35 Burst results for "Autism"

Americans Aren't the Only Ones Who Don't

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:23 min | 2 weeks ago

Americans Aren't the Only Ones Who Don't

"I knew this at a very young age. I said, do you understand where we live? Do you, they don't. I know. So the person who responded to, what was it, a tweet? Just an Instagram post. An Instagram post. So the person who responded to that well, what about all the people who don't have privilege? They don't understand who so my response would have no impact on that person would be who are you thinking of? Blacks, Hispanics, gays, women, whom are you thinking of when you say they don't have your privilege? Right. Well, she probably is thinking of those groups. Right. But she's out of her mind. And again, not to pull a victim card, but it is just true. Gina suffers way more than the average person in most of those groups. Okay, when people talk to me about protecting the voiceless and defenseless, give me a break. Gina has endured negligence and abuse and by the way, this is only stuff we know about. Imagine what we don't know about. She can't tell us, hey, they're not being nice to me. That's right. You know, we see bruises on her. She can't tell us where those bruises came from. And so if there's anyone who understands that there are some Americans that don't get the same benefits as other Americans, it's me. And yet, I'm able to see that America is still a great place that I'm proud to live in.

Gina America
there's no God and That's the Problem

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:53 sec | 2 weeks ago

there's no God and That's the Problem

"Were not as hounded. By this question, as we are. I mean, though I want to say the earliest book of the Bible, according to scholars, is job, which is all about unjust suffering. And the question of God. So it clearly as always bothered people. But it didn't bother them enough to say there is no God. Some did. There's a psalm that says only fools say there is no God. It's one of my favorite lines. But they saw so much suffering. I mean, do you know that I don't know which culture it was? May have been more than one culture. They didn't name a newborn until 30 days after birth. Oh, yes. I did know that fact. Because they so many died. Right.

the gospel according to UNK

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:46 sec | 2 weeks ago

the gospel according to UNK

"I said to you, talking about reconciling God and evil is your favorite topic. Well, it was. Yes, it's not my favorite topic now, but it took me much of my lifetime to sort of abandon the search for the answer. Right. My friend Joseph telushkin, so I know since high school, he used to joke, if Dennis sees the word God and evil or God and pain or God and suffering, he buys the book. You know, I just asked Dennis before or sorry, not Dennis. Well, I did ask you, Sean. I meant to say Sean before this episode. Do we talk about religion too much on this podcast? That was one of the things I'm wondering, but it's so interesting for both of us.

Joseph Telushkin Dennis Sean
when a child 's life is anything but normal

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:25 min | 2 weeks ago

when a child 's life is anything but normal

"It's interesting that you ask this question, I ask my dad this question a few nights ago. Because my dad is religious. He grew up in a Lutheran household. I don't know if you know this Dennis, but my paternal grandfather was a Lutheran minister. And my mom's side of the family is Catholic. By the way, that was kind of an event when they got married. The two families, they end up loving each other, but it was interesting. They both had some hesitations about, of course. Marrying someone, I never fully understood that because you're still Christians at the end of the day. But that's a separate conversation. I now understand it, but yes, we'll talk about that after I'm very interested to hear what you say. I asked my dad this a few nights ago, and boy, this is a bit of a tangent, but I just have to give a shout out to my dad. I think he's one of the biggest reasons why I'm a conservative. Growing up, he would talk to me about God. He would talk to me about how lucky we are to be in America. And seeing the way that he has handled and my mom, too. The way that they've handled my sister, they never solicited pity from anyone. They never wear it on their sleeve. They never used it as an excuse. It's been a huge example to me. So the other night I'm asking my dad what you just asked me and he said something so so sad and also so sweet. He said, you know, when I go to heaven, hopefully I go to heaven. I really think I will go up there and Gina will talk to me.

Dennis America Gina
The World According to My Autistic Stepson

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:30 min | 2 weeks ago

The World According to My Autistic Stepson

"Going to ask you a super duper serious question then you have no idea what it is. I only told you that it would be about your sister. I don't know if people know you, you have an older sister who is autistic, but as I know because I have an autistic stepson who lives with my wife and me and you know him pretty well. But he is, of course, easy as easy as a person can get. So to live with, he can't live on his own, but he takes care of himself and he's actually fun. Oh, he's so funny. He's fun, exactly correct. And as I note to people, he's to the right of me. And that is true. Yeah, yes. It's a riot. It's just really. He knows a lot about politics too, seriously. Yes. He used to know what is interesting. So people who know autistic people know that the perseverate. They fixate on one subject and repeat it. So for him, it was weather about half. I know him 20 years, basically. And weather was overwhelming. He greets you with the door and tell you about the cold weather pattern over Minnesota. Right. He's addicted to the weather channel. But that has so evolved, he is now, I would say he's more interested in politics than he is in even in weather. Now he greets you at

The Weather Channel Minnesota
"autism" Discussed on Leading Saints Podcast

Leading Saints Podcast

05:46 min | 3 months ago

"autism" Discussed on Leading Saints Podcast

"Study president ehlers quorum, being a bishop where high levels of empathy of emotional intelligence or I feel like we default to them, whether it's right or wrong, but we sort of want the bishop who's like, or the elders corn president who picks up like, oh, you know, rather so and so, it was just often, I'm gonna go sit by him and engage there and see if I can pick up on those things or an individual may feel like I need a bishop. Like, I'm going through a hard time. I need a bishop who's extremely empathetic. You can really just embrace me and help me through this emotionally and not somebody who's very logical and whatnot. And you mentioned earlier that autism doesn't mean they're not empathetic, but I'm just curious in those roles where we really need an empathetic person. How would they respond in that role? So I would say, if I really stopped to think about it, and I hope this isn't offensive, but sometimes people are called to lead in specific positions because there are more or less, well, I actually have to backtrack on what I'm about to say. I was going to say, sometimes it's more for the person that's serving in that calling. They have lessons to learn. But I don't know that that's necessarily how I feel if I really, if I really step back and think about it, it's okay for us to make a few adjustments ourselves although when we are in places of real need, I do know that we need more empathy than non empathy. Right. And so that can be a little bit tricky to navigate and many, many years ago. I had a bishop who stood up and gave a talk in sacrament meeting. I think he offended half of the of the congregation. 'cause I was at the time in the relief society presidency there. I was one of the counselors and I had so many people come talk to me and I just said, you can dwell on it. If you would like to, and you can also let it go. If you would like to. So what do you want to do with this information? And I actually, I'm a little irreverent sometimes. I thought it was so funny. Because it was really off the wall. And maybe that was me being geared up to have kids that were that are autistic to actually let things go. I think we have to learn how to, I always say to my kids, drop it like it's hot. Because you can't hold on to that. You just can't hold on to that..

autism
Allen Wolf's 'The Sound of Violet' Sounds Like a Joke, But It's Not

The Eric Metaxas Show

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Allen Wolf's 'The Sound of Violet' Sounds Like a Joke, But It's Not

"Books I'm talking to the filmmaker Alan wolf, Alan wolf is also my friend and the film is the sound of violet. Okay, for folks just tuning in, Alan, you're the director, the producer you wrote this. It's been a long journey. Give people the 22nd pitch. What is this film about? This film is a romantic comedy about a man who thinks he found his perfect soulmate, but his autism keeps him from realizing that she's actually a prostitute. And she's looking for a ticket out of her trapped life. No seriously. We're on the air, please. Honestly, but because I know you have known you for so long and because of your sense of humor, it sounds like the kind of thing that you would say as a joke. But obviously, this is really, but it's an amazing thing that you were able to pull this off.

Alan Wolf Alan Autism
Director Allen Wolf Discusses His New Film 'The Sound of Violet'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:22 min | 3 months ago

Director Allen Wolf Discusses His New Film 'The Sound of Violet'

"They're very few people. That cracked me up instantly. And I hate it because I have no control over myself. I just get like a goofy idiot. Alan wolf, who is my friend, is one of those people. He's a filmmaker. He's got a film coming out this week, Alan wolf, welcome to the program. Thanks for having me, great to be here. I'm gonna try to have a substantive conversation with you and not just get really stupid and jokey because that's what happens. How many years I've known you for like 25 years? Yes. Yes, more than the age of my kids, my marriage, a long time. Well, way before that. Way, way before that. I think I knew you before I was married. Yeah. That's true. So for a quarter of a century and you're a filmmaker and you have a film coming out, this Friday. This Friday, my Friends. I can't believe it. I want everyone to get all these facts. So my friend Alan wolf, tell us the film is the sound of violet. What is this film? This film is a romantic comedy about a man who thinks he found his perfect soulmate, but his autism keeps him from realizing that she's actually a prostitute. Looking for a dead sounds like something you would make up as a joke. But it's actually true. That is the truth. He doesn't realize that she's looking for a ticket out of her chop life, but the movie has an anti trafficking message as part of it as well. It's been called a more serious take on pretty woman, but yeah, it just feels like you allow your crying. Okay, so it's called the sound of violet and no joke folks. This is the premise of it is that the protagonist, what is his name in the sound of violet Shawn? Okay, Sean is what we say on the spectrum, but it's not just Asperger's. He actually has functional autism. Yes, that's correct. Asperger's usually means they're at the high functioning part of the spectrum and that's him. He's high functioning. Okay. So this protagonist because he doesn't pick up like a lot of people if they have autism or aspergers, they don't pick up social clues. So he does not pick up that this woman, this young woman actually is a prostitute.

Alan Wolf Autism Violet Shawn Asperger's Sean Asperger
Utah deputies find man who disappeared as teen in California

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 4 months ago

Utah deputies find man who disappeared as teen in California

"A a a a teen teen teen teen who who who who disappeared disappeared disappeared disappeared from from from from his his his his family's family's family's family's home home home home in in in in California California California California nearly nearly nearly nearly three three three three years years years years ago ago ago ago was was was was found found found found in in in in Utah Utah Utah Utah Susan Susan Susan Flynn Flynn Flynn didn't didn't didn't give give give up up up when when when son son son Connor Connor Connor Jack Jack Jack Oswald Oswald Oswald who who who has has has autism autism autism went went went missing missing missing from from from home home home at at at age age age seventeen seventeen seventeen working working working Summit Summit Summit County County County sheriff sheriff sheriff Justin Justin Justin Martinez Martinez Martinez says says says officers officers officers found found found Oswald Oswald Oswald asleep asleep asleep in in in a a a convenience convenience convenience store store store but but but felt felt felt there there there was was was more more more to to to his his his story story story there there there was was was a a a humanitarian humanitarian humanitarian effort effort effort that that that need need need to to to be be be explored explored explored further further further that's that's that's when when when they they they dug dug dug up up up a a a missing missing missing persons persons persons report report report and and and got got got the the the family family family on on on the the the phone phone phone it it it wasn't wasn't wasn't in in in the the the ground ground ground Linda Linda Linda is is is thankful thankful thankful to to to everyone everyone everyone and and and hopes hopes hopes others others others can can can be be be as as as lucky lucky lucky we we we are are are planning planning planning on on on that that that I'm I'm I'm Julie Julie Julie Walker Walker Walker

Utah California Susan Susan Susan Flynn Flynn Connor Connor Connor Jack Jack Autism Autism Autism Summit County County County Justin Justin Justin Martinez Martinez Martinez Oswald Oswald Oswald Linda Linda Linda Julie Julie Julie Walker Walke
Emmy Award-Winning Journalist Sharyl Attkisson on Media Cover-Ups

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:55 min | 6 months ago

Emmy Award-Winning Journalist Sharyl Attkisson on Media Cover-Ups

"I always want to give the other side the benefit of the doubt, if only to understand how people could behave the way they do, another was one case would they make, you know, if you're in the news business and somebody from big pharma comes to you and says, don't run this story. What are the kinds of things that they say or that they could say to make people with their finger in the wind so to speak move in a certain direction? Well, it was pretty unusual back then. It's not now. That's what drew my attention for someone to say don't air a story. You might have them say, put this side of the story on or represent my view this way, but I had not been frequently approached by anybody saying, don't let the public know the information. And as that happened with greater frequency, I knew something was going on. But the things they would say, including government officials who are trying to stop the stories would say, if you report these stories about vaccines and autism. Even if they're completely factual, they said it will scare the public and they'll turn away from vaccines and public diseases that we've eradicated will be rampant. And you'll kill people. People will die. And I would say, at first, when someone first says that to you, you get this sort of like, wow. But if you start thinking it out rationally as a journalist, it's not my job to decide how people use factual information that I give them and therefore to try to make them behave a certain way. It's up to the government. If facts come out that worry the public, the government needs to come up with a plan to reinstitute confidence in the program. That's not up to the journalist to hide facts so that the government doesn't have the problem of lack of confidence. But I also came to understand that the excuses they gave about this were really just a cover for the pharmaceutical industry interests that didn't want this out because they would lose a lot of business because if the crack of the door opens a little bit on some safety issues, there's just so many more to look

Autism
Fighting wave of misinfo, YouTube bans false vaccine claims

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 11 months ago

Fighting wave of misinfo, YouTube bans false vaccine claims

"YouTube is banning vaccine misinformation and conspiracy theories the video sharing tech platform has announced immediate bans on false claims that vaccines are dangerous and can cause health issues like autism cancer or infertility YouTube also deleted accounts belonging to some of the most notable propagators of vaccine misinformation and conspiracy theories the ban on misinformation extends to all immunizations approved by health authorities and currently being administered public health officials have struggled to respond to the steady current of online misinformation about the covert nineteen vaccine since development got under way last year I'm Ben Thomas

Autism Cancer Youtube Ben Thomas
In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

Parenting: Difficult Conversations

02:32 min | 11 months ago

In 'We're Not Broken,' Author Eric Garcia Takes On Myths About Autism

"In the beginning of your book. You mentioned that the writing began in part out of frustration and frustration specifically fueled by how media covers autism. What frustrated you about that. And what were you hoping to do about it in this book so i feel like the frustration i had about the way we talk about autism was that any conversation about autism began and ended with discussion about vaccines. I should say the completely false idea that vaccines caused autism. There is no evidence whatsoever about it and then there was the other part. Which is that if we want to get. We wind up getting past discussing vaccines. There's just a lot of discussion. about curing. autistic people are curing autism or combating autism or fixing autistic people and almost never. Was there any discussion about well. What is it that autistic people need right now. Even if you believe that there should be a cure which i really articulate that. I don't think that there should be cure that there can be a cure for autism. That's something that's a long way down the road and that doesn't really serve autistic people now and i also was frustrated that i felt like almost every discussion about autism focused mostly on white male adolescent boys and i felt like that was a very incomplete. Discussion about autism was a very incomplete excluded. Plenty of autistic people who. Don't that that categorization right right so it. Just it sounds like there's just a lot of myths that get perpetuated through the media which is all too common right and that this in part this was to dispel some of those that have been so pervasive precisely. I think that one of the things that i wanted to do was again to ball from the title of my book. Change the autism conversation to include as many people as possible. Because i felt that there were. There are a lot of pernicious ideas. About what the idea about whether autistic people can live independently or even even if they can't live independently live and they deserve to live in the community rather than institutions or the idea that autistic people can either not work or only work in a very specific sector of science technology engineering mathematics. And i also thought that there were a lot of misconceptions about whether people can have families or have legitimate relationships or legitimate

Autism
Officials Urge Killing of Invasive Spotted Lanternfly

Kottke Ride Home

01:44 min | 11 months ago

Officials Urge Killing of Invasive Spotted Lanternfly

"If you live on the east coast of the us especially in new york or pennsylvania and see a visually striking spotted lantern fly. The state governments would like you to forget any humane ideas about carefully moving it from one spot to another and instead to immediately kill it the spotted lantern fly is an invasive pest that is not native to the us and apparently is threatening to over seventy of the plant species that feeds on feeds on meaning draining sap and leaving them weakened and vulnerable to disease among those species. Is the atlantis autism or tree of heaven which the new york times points out is best known as the tree from betty. Smith's nineteen forty-three novel. A tree grows in brooklyn but this pernicious beast who has delicate grey wings spotted in black with a bonus set of bright red wings also spotted with black underneath. I arrived in the us from asia seven years ago and entered new york city last year. During the pandemic environmentalists ecologists are encouraging people to kill the bugs site because they have no natural predators here and no organic pesticides that can take them out here. New york the department of agriculture is additionally asking people to submit the location where you found the lantern fly on their website in pennsylvania. If you're caught moving the insect from one location to another you could be fined. Abort from the destruction these little lantern flies could cause on native species. Governments are being so intense because they know that the lantern flies are quite striking. They're not the kind of bug most people would want to kill. Unlike some other invasive species like the asian longhorn beetle that caused a massive deforestation throughout new york in the late nineties. According to the new york times

Pennsylvania United States Autism New York New York Times Betty Brooklyn Smith New York City Asia Department Of Agriculture
NY Post Buries Facts About Covid Death of 15-Year-Old Kentucky Boy

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:53 min | 1 year ago

NY Post Buries Facts About Covid Death of 15-Year-Old Kentucky Boy

"I saw an article last night. He just broke my heart reading about this fifteen year. Old boy in louisville kentucky and all i saw the new york post new york post the entire article and why post dotcom dad makes emotional plea. After teams son dies recorded fifteen year. Old kentucky boy died of cove it his grieving father is urging others to take the virus seriously the boy just incline loved music whistling his ipad playing drums and swimming. The joy of the article says but the new york post article links to a small town paper the lexington herald leader article. Then you click on that link and you read about this poor kid and the grieving father and buried in that article comes this reveal. Jason had autism and was nonverbal. His father told the herald leader. He had extensive medical issues a weak immune system and had twenty five or more surgeries in his lifetime. Now that poor kid. I'm not trying to minimize or marginalize. A fifteen year old kids death but do you know how many millions of people probably read the article that went viral about the fifteen year old boy that appeared according to the new york. Post to be healthy fifteen year old teenage boy who loved his ipad and love to whistle. And you've got gotta dig you have to get you got to cut through the propaganda crap to realize this. Poor young boy was severely compromised. He was vulnerable. He had tons of medical issues including a weak immune system.

New York Post New York Post The New York Post Kentucky Lexington Herald Louisville The Herald Swimming Autism Jason New York
What Would the 12-Team College Football Playoff Landscape Look Like

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

02:32 min | 1 year ago

What Would the 12-Team College Football Playoff Landscape Look Like

"I rob we talked a few. I get it now. I think it was a few months ago at this point about the playoff expansion in college football and at that time it really seemed like the twelve team playoffs was was coming and they have momentum in you know everybody seem or most people seem like they were for at least the people on the committee and it seemed like that was going to be the next phase of college football and now it is being put on hold and very much in jeopardy and as much as i'm for and you know this. I'm for the playoff expansion for the twelve team playoff. But i understand why it's a whole and that's because oklahoma and texas are about to leave the big twelve suit and it. Looks like the sec. Are they creating some type of super conference. And then will you know the pac twelve and the big ten like some of these other big conferences. That are left out. I mean rob. There are people that think we could end up with two. Maybe three super conferences like a almost like a. You know the first division is. maybe. I don't know forty fifty teams because let's face it that's really what it is anyway. Well but forty fifty teams at the top level. Almost like the nfl. So i think with autism. Flux i don't think you can is the to twelve at this point you gotta see the conference play out. I in my opinion. I also think there's distrust amongst these guys like trying to get out because of what's happened chris. Like people sneaking out of their conference in the middle of the night right leaving the other the other ones in the learning tracks in in in effect you know like like like some of them of affected. The tv contracts right out of schools pulled out and then that gives a clause to espn. Or fox's say wait a minute no no no. We didn't sign up for this without these teams. So you know what i mean like. We got a problem and we're good avoid. I mean it is just. It's been insane this past off season. I would college football and where it's headed chris. And you're right. I mean it's going to be the haves and the have not it's a flat out money. Grab by college

Football Oklahoma SEC ROB Texas Autism NFL Chris Espn FOX
Food Allergies in Children with Dr. Kenneth Bock

The Ultimate Health Podcast

02:44 min | 1 year ago

Food Allergies in Children with Dr. Kenneth Bock

"Talk more about food allergies. This is an interesting thing to delve into talk. Abo- how often you'd see people with these back in the day. He talked about this this patient back when you gave that lecture that you already working with with autism and then how commoner they these days how is that changed over the years. Well i think they're more common There's there's actually food allergies which is a classical food allergy reaction Kind of more like the immediate strawberries. Get hide so to speak And then there's more delayed reactions food sensitivities which are different than denies to. They're usually they can be very very disguised because it can happen later. It doesn't happen right away. but and so i think the incidence of allergies has increased because the immune systems. Our kids have gotten skewed. And i'm happy to talk a little bit that sufficient second because i think it's contributed but So there's more and more issue's gi issues especially in the partition population. But certainly all these kids with mood. Disorders anybody with a chronic illness whether it be physical or neuropsychiatric. But what have you. You have to look at the gut and that when there are problems in the gut that can contribute in the microbiome The good the good bacteria in the gut that could contribute to immune imbalances skewed immune systems and more food allergies and also food sensitivities. Where you know where if you have a permeable gut lining you. Don't you lose the integrity of the gut. Lining keep certain things out especially large molecules. They get in tight. Junctions get opened up. These large molecules getting the immune system. Seventy to seventy five percent which lies right under the this one layered epithelium in the gut allows these molecules to getting immune system sees them and they reacting appropriately with an immune reaction to something that they should be reacting to food. And so whether you get a food allergy reaction Action and. I do believe that this is. There's no question has been happening. More and more. We see it more. And more i think disruption to the microbiome the microbiome is that correction of the microorganisms got trillions of bacteria other organisms that hopefully are in a healthy diversity a healthy balance but frequently unfortunately not and that also contributes to increasing food allergies.

Allergy Reaction Autism
Afghan Allies Are Worried About Being Left Behind As Americans Evacuate

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:05 min | 1 year ago

Afghan Allies Are Worried About Being Left Behind As Americans Evacuate

"Less than a week away from the deadline to get every last american out of afghanistan along with every deserving afghan on an outbound aircraft as they were told to expect months ago the taliban all the cards now the administration and many americans have so many questions they want asked. And as you'll see in here tonight our chief foreign correspondent. Richard engel asked the taliban directly in tonight's report from kabul. The taliban is stressing. It's time for the us senate allies to pack up and get out transport planes and civilian aircraft from around. The world are evacuating vulnerable afghans. But there's a huge bottleneck at transit hubs at the us base in doha cutter thousands or crowded in holding areas temperatures. Well over one hundred degrees ever in kabul. The taliban are helping speed up the evacuations today keeping crowds away from the airport handling food and water but many afghans field. They're being abandoned especially women and girls who are oppressed when the taliban ruled twenty years ago now the taliban promised to be different but have they changed or are they just playing nice until the americans leave tonight. I met zabihullah. Mujahid taliban spokesman. The united states is evacuating and it is taking out americans who worked with us forces but not everyone is going to be able to make it out. Will you let those people leave in the future. Can you guarantee their safety no autism. We don't want our countrymen to go to america whatever they have done in the past. We have given amnesty. We need young educated professionals for our nation. But what if they want to leave. It's their choice. What would you say to women. Afghan women who are terrified. They our sisters. We must show them. Respect should not be frightened on. The taliban are humans and from this country they have fought for their country. Women's should be proud of us not scared.

Taliban Richard Engel Kabul America Zabihullah Afghanistan Doha Senate Mujahid Autism
Canary Speech Uses Voice to Identify Human Conditions Across Multiple Applications

Project Voice - Healthcare Summit - 2021

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Canary Speech Uses Voice to Identify Human Conditions Across Multiple Applications

"Canary speech technology is currently commercially available. It's practical and scalable. We range in population sizes from a few thousand to hundreds of thousands of individuals within the population that we're monitoring and scoring. We have a range of different human conditions, stress anxiety, depression, we've had probably the most extensive use with. We've done some work in PTSD as well. Second to that we have a lot of work done in MCI Alzheimer's and cognitive function and decline. In this particular case, we currently have four clinical partners in different locations in the world where we are doing validation studies on Alzheimer's and cognitive measurements. And then of course, employee burnout, things like congestive heart failure, autism and others are ones that are being worked on as well. I've talked about our patents, we have new patents we're applying for things that we've been learning through these studies. And then our speech analysis as we mentioned before is done generally on 40 seconds to a minute of speech. And we return scored through our system within three seconds of time. Our partners range across the world. I've talked about hack attack meridian. I'm going to talk a little bit more about them later. Ulster hospital tele hospital and Dublin Ireland wake forest Hitachi SNK telemedicine companies like Best Buy health and several others.

Alzheimer's MCI Ptsd Depression Congestive Heart Failure Autism Ulster Hospital Tele Hospital Dublin Ireland Hitachi Best Buy
The Three Approaches to Autism Intervention

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:52 min | 1 year ago

The Three Approaches to Autism Intervention

"Let's take a few minutes briefly to summarize the three main intervention approaches for young children with autism in the past couple of decades the field of autism intervention as evolved into three main evidence based approaches traditional applied behavioral analysis. Aba developmental relationship based intervention. Dr bi and naturalistic developmental. Behavioral intervention and de bi aba is the best known type of intervention. It's based on operate learning theory. Meaning that the behavior learned based on what happens before the behavior and antecedent and what happens after it. the reward. Some drawbacks of the aba approach include poor maintenance of skills for generalization of learning to new situations and reliance on adults to inform children what to do otherwise known as prompt dependency in contrast to behavioral intervention d. r. by is apparent mediated intervention. He am i with a primary focus is on supporting parents and other caregivers to build and use warm meaningful interactions to help the child to function better in communicating learning and problem solving the strategies of developmental interventions are distinct from behavioral intervention approaches in that they use free play without direct didactic instruction or contingent rewards and adult takes a child's interest and built on it well making the activity and emotionally meaningful experience. The best known model is the dr floor. Time or simply floor time

Dr Bi Autism ABA
"autism" Discussed on Diary of a Nation

Diary of a Nation

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"autism" Discussed on Diary of a Nation

"Your nervous system down. When you're at a ten you know we are a big family. As you know my husband's a great big italian guy. He lives at a twelve. You know he is always like he's up there. I think in the office. He's a little quieter opinions. He does seem very gentle. He's gentle but he's just you know we're gonna make pizza tonight. And he's a lot of moving parts. He's he's i mean you can't see me. Your audience can't see me. But now gesturing boldly his moving all the time. He's has ideas all the time and so we've decided as a family. Were really much more comfortable at a six. We worked to stay in that six and we bring our toolkit right along with us whether it's breathing or taking a quiet moment. Begun recently to utilize something that i read about. It's actually something people in recovery us called halt so we want to respond quickly to a triggered situation. We feel angry. Fill rates you just take a moment say and my hungry may angry and my lonely and my tired just that exercise alone brings nervous system down and then when i have of alner ability maybe i am a little hungry and i can. I can address that basic basic need. I come from a place of discovery once again. And so we have a lot of those ongoing dialogues to keep ourselves in in a place where we can take in information and learn from it. You do and you. Don't regret telling the world that jack has autism before jack was ready for the world to know. Could you explain. Well i yeah. I wrote that a while ago because now i don't regret it all to be honest but back then. He was so tender. Someone who wants it to me. You know a woman who's known me through this whole journey. And she said when i first met you it was like you had these mother wings wrapped around him right and you would only let him peak out and let people really see him. Occasionally and sort of as as the years went on i started to kind of open my mother wings a little bit. I guess i was sorry when i told people and they no longer saw the boy. They saw the diagnosis. I which is inevitable still happens to this day. But now i realize keeping it a secret or shrouding him wasn't gonna really reverse that reaction to who he was so Now we're all in. It is sort of you know we live out loud. I say as i tell him it is a part of who you are just like blue eyes and light brown hair and being taught is just one piece of many that makes up jet carry yellow. How do you parent the unlikable side of autism. It is a balancing act. Because there is there are unlikable signs of autism. I try to remind myself this autism. Not the boy. And i try to remind myself. This is where the work is because let me give you an example. You know a few years ago. May maybe eight or nine years ago. He was hitting people and my sister-in-law said. The law doesn't care if you have autism you can't hit people right so a carry that advice in similar pieces with me. The world doesn't care. Jack cannot act a certain way simple. it doesn't give him permission to behave in a way..

autism jack Jack
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"A an autistic individual may not use the communication. And also. Have Challenges Understanding verbal communication. It might be that they have. That communication use the communication, but. No in a meaningful way, so for example. Saying phrases. The rows of context now. Let's dive deeper into this. The ton ECHOLALIA. Is often used to describe when a child repeats back. Something that's being said so if we think about their understanding of. Communication on that An ability to express communication. Perhaps it could mean that. Then, not too sure how to answer that question or understand that question all to use verbal communication in a way to. To. Express their meaning, so for example it might be that you've lost a child a question and they repeat the question back to you. It could be that. A child has remembered or learn to phrase that had been said to the previously so for example. I know a child who would say the phrase I like it. And, she didn't actually mean I like it. She learned that phrase from a previous time and had used it to try to tell. That said that she didn't want to do something now. That's a good example of. Communication and language being used in a way that was meaningful to her. She had learned the phrase. I like it. But the meaning behind. It was very different to what she was saying so this is really important to remember because it could be. The child is saying a phrase. It could be in the right context, but actually has a different meaning because of their challenges with expressive language, and actually this is a really important point to say that when we all teaching and modeling. Questions on language that we modal. Responses! To questions, because often is quite natural for us to say the question and say Gee, want this or this. We also need to muddle the onset as well so say for example. I want the drink. Now. This will be explained more so in the module. Help me communicate. This is just really thinking about those challenges, all expressive and receptive communication and thinking about the ways a child might use communication to express themselves. Another example is a child learning phrases from maybe one of their favourite TV shows thinking of a child who uses EPA pick phrases very often, and quite often they are in the right context for example, using a phrase with the word would Toyota when he's in the toilet. The phrase is. necessarily. Repainted in the sense that he'll use the same phases in the same. Context and in response to answers so. That's an example of using phrases in a way that was meaningful to him and he'd love them through watching his favorite shy. And this can be quite coleman. Sometimes you might have had children using phrases that they had heard. And they may be in the right context, they may not be sometimes. We have to really observed. Children's to know what they mean from what they're saying. If. You'd like to learn more C. Talking Abou lots more in terms of understanding autism and learning. Download, the resources take part in the reflections asks them please visit. The website causes autism spectrum teach dot com, the causes of flexible. You can do it in your own time, and when you complete it..

Gee Toyota EPA coleman
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Landing. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> And here's your <Speech_Music_Female> host. My favorite <Speech_Female> teacher jaw <Laughter> staff. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Going <Speech_Female> to fight console, <Speech_Female> autism and <Speech_Female> social communication <Speech_Female> interaction. <Speech_Female> So <Speech_Female> if we think about communication. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We can break <Speech_Music_Female> it down to <Speech_Music_Female> the expressive <Speech_Female> part <Speech_Female> of Communication, <Speech_Female> so how <Silence> we? <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Give <Speech_Female> a communication <Speech_Female> message to somebody <Speech_Female> else and express <Speech_Female> it, <Speech_Female> and then we have <Speech_Female> the receptive <Speech_Female> part of communication, <Speech_Female> which is <Speech_Female> undestanding <Speech_Female> I'm receiving <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> communication message <Speech_Female> from somebody <Speech_Music_Female> else <Speech_Female> say that undestanding <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> off <Silence> communication. <Silence> <Speech_Female> Now it may <Speech_Female> be. The autistic <Speech_Female> individuals have <Speech_Female> challenges <Speech_Female> with <Speech_Female> receptive <Speech_Female> and expressive <Speech_Female> communication <Speech_Female> may be that they <Speech_Female> also have challenges <Speech_Female> with perceptive <Speech_Female> communication. <Speech_Female> Now <Speech_Female> let's think about <Speech_Female> if we <Speech_Female> further breakdown <Speech_Female> expressive <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Female> receptive communication <Speech_Male> because <Silence> within bud. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> With Galt, <Speech_Female> verbal communication <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and nonverbal <Speech_Female> communication <Silence> so. <Speech_Female> Using <Speech_Female> the nonverbal <Speech_Female> communication <Speech_Female> in a meaningful <Speech_Female> way and <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Understanding <Silence> receiving <Speech_Female> verbal communication <Speech_Female> known, <Silence> Rabbi Communication. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> And <Speech_Music_Female> it could be <Speech_Female>

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Now this episode and the next seven Polka step sites are going to sound very different to previous episodes in the fact that they will be a lot shorter, and it will just be May and there is a theme that's going to be running through this and the next seven podcast, and that is that I'm very pleased and proud to announce the I released a series of online training courses, which gives a lot of concise and digestible information as what is practical strategies and how to apply these in real day life. There's a lot of information out there I've designed these courses to give you. The key information how to do different types of strategies in order so that you can go away and apply them straight away especially because we know how personalized strategies. Tailored strategies are really needed because every child is so different, so this is my way right now to be able to support. Teachers Teacher Sister Sankoh's parents, carers, anyone who is supporting an autistic child and eight courses are all based around different themes, so this Polka sets sight and the next seven episodes I'm going to introduce each course, but of course I want to give you. Value wants to give you free information, so you're going to hear snapshots from the training to give you some information, so you can still listen and hopefully take something from it, and of course if you. You want to learn more than I'm GonNa be directing you to the site. Courses Dot autism spectrum teach dot com where the course is being hosted. I've been working really hard on these courses making sure that they provide really beneficial information in bite sized presentations. What has reflection tasks to help you think about those individuals children around you and their own pass. NO APPENDICES NEEDS AFTER I've gone through this transition period. We'll get back into those meaty juicy. Episodes where there's interviews and lots of information. But bear with me while I'm going through this transition period, it's difficult time for all of us I know, but as much as it's a difficult time. I know the support is even more so needed so I really wants to get this information to the people that need it the moist. The first course I'm going to present to you and also play you five minutes. Snapshots is cooled understanding autism a learning, and it's all about that background information about autism, really understanding those key areas of difference of challenge that autistic individuals may face, and therefore what we need to do, or what we can do to support to help to adapt ourselves to adapt the environment to really meet the needs of autism, individuals and everybody. In fact, one of the testimonials from the course already has said everybody should know this information and I completely agree everybody should know. Good background on the standing about autism, so that we know how to effectively help and support. Here's a snapshot from the Coast Understanding Autism and.

Coast Understanding Autism Sister Sankoh
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"I. Don't know how to describe it been absolutely crazy been very strange, been difficult been challenging. There's been highs has been lows, but fundamentally. Fundamentally. Things have changed things at different things are uncertain and I know that we've all had all own experience on our journey. And our own challenges. So I hope you and your loved ones a safe and well. If you have your own children. I hope that you are all in one piece and you have managed to have some kind of quality time together. If you're a key worker, we love you. Thank you Paris. We love you teaches. We love you. Thank you to everybody and the main bottom line is a hope that you're well now. Things for myself and and spectrum teacher, which is myself. have been very challenging because like yourself or others you know. I was without any works so my work. Before the COVID, nineteen pandemic was in schools, supporting staff supporting families supporting Sankoh's teachers developing send provisions in practice, and of course then schools closed and unable to support the schools unable to support the families in the same way that I would have done before. Now of course we've all been managing the best that we kids and supporting from a distance and to a point that's helping some people. But, of course I wanted to do more, and essentially I needed to keep everything that autism spectrum teacher, and myself does all the projects this podcast and this is the reason why I've had to put on hold for the past couple of months because. It is fully funded by myself and without those means of ensuring. Stability for the PO- cost like kids and continue it however i. have some plans. I have things in motion I. Want to tell you what about that and tell you all about the future plans and. The adaptions we will hat so adapt right, and to be honest, I've been really pleased with how some of the children have adapted when we've sometimes, we really do fear the worst way. Of course there have been many challenges on a lot more challenges I would say, but we've got to stick to the positive here. There have been some children that have really surprised.

Sankoh Paris
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

17:02 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"You find the peaceful on his yours. My favorite teacher staff. I I think I think this is live saw. I'll I'll start festival. My name is Jeffrey. I am an autism specialist teacher and consultant and firstly. What a wonderful group. Well done toward the admins fantastic support and everyone being involved with clearly living in some very difficult and unpredictable. Times just to give a quick introduction. I'm set free and I was born in Jersey. I GREW UP IN JERSEY. I now live in London and my background is teaching mainstream teaching in autism specialist schools. And also I've been especially coordinators. Were Sankoh and who side. I developed a program for outreach support so supporting schools to develop that autism practice and I've been invoked instruments national projects as well so developing an autism education program in Amman in Moscow. Right so yeah I was as I was saying. We're living in some really difficult and unpredictable times and of course it's really challenging for all of us but especially those who additional needs and of course everyone's situation is different. Everyone's needs a different. Everyone's family is different. Therefore we've got to really think about all circumstances on what's manageable for for us in the situation that we have some people have more access to more space than others so yeah really thinking about i. Guess what I'm saying. Is We want to get stressed because stress for the family stress for the parents will only makes the children's stressed. I learned this very quickly in my career. I tall of children with very high sensory needs. Hi Communication needs and you know I could sense or I could tell you know if I was feeling relaxed and confident I could see the you know. The children felt safe around around me. If I was not feeling you know. Maybe there was a day that I wasn't feeling myself you know I could see from. I'm thinking of one child in particular he would be. That would make him anxious. Now we've got to think about I. No it's very very difficult and very challenging circumstances but if we can be calm ourselves that's going to have a big impact on the children. Firstly as it's really important to mention that you know for a lot of our children young people adults they can have a lot of professionals involved and you know of course use all of the information you have in terms of supporting them at home. Some families have so much paperwork in terms of advice for professionals. But you know go back through it use it. The there'll be some things that maybe can implement at home. Just I've mentioned like that's really important because everyone's needs again is so different and going back to being. You know being calm and having a sense of calm at her there are Maybe some things that that can be can be implemented for example may be doing some calming activities together now and when we think about it about calming activities you can always look at calming activities on one end of the spectrum and then you have alerting activities which are those things that make us really energized and lots of movement and we can support children sensory needs by using these different types of activities and it might be helpful to think about times in the day that you have maybe some calming activities. That could be listening to some really Calming Music. Or maybe it's doing some some massage on the hands with some cream or maybe it's reading a book it depends on on the child or or your family were awesome calming activities. That you can implement. During the day it could be multiple times a day. You not to support the regulation of the child and have that calm time and likewise is to think about other times in the day where we can make sure. We have some movement and some and some active awakening activities. Maybe that's doing doing a youtube exercise videos. There's loads there's absolutely loads a free to watch us all really great children's Yoga movements while I can Post the link to that as well after new. Write that down so times in the day. Were we're doing some movements and times in the day? Why we're doing some calming activities. What's going to be really really important for everybody? Especially those of additional needs is having a structure to the day or having some routine so as I mentioned we. You know we can have some times in the day where we're doing some khar-ming activities. Sometimes in the day were doing some Alerting movement activities things like you know. Maybe it's even rolling a ball to each other or doing some star if we can make a predictable or kind of consistent routine this conversely help the children to become familiar with something that's going to happen. For example. School is incredibly structured and incredibly routine based if we can not not do not try and do a whole school routine at high. It's it's not and it's going to be very stressful. Of course let me just say hey your schools and your teachers of course will have given you the information to support your your child with learning this thinking about the actual routine and how it's implemented is really going to help the child to understand what's coming next so if we can implement something that's maybe follows a similar pattern each day. So we're breaking up the tasks and way going to provide some some clear routine so let me give you an example. There was a parent the asked a question before about supporting child to focus on some learning tasks at high it was mentioned about implementing a visual structure in the environment. So it making it really clear to the child that this is where we're going to do some some work awesome learning and making it really clear that we're doing activities and these are going to be in. Maybe an book says or they're in Wallets. And when you look at that in the environment so for example visit desk or table having that space and implementing a visual structure so that the child comes familiar that this is going to be a space where. I'm going to be doing some learning activities having said that it doesn't mean that that's the only space that you can do the learning activities and I want to stress the importance of practical learning. And there's lots of opportunities at home where we can implement parts. Of course it really depends on the learning objectives and learning outcomes specifically for your child so it could be that. Let's take counting. Maybe they're doing some Counting activities provided by a school. Or your all your teacher. Spoken about some counseling activities and then to support the child to to generalize learning it'd be great to do some Practical activities maybe. It's counting the plates on the table. Counting the the cloves. Maybe it's going to be something. Maybe it's a turn taking activity and doing some time taking. Maybe there's going to be other opportunities throughout the day were turns aching can take place maybe with siblings or going back to what. I was saying before about that routine being so important. Maybe it's doing a turn taking activity at the same time every day and so be afraid to to repeat activities over Pete things that you're doing. Globally that gives us gives an opportunity for the child to become more familiar. More settled with doing something. Especially because it's it's new. We're doing this doing some learning at high and also gives the opportunity for the child to maybe do it with less support the next time you do it or maybe it's going to be yet doing it more than they might be able to do it. More independently please ask any questions. I'll try and help as much as I can but let me just go back over the points that I was making. His thing is good just to think about things that could be helpful in how they could be implemented because our situation right now is just so different that I've seen a lot of families getting very stressed. And this is obviously one of my biggest concerns. Do what's manageable so it might be that you off with if we thinking about The home learning. Maybe you you could just start off with doing one thing or one learning activity and maybe after a couple of days you could build up to doing to maybe after a couple of days build it up to three what will really help alongside this. And you may already do this. You may have seen this at school is presenting this in a way that it's like a visual structure. What we want to do. Try to help the child to understand. Exactly what is it is going to happen. And what's what's expected in that session and when it's going to end because this can be it can cause a lot of anxiety and support with all of those things that can help to have a visual structure. Which could be you know just roaring during the different things on a piece of paper. Maybe it's finding some pictures From Google of the different activities. So let's just just think about some of those things that I've just mentioned before so it say. For example a few is setting up a routine to implement some calming activities some learning activities and some kind of awakening alerting activities. Maybe you want to have a visual structure. That looks like maybe it starts off with massage. So you have a picture of if you have access to using using the Internet. You can google up a picture of massaging hand. Maybe WanNa take a photo of you doing it with the child. Maybe he just wanted to draw rights so you could have. That then maybe. The first learning activity is Reading a book Sakaba Book. Maybe the next one is counting counting pitcher and there may be. You're going to finish off with doing some rolling the ball to each other last just an example but it in pictures you know you have the images some symbols but to show you the child in a way that's going to be meaningful to them. Some some children may you know may look at a symbol and not get much meaning from it but they might get more meaning from an actual photo. So maybe. What's take a photo of a make. Timetable Hagen. Any tips for an artistic seven year old. Who now leave the house at all. And do you have any idea why your seven year old doesn't want to leave? The House. Is it due anxiety around? The situation is around the understanding of the situation that this is the thing I guess if we can understand the reasons behind a specific behavior or if a child is doing something and sometimes we can can work out straight away. Why they're doing something you know. We're recognizing that as a form of of communication and understanding okay. So that child is doing that that can help us to think about how to help and support for example if it is going to be because it's it's a very different difficult situation to understand because it is so unpredictable. Now they're awesome really good social stories one when I just held up before I'm GonNa send right so if I put a link in here. This is Sheffield. Nhs they've done some really really good free resources. The are acceptable to children of calls. It depends on on on your child's needs. Let me this link here. There's some really good resources to help children who try to understand situation and the the reasons why we're having to stay at home how we can help ourselves. I'm just wondering whether teague in the is the reason you fink. Due to to that anxiety of of of the unknown I would highly recommend the stories on that link and talking about it. If if if your child can in a way that your child can understand. It's as I mentioned earlier. It's it's the way that we are going to wear really anxious and showing that that could also make every body or the children also feel anxious about that. So it's it's very difficult but it's also recognizing is there something that we could help to make ourselves feel calm in such a uncertain situation? I don't know whether that was helpful. Teagan but any I'm trying to think of this Some Some other resources if you child is used to using symbols at school which it Free access to the online program which is really good because quite often it can help.

Jersey Google consultant Sankoh Jeffrey London Sheffield Nhs Amman teague Teagan Pete Moscow
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

07:06 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"With your child Them as long as you can as long as you can't beyond the junior rem unite into the middle phases of school. And that would be something that is interested in Dinosaurs thank wouldn't cope with themselves but radi does give an opportunity to spend that time to give up a little bit of snuggle time with the parents can only just manifest that love of reading and continued to keep them interested in books. Even if it's something that is A challenge for them in the school environment united to have that one on one time. We you reading something that you really enjoy not interested in And and we say it doesn't have to be something that they are reading themselves but broke into Sel to to a child It just keeps love of reading along. Aw Yeah no that's really important especially to see your parents enjoying reading as well already. That's going to spark and interest from. I'm from children. I wonder if you have any success stories you could share. I really love to hear about you. Know when things go really well Maybe it's a specific child or a group of children or something that something that's worked pretty. Well we we have. We do a specially around Sellafield intervention Where we have parents coming in with children you joined went to lead and honestly task is difficult? They're not going to want to do it so we you know. We put children through the interventional with with him in the remedial environment. And we've had feedback from parents. When childhood wit with headed convergence issue so she had official pricing delicacy and she waited individual therapy but because of the visual processing difficulty? She had wanted to read those she was on reading age and remain. He just wanted to bring the older tree individuals individuals given we put her through the Southfield Intervention She was one of my favorite silcon sexually and who mum fight me a couple of weeks after the the socal treatments and to me I just had to share with you that I was walking down the passage law smacks US undock. Tate at posture remain as dominic book until fat. Latin says. Stick back into the passage echoed. Armagh good news. Is that Radi. The child all that. I just said those words. She was a child who had never wanted to read. And what a sudden she because it was not something that was easier for her she just developed developed this love of reading and discover the world of books came a little book Quim And she went on to you to study Manson actually Hands from childhood was struggling with reading to have this big academic Korea. Something quite remarkable and and Just to to show children. That can be something that they can overcome and something that can be used as a tool for them. You know reading Kasumi. Children isn't obstacle coal. The imaging any as opposed to something that should be easy and something that shape they should be able to use to And Yeah we we've got a couple of stories like that but that one really is very special to me because I shoulder become my children With the children that you work with the radio take his struggles on board to to give that kind of feedback. Yes especially sleep when you see the impact that it has on their life you know to hear that. She went onto to study medicine. That's yeah that's brilliant the impacts being able to to read and want to read Andrew before we finish It's been so great to speak to you new sets. Let's you've given so many tips here Tips and advice yeah. Is there anything else that you'd like to share with. The parents or teachers are listening. That may I. If they're they're they have a child who's perhaps learning to read or having reading difficulties there is. Is that something thing that you would like to say to them. That would be the first thing they try or any advice or a takeaway from this conversation. I think it it. You know a child can succeed. I think that's important to me. Just keep in mind that every child is different and they can't succeed eight domestic what they do is gave the supported. She need Get the assessments done. The as with the schools. I'm and radio as much as possible. Try and keep that chance confidence and self esteem intact because we see people that are successful in all black with whatever difficulties they have so. I think we have to keep that as as a big picture on the way that we can work through this The is a lot of support report and it can be done. Yeah brilliant thank you so much thank you with you. Yes Nj and Yeah left the Catch view again in the future and left to let me know when you're coming to London. He will be well well. I hope you enjoy that conversation with Angela. Charalambous from the workshop reading Sensei in Johannesburg lots of strategies there to help our readers be more confident faded and support them sit enjoy reading. He can find more information about this site on the podcast page on the website autism spectrum teach dot come. You can find me on social media on facebook and Instagram at autism spectrum. Teach our Switzerland then at Steph read. Ast Ast also come join our facebook group autism and inclusive teaching it is where we're supporting each other sharing information strategies good tips. Oh come and ask a question I would really appreciate and love to know what you think about the podcast. So if you can leave a review on the podcast platform platform for example on apple costs this would be so helpful to Maye anno side of the people who are looking for this type of information and help them to find. Find it if you haven't already subscribe to this podcast in your chosen. pocos platform such apple. PODCASTS spotify Google the android and then you get the next episodes sent straight to your device. If you'd like to find out more information about how I could support you your family or your school or service. Fees semi an email to Steph at autism spectrum. TEACHER DOT COM. I K- enjoy the rest of your day. Hey an I was beach in the next episodes. Take Care bye-bye..

apple Steph radi Southfield official Armagh Johannesburg Korea spotify US Tate London Manson Switzerland facebook Andrew dominic socal Angela
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

09:29 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"About sharing sharing information and practical advice related to the teaching and learning of autistic on neuro diverse learners. Now good autism practice. This is good practice for everyone. Today's special guest is Angela. Chara Landis who's reading specialist at the Workshop Reading Center in Johannesburg South Africa. Angela gives some really good advice about supporting children. Who are having reading difficulties and Nisa advice isn't just great for autistic children but a lot of different learn is so if you're thinking about helping and supporting a child in your life life who's perhaps having some difficulties with reading? There is lots of great information coming up. This is also a particularly personal subject for me I I am dyslexic and have experienced reading difficulties throughout my education. And still do now so there are different strategies. The I have myself to help me as a reader data so I hope you've enjoyed this conversation with reading specialist undulate charalambous. Here comes the Android on his your favourite teacher staff Angela. Thank you so much for joining me on the PODCAST. Now you run the workshop reading sensor in Johannesburg. I'd love to hear how you're helping children with reading difficulties difficulties show. Thanks for having me. We based yes in hemispheric and FAC- came we work with children with with renamed the vacancies in the areas that we kept our gang assessments for children that struggle we do dyslexia screening tests as will oh that mandate in anything that follows on from that for mediation with goal tended. Intervention from Australia would sell field which works with the way that the brain processes information attention during reading. Have some lovely improvements with that intervention. It's other method. Instruction reading but it's insulated A program way children will on computer and it works with the way that the brain processes information for reading and they having come out of that we we ran us that parents and teachers also need support with children with difficulties and that lead to the the development of various workshops that we run for children comprehension influential skills that type of thing and for parents as wet as teaches this ends. Do you support many logistic children. We'd save need whipped central That functioning And I think just you're in the in the costume environmentally. We really need to be ensuring that on teachers have the tools to be able to support children. What if the tea is? Yeah and I think you're not trying to find a statistic of walked percentage of autistic children from have reading difficulties and the information that I found very from what intend to full intention children with autism having reading difficulties. So I don't put my head on the block and say the you know percentages but certainly if I if I look at skills the classroom environment way teach can do things to us. Children that are not near as vehicle. things like making learning multi sensory. He's an audiovisual information. I'm flash pictures and things like that in allowing children to she presents in a different format maybe in a powerpoint presentation as opposed to being a pricing on nine to work in the area of interest radiologist m accommodating children in ways that they need a lot of children with with that are very a lot of sensory issues whether they artistic or not we need to accommodate them in across from by making sure that be sensitive took to whatever song is in the environment and we want him to be relaxed uncomfortable in that learning environment in the way that we are teaching children with difficulties by breaking up releases into manageable tracks revising. What's been doing what's been done before? Unfold giving an account of wavy going so just making sure that the child is comfortable of way we being Going James of listen cannons on and Starting Eighty Direction explicit instruction breaking up instructions into manageable chunks. All of those things I think we we need to do with with children. That struggle was learning would be relevant four to six children as well. Yeah Yeah and everything. Can you just said that would help all children. Yeah ooh although strategies that you know I'm really make loaning visual multi sensory and and like you said breaking down tasks into into manageable chunks and revisiting learning. Yes they can help all children and I'm I quite often have conversations with teachers and headteachers and talking about how good autism practice on good inclusive practice is good practice for children processing agreed he really is And thank you know they statement the into sake of children with Winstons attention difficulties to some you know. So Instance Instance Saints repricing. Malcolm's on social skills could be an interesting for both of those areas so I think we just really need to be educating and supporting teachers so that they can support children and I think that worldwide is is something that needs to be done. Yeah Yeah just say that we can make teaches away. Bet Child has reading because he doesn't like the region law in costume situation so that we really can accommodate children Rita schooling system as state with confidence a Mesa esteem as intact as possible. Yes definitely I can really relate to that I'm dyslexic. And when I was at school I was filled with so much anxiety and dread if I knew that I was going to have to read out loud or if the teacher just randomly pick somebody so. That's something that I don't do in my own teaching practice when we're thinking about children with reading difficulties he's boosting. Confidence is important some strategies that help me as a reader because to me text. Looks like it's vibrating. Thanks I bright lights really. Don't help and a color filter all colored overlay over a page or screen can make reading a bit more comfortable. What exact? It's such a simple thing. Any put on urban onto a whack page and and if that's going to assist the child it's such a simple little tool not used to make him more comfortable with reading. Yeah we need to just be saints. took to all of those things again coming down just awareness on off from the appearance on the teacher to speak to those tune. What tools can be used in the classroom just to to accommodate children? Yeah and I really liked what you said about using the child's interests because especially for young children to try and engage them in reading when they've got something about their favorite characters or they're you know they love cars or they they they love superheroes having a book about that is already going to capture the their interests no matter what their needs are serum. Yes it's really important to us and harness those interests interests absolutely. We want to maintain a love of reading even for children that struggle with reading we recommend reading from three three different areas so reading really easy material which Bruce Confidence Comic Book or reading a simple book to a younger sibling or something like that that is below h label. Something that they cooperating. Well that's really does boost confidence and give them that feeling of irate already can do this reading at age appropriate levels. A school reno was something where they cope with most of material but the on new words they push semi little bit so that they grow had a skill develops and main reading at a difficult so when about age label Maccabi. Something as you said that is an area of interest and it may be a book that is difficult And I would say to parents continuing.

Workshop Reading Center Angela Johannesburg Chara Landis South Africa Nisa reno FAC Australia Winstons Bruce Malcolm
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"I'm one of them. But he rightly highly French now from an outsider. Looking in his him with his learning difficulties you would think are wide seeing takes us probably one of his homily subjects so when I picked it with him and said what. He's telling me about French. What is it about French? Be Easy you go in and he start with you. Always we stop counting than we do a song and then we play a game and then we finish with a song every lesson was exactly the same. So there's predictability is that lack of intolerance of thirty six. I absolutely no with French. While I'M GONNA get a May not understand what the world saw but what the structure of the lessons going to be Shaman that makes me feel comfortable optical so again that work on picking with the individuals and hearing what is their funding then you can start to work with them and developing strategies to manage those Tis. Thank you very much. Is there anything else that we haven't covered. You would like to mention. There was lots of extremely collectible information that one of the other things with working with the child about thinking so I had a child who didn't lessons. He's a year eight challenge. People were starting to disengage these lessons since the point and the toll so again we took him out. That situation did somewhat with him. It's someone that mapping laughing landscape fair but the biggest thing that had the most impact with Mussa do person centered pathway with him so we mapped out for him and his family and people people who cared about him what his long-term goals were and he wanted to be trained Dr so then we were up to break down all the pieces of what he needed to do to get to that long term go. And when they were broken down into little chunks he could see the need to engage with his learning and Lo and behold he was going back in the classroom and reengaging with his learning it made sense to him again but big conceptual level. It didn't so he needed to have broken down. So that uncertainty taken away to see what that clear Paul Golfway Wolves thing that we've seen Levels of anxiety come down on their better engagement in learning is some of our schools. Have Vince juice sensory circuits at the start of every day. All at certain points in the day when the child with autism needs so that the ones are the start of the day tend to be for range of pupils some with autism also some of our pupils with sem h have benefited from them. And I think all of us who've experienced watching them in schools you can see the children's level invincibility come.

Lo Paul Golfway Mussa Vince
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

06:58 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Here's your host like favorite teacher staff free. Well thank you. Jane and Helen Feel Time. Today it's really appreciated and be really interesting to talk about the evidence base guide to anxiety and autism and I mean this guy is really informative and it really gives clear explanations of current understanding over in autism as well as what potential causes of anxiety could be and also strategies that can help individuals managing Zaidi but a link to guide and the show notes and BA firstly Jane and had them before we we talk about the guide. What is your experience in autism on your current roles? Okay so my. I came into to the world of autism rarely because I was teaching in a primary school and It appeared that there were more children having social communication difficulties and also taught couple of children who had a diagnosis of autism. So I had. I became fascinated by it really which led me to end up applying to join the autism and social communication indication team eleven years ago and and then we as part of the role I studied at the University of Birmingham Distance. Course for yeah so And then it's been my pleasure to lead the team for the last eight. Yes and so. The experience really is just the hands on experience within schools and then sport in children that we do now cross county not slightly different routes in So I worked in corporate world. I'm became pregnant with my first child and my very last job was to go to the National Society heavily pregnant I pick up a brief from them and while I sat in reception I sat there thinking thinking about autism thing. I wonder what it's all about two years later. The baby's been carrying was diagnosed with autism at two years old And it's been a journey for me ever since he's going to be eighteen in a couple of months so he took me on a journey. I did reverse older As a parent obviously interested became more and more interested in autism. So I took the distance learning from Birmingham and then became a Ta and then became a teacher. And then I landed where I call monitoring job to be working some of these individuals every day for six years. Now Oh that's great great to hear the different journeys and rates and okay so let's talk about the guide anxiety and autism. So how did this come about okay social so I met Dr Sebastian Gag. WHO's the doctor who has done the research that this is all? Based on at an event we were both presenting. I listened to his presentation and then he listened to us and afterwards we met and basically we said we must have some things we could do together because he was doing the theory on the one side and we were doing the practice on the and one of the tenants. Silence of our team is to recommend things that all based on evidence so this was a perfect opportunity to look at what the evidence was for the strategies that we were recommending ending. So that's where it started. So then it developed from there to Oscar tending an event of his talking with him and then he attended a copy. Spokane spoke conference of ours and then out of the natural evolution of that was to work together on this guide so the guide really gives a good good summary of what is commonly understood about anxiety in autism. It would be really great to hear a summary very of this. I found really helpful. In because I've I've shown this booklet to parents and teachers and to think about anxiety as separate from autism. Perhaps you think I think that is the key Lynch of the the guidance and it is that it is a separate entity yes. I think it's been very easy in the past but people just dismiss it and say well anxieties poverty. Some you have to learn to live with it. It isn't there may be some parts of your automatic condition that may be contributing to your anxiety. But it's a separate entity and we can work on anxiety. Exorbitant develop strategies make life much more comfortable for autistic individuals definitely from our assets of practice in in the county. That was good news for us to hear because we've always thought that was the case. But but it's really good that is being it'll cheer definitely for it to be really clear sky. I think that helps people's understanding I think also it's the fact that it can be difficult to identify that sometimes are just because it may present in quite unusual new way and that that might be part of it so for example if the guide it compares social anxiety and a new roof typical person and so they they worry about what people might be thinking about what they're doing that wouldn't be the case of how social anxiety present for an autistic person they would be. I am thinking more about what kind of barriers they need to overcome what they need to do next rouse them. What other people so it? Presents is quoted to inquire what differences same thing is both of those scenarios of social anxiety but they present quite differently in an autistic individual. And I think the difference is is that the typical where they're they're social anxiety comes from wanting to impress their mates and not making a fool of themselves. I I think the difference is and why possibly it's a higher level of anxiety and somebody with autism is because there is that level of panic of. I don't actually know what I can undo. I don't actually know how to overcome this builds and builds and builds and it is something that we try really hard with our schools is to them to see that some of the behaviors that they're commenting on to us the underlying thing. Obviously the autism awesome is related. Actually there is an anxiety there is so it's been helpful as well. So looking at the differences.

anxiety Jane University of Birmingham Dista Zaidi National Society Dr Sebastian Gag Spokane Birmingham Helen Ta Oscar Lynch
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

10:48 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Of actually getting family impo are often. I've looked in. There's a big area of research specifically typically parental also family involvement and the fact that this Canley really challenging for many reasons. Maybe like the parents should should we say own experience with schools might mean that that reluctance come to these meetings and engage is also like a little bit of a professional parent hierarchy hierarchy which definitely exists and needs to be taken into account that the parent might come into this room full of who they perceive experts in different fields. They will just feel like they can't express what they know about their child and I guess that's where it's our job to make sure that you know we're providing that kind of environment rent an atmosphere where the parents are feeling like they have their say and they're say is valued whether that's going to be powerful. We're inviting parents into assessing the type of meetings that we're having again going back to the various forms of early intervention. Even things like finding casts I rest spike. Basically for a child's is also almost a form of intervention in that. You're giving the pattern for the care that time to go and just chill out because the loss of relationship between the parents quality of life and that I think have to rate a tie into accounts that the parent needs to be getting the rest by. They need to be common able to manage the situation. And what what can we introduce to support that to happen as well so I would always always pays any of these meetings. You're talking to the parents you'll deciding what you're GONNA do to support the child. But as a second plot that conversation could even be fastball. In some instances this is another part. She received that goes ation is is what are they doing for themselves because that's such an important integral abyss that we need to be making sure that as supported reported as the child I think coming to the end of this. I think a really important message is that there is no right intervention. It always concerns end music if I if I had someone who says This is what has to happen to my child as soon as possible because x y and I kind of think. Yeah yeah that might have really worked very well for another child from another context. But that doesn't mean it's going to wet Pathak leave your child and there are two thanks to coach him with us as well as a it might. It might simply not be available to you. That could be because it didn't do in the UK all it's really really expensive expensive. And you Kinda take these factors into account. I'm ready just whack out. What's achievable and available? So let's take sets. Let's switch is something that I have used to have a huge amount of respectful. Which is a a program that's multidisciplinary so it takes aspects of have different programs developed by speech and language therapists and essentially aims to support children with social communication and the national regulation but will say those around them to be aware of and evaluating what you all transactional supports the how? We're actually helping children to access their environment. All how a changing the environment to support them and we'll I continually felt was fantastic. mastic about sets was it with the child and it stays with the child. Say Look into really change the child in any particular way you're just Getting some ideas maybe from it about things that could help the child with the communication and their emotional regulation but fundamentally. Hey there's there's nothing that's trying to eradicate from the With that break. So if we're seeing that waving their hands in the as helping them to to feel more my shouldn't they regulated than us right and that will be recognized and supported an added that communication possible. You know. I think what set has done is zits money's team in a way combine lots of different programs quite effectively and helped pull the understanding of professionals does. The approach was developed by looking at typical development especially in the areas of attention and joint attention. I know for me. What's that is really highlights and increase my understanding in terms of the development of attention on the development of emotions and emotional national regulation and the impact that therefore has on the way? I'm able to support children and recognize what stage of development there. What's with the attention and social communication and unemotional regulation just kind of factor? The functional analysis thing. Isn't it so you'll you'll moist. ICED is is to support you to support your child's which is worse so useful about that. Yes definitely a KO wrap up here by summarizing in some of our key points and that is that a combined approach can have lots of benefits of very personalized tailored approach coach. Depending on the child's needs the team around the child is really really important and their access to evidence based practice assists strategies interventions. Which of course need to be monitored and evaluated to ensure that they're having an impact and we really need to highlight? What are we intervening for? And why and we mentioned about the importance of Hyman school partnerships working together making sure all information mation is being shed the importance of a multidisciplinary approach and of course always acting in the best interest of the child. Which of course should be oviously but is important to highlight definitely and I think another just really important thing is about being aware that it's not going to a bill like this forever? Say you are of a parent or you are a care of a young child. And you're ready struggling with aspects of that behavior. Then you'll title Oleg because as a lot of parents out there regardless of whether by child has a tight Bravely struggling with the specs affects that child's behavior. I'm I think it's important to recognize that. It is a challenging time for many people with having a child but the child is GonNa McGregor and they all going to change and become necessarily predict in what ways especially if they are autistic but the the things will change. And let's seeking that support I think is just so important. They're very adult giant. Yes seeking support is so important and of course as practitioners Titian as we've also got to support those families who may not be seeking support for whatever reason for whichever stage. They're at in their own journey with their child's needs and for us to support that also so to make sure that We as professionals highlight the services that are accessible in our area. Or aw if your parent knowing what services are available in your area there's lots of support groups online in fact by the time this episode so come out I will have started the facebook group for parents. Teachers teach sisters speech language therapists. Anybody that's involved and wanting to get the support around autism and different learning needs inclusion Russian. The aim is the group has learning together sharing ideas problem solving asking questions. But yes. There's lots of different support groups online and John might possibly be some in your local area. Make sure you're aware of of what is taking place out there. And what support is available without okay into cheesy if it comes to support groups and stuff then be that change if you can't find anything in your immediate area than than set something up yourself if you can handle let and it doesn't have to be much more than like Kofi once a week all once a month if that was better I think sharing sharing ideas sharing experiences experiences. Just having someone who gets a bit where you're coming from oil going through his sample and thank you so much higher my pleasure thank you and yet it's been absolutely brilliant to speak to you to keep talking. Nothing is fantastic caustic and really useful for many legal. Yes thank you very much via time. That was higher. I inside thank you so much. Hi It's always such took pleasure to speak to you. All of the links that we mentioned in this episode will be in the show notes on my website. AUTISM SPECTRUM TEACH DOT COM. So just go to the podcast page and you can find the episode if you WanNa find me on social media on facebook and instagram. I'm at autism spectrum teacher and on twitter and Linton you can find me at Steph read. Ast If you want to get in touch please send me an email steph. At autism spectrum teacher DOT COM and as I mentioned earlier I am looking for cost editor. So if you think that might be you. These email me Steph. AT AUTISM SCHISM SPECTRUM TEACHER DOT COM. And as I mentioned earlier the next episode will be live in two weeks. I if you haven't already subscribed bribed to this podcast then you can do so in the pokonos player of your choice. Whether that's android Google Apple podcasts. spotify notify and I'd love to hear what you think about the podcast. Any reviews is really helpful for me because I get to see what well you may like about the puckers but also it helps other people to find the podcast also. I mentioned the facebook group in the episode so you can find on facebook. It's called autism and inclusive teaching ideas that come and join the group and I will speak to you in to me the..

facebook Steph UK DOT COM Pathak spotify Hyman twitter editor McGregor Kofi John Linton
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

09:39 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Expectations on the part of the people supporting that child and that might simply Jesse too much they both. I would argue elements that can be really really useful for the child for the professionals for the family. That's about kind of taking what works sharing intimation and yet fixing on going back to the point that we again said before about making sure that whatever you are intervening with they will ever. You are supporting the child to change or to adapt is is actually appropriate functional. For that child I think on the side Daca doc night potentially I was thinking about Eilly intervention and specifically in the UK. I always worry that parents will access this this amazing resource that we have available to us. which is the Internet? And you'll get all of this information again as I was saying a rabbit hole. You have some people telling you this and other people telling putting you that but you'll also have just so much information and maybe you're informed to the point where you decide this intervention. This program is exactly what you need for your child. We need to be aware of the resources that we have available to us and it regional in the UK. So you might in one place and you would have certain programs available to you. Then you'd be different place in that wouldn't be available and these things can be really really suit per expensive expensive and time consuming and put huge amount of strain Oakton even distress and like the family environment. So think again. It goes back to what I was saying about these programs at great and they are evidence base. But it's taking what you kind of what works from those programs and applying it to your environment. You're Brian Context. And I'm maybe token European more incentive like the parent or the Guardian at that point but another link that I really would love if you could include adopted. Compensation is the nice guidelines which cover diagnosis will do some fool under a under nineteen. There's also adult version and the written By experts and I feel that many people know about them but a really fantastic guide about way. You should be looking at each stage. They pre dyke Mike Nicest. You have any consents though. I light some things that could direct you to go and seek advice from maybe a paediatrician or doctor and then they'll kind of fully in three stages of that process even into intervention price diagnosis. I really recommend just anyone interested in kind the fort is in the UK. And I went to check out thank you I completely agree. And I'll put a link in the show notes. Okay let's talk about an example who of an area of intervention that poses a question of whether there should actually be an intervention or not. So we've got a a child who is four years old recently been diagnosed with autism. Their parents are still coming to terms with the diagnosis named named occasions on the life that they had may be imagined for this trial. Also that ran lives is family something that they particularly finding finding difficult at the moment. Is that this child really likes to wave. Their arms in the air is a typical example of a stemming behavior so that yeah kind of thing okay. She's artistic bought. We just can't handle the fact that she's doing this and we want to stop doing this so then. Should there be an early intervention around that already intervention about Mata. Well how do you do that. Yes and this leads onto a much bigger theme think about acceptance and understanding and is there actually any issues here all the issues more to do with external factors and other people's opinions and views about how people should be behaving. I would like to explore the parents. What do they feel? The issues are here. Is it actually helping the child. How is the child feeling? They expressing themselves. Well is the function of the behavior and looking at this with the parents or carers one's a stand by why the child is doing why they are waving their arms is it because they the happy and excited they angry. They regulating themselves to try and stop the child from doing this then there could be other consequences consequences because this behavior will be having a function. Full that child so interesting because then it's almost like people mice described actual functional analysis switch switch. We wouldn't necessarily say was early intervention such in the doesn't directly target the child or any aspect of that behavior but functional analysis where you're trying understand. The function of here is kind of going back to our earlier conversation more all over support for like the professionals of the family. And it's it's almost like you're kind of still intervening in a way by showing them. This is why she's doing. This is the reason and so. That's again like kind of another way looking at early intervention is it doesn't necessarily have to be targeted at the child. I think that's kind of capturing something that's really important. Yeah early intervention specifically as with any intervention can also be targeted people around the child. Maybe yes definitely and research shows us that supporting parents have families with understanding needs and supporting areas such as communication play leads to better outcomes for children and also the same of supporting supporting teachers and educational settings. I actually completed a research project a couple of years ago which highlighted that when the knowledge edge of school staff was improved this leads to increase confidence of teachers and most importantly better outcomes for children and especially especially when we are perhaps working with a child. That isn't able to effectively express their needs and their wants and how they're feeling we saw. Aw The people the family the professionals we are the people that are trying to understand what is happening in that child world. How is that child feeling feeding and that is really important? Especially when you think about all responses to the child and how that's going to have an impact on them when you're present but then I think another aspect of this which is interesting specifically in terms of early intervention. She say generally we might be working with children who approvable or at least half substantial stunt communication difficulties so we have like the mental capacity. Act which was introduced to protect tsk adults. He might not necessarily know if they had the capacity to make a decision about something like say an interventional rather questions in the way they would live et Cetera so the mental capacity act was introduced to to protect these people and I think the key principles are basically that anything has to be done in the interests. If that person who said that all efforts have to be made to actually support that person to decide and fix really interests me especially in in context at intervention another key principle is even if you think that decision is unwise. That doesn't give you the right to make the decision on that. Aw How often do. We think that we're just wise it and say children and therefore we sort of decided that they shouldn't be playing with that because that's inappropriate. Actually David maybe expressed an interest in that. And I'm not saying him with them in danger but like if a child has a really strong interest in one particular toy and you think it's unwise but they have that toy with them too much because they might become overly dependent on it then. I feel like you'll you'll going against that principle which is basically that that this child is is selecting something and it's working for them and we kind of have to be empowering children as with as with anyone to to make it's decisions and yet the mental capacity yet obviously doesn't apply. I'm not saying either. The in necessarily ship because there's a degree of Karen responsibility ability that is needed. If you're discussing child but I think the principles really interesting to take into account again going back this conversation. What are we trying to make happen for this young person what we try to change what we're trying to develop yes? Most importantly everything must be done in the best interests of the child I owed and therefore the CO context needs to be considered maybe with the example of the toy it may be that parents and professionals does agree on a strategy to support the child to perhaps develop other interests or take part in some activities without that favorite favorite toy but again everything must be in the best interests of the child. And this is where it's also very important that there is a multidisciplinary approach. The impact of a range of professionals are specialists. In in those different areas speech and language therapists occupational thera `pests perhaps physiotherapists specialist teachers. Are you've got the impact of different people and most importantly the family I think the challenges.

UK child world Jesse Brian Context Mike Nicest Mata Karen David
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

11:22 min | 2 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"I've got the wonderful higher ironside. WHO's an experienced special needs teacher to talk about early intervention invention? She is a former colleague of mine and I absolutely loved working with her. We know through research the earlier interventions can be put in place to support a child and their family. The better the outcomes would be and this is true. For All areas of development including those related to autism such as language engage communication social interaction skills and as what has improved family understanding and the support systems around them. That are in place during this episode. Man Higher are GonNa talk all about some important factors to consider in early intervention but just before we get into the conversation with higher. I just wanted to mention that there has been a bit of a break with the PLO cost. I haven't released an episode since April Two Thousand Nineteen and the reason being. I was doing lots of different projects including supporting a number of schools in London outreach and training I I was also a Sankoh up until July twenty nineteen. I'm now dedicating all my time to autism spectrum teacher to provides schools and services with bespoke support to develop autism practice and ensure children with additional needs are making good progress and also to expand. I I online outreach. To share helpful information for this podcast my website autism spectrum teach dot com and social media channels knows I also spent quite a bit of the summer in Mosca Amman supporting and developing an autism education program with an education nations service out there and what an absolute privilege it was to support many local families whose children were mostly not accessing. School this would actually be really good to discuss in another episode saw. Leave this for now. I realized with the work I was doing and I couldn't to continue doing this. Focus by myself so I have a loss of recorded episodes. I'm really excited to share with you and now I'm the point where I do need somebody to help with the podcast. So I'm currently looking for a podcast editor. If any of you are into editing podcasts please give me a shout Steph. At autism spectrum teach dot com but the exciting news is the I will now be sharing pocus upside every tweet two weeks so I'm really excited about sharing more content with you mentioned this again. My contact details at the end of this episode. So they won't take any more time talking about this because this episode is really exciting. I hope you enjoy it. Here is a conversation with experienced teach are higher ironside ride about audience invention and he's yours my favorite teacher staff. I thank you so much for joining me on the podcast today. High Staff. Thank you so much for inviting me. It's it's really good to be here. I've listened to all of your episodes very inspiring and yeah can't wait to have alcohol Thank you I'm really looking forward. Go to this I know our conversations are always very passionate journeys working so high at. Tell us about your experience in teaching autistic mystic children. Okay well I've had either ten years experience working with children in general and nearly five years specifically with the Children I'm just become increasingly interested in the earliest at intervention. I trained as an adult ED class trainer for the National Autistic Society which was really interesting way to actually speak with parents about that children an and see its of outside educational setting. I was also teaching reception in a special school for children with diagnosis of autism in London. And Yeah I just I just wanted to thank those children and their families in particular and the other professionals. Because I'm sure that in this conversation today we will use maybe some examples from the experience the indefinitely biggest teachers are the children or show and listening so yeah. We're GONNA be talking about early intervention today. Yes so my feeling really is that early. Intervention is a buzzword and essentially linked to the fact that we can now diagnose children a lot earlier so whistle saying well if we can do that and we have them when their brains are essentially more malleable than this is a great time and to intervene and support not only the children but also that families so I finally intervention is basically trying to do something that's like basically as early as possible in order to support Charles Development. I'm there are so many I mean I'm sure you know kind of in your experience. There are so in many different programs but it's quite a rabbit hole in terms of like the different things that people are going to tell you like on. This works really well for my child. Wild radio well I think in my experience the outcome of any intervention really depends on the context of the child panel. Say the particular Komo therapy that you're using. Yeah I guess. Every child is an individual has very personalized needs and like you're saying one type type of intervention or approach would be suitable to meet the needs of one childen support their development and for another child. It might not have much impact to there's also like Hussein so many different approaches and interventions. I ninety definitely in my experience and POPs in yours using a a combination of interventions work well to support different areas of development and learning. But again it's some will have more of an impact than others depending on the child's needs tightly and I think there's also a degree of trial and error of flexibility which is really necessary on the part of the team around that child piled so you might try something and you need to give it a certain amount of time that you need to have evaluation procedures in place that you can say. Well you know. This is really isn't working checking or maybe the child's actually just totally hating this and then you're able to be flexible in. You're able to kind of change that and it really just depends on on the child and finding something the works for them. You just made a really important point about evaluation and monitoring and what is the impact on those particular interventions nations for that child. Is this working. How's it working and therefore should we continue this tightly and that was another thing incontinent? Wanted to touch on conversation today. Aside from whether the intention is necessarily working not working for the child. I think that the loss of other things that we need to take into account which is what are we intervening full like some people. They would say that should be embracing. You're or a diversity and it's not necessarily the child. He really has to change in order to just conform to US society. But maybe we need to actually be acting so that the child is able to blossom as a young autistic Passan am I know is going to send you a link the Guardian Film about this young girl. I think the best Mylan is home for me when she she says at one point that she's afraid has nightmares that she's going to wake up the next morning and she's not going to be autistic she so so kind of vet with her identity and definitely the work that have parents and other people in her life have done to kind of help with that has been invaluable. But I think it's really really. Yeah when you considering any intervention like huge question is well what we intervening with. Why but without set? I don't WanNa say like don't right into being because you do find something that works for the Child and works for the family your wet for the people who are involved then you will gonNA potentially operated operated successful outcomes and I wanted to impose of a successful outcome could look like Child a WHO's voyeurs old they've got relatively to be mild autistic features. They're going to mainstream school. They're receiving intervention in the form of speech and language therapy sessions like designed around the interest. And they're really motivating aren't the Guardian myth with Hiram is also using some of the strategies and so the time where she see that a child a linguistic communication difficulties decrease so that's like a fantastic example of early intervention which is has been done really effectively for that child and they've also got kind of the support around them so the context which is that Guardian is supporting them. The school is supporting for examined. That for all their able to be successful so I think it's really important in this conversation to basically will have Ernie gang me early intervention right in whatever form that may be but also make sure that the other things around the child also live as secure and as positive as possible so high school came together like that. I mean as someone who's worked in the anyone who knows me in that role will neither. That was kind one of my biggest thing building link between the highland school and just making sure that only information is being shared. Because that's really how I felt. We could do the best that we could do for that child for example if there is something that's working really well at school. ooh That's helping a child. Perhaps who has difficulties transitioning if that's helping them at school then that could help them at home and I had a really great in depth conversation the station of apparent recently about food and the progress in eating and trying some different foods at home and without knowing this important information for school and we could be going at such a slow pace and working together. You'll keeping that. My Men's manure ensuring that child is getting the most effective and consistent assistant support at home and at school tightly. I think it just it just means that again. It's back to what you said about multiple pulled approaches because again people are going to do things differently and if we fight us some examples specific interventions. Let's take two Aba Applied Behavior analysis sets which is such communication emotion regulation transactional sport like both of these quite daunting in the extent of paperwork type work and review and.

London National Autistic Society PLO highland school Mylan US editor Mosca Amman High Staff Charles Development Komo Hussein Hiram Ernie
"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Adam highlighted the importance of breaking down activities into steps steps and how this can really help and support the children and you'll say talked about different language strategies and planning strategies depending on that child's abilities as a needs if you haven't already listened to the first episode of the Autism Spectrum Teacher podcast I talk about different teaching in support strategies. He's not just beneficial for children with autism but for all children so do have listen back if you haven't already and make sure you're subscribed to the podcast. I and you can do that on. I tunes spotify stitcher. Google poke casts or you can listen on my website autism spectrum teach dot COM I would really appreciate if you could leave a review on whichever platform you. Listen to. This will help the podcast be seen by other people who do it could potentially help so that would be really appreciated. Adam thank you again for having that conversation with me and giving some really valuable advice. That's all for today's episode. If you do want to get in contact with me my email is steph. At autism spectrum teach dot com and you can find me on facebook book an Instagram at Autism Spectrum teacher and on twitter and Lincoln Steph read. AST vessel for now take care bye.

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"And here's your favorite teacher staff. Welcome to the second episode of the Autism Spectrum Teacher. podcast my name is Steph. Read and I'm an autism specialist teacher teacher and I provide outreach training coaching and consultancy to schools and services. And you can find me at. WWW DOT autism spectrum teach dot com the autism spectrum teacher focused is all about developing understanding of autism for having conversations with or individuals parents parents teachers service providers educational professionals and. I'm really excited about today's conversation with Adamson Demar all about emotional national regulation here. We Guy Adam. Thank you for joining me today. I really appreciate it. It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you so adam is as being. A friend is an experienced children with autism. And we saw by you just giving a background background of your experience the schools you've been teaching at should've say I've been working with children and young people with autism for the last ten years prior to that I worked in mainstream education During the ten years of worked with Peoples from all of key stages from key stage one up until post sixteen students Had some experience with the whole range across the spectrum from the children with sieve night language to you children with lots of.

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

Autism Spectrum Teacher

16:30 min | 3 years ago

"autism" Discussed on Autism Spectrum Teacher

"Renamed and a K brilliant before I get in to the teaching and support tips. I just want to give you a little a bit of background information about me. Your host Steph read since my very first interaction with an autistic child whilst I was on a work experience placement whilst at school. I've wanted to learn everything I can about autism. Spend as much time as I could about cystic people and John's I went on to study especially as inclusion studies and Early Childhood Studies as my undergraduate degree and then I've since been teaching in different types of educational setting such as mainstream schools and special schools specialist schools specifically for cystic children as well as a provision and autism provision within a mainstream school so very different settings and I've also had a lot of experience in using different types of research based approaches an intervention. Such as Sir Social Stories teach cocoon attention autism positive behavior support the picture exchange communication system intensive interaction and many any other different types of strategies and interventions. I will go into more detail about these different research based methods in later episodes of the cost cost. I also want you to let me know if there is anything that you would like to be explored in later sides of the podcast. And I'll touch on that at the end end of this episode Maurice Lately. I've been involved in developing and leading an outreach program of support to different schools where The main focus is really building capacity developing knowledge and understanding of staff as well as really ensuring successful provisions Asia and practice is in place. Because let's be honest. Good autism practice is good practice in general so a lot of the things. I'll talk talk about in this. PODCAST episode weren't just be beneficial for children of autism but for a lot of our children now without any further delay here are awesome effective strategies for teaching and supporting autistic children so the first hip is to always think about the sensory Dentsu. We import in the environment. And how this might be having an impact on the children. You're teaching in the classroom. Or how the sensory IMP- Hi might be having an impact on an individual or perhaps in the service you're providing. There is quite often lot of sensory input going going on around us all the time and for example in today's classrooms. You already have a lot of sensory stimuli for example who busy colorful classroom displays lots of resources around the room on tables on shelves quite often in very bright lights lots of different smells. Lots of different sounds from the other children. Perhaps even from electrical requirements and sometimes autistic children can find it difficult to block out different. Sounds or be able to focus on the sounds. A you want them to focus on. Or perhaps they're experiencing those senses just much more sensitively than you or I. Why and we always need to remember that everyone is experiencing the sensory environment the sensory input around them differently and this is especially true significantly true for an individual with autism? Sometimes the impact act can be obvious and what I mean by that is for example. You may see a child covering that is. That's very obvious. They're trying to block out some parts of their auditory input so already that signals to you. Something in the environment is having an impact on them. What can you do about it a child? That's covering the eyes or turning off the lights writes that signaling to you that perhaps the lights are too bright or the paper is too bright can these be adapted did a child that's moving in a particular way. Maybe they're seeking some kind of sensory input. They pulling in things into them. Tightly is is not signaling to you that they they're they're seeking that sensory input is is something you can give to them to provide them with that woulda movement break. Help would some kind of equipment that would give them the depression for example a a weighted blanket or a hug vest. There are lots of different strategies that can hope support the sensory needs of children and I would suggest that you always look at the impact of the sensory environment if a child has become this regulated then perhaps very upset. There may be very angry angry. Something is something frustrated them look at the sensory environment. Look look at what is going on around them has. There is just too much since we import. Is it causing them sensory overload and it's just too much there is what's known as hypersensitivity eight has been very very sensitive to sensory input or that's high pose sensitivity which is under sensitive or perhaps not register sensory input and children can have both sensitivities. They can be oversensitive under sensitive to different sensory input. So it's all about looking. The individual sensory needs providing the right support will help a child to hope a child to regulate and manage that sensory environment around them because if they are very sensitive. It's going to be highly overwhelming. I'm on forget about learning. Forget about forget about teaching. That's not going to. They're not going to be able to focus. Concentrate so always think about about. The sensory environment observed the child observe the environment. What is happening okay? Number two now children with autism will get that diagnosis because they have some differences in the receptive and perhaps apps their expressive language so each individual will have very different communication needs. It could be that one person. doesn't develop any verbal language and has challenges with understanding the language and communication used by others perhaps in other person has very advance expressive language skills and can talk very well and but may experience difficulties with understanding nonverbal communication. All some of the language around them so receptive communication means understanding understanding the communication from other people understanding verbal language non verbal language. Of course us. Everyone is different but what we can do is make sure we choose our language. Our methods of convenience communication why's Lay A. I'll never forget when I was a teaching assistant. Probably my first week of of working with a young boy and and I had said to him come back and what did he do. He walked backwards and from that moment I said to myself love. I need to make sure the language I use is very specific because otherwise it may be interpreted in a way that you didn't mean so be very specific in your use of language. Say what you mean if you want a child to do something trump thing say exactly what you mean is GonNa make such a difference. So if you're going to say something like like Tommy Run. That message could actually be taken. They may just hear the word run is it's it's going to be much more helpful. If you say Tommy Walk and say exactly what you mean an example of language. That's really not specific. Could be something like don't do that. Those words don't really mean anything. It doesn't tell the a child what to do it just and it doesn't even tell them what not to do it. Don't do that. That could be anything so as specific say put your feet on the floor or whatever it is wherever you want that child to do. Tell them exactly exactly that. Sometimes it can look like a child or young pass in has undestood what you've said because perhaps they've replied yes to you or maybe they've repeated what you've said. Perhaps it something that you do regularly and you think the the actually they they know the routine is always a good idea to keep it in the back of your mind that perhaps thought person may may not have understood what you've said and you might be able to observe this in their behavior but definitely don't get frustrated if if a child or an individual has not what not done what you've asked them to do perhaps they don't actually understand what you mean and maybe you need to to change your language or change or form of communication. Sometimes we might use too much language and this can cause challenges Alan Ges because words or the communication communication message gets lost for example A long sentence Benson's might be something like can you please turn around and come and sit down now. A more effective way of asking a child especially a child who has communication difficulties would be to say their name and then say set or common set so that you can make sure the child gets the key information from the language rather than that message getting lost in lots of unnecessary language so reducing our language to the key information can really really help. Language can be further supported with the use of pictures images objects. If you're holding something visual of what you are talking about. That's going to really help the children. The child the individual to decode. What you're saying or make more sense of what you're saying? So it's a good idea to pair language with aver picture or the object when for example when I ask a child if they want to go to the toilet hold up a picture of the toilet and say do you want the toilet another way that we can help. autistic individuals or individuals of communication difficulties is to use sign megatonne sign which is is a simplified version of of British sign language so using those key signs. When you're talking can really help to emphasize the word and the meaning of the word so be concrete with your use of language? Abstract got concepts can already be very challenging to understand because we can't see them so if we can try and make our language I onto stable as possible definitely avoid using any language that has a different meaning. All soft. Kasim Salk Doc. Hasim unless you're going to teach exactly what sarcasm means avoid using it because it can really confuse a child but by all means teach teach what sarcasm as and when you can use it as always important to ensure you give the child time to process and on for for different children. That's going to be a different time. But I mean I would say give ten seconds for for Charles Prices and Instruction Direction unless child can manage having more than one instruction at time. Avoid giving multiple instructions just give one instruction time and wait for for that child to process the instruction therefore you're giving them much more opportunity to be successful K.. Number three consistency Eh. This word consistency is so important. Especially when you're using perhaps a particular strategy not a maybe even when you're thinking about language be consistent and show. That child fully understands that when you you do something or when you say something. They know their response. Because you've been doing it so many times you'll being consistent. The child will will learn that. This means this. If you're not consistent if you sometimes say this sometimes sometimes say that that can be very confusing if you sometimes use for example if you sometimes use a visual timetable to to help structure their day. So they know what's coming up and sometimes you don't that will cause a lot of anxiety. Consistency consistency I'd say but he's really important. Consistency A. K. number four organization is extremely important. Potent when I was teaching fulltime a class of children with autism and severe learning difficulties. If I was not organized and didn't I have my resources and in the right places I used to use books as everything was exactly where I knew it would be. I know that a lesson would just fall apart. Because without having that organization in place things can run smoothly. And you want things to run very smoothly for an example. As if there's a child doing some work activities perhaps this child has maybe a a short attention span. And you're doing some activities at a table if your activities nicely organized perhaps therein. I I always like to use Individual Wallets for different activities. So so the activities can come out individually one one on the table. Do that Timothy next. If they're not organized and you're trying to look for resources that child is probably already up and the other side of the classroom and you cannot blame them. Of course they they need. They've they've found something more exciting today. So make sure your organized number five talk about emotional regulation and the ability to be able to.

autism Asia Steph Maurice Early Childhood Studies teaching assistant John Tommy Run Tommy Walk Timothy Kasim Salk Doc Alan Ges Charles Prices Benson