35 Burst results for "Autism"

Guerrilla Girls: Corrupt Museum Boards, the Female Nude and NFTs

The Art Newspaper Weekly

01:37 min | Last week

Guerrilla Girls: Corrupt Museum Boards, the Female Nude and NFTs

"Say thank you so much for joining us on the podcast and boy. Oh boy or should. I say go go. It has been a year with all the social and political uprisings from black lives matter movement to autism being arrested in protest over leaderships in russia. America hong kong to name but a few there has been a lot to shout about recent me so my question fastest. Has this been exceptionally busy. Time for the guerrilla girls. Actually it has you would think during the pandemic were all working. Virtually not together things would have slowed down but as you know. We have this big art night project launching next week. And we've still had exhibitions. Mostly virtual all over the place and our activism. never stops. We've been doing a lot of recent work against all kinds of museum issues museum corruption and things like that. So you're right. There are so many problems right now so many horrible things going on. But for us activists. That's what we do. We just keep pushing that rock up a hell trying to make things a little bit better. I think one thing. That explains why we've been so busy is that we've always been virtual. We've always been online. We of course did live appearances. We don't do those now but it's so much of what's going on now in in terms of protest and dissent happens online as well and we've always been you know working those working at routine.

Autism Hong Kong Russia America United States
Drew Lock on Tuning Out Off-Season Rumors

Broncos Daily Podcast

02:07 min | 3 weeks ago

Drew Lock on Tuning Out Off-Season Rumors

"Let's start with drew. Lock the incumbent and he was asked to part question right off the top about how the quarterback competition effects his mindset as well as working with peyton manning but drew really thoughtful answers and I wanna you hear the whole thing. the entire press conference where actually. I don't know if i got to ask a question. In fact i didn't and i took exception to but it was remedied. I ask the first question to teddy so here though is drew talking about the mindset of the competition and getting the chance to work with peyton manning this offseason think being in a quarterback competition and then sort of say if you were to say last year not being in one your mindset does change. It'll come into your key. Dorothy quarterback for this team and that's the mindset. That i have right now. I'm excited to be able to be there at this competition in push myself to hold level that Wouldn't have gotten to without this as far as aden as he can be able to give. His time was worth a lot of to my game with more than i think. I'll ever realizing for him dating do that for me in taking the time on his day to be able to do that a. so subtle things where like i am. More is on on film on technique from guy. That's the best for best for a really long. Time was nice having my courtroom dealer with a couple of for you. How were you able to blackout the rumors of the broncos activity. This autism was stafford. Maybe watson maybe rogers maybe fields was that difficult on no or not no. It was not. Because i decided that i was gonna develop a plan in this offseason really long days but it was gonna be worth every single second of

Drew Peyton Manning Teddy Dorothy Broncos Stafford Autism Watson Rogers
Do Your Career Differently with Danielle deShaw

The KTS Success Factor (a Podcast for Women)

01:57 min | Last month

Do Your Career Differently with Danielle deShaw

"Thanks for joining me today. Thank you so much dr brown. How me here today. I'm really excited to be here. So what is the biggest challenge you help female leaders face and business today and what might be the symptoms of that challenge but there are a lot of new challenges. That women leaders are facing today and their careers challenges. We have never seen before. What's happening though is that women leaders were crying to face his talented with old thinking habits and behaviors and it symptom of this is. We're trying to do and talent challenge and create solutions and results and we're doing the same thing expecting different results and we're not getting them and this at the end of the day is impacting engagement retention thieves and really the overall results that women are experiencing personally professionally and the organizations as well. They're its agent. Bow around thinking differently in approaching our problem solving decision making differently. Earth is because a lot of times. We don't know how to think differently. We've done professional development for years. We've received that same training. Everyone else as for our training curriculum. But when we're all thinking the same is sometimes hard to step outside of what we know to look at what we don't know it's it's new indifferently thinking new. It's unfamiliar. It feels uncomfortable and at the end of the day. There's no Outcomes import the Revolt in business making over for leadership. Were always looking back to when we did. We did off. Slow is the wife all that we got when we're thinking differently we don't have that asked data that we can go back and analyze on or predict the outcome will be so that's an autism. Thinking is impressive and sometimes let me try to think differently. Clever ego gets in the way we would be thinking. Oh well. I should know how to do this already. Or if i'm thinking differently. It means i do corrective again. Why

Dr Brown Autism
How To Make A Handbag the Old-Fashioned Way With Slow Fashion Craftswoman Simone Agius

Wardrobe Crisis

02:33 min | Last month

How To Make A Handbag the Old-Fashioned Way With Slow Fashion Craftswoman Simone Agius

"Before we get into the angle. The i wanted to kind of pin you down on. Which was your suggestion. Which is why we chose you to tell you story. Let's just really briefly. Give us an idea of what these bags that you make. Look like well the quite graphic this symbolic of the moon there crescent moon shape which is it's an iconic shape it some inspired from vintage to some degree. I love seventies fashion and one of my favorite handbag. Brands is khloe in that style. Differently inspires me and they cleaned the elegance. They look beautiful. Digest just beautifully handcrafted bags though. So i'm not sure if the entirely so instead strike the not entirely hand-stitched there's a lot of hand processes though as i mentioned the the one or two at a time. There's a lot of glowing involved. We would buysc lose when i first started learning about that was also Basically which is extremely toxic to be breathing in all day and it was actually at the amid traveling shore when the women from attila was sitting in it. She was stitching a handle or something like that. She had the little pot of glue next door and shed the french translator. And i was like can you ask. Oh what's in the pot and he was like aqua. I'll like water. Water base clue. I get this and that was literally when i was like okay. I'm switching on water. Basically with doing that if as doing at we can do it for listeners. Who aren't aware of this incredible traveling exhibition that amazed which actually came to sydney anti melvin and traveled in all different countries. I'm not sure exactly. Where but i did go and see in sydney and the luxury french iconic fashion house brought their processes to a museum context in living way. And so you could actually meet the autism and see them do what they do is amazing right. It was so cold. I was there for like three hours just watching. It was awesome and the fact that you asked about materials in they told you help you and your processes amazing yet. Definitely we now by glue. It's an italian glue and it's awesome stuff but it does mean that we have to teach everything because solving bicyclers superstrong. It's what they use ensures where you don't need stitching to have strong as okay but with bags like when you see an acne bag that doesn't have the top line stitching and everything's bundled that's sullivan glue. Water-based glue you need stitch delays together. Because over time it will come

Attila Brands Sydney Melvin Autism
26 Year Old Father, Caretaker Dies in Alameda Police Custody

Pacifica Evening News

01:07 min | 2 months ago

26 Year Old Father, Caretaker Dies in Alameda Police Custody

"The family of an Allen need a man is demanding answers after 26 year old Mario Gonzalez died in police custody on Monday. Gonzales had a four year old son and was a caretaker for his 22 year old brother, who has autism. Family members save the Alameda Police have been withholding both information about Gonzales and his body. Alameda Police Department released a statement saying that Gonzales suffered a medical emergency while in their custody. Family members say the 26 year old was healthy and suffered no medical conditions. They want his body back so they can conduct an independent autopsy. George Galvis of communities United for restorative Youth justice charges. Police have begun to release statements to smear Gonzales, calling him a suspect and a possible theft. Office called the statement that continuation of the familiar pattern of criminalizing those killed by law enforcement in an attempt to discourage support and empathy.

Gonzales Mario Gonzalez Alameda Police Alameda Police Department Allen George Galvis Communities United For Restora Autism
Oliver Lee: Young autistic bell ringer and historian

Fun with Bells - bell and handbell ringing interviews

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Oliver Lee: Young autistic bell ringer and historian

"My guest. Today is oliver. Lee is twenty years old. He has autism which is a neurological condition that means he processes information differently. It also means he has difficulty with change and things that are unfamiliar to him. He's had some problems forming friendships with his peer group and this could lead to social isolation in twenty ten. He began bell ringing. It's the best thing to happen to him. He has made lots of positive contacts with people and is now well established member of the essex ringing group like many others. He has struggled during lockdown and the absence of ringing bell ring is going through that my first question to you oliver is. What made you take bell ringing in the first place. What always had an interest in churches stems from that because something i've always been fascinated with and think it's not background rid. The the comes from those tend to at my at price church and nice days never had to recommend arenas so i learned to opponent which is pretty averaged six just a couple of miles from and what is it. You like about bowing before. Start spitzer very interesting because some of sponsor there's a lot of interesting background to is. I think going specialists say what is it that you found interesting. Spiracy amount of history. The restaurants are towers the ring during the nineteen twenties. Recall pills civil law surprise nature stuff. And it's just interesting legacy feeding that y'all carrying that on is royal. Yes what's yo what's been your biggest challenge. Ringing wise screams audible devils trickier aspects. And how did you learn to overcome. There's the person both ways different towns because palm slightly higher than the difficult. So i've been trying to is trying to lend beaumont under backwards. Packwood singular one thing and you use the skills for another things. I've been trying to

Essex Ringing Group Oliver Autism LEE Spitzer Beaumont Packwood
Greenwood Genetic Center on Epigenetics

DNA Today

01:53 min | 2 months ago

Greenwood Genetic Center on Epigenetics

"I guess they are front. Greenwood genetic center. Dr louis and kelly walden rate is an assistant director in greenwood's molecular diagnostic laboratory and kelly is greenwood's director of diagnostic development and h net counselor by training. Welcome to the show guys. It's fantastic to have john. Thanks for having us. Thank you so a lot of genetic counselors. If they're listening they know greenwood for their visual aids. I think that's what greenwood is most popular for. But could you give us a little more background and tell us about the other division of green genetic center. That people may be less familiar with kelly. Did you want to start us out of just giving background information. So the green which genetic center is a nonprofit organization We do have four divisions we have our clinical division said they see patients across the state of south carolina. We have our research. Division focused on functional studies setting the causes of autism birth defects intellectual disability. Our education division. They provide programs across the state from middle school. High school all the way up through our medical genetics training programs and then are gonna collapse. I agree with diagnostic labs. We have cited genetics molecular and biochemical testing. And so in this episode we are focusing on epigenetics and really exploring what happy. Genetics is testing four. Bg that conditions for those. That may not understand like they hear this epigenetics term. They're like what is genetics. I have no idea reagan. You fill us in on just giving us that background information so that you know us talking about testing options and conditions all make a little bit more sense. Yup so epigenetics is the process in which expression in jeans are either increase or decrease in a way that's independent makoni sequence

Greenwood Genetic Center Dr Louis Kelly Walden Greenwood Kelly Aids John South Carolina Autism Middle School Reagan
Fall River Schools, DCF Could Have Done More To Prevent Boston Teen’s Death

WBZ Midday News

01:07 min | 2 months ago

Fall River Schools, DCF Could Have Done More To Prevent Boston Teen’s Death

"Officials have released a new report concluding that more could have been done to prevent the abuse. And the death of a 14 year old boy With autism last fall, the investigative report from the office of the Child Advocate offered a scathing review. The Massachusetts DCF and the Fall River School district for their in action. This is more from Maria Most cities, the office's director, the decision to reunify was a serious error. That unfortunately, was compounded by the pandemic, and in this case, every single safeguard failed David, and in the end the child died. 14 year old David Allman died last October, living at a fall river apartment with his dad and his father's girlfriend. The teen and his triplet brother Michael, were reportedly found severely malnourished, abused, neglected living in horrific conditions. The boy's father and his girlfriend have since been indicted on second degree murder and neglect charges.

Office Of The Child Advocate Fall River School District DCF David Allman Autism Massachusetts Maria David Michael
Cynthia Shares Her Experience Living With Autism

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

05:27 min | 3 months ago

Cynthia Shares Her Experience Living With Autism

"Okay so cynthia tell me where did you grow up. Our grew up in garden grove california. What was the best thing about. Growing up there Same with my friends. All the friends that i had and on the pool. We'll just play all the time just playing playing playing all day every day. God i miss being child. Yeah the kids are now. We don't do that. We never like rauner phones or ipods. None of that. They play outside all the time. What what did what kind of games did you play outside. Jonesboro bean play tag mmc swimming pool. Break seen rod alive. Y'all scorers are hughley shoes. Remember those issues. Hey i got really. I wasn't allowed. My dad waters the humidity. We played dolls. do sleepovers. I mean kids nowadays is like wow this crazy. They're just like staring at rectangles in their hands. It just makes me wanna scream. Yes pretty sad. Like dang cynthia is the baby of the family. She grew up near her cousins and they were all really close. They played together. they had sleepovers. How did you feel about school when you were little like elementary school. It was fine. I mean it was like i was just the days. Were like our sold. It does. I don't like in elementary schools. Their own house. it was fine. I guess that's fine. Good while i'd always like i don't know like when i was little i was always like always in a good kid does like did you say kids. What do you mean. I was kind of a bully and the how lake which is always like always had friends and like. I don't know this weird puppies turned. She hit them. I wanted hate people out kids but like always like be friends with the people were the bullies. Like kind of. I guess like the kids you know. I think that's i. That's kind of a survival skill. In some ways. I think every kid goes into their a law school and junior high and high school so pretty much all through school growing up. What did you know about growing up. I really think i was too little to no but it was weird that everyone was kind of more not normal but lake was like though like was doing like the habits that i was doing so they all the kids weren't jumping up and down and doing their hands like to their to their chin or leg touching their face or rocking back and forth. So that's why. I thought it was a little different than other people other kids for example. She had this habit where she would Put her hands together. Squeeze them and then she would like put her hands together on a chin like pushing them towards her chin and we started noticing an actually interschool pictures that it started taking a toll We serve seeing her chin like couldn't get crooked because she was doing it. So much and like shoes would ask you know like yeah you know when my hands her my chin hurts and mike what am i supposed to just be like. Well just try to stop doing it. Ooh my mom round wave once they open the window and my girlfriend ran off and wasn't home so my mom's like oh my god like what am i going to do to have to call the cops. Because she can't be found so then. My mom was like crazy. Crazy looking through me dear number that that's the thing i don't things like that i don't remember but then my mom got me walking with an old woman. Right me yeah. She found walking back home with an old old woman in those woven was a. Hey this your daughter. Like she's been walking around the street and that's my mom's oh my god. We have to have some view like have home all the time. How old were you when you found out your artistic Also like twelve one nine found out told because they saw another kid doing the same habits but he was rocking back and forth and they asked. My mom solves like he awesome like. That's the same thing that i do. Sounds like oh. He has autism. He saw my mom like Told me that they had autism. Always about eleven or twelve hundred do really like knew that they had autism

Rauner Hughley Dang Cynthia Jonesboro Cynthia Swimming California Mike Autism
The Invisible Issue: Understanding Statelessness

Immigrantly

08:18 min | 3 months ago

The Invisible Issue: Understanding Statelessness

"Could not cloth and it got to rina are both stateless. Carina has a said if a kid with autism as the birthplace aboard ones under the ussr. Rena immigrated to the us on a soviet possible cash twenty two in all their forms of identification rented them as belonging to the soviet union. A nation that no longer exists. There is so much wrong with this situation. It seems to be this this perfect storm of unfortunate diamond place but is my take on this story. I think it points to something more implicated of things. We can control from upholding. Basic human rights to adopting accessible fair bats to citizenship as countries societies individuals. Be are failing to do that now. I am not an expert on this matter. I cannot even re-lead to the experiences of these two guests but this interview was undoubtedly a teaching moment. And i am in awe of carina and he got to rina's resilience weakness wonder ability fear. I think all those emotions are important to own. And it's stories like these becky peak going. And i hope i really hope it touches you wear blue are disputed food incredible moving strong story and i hope that in a way you feel more creches and cognisant so let's get started. Welcome corinna and it got reena to immigrants. I am extremely excited to have both of you here. Thank you so much saudi to pleasure to be here and having us so normally. I know how to begin the interview or way to start but i'll be honest today. I'm struggling a bit because what we are going to talk about is so critical to the basic idea of human dignity and yet the issue itself is invisible. We don't hear about it I have worked in the human rights. Space for a long john hayman. Unfortunately statelessness was never bought of my consciousness. Which is sad. Because i've worked with refugees. I worked with asylum-seekers. I worked with persecuted populations but this is something. That is an invisible problem. So i want to start with the basics. Can you explain what it legally means to be stateless and shared how one can become stateless weather here in the. Us art abroad without question. Still snus is often referred to as a kind of an invisible issue steals mrs global human rights problem that affects people in nearly every country on the planet a stateless person but definition is someone who is not considered a national by any state under the operation of its law in other words. Steelers person is someone who has no country. No nationality in every country in the planet would consider and treat them as a foreigner. Imagine that estimated fifteen million people worldwide are in fact st louis in terms of how it happens. I'd say that most people would agree. The cases of statelessness occur as a result of a discrimination of one type or another so laws and practices that are discriminatory whether it's gender-based religion-based ethnicity or race. Based are the main drivers of statelessness. Of course additional factors such as shifting borders or when whole countries dissolve and become replaced with other countries and this is called state succession as well as lack of proper birth. Registration practices can all be major factors. sometimes nationality laws of countries can be a conflict with one another so how nationalities obtained for example in the united states. People can be born into being an american. Or if they're born to american citizens is two pathways that us employees But in other countries sometimes they can conflict and the result in statelessness on but it is important to remember that we are talking about human beings right and well on the surface. This may sound is such a technical term in a complicated situation. What we're talking about is human beings who find themselves living their lives without protection of any country with no legal entity and there's quite often no way out of the situation because many countries don't have protective mechanisms to allow stateless person to get their nationality. Back i wanted to add that in the united states statelessness appears in so many different ways. But you know we are a huge diversity between different experiences and wishes and backgrounds and just last year a groundbreaking report came out by these senator for migration studies and that report estimated there over two hundred thousand stateless people and at risk people that are at risk of statelessness in the united states. You know on a diversity speaks four Data where we are in the us represent from over thirty different countries and territories of the world. This looks really different than what appears and other areas of the world where there's a specific ethnicity specific race or sex that is targeted You know in further and there's multiple ways person a stateless person appears in the us or comes to the us you know we are asylum seekers that were denied the claim some of us came on visa tourist or student. Some of us are refugees. Some of us have temporary. Protective status says were victims of trafficking a one point our lives we unaccompanied minors. Statelessness does at the center of the displacement in the us and there is no legal framework to acknowledge the issue so united nations has to conventions d nineteen fifty four convention on start of st louis and then the nineteen sixty one convention which aims to prevent statelessness and reduce it over tying and it does require states to establish safeguards in their nationality laws to prevent statelessness at birth and later in life. But sometimes i feel like despite having these conventions and hoping that countries will ratify them and be signatures. Do these conventions. I don't see many countries working towards that goal. Why do you think it is so inconvenient. For different nation states to solve this issue if we think about the human rights framework the global human rights framework and we think about united nations. I mean even the term united nations. It's representative of united nations right so the interests of countries will be always superseding those than interests of non-countries right and in case of statelessness. We're talking about human beings who are literally left without the protection of countries. They're not linked or bonded to any state so as a consequence i mean that could be definitely. I believe considered as one of the contributing causes. You know so until very recently there has been very little advocacy on behalf of stateless persons. But this is starting to change so there. Definitely global initiatives including of course unhcr who are mandated by the united nations to protect stateless persons. But the work is definitely a starting to pick up

Rina Becky Peak United States John Hayman Carina Rena Reena Corinna Soviet Union St Louis Autism Steelers United Nations Unhcr
Is this the worst year ever for the UK music industry?

Today in Focus

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Is this the worst year ever for the UK music industry?

"How damaging has the pandemic beam to the uk. Music industry in terms of the live industry has been completely devastating. Sophie shows went ahead last year. There were one or two by artists. Like van morrison establish autism can afford to take the risk on having basically half the audience in the socially distance venue parks twenty twenty was going to be a big year for you and in many ways it was. You recorded an album. In lockdown which went to number three of this month here performing caroline from her debut album. It is parks album in. Sunbeam's this out now making her network television debut. Arlo parks sounds. You've done amazingly well considering the circumstances but it's not the you had planned desert young. I mean this time. Last year i'd risen a few songs for the record. But i was ready to go until i was ready to go on my own headline tall and play these festivals. I think we had about fast. He seven festivals booked. In and i was supposed to be towing the states with heavy williams as well Slow slow you know especially at the beginning of of one's career. A lot of it is getting around. Getting out the physically. I think it felt like it was going to be very much of looking outwards and finding out more about myself especially as a performer but it turned into a more inward-looking year more introspective year

Arlo Parks Van Morrison Sophie Autism Sunbeam Caroline UK Williams
Exploring And engaging autism With Doctor Todd Peter Levine.

Wait What Really OK with Loren Weisman

05:57 min | 4 months ago

Exploring And engaging autism With Doctor Todd Peter Levine.

"This is when this is the brand messaging podcast. Wait what really okay today. I'm here with todd. Peter levin he happens to not be a serial killer. Actually we can make it four words. It could be a doctor. Todd peter levin Like would you like fava beans with that. Now we're now we're really going. Its silence of the. Todd's thing in all seriousness. Though because we we are going to start joking. Not todd for a while. I didn't talk to him for a while. But dr todd. Peter levin is here with me today again. This is loren wise and the title of today's episode is exploring in engaging autism with dr todd. Peter levin todd tatas is. We're not doing this. Dr stuff are we know. Please don't please call todd. Thank thanks so much for having me. No i go by todd all over the place professionally and personally so i appreciate that. That's cool and it's a little bit more laid back okay. So we met. Let's just breaking the ice or breaking back the history here. We met nine thousand nine hundred eighty five correct. That can't camp frank a day in west. Brookfield massachusetts in a yeah. It was. That was the summer that we both turned. Eleven that we're both i. Would i remember it myself. Because i can't speak for you. Awkward lanky looking for socialization may be interested in girls and Stumbling miserably over ourselves but a great place to do that. I thought you know camping canoeing. Linda cabin it was awesome. I look back. And i found one of those photos that my wife saw it was like bothers is really short shorts. Unlike not only was it. An awkward timing was nineteen eighty five. Yeah and don't forget. Don't forget the tall socks socks pulled up to your knees with stripes. You know along the top part of it. That was a big move for me. Absolutely now i before we dig into him and and he's here for autism. He is a doctor. We're going to talk about the otherness. Podcast his podcast. It's in the process of production. But were you there and this is not a rumor. A boat blew up one summer. I was there when it happened. I didn't see it but lightning struck the lake and struck the boat and there was an explosion. Was that we in the same camp that year was that a year before a year later. Do you remember that it might know because that is definitely something i remember and my because you were there a few summers before me. And then i what happened was are overlapping. Ear was the first year. I was there in the last year. You were there. So there wasn't a boat explosion but was something almost as exciting. The you know the the fireworks on the fourth of july someone you know had a roman candle you know the the the basically the two that shoots balls at out and nailed someone in the face. Where the counselors. And i have no idea. Yeah that was. That was the excitement of eighty five. I think maybe was. I don't know if it was summer. But that was the most explosive in terms of flames. And and that sort of thing. I do remember. I hadn't picked up the drums at that point but there was a cabin. I think two or one up from ours and it was a guy with the way i remember. It was a white drum set and a whole bunch of us were inside and he was drumming. And i don't know again a month necessarily gonna say it was camp david. I remember just being in awe of this. This guy in this drum said and loud and rock and roll and i don't know maybe it was that summer camp and start for me. Yeah no i do remember it. It was yeah two cabins down. I guess it was empty and the guy had a drum set and he reminded me of sort of every eighties rocker. You would have any developing eighties rocker. I remember long blonde hair. You know terminator sunglasses. Some sort of cutoff t shirt. And he's a good guy too. So yeah i remember standing watching him and or hearing from like you know two hundred yards away or more because it was loud of course so and here's a little bit more of the irony. I'm always the one in most of my podcasts. When i talk to people about podcast say you know what dig in. Don't go into crazy stories too often. Don't talk about things that people can't necessarily relate to you. But i rarely have guests much less guests that i haven't really seen and the better part of thirty five years so i'm breaking my own rule here but the leading a little bit forward here we you added me on facebook and i guess i just accepted and didn't even put two and two together a little back before we connected in the fall right so that was going back a few years. I remember the name loren wiseman and you know as as we caught up you sort of picked up. I do remember quite a few things over the years. So i remembered hearing the name. See well reading the name seeing the photo in. Of course i wasn't gonna put two and two together and say that was definitely the kid i went to camp with but i said hey in the spirit of connectedness let's do it and then what transpired from there was reading about your work in authentic messaging brand messaging and sort of putting important things out there in ways that are about the about the authenticity authority. Not about kind of gone with the fads and stuff too. So that moment. are those your post. Plus my transition in life from where i was living in rhode island to cenex were important. Wants to and as podcast idea came to me with a group of friends from college a few months earlier i reached out and the results were

Peter Levin Dr Todd Todd Todd Peter Levin Loren Wise Todd Tatas Linda Cabin Autism Brookfield Massachusetts Frank Loren Wiseman David Facebook Rhode Island
6. Family Travel Association with Rainer Jenss on the Adventures with Grammy Podcast

Adventures with Grammy

05:41 min | 4 months ago

6. Family Travel Association with Rainer Jenss on the Adventures with Grammy Podcast

"That's the biggest advantage. I see of travel is that it is such an educational opportunity for children and it reinforces what they learn in the school systems hundred percent very well said and if i may add to this something that i think most parents are not really aware of our additional benefits that come out from traveling with your children so for example we all know or suspect that they are learning about the world as they travel through it which certainly was the case when we did it with our children. You know those cultural differences relieve impression and now so many things but there is also not only they exploring the world outside of themselves but unbeknownst to them. They're really learning about themselves. They're learning life skills. They're developing not just new perspectives but discovering personal interests. That that's this interesting. Byproduct of getting your kids out of their comfort zone and from what's familiar now. That's what travel affords Everybody not just children but particularly children who are going through. Whether it's adolescence are changes that are going on in their lives. All of this mixed together with this discovery about themselves through what they're seeing externally is i wasn't aware of When we embarked our trip and really realized. When i got back it's no surprise at my older son is now twenty three years old. Got his first job. Out of college at spacex he developed this love and appreciation for not just photography. that's a life skill. He learned while he was driving but an appreciation for our nautical engineering and space rocketry. That came out of visiting places like the kennedy space center and so forth so it could lead to be really anything but this gives children opportunity to discover themselves without the kind of influence of their peers and and you know kind of the day to day struggles that they have is young people. I hope the audience out there really takes this to heart. Maybe in some way practices on their own because to be aware of it will really enhance the experience. I think without being no intentional about it. 'cause it should just it just kind of happens and that's where the magic is and that's why go to career in trying to promote All the things that families can do together not just a theme park beach the case. It's some we talked about. But you know there's so many great ships one mention For example dude ranches very popular with the multi gen skipped gen circles if it's a chance to get outdoors and You can not just ride horses by go fly fishing and you'll quality time the cookout or you know by the by the can fire. You know making a sure or young burning marshmallows. Toasted marshmallows students attended arnhem but You know these are. There's so many things that i know. Parents grandparents alike will take the time to research. Discover not to put a plug for family travel association that i that i founded seven years ago but family travel dot org. I urge here audience. Check it out and maybe get some ideas and look at things that you never thought were even possible. Scuba diving with with children is is a possibility. I've gone on dive trips all around the world with my kids and other families ten years ago. I didn't think that was even remotely possible. I didn't realize that a ten year old could certify. Get their certification. I thought it would have been at least in the teens. If not a little older but anyway there's so much out there but as we kind of started with its finding that that kind of common ground that so important one planning something like this you know. What are some of the things that everyone in the family likes to do. And one last thing a common mistake that's also made when it comes to planning travel With families and certainly with multi jan groups is that they don't consider the activities before the destination in other words. People said okay. Where do you wanna go. And let's say for the sake of argument. Someone says i want to go to hawaii and allies. Great were really. What hawaii is is destination with beaches resorts things like diving as i mentioned some cultural experiences but if you pick the destination i you limit yourself to that destination offers instead. Start with all. I wanna go. Sailing are oh. I wanna beach vacation decide on the activity then. Your geography is much larger than you can choose from a greater variety not to mention expenses. Let's say everyone decides to go to hawaii but some people live in florida You know those are all factors so pick the activities. I the destination second. I hope you enjoy today's episode of the adventures with remy.

Kennedy Space Center Park Beach Hawaii Florida Remy
What Is Your Back Catalogue Worth?

You Are The Media

08:33 min | 4 months ago

What Is Your Back Catalogue Worth?

"What's asiapac. A low worth has an intrinsic value to you as well as the audience. You're creating for go back catalogue is when you create work. This not just focus on what's current but takes account of the longer term. It's content that pertains fairly because there's something universal and perennial about it in this way. Not only is it valuable to others. It also helps manual position in the marketplace. Currently there's a flurry of music. Artists alina back catalogs. The lives of bob dylan new young secure of done it even dolly parton thinking about pissing beat to be head so if you build an audience share content defines. Its home of your audience. Your back catalogue can also become something. That's desirable catholic. A work is your audience can always access. It's worth the grows and evolves alongside your audience. You can become a self replenishing goldman in times of new clients have improved that you'll someone who does the work and potential clients getting comfortable with your approach. A website that shares one or two articles every now and then feta video and if you four-page e books does not come across as high value however one of the back catalogue of regla audio writing and video content posted over a period of time suggests is a place of value to us on a u. at the media online in two thousand and twenty joe pelosi said to everyone but anyone michelle content if it went tomorrow. If not your content you have a problem a back cutler means you invite days that you share today but also track record that shows. You're someone who keeps and has kept on giving me never become irrelevant by choosing to rest for used in the past with touring on home to the ever-growing increase in streaming. We're seeing a trend for music. Artists selling the rights at back. Catalogues artists unrealized by a cashing. In on the value of songs they produce david as uk based rotea fund. Hypnosis is obtaining the rights to artists from blondie to mark ronson in the sky article musical journalist. David sinclair said. If you're talking with the idea if you're a rockstar. If you bob dylan you're thinking to yourself. This might be time. He's getting twenty using comp one year right that in a lump sum in sakir who sold the rights to one hundred. Thirty five songs to hypnosis. I'm humbled that songwriting. And given me the privilege of communicating with others being a part of something bigger than myself autism now handing over the word ridden and shed over the years for fake off certainly does not mean tied in this context. This story of selling bank catholics chimes with how we in the beats a bass bass produce work for an audience. It proves that when you work is relevant to others this more reason to keep going the blog articles you produced back in two thousand nine nineteen. Maybe didn't get many views when they were first published. But that doesn't mean the not value sitting within your overall bank of work similar to music artists. Your job is to keep plane so that you keep developing your audience when people find you they can then join the dots and get a more complete picture of y you share is relevant to them. Those articles that received little traffic into nineteen are important in the context of your overall efforts. A moment in time should not be your only anka booting up a back catalog of which shows in your work over time making it easier for people to make a decision on whether to buy or subscribe. Starting the a space that people can visit but also record of how you've developed in the music industry return longevity. What about you. How will you know wherever you're back catalogue is where something it won't be. The same. ballpark is bob. Dylan's three hundred million pounds. When he sold his six hundred songs universal music for how we find out. If what you share has worth you would. Immediate has been around every week apart from some short breaks since october. Two thousand thirteen almost eight years. Now here's why building a back. Catalog of content provides vani in both the short and long after the first one. Is this over time. People see the value provide be prepared to play. The long game is so important. I wonder where ought be now if i hadn't been producing content every week for you at the median. I reckon it would be somewhere where i am today when people recognize. Your work is something that they can get behind you have a license to develop momentum secondly it can support your wider efforts. Your back catalog makes it easier to introduce for new initiatives. The one thing that has remained constant from me has been my writing. This was the tree. I planted back in twenty thirteen and new branches of grown. It made introducing in person and then online live events easier. Don't think of the word you produce in isolation look at it as a way to connect your intentions and third lake is greater use beyond the immediate space producing a back. Catalog extend your scope by this. I mean what stance a piece of work in one channel can extend into other formats. For instance blogs have become talked topics for other people's podcast. One single article became a webinar in april. Twenty twenty on your first ten email subscribers the next point is that it becomes and it brings people closer or from people. The proof of the work. You've already done helps you by helping them. Make a decision go back catalogue in contrast to say tha that competitors whose output may be more sporadic demonstrates perseverance. Next point is that it contributes to sales while message of this. You the media online. That i'm talking to you now is not around selling your business based on your content. Your work can be indirectly related to revenue for instance. The world you produce can also present a way to sell products and services but in a way that isn't merely emphasizing for instance being a trusted business increases the impact. You can make and this links to one of the aspects of what the month of learning represents a recent podcast looked at the impact of trust. Next is your were becomes a reference and search to your back catalogue can become a place for us to take from an somewhere. Search engines recognize websites. We've over three hundred and eleven index pieces of work c. Two hundred and thirty six percent more traffic than no sign of not too many pages and this is ups ball. What this means. Is that the better. Your ongoing work is indexed. There is more for a search engine to look through and support your search rankings ultimately ultimately want visit us to stick around on your site for that you need to offer work they will enjoy and lastly grow from it. The more you practice delivering something the better you become by learning. How the audio space works. I've become a better speaker by sharing a short video every week for the of the media weekly email. I think become a better presenter by writing every week. I've become a stronger writer. Whilst as an emphasis on creating roughness never forget this contributes to your own personal development. Let's roundup similar to writing and sherry music. You just put all your effort into a once a year christmas. Oh you have to keep introducing new material. That can stand the test of time all comes down to having that ability to keep going is what you're creating talking to be worth. Something is what you're producing contributing to your overall message actions in commercial delivery to give you the freedom to play an experiment. Why if your entire back catalogue disappear tomorrow but people let you know what they show concern. You're back catalogue is your commercial worth directly and indirectly and it's important to keep on playing for the audience as you show up to it

Joe Pelosi Bob Dylan Rotea Fund Sakir Alina Dolly Parton David Sinclair Mark Ronson Goldman Cutler Blondie Michelle Autism Dylan David UK BOB
Facebook steps up vaccine misinformation efforts. Will it work?

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

Facebook steps up vaccine misinformation efforts. Will it work?

"Facebook is vowing to take extra steps to block the spread of bogus claims about the coronavirus vaccines as inoculation efforts ramp up around the world Facebook says it's going all in to stop false reports like claims that vaccines are defective or they're toxic dangerous or cause autism last year the company band to paid ads that discouraged vaccinations with one exception for advocacy ads about government vaccine policies but even as Facebook cracks down there are still private groups and there are Instagram influence peddlers the watchdog group center for countering digital hate says millions of people are being fed dangerous lies which leads them to doubt government guidance and helps prolong the pandemic I'm Jackie Quinn

Facebook Autism Jackie Quinn
New York City Public School Seniors Say The Pandemic Is Shaking Up And Slowing Down The College Application Process

All Things Considered

04:01 min | 4 months ago

New York City Public School Seniors Say The Pandemic Is Shaking Up And Slowing Down The College Application Process

"Carlson. New York City public school seniors are now in their second semester, and that's historically a time to take a breath after completing college applications, But some students are still scrambling to submit essays and complete financial aid documents. W. My CI's Jessica Gould reports. That's only one of the ways the pandemic has shaken up the college process this year. Just a few days ago, Joshua Sr was sitting in front of his computer sending in his last college application to Howard University. I can't believe it a school y'all and This my final application. Wow. Yes, Josh goes to Brooklyn Tech, and he's a superstar. He's an a student with high test scores. He loves biology and Mandarin. He always planned to apply to college and the Corona virus didn't change that. But it did make it much harder. There were no campus visits or college fairs. He couldn't pop by his counselor's office to brainstorm. It's very much me in front of my computer like 12 A.m.. The night are in the early morning hours. This like China, think of things and there was no one to look over his shoulder while he filled out financial aid forms. I was so scared. I was gonna mess up Maybe one figure and You like label of fraud or something. But he says the biggest challenge has been juggling all his new responsibilities at home. Josh lives with his father and sisters in bed Stuy. His dad is a property manager who has been working around the clock since March. So Josh takes care of his 98 year old grandmother a week. My grandma every morning, I'll put her on the heart of party that's next to her bed also helps one of his sisters who has autism with remote learnings. I've had to kind of fill in as a teacher kind of helping her out with some of her homework, he says. For awhile, college applications just had to take a back seat to his other obligations. And experts say that's been a common theme this year. Angelique Figueroa is a counselor with a college bound initiative, a process that would have ended completely in December is now being pushed into January and February, she says. Part of the challenge has to do with applying remotely. She thinks the main reason is because students are under so much pressure, and some of their parents have lost their jobs. So now they have to work and they have to be able to provide And, um, I'm sorry I'm getting emotional, but I think that that is why it's taking them so long because they have to now. Not only be a senior Graduate from high school and be the first in their family. But now they have toe provide financially for their families. Like everything else with the pandemic. The impact on college applications depends on where you sit on the economic spectrum. With no s A T or a CT this year, applications over all appear to be up. But applications by students from low income families, students like Josh, who qualify for few waivers are down. Eric Waldo is with the common APP, which allows students to apply to hundreds of colleges at once, certainly a decrease in applications from first generation and low income students. And that's been probably the most troubling takeaway. He says. It's not surprising given how much families are struggling with finances and with loss. He says. Covert. 19 has also underscored how important it is to go to college. Having a college degree is actually was protected people and giving them the ability to stay home it all from the pandemic. It's been a life or death issue, so to be is that much more important that we you let this be a really a clarion call to all of us to do more to make sure students are applying to school and that they're actually showing up and going to college. That message isn't lost on Josh Sr. It's really just a question of where he'll be going next year. He's still waiting for responses, but he's already gotten a few, including this one from SUNY Binghamton accepted Yeah. First college acceptance ever he hopes many more of these are on the way. Thank you. Lord Jessica Gould w N.

Josh Jessica Gould Joshua Sr Brooklyn Tech Angelique Figueroa Howard University Carlson New York City Eric Waldo Autism China Josh Sr. Binghamton Lord Jessica Gould
Behavior Analyst Creates Resources for Parents and Teachers

Side Hustle School

06:14 min | 5 months ago

Behavior Analyst Creates Resources for Parents and Teachers

"Today's story and expert uses her knowledge to create resources that help parents teachers and professionals improved behavior in children with autism. So i worked on story. I was really impressed by all the things this expert and also her twin sister who helped out a bit did grow her business show. I'm going to tell you about them. Of course but i also realized that a long list of actions can sound overwhelming. First of all welcome to us. We'll school my name is chris. Fellow i'm your host the privilege of making the show for you every single day. I'm thank you so much for being part of it and the day before yesterday. I mentioned that. What i'm trying to do here is get you thinking thinking about ideas as well as help you acquire a mindset the mindset really is critical mindset and taking action those are probably the two most critical things so when i mentioned this list of actions. I was thinking about that. I was like you know variations of this topic or this question. They come up a lot. I hear these questions all the time. Do i have to do social media. do i need to learn about seo. I'm not good on video. Should i just get over it and get on youtube. What do i need to do about advertising and so on and so forth and a lot of those questions are why each week. I'm answering three or four those questions and trying to give you some real specifics. That people actually know what to do and at the same time. I know there's this lingering concern in the background about well. I don't want to be overwhelmed like do i have to do all this stuff so as i said. I'm going to tell you what this person did in the story. Because that's the best way we're gonna learn through stories and examples. But i never want you to think that you have to go out there and try to do everything in fact you're going to be much more successful by figuring out what the right things are just doing those few things anyway. We'll talk about that some more but the story is coming up. Behavior analyst creates online resources for parents and teachers of children with autism. Stay tuned big thanks to our longtime sponsorship station bringing you this episode and so many others completely free if you sell stuff online you know how busy twenty twenty wise. Everyone and their dog was shopping online. Also some cats well get ready for twenty one going to be even bigger and that's why online sellers like you need ship station. No matter where you're selling amazon oetzi. Your own website ship station can make everything just so much easier. Get twenty twenty one off to a great start by visiting ship. Station dot com. Just use our opera code hustle to get a sixty day free trial. That's two months. Free of no hassle stress. Free shipping just gonna shift station dot com. Click the microphone at the top of the homepage and type in the ship station. Dot com enter. Offer code hustle. Ship station make ship happen. Amelia bellefonds found her calling seventeen years ago while she was teaching with head. Start a program that provides early childhood education to low income children and families. She worked with all kinds of kids over the years but one in particular stood out. He was a four year old boy with frequent tantrums and very little verbal communication. Amelia and our fellow teacher wanted to help him so they began researching his behavior and discovered that he might be autistic wanting to learn more. Amelia began studying applied behavior analysis. A scientific approach that can be used to reduce challenging behavior and teach new skills and children with autism. Amelia liked aba strategies because they're easy for non-professionals to learn and can have lasting benefits for the child if they're used consistently not too long after. She started her research. She ended up switching jobs. She wanted to understand more so she decided pursue a master's degree and become a board certified behavior analyst again specializing in working with children with autism. And this is what brings us to the side hustle part of the story. Amelia started a blog called accessible. Aba dot com hoping to share insights to help parents understand more about the field and their child soon. Afterwards around christmas two thousand eighteen. Her twin sister. Diana came for a visit. Diana enjoyed writing so she offered to write some post. The goal of the blog was simply to share information with both sisters working away. They started posting one or two times a week as they built momentum. They increased to two to three times a week. After six months they were posting almost every day looking back. Amelia says she would have started posting daily to the blog right from the beginning. But it's always better to pick up the pace as you go along than lose momentum by slowing down. They started out blogging just for parents but eventually expanded to have a separate log for each of their target audiences parents teachers and professionals altogether these blogs get over forty thousand page views a month they also started offering courses on you to though now they self host courses well sisters celebrated their first sale overtaxed even now more than two years into their business they still celebrate every sale with a text some days. It feels like texting all day long in addition to online courses accessible. Aba also offers three levels of membership per nine dollars a month or ninety five dollars a year members get self paced learning and downloadable content. They can pay a bit more and get all that plus monthly videos and a monthly free product. They can pay a bit more. Still get everything. Plus thirty minute monthly one on one call. Before the pandemic hit the sisters had plans to attend a couple of live events but when everything was cancelled they decided to double their efforts on the website they also put together some of the content they already had and self published a book on amazon called. Aba fundamentals for parents. Finally they're starting to post on youtube as a way to extend their reach ameliorate. Miss that is difficult as the pandemic has been it's also been a catalyst is pushed them to work even harder. They're bringing in around fifteen hundred dollars a month however they've really just started to focus on monetization for most of two thousand twenty. They were focused solely on growing the blog and developing those courses. The pandemic hasn't been the only challenge plus opportunity. They've also had to deal with moving to a new state. Changing jobs illnesses and kits despite the business. Amelia says. they've gained a lot from the experience. There's a feeling of control over the future. they don't get working for someone else. They know that if they want to make more money they have to come up with a better product or offer improve their marketing. Reach a new audience or take some other action one of those things or perhaps all of them is exactly what they plan to do.

Amelia Autism Amelia Bellefonds Youtube Diana Chris Amazon ABA
WHO team arrives in Wuhan to investigate pandemic origins

1A

02:06 min | 5 months ago

WHO team arrives in Wuhan to investigate pandemic origins

"There's an international team of researchers from the world health organization who arrived just yesterday. They are in wuhan to investigate the origins of the pandemic. The david tell us what we need to know about the investigation. What exactly are they looking for at this point in the pandemic listeners can be forgiven for thinking one. Oth- is this investigation turning a year off to the pandemic began in wuhan and the answer is politics. The answer is that china is spreading a story which it is spreading with incredible force and assertiveness that it is grotesque to say that china is to blame for covid that it made it even begun in wuhan that maybe it was first spotted a mojang because chinese scientists are unusually diligent but we have seen very senior chinese officials. Just kind of throwing out Random theories about where this. Boris may have begun whether it was india or italy or the uk or the american military. Maybe brought it in or maybe it began in several places simultaneously. Which was the line from the chinese foreign minister of the year. Anything rather than it that actually at the beginning of this for a month maybe two months there was a cover up by calmness officials who didn't want to admit that they had a new virus on their hands in wuhan. So now you have this team. From the world health organization it was supposed to be fifteen is now any thirteen because two of them were stopped in singapore because they had autism their blood when they were tested. Then i'll even on the ground there in quarantine now for two more weeks. There are no promises on the chinese side that they will get to talk to the chinese doctors. Some of whom certainly know about that. Cover up because they were that trying to get information out and were punished. Getting out so really. I'm afraid this investigation is anything. But the real independent scientific probe into whether this deadly disease began on how to prevent another one taking place. It isn't entirely political. Very controlled exercise grudgingly allowed onto the ground in a very limited way by chinese government determined to say that covered is actually a triumph for the chinese communist party. Because they've control the virus now within china's closed

Wuhan World Health Organization China Boris David Italy India UK Autism Singapore Chinese Communist Party
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"A an autistic individual may not use the communication. And also. Have Challenges Understanding verbal communication. It might be that they have. That communication use the communication, but. No in a meaningful way, so for example. Saying phrases. The rows of context now. Let's dive deeper into this. The ton ECHOLALIA. Is often used to describe when a child repeats back. Something that's being said so if we think about their understanding of. Communication on that An ability to express communication. Perhaps it could mean that. Then, not too sure how to answer that question or understand that question all to use verbal communication in a way to. To. Express their meaning, so for example it might be that you've lost a child a question and they repeat the question back to you. It could be that. A child has remembered or learn to phrase that had been said to the previously so for example. I know a child who would say the phrase I like it. And, she didn't actually mean I like it. She learned that phrase from a previous time and had used it to try to tell. That said that she didn't want to do something now. That's a good example of. Communication and language being used in a way that was meaningful to her. She had learned the phrase. I like it. But the meaning behind. It was very different to what she was saying so this is really important to remember because it could be. The child is saying a phrase. It could be in the right context, but actually has a different meaning because of their challenges with expressive language, and actually this is a really important point to say that when we all teaching and modeling. Questions on language that we modal. Responses! To questions, because often is quite natural for us to say the question and say Gee, want this or this. We also need to muddle the onset as well so say for example. I want the drink. Now. This will be explained more so in the module. Help me communicate. This is just really thinking about those challenges, all expressive and receptive communication and thinking about the ways a child might use communication to express themselves. Another example is a child learning phrases from maybe one of their favourite TV shows thinking of a child who uses EPA pick phrases very often, and quite often they are in the right context for example, using a phrase with the word would Toyota when he's in the toilet. The phrase is. necessarily. Repainted in the sense that he'll use the same phases in the same. Context and in response to answers so. That's an example of using phrases in a way that was meaningful to him and he'd love them through watching his favorite shy. And this can be quite coleman. Sometimes you might have had children using phrases that they had heard. And they may be in the right context, they may not be sometimes. We have to really observed. Children's to know what they mean from what they're saying. If. You'd like to learn more C. Talking Abou lots more in terms of understanding autism and learning. Download, the resources take part in the reflections asks them please visit. The website causes autism spectrum teach dot com, the causes of flexible. You can do it in your own time, and when you complete it..

Gee Toyota EPA coleman
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Landing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> And here's your <Speech_Music_Female> host. My favorite <Speech_Female> teacher jaw <Laughter> staff. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Going <Speech_Female> to fight console, <Speech_Female> autism and <Speech_Female> social communication <Speech_Female> interaction. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> if we think about communication. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We can break <Speech_Music_Female> it down to <Speech_Music_Female> the expressive <Speech_Female> part <Speech_Female> of Communication, <Speech_Female> so how <Silence> we? <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Give <Speech_Female> a communication <Speech_Female> message to somebody <Speech_Female> else and express <Speech_Female> it, <Speech_Female> and then we have <Speech_Female> the receptive <Speech_Female> part of communication, <Speech_Female> which is <Speech_Female> undestanding <Speech_Female> I'm receiving <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> communication message <Speech_Female> from somebody <Speech_Music_Female> else <Speech_Female> say that undestanding <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> off <Silence> communication. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Now it may <Speech_Female> be. The autistic <Speech_Female> individuals have <Speech_Female> challenges <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> receptive <Speech_Female> and expressive <Speech_Female> communication <Speech_Female> may be that they <Speech_Female> also have challenges <Speech_Female> with perceptive <Speech_Female> communication. <Speech_Female> Now <Speech_Female> let's think about <Speech_Female> if we <Speech_Female> further breakdown <Speech_Female> expressive <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Female> receptive communication <Speech_Male> because <Silence> within bud. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> With Galt, <Speech_Female> verbal communication <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and nonverbal <Speech_Female> communication <Silence> so. <Speech_Female> Using <Speech_Female> the nonverbal <Speech_Female> communication <Speech_Female> in a meaningful <Speech_Female> way and <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Understanding <Silence> receiving <Speech_Female> verbal communication <Speech_Female> known, <Silence> Rabbi Communication. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> it could be <Speech_Female>

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Now this episode and the next seven Polka step sites are going to sound very different to previous episodes in the fact that they will be a lot shorter, and it will just be May and there is a theme that's going to be running through this and the next seven podcast, and that is that I'm very pleased and proud to announce the I released a series of online training courses, which gives a lot of concise and digestible information as what is practical strategies and how to apply these in real day life. There's a lot of information out there I've designed these courses to give you. The key information how to do different types of strategies in order so that you can go away and apply them straight away especially because we know how personalized strategies. Tailored strategies are really needed because every child is so different, so this is my way right now to be able to support. Teachers Teacher Sister Sankoh's parents, carers, anyone who is supporting an autistic child and eight courses are all based around different themes, so this Polka sets sight and the next seven episodes I'm going to introduce each course, but of course I want to give you. Value wants to give you free information, so you're going to hear snapshots from the training to give you some information, so you can still listen and hopefully take something from it, and of course if you. You want to learn more than I'm GonNa be directing you to the site. Courses Dot autism spectrum teach dot com where the course is being hosted. I've been working really hard on these courses making sure that they provide really beneficial information in bite sized presentations. What has reflection tasks to help you think about those individuals children around you and their own pass. NO APPENDICES NEEDS AFTER I've gone through this transition period. We'll get back into those meaty juicy. Episodes where there's interviews and lots of information. But bear with me while I'm going through this transition period, it's difficult time for all of us I know, but as much as it's a difficult time. I know the support is even more so needed so I really wants to get this information to the people that need it the moist. The first course I'm going to present to you and also play you five minutes. Snapshots is cooled understanding autism a learning, and it's all about that background information about autism, really understanding those key areas of difference of challenge that autistic individuals may face, and therefore what we need to do, or what we can do to support to help to adapt ourselves to adapt the environment to really meet the needs of autism, individuals and everybody. In fact, one of the testimonials from the course already has said everybody should know this information and I completely agree everybody should know. Good background on the standing about autism, so that we know how to effectively help and support. Here's a snapshot from the Coast Understanding Autism and.

Coast Understanding Autism Sister Sankoh
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"I. Don't know how to describe it been absolutely crazy been very strange, been difficult been challenging. There's been highs has been lows, but fundamentally. Fundamentally. Things have changed things at different things are uncertain and I know that we've all had all own experience on our journey. And our own challenges. So I hope you and your loved ones a safe and well. If you have your own children. I hope that you are all in one piece and you have managed to have some kind of quality time together. If you're a key worker, we love you. Thank you Paris. We love you teaches. We love you. Thank you to everybody and the main bottom line is a hope that you're well now. Things for myself and and spectrum teacher, which is myself. have been very challenging because like yourself or others you know. I was without any works so my work. Before the COVID, nineteen pandemic was in schools, supporting staff supporting families supporting Sankoh's teachers developing send provisions in practice, and of course then schools closed and unable to support the schools unable to support the families in the same way that I would have done before. Now of course we've all been managing the best that we kids and supporting from a distance and to a point that's helping some people. But, of course I wanted to do more, and essentially I needed to keep everything that autism spectrum teacher, and myself does all the projects this podcast and this is the reason why I've had to put on hold for the past couple of months because. It is fully funded by myself and without those means of ensuring. Stability for the PO- cost like kids and continue it however i. have some plans. I have things in motion I. Want to tell you what about that and tell you all about the future plans and. The adaptions we will hat so adapt right, and to be honest, I've been really pleased with how some of the children have adapted when we've sometimes, we really do fear the worst way. Of course there have been many challenges on a lot more challenges I would say, but we've got to stick to the positive here. There have been some children that have really surprised.

Sankoh Paris
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

17:02 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"You find the peaceful on his yours. My favorite teacher staff. I I think I think this is live saw. I'll I'll start festival. My name is Jeffrey. I am an autism specialist teacher and consultant and firstly. What a wonderful group. Well done toward the admins fantastic support and everyone being involved with clearly living in some very difficult and unpredictable. Times just to give a quick introduction. I'm set free and I was born in Jersey. I GREW UP IN JERSEY. I now live in London and my background is teaching mainstream teaching in autism specialist schools. And also I've been especially coordinators. Were Sankoh and who side. I developed a program for outreach support so supporting schools to develop that autism practice and I've been invoked instruments national projects as well so developing an autism education program in Amman in Moscow. Right so yeah I was as I was saying. We're living in some really difficult and unpredictable times and of course it's really challenging for all of us but especially those who additional needs and of course everyone's situation is different. Everyone's needs a different. Everyone's family is different. Therefore we've got to really think about all circumstances on what's manageable for for us in the situation that we have some people have more access to more space than others so yeah really thinking about i. Guess what I'm saying. Is We want to get stressed because stress for the family stress for the parents will only makes the children's stressed. I learned this very quickly in my career. I tall of children with very high sensory needs. Hi Communication needs and you know I could sense or I could tell you know if I was feeling relaxed and confident I could see the you know. The children felt safe around around me. If I was not feeling you know. Maybe there was a day that I wasn't feeling myself you know I could see from. I'm thinking of one child in particular he would be. That would make him anxious. Now we've got to think about I. No it's very very difficult and very challenging circumstances but if we can be calm ourselves that's going to have a big impact on the children. Firstly as it's really important to mention that you know for a lot of our children young people adults they can have a lot of professionals involved and you know of course use all of the information you have in terms of supporting them at home. Some families have so much paperwork in terms of advice for professionals. But you know go back through it use it. The there'll be some things that maybe can implement at home. Just I've mentioned like that's really important because everyone's needs again is so different and going back to being. You know being calm and having a sense of calm at her there are Maybe some things that that can be can be implemented for example may be doing some calming activities together now and when we think about it about calming activities you can always look at calming activities on one end of the spectrum and then you have alerting activities which are those things that make us really energized and lots of movement and we can support children sensory needs by using these different types of activities and it might be helpful to think about times in the day that you have maybe some calming activities. That could be listening to some really Calming Music. Or maybe it's doing some some massage on the hands with some cream or maybe it's reading a book it depends on on the child or or your family were awesome calming activities. That you can implement. During the day it could be multiple times a day. You not to support the regulation of the child and have that calm time and likewise is to think about other times in the day where we can make sure. We have some movement and some and some active awakening activities. Maybe that's doing doing a youtube exercise videos. There's loads there's absolutely loads a free to watch us all really great children's Yoga movements while I can Post the link to that as well after new. Write that down so times in the day. Were we're doing some movements and times in the day? Why we're doing some calming activities. What's going to be really really important for everybody? Especially those of additional needs is having a structure to the day or having some routine so as I mentioned we. You know we can have some times in the day where we're doing some khar-ming activities. Sometimes in the day were doing some Alerting movement activities things like you know. Maybe it's even rolling a ball to each other or doing some star if we can make a predictable or kind of consistent routine this conversely help the children to become familiar with something that's going to happen. For example. School is incredibly structured and incredibly routine based if we can not not do not try and do a whole school routine at high. It's it's not and it's going to be very stressful. Of course let me just say hey your schools and your teachers of course will have given you the information to support your your child with learning this thinking about the actual routine and how it's implemented is really going to help the child to understand what's coming next so if we can implement something that's maybe follows a similar pattern each day. So we're breaking up the tasks and way going to provide some some clear routine so let me give you an example. There was a parent the asked a question before about supporting child to focus on some learning tasks at high it was mentioned about implementing a visual structure in the environment. So it making it really clear to the child that this is where we're going to do some some work awesome learning and making it really clear that we're doing activities and these are going to be in. Maybe an book says or they're in Wallets. And when you look at that in the environment so for example visit desk or table having that space and implementing a visual structure so that the child comes familiar that this is going to be a space where. I'm going to be doing some learning activities having said that it doesn't mean that that's the only space that you can do the learning activities and I want to stress the importance of practical learning. And there's lots of opportunities at home where we can implement parts. Of course it really depends on the learning objectives and learning outcomes specifically for your child so it could be that. Let's take counting. Maybe they're doing some Counting activities provided by a school. Or your all your teacher. Spoken about some counseling activities and then to support the child to to generalize learning it'd be great to do some Practical activities maybe. It's counting the plates on the table. Counting the the cloves. Maybe it's going to be something. Maybe it's a turn taking activity and doing some time taking. Maybe there's going to be other opportunities throughout the day were turns aching can take place maybe with siblings or going back to what. I was saying before about that routine being so important. Maybe it's doing a turn taking activity at the same time every day and so be afraid to to repeat activities over Pete things that you're doing. Globally that gives us gives an opportunity for the child to become more familiar. More settled with doing something. Especially because it's it's new. We're doing this doing some learning at high and also gives the opportunity for the child to maybe do it with less support the next time you do it or maybe it's going to be yet doing it more than they might be able to do it. More independently please ask any questions. I'll try and help as much as I can but let me just go back over the points that I was making. His thing is good just to think about things that could be helpful in how they could be implemented because our situation right now is just so different that I've seen a lot of families getting very stressed. And this is obviously one of my biggest concerns. Do what's manageable so it might be that you off with if we thinking about The home learning. Maybe you you could just start off with doing one thing or one learning activity and maybe after a couple of days you could build up to doing to maybe after a couple of days build it up to three what will really help alongside this. And you may already do this. You may have seen this at school is presenting this in a way that it's like a visual structure. What we want to do. Try to help the child to understand. Exactly what is it is going to happen. And what's what's expected in that session and when it's going to end because this can be it can cause a lot of anxiety and support with all of those things that can help to have a visual structure. Which could be you know just roaring during the different things on a piece of paper. Maybe it's finding some pictures From Google of the different activities. So let's just just think about some of those things that I've just mentioned before so it say. For example a few is setting up a routine to implement some calming activities some learning activities and some kind of awakening alerting activities. Maybe you want to have a visual structure. That looks like maybe it starts off with massage. So you have a picture of if you have access to using using the Internet. You can google up a picture of massaging hand. Maybe WanNa take a photo of you doing it with the child. Maybe he just wanted to draw rights so you could have. That then maybe. The first learning activity is Reading a book Sakaba Book. Maybe the next one is counting counting pitcher and there may be. You're going to finish off with doing some rolling the ball to each other last just an example but it in pictures you know you have the images some symbols but to show you the child in a way that's going to be meaningful to them. Some some children may you know may look at a symbol and not get much meaning from it but they might get more meaning from an actual photo. So maybe. What's take a photo of a make. Timetable Hagen. Any tips for an artistic seven year old. Who now leave the house at all. And do you have any idea why your seven year old doesn't want to leave? The House. Is it due anxiety around? The situation is around the understanding of the situation that this is the thing I guess if we can understand the reasons behind a specific behavior or if a child is doing something and sometimes we can can work out straight away. Why they're doing something you know. We're recognizing that as a form of of communication and understanding okay. So that child is doing that that can help us to think about how to help and support for example if it is going to be because it's it's a very different difficult situation to understand because it is so unpredictable. Now they're awesome really good social stories one when I just held up before I'm GonNa send right so if I put a link in here. This is Sheffield. Nhs they've done some really really good free resources. The are acceptable to children of calls. It depends on on on your child's needs. Let me this link here. There's some really good resources to help children who try to understand situation and the the reasons why we're having to stay at home how we can help ourselves. I'm just wondering whether teague in the is the reason you fink. Due to to that anxiety of of of the unknown I would highly recommend the stories on that link and talking about it. If if if your child can in a way that your child can understand. It's as I mentioned earlier. It's it's the way that we are going to wear really anxious and showing that that could also make every body or the children also feel anxious about that. So it's it's very difficult but it's also recognizing is there something that we could help to make ourselves feel calm in such a uncertain situation? I don't know whether that was helpful. Teagan but any I'm trying to think of this Some Some other resources if you child is used to using symbols at school which it Free access to the online program which is really good because quite often it can help.

Jersey Google consultant Sankoh Jeffrey London Sheffield Nhs Amman teague Teagan Pete Moscow
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Perhaps it's a science lesson where you're doing a really exciting experiments about difference using different materials. And maybe it's choosing which color to us or maybe it's having a choice. Sport of the materials being used in the science experiment and that child choosing which resources to use of course all of these different strategies need to be tailored to the needs of the child. It may be. The child doesn't recognize symbols for example and a object is going to have much more meaning to them so making a choice between two objects is going to make more sense to them than than being offered to symbols. So it's all about thinking. What is that child understanding from that choice or from this method of communication and providing them with the best opportunities to take part in interactions and communication. Maybe this pocus episode has sprung some ideas into your minds oil. Think Oh maybe I can give that a try or maybe I should try this. Write it down. Don't forget to write it down because if anything like me and you probably are. I think we all are. We will forget and if we just write that one thing down. Think about how how you'll be able to do it. What resources your needs and then just give a guy? Implementer see if it is enhancing those opportunities for communication. Now I always love to hear from you from the listeners. So please get in touch with me. My email is Steph at autism spectrum teacher DOT COM. We also have a facebook group where we were always talking about. Lots of different. Teaching ideas is code autism and inclusive teaching ideas. So come and join. Come and take part in the conversation. You can find on social media at autism spectrum teacher on facebook and instagram and on linked in and twitter. I am at Steph. Read A S T. If you'd like to hear more about the training workshops the outreach support and coaching that I provide two teachers to provide them with support for the needs in their class so for example through observations through coaching sessions with the teacher was teaching assistance with the whole team. I'm.

Steph facebook twitter instagram
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

07:06 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"With your child Them as long as you can as long as you can't beyond the junior rem unite into the middle phases of school. And that would be something that is interested in Dinosaurs thank wouldn't cope with themselves but radi does give an opportunity to spend that time to give up a little bit of snuggle time with the parents can only just manifest that love of reading and continued to keep them interested in books. Even if it's something that is A challenge for them in the school environment united to have that one on one time. We you reading something that you really enjoy not interested in And and we say it doesn't have to be something that they are reading themselves but broke into Sel to to a child It just keeps love of reading along. Aw Yeah no that's really important especially to see your parents enjoying reading as well already. That's going to spark and interest from. I'm from children. I wonder if you have any success stories you could share. I really love to hear about you. Know when things go really well Maybe it's a specific child or a group of children or something that something that's worked pretty. Well we we have. We do a specially around Sellafield intervention Where we have parents coming in with children you joined went to lead and honestly task is difficult? They're not going to want to do it so we you know. We put children through the interventional with with him in the remedial environment. And we've had feedback from parents. When childhood wit with headed convergence issue so she had official pricing delicacy and she waited individual therapy but because of the visual processing difficulty? She had wanted to read those she was on reading age and remain. He just wanted to bring the older tree individuals individuals given we put her through the Southfield Intervention She was one of my favorite silcon sexually and who mum fight me a couple of weeks after the the socal treatments and to me I just had to share with you that I was walking down the passage law smacks US undock. Tate at posture remain as dominic book until fat. Latin says. Stick back into the passage echoed. Armagh good news. Is that Radi. The child all that. I just said those words. She was a child who had never wanted to read. And what a sudden she because it was not something that was easier for her she just developed developed this love of reading and discover the world of books came a little book Quim And she went on to you to study Manson actually Hands from childhood was struggling with reading to have this big academic Korea. Something quite remarkable and and Just to to show children. That can be something that they can overcome and something that can be used as a tool for them. You know reading Kasumi. Children isn't obstacle coal. The imaging any as opposed to something that should be easy and something that shape they should be able to use to And Yeah we we've got a couple of stories like that but that one really is very special to me because I shoulder become my children With the children that you work with the radio take his struggles on board to to give that kind of feedback. Yes especially sleep when you see the impact that it has on their life you know to hear that. She went onto to study medicine. That's yeah that's brilliant the impacts being able to to read and want to read Andrew before we finish It's been so great to speak to you new sets. Let's you've given so many tips here Tips and advice yeah. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with. The parents or teachers are listening. That may I. If they're they're they have a child who's perhaps learning to read or having reading difficulties there is. Is that something thing that you would like to say to them. That would be the first thing they try or any advice or a takeaway from this conversation. I think it it. You know a child can succeed. I think that's important to me. Just keep in mind that every child is different and they can't succeed eight domestic what they do is gave the supported. She need Get the assessments done. The as with the schools. I'm and radio as much as possible. Try and keep that chance confidence and self esteem intact because we see people that are successful in all black with whatever difficulties they have so. I think we have to keep that as as a big picture on the way that we can work through this The is a lot of support report and it can be done. Yeah brilliant thank you so much thank you with you. Yes Nj and Yeah left the Catch view again in the future and left to let me know when you're coming to London. He will be well well. I hope you enjoy that conversation with Angela. Charalambous from the workshop reading Sensei in Johannesburg lots of strategies there to help our readers be more confident faded and support them sit enjoy reading. He can find more information about this site on the podcast page on the website autism spectrum teach dot come. You can find me on social media on facebook and Instagram at autism spectrum. Teach our Switzerland then at Steph read. Ast Ast also come join our facebook group autism and inclusive teaching it is where we're supporting each other sharing information strategies good tips. Oh come and ask a question I would really appreciate and love to know what you think about the podcast. So if you can leave a review on the podcast platform platform for example on apple costs this would be so helpful to Maye anno side of the people who are looking for this type of information and help them to find. Find it if you haven't already subscribe to this podcast in your chosen. pocos platform such apple. PODCASTS spotify Google the android and then you get the next episodes sent straight to your device. If you'd like to find out more information about how I could support you your family or your school or service. Fees semi an email to Steph at autism spectrum. TEACHER DOT COM. I K- enjoy the rest of your day. Hey an I was beach in the next episodes. Take Care bye-bye..

apple Steph radi Southfield official Armagh Johannesburg Korea spotify US Tate London Manson Switzerland facebook Andrew dominic socal Angela
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

09:29 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"About sharing sharing information and practical advice related to the teaching and learning of autistic on neuro diverse learners. Now good autism practice. This is good practice for everyone. Today's special guest is Angela. Chara Landis who's reading specialist at the Workshop Reading Center in Johannesburg South Africa. Angela gives some really good advice about supporting children. Who are having reading difficulties and Nisa advice isn't just great for autistic children but a lot of different learn is so if you're thinking about helping and supporting a child in your life life who's perhaps having some difficulties with reading? There is lots of great information coming up. This is also a particularly personal subject for me I I am dyslexic and have experienced reading difficulties throughout my education. And still do now so there are different strategies. The I have myself to help me as a reader data so I hope you've enjoyed this conversation with reading specialist undulate charalambous. Here comes the Android on his your favourite teacher staff Angela. Thank you so much for joining me on the PODCAST. Now you run the workshop reading sensor in Johannesburg. I'd love to hear how you're helping children with reading difficulties difficulties show. Thanks for having me. We based yes in hemispheric and FAC- came we work with children with with renamed the vacancies in the areas that we kept our gang assessments for children that struggle we do dyslexia screening tests as will oh that mandate in anything that follows on from that for mediation with goal tended. Intervention from Australia would sell field which works with the way that the brain processes information attention during reading. Have some lovely improvements with that intervention. It's other method. Instruction reading but it's insulated A program way children will on computer and it works with the way that the brain processes information for reading and they having come out of that we we ran us that parents and teachers also need support with children with difficulties and that lead to the the development of various workshops that we run for children comprehension influential skills that type of thing and for parents as wet as teaches this ends. Do you support many logistic children. We'd save need whipped central That functioning And I think just you're in the in the costume environmentally. We really need to be ensuring that on teachers have the tools to be able to support children. What if the tea is? Yeah and I think you're not trying to find a statistic of walked percentage of autistic children from have reading difficulties and the information that I found very from what intend to full intention children with autism having reading difficulties. So I don't put my head on the block and say the you know percentages but certainly if I if I look at skills the classroom environment way teach can do things to us. Children that are not near as vehicle. things like making learning multi sensory. He's an audiovisual information. I'm flash pictures and things like that in allowing children to she presents in a different format maybe in a powerpoint presentation as opposed to being a pricing on nine to work in the area of interest radiologist m accommodating children in ways that they need a lot of children with with that are very a lot of sensory issues whether they artistic or not we need to accommodate them in across from by making sure that be sensitive took to whatever song is in the environment and we want him to be relaxed uncomfortable in that learning environment in the way that we are teaching children with difficulties by breaking up releases into manageable tracks revising. What's been doing what's been done before? Unfold giving an account of wavy going so just making sure that the child is comfortable of way we being Going James of listen cannons on and Starting Eighty Direction explicit instruction breaking up instructions into manageable chunks. All of those things I think we we need to do with with children. That struggle was learning would be relevant four to six children as well. Yeah Yeah and everything. Can you just said that would help all children. Yeah ooh although strategies that you know I'm really make loaning visual multi sensory and and like you said breaking down tasks into into manageable chunks and revisiting learning. Yes they can help all children and I'm I quite often have conversations with teachers and headteachers and talking about how good autism practice on good inclusive practice is good practice for children processing agreed he really is And thank you know they statement the into sake of children with Winstons attention difficulties to some you know. So Instance Instance Saints repricing. Malcolm's on social skills could be an interesting for both of those areas so I think we just really need to be educating and supporting teachers so that they can support children and I think that worldwide is is something that needs to be done. Yeah Yeah just say that we can make teaches away. Bet Child has reading because he doesn't like the region law in costume situation so that we really can accommodate children Rita schooling system as state with confidence a Mesa esteem as intact as possible. Yes definitely I can really relate to that I'm dyslexic. And when I was at school I was filled with so much anxiety and dread if I knew that I was going to have to read out loud or if the teacher just randomly pick somebody so. That's something that I don't do in my own teaching practice when we're thinking about children with reading difficulties he's boosting. Confidence is important some strategies that help me as a reader because to me text. Looks like it's vibrating. Thanks I bright lights really. Don't help and a color filter all colored overlay over a page or screen can make reading a bit more comfortable. What exact? It's such a simple thing. Any put on urban onto a whack page and and if that's going to assist the child it's such a simple little tool not used to make him more comfortable with reading. Yeah we need to just be saints. took to all of those things again coming down just awareness on off from the appearance on the teacher to speak to those tune. What tools can be used in the classroom just to to accommodate children? Yeah and I really liked what you said about using the child's interests because especially for young children to try and engage them in reading when they've got something about their favorite characters or they're you know they love cars or they they they love superheroes having a book about that is already going to capture the their interests no matter what their needs are serum. Yes it's really important to us and harness those interests interests absolutely. We want to maintain a love of reading even for children that struggle with reading we recommend reading from three three different areas so reading really easy material which Bruce Confidence Comic Book or reading a simple book to a younger sibling or something like that that is below h label. Something that they cooperating. Well that's really does boost confidence and give them that feeling of irate already can do this reading at age appropriate levels. A school reno was something where they cope with most of material but the on new words they push semi little bit so that they grow had a skill develops and main reading at a difficult so when about age label Maccabi. Something as you said that is an area of interest and it may be a book that is difficult And I would say to parents continuing.

Workshop Reading Center Angela Johannesburg Chara Landis South Africa Nisa reno FAC Australia Winstons Bruce Malcolm
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Here's your host like favorite teacher staff free. Well thank you. Jane and Helen Feel Time. Today it's really appreciated and be really interesting to talk about the evidence base guide to anxiety and autism and I mean this guy is really informative and it really gives clear explanations of current understanding over in autism as well as what potential causes of anxiety could be and also strategies that can help individuals managing Zaidi but a link to guide and the show notes and BA firstly Jane and had them before we we talk about the guide. What is your experience in autism on your current roles? Okay so my. I came into to the world of autism rarely because I was teaching in a primary school and It appeared that there were more children having social communication difficulties and also taught couple of children who had a diagnosis of autism. So I had. I became fascinated by it really which led me to end up applying to join the autism and social communication indication team eleven years ago and and then we as part of the role I studied at the University of Birmingham Distance. Course for yeah so And then it's been my pleasure to lead the team for the last eight. Yes and so. The experience really is just the hands on experience within schools and then sport in children that we do now cross county not slightly different routes in So I worked in corporate world. I'm became pregnant with my first child and my very last job was to go to the National Society heavily pregnant I pick up a brief from them and while I sat in reception I sat there thinking thinking about autism thing. I wonder what it's all about two years later. The baby's been carrying was diagnosed with autism at two years old And it's been a journey for me ever since he's going to be eighteen in a couple of months so he took me on a journey. I did reverse older As a parent obviously interested became more and more interested in autism. So I took the distance learning from Birmingham and then became a Ta and then became a teacher. And then I landed where I call monitoring job to be working some of these individuals every day for six years. Now Oh that's great great to hear the different journeys and rates and okay so let's talk about the guide anxiety and autism. So how did this come about okay social so I met Dr Sebastian Gag. WHO's the doctor who has done the research that this is all? Based on at an event we were both presenting. I listened to his presentation and then he listened to us and afterwards we met and basically we said we must have some things we could do together because he was doing the theory on the one side and we were doing the practice on the and one of the tenants. Silence of our team is to recommend things that all based on evidence so this was a perfect opportunity to look at what the evidence was for the strategies that we were recommending ending. So that's where it started. So then it developed from there to Oscar tending an event of his talking with him and then he attended a copy. Spokane spoke conference of ours and then out of the natural evolution of that was to work together on this guide so the guide really gives a good good summary of what is commonly understood about anxiety in autism. It would be really great to hear a summary very of this. I found really helpful. In because I've I've shown this booklet to parents and teachers and to think about anxiety as separate from autism. Perhaps you think I think that is the key Lynch of the the guidance and it is that it is a separate entity yes. I think it's been very easy in the past but people just dismiss it and say well anxieties poverty. Some you have to learn to live with it. It isn't there may be some parts of your automatic condition that may be contributing to your anxiety. But it's a separate entity and we can work on anxiety. Exorbitant develop strategies make life much more comfortable for autistic individuals definitely from our assets of practice in in the county. That was good news for us to hear because we've always thought that was the case. But but it's really good that is being it'll cheer definitely for it to be really clear sky. I think that helps people's understanding I think also it's the fact that it can be difficult to identify that sometimes are just because it may present in quite unusual new way and that that might be part of it so for example if the guide it compares social anxiety and a new roof typical person and so they they worry about what people might be thinking about what they're doing that wouldn't be the case of how social anxiety present for an autistic person they would be. I am thinking more about what kind of barriers they need to overcome what they need to do next rouse them. What other people so it? Presents is quoted to inquire what differences same thing is both of those scenarios of social anxiety but they present quite differently in an autistic individual. And I think the difference is is that the typical where they're they're social anxiety comes from wanting to impress their mates and not making a fool of themselves. I I think the difference is and why possibly it's a higher level of anxiety and somebody with autism is because there is that level of panic of. I don't actually know what I can undo. I don't actually know how to overcome this builds and builds and builds and it is something that we try really hard with our schools is to them to see that some of the behaviors that they're commenting on to us the underlying thing. Obviously the autism awesome is related. Actually there is an anxiety there is so it's been helpful as well. So looking at the differences.

anxiety Jane University of Birmingham Dista Zaidi National Society Dr Sebastian Gag Spokane Birmingham Helen Ta Oscar Lynch
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

10:48 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Of actually getting family impo are often. I've looked in. There's a big area of research specifically typically parental also family involvement and the fact that this Canley really challenging for many reasons. Maybe like the parents should should we say own experience with schools might mean that that reluctance come to these meetings and engage is also like a little bit of a professional parent hierarchy hierarchy which definitely exists and needs to be taken into account that the parent might come into this room full of who they perceive experts in different fields. They will just feel like they can't express what they know about their child and I guess that's where it's our job to make sure that you know we're providing that kind of environment rent an atmosphere where the parents are feeling like they have their say and they're say is valued whether that's going to be powerful. We're inviting parents into assessing the type of meetings that we're having again going back to the various forms of early intervention. Even things like finding casts I rest spike. Basically for a child's is also almost a form of intervention in that. You're giving the pattern for the care that time to go and just chill out because the loss of relationship between the parents quality of life and that I think have to rate a tie into accounts that the parent needs to be getting the rest by. They need to be common able to manage the situation. And what what can we introduce to support that to happen as well so I would always always pays any of these meetings. You're talking to the parents you'll deciding what you're GONNA do to support the child. But as a second plot that conversation could even be fastball. In some instances this is another part. She received that goes ation is is what are they doing for themselves because that's such an important integral abyss that we need to be making sure that as supported reported as the child I think coming to the end of this. I think a really important message is that there is no right intervention. It always concerns end music if I if I had someone who says This is what has to happen to my child as soon as possible because x y and I kind of think. Yeah yeah that might have really worked very well for another child from another context. But that doesn't mean it's going to wet Pathak leave your child and there are two thanks to coach him with us as well as a it might. It might simply not be available to you. That could be because it didn't do in the UK all it's really really expensive expensive. And you Kinda take these factors into account. I'm ready just whack out. What's achievable and available? So let's take sets. Let's switch is something that I have used to have a huge amount of respectful. Which is a a program that's multidisciplinary so it takes aspects of have different programs developed by speech and language therapists and essentially aims to support children with social communication and the national regulation but will say those around them to be aware of and evaluating what you all transactional supports the how? We're actually helping children to access their environment. All how a changing the environment to support them and we'll I continually felt was fantastic. mastic about sets was it with the child and it stays with the child. Say Look into really change the child in any particular way you're just Getting some ideas maybe from it about things that could help the child with the communication and their emotional regulation but fundamentally. Hey there's there's nothing that's trying to eradicate from the With that break. So if we're seeing that waving their hands in the as helping them to to feel more my shouldn't they regulated than us right and that will be recognized and supported an added that communication possible. You know. I think what set has done is zits money's team in a way combine lots of different programs quite effectively and helped pull the understanding of professionals does. The approach was developed by looking at typical development especially in the areas of attention and joint attention. I know for me. What's that is really highlights and increase my understanding in terms of the development of attention on the development of emotions and emotional national regulation and the impact that therefore has on the way? I'm able to support children and recognize what stage of development there. What's with the attention and social communication and unemotional regulation just kind of factor? The functional analysis thing. Isn't it so you'll you'll moist. ICED is is to support you to support your child's which is worse so useful about that. Yes definitely a KO wrap up here by summarizing in some of our key points and that is that a combined approach can have lots of benefits of very personalized tailored approach coach. Depending on the child's needs the team around the child is really really important and their access to evidence based practice assists strategies interventions. Which of course need to be monitored and evaluated to ensure that they're having an impact and we really need to highlight? What are we intervening for? And why and we mentioned about the importance of Hyman school partnerships working together making sure all information mation is being shed the importance of a multidisciplinary approach and of course always acting in the best interest of the child. Which of course should be oviously but is important to highlight definitely and I think another just really important thing is about being aware that it's not going to a bill like this forever? Say you are of a parent or you are a care of a young child. And you're ready struggling with aspects of that behavior. Then you'll title Oleg because as a lot of parents out there regardless of whether by child has a tight Bravely struggling with the specs affects that child's behavior. I'm I think it's important to recognize that. It is a challenging time for many people with having a child but the child is GonNa McGregor and they all going to change and become necessarily predict in what ways especially if they are autistic but the the things will change. And let's seeking that support I think is just so important. They're very adult giant. Yes seeking support is so important and of course as practitioners Titian as we've also got to support those families who may not be seeking support for whatever reason for whichever stage. They're at in their own journey with their child's needs and for us to support that also so to make sure that We as professionals highlight the services that are accessible in our area. Or aw if your parent knowing what services are available in your area there's lots of support groups online in fact by the time this episode so come out I will have started the facebook group for parents. Teachers teach sisters speech language therapists. Anybody that's involved and wanting to get the support around autism and different learning needs inclusion Russian. The aim is the group has learning together sharing ideas problem solving asking questions. But yes. There's lots of different support groups online and John might possibly be some in your local area. Make sure you're aware of of what is taking place out there. And what support is available without okay into cheesy if it comes to support groups and stuff then be that change if you can't find anything in your immediate area than than set something up yourself if you can handle let and it doesn't have to be much more than like Kofi once a week all once a month if that was better I think sharing sharing ideas sharing experiences experiences. Just having someone who gets a bit where you're coming from oil going through his sample and thank you so much higher my pleasure thank you and yet it's been absolutely brilliant to speak to you to keep talking. Nothing is fantastic caustic and really useful for many legal. Yes thank you very much via time. That was higher. I inside thank you so much. Hi It's always such took pleasure to speak to you. All of the links that we mentioned in this episode will be in the show notes on my website. AUTISM SPECTRUM TEACH DOT COM. So just go to the podcast page and you can find the episode if you WanNa find me on social media on facebook and instagram. I'm at autism spectrum teacher and on twitter and Linton you can find me at Steph read. Ast If you want to get in touch please send me an email steph. At autism spectrum teacher DOT COM and as I mentioned earlier I am looking for cost editor. So if you think that might be you. These email me Steph. AT AUTISM SCHISM SPECTRUM TEACHER DOT COM. And as I mentioned earlier the next episode will be live in two weeks. I if you haven't already subscribed bribed to this podcast then you can do so in the pokonos player of your choice. Whether that's android Google Apple podcasts. spotify notify and I'd love to hear what you think about the podcast. Any reviews is really helpful for me because I get to see what well you may like about the puckers but also it helps other people to find the podcast also. I mentioned the facebook group in the episode so you can find on facebook. It's called autism and inclusive teaching ideas that come and join the group and I will speak to you in to me the..

facebook Steph UK DOT COM Pathak spotify Hyman twitter editor McGregor Kofi John Linton
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Expectations on the part of the people supporting that child and that might simply Jesse too much they both. I would argue elements that can be really really useful for the child for the professionals for the family. That's about kind of taking what works sharing intimation and yet fixing on going back to the point that we again said before about making sure that whatever you are intervening with they will ever. You are supporting the child to change or to adapt is is actually appropriate functional. For that child I think on the side Daca doc night potentially I was thinking about Eilly intervention and specifically in the UK. I always worry that parents will access this this amazing resource that we have available to us. which is the Internet? And you'll get all of this information again as I was saying a rabbit hole. You have some people telling you this and other people telling putting you that but you'll also have just so much information and maybe you're informed to the point where you decide this intervention. This program is exactly what you need for your child. We need to be aware of the resources that we have available to us and it regional in the UK. So you might in one place and you would have certain programs available to you. Then you'd be different place in that wouldn't be available and these things can be really really suit per expensive expensive and time consuming and put huge amount of strain Oakton even distress and like the family environment. So think again. It goes back to what I was saying about these programs at great and they are evidence base. But it's taking what you kind of what works from those programs and applying it to your environment. You're Brian Context. And I'm maybe token European more incentive like the parent or the Guardian at that point but another link that I really would love if you could include adopted. Compensation is the nice guidelines which cover diagnosis will do some fool under a under nineteen. There's also adult version and the written By experts and I feel that many people know about them but a really fantastic guide about way. You should be looking at each stage. They pre dyke Mike Nicest. You have any consents though. I light some things that could direct you to go and seek advice from maybe a paediatrician or doctor and then they'll kind of fully in three stages of that process even into intervention price diagnosis. I really recommend just anyone interested in kind the fort is in the UK. And I went to check out thank you I completely agree. And I'll put a link in the show notes. Okay let's talk about an example who of an area of intervention that poses a question of whether there should actually be an intervention or not. So we've got a a child who is four years old recently been diagnosed with autism. Their parents are still coming to terms with the diagnosis named named occasions on the life that they had may be imagined for this trial. Also that ran lives is family something that they particularly finding finding difficult at the moment. Is that this child really likes to wave. Their arms in the air is a typical example of a stemming behavior so that yeah kind of thing okay. She's artistic bought. We just can't handle the fact that she's doing this and we want to stop doing this so then. Should there be an early intervention around that already intervention about Mata. Well how do you do that. Yes and this leads onto a much bigger theme think about acceptance and understanding and is there actually any issues here all the issues more to do with external factors and other people's opinions and views about how people should be behaving. I would like to explore the parents. What do they feel? The issues are here. Is it actually helping the child. How is the child feeling? They expressing themselves. Well is the function of the behavior and looking at this with the parents or carers one's a stand by why the child is doing why they are waving their arms is it because they the happy and excited they angry. They regulating themselves to try and stop the child from doing this then there could be other consequences consequences because this behavior will be having a function. Full that child so interesting because then it's almost like people mice described actual functional analysis switch switch. We wouldn't necessarily say was early intervention such in the doesn't directly target the child or any aspect of that behavior but functional analysis where you're trying understand. The function of here is kind of going back to our earlier conversation more all over support for like the professionals of the family. And it's it's almost like you're kind of still intervening in a way by showing them. This is why she's doing. This is the reason and so. That's again like kind of another way looking at early intervention is it doesn't necessarily have to be targeted at the child. I think that's kind of capturing something that's really important. Yeah early intervention specifically as with any intervention can also be targeted people around the child. Maybe yes definitely and research shows us that supporting parents have families with understanding needs and supporting areas such as communication play leads to better outcomes for children and also the same of supporting supporting teachers and educational settings. I actually completed a research project a couple of years ago which highlighted that when the knowledge edge of school staff was improved this leads to increase confidence of teachers and most importantly better outcomes for children and especially especially when we are perhaps working with a child. That isn't able to effectively express their needs and their wants and how they're feeling we saw. Aw The people the family the professionals we are the people that are trying to understand what is happening in that child world. How is that child feeling feeding and that is really important? Especially when you think about all responses to the child and how that's going to have an impact on them when you're present but then I think another aspect of this which is interesting specifically in terms of early intervention. She say generally we might be working with children who approvable or at least half substantial stunt communication difficulties so we have like the mental capacity. Act which was introduced to protect tsk adults. He might not necessarily know if they had the capacity to make a decision about something like say an interventional rather questions in the way they would live et Cetera so the mental capacity act was introduced to to protect these people and I think the key principles are basically that anything has to be done in the interests. If that person who said that all efforts have to be made to actually support that person to decide and fix really interests me especially in in context at intervention another key principle is even if you think that decision is unwise. That doesn't give you the right to make the decision on that. Aw How often do. We think that we're just wise it and say children and therefore we sort of decided that they shouldn't be playing with that because that's inappropriate. Actually David maybe expressed an interest in that. And I'm not saying him with them in danger but like if a child has a really strong interest in one particular toy and you think it's unwise but they have that toy with them too much because they might become overly dependent on it then. I feel like you'll you'll going against that principle which is basically that that this child is is selecting something and it's working for them and we kind of have to be empowering children as with as with anyone to to make it's decisions and yet the mental capacity yet obviously doesn't apply. I'm not saying either. The in necessarily ship because there's a degree of Karen responsibility ability that is needed. If you're discussing child but I think the principles really interesting to take into account again going back this conversation. What are we trying to make happen for this young person what we try to change what we're trying to develop yes? Most importantly everything must be done in the best interests of the child I owed and therefore the CO context needs to be considered maybe with the example of the toy it may be that parents and professionals does agree on a strategy to support the child to perhaps develop other interests or take part in some activities without that favorite favorite toy but again everything must be in the best interests of the child. And this is where it's also very important that there is a multidisciplinary approach. The impact of a range of professionals are specialists. In in those different areas speech and language therapists occupational thera `pests perhaps physiotherapists specialist teachers. Are you've got the impact of different people and most importantly the family I think the challenges.

UK child world Jesse Brian Context Mike Nicest Mata Karen David
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

07:15 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"A completely different experience and through doing those observations on yourself being reflective when you watch those things back and think about okay well could I have done differently there. Actually I can see now that he's not engaged at all and it was because he wasn't engaged in its later those disruption in Alexei which may be actually made the lesson quite as good as it could have been Space despite his parents in Caras of say. You've got to do the same thing he since I'm going to take a step back and just thinking subjectively and just think to remove yourself from day to day stress and the emotional and just step back a K.. What do I want to change? Won't be will them to be able to save day will express little yes. I think sometimes is very hall to save reflect or think about change. When you're on the treadmill as like treadmill you call stop flack because they can certainly flying off the back of the treadmill but you have to create some gaps. Still poses is is a spice feeds Think to make a strategy to try this and then they give yourself self time to try it to see if it works to save fuel Child again peasants responding if it's going to help them And not just if not get cold in everyday being the same if every visit bloom there every day than that. You're either going to go on without problem every day. Oil At some point you have to take a step back. I'm not going on this. We've got to do something about out that I have. I mean I mean the big thing with a lot of parents food items of Fussy eaters and children awesome very restricted diet since the And I think that's a big emotional parents. As well as the parents of the students I work with who all very very fussy is. It can be difficult for the parents because they have concerns about that child's health some children don't inch by drink fluids also concerns about that in quite emotional testing for them. So yeah I would say try and give yourself time and space to step back and there's like commission as well can be ready hall. I think it can be very hard spoil things young children especially it's different different by different age groups present different sets of challenges as parents of a child with autism. Then let you'll save needs when the child's may be real for doesn't is not long had a diagnosis is. That's quite different for the needs of parents wants who Sixteen year old children. And give yourself said permission onsite. UK Decay for. Everything will be okay. Like life's hauled fretting mice people alone habits of children with severe disability. Give yourself permission for not to be. Okay say that. There's something here that we won't affect some positive change create a strategy and stick to it consisted late Half any work Mike my favorite thing to do with the children's intensive instruction which is just kind of engaging with them on ever level and initiate the interaction and then you following safe the direction which I think think is just like the most lovely white interact with children with autism and encourages that communication. And it helps you to get into. They will understand them so yeah I would say enjoy. Your children are are lovely Adam. Thank you very much. Thank you so much for being my my. I guess I really appreciate it. Appreciate everything he said and I think a lot of people can be learned from some really important points. So thank you for sharing good. Thank you for listening and go enjoy your children. Carlos the and that brings the conversation to a close. I really hope you found the episode interesting. Or you've taken something away from it. I absolutely agree with the last point at a made their about intensive interaction and interacting with children young people at their level and that's their level all of communications so for example if the child is non verbal interacting and joining in with them with their vocalisations or their actions and ensuring they are the ones that lead in that interaction. I'll put some links in the show notes to some further information about intensive of interaction as well as some links to some blog posts. I've written about implementing different emotional regulating strategies. I'll just quickly highlight some of. There's really important points that Adam just made including knowing your students really well understanding an observing and listening to what they are finding challenging and what areas of emotional regulation do we need to focus on to help and support them controlling any environmental factors that are having an impact and this comes hand-in-hand with sensory sensitivities is something to do with the noise always or the visual stimuli or the physical environment the can be changed and adopted in to help that student feel more comfortable being consistent in our approach and not changing too many things at once. Another important point was understanding the function of behavior. And why child might be behaving the way they are is causing or triggering them to be feeling this way and therefore behaving a certain way at a mentioned about implementing think functional communication support to help the children to communicate and express themselves. He also mentioned about teaching functional regulating eating strategies that can replace harmful strategies that perhaps the children have have developed so finding something that works for that particular child diode and to help them regulate which is going to be safer and less harmful to them..

Adam Caras Alexei flack UK Mike Carlos
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

13:24 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Language cognitive abilities very cognizant of ability range of needs Z.. And ability okay. So today's topic we're GONNA focus on emotional regulation so first of all. I guess to think about what exactly emotional regulation means. So how would you define an nationally. Well especially national regulation as a skill we all have varying degrees. It's not something. The thing that we are taught in schools mentioned something that we learn from parents and pays obviously this many reasons why CHILDREN YOUNG PEOPLE WITH AUTISM MAMA bill to regulate emotions in the way that you are right. Come about define it As your ability to keep you Gerald immediate surroundings acceptable to not not not not how things in your of your own small world causing distress or anxiety not say knowing knowing how to safely manage emotion. Yeah Yeah especially Crying when you're upset is away regulating your emotions So is if you want to go out full of save a Walker by cried sit. Help yourself calm down missiles the vessel aways regulating your emotions knowing for example. What you said about going to war maybe your you first of all need to identify how you feeling young? I'm feeling a bit Maybe side I went to think about make making me feel silently myself for world strategy. Am I think we can all empathize with what it's like to be to be disrupted for some things will be wrong You'll you'll will will your immediate of mood and you've not radio identified that feeling yourself yet so you don't really know what to do because you'll it just you'll having that emotion not manifest itself is not in people but I think most typical people when they do recognize how they're feeling they've got a tool kit of strategies to help them deal with emotion could just be asking asking someone if you're a bit of space till you're lanes. which if you think about the North cystic child in a school? If they don't have language they don't have the ability to say. Can you just just give me a little bit of spice please. They don't have one tool that they don't have immaculate an essay if we think about how old Things that you can do to regulate your emotions than a low of you'll save behavior and all the things that you do are or about regulating your emotions feeding side. It's about sharing yourself if you feeding worried about reassuring yourself if you're feeling nice and calm and hop is about sustaining nice in common. Happy feeling say we're all doing it all the time just to keep ourselves else on even keel is not just as if is not just to save a bringing yourself up when you're feeding down thing it still say a so when you're feeding Avis stimulated what you can do to to bring yourself Down I think everyone I mean the struggle sometimes if Getting on a busy train and the train stops at the station. The does Abe and someone has to rush onto the train before people get off. Then I use my regulation at that point. Quite rates The train so we'll do it all the time and I think when you you know an undescended how children with autism trying regulate themselves you can see in them all the time as well they all constantly and they it said because as the Along the time constant full than the anxiety navigates away for some some children. They are just kind of sometimes. That can these leaps regulation behaviors which two people died understand. That doing can look kind of strange. Not socially appropriate list of things that maybe you wouldn't want to take your child to the market because if they get upset Soleil stall regulating themselves in the way that they usually do. You know that someone's may be going to come in so someone's GonNa give you some Flight YOU'RE GONNA receive the understanding. Yeah and I guess for fourteen years like ourselves. I guess I've always looked At the area of emotional regulations as so important. Because like you said before if you're not regulated you're not gonNA be able to take part in a lesson for example you're not going to be able to to join in with the learning and therefore it's even more important to focus on learning and understanding some strategies to regulate reservations so in the classroom. What are awesome? Shush used to teach children how to regulate their emotions. It over well I mean everything in the With said nothing your students in knowing that profile and knowing what it looks like when they all trying to regulate their emotions in different ways because a meanwhile meanwhile child might be a sensory May Be lighting the nails of the skin around the the finger something for another student that might be a sign of very serious anxiety and distress in some save like the something is GonNa happen very soon. Intensive like a breakdown of their emotional their ability to save. Hold it together. So I think having doing your students is firstly K. tonight Signs looked like Kim -Ation Zoll things that the child is saying saying or doing when she know your student and if you leave of the same group of students coming to class every day and every day goes joins insist however one mice in common a well-regulated ready to take on some save. Like skilled. Participate ached in us a learning activity. The second thing always do is to just like to look at the classroom and see just if remove remove anything which is causing distress anxiety and not can pay almost anything. I mean for children. They don't have a clock on the wall. Maybe they can hear the taking of the second hand I guess we didn't knowing full them so removing things that like some of had students who just you just cannot have the window of history might been. Maybe because there's a sound outside they can head of people come all children will opposite. You need need like a soft area on the floor to like sit down with the children like to sit on the flow transmitted. Adopts the Riemann. The layout may be this. June doesn't like to sit anyway by students in your Rangers have seating formations. They are as if not doc class together. Say Yeah just three because I think the is easier to control environment than it is to you. Adapt to the behavior says. There's something in the room or the environment which is save triggering anxiety all the distress then just delays things as much as possible Z.. Outside With nothing students nine while the signs of that if it just regulation then secondly looking at the rear if you're going to be a number of everyday getting rid of everything is a possible source of if any if Arkansas have you any any particular examples that as something particular in the room that you've noticed taste like the time that's perhaps who was then to become this regulated. I made you aware of at the beginning. I think I think I think a lot of it is probably relates. Like sensory intolerances. Nate wellness is like lights being turned on and sometimes the rain is like dog that people coming DC. Well they're doing but the student will not let you down white on the windows. The Evan lots of things means So they can pick up on sometimes really tiny little a buzzing coming from from like a computer. I can kind of empathize because I've got quite high pitched hearing and sometimes I can hear if like a TV's off it listen to instill make him very high. Pitch Sound of Maine drives me crazy in other people can't hair will say full of as a AH young person with autism if that something that is driving them around the bend that they one else can radi hail interpreting. And then you've gotten way way of saying like like an hey. This noise is a radio. Annoying May Then you've got to try and zoom out or anything about it. Sometimes of China is a lot of trial and error. Yes which also comes with its own eh problems because of the say the children light said things to be consistent in the same and sometimes when you then I have a commission you gang food electron in our prices which means you're changing things all the time And I think sometimes it's just good good to if you've got us at a decent theory of maybe walks bothering this. June is than just let try a solution Rickett cricket period of time and tried to bed in June get used to it because when she got into the city of the routine of trump to swap walpin change things around. But try this and try that. Then there's no consistency for the students or on the go like a baseline of what to expect when they come in on Tuesday. You try and different things on Tuesday a for example. Those something happened. If you're walking to go swimming pool and one one in St Louis if like a bit of an incident with a dog will thing and the next week the students not want to walk by back that way because worried about the dog but then if you start looking at different route to swimming every time then someone else is going to get like seth I said I sometimes yeah I think it sometimes hauled today with trodden era if you own radio show while the.

AUTISM Rangers Gerald St Louis Walker Avis China Abe Soleil Kim Evan Arkansas seth DC Maine
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"And here's your favorite teacher staff. Welcome to the second episode of the Autism Spectrum Teacher. podcast my name is Steph. Read and I'm an autism specialist teacher teacher and I provide outreach training coaching and consultancy to schools and services. And you can find me at. WWW DOT autism spectrum teach dot com the autism spectrum teacher focused is all about developing understanding of autism for having conversations with or individuals parents parents teachers service providers educational professionals and. I'm really excited about today's conversation with Adamson Demar all about emotional national regulation here. We Guy Adam. Thank you for joining me today. I really appreciate it. It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you so adam is as being. A friend is an experienced children with autism. And we saw by you just giving a background background of your experience the schools you've been teaching at should've say I've been working with children and young people with autism for the last ten years prior to that I worked in mainstream education During the ten years of worked with Peoples from all of key stages from key stage one up until post sixteen students Had some experience with the whole range across the spectrum from the children with sieve night language to you children with lots of.

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

16:30 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Renamed and a K brilliant before I get in to the teaching and support tips. I just want to give you a little a bit of background information about me. Your host Steph read since my very first interaction with an autistic child whilst I was on a work experience placement whilst at school. I've wanted to learn everything I can about autism. Spend as much time as I could about cystic people and John's I went on to study especially as inclusion studies and Early Childhood Studies as my undergraduate degree and then I've since been teaching in different types of educational setting such as mainstream schools and special schools specialist schools specifically for cystic children as well as a provision and autism provision within a mainstream school so very different settings and I've also had a lot of experience in using different types of research based approaches an intervention. Such as Sir Social Stories teach cocoon attention autism positive behavior support the picture exchange communication system intensive interaction and many any other different types of strategies and interventions. I will go into more detail about these different research based methods in later episodes of the cost cost. I also want you to let me know if there is anything that you would like to be explored in later sides of the podcast. And I'll touch on that at the end end of this episode Maurice Lately. I've been involved in developing and leading an outreach program of support to different schools where The main focus is really building capacity developing knowledge and understanding of staff as well as really ensuring successful provisions Asia and practice is in place. Because let's be honest. Good autism practice is good practice in general so a lot of the things. I'll talk talk about in this. PODCAST episode weren't just be beneficial for children of autism but for a lot of our children now without any further delay here are awesome effective strategies for teaching and supporting autistic children so the first hip is to always think about the sensory Dentsu. We import in the environment. And how this might be having an impact on the children. You're teaching in the classroom. Or how the sensory IMP- Hi might be having an impact on an individual or perhaps in the service you're providing. There is quite often lot of sensory input going going on around us all the time and for example in today's classrooms. You already have a lot of sensory stimuli for example who busy colorful classroom displays lots of resources around the room on tables on shelves quite often in very bright lights lots of different smells. Lots of different sounds from the other children. Perhaps even from electrical requirements and sometimes autistic children can find it difficult to block out different. Sounds or be able to focus on the sounds. A you want them to focus on. Or perhaps they're experiencing those senses just much more sensitively than you or I. Why and we always need to remember that everyone is experiencing the sensory environment the sensory input around them differently and this is especially true significantly true for an individual with autism? Sometimes the impact act can be obvious and what I mean by that is for example. You may see a child covering that is. That's very obvious. They're trying to block out some parts of their auditory input so already that signals to you. Something in the environment is having an impact on them. What can you do about it a child? That's covering the eyes or turning off the lights writes that signaling to you that perhaps the lights are too bright or the paper is too bright can these be adapted did a child that's moving in a particular way. Maybe they're seeking some kind of sensory input. They pulling in things into them. Tightly is is not signaling to you that they they're they're seeking that sensory input is is something you can give to them to provide them with that woulda movement break. Help would some kind of equipment that would give them the depression for example a a weighted blanket or a hug vest. There are lots of different strategies that can hope support the sensory needs of children and I would suggest that you always look at the impact of the sensory environment if a child has become this regulated then perhaps very upset. There may be very angry angry. Something is something frustrated them look at the sensory environment. Look look at what is going on around them has. There is just too much since we import. Is it causing them sensory overload and it's just too much there is what's known as hypersensitivity eight has been very very sensitive to sensory input or that's high pose sensitivity which is under sensitive or perhaps not register sensory input and children can have both sensitivities. They can be oversensitive under sensitive to different sensory input. So it's all about looking. The individual sensory needs providing the right support will help a child to hope a child to regulate and manage that sensory environment around them because if they are very sensitive. It's going to be highly overwhelming. I'm on forget about learning. Forget about forget about teaching. That's not going to. They're not going to be able to focus. Concentrate so always think about about. The sensory environment observed the child observe the environment. What is happening okay? Number two now children with autism will get that diagnosis because they have some differences in the receptive and perhaps apps their expressive language so each individual will have very different communication needs. It could be that one person. doesn't develop any verbal language and has challenges with understanding the language and communication used by others perhaps in other person has very advance expressive language skills and can talk very well and but may experience difficulties with understanding nonverbal communication. All some of the language around them so receptive communication means understanding understanding the communication from other people understanding verbal language non verbal language. Of course us. Everyone is different but what we can do is make sure we choose our language. Our methods of convenience communication why's Lay A. I'll never forget when I was a teaching assistant. Probably my first week of of working with a young boy and and I had said to him come back and what did he do. He walked backwards and from that moment I said to myself love. I need to make sure the language I use is very specific because otherwise it may be interpreted in a way that you didn't mean so be very specific in your use of language. Say what you mean if you want a child to do something trump thing say exactly what you mean is GonNa make such a difference. So if you're going to say something like like Tommy Run. That message could actually be taken. They may just hear the word run is it's it's going to be much more helpful. If you say Tommy Walk and say exactly what you mean an example of language. That's really not specific. Could be something like don't do that. Those words don't really mean anything. It doesn't tell the a child what to do it just and it doesn't even tell them what not to do it. Don't do that. That could be anything so as specific say put your feet on the floor or whatever it is wherever you want that child to do. Tell them exactly exactly that. Sometimes it can look like a child or young pass in has undestood what you've said because perhaps they've replied yes to you or maybe they've repeated what you've said. Perhaps it something that you do regularly and you think the the actually they they know the routine is always a good idea to keep it in the back of your mind that perhaps thought person may may not have understood what you've said and you might be able to observe this in their behavior but definitely don't get frustrated if if a child or an individual has not what not done what you've asked them to do perhaps they don't actually understand what you mean and maybe you need to to change your language or change or form of communication. Sometimes we might use too much language and this can cause challenges Alan Ges because words or the communication communication message gets lost for example A long sentence Benson's might be something like can you please turn around and come and sit down now. A more effective way of asking a child especially a child who has communication difficulties would be to say their name and then say set or common set so that you can make sure the child gets the key information from the language rather than that message getting lost in lots of unnecessary language so reducing our language to the key information can really really help. Language can be further supported with the use of pictures images objects. If you're holding something visual of what you are talking about. That's going to really help the children. The child the individual to decode. What you're saying or make more sense of what you're saying? So it's a good idea to pair language with aver picture or the object when for example when I ask a child if they want to go to the toilet hold up a picture of the toilet and say do you want the toilet another way that we can help. autistic individuals or individuals of communication difficulties is to use sign megatonne sign which is is a simplified version of of British sign language so using those key signs. When you're talking can really help to emphasize the word and the meaning of the word so be concrete with your use of language? Abstract got concepts can already be very challenging to understand because we can't see them so if we can try and make our language I onto stable as possible definitely avoid using any language that has a different meaning. All soft. Kasim Salk Doc. Hasim unless you're going to teach exactly what sarcasm means avoid using it because it can really confuse a child but by all means teach teach what sarcasm as and when you can use it as always important to ensure you give the child time to process and on for for different children. That's going to be a different time. But I mean I would say give ten seconds for for Charles Prices and Instruction Direction unless child can manage having more than one instruction at time. Avoid giving multiple instructions just give one instruction time and wait for for that child to process the instruction therefore you're giving them much more opportunity to be successful K.. Number three consistency Eh. This word consistency is so important. Especially when you're using perhaps a particular strategy not a maybe even when you're thinking about language be consistent and show. That child fully understands that when you you do something or when you say something. They know their response. Because you've been doing it so many times you'll being consistent. The child will will learn that. This means this. If you're not consistent if you sometimes say this sometimes sometimes say that that can be very confusing if you sometimes use for example if you sometimes use a visual timetable to to help structure their day. So they know what's coming up and sometimes you don't that will cause a lot of anxiety. Consistency consistency I'd say but he's really important. Consistency A. K. number four organization is extremely important. Potent when I was teaching fulltime a class of children with autism and severe learning difficulties. If I was not organized and didn't I have my resources and in the right places I used to use books as everything was exactly where I knew it would be. I know that a lesson would just fall apart. Because without having that organization in place things can run smoothly. And you want things to run very smoothly for an example. As if there's a child doing some work activities perhaps this child has maybe a a short attention span. And you're doing some activities at a table if your activities nicely organized perhaps therein. I I always like to use Individual Wallets for different activities. So so the activities can come out individually one one on the table. Do that Timothy next. If they're not organized and you're trying to look for resources that child is probably already up and the other side of the classroom and you cannot blame them. Of course they they need. They've they've found something more exciting today. So make sure your organized number five talk about emotional regulation and the ability to be able to.

autism Asia Steph Maurice Early Childhood Studies teaching assistant John Tommy Run Tommy Walk Timothy Kasim Salk Doc Alan Ges Charles Prices Benson
"autism" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"autism" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Is the notion that some disorders may be a disorder of this predictive coding and the the threshold of the filter so specifically some people with autism autism is hard to talk about because it's not a homogeneous disorder heterogeneous right so it's a lot of different things that we call autism because they superficially very similar but there may not be identical in terms of the underlying neurological affects but with they're saying is some people with autism that maybe they have a disorder of their predictive coding so they don't know how in what to filter out or yeah mean yeah that seems like i've read things about how people with autism where everything is just about bombarding their senses and they and failed him and that's that's that's part of it they get sensory overload but happens to and people i turn their new census on like people who get cataracts removed or people who ho clear implants it's they describe it as noisy because their brain has learn how to filter but also that some people with autism really are obsessed with having very predictable unchanging environments yet and ridge like rigid in their food or yeah to watch judge wapner gotta watch the twelve ner everything's gotta be very predictable because their brain isn't doesn't have an ability to be there's an isn't dynamically or adaptively being able to predict their environments valley to keep everything exactly the same to reduce to help their filters.

autism
"autism" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:08 min | 4 years ago

"autism" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"To the measles vaccine and autism and just to be completely clear in case there is any doubt in the room there was one study that supposedly showed a connection between the measles vaccine and autism but that study was debunked multiple times it was found to be fraudulent study some of the people who are involved that said he actually lost their licences and all the result of that has been is that is propagated misinformation to millions of people and they are people who may decisions and not to get vaccinated as a result of that now we shouldn't who designed mean that we should never our question science because we should we should be thoughtful we should ask ourselves is a quality of the data that we have good enough it's always the important question asks in the case of the measles vaccine the quality that data is incredibly high there are few things that have been more scientifically proven and supported than the lack of connection between the measles vaccine and autism so this is why it's important for us to see to know that we need to be soldiers in the war against misinformation each and every one of us i i went over surgeon general part of my responsibility was to get information of the public but i knew very well that they were many circumstances where the most effective messenger was not necessarily me but sometimes a person's best friend or their mother or their father or their wife or husband and sometimes their kid i end so each of us our someone's friend someone's my son or daughter in some cases you might be someone's mother or father and you had the ability to help educate and inform them and that's what we have to do we all have to be soldiers fighting for truth in this day and age because the were battling against is a a wave.

autism