41 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"For every major studio in hollywood. I mean as you kind of went on your own One of the things. I'm always curious about is how people get customers in the early days. Did you have to go out and and kind of pitch yourself or or things kind of coming in through word of mouth. Yeah you know some of that idea of you know. This is a young black woman. And i worked on. You know black stuff and lady stuff anything to do with women anything to do with youth animation and so that's basically how i started in that business was coming in really nicely and so and yeah we would pitch we pitch stuff send out. Proposals rarely cold. I had those context but but yeah it was a constantly. That business is constantly china. Make sure you have enough business And that you're servicing those clients so they'll come back again and were you. I mean were you like also managing like press junkets for for stars. You know when come you will see. You would be the person with them at times while they would do the five minute tv interview after interview after interview. Yep that's my job. I do red carpets. That's why whenever. I walk on a red carpet now. I have so much respect for the people who hard work is very hard work a red carpet most people who are notable who are asked to go on a recarpet. They walk out there thinking. I'm star like this or this is my moment or i have to do the carpet. You know my gosh. I don't wanna do it or whatever and people were yelling your name and you're doing the whole thing but you gotta think back to two weeks. Before when that recarpeted was constructed immediately alert was written. It was sent out everyone. That's on that carpet yelling. Your name was booked. Confirmed directions had to be sent to them. They arrived they had to be put in their places often times. They fight over their place. I wanna stand here. No i'm here. The publicist they're trying to wrangle. That you know the red carpet company that has to come and put down the red carpet. Put up the stanton's put up the lights. There's a whole industry around this the hair and makeup and the hotels that participate in. I mean it's it's a machine and it's a You know it's a machine that's around the business of selling movies. And that's what i did. I i've always felt like a publicist has to have the same level of patients as like a realtor or even a talent agent in that they are servicing clients. Who can sometimes be really difficult right. Like if you're a realtor your client might blaine. You thousand doesn't sell for what they want. Or if your publicist the client might blame you. If they don't get as much publicity as they think they should get did you. How would you handle that kind of. I don't know. Are you just super patient. No i'm not patient at all. I didn't do that kind of publicity. So in your in your example like a real estate agent. That's so true. The real estate agent has to be the patient one. Because they're interfacing with the client. I would be considered a broker. I was the publicist for the film. Not the individual people. So i didn't have to deal with how you got your hair done and why you didn't like your sandwich and this person was mean to you and you don't like that question right. So my clients were studios in networks not individual people and that was by design because not patient. I'm not gonna tell you everything's okay if it's not. I'm not going to sit there and listen to your sad story when you're sad story is you. Don't like your sandwich saying. I would be the one that would be able to just have the straight talk with the client. You know what. I liken it to guy i was your. I'm not your mom. okay. I don't have to go home with you and be with you forever. You come over grandma's house you have a nice time. She sends you home after a certain period of time. That's what i was. I was with you for the period of this film. And when the film is over you go somewhere else so it allowed me to be transparent to be able to say what i meant and what we needed and just to talk straight and i found that that that really helped me as a director when you. I mean as 'cause. I know you worked with clint eastwood. Bill condon and a bunch of really well known directors and read that you were brought onto work to publicity for the film collateral michael mann film which was kind of a turning point for you and i used to think about what you wanted to do is that is that right. Yeah that was a big deal for me to be on the set of collateral. First of all it was just so cool the concept of the film but also said very hot actress at the time. Tom cruise jada pinkett jamie fox. A young javier bardem and it was just a exhilarating project work on but yeah something happened on this. That set i ice a couple of things. First of all he was using these digital cameras and it was the first time i'd ever seen a film shot on a digital camera. He was one of the first to use these digital cameras called vipers which could shoot through the night. You could see the depth of the night it would capture distance in the night which is why that film looks so milky and gorgeous and then also he was shooting in a part of town that i knew very well east. La shot a lot in east la with brown people and black people and the story had black people in it and brown people. And i thought. Wow he's shooting. Kind of like in the hoods that i know and i just began watching him thinking. Oh i i wanna do that. I've been on many sets before and it never really hit me like i want to do that. I'd been on sets before where i thought i could do. I could do what he's doing you know everyone's on a set watches now. I know people think that now because they're watching me on set and they'd be like i can do. I can totally do that. But i wasn't until i was on that set where i thought. Oh i want to do that. I want to use those cameras. I want to tell a story like this with actors.

michael mann Tom cruise javier bardem jamie fox five minute china jada pinkett blaine Bill condon first time clint eastwood One east la two weeks stanton First one hollywood things first
"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:07 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"Performing in front of other people. I think i think it's the artist to doesn't have nerves about the presentation of work. And so yeah definitely very nervous to get up there. I read that when you graduated You wanted to become a journalist. And at some point you actually went to to cbs to pursue this career path. And i was what like the mid thousand nine hundred ninety. What what were you assigned to do. Yes my senior year in college. I got an internship with cbs. Evening news with dan rather and connie chung based in la at the bureau And this is right. The time of the oj simpson trial and was an intern with very prestigious. Paid internship that. I was very excited about that i mean. Cbs big deal was like the high. There's a big big deal ninety huge deal. So that's the kind of thing you needed to move on and in space and did it and was assigned a juror. On the first day. I remember going you were assigned to what follow a juror on the oj simpson trial. You can follow them because they were sequestered but i had to sit outside of their house. 'cause obviously the that was a way to get breaking news. And what does that feel awkward. Weird yeah so. I was basically outside of this lady. I can't remember. I basically just set aside. Her house saw what was coming and going and like made notes. And i remember hating it and feeling like this is stupid and wrong. And i don't want to be doing this and and it really soured my appetite for news. So that was my last job in news so when you really of began your career then at this pointing and you're young woman graduate on you went into into film publicity. How did how did you. How did you get into that. Because i was really interested in media still from the the newsday's and Had heard that publicists shape the news. They they are involved with with media. Outlets so i was really interested in the media that time i went. I worked at a small studio for a while about a year. I was an assistant on a on. A publicist desk and then Went to an agency and worked in agency life where i was mom juggling multiple projects and this was all in the film and television space and hedge like it. Was it everything that you had imagined in more was were you. Did you feel like you were shaping stories. Yes i love publicity to this day. If i was not a film filmaker assist. I think about it as in terms of offering stories and i'm presenting stories and understanding the power of liberty. In that you know help me understand that you know everyone has a story. He just have to present it correctly. And it's giving me a lot of confidence in my own storytelling filmmaker whereas i'll talk to filmmakers. Who will sometimes be driven by was the sellable. Can i market this. I never think that way. Because i know you can sell market anything if you know how to do it which i do so yeah i i loved it and i still do and i'm so happy that i had the tool set. That was my time. Is a publicist was really my film school in so many ways. Yeah i guess you worked for a few different agencies for a couple of years and then when you were like like twenty seven You start your own agency and the story i read. Was that your dad. A marine was the one who encouraged to do like he kind of lead you to realize that that you you weren't getting paid enough is that is that how you ended up starting your own business. Yeah yeah that was one of the the steps in it. I talked with him about you. Know some of the projects that were coming into the agency that i was Where i was at the time there were coming to the agency because there was a young black publicists working there and they were you know black films films that were youth oriented that were coming into the agency or i was being used. And you were bringing those in. I was bringing some in or i was being a centerpiece of the pitch of the agency. Like this will be your day to day and look at her and she can do this. And i get in the meeting and i do my thing. And we'd get the business so yeah. It was a conversation with my father. Who got me thinking about the numbers. Because i was like. Oh i'm getting a nice salary. And he's yeah but it he never said it. I mean he was just such an elegant softspoken. lovely man. like i would've said cut to avis version. I said okay. Dummy. what are you doing. look at the money. you're bringing him but he just kind of walk compete through. It is so how much are the retainers like. How much do they pay. As roma's it's like ten thousand dollars a month he's like wow so you have you've brought in you've six clients that are at ten thousand dollars a month and i said he had. He's like so that's sixty thousand dollars a month. And i said yeah and he said. And how much do you get paid here. Ouch so seven hundred twenty thousand dollars. Not even sixty thousand dollars. How about that so so yeah it was. That was an eye opener and there was a woman who still working today by the name of jackie. Zan black woman who had one of the few black owned entertainment. pr firms at the time. Jackie chan handled films. Out of the east coast was another woman. Marcy devo who out small practice with to people. She did television in in los angeles and so there were these two women who i think. It's important to say their names. I saw doing and after my father had put that in my head i i looked for those examples and got to know them and it was really jackie chan. Who's very kind i remember. She gave me copies of letters of agreements early on with clients. She told me you know how to set rates and how to do some of that stuff really early on a and even early in my my own agency days we would share films. See what to the east. And i would do the west. She was very generous. And that way. And so yeah. I eventually started to film and television at home. Entertainment corporate crisis event Unit publicity strategy strategy got into marketing promotions. And eventually by the time i close my agency had.

sixty thousand dollars los angeles six clients two women seven hundred twenty thousand today Marcy devo sixty thousand dollars a month jackie chan ten thousand dollars a month connie chung oj simpson one twenty seven jackie dan Cbs roma Zan first day
"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:10 min | Last month

"ava duvernay" Discussed on How I Built This

"From npr. Is how built this show about. Innovators entrepreneurs idealists and the stories behind the movements. They built guy rise on the show today. How do renee took her skills. As a publicist writer director and entrepreneur and built a movement. That's changing how movies are made and who gets to make them when it comes to thinking about who is an entrepreneur. We often overlooked people who get their start in the creative arts thing about walt disney before he built what would become one of biggest media companies in history. He created the most iconic cartoon character in history but for his time. He was pretty unusual. Artists usually make their money by selling their art their acting skills their paintings their music their novels but over the past decade more and more creative types of started to take more control over how their work is used and in some cases to own and distribute and market their own work. This is how abdul rene has constructed her entire career. she's not only one of the most entrepreneurial creators hollywood but increasingly one of the most influential. Now you might think of as a director. Her documentary thirteenth. About mass incarceration in the united states was nominated for an academy award and her trauma when they see us. Based on an assault in central park and the wrongful conviction of black and latino teenagers made a huge impact when it was released in two thousand nineteen abras directed big budget films like a wrinkle in time and historical dramas like salma but her directing business is only one part of a much bigger enterprise even a movement that even do vernay has built from the ground up. She began her career. As a publicist and at age. Twenty seven started her own publicity agency. She self-financed her first films and because she had a background in marketing and knew how to network she was able to build her own distribution company today overseas campus. Just outside downtown. La that encompasses much of her work array is a production company a distributor of films a nonprofit education center a community event space and a resource center to help people of color get into the film. Industry fell in love with the arts at an early age for the first years of her life. She grew up in compton california and then moved to the nearby neighborhood of lynnwood and one of the most important people in her life was her aunt denise. She was a frustrated artist. Who loved music and fine arts and movies and didn't grow up in a time or in an environment that encouraged or celebrated that those interests in her so she became a nurse following in her mother's footsteps but always fostered her love of art as a a distant lover of it to fan And really exposed me to all kinds of things that i would not have. I don't believe i would have come across if if it hadn't been for her and it sounds like we'll talk about this later but Sounds like you particularly had a strong bond with her. Yup i mean she was. There were three of them who raised us. It was my mother. Her mother my grandmother and her sister. My aunt just a big big part of our lives and my two sisters came right after bay. So this is a lot of ladies a lot of that energy and i would go to my aunt's after school and i just spent a lotta time with their. So you know was as close to her. As i was to my mother a they had very different interests. Mother's interests were you my education and clothes on my back in the food on my plate and just trying to keep it all going and my aunt who was single. Her interests were art and fun. And you know kind of The things that my mother was so busy and focused on taking care of us. The didn't really have have the space. The mental space for and so. They made a good team. I guess when you were a little girl maybe maybe eight or nine years old. A a man named murray may came into your life Your mom married him and he would become a hugely important influence on you as a as a kid. And then as a grownup right yeah. My dad she I remember the first day that he came to pick her up for eight and opened the door. I've ever told the story. I opened the door. He was so handsome and he had on a starched white putting up and slacks and shiny shoes. And i just really liked him from there. He was such a gentleman so kind to me and continued that to be that to me All all of his life the rest for the rest of his life so he had a big effect on me. He was an entrepreneur. He had his own business right. Yeah i love you. Call him an entrepreneur. Because i think that we don't use that word for people who are not you know Creating companies that are fancy so to speak but he owned his own business carpet. Small carpet and flooring company and had about. I don't know six or seven Men men who worked with him but he would get down on his hands and knees and put in and flooring for residences and commercial spaces in los angeles when you were a teenager And people would meet you and they would say. Oh eva she's gonna be this or that will what people say about. She'd say oh she's going to be president. What what would you remember. People saying i always got that. I was know bright. That i was smart. The things that every kid should here right just that you know i had potential and i could be anything that i wanted to be at the time for many many years when i was young when people would ask that horrible question that you asked children which i don't think children should be asked. What do you want to be when you grow up. I'd say a. And i would always hear you know positive reinforcement. Oh i can see that for your. That's perfect or you're going to be that i remember my godmother charlene Gave me a briefcase for my eighth grade graduation and i thought right this these are. These are the tools that i need to go into the courtroom and i am truly a few short steps from the courtroom. This will not take long. I am that smart. And i will use this briefcase and i will go to the supreme court and do whatever i needed to do. Was there anything in your childhood or teenage years. That would in any way you could look at and say yeah that i was going to be filmmaker no other than loving movies. What what movies. Love as a kid. Anything that they played at the lakewood mall. That's the only place. I went to see movies with my aunt to niece. Who would take me after school to the lakewood mall chicago. That's a movie one day that probably bring back such emotional such emotion but yeah anything it. So this is. This is the late seventies early eighties. Yeah i mean so everything. From i don't know like et to action.

eight los angeles charlene six abdul rene two sisters seven Twenty seven renee first years three lynnwood first films united states late seventies early eighties compton california La chicago one nine years old
Yaphet Kotto, 'Alien' Actor and Bond Villain, Has Died at 81

Fresh Air

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

Yaphet Kotto, 'Alien' Actor and Bond Villain, Has Died at 81

"Yaphet Kotto has died Kowtow, played a bond villain and starred in the movies Alien A Midnight run. His wife confirmed his death on Facebook. He was 81 years old. MPR's Elizabeth Blair has this remembrance. With a burly presence and a wide smile. Yaphet kowtow could play both tough and charming. In NBC's homicide. Life on the streets, Kowtow played a hardened but paternal Baltimore police lieutenant, a role that earned him for and double up Image Award nominations. You can't serve two masters, Michael. Yeah, that Kota was born in New York City. He landed his first acting job at age 19, playing a fellow on stage. Kota was nominated for an Emmy for playing Edie Amine in the 1976 TV movie raid on and to be paying tribute to kowtow director Ava Duvernay rights. He's one of those actors who deserved more than the parts he got. He took those parts and made them wonderful. All the same Elizabeth

Yaphet Kotto Elizabeth Blair Yaphet Kowtow MPR Kowtow NBC Edie Amine Facebook Kota Baltimore Ava Duvernay New York City Michael Emmy Elizabeth
Netflix announces new series about Colin Kaepernick

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Netflix announces new series about Colin Kaepernick

"You may not have a job in the NFL, but Colin Kaepernick's life is being made into a TV series Kaepernick teaming up with Netflix and Ava Duvernay for six part drama Kaepernick will narrate the show and an actor. Just to play the younger football stars. No word yet when we'll see Colin and

Colin Kaepernick Ava Duvernay NFL Football Netflix
Ava DuVernay joins the film academy's Board of Governors

Jason and Alexis

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Ava DuVernay joins the film academy's Board of Governors

"Ava duvernay got some good news yesterday and it's good news for all of us that are fans of the motion picture industry what what happened yes so the academy of motion picture arts and sciences sciences but I she's been elected to the board of governors she's one of six to start her first term of course eva she did Selma thirteenth the move it we just kind of briefly talked about and when they see S. so she has been she is joining the directors branch no I don't know much about this after reading this in a little bit more but they're seventeen different branches to the academy and they represent directors casting directors film editors all do you know make up and hair stylist visual effects all different parts of making a film and so in the academy in the board of directors each branch there seventeen is represented by three governors so she'll be of course with the directors they can serve up to three years for three consecutive terms and basically what they do is they think about the vision of the academy they want to preserve their financial health and then make sure that they're doing what they say they're going to be doing yeah and of course representation is very important state right now with the increase of the six people there's five and twenty six women it now on the board and twelve people of color and then so try to figure out how many total that is it's almost half for women which is good that's fantastic and then of course with women of and there are people of color it looks like a click a quarter so but that's good Hey it's about time I'm surprised she hasn't been asked to be on this board

Ava Duvernay Selma S.
Former prosecutor sues Netflix over Central Park 5 series

Ron St. Pierre

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Former prosecutor sues Netflix over Central Park 5 series

"Seven Linda fair Steen is going after Netflix and an actress over her depiction in a series of the Central Park five here's fox's Michelle Paulino former New York prosecutor Linda faerstein sued Netflix ava duvernay and the writer behind when they see us to run a series on the now exonerated Central Park five pairs team claims the show portrayed her as a racist unethical

Linda Fair Steen Netflix Central Park FOX Linda Faerstein Writer Michelle Paulino New York Prosecutor
"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

10:08 min | 1 year ago

"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"A fascinating time where it seems like the center of power is moved away away from the studio in the theater and the Academy Awards and now it's like get your content out there more people who can see it is that you view that as a benefit title word thing all people it opens up the door to storytelling narrative. Change on part of narrative. Change you know when you tell someone in your story. It changed their metabolism idea. About who you are so if we can tell more kinds of stores about more people we can do much better than we're doing in this country right if we can challenge the narratives narratives that we hear the stories that we hear a minute but I heard a different story. Check this one out and it's not just everyone listening to the same thing all the time. We opened up ourselves culture as a community society as a country. Truly believe that so part of that is being able to give more people access to more stories and more ways you know you can see someone some of. There's no movie theater. So there's there's no movie theater in Selma we makes up straight OUTTA COMPTON FULFILL Beautiful. Should've should've been nominated for the Oscar. My opinion by F Gary Gray couldn't watch hopton because they're not with the competent no movie theaters on native reservations. There's movie theaters and a lot of black and brown communities in this country and so people are left out of seeing movies. How does it Irishman? They have to take the bus going to drive into the thing the subway into the next community. That's not their home or you can watch it in your house. I mean do you. I want them to see the movie or does it really matter the way they see the movie. and that's why challenge filmmakers theatre owners and all of that yes. We love eaters I love. Netflix has brought the POW the Paris I theatre here keeping a movie palace going. That was going to go away right. These are important theater spaces but also everyone can't get to it. Everyone can't afford it right. And so it's important to think about new ways to share these stories and I think the new streaming new ways to interact with story is a positive thing and so the sooner that old guard can let go and see the good that comes from it. The sooner will be better. But in the meantime we're GONNA have friction fiction book still fighting for the old way it won't last you know it's kind of like old man on the yard on the lawn yelling at cloud to cloud there. It's not gonNA move 'cause you're yelling at the case of them and it's to their benefit to let go adapt and see how they can make some new businesses but also also you always gonNa love the experience going to seem so for the people who can't afford it and whoever theater near them fantastic but also to the you know the the dad who's been working all week you know what I mean. He just wants to sit down couch and watch something other than football. Right Richman slip to the or you get up to stick around to hear more from Asia. Duve Rene on the Sunday sit down podcast including what it was like to make history with films like Selma Thirteenth and a wrinkle in time. Welcome back to the Sunday. Sit Down podcast now. More of my conversation conversation with Eva Duvivier. You've mentioned history You made history with Selma you made history with thirteenth. You made his is tree with a wrinkle in time. Being the first African American woman to direct a film of the budget over one hundred million dollars are those important milestones to you. When you hear those does does that feel good does it feel important? I know that it's important to other people I it doesn't feel real to me like it's not a part of my identity Alyssa. Sometimes when I hear when I'm introduced feels bitter sweet because it puts kind of seeks to or inadvertently sets me apart it from my sisters who've been doing for a long time who came to early Julie Dash casing women's right like those are women who are doing incredible work. WHO's on policy incredible work before I was born right before I was even doing this? And yet I get those accolades of NATO. It don't when their work is just as beautiful and even more so since the time right and so I think in perspective and not get too caught up in the first. It's it's nice for a moment and I know a lot of people embrace that so I don't WanNa diminish it but also a lot of other incredible women out there like for for example. I've been congratulated all fall for directing Harriet Queen and slim in Hollywood food. In Hollywood where we make movies. People saying congrats on here like you didn't direct. That movie congrats on Queen and Slim. It looks great. I think it looks great to did make it. Don't have anything to do with it. But the because they know slack them make an assumption. Now she's really. Oh we gotta we gotTa Push Mascow that we need to open it up and until that happens. We're going to be pretty static place and this is not the time to be so interesting. You said I interview Sterling K.. Brown a couple of weeks ago and he made history with his emmy us. I asked him that question. He said you know honestly willing my reaction was we still do and I still. That was the first half of last ear. And I've taken enough of your time and we WANNA do not do and ask him 'cause you're such a powerhouse like what is out there in your mind that you haven't done that your dream danner you're going to do a little. DC Yeah like what still out there for you got a lot of road ahead of you just getting started. I also that one just getting started I think for me. My goal is not to expand. My goal is to stay say president. I mean I just WanNa be here ten years doing it and so I don't know if that's a function of being a black woman director in a space where there aren't many people don't even know the difference between us. You know what I mean. Or if it's a function of not seeing any work women with thirty year forty or fifty year commercial careers doesn't exist and that's something that's just hasn't been done before so my goal is to make an empire do things I haven't done Michael this to just be making work. That means something to me that I think will resonate for other people ten years twenty years from now thirty years to be like on your smart directing with my cane. You know I wanna be Scorsese Azazel with a hitch hit movie seventy-seven. It's not been a black woman that stunned that before right and so my goal is to mark secure space and stay there. And if I can do that I'll be the success in my own eyes. I've no doubt to L. chairs. They think Quinton Slim was great. Good job now. I just I had to do it. I had to congratulate her on Queen Slam after the story. She told me about being congratulated that just by strangers on the street but by people in Hollywood for making queen and Slim and Harriet. Which of course did not make you can catch? Asia's new series. Cherish today on the Oprah Winfrey network. I am joined now by the producer of the Sunday. Sit Down podcast Maggie Law Maggie. Okay so there's the body of work there's all the incredible films she has made aid There is her work ethic There's her attention to detail all of which I love. I love most about her stories that she just hasn't been doing this very long. I now now I sort of in the Hollywood Stratosphere of directors and powerhouses as we call her but she hasn't been there very. Yeah I know I loved the. She says she started. I think at thirty two. She kind of like jumped into this world and she had her own. Pr Firm and everything. I I left her advice. She said don't quit your day job. She he said you know I sort of tested the waters. I made a short film about her mom And then once she realized at Sundance she got that award that she could really do it fulltime. She said that's when I you know getting recognition from their peers jumped right into it and you know she said don't quit your day job and also make sure that whatever you're going into you actually like do it you know. Are you good at it but also is this truly your passion and worth sort of leaving you know your other job for the analysis is playing the harp. Okay you WANNA learn and the heart great right. Let's go see if you're any good at the heart. And if you'd like to flip which I thought was a good way to think about. Don't quit your day job. She didn't she continued. You'd work PR and didn't really quit until she won the award at Sundance. It was like okay. I think some people think I can do this and I think I can do it. And man she's had an incredible run and and just even in the last couple of years from Thirteenth and when they see as such an amazing series the Netflix series about the Central Park. Five people I love wrinkle in time and I sort of liked that she was like. Wow that was history wrinkling time with the budget for an African American direct Selma. Obviously were the first yeah best picture nomination. She's like yeah she's like that's nice. I guess but it's not why I'm doing that. She was like it's a little bittersweet because she's she was like it's sort of the time that we're in now but there were so many that came before her that just weren't getting that recognition through now. She's almost lucky in that. It's just time is right right now for it to happen which yeah I thought was so interesting and who knew I like T- t guy but when you somehow ginger milk tea I guess when you go to the right place like even know how join and she helps you pick the right? which she did we wouldn't pick and I love that she again? Like had the sort of lay out of the tea and everything like as I say interviewing director she sort of knew. Oh Oh yeah around the room like how everything was supposed to look where the cameras were what they were picking up but I was like I like that. She had thoughts about the camera angles. We got this. I WanNa take good care of you our production as I said I love that about. Yeah I love somebody who cares that much every detail. Of course why she successful Maggie Aggie. Thank you very much. Thanks all of you as always for tuning in this week..

Selma Hollywood Netflix Sundance Asia director Quinton Slim Gary Gray Academy Awards Oscar Julie Dash Harriet Queen Maggie Law Maggie Queen Slam Maggie Aggie Duve Rene DC football Eva Duvivier Alyssa
"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

09:56 min | 1 year ago

"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"Sit Down podcast now. More of my conversation with EVA Duvalier people. You're on this crazy run and you have been for five or six years. People don't realize your back story. They assume even making movies for life and you grew up on. He'd be a filmmaker. And now you are. You've had this fascinating career so so your mom's in the room she might have an answer to but when you were a little girl growing up in southern California what was the dream. Would you want to be. What did you think about as you were growing? Want to be a lawyer for part of the wall and four time. I wanted to be broadcast journalist for time. went to produce the news. It's not being front of the camera. I don't even know why I got from some movie or someone with someone walking around producing newscasts news. Maybe maybe maybe or network brochures somehow thought it was going to produce the news. Whatever that is and you were an intern? It's all the way I was an intern. CBS Susan And Yes oh yes. We missed you China by year. I think yes because you were on the O.. J. was was the next summer. Yes unit and that made you do this now way out of here but also so yeah I was That really was the beginning of my career journalism. It was radic. Look I'm good. Yeah so I I went to publicity because there was still a the news so publicity allowed me to touch news to still work on articles and in broadcast S. pieces but not literally for the network but for you know the person who's being in and and so still able to touch news in that way and I did that for a time and then got into moving publicity a which married my two interests news and movies which I loved and so I did Tafoya while at my own agency and then while I was working with all these movies on all these sets and I started thinking looking at the guy directing us like you know I like to knock that off expat right so I would be watching these ramps to the Cameroon thinking does anyone have just or I think you should walk over here instead. They should put the camera there. Autism my mind directly my head and finally let me just go ahead and give it a try and so you made a film for six thousand dollars. Heart store fell about my mom in. How did it turn out it is? I've wiped off. The face of the earth. Day was like what's that movie you made about me. I don't well I think somebody lost it. It is it's tough and it was. My school started two years old. You know I wasn't going to be able to film school so I just jumped in and learn by doing so. You kinda dabbled in both worlds for a long time. Yeah I didn't quit my day job right. This is the big thing I've talked. It's a Lotta people by dreams. How do I change careers in the middle I said well don't just do it all at once taken steps. You don't have to just quit your the job today and go play the harp because you always hard on the weekends no your strings. You know what I mean learn you're good at And also like it even really like I deal for yourself so do it and step since I took those steps over a period of time and and little by little I phased out the other job and then you eventually in two thousand twelve human big directing word Sundance. Maybe I should. Maybe I should quit that ED.

intern EVA Duvalier Susan And Sundance California Tafoya Cameroon CBS China
"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"I'd never done that before. This is the book in script for just like yeah. We're going to do. There's something more like and I was like. Oh okay so I took it. And I I had because it's it's a world right poodle race-tinged service and like action car crash gave it to her and she was like yeah. Then ask. Didn't think you were going to do now. My back a little bit so I just I did one third time. I remember saying you know. If you can't do let me see so I may might my next one. And she said that's it. That's the so you see and that's really. The last gave me notes really once I hooked into what it was and it felt right It's been five years of rupe beautiful creative leeway leeway and so and I've experienced chairs today too so it's been we've also got a track record. I think she trust you. Turn out pretty well I think so I think so but you know I I and I never would hesitate to receive a call with a note. I always ask her telling me to thinking so eloquently to that day when it comes to queens shirt was born in one of Oprah's houses making this has been a a crazy year for you with when they see it as well which you mentioned spending six months here in the out in the rain and everything else in New York I hate to bring that subject but it turned got to be such an extraordinary work. We really thank you. That's a big one to take on and want to get it right. You WanNa treat their stories the right way. Why did you want to tackle that subject? You know I felt like there was some first of all very personal. I met them in. The first thing was the case was fascinated. Yeah and when I met the minute became emotional for me on a personal because you look in their eyes and you hear their stories and you want the truth to be known and there was a lot oughta truth skewer it all these years but then on top of that I felt like as I look at all of it. The macro of that story really addresses all the parts of the criminal justice system. And if you could tell it in a way that was sweeping you would be able to share with people how it feels to be arrested. Profiled how it feels to go into onto a precinct unprotected not knowing your rights and the kinds of things that are done in the precinct that may not be on the up and up that may not be a part of what our constitution says. It should be the judicial process. And how it favors folks with money might even be guilty more than people who don't have money who might very well be innocent. You know the the incarceration experience what that's like for people living breathing people human beings and the way that we treat them in this country out of sight out of mind horrible treatment and post incarceration. Once you've done your time how you still stripped of rights. You haven't done your time because you can't vote can't get a job can't get a student. Loan can't rent an apartment government. A main You you're still a certain kind of societal jail and so all of that can be conveyed through the story and so that became really exciting to me and so all all those layers just went into five year process of trying to stick it out day by day and so the response to that level level of detail and passionate we put into the response has been in-kind it's been proportionate and and so that's the greatest honor for an and artists to what you put out comes back to you in a spilt by people so it's been a great honor to have made it. I was reading a story that you tell hoping you got it right for them. First and foremost and them seeing it. Yeah and turning to you with tears in their did yeah. That's our story. That was nerve wracking working day. Jay Netflix flew out to La and they at one of their small screening rooms. And it's a very intimate screener. My chose success to to to rose so they were in the front row and I was in the background so basically through the whole five hours I watched them watch the movie and kind of terrified because I can only the backs of their heads really and they would shift or they would move. Where they would the sniffles a little crying crying here? Oh maybe a little shifting that feel angry at certain times like they were reliving and at the end of the time they rose and they turn to me the light of the projectors still faces and they're just in tears they learn things about each other that they didn't know especially about Corey wise in the final episode and they all gathered around me off five of them. And just let me describe together and so what else is better than that. I mean there is nothing else that could've review no award. No nothing that was better than how that happened early. Everything else was just like a beautiful green. The last episode the whole series was great. That last episode it felt to me. I don't know who was like a level above even everything else it was just I think because it was so focused on Corey one character and you did you got the experience of what happens to a man in prison especially knows he shouldn't be okay How did you approach his story in particular? When I first sat down from years ago he said you know before we talk? This is not a story of Central Park by AH story about four plus one because they had a different experience than I did and no one wants to tell that story and I so I want to tell the story. Tell me so we. We did over the years. And it was heartbreaking soul crushing story but one that also is hard expanding and sold lifting because he survived and he's sitting before you and he's telling the story of survival on what he did how he did it and how it all felt and so my goal was to somehow how reconstructed as best. I can keeping his dignity intact part of more than more than half of what it. It's what you see the half of it he endured so much more and so So yeah I think the goal of designing the first episodes to be an overall Ross story but then some kind of break him out was an early decision and and I think You know demanded a bit of a different level. Love introspection both by him and by me as the writer director producer of it and all the team must feel so good to poor that much into a project and get the kind the reception you got for it including last night congratulate you even more awards. Only the thing that I love about. It is the way that the men's there they are walking icons now and people believe that you know what I mean. People believe them people know their story. People connect with them they represent. It's something larger now and So I see I know all very well. Now they've changed over the five years they change over the last six months. Let's people and they walk around. You know a little more should assured you gave them that that's beautiful. Hey guys thanks for listening to the Sunday. Sit Down podcast stick Dick around to hear more from Avon do gourmet after.

Corey wise Oprah Jay Netflix Dick Central Park New York Avon Ross La writer producer director
"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

12:07 min | 1 year ago

"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"A quiet time car in the four zero five now I right now. You're talking to account for you. I see you mentioned freeway numbers. We found one that was for you in New York. So let's talk about. It's almost you're talking about your run. The last few years has been like bananas. Let's talk about the current project. Cherish the day with own it has really cool concept upped to one love story. preseason yes every hour is a day in the life of this couple. Tell me about the concept when dreamed up. I want to deep dive into especially in these really challenging times just a love story and went to play with idea. How could I do it in a bit of a different way? I love the linkletter films before sunrise before sunset. And these are the movies trilogy of movies that just take a couple of when you see them over the years on one day and so I want to say how do you can you apply that to people. Go to Brown people. Moen people native people. I WANNA see more kinds of people fall in love. It feels like I see just a certain kind of person I love and so Oh and love story. That's not heightened. That's not you know set against something big in epic going on just the quiet everyday moments so cherish the day just shares. What happens on a particular day and it's not necessarily an anniversary or a big day in the life of these relationships? It's just the little moments that you remember that. Stay with you. That change how I feel about the other person that was idea. And it's it's interesting because it's a slow unfolding of the show it's eight episodes and the episodes job so the first episode. What is the first day they meet? The second episode is a year later. The third episode is three months later and so it jumps around it just kind of locates the big days in the life of the couple and and that's to me and I told her I watched the first episode of it is it is just little stuff adds up to something big by the end of the hour. Hopefully there's no big moment for step so there's no explosions or whatever else you want to. But it's like analyzes relationship really nicely so when you obviously at this point you've got your choice of the things you WanNa WanNa do the projects you want to take on doing a lot of things at once. What was it about? This release of this thing is worth my time. I'm going to get behind this you know. They're I'm working on Selma thirteenth when they see us. And all of these projects. That are very politically muscular. And historically kind of you know rigorous in terms the research and really building the architecture of these narratives that really complex and so I wanted to delve into something that was more intuitive organic or about love and personal so relationships and those things are complex as well but just to allow it to fold it away where I didn't have to do our research to take on the Court of public opinion. Just you know something. Something a little lighter but also something that means something to me which is to illuminate all facets of life of marginalized people and I think our personal is just as important as political is our cultural lives a lot of times. I'm asked to talk about my identity and history history work the CO current political climate But also what goes on behind closed doors. I think it's important to examine as well. So that was the idea behind it and then the audience for own I have my show Queen Sugar and so I've come no good audience. And they like and really feel like I wanted to serve them. You know it's over indexes with women A lot of women of color. Who are you know doing beautiful things in their own lives and I think it's important to not only uplift? Folks who are politicians directors are superstars but the women who are really superstars in our lives. Day to day the MOMS and the live and the sisters and so all that went into the STU of Jarash. Today we're talking a minute ago about how you create this who producing it. But you're not directing it uh-huh so that's different for me. It is a different thing. Is that difficult for you. It is really difficult for me because I guess this show really taught me that. You are a control-freak you know I really am. I never really thought to myself that way but I think this is part of a writer director producer. I'm involved in every aspect right so they have to take one off was challenging for me but this is a different way of working. You know I wrote it and produced and directed It's kind of like I can't direct REXONA and write something without producing it. I can't do sit in directed without writing becomes difficult and so that was one of my challenges on Ritalin time I didn't produce you sit and I didn't write it but I directed it so that was the first time that was working with material that I couldn't control every aspect of it and it's it's different. Yeah but when you've got the concept for this show got it up here and then you sort of handed off to some then you come back later and see it. I'm still producing it for the right here in their everyday the actors and the costumes and all that and that's usually it was really hard for me to be on set. I'd be there and I'd be like don't you want to do. I think the cups or his hair. Oh I can't do that okay. Let me to stand over here. 'cause that's yes so yeah it was interesting. Bite your talk a little bit. I did what I just didn't want to make people uncomfortable but just com checking. Everyone's doing and then leave. You know because it wasn't for that because the kid wanting to do so I love. I love people to do their jobs that I think so. The piece is has a different flavor to it. It's not directed by me but it's written and produced by me so it has some elements of me but it has elements of the other directors. Who a hand pick and And so it's it's is lovely. Direct T. service go directly by eight and you're like nope good okay. Russia play out the teapot right. One of the other cool things about Jerick was that you achieve gender equity. Yes the production team. Yes how big a deal is that to you. How important how significant? Yeah I mean one of the reasons why that show another reason why it was important beyond kind of exploring the nuances is love and the different face is the way you make the work. And that's something that I've just been really focused on over the last years that I've had more I guess power in the situation being able to dictate who's in the space who's working Making sure that women are being interviewed people of Color in the room getting opportunities I think it's really easy for folks to say and I don't blame people for saying guys because they want to get the job done and they want to jump for me so these guys are going to get it done for you and I learned that through one of my ep. WHO said I just want to do the best job for view and I know that these guys who always worked with will do the best job for me because I know them and so I want that but I also can't just be looking at the same guys for ever we have to change we have to diversify? We have to open up the doors to who can do the best job for me unless you give people the opportunity to do you never know. Oh and so little by little over the course of my products. I've been pushing pushing at with the goal of one day. Achieving gender parity there equal number of men and and women on sets and for people at home don't know that it's very rare to have that those equal numbers. You know the time I walk onto sets and all men and it's usually Whiteman and so to have a space where equal numbers of men and women you know Starting near parody on people of color as well all current projects we WANNA make. Everyone can stay on their hands on it so I think more people are industry. WanNa do that then. Don't just don't no how sometimes it gets uncomfortable because some people have to move around like a musical chairs light. But it's about time we do it and so on anything that I work on. You know it's it's it's a part of the requirement of doing it and so we achieved on this show and I'm thrilled with. We actually had a few more women than men always over the over. Yeah good for you. So how do we get to the point where I don't ask you that question like it's a big deal like wow you got to fifty percent. How do you change? That went on for a while. It's going to have to become become standard. Become normal until then we have to keep asking about it you know. I don't mind that with the keep asking about it keep talking about it keep pushing it But until the day where the questions uninteresting interesting and there's not an interesting answer and there's no process to just happening been we we have to keep talking about the lesson that there are those women. They're all those people Out there who can do the job so you're just not finding them. That's the thing that the myth is that. Yeah we can't find them. Yeah they're not out there but it's just not true it's just not true there And so yeah you always want to train more people but they are there they are. They're here they're trained they're capable. They're ready they're experienced. They're just scattered across also all these productions where they might be. One woman in this department are two women on this production so when you start to empower them to be together You know you get really beautiful results. And that's one of the the pieces of this puzzle of chairs today as I watched the framed watched the show and I know that it was truly made by all kinds of people. I think that comes comes out in the in the in the sauce. When you watch it really cool crew shot to where it was a shot I've seen before it was on the set supported us in doing that? There was even a day or one of our women wasn't able to be there so and she was a part of her department. So so he wasn't he there's one guy in the picture holding aside say I represent such So it was a great set and we're looking to discontinue that is innovating in front of the camera in the stories that we tell but the way that we tell you know because Hollywood is a system now some things need to change you mentioned queen sugar also on own. Yes and what does the experience like working with and for Oprah and the people don't why is that a good platform for you. I never forget that own. The Oprah Winfrey Network Doc. She is a like the whole thing. But I do Because it's a network named for her that abides by the principles that she prioritizes sizes and it is a place where I can do something on Queen. Sugar Ray said I WANNA hire only women directors. I want to try to kind of balance the scales. What's going on and so we did that five years ago and it's really really changed in our industry in terms of pushing other show runners and other networks to do the same so you can really see the sea change of how folks respond to that challenge on this with now going deeper beyond directors but into the whole crew so those kinds of things that you need a studio a network at work? That's going to be supportive of. And they were down ready to do whatever they could to make that happen. You Bob with Oprah before is she the kind of person who will. We'll watch a rough cut or watch it and give you notes on it or not. That hands off. She trusts you at this pants off. Yeah Yeah it's always been that early on and so with Queens Sugar. The way that came about was we had made summer and I had gone to one of her home. Relax I was like dude over. His house somewhat said that house one one of the houses and it's awesome. It's just comfortable and lovely it's not uh tation ostentatious it's just cozy in lovely and by the book. The bed stand was a book. quaint you ever. I long as somebody's reading. That kept going next day. It was like a little closer to the next day. It was like on the bed so I said at breakfast. There's a book. Corporate service thirds moving around my sweet. She said Oh. Yeah the kids should read it and see if you WanNa make and so I read it and I thought of do it and so we started making the show and I put the first script.

Oprah WanNa New York Moen Court of public Jarash Russia Jerick Whiteman Hollywood writer Ray Bob producer director
"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

04:11 min | 1 year ago

"ava duvernay" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"Term she writes she produces she directs. Does is everything you can do except for here in the movies her. Most recent work is the NETFLIX series. Highly acclaimed series when they see us about the central park mark. Five case in New York City in nineteen eighty nine. She also of course was the director of Selma which was nominated for best picture a few years back. She directed a wrinkle. All in time. Oprah Winfrey's movie that had a budget over one hundred million dollars which was a new record new standard. She made history as an African. American can woman producing a film like that also directed the documentary thirteenth which was nominated a couple years back for an academy award. Her latest project is a series called cherish. The day for the Oprah Winfrey Network. I'll let her explain the premise of the series. She produces it. She created it. She didn't direct it though which. which as you will hear was hard for her to take her hands off because she's so hands on and she has created and produced a directed every piece of work? She's done since she got into the business which brings us to the most interesting part. I think of her story. She's only been doing this for a few years. She won an award as director at the Sundance Film Festival. Seven years ago. Oh and that launched her career she had a PR agency for a long time. She worked with actors. She walked famous actors down the red carpet and did their interviews for them and then she took a look on some of these film sets when she was around movies and said. Hey I think I can do this and man. Has she been able to do it ever since. Eva took me to her favourite tea shop here in New York City. She's very la based as you'll hear she's more L. A. Than she is New York but she's got her spots in New York City and she loves not so she brought me not spot We did a pot of her ginger milk. Tea which I have to say. I'm not a big tea drinker but was excellent She's very detail oriented as you will also hear she's moving the pot around and getting the cups in the right places a director and the other cool detail is her entourage. Raj consisted of her mother. She brought her mom to the shoot. Talk about winning somebody over Mike. You're here with your mom. Amari all in. Here's our conversation in with Eva du Vernay on the Sunday. Sit Down podcast David. Thanks for doing this. We start by you telling me what we're drinking here. This is ginger milk tea cheap and I don't really drink a lot of coffee because I'm already late. This is going to unhealthy levels of energy energy with the coffee so I tried to do and I like creamy thing. Sure so it's can we pinky yeah thinking okay to make sure those hot. That's nice. Nice right we're rainy days snowy snowy day and this is your spot right. How did you find? I was down here working one day and I wanted t so I go like maybe six or seven years ago and since then I've brought so many people here and people like this is a great. It's inspired the people walk by and never see I said to you. I've walked by here. Probably thousands of my life. I never even noticed. Woke dinner so thanks for letting me come spot my one of my New York spots. It's the spot. New New York City really lay where you're from. La and I just feel more comfortable not here. It is the cost phobia the weather. What is a really hard time they can when they see us here was here for about six months and it really? The city works on you. I respect Beck for people who love it here and thrived here. It's just not me I opposite effect so you need really brought me to a place. I mean yes. I was working on a very challenging Story right but but yeah on top of that the city is just very and you're always there is it. Yeah.

New York City director Oprah Winfrey Oprah Winfrey Network NETFLIX Eva Eva du Vernay Beck Selma Raj Mike
Emmy Special: Julia Louis-Dreyfus

The Frame

04:52 min | 2 years ago

Emmy Special: Julia Louis-Dreyfus

"Welcome to the frame emme special from KPCC in Los Angeles. I'm John Horn the host of the frame and I'm Lorraine Ali television critic for the La Times Save. We'll hear from a lot of nominees. It's about their work and their shows and we'll talk about. Emmys can tell us about the state of television right now. which is a really really interesting state? Yeah and one thing I want to talk about is he is late night. Talk shows I mean I know. We think that that's a place to go for humor and some jokes. I'm finding some of the best documentary reporting on television right now is happening on shows like John Oliver Samantha B so we'll cover that I am really looking forward to the limited series category this year because it is dumbass about stuff that has been on television talking about Chernobyl when they see us Fussy verdon escaping down more these are excellent shows and the limited series category used to be kind of like now. It's like that is the place that we're looking at it. I'm looking forward to see what happens with that but we're going to start with a comedy series and that Atas veep its lead actress could make some Emmy History Julia Louis and the emmy goes to even Julia Louis Dreyfuss. Let me try to annoy drivers now for most emmys one by performer and the same the same series peaches came back for its final season. There is another big final season it rhymes with game of thrones it is getting thrown and so on but before veep wrapped up its final season. I had a chance to speak with Julia Louis Dreyfuss. There's a lot of grief around the end of a series assuming the series has been a a good thing and a happy thing which in our case it has been and that has an incredible bitter sweetness to it that can really got you and it did. Let's talk about the final season running for President and she is asked a basic question of very early in the season which is why and other people are curious but here's a conversation. I bet she has with Gary who's played by Tony Hill because it is my God is was the game changer. I took bombed the glass ceiling. I shave my in the sink of the Old Boys Club for three years. He kept me chained to a radiator some basement in Cleveland. So as far as I'm concerned America owes me an eight year stay in the White House at this time. I want a war yeah. What is it like listening to that. It's gobs of fun. I think that's so well written so I was just sort of listening to the language you you know she's not a great candidate. That's not under state but I appreciate her her bitterness and her struggle when you are playing her. You'll have some way of saying okay. I know that this is a character and and I know that what she wants is not something that she's able to express but that's the actor plane her. I have to believe what it is. She wants here's how I would answer that. She's he's a very horrible human being and hideously behaved and really has no leadership skills whatsoever or no point view even other than her own narcissistic endeavor but when you player you have to come at it from well bill why and once you start to humanize that horrible nece you can find a way in to play it with a certain amount of well in a weird way. I say empathy and even though I'm not necessarily asking the viewer to be empathetic. I just want the viewer to laugh off but it just perhaps that keeps her from being hated by the audience right. What are the greater kinds of compliments. You can get from people who work in politics. I I hear time and time again. This is what it's really like in Washington and you know. I- winces I say that too but yeah that's that's what we hear. I had the great good fortune into meet Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan once and she told me that she got together with Justice Scalia. When veep was on on the air every week to discuss the past week's episode because there were both fans imagine that are can't? I know I would do anything thing to have those conversations. Let's hope somebody recorded them. I know maybe the FBI

Julia Louis Tony Hill Emmy Los Angeles Lorraine Ali La Times John Horn Elena Kagan John Oliver Samantha B Justice Scalia FBI Supreme Court President Trump Cleveland I Old Boys Club Washington America White House Gary
"ava duvernay" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"ava duvernay" Discussed on Fresh Air

"To the five in the settlement of the five lawsuit against the city and also when the burns documentary was made president trump was not pre. He was just donald trump. He wasn't president yet so i. I want to ask you about trump. What what it's like to see the role that he played in being a megaphone for finding the central park five guilty not before they were even tried you know just like days after they were arrested and charged he took out full page ads in all all of new york's for major newspapers saying bring back the death penalty bring back our police and this was an argument for the death penalty basically for for children i mean and there were fourteen fifteen sixteen years old so i'm just interested in what was like for you to see his role in the central park five. Yes we played a very famous role in the case <hes> you know with taking out the ads but ultimately you know he's not the story <hes> and <hes> so the i made the decision just to keep it very you know using very sparingly and and use them with his own words and his own footage and we do it a couple of times and there's a couple mentions <hes> when really researched this time he was one of many froment voices that were out saying all kinds of crazy stuff. I mean pat buchanan basically said that corey wise should be lynched <hes> he should be hung in a public park. This is the climate of the time and it was all seen as acceptable and it was just all happening without much of a second thought ought certainly not <hes> the thought about the humanity of these boys and their family so <hes> so yeah as we as we went through just make decisions not to lean in too much into trump. That's one of the reasons why i went to change the name from central park five to when they see us i felt the central park five had become so kind of synonymous with him and him a hash tagging tagging it and talking about it particularly around the documentary as he slammed ken burns and tweeted against him <hes> that i just really wanted to to to to change range the perspective in which we were thinking about this case. Can you tell us something about their lives. Now <hes> <hes> they are great people. I love them a lot. You know really cry thinking about them. All the good good guys <hes> and you know three of them live in atlanta. It's funny because you know anti-roma kway craze the first to leave. He goes to atlanta. He finds this beautiful. Oh black oasis in atlanta where you you know for dominantly black town with you know lots of people from a lot of different parts of the country and and you know there's a cer- certain <hes> prosperity that happens in some parts of the city and lots of activity and things to do and so he goes out there by way the of baltimore and a couple of other cities that he'd stopped in and lived along the way and he finds atlanta and raymond comes to visit raymond is the person he's closest to. They're really best. Friends and raymond comes to visit raymond's like yo. What is this you've got grass in front of your wait in the back to oh no wait what and so shortly thereafter raymond picks up and he moved to atlanta and then a few months after that use of picks up moves to atlanta so three of them live in atlanta and then <hes> kevin lives in new jersey just got married. When i first met him he was not married he was dating this really wonderful woman and i remember him thinking maybe she's the one and i'm like she the one what's going to happen and and now <hes> he's married and they live in new jersey with their new daughter <hes> and and and his stepdaughter they're the cutest little family an inquiry <hes> is in harlem <hes> and he has tried to live other places and just loves harlem you know when he moves hooves out of the city he longs for harlem i mean he he will drive back in the harlem just to to be there. He goes to <hes> al sharpton. Hs weekly meetings every saturday in harlem community meetings <hes>. He's a real part of the community. I've walked the streets with oprah pro before it's similar. It's people love him. They respect him. They look out for him. They give him a lot of love. There and that's why that's why likes it. It's home <hes> so that's what the five of them are doing. You know in different in various places you know with their promotional reckoning <hes> you know but but my hope has been and i've seen it a bit that the that the film is finished therapy in some ways they're able to talk about. The main thing is now people know the story. Corey is really really adamant that people know his story. He said to me early on <hes>. It's not the central park park five four plus one. I had a different story and he wanted people to know and we did everything we could to tell his story. It's it's a very singular story and it's different from the other guys and so just the fact that now when people walk up to him they know him. They know his story. They respect what he went through. I think is i hope and pray that it has a positive effect on him on all of them it will do rene. Thank you so much for talking with us. Thank thank you so much. I appreciate it. Thanks for having me over dove rene directed co wrote and produced the netflix series when they see us which is nominated for sixteen emmys including two for du vernay best writing and best directing for a limited series after we take a break will hear from michael k williams who's nominated for an emmy for his his performance in when they see us as bobby mccray the father of anton mcrae. One of the five wrongfully convicted boys. I'm terry gross and this is fresh air support for this podcast and the following message come from home instead senior care bonnie a home instead caregiver works to enhance the lives lives.

atlanta harlem raymond donald trump president corey wise ken burns new jersey new york pat buchanan terry gross al sharpton netflix emmy bobby mccray michael k williams du baltimore kevin
"ava duvernay" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

14:26 min | 2 years ago

"ava duvernay" Discussed on Fresh Air

"W._h._y._y. In philadelphia i'm terry gross with fresh air today are emmy week continues with eva du vernay the producer writer and director of the netflix series when they see us which has sixteen emmy nominations. The series is told from the perspective of the five black and brown boys known as the central park five who were wrongfully. I'm fully convicted of assaulting and raping a woman in one thousand nine hundred nine. The serious shows how they were manipulated by officials into giving false confessions. There was yelling screaming abby hitomi soi. I figure i tell them what they want you to tell them what they want. Alcohol sauce while we'll also hear from michael k williams who's nominated for his performance in when they see us as the father of antra mcrae. One of the five boys williams became famous for his role on the wire as omar.

emmy michael k williams antra mcrae philadelphia netflix producer director writer
Let’s Go Crazy: Ava DuVernay “Honored” To Be Making Prince Docu At Netflix

24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Let’s Go Crazy: Ava DuVernay “Honored” To Be Making Prince Docu At Netflix

"The prince documentary will be her second for net flicks. She also directed the thirteenth about mass incarceration as a form of continued slavery for African Americans. It was nominated for best documentary by the Academy Awards and won an EMMY award for outstanding documentary US consumer confidence rose again this month hitting a new eighteen year, high the Conference Board says its consumer confidence index climbed to one hundred thirty seven point nine in October from one hundred thirty five point three in September. Both readings are the highest since September of two thousand the index measures. Consumers

Emmy Award Academy Awards Conference Board United States Eighteen Year
Ava DuVernay will direct DC's film adaptation of 'New Gods'

24 Hour News

01:18 min | 3 years ago

Ava DuVernay will direct DC's film adaptation of 'New Gods'

"To a national park in michigan over the next three years to replenish a population that's nearly died out because of inbreeding and disease the national park service says it's reached a tentative decision to bring about twenty to thirty of the wolves to i'll royal national park it'll make a final decision in thirty days after the public has reviewed a new environmental statements that endorses the plan wolves made their way to the lake superior island in the late nineteen forties since then they've played a valuable role in keeping the moose population in check and they've become a cherished symbol of the remote wilderness outpost but the wolves numbers have fallen drastically only two are believed to be alive today a wrinkle in time may have disappointed at the box office but it's director already has her next gig lined up warner brothers says eva do vernay will direct the new gods a dc comics property created by the famed comic book artist jack kirby it's an elaborate science fiction work part of kirby's fourth world saga about two warring alien planets it debuted in nineteen seventyone do vernay became the first african american woman to direct a live action movie with a budget of one hundred million dollars or more with disney's a wrinkle in time but it debuted last.

Lake Superior Island Wolves Director Jack Kirby Disney Michigan Royal National Park Dc Comics One Hundred Million Dollars Thirty Days Three Years