35 Burst results for "Australian government"

Australian coal exports reportedly banned by China

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:01 min | Last month

Australian coal exports reportedly banned by China

"Chinese state. Media is reporting today. That china has made official severe restrictions on the import of coal leaving hundreds of millions of tons of the stuff parked haplessly off the chinese coast in ships. That won't be talking. It is a severe and clearly symbolic expression of china's accelerating annoyance with australia. The two countries had long been profitably bound by china's fullness of australia's mineral resources the current episode of monocle. Twenty fours the foreign desk takes a broader look at the china. Australia spat in it. I speak to former australian. Prime minister and former australian diplomat to china kevin rudd. I began by asking him. Just how bad things are got most of us who have been but analysts said -ticipant in its relationship of the last several decades would site that in the near fifty year period since diplomatic relations were established in nineteen seventy two. This is the worst stage that the relationship is raised beds against all measures political diplomatic economic security human rights united. It's all gone right down. The too many contributing factors to this but indirect to question. It's a fifty year low. I think the way to analyze what's unfolding in. The of china relationship is to see it in terms of the normal outworkings all a great cow on the rise in this case but abnormally in this case the rise of a pow which is a one party state with an authoritarian political system. Fewing somewhat mckendall is taken on ole sees as well as seeking to adjust boundaries with its nighters maritime and land by his boundaries that is part of the reality but it does impact not just a straight but other american allies like japan the republic of korea in south southeast asia those in central asia even the russian federation bubble miata hand. What you've had is. An australian government said somewhat incapable differentiating between what i would describe as the operational characteristics of effective china's strategy and confusing that deliberately or otherwise on a continuing basis with a declaratory strategy which ends up being driven by domestic political imperatives. So it is. In fact the call these factors. In imprecise kerr relation with each other which actually produces the net result and frankly. It's an ungodly miss. The time for circuit breaker has well and truly come to prison. The mood for such circuit breaker has not yet arrived. But if you are not just necessarily this australian government but an australian government is there no grounds at all for concern about sinister designs. China may have on australia at this point. In recent months and years we've seen detention of australian journalists in china. There's been varies. Influence peddling scandals strode in michael burgess the director general of aco claims. There's more espionage. Dwayne australia right now than there was during the cold war. The key point here is what we conclude domestically in australia as constituting real threats to try national security by giving janis actions whether it's in state basis cyber cyber-attacks influence operations against his train. Politicians will the media or other such activities in dealing effectively. With each of those challenges it is not necessarily mandated that she didn't take out a mega fan every second day and proclaimed that from the rooftops is the constant differential i seek to explain between an operational strategy as opposed to a declaratory strategy. My advice to premise morrison repeatedly has been do more. Silas do more is in fact. A series of concrete measures enhancing on national security pows enhancing now intelligence assets enhancing fundamental economic cow enhancing out calculation growth in strengthening our alliances and relationships with countries. Around the world of just the united states but in southeast asia and beyond as well and that is gonna separate matter from proclaiming. I said every second tuesday morning. The original There's about two landing bondi beach by the chinese amphibious force. It's quite a different matter. Intelligent mature national strategy. Understand the difference between the two and the owners say practical example. The difference between the two look for example japan on a daily basis weekly bi assists in the last several years handled its relationship with china relatively stable notwithstanding the fact that japan is a annella. United states. Big is a liberal. Democracy see has tonners single loudest economic D has american military bases on its soil and e as a rolling territorial dispute with china chinese china sea of caucus data yet. Despite that the japan china economic relationship prestige relatively unmolested. Why because by the albay and supersonic plaisted looney eternal shall we say eastern virtue of shutting up from time to time as opposed to simply proclaiming everything from the rooftops that's effective strategy as opposed to opening your mouth full of time which is primarily driven ministries case by range of domestic political imperatives. Which in turn complicate the foreign policy agenda is saving to prosecute.

China Australia South Southeast Asia Kevin Rudd Republic Of Korea Japan Russian Federation Michael Burgess Australian Government OLE Kerr ACO Chinese Amphibious Force Janis Silas Morrison Bondi Beach United States
Australia faces difficulties with domestic-developed coronavirus vaccine

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Australia faces difficulties with domestic-developed coronavirus vaccine

"Australian researchers say they've abandoned development of a potential coronavirus vaccine because of false positive results researchers say the university of Queensland vaccine the walls to be manufactured at Australian by a pharmaceutical company C. S. al's Melbourne headquarters have proven safe and produced a robust response during phase one trials but the teams have agreed not to proceed further because of a false positive HIV results due to a protein contained in the potential vaccine it was one of five on which the Australian government has signed contracts with developers the stadium is a major blow to Australian vaccination plans to become self sufficient I'm Charles de Ledesma

C. S. Al University Of Queensland Melbourne HIV Australian Government Charles De Ledesma
Trouble brewing for tennis in Australia

The Tennis Podcast

04:33 min | 2 months ago

Trouble brewing for tennis in Australia

"We've had some news tonight from australia. That a lot of the plans that they'd had in place that we understood them to be from the interviews that criteria the tournament director done. All the idea. Was that players would come in. Mid-december do that. Two weeks of quarantine play all of the pre australian open tournaments in melbourne To reduce travel and potential spreading of the virus. And that has. We've been told tonight in reporting by tennis channel. Initially that is not going to be viable. That players are not going to be allowed to come into the country as things stand in december at all and the first day that they will be allowed to set foot in the country as the first of january. Which if they are required to do two weeks quarantine at that point would take them up to about three or four days before the australian open is due to begin which is hardly ideal at the very least and potentially threatens the entire australian tennis summa Certainly those preview those run-up tournaments that That they would hope to run whether the couple for some of the other events that they might bring over from brisbane and adelaide and sydney. We don't know officially wear tennis australia. Stand on this at the moment. We we've only heard this news in the last few hours and it does follow comments from the premier of victoria. Saying that it's absolutely not a done deal. Plays can come in in december you know because of the logistical issues of bringing all these people in and they've spent such a long time in lockdown getting rid of the virus dampening down to the fact that they've had apparently zero cases over the last couple of weeks new cases So we don't really know where we stunned. I think the what kind of expect they may end up doing if this continues in plaza not allowed to come until the end of december. The the first week in january is to try to coincide the two weeks of quarantine with those tournaments and be able to get permission for players to practice and play competitively. I would imagine in some sort of bubble whilst effectively quarantining and therefore that would make it doable for them. Not only to run additional tournaments but also to play the strain open. But catherine this is Just generally this is a pretty alarming state of affairs. isn't it given. it's not that far away now. Now we're talking about plays plays would have been booked in planning to travel in less than a month's time to australia significantly less than a month's time in in some someplace cases and particularly exum i think because because the tennis will the i thought okay. I mean the the barriers to entry to australian and the price of entry is incredibly high but once their once the tennis world is there and and post three days barriers. It's a it's a kind of safe haven for tennis to exist for while and and flourish for oil for that to be thrown into some uncertainty Is is quite discombobulating. Ready an i. I can only imagine how the players in the tools feel about it. I i completely respect the position of If the australian government absolutely i mean we are in a glass house in terms of criticizing the likes of australia's Approach to risk averse approach to To covid nineteen absolutely But yet the timing of it is is very disconcerting. Absolutely me i'd say something. I keeps coming back to me when we have in the events after the us. Open rome and run gar austin a couple of times match just mentioned. I'm watching this. And i'm still wondering whether it really is right. You know to see all this international travel when this is going on it. Just it's hard to put the two together as much as we love the sport and wanted to be out to be viable at the moment.

Tennis Australia Melbourne Exum Adelaide Brisbane Sydney Victoria Catherine Australian Government Gar Austin Rome United States
Why 1 million coronavirus deaths is only just the beginning

Coronacast

07:24 min | 4 months ago

Why 1 million coronavirus deaths is only just the beginning

"Yesterday Norman the world clock devote one million deaths from covid nineteen since this began less than a year ago it's been reported by the Johns Hopkins University. Dashboard, which is a pretty morbid side that keeps keeps an eye on all this sort of stuff apart from the one million deaths we've got thirty three point three, million cases in counting. And it's amazing to think that this all started from one person probably about less than a year ago. Yeah. Ten months ago November, that's the smart money is one person in China from a Bat Or Bats and moved into on ESPN. Is, an extraordinary number. And this is not necessarily going to slow down as many countries go into the second way. So we're at one million. What's the chance? Do you think we'll get to two million? Oh, I think that we'll get to two million without too much trouble unfortunately. We've got view of the United States figures on that Hopkins sites the United States numbers are going back up. There were going down a couple of weeks ago or through a few weeks ago and other going back up. Second Wave Solidifying in Europe France, not come back to France and a minute. So I think that we will get to the the the second million sadly tragically and low to middle income countries are really just getting going with this and there that just don't have the medical facilities that we do into in terms of helping people who've got severe illness. So unfortunately, this is going to go on. So when you look at also where the number of deaths really have. occurred it seems like about ten countries account for more than seventy percent of the debts. Obviously, the US is the big one there nearly a fifth. That's about two hundred and something thousand followed by Brazil India Mexico the UK Italy, where do you think that the new deaths will likely come from? Where is the the virus currently growing? It's going to come from those countries probably because they're the one seeing second wave in the second wave could well be worse than I. I wouldn't be surprised if that looks pretty similar. In some other countries, you're not necessarily going to know what's happening because they're not doing enough testing to really be sure how much corona virus they've got many people are dying of it. So I think it's in countries with doing testing that you're going to see the effect and it's likely I mean you see a million? It's likely that it's seven to ten million in reality. Because we are underestimating the amount of coronavirus around. So one million is just what we know about seven to ten is probably what the real figure actually is, and that's really scary. You mentioned the the second wives coming through a lot of countries and where in Europe, in particular saying a lot of cases suddenly jump up a lot from where they were. But. We're not actually saying the death toll yet follow. Why do you think that is all and do you think that it's likely that that's going to continue that trend so one reason you see a delay in the deaths appearing is that it takes a couple of weeks. People become seriously ill, and then we can be seriously over quite a long time. So that's one reason why it's a delay. There's probably a reduced death rate as well because the getting better at treating people in intensive care with decks meth zone, which reduces death rates by twenty percent nursing tummy not using ventilators and also the older people are so socially isolating themselves wearing masks. So they're tending not to get infected, and so the bias infections towards younger people who tend not to die of covid nineteen of Ova can get long-term effects we've spoken about. On Kurna cast before and you mentioned France before what did you want to say about France? France. Is reporting an upsurge and the authorities there are really getting worried in its report there that for example, one of the senior doctors and France as told newspapers that they're worried that there's going to be enough medical personnel to be able to deal with the the record number of cases that are appearing in France and that they may run out of intensive care beds. And it's patchy and it's also into an underprivileged areas such as Marseille where there's a lot of overcrowding and there's the worry that the capacity of the French hospital system to cope with could be welcomed a very good hospital system. So you mentioned testing before and there's been quite a few announcements recently about testing the other day we saw one from the World Health Organization about rapid testing and I think we also saw demonstration at the White House by President, trump what's the rapid testing? All about what what's it hoped that it'll achieve take overseas before we get to Australia, what the World Health Organization has done through the gates. Foundation is purchased one, hundred, twenty, million test kids rapid test kits. and. These test kits. One of them in particular is a bit like a pregnancy test where you do a swab, you shake it in some liquid and then you Putin liquid on a test strip and you went fifteen minutes into the. Shows the line or to bend your positive for the virus and it's pretty accurate. It's not quite as accurate as the PTR tests the wonder doing the moment but you don't need the artery. You don't need cars to take your samples to a laboratory then get an Aq- and wait for the results. This is done on the sport fifteen minutes. You've got an answer. So it's a way in resource poor environments to get an answer and it is cheaper than doing the PC artists. In countries like Austrailia, these tests could be used as a way of controlling the pandemic moving forward. What are we going to do in states like Batori and you South Wales even Western Australia with US tonight breaking the ship off the coast of port hedland where everybody's vulnerable to new infections coming in from overseas in particular? HOW ARE WE GONNA? Make sure there's no virus circulating that we're not aware of and mass testing particularly where people gather in large numbers is one way to actually see whether it's almost like screening the population see if you're missing any virus. And you can't really do mass screening with the existing resources because you're just going to clog up the system. If. It's instant testing people are more likely to agree to it because they don't have to hang around. They don't have to isolate themselves until they get a positive result. And it's a way of quickly finding out what's going on in an affordable way. Do you know any plans by the Australian government to get any of these rapid testing kits and and instigate that that type of program with therapeutic goods administration has stralia has approved several of these I think it's four or five of these rapid testing kits so that all they're already available in Australia. The one ones that w chose bought, which is like the pregnancy test. By Abbott, his is still under consideration for approval and there's no reason why wouldn't be approved. So the the tests are available here and available affordable price. The ideal here would be one that self contained. We don't need a little machine sitting on a desk some of them do you have to put it into machine? This one is a shake squeeze onto a strip and just wait for the result and there are others do that as well. So there's no reason why not? No in Victoria the DAUGHERTY institute is testing a way of doing mass testing using the PR test, which is the old test if you like the accurate using using saliva and they're testing that in the thousand members of the police force just to work. Out, what is the most efficient way of collecting the saliva? So you could mess testing with the old way of going about it, but the rapid testing is probably more flexible,

France United States Austrailia Europe Johns Hopkins University Norman Espn China World Health Organization Marseille Daugherty Institute Brazil India Mexico Australian Government Putin UK Port Hedland Foundation Abbott French Hospital
"australian government" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 4 months ago

"australian government" Discussed on Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

"Like any <hes> INFO <hes>. . Technology Sector <hes> security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. . Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us <hes> I thought this <hes> for Senate index was. . Useful because it doesn't come from <hes> I accompany <unk> product. . It say independent academic <hes> <unk> attempt to benchmark Com, , sub security capability and intent from nation sites <hes>. . It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past <hes> spend a little bit of Thanh. . Talking to their academics <hes> in previous roles and particularly locked the way that <hes>. . This report sets <hes> metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations <hes>. . So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice <hes>, , and one of the kind of things that we could use to <hes> objectively major capability. . And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, , low capability quadrant <hes>, , and the reason for that is because when <hes> the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, , entities about what our intent is. . Assab security spice. . Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? ? But. . Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of <hes> objective metrics. . We fold anti sixteenth in that space. . So, , FA May <hes> that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. . One that I think is familiar to a lot of. . People in the Strand security sector. . In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, , Day sub, , security strategy. . A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. . In the years after that have been made <hes>, , you say less deleted then was announced to the media. . Will what's on the industry? ? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen , strategy that was undefended <hes> at least out of the Prime Minister's office. . This one <hes> is looking out at a ten years. . The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. . And proposing one point six, , billion, , dollar <hes> funding. . Backdrop, , but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. . What's your take on the strategy itself? ? Overall as you say, , it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but <hes> certainly <hes> yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty <hes> from the twenty six danes strategies. . Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, , sixteen or? ? Taking a completely new direction. . While the that, , you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy <hes>. . That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. . <hes> I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, , adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is <hes> temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy <unk> a kind of a toddler. . Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. . Associated with these twenty twenty strategy <hes> he's allocated to security agencies <hes>. . So it goes into building. . Capabilities with particularly the is day but also <hes> other security agencies on. . Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, , and that's well and good <hes>. . We have I think outstanding <hes> internationally recognized capabilities within is. . <hes> and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. . Maintain those capabilities in my time <hes> that that international ranking. . Suppose big <hes>. . Criticism that that libraries had <hes> is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at <hes> security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. . To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, , mock the baseline up security security. . Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy <hes>. . You know there's a lot of examples of that. . Wall is day is absolutely world standard. . Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description <hes> reminding at relatively low levels. . <hes> you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. . Seventies ago now. . <hes> had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. . <hes> when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. . Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. . Is Connect between very high capability. Inside . Is Day <hes> lower levels of saga resilience <hes> and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. . Telcos, , <hes> absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. . But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. . In the I six navy top fifty. . And you start seeing. . Very, , different levels of resilience.

Morrison government Tim Trust Society Prime Minister Brandon Melvin Swiss INFO Technology Sector Senate Harvard Kennedy School Kodak Steiner Israel Watson Bill Center Australia Australia Melbourne Sydney Malaysia reporter Chris
Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:22 min | 4 months ago

Cyber Power Index highlighting Australian Governments gaps in cyber capability

"Like any INFO Technology Sector security has plenty of indexes flooding around or get. Indexes collided by vendors and people trying to sell things to us I thought this for Senate index was. Useful because it doesn't come from I accompany product. It say independent academic attempt to benchmark Com, sub security capability and intent from nation sites It appealed to make per couple of reasons may not have had A to do with Bill Center in the past spend a little bit of Thanh. Talking to their academics in previous roles and particularly locked the way that This report sets metrics that up designed to objectively major subsidy maturity in nations So it says what are the kind of things that we could judge the intent of a nation in the obscurity spice and one of the kind of things that we could use to objectively major capability. And it tells an interesting story in Australia Australia's categorized in the higher intent, low capability quadrant and the reason for that is because when the the objective metrics this reporter applied to the statements made by by government ministers by government departments, entities about what our intent is. Assab security spice. Where about the most ambitious nation in the world for ask security attend? But. Then when you look at what our actual capabilities against that intent on again measured in a series of objective metrics. We fold anti sixteenth in that space. So, FA May that told a pretty familiar story because this over promising on delivering stories. One that I think is familiar to a lot of. People in the Strand security sector. In the context of these trying government's actions since the twenty six, Day sub, security strategy. A lot of announcement to be my bet when you follow up way those announcements. In the years after that have been made you say less deleted then was announced to the media. Will what's on the industry? Kodak in the two thousand, sixteen strategy that was undefended at least out of the Prime Minister's office. This one is looking out at a ten years. The two thousand twenty strategy is looking at at the ten year timeframe. And proposing one point six, billion, dollar funding. Backdrop, but a lot of that is going into law enforcement and as you say might be into that capability. What's your take on the strategy itself? Overall as you say, it's it's another announcement is on the strategy whether it's not as another thing but certainly yet your thoughts on the strategy itself and where maybe else we could have been in twenty twenty from the twenty six danes strategies. Have you have you seen that the two thousand twenty strategy's building on the twenty, sixteen or? Taking a completely new direction. While the that, you can certainly say the why the two thousand twenty strategy is reaction to experience the twenty six strategy That the twenty sixteen subsequently strategy had a very large number of of objectives and Nisha announced under it. I think the government found the experience of trying to implement those very large number projected initiatives again, adopted under outcome Tambo's prime ministership around the breathing bruising exercise because the twenty twenty strategy dramatically rationalize is temptation I'm say that the broad spread of of initiatives and objectives under the strategy a kind of a toddler. Your decide that the Gospel confessed about ninety percent of the funding. Associated with these twenty twenty strategy he's allocated to security agencies So it goes into building. Capabilities with particularly the is day but also other security agencies on. Enforcement agencies like the the I pay, and that's well and good We have I think outstanding internationally recognized capabilities within is. and this is the conduct that you have to keep investing in order to. Maintain those capabilities in my time that that international ranking. Suppose big Criticism that that libraries had is one that we've been exploring for at the loss twelve months and that's really When you look at security policy to strike the problem is the ability to project those capabilities out of the silos of how defense and security agencies. To the problems in Australia Com in terms of lifting a bench, mock the baseline up security security. Brazil and Sada resilience across the Australian government trying economy You know there's a lot of examples of that. Wall is day is absolutely world standard. Saab resiliency combined entities is as at the government's own description reminding at relatively low levels. you know the is days top full became mandatory in the. Seventies ago now. had a slew of a straight national ordered office inquiry since then. when you type them all up on like twenty nine percent of Kamal entities compliant with all the top four. Seven years after theoretically became mandatory say interesting. Is Connect between very high capability. Inside Is Day lower levels of saga resilience and more broadly throughout government not to sign story that we see in the corporate sector unites now at banks and Al. Telcos, absolately will class intends to their sub security posture. But you only have to sort of take one stiff through the down. In the I six navy top fifty. And you start seeing. Very, different levels of resilience.

Info Technology Sector Senate Bill Center Australia Australia Kodak Australia Prime Minister Saab Tambo AL Nisha Absolately Reporter Brazil
Rio Tinto CEO to leave over destruction of Indigenous sites

BBC Newshour

05:09 min | 4 months ago

Rio Tinto CEO to leave over destruction of Indigenous sites

"It's not very often that shareholders of a big multinational company forced the resignation of a chief executive. But in the case of the global mining giant Rio Tinto, it seems they have shown Sebastian Jack is stepping down after an outcry over the destruction of sacred and archaeologically important aboriginal sites in western Australia. To ancient caves in pill Burwood blown up because they sat on top of millions of dollars of high grade on all well that sparked widespread condemnation from the shareholders and, indeed, the wider public. I've been speaking to Professor Marshall Langton. She's an aboriginal academic at the University of Melbourne. She's been telling me first of all why the sites was so significant. I thought the traditional property off a group of traditional Ainas in the Pilbara Everyone refers to the buy of the shorthand P k. K p So they are extremely important religious sites. They haven't had much of an opportunity to explain to the public why they are so important to them. Although they have been a few statements in the media. They've said that they had broken they regard. This is a tragedy for all of their people before the destruction, they wanted to take their young people to these sites. And they were also of deep on through biological. And while archaeological significance as well, when they yes. Oh, they found evidence that dates human occupation of these caves to 46,000 years ago. This is during the place to say this is, you know very early on in the history of human Occupation off this continent and, you know, travels across the globe. And then I found a human hair bills and they were able to extract and I the dyke I'm in at many, thousands of years, and the interesting thing about that discovery is that the present I traditional Ainas. Are the direct descendants of those people, They say areas where off world heritage status so our Rio Tinto able to destroy them in that, such for Arnold They applied some years ago to the western Australian government under the western Australian cultural heritage eject And the minister readily granted it to them because the state of Western Australia is entirely dependent on mining rules ease. And so as far as I know, no minister in the western Australian government has ever refused a mining company. P. K. K P people tried to object, but there's no right of appeal under the legislation once the ministers might a decision, how surprised are you then? That Rio Tinto's chief executive has resigned as he said they've bean many sites in the past that have been destroyed, with little consequence for for the mining companies. But not this time. Why is that? Well, there are two reasons. I'm the first one is that in the past the indigenous land use agreements were drafted in such a way that the traditional Ainas were able to be consulted regularly and have a sigh in their cultural heritage on mining leases and really tinto quite a few years ago. Had very good Ray Shane for implementing those agreements with the Aboriginal Tradition alliance. But what Jack has done in the years that he was CEO was got that staff workforce body of expertise. And culture off, you know, operating values, and he removed all of the experts eh removed the cultural values from the company. He removed the commitment to working closely with traditional Ainas to retain the the company's Social Lawson's too upright, And that is one of the primary reasons for the other negligence that has led to The destruction of the sites has there also being a sort of cultural change in Australia as regards to the protection of these sorts of places? Yes, so many sites have been protected both by mining companies and governments. And also, for instance, you will know that the old route was closed to climates last year, and there has been a community change. Under the reconciliation action plans devised by corporations, universities associations and approved by reconciliation, Australia. People might commitments to treat aboriginal people with respect and to trait average on people's cultures with respect. The destruction of the caves was like the blowing up the Buddha statue Aryan it's on that scale of cultural heritage destruction. And it's you know, quite shocking to may that that Jack and Nevan and soul spray who will resigned had no comprehension off the gravity of what they had

Rio Tinto Sebastian Jack Ainas Australia Chief Executive Professor Marshall Langton Pill Burwood Western Australia University Of Melbourne Aboriginal Tradition Alliance P. K. K P Ray Shane CEO Social Lawson Nevan
China slams Australian Government for 'blatant irrational behavior' over foreign interference investigation

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:27 sec | 4 months ago

China slams Australian Government for 'blatant irrational behavior' over foreign interference investigation

"Has slammed the Australian government for what it calls blatant, irrational behavior over a foreign interference investigation is an ABC in Australia's story China's Foreign Ministry saying it has embroiled a group of Chinese academics and journalists. In the country. The Chinese media outlets alleged that Australian National Security Agency's had raided the homes of four Chinese state media reporters in June, sees their equipment in order them to stay silent about the probe.

Australian National Security A Australian Government ABC China Australia
Why make a vaccine mandatory?

Coronacast

05:45 min | 5 months ago

Why make a vaccine mandatory?

"Sino men were hearing that the Australian government is is trying to secure US supply of vaccine for strands. Once a vaccine is successful, which is great to hear, but we're also hearing from the peon that he wants to make it. As mandatory as possible that people would have to get it at, which is sort of interesting wording I thought given that the vast majority of Austrians have indicated this research showing that they've indicated that they would get it if they could and only a really small proportion say that they wouldn't. So what's the purpose of making a vaccine mandatory if people wanted anyway well, it is a risky strategy. Even, people that might be in favor of having the vaccine might say, well, you're going to force me to have it stuff you. I'M NOT GONNA have it and rebel against the idea just because you're forcing people to have it. So it is a is a difficult situation and you'd have to be pretty sure that the vaccine that you're offering is very, very safe. So that's that's the ethical side of it. There is there are two good scientific reasons for doing it although I'm not promoting the mandatory view I'm just giving you the argument here. So. There is one which is to do with the virus one reasons to do with the virus. So, the virus mutates all the time and by the play of Chen, some of the mutations will give that particular version of the virus an advantage. So we've got this virus that's one four G. that's dominant in Australia, and that's almost certainly dominant because two mutation on the spike protein that allows the virus to enter the body that six one, four g mutation almost certainly. Allows the virus to be transmitted more easily, and therefore that version of the virus will preferentially survive. There'll be more of it is doesn't seem to be a naseer form of the viruses just has more survival advantage. Now, the only selective pressure on the virus at the moment is social distancing. So by social distancing, we're making the harder for the virus to spread in the community. and. Therefore, the viruses that will tend to survive when your social distancing locking down will be those that transmit more easily. But as soon as you go to vaccine and vaccine is blocking a whole lot of mutants of the virus but there might be mutants of the virus which are resistant to the version of the viruses, the vaccine, and therefore those mutants might escape round and therefore it's a bit like antibiotic resistance and you've got a sense viruses that are resistant to antibiotics resistant to that particular form of the vaccine. Now if you mandate a vaccine and you try and get very quickly one hundred percent of the community or near it. Immunized there's almost no virus left in the community to mutate and spin around and get around the corner. That's a strong scientific reason for mandating it or trying to get almost one hundred percent coverage. The other reason is that you don't know yet how effective the new vaccines are going to be. It may be that the first versions are only fifty or sixty percent effective. So therefore, do the maths if only say seventy percent of the community gets immunized and it's only fifty percent effective. Then you've only got thirty thirty, five percent coverage that's not enough to give you large enough haired immunity to. Get the virus down to very low levels. I mean the other incentive is that you know if you WANNA go to Port Douglas for your holidays, you're GonNa need something like the old yellow fever vaccination certificate to show that you've had it before they'll let you in and that'll be a strong incentive to people to do that or if you want to go to the movies, you gotTa Show Your certificate but you've had it done robin mandating it you got to be immunized to get into certain environments right then that's what we have at the moment in the sense with child vaccinations. And being able to access childcare but there are problems with mandating a vaccine that on one hand is the individual side of it where you balancing someone's ability to have an individual choice against the greater. Good. But even on the greater good. If they were problems of the vaccine, because anything that we have is going to be brought out quite quickly if there were any sort of problems with it, then that really arrives that public trust and might make it even harder to get the sort of number of vaccinated people that we would need to get to get the reduction in transmissibility that is. What we need a vaccine full yeah and those are really good reasons. The reason that you can really push it hard particularly, which preschool children is that the vaccines we have given to hundreds of millions of kids, hundreds of millions of adults. We know the really safe. We know the site apart profile, really really rare and you can insist on it with a lot with a high degree of safety. In other words, you know what the risks of getting measles are, and you know what the risks getting polio are and the risks of the vaccine or infinitesimal highly almost non measurable comp-. In comparison. covid nineteen it's a little bit different because point six percent of people die from this although ten or fifteen percent maybe even more get quite unwell with it. So that's quite a large proportion of the community but you the you're right. That is the equation of the government is going to be very confident about. Okay. So let's say we do have a vaccine and one hundred percent of Australians get vaccinated what we still living on a planet with other people we can't. We can't guarantee vaccination for the whole globe. So there is there is an answer to that question and Garvey the global. Immunization Initiative not for profit initiative argues exactly that point is that there is no point and just having your own nation immunized because if you want International Border Open Up, you need the world to be immunised, which is why they've got this system through Sepe and Garvey of of funding vaccine so that low income countries get access to the to the

Garvey Australian Government United States Port Douglas Polio Immunization Initiative Chen Australia Sepe
The Murchison Murders

Casefile True Crime

04:05 min | 6 months ago

The Murchison Murders

"The Murchison his large raging in the state of Western Australia. That's nine for it's agricultural and mining prospects. Spinning across two hundred, ninety, one thousand square kilometers, the region is home to many small sparsely populated towns that consists mostly of rugged up back and Darod Bush land. During the Western Australian Goldrush of the light eighteen hundreds, many people flocked to the area in the hopes of securing a fortune which resulted in the construction of several towns that were later abandoned when the short lived gold rush ended. Afterwards there was little work available except for agricultural workers shape, shearer's camel and toe spike is blacksmiths and boundary riders who were employed to maintain the outer edges of sheep and cattle stations. But. The turn of the Twentieth Century Roberts from the country's ace than sites had made their way across the desert, and into Western Australia's agricultural areas. European settlers had introduced the rabbits to Australia more than a hundred years earlier and to die, eventually became an invasive pest that caused significant damage to the country's ecology and farmland. To combat what became known as the great plague? The Western Australian government decided to build the world's longest fence which stretched all the way from the north. Coast to the south coast. In Nineteen, Oh two construction of the first phase began in the small wheatbelt belt in of Barak Open which became the major administration center for the fence. A twenty foot wide lawn was cleared through the Bush all the way south to a small bay called starvation. Boat Harbor and the Mesh fence was then erected to fate west of the center of the line. Twelve foot gates were installed at designated intervals to allow passage through the fence. Wooden posts were also added every mile h Ma with a number that represented the distance from Barak, open. In nineteen, Ninety five, the second phase began with the remainder of the fence, being built from Barracuda open to the north coast of Western Australia. Stretching for one thousand, eight, hundred twenty seven kilometers, it became known as the number one rabbit proof fence. The number two fence was completed in April of ninety five, and was one thousand, one hundred and fifty eight kilometers loan. It began on the south coast, approximately one hundred twelve kilometers west of the number, one fans, and essentially ran parallel to it before turning east and joining the first fence at Gum Creek. The number three fence, which was completed in Nineteen, seven, started knee Geraldton and extended two hundred and fifty six. Columba's east until it met the number two fence. Collectively the rabbit proof fence was three, thousand, two, hundred thirty seven kilometers long and building. It had cost the equivalent of around eighty three million Australian dollars in today's currency. A government sub department was established to supervise the constant maintenance of the fence. The maintenance team included a shape inspect off sobbing inspector, camel drivers. Rabbit hunters and boundary rod is. Fines were issued to anyone court leaving negates along the fence open, and it was also an offense, but any member of the public to use any of its maintenance tracks. Scattered along, the fence was small. Government earned stations and homesteads when maintenance supplies, watersheds and other facilities were housed.

Western Australia Barak Open Darod Bush Barak Shearer Bush Columba Boat Harbor Roberts Gum Creek
The Murchison Murders

Casefile True Crime

03:53 min | 6 months ago

The Murchison Murders

"The Murchison his large raging in the state of Western Australia. That's nine for it's agricultural and mining prospects. Spinning across two hundred, ninety, one thousand square kilometers, the region is home to many small sparsely populated towns that consists mostly of rugged up back and Darod Bush land. During the Western Australian Goldrush of the light eighteen hundreds, many people flocked to the area in the hopes of securing a fortune which resulted in the construction of several towns that were later abandoned when the short lived gold rush ended. Afterwards there was little work available except for agricultural workers shape, shearer's camel and toe spike is blacksmiths and boundary riders who were employed to maintain the outer edges of sheep and cattle stations. But. The turn of the Twentieth Century Roberts from the country's ace than sites had made their way across the desert, and into Western Australia's agricultural areas. European settlers had introduced the rabbits to Australia more than a hundred years earlier and to die, eventually became an invasive pest that caused significant damage to the country's ecology and farmland. To combat what became known as the great plague? The Western Australian government decided to build the world's longest fence which stretched all the way from the north. Coast to the south coast. In Nineteen, Oh two construction of the first phase began in the small wheatbelt belt in of Barak Open which became the major administration center for the fence. A twenty foot wide lawn was cleared through the Bush all the way south to a small bay called starvation. Boat Harbor and the Mesh fence was then erected to fate west of the center of the line. Twelve foot gates were installed at designated intervals to allow passage through the fence. Wooden posts were also added every mile h Ma with a number that represented the distance from Barak, open. In nineteen, Ninety five, the second phase began with the remainder of the fence, being built from Barracuda open to the north coast of Western Australia. Stretching for one thousand, eight, hundred twenty seven kilometers, it became known as the number one rabbit proof fence. The number two fence was completed in April of ninety five, and was one thousand, one hundred and fifty eight kilometers loan. It began on the south coast, approximately one hundred twelve kilometers west of the number, one fans, and essentially ran parallel to it before turning east and joining the first fence at Gum Creek. The number three fence, which was completed in Nineteen, seven, started knee Geraldton and extended two hundred and fifty six. Columba's east until it met the number two fence. Collectively the rabbit proof fence was three, thousand, two, hundred thirty seven kilometers long and building. It had cost the equivalent of around eighty three million Australian dollars in today's currency. A government sub department was established to supervise the constant maintenance of the fence. The maintenance team included a shape inspect off sobbing inspector, camel drivers. Rabbit hunters and boundary rod is. Fines were issued to anyone court leaving negates along the fence open, and it was also an offense, but any member of the public to use any of its maintenance tracks.

Western Australia Barak Open Darod Bush Barak Shearer Bush Columba Boat Harbor Roberts Gum Creek
Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

Between The Lines

12:41 min | 8 months ago

Kevin Rudd on anarchy in the post COVID-19 world order, and could stable democracy be a reality in Iraq?

"Former Prime Minister Kevin right on the geopolitical consequences of the pandemic. He predicts the coming post covered. Anneke plus Iraq believe it or not. It's future looks brought today than it has an any point in the past Dick. I'd stay with us for my chat with Linda Robinson from the Rand Corporation. She'll tell us while we should not give up on Baghdad's fragile. Democracy Corona virus continues to take a toll on the health of nations around the world. One thing has become clear the winners and losers not who we might have expected a year ago. The virus is taking an uneven and unpredictable. Course through the world defying. I usual assumptions about power and resilience. Some small poor countries being left relatively unscathed all powerful prosperous nations. I've been ravaged. So what does this mean for global order and for the strategic robbery between China and the United States? Will everything change or is the virus? Mealy accelerating trends that were already in place. Former prime minister of Australia. Kevin Rudd is the President of the Society Policy Institute in New York. He's written an essay in the most recent issue of Foreign Affairs magazine in New York. It's called the coming postcode Enki and he joins me now. From Queensland's Sunshine Coast Kevin Rudd. Welcome back to between the lawns. Good to be with you on between the lines. Now you'll recent essays titled The coming Postcode Anneke Y Anneke. You're good real turns color of international relations you would know that realists assume that. Anneke is in fact the natural state All the International Society of states rent was Headley Bull who wrote about this crowd along time ago and Australian realist and Australian realist. Ten within the real documents that order actually represents the exception rather than the rule So why do I argue this I argue it because the current order as we've done since forty five is underpinned by and large by US geopolitical pound Gio economic power secondly That's become challenge at least by China Thirdly the Cova crisis has turbo charge The hit on American real and perceived power. But there's a full factor as well. Which is the impact which the Cova crisis has on China's Powell not least the damage to its economy the flow through effect to its ability to spend on the amounts of money on its military and on the belt and road initiative example but more importantly international perceptions of China in the developed in the developing world. So where do we end up? We end up not with The same old order as in the past but a slow and steady drift towards more anoc order. We're both China and the US damaged and the institutions of global governance with the UN. The will bank the National Monetary Fund the G. Twenty etc become increasingly the terrain for geopolitical battle. Between these two wounded POWs a K. Sunday the country's the victory he but some analysts say that China's heavy handed approach eccentric lockdowns violence. That's been a political win for Xi Jinping in Matt strengthened the Central Authority of the communist regime. How would you respond to them? Well let's look at That argument within China itself. There's been a huge hit on the accompany And as a result of that China will have its worst gross numbers twenty twenty the Ted in over half a century since the end of the Cultural Revolution almost That is huge. It undermines She Jinping's China Drain which was One pillar of which was for China to quadruple. Its G. D. DP by twenty twenty measured against two thousand levels this single year of itself. Economic non-performance blows a hole amidships in that and then secondly on top of that. Tom You've got the problem which arises in terms of internal political debates within China so and I think some growing levels of resistance to Xi Jinping's on leadership and finally as I mentioned before The blowback around the world in terms of the economic damage To economize both developed and developing causing a big question mark to a rise in terms whether China has in fact being the risk to the world's best friend because of the outbreak of this virus. So these factors I think. Qualify the overall argument you hear from some the China's authoritarian model in managing the crisis domestically translates into a geopolitical win the China internationally. I don't think that necessarily holes walk conversations. Do you think heaven. I going on right now in Beijing over China's place in the world I mean is the division division over this so-called Wolf Warrior this is the and diplomacy we often hear about a division between that Wolf Warrior. Diplomacy versus say China's desire to promote soft power. Chinese politics in some respects is not dissimilar to elements of politics. We and other countries. That is you find nationalist. Ten internationalists you find a local ists globalists' you find audio logs versus as it were reformers and pregnant at this and so the as political system while it's Control by Xi Jinping's leadership still has all these tensions and personalities within it so the debates now I think are of a twofold. How do we allow this to happen? In the first place what failed in terms of the processes insistence China put in place after the Saas Crisis of two thousand and three to prevent a pandemic or epidemic as it was then from happening again. The second debate is how the Hillary you get the economy back together again given the China a economy with forty percent of Gdp comes from the traded six or the economy and International. Trade is being blend. Bits by this crosses and the other debate again between nationalists internationalised is the one. You've just touched on the Tom. Which is China's wolf worried diplomats out there launching attacks against any critique of China's performance On the one hand defend the party's legitimacy and on the other hand older more seasoned diplomat saying this isn't actually contributing much to the improvement of China's global image those discussions and debates underway. At the moment we're talking about this wolf warrior diplomacy. What do you make of China's recent boycotts threats of boycotts of Australian Exports Bali? Beef what what's going on well as I've said in other recent interviews since those public statements by the China's ambassador Australia it's unacceptable in my view for any ambassador accredited to any country to receive public threats against the host country In City five years of more dealing with the Australian China relationship I don't recall previous Chinese ambassadors of having done that not by any Australian diplomat ever having done that irrespective of the crisis of the day with was ten on all the things that I went through when I was in office etc so I think as a matter of shall we say diplomatic practice. What occurred then was regrettable as as being some of the hotline commentary. Which emanated from the Chinese nationalist media? the bottom line is however the Chinese nationalists have seen The effectiveness All the some of these sorts of measures when applaud various countries in the past sorts of economic leverage which China replied to no way out to no way through the Nobel Prize Committee Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize to a famous Chinese dissident And I've also seen how those Economic Leverage points of work with various of the Europeans. So this is not alien to the Chinese playbook my argument about China's Australia's management of The relationship in prison is that if the Australian government's of the view and a view I in general support that there needs to be an independent international inquiry as to the origins the virus transmission of the virus notifications to the WHO and threw them to the world community etc. Then again to put that Ford isn't as trade in government and then do some work on it. I get a few other governments to come along with you an advance that through the multilateral machinery which rather than just blow it out as a thought bubble That's the way which you do. Real things in the international community rather than I. Fear sometimes pitching a diplomatic initiative primarily for domestic political leverage into straighter. What complicates matters? Further is president trump's theory that the virus was leaked from a lab in Wuhan and raises the question. Why would China agree to enquiry without losing this between the lines on? Abc Radio National. The familiar voice. You're hearing is former prominence to Kevin. Rudd is now president of the Asia Society Policy Institute in New York. We've been talking about his article in the current issue of Foreign Affairs magazine. Kevin we'll talking about China and how it's paid a price as a result of this current ivars. Let's turn to the United States. How badly damaged is the use in your judgement? I mean we'll recover reasonably quickly With a change of administration in November or does the damage go deep. Perhaps too deep for recovery has been deep damage politically. The the. The House is a divided house within the United States. Those of us who have followed. Us politics of the many years have rarely seen it This divisive and that actually is a real factor in terms of constructing a post presidential election national consensus on how America engages the World. And the future. American politics has become so binary including on America's own future will view on the economic damage. It's huge. This is the biggest hit on newest economy at least since nineteen forty-six and the recovery from the war and probably since the depression the end of the depression and thirty three So this takes a while to recover But the American economy know a history of resilience. Look what happened after the global financial crisis? But well I was going to make the point to is enormous capacity for change and renewal. I mean you think about its recovery from the civil war that oppression in Vietnam. You being a bit too pessimistic. Kevin. Well I live in the United States and I actually listened to the debate on back in Australia now and when my American interlocutors Republican and Democrat Friends of mine over twenty years who A positive let's call it. The Foreign Policy National Security Policy Machinery signed that it's become increasingly hard to forge consensus these days across the aisle on America's behavior in the world That is a real issue. Then it's not just my external analysis it's part of the internal analysis within the US itself. Do I think the United States can come through the domestic political Malays and the Economic Destruction? Which has occurred? Yes I do. Because it's remarkably resilient country But I think a precondition is that We see a Democrat. Win this November it's not that. I am a A cheerleader for Joe Biden. Personally I barely know the man Bought he's lucky to put together a mainstream Competent Foreign Policy and National Security Policy Tame as opposed to Frankly the chaotic nature of the trump administration on most foreign and national security policy questions. And that I think is necessary for America to rebuild. Its alliances abroad rebuild. Its credibility in the eyes of the risks of the will and to overcome what has been an extraordinary period where America rather than taking the lead in the global recovery From the virus both in public health systems and economic terms as simply being missing in action and in fact the unable to contain it's the damage domestically

China United States Kevin Rudd Anneke Xi Jinping Australia Anneke Y Anneke President Trump Prime Minister Foreign Affairs Magazine America Baghdad New York Linda Robinson Rand Corporation Dick Joe Biden Iraq Nobel Prize Robbery
The Future of Education

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:41 min | 9 months ago

The Future of Education

"As students. Head back to classrooms and other countries schools are adapting in order to keep students safe in Taiwan. For example there are now plastic partitions around the desks of elementary school students during lunch the Australian government has asked more vulnerable staffers in their schools to work from home. If possible in Denmark Cafeterias are disappearing and students now eating their classrooms to avoid large gatherings. Now it's the United States turn to determine what must be done to open school safely. My colleague Evan. Mcmorris Doro has been covering the impact of the corona virus pandemic on the United States educational system. I talked with him about how and win students from pre K. To College Michael. Back to classrooms are people processing this the way that you'd expect or are they not believing that this is necessary. What are you hearing well? One of the wildest things about this whole time has been just how quickly that change had to happen so you know you think back to March. We're having a normal school year. But everything changed just so quickly. The best way I can think about describing it actually came from Lily Eskillson Garcia. Who's the president of the NEA? Which is the largest teacher's Union the United States? We're in the middle of tried to find the right metaphor. A lot of teachers have said. We're building the airplane. Well it's going down the runway. Another teacher said Oh. It's bigger than that. We're apollo thirteen. We're Houston and we have a problem and our kids are on that space ship with their parents. Isolated the efforts that go into a successful school. You're already massive. Right like the Moonshot we gotta get a crew to the moon and get them back but what happened. In this case was something went wrong along the way and actually made the job harder because all of a sudden it's not apollo eleven now it's apollo thirteen in which everything breaks down and then you have to use only the tools inside people's lives in their home lives to get education done. We think about that scene in the movie where they dumped that stuff on the conference table. Okay here's all the tubes and stuff and they have on the ship of kids. Listen we gotta find a way to make this fit into the whole for this using nothing but that well this is what they're talking about when it comes education all you have is the technology type people's houses. It's a very different kind of teaching two very different kind of education but the schools themselves in terms of doing what we count on schools to do. They were not prepared for this. Did you get any sense Evan? That they're starting to think about the fall right now. We hear about states reopening obviously all over the country and at the same time we hear. Maybe there's going to be another wave or this isn't going to really go away. Is the general sort of idea that schools will be back. Open the fall. Or what are you hearing? Well the difficulty for schools difficulty facing a lot of people which is that they have to take a long time to plan to. They're going to do next but we don't know what's going to happen next. So at baseline level. I can say this there will be schools open in the fall from the K. Through twelve level into the college level. What that looks like. We're not totally clear on few years ago for sixty minutes. I did this piece about the Khan Academy and they were making the case. I remember this years ago that There could be advantages to online learning. Are there advantages that this type of learning offers over bricks and mortar when we went to a full online system? What we learned was that we had problems with things like the education. Gap Education gathered already. Exists became much much more broad. I spoke to a teacher in. La Named Gannon's four. She can't even take attendance. Absence rates are high. We're dealing with it. The things we're dealing with some students whose parents still have to go to work and so being the oldest because I teach high school so a lot of them are having to take care of younger siblings. We do everything we can. We send emails and make phone calls and things like that so I think that we are definitely going to have a learning gap. We're going to see it in the next few years. We're going to have lower test scores. I think it's inevitable as part of your reporting if you've been talking to the students themselves I mean I'm I'm wondering what? How are they reacting to this adapting to this? The students are stressed out. We're hearing that from teachers. We're hearing that from parents and I think in my own conversation with the students themselves. I felt that same thing. There is an excitement. I think about something new at first as you've gone along with this thing you found that distresses just they? They want to go back to traditional school. I've not yet met a student who was like man. I would love to do school from my parents basement for the rest of my life. That's not something that I've heard. I think that that reflects my my kids attitudes as well although I will tell you. It's Funny Evan. Maybe not surprising when this first started. I said we're still going to maintain a schedule. You'RE GONNA GET UP. You'RE GONNA shower. You'RE GONNA brush your teeth. You know the basic stuff and now if they can roll out of bed and get to their laptop in time. It's it's sometimes asking to WanNa work in our sweatpants. They can definitely go to school. Sweatpants right one. One thing that we are seeing is is that some schools are reopening You know in Montana for example and I'm wondering how are they approaching it? What are they doing there? Are there lessons? I guess for for the rest of the country because Montana is a state very different from more populous states. They had these really small schools in these really small school districts. One of them is Willow Creek School. Which is has sixty kids in it. It's a town of two hundred and fifty people about and sixty kids. The Superintendent and the principle of Willow Creek is named Bonnie Lower and what she described was the school day. Very different than what we're used to. We have six foot distant marks on the playground so that they can play games at recess and save six feet away from each other and we will alternate our bell schedule so that kids are not in the hallways at the same time. Common areas are being disinfected regularly. Every classroom has hand sanitizer wipes teachers have masks. So if they're in a student's bubble they put the mass on. They'll there's a lot of precautions. Bathrooms will be used one at a time. We're ready to get back to normal as normal as we can and even the arrival school is very different so they've had to reduce bus schedule so a lot of parents are dropping their kids off and then once the kids get to school are led into the building by an adult one by one and before they go in their temperature is taken. There's no more luncheon cafeterias so they are in the building but the school day looks very very different and these are the kind of things that we may see in schools across the country when they reopened. This is the challenge. The challenge is how to try to do social distancing in something that was never designed for that. We've all been forced to evaluate risk differently. I mean the truth is that we all take risks on a daily basis. Getting in a car and driving is one of the riskiest things that we typically do. And there's a lot of people who say well a kick ball and then somebody touched that I touched it with my hands and then I touched my eyes. My nose my mouth something like that. What are the chances of me really getting infected? And it's still very hard. I think for for public health officials to answer that question but I think what they'll typically come back to is at the answer is that the risk is low but it's not zero. I spoke with a rising college freshman from Minnesota who are trying to plan on what schools he was. GonNa go to and the college campuses are out there right now advertising. Look we're going to reopen. We don't know how we're going to try to make say we're GONNA change the way dorms work classes. Whatever what they really have to try to convince people that they can create a safe environment. I asked this kid. This is an eighteen year old kid. I said look if they open a college campus right now would you go and he said no right now. I would not maybe in August. Maybe if I could be convinced that things were safe but right now I'm not ready to go. So there's there's a difference in how people take that risk and feel about the risk factors and feel about how things are going on that. Maybe you have a situation where these elementary school students in Montana. Their parents are feeling like look. This is a worthy risk. Will take you know. We'll see how it goes but doesn't work. We'll just shut things down again and it's not that big a deal and on

Evan United States Montana K. To College Michael Australian Government Mcmorris Doro Willow Creek School Taiwan Denmark Lily Eskillson Garcia Khan Academy NEA Gap Education Houston President Trump LA Willow Creek Gannon Superintendent
The Big PhD Pause - postgraduate students, COVID-19, and the next brain drain

Science Friction

07:05 min | 9 months ago

The Big PhD Pause - postgraduate students, COVID-19, and the next brain drain

"Across Australia graduate students are always on taught deadlines to deliver a major work of original research. But now they're all important. Experiments are suspended or hanging on a precipice locked out of their labs or unable to travel to their field research sites. Many of lost the part-time jobs that pay rent or feed their families and some now also wondering what the future is for jobs in science in a post pandemic world. Could this pandemic trigger a as next GEN? Brian drying something that people don't realize about a PhD is that it's very isolating. You're like your. I'm in an office with other people for sure but we're all working on very different things and very niche things. Yeah it's really hard to to not feel learn in this when you've got that initial stress the initial problems that come with doing a PhD and then you wack pandemic on top of this is really Problematic for most of us being in a PhD being so isolated in this line of research. Which is why we get into it. We want to be independent research. Is We want we? It's our own body of work you know it's professional but it's personal and emotional. It's this thing that you divide basically three or more years of your life to and the idea of more isolation. I wasn't immediately helming but as as the month of gone on it's been it's been quite difficult. Scientists get this ID. We have the stereotype of being quite stoic and emotionally removed. It comes from the idea that we the work that we do is at. Its core unbiased survey of the world around us. Become at anything bias. What you're observing. What you're experimenting on So in creating a dialogue around it being okay to tell people what. You're feeling personally without letting gory. This old preconceived notion that talk about your feelings as a scientist today passionate young scientists open up it is a well established fact that went into PhD Students. Experience distress and one in three are at risk of a common psychiatric disorder. The focus the hours a PhD demands a damn hard at the based times. But how are post Grad students holding up in this pandemic and what Judy of k? Do strutting universities and the Australian government have to support them. I stepping up really daunting and obviously now during this pandemic when there's a lot of uncertainty facing aspect dot mental health issues just getting worse Ramana Ri- abuse of each is doing her. Phd At Curtin University investigating molecular mechanisms of aggressive pancreatic cancer to help develop more effective treatments like many students who crucial lab experiments have been halted but she also has the needs of the entire nations post. Grad students on her plate as national president of the Council of a strategy and Postgraduate Associations. Capa but I cannot believe that I inherited the Cup national president's position during a global pandemic. Got It thinking. Forty Years COUPLA existing. They has ever been a pandemic like this. They're doing pay is not like an Undergrad degree. It's MOLUCCA A job. It's the crucial foundation for your career. In Science. In fact it's the stage when many Nobel Prize winners of done some of their k. Work but this pandemic is already forcing Grad students to make really tough urgent choices. The thumbs students have already withdrawn and as a result some international students have already gone back. Herm other students Yet is T-o-n how long this situation will continue. We have a situation now. graduate Looking at what's enough or day. Students circumstances are so different depending on the project. They're doing what they're up to in the three and a half years I've got to finish. Universities are really going to need to respond to this crisis case by case Taylor roads and I'm a third year each student at Latrobe University. And I'm doing my PhD. In a lab that focuses on Christie says over blindness which is a neglected tropical disease caused by a worm. Basically this illness is found in sub Saharan Africa and it can lead to blindness in its worst kind of bombs. Epilepsy developmental delays. It's really a bad thing to how high low is genetically analyzing samples of the parasitic worm. Take him from African communities to understand its evolution and spray it we found the transmission radius is actually a lot larger than what the W. H. Pat originally hypothesized answer. L. Analysis is kind of informing the carrying out of Mass Drug Administration throughout Africa and all these areas to actually eradicate the worm or even control it. What is this pandemic donning? In terms of what you can and can't do. Now I would have been sequencing more ones to get at bigger sample size for some of the analysis. I want to publish at least in the state of Victoria we on able to go into a facility and US out lab facilities. My University universities very strict on this. Or you have to prove that the work you're doing is absolutely essential. Anton sensitive in my work doesn't come under the umbrella. Sir. I'm not able to access the lab and I'm not able to access my computer in the office but I have my laptop at home with me so I'm able to do some work on that right now. I'm just coming through the daughter. I already have and seeing. What kind of story I can make with that Dada? I've it in a publication which is your pending. More daughter Nell yes. I'm Kinda just trying to fill time with whatever I can do. That will be somewhat productive. But I wasn't the merced affected by this. There are people who were on a really long time course. Experiments with moral animals hats euthanize. All the animals basically just pick up and pack up and Gar in the middle of a three months costs which would have been terrible sir trying to keep my inconvenience in. Context

Scientist President Trump Brian Curtin University Australia Australian Government Africa Saharan Africa Nobel Prize Latrobe University Nell Judy Merced GAR Capa United States Christie Postgraduate Associations W. H. Pat
The U.K. bought 250 ventilators from China. Doctors warn they could kill.

Phil Valentine

01:42 min | 9 months ago

The U.K. bought 250 ventilators from China. Doctors warn they could kill.

"Doctors in the UK or warning about unreliable ventilators made in China that could kill patients so yes insult meet injury a group of senior doctors in the UK issued a warning about the deficiencies in two hundred and fifty ventilators that were sourced from China including concerns about sanitation and oxygen supply this is a a letter seen by NBC news the doctors warned of the oxygen supply was very able and unreliable and the quality of the machine was basic the ventilators were built to be used in ambulances causing Britain's National Health Service staff to create makeshift stands in order to use them concerns about sanitation also raises the machines have fabric fabric case they cannot be cleaned properly letter was written by senior intensive care doctor who works at Sandwell and west Birmingham NHS trust is one of UK's hardest hit regions China of course facing accusations of sending defective personal protective equipment around the world the Australian government for example they reported that five hundred thousand masks were unusable and thousands of Colbert nineteen test kits purchased by the Spanish government had an accuracy rate of only thirty percent Michael game or gold skews me a senior member of the prime minister Boris Johnson's government easily thank the Chinese government for securing the ventilators but he should have waited to see if they actually works like buying a used car from those folks I bought it from you know the level of a bald tyre on your

UK China Britain Sandwell Australian Government Colbert Spanish Government Michael Prime Minister Boris Johnson Chinese Government NBC National Health Service Birmingham
Australia's Extreme Heat

Environment: NPR

05:07 min | 11 months ago

Australia's Extreme Heat

"By and large are pretty direct people so it figures walking into Mary Con Yards House west of Sydney. She would get right to the point. Good how are you hot cooking here? It's about thirty eight degrees Celsius outside one hundred Fahrenheit which is relatively cool compared to what it's been like this frontal at least it keeps some of the heat out some not much. Three fans are humming in Conrad's living room. The lights are off to save money on electricity in con- yards banks cleaned to her forehead like she just got out of the shower. Just vacuumed ZANU. Coming and this is what happens to me. Lives in community housing a rental unit for lower income. People that's located in Greater West Sydney a fast growing part of the country's largest city that a few months ago held another distinction the hottest place on Earth about one hundred and twenty degrees Fahrenheit or as Conard puts it. It was hot and when its stinking hot door. Just you know hot hot like it is on this day. Conard like many people in West. Sydney has a really hard time running. The air conditioner. Day is not an option. It's too expensive so is moving. It's a struggle. It's really a struggle. You WanNa do things but the heat just zaps it out of you. Heat waves as well as being a silent killer. It's a social killer. Lucinda coats is a scientist with risk. Frontiers a private research center that focuses on natural hazards like bushfires cyclones and flooding about twenty years ago. Coats had the grim task of cataloging. How many people? Each of those natural disasters had historically killed in Australia. And that's when we first thinking hang on a minute hate wives. They seem to have killed more people than all the other natural hazards combined. Yes all other hazards combined with elderly people in the poor. Most at risk code says it's too soon to know how many people may have died during this past. Summer's extreme heat but history might provide a somber clue in one thousand nine thirty nine in two thousand nine. Australia had devastating bushfires black Friday and black Saturday as they're now called both were preceded by heat waves and those heatwaves alone code says are each believed to have killed more than four hundred people the deadliest fire a hundred and seventy three is twice as many as succumb to the bushfires but the heat waves didn't get nearly the same attention. It was all fire photos of crying families. And cinch teddy bears and you can see why the the newsworthy bushfire is a terrifying thing but heatwaves. How can you take a picture of a heatwave? I've got a powerpoint presentation with a young chap just holding a water bottle and drinking out of the water bill. That's that's my picture of a heatwave. So it's really hard to communicate the immediate danger and there's a fast growing need to communicate that danger. A recent climate report by the Australian government found the country has warmed by more than one degree Celsius just in the last century. Extreme heat events are increasing in frequency as is the risk of extreme fire and extreme flooding. All of which has happened in Australia and just the last few months. Sebastian vouch is a research fellow at western Sydney University. Who's focusing on climate change in urban heat? Everything's extreme. It's exactly like how scientists for thirty years predict climate change to actually pan out and it's not twenty thirty forty or fifty anymore. It's twenty twenty. We have it. It's happening vouches. There are ways you can build for heat. For example houses could be painted. Certain color to reflect light. Green or living roofs could provide insulation. Houses could be built smaller with more room for treason greenspace. Australia is updating. Its National Construction Code in twenty twenty. Two and extreme heat is being considered in the changes but new codes would primarily be aimed at new buildings and the people most affected by heat tend to be folks like Mary concert living in older buildings that were designed long before bouts of extreme heat. Were much of a thought. Don't get me wrong. I appreciate the refi. Have my head and being able to pay pay for it and do that but I think sometimes it's poor design went with public housing. The nonprofit that LISA'S COGNAC. Thome knows this is an issue. Divisional Manager Heather Chaffee says she hears it from clients all the time for us as a housing provider. Tricky housing market. It's it's distressing to be honest. When often doesn't own the homes they rent chaffee says so? It makes it hard to make modifications instead. They focused on warning tenants. When extreme heat is coming but she knows that's not enough heat. She says is a global social justice issue. It's the poorest people that are going to suffer them iced so she says there needs to be a larger societal discussion about how we prepare for extreme heat because as a summer just showed. It's already

Australia Heather Chaffee Sydney Mary Con Yards House Scientist Conard Lucinda Coats Greater West Sydney Conrad Australian Government Western Sydney University Research Fellow Thome Mary Divisional Manager Lisa
China reports no new infections outside Wuhan

BBC World Service

01:52 min | 11 months ago

China reports no new infections outside Wuhan

"China there is some positive news from China today regarding the corona virus outbreak the president province of Hubei at the center of the epidemic is registered no new cases outside the city of Wuhan for a second consecutive day a Chinese official says the lockdown of residence in who break could be ending soon elsewhere though governments are increasing measures to try to contain a sharp rise in infections that in Australia one of the latest news there is being to banned tourists from visiting aboriginal settlements and I also Sydney correspondent Phil Mercer what the thinking was behind that specific measure essentially it's using geography to try to fortify remotes indigenous settlements against the spread of the code of eight nineteen virus now these remotes aboriginal communities often only have one oh two roads in or out in the idea raises that some of these communities will for Bates visitors who've been to China Iran South Korea Japan it's silly and they won't let the main for the next three months so this is a way for indigenous people to try to get some sort of control given that the Australian government believes that indigenous people a one of the groups most vulnerable to the corona virus and this is what because of pre existing health conditions that that might exist yes you have to remember that the indigenous Australians suffer higher rates of ill health imprisonment poverty more than anyone else and they also suffer high rates of diabetes and renal conditions but also housing is invariably chronically overcrowded and some of these communities to Saudi authorities believe that these pre existing conditions and these other problems could be extremely flat tile ground full of virus light cove it

China Hubei Wuhan Official Australia Phil Mercer Australian Government President Trump Sydney Iran South Korea
"australian government" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:38 min | 11 months ago

"australian government" Discussed on Here & Now

"From NPR and WBZ. I'm Tanya Moseley. I'm Jeremy It's here now and let's get more reaction to last night's debate which comes just two days before the Nevada caucuses. There were six Democratic candidates on stage last night but the newest one Michael Bloomberg is not on the ballot in Nevada. He's got his eyes on Super Tuesday. Which is coming up in twelve days and he took fire from all the other candidates Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Amy Klobuchar and Pete Boot. `Age let's bring in. Npr's Osma holid- in Las Vegas. Hi Asthma so let's start with former mayor Bloomberg it was his first time on the national debate stage and many are saying he seemed unprepared for some of the pointed attacks. He faced including his support of stop and Frisk. Policies during his tenure. As mayor. Here he is. I've apologized to give nece but the bottom line is that we stopped too many people and we've got to make sure that we do something about criminal justice in this country. There is no great answer to a lot of these problems. If we took off everybody that was wrong. This office panel everybody. That was wrong on criminal justice at some time in the careers. That'd be nobody else up here. Even his own campaign staff have admitted he didn't do as well as expected. What are people saying today that he's actually having a rally in Salt Lake City in Utah today that that's going to be voting later in the calendar as you mentioned? He's not on the ballot here in Nevada and my colleague Isha Rosco has been with him and she says that he has tried to pivot towards the General Election. Message essentially saying that Donald Trump sees his poll numbers and he scared and he also warned against nominating Bernie Sanders saying it would be fatal error. T T to the point of cleanup of yesterday's debate. I mean look the the campaign has been suggesting that a lot of folks came out directly to target Mike Bloomberg and that he had not been on the debates dishes and debated in over a decade. I think that's sort of tricky question. I mean he has the money and the ad space to be able to change the narrative regardless of what people saw in last night's debate. But like you said he's not actually on the ballot. He's not going to be a contested force until Super Tuesday. So I don't know that we have a clear sense of how this actually shakes out with voters yet will I? It was surprising. Given the Bernie Sanders is in the lead in the polls at this point how few attacks compared to Bloomberg that he got He he stood his ground on several of them though including criticism of his Medicare for all plan on how to pay for it Let's listen to the answer here. He is an exchange with Pete. Buddha judge people.

Michael Bloomberg Bernie Sanders Nevada Joe Biden Bernie Sanders NPR Bloomberg Tanya Moseley Jeremy It Pete Boot Donald Trump Isha Rosco Salt Lake City Osma holid Las Vegas Elizabeth Warren Amy Klobuchar Utah
Virus spreads on cruise ship in Japan, U.S. passengers flying home

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Virus spreads on cruise ship in Japan, U.S. passengers flying home

"High level meetings in Japan over the weekend prime minister Shinzo Ave says the virus is constantly changing and they'll have to project its course then get in its way he says passengers from the cruise ship diamond princess will be disembarking February nineteenth three hundred fifty five passengers on that ship have been infected and the U. S. as a first evacuation flights of cruise passengers has left Japan for the U. S. they will be out of quarantine there and then back into quarantine in the United States when they get here six hundred Americans on board forty four Americans tested positive they'll be staying in Japan the to to recover those that were on board in effect in the gardens reporting Australian government is working on its plan to evacuate its citizens off the diamond princess nearly two hundred on board sixteen of tested positive for the

Japan Prime Minister United States
"australian government" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"australian government" Discussed on AP News

"Australian government has scrapped a twelve year old time table for ending indigenous disadvantage saying that the policy had failed a new center left labor party government launched the ambitious closing the gap initiative in two thousand eight its goal was to achieve equality for indigenous Australians in health and life expectancy within a generation prime ministers that presented to parliament to report every year since then qualifying progress made in seven areas conservative prime minister Scott Morrison uses annual report to note that only two of the seven measures were on track closing the gap between indigenous and other Australians and finishing high school and getting four year olds and rolled in early education but indigenous man continued to die almost nine years younger than other Australian men and indigenous women died almost eight years younger than other women the gap is widening in the measure of child mortality which is twice the rate than the indigenous community that and the wider Australian society Morrison's that successive governments top down approach to closing the gap just hasn't worked actor jussie Smollett has another performance in Chicago a piece of my cross your reports he's been indicted there on a half dozen new charges a grand jury in Chicago has returned to six count indictment accusing actor jussie Smollett of lying to police when he reported a racist and homophobic attack last year the indictments were announced by special prosecutor Dan Webb who was appointed by a judge in August after the original charges against small let were dropped after recusing herself from the case cook county state's attorney Kim fox unexpectedly drops disorderly conduct charges against molest angering police officials and then mayor Rahm Emmanuel the city of Chicago has sued small at seeking reimbursement of more than one hundred thirty thousand dollars for overtime pay two officers who investigated his report hi Mike Ross yeah harmful material on Facebook Twitter and other social media could lead to fines in Great Britain as AT correspondent Charles de Ledesma reports the companies themselves are on board new plans would give the tele communications watchdog off com how to enforce a duty of pale on companies such as Facebook and Twitter two official site protect users from harmful and illegal terrorist on child abuse content in particular firms that do allow harmful material to flourish well don't remove it quickly would be sanctioned it looks like tech companies a welcoming the regulations Rebecca Stimson the social networks head of public policy says for one Facebook because long cold the new regulations to set high standards across the internet Charles de Ledesma London.

Rebecca Stimson official Twitter Mike Ross attorney cook county prosecutor jussie Smollett Charles de Ledesma London Australian government Facebook Charles de Ledesma Britain Rahm Emmanuel Kim fox Dan Webb Chicago
Australia Raises With Iran Imprisoned Australian AcademicAustralia Raises With Iran Imprisoned Australian Academic

Michael Medved

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Australia Raises With Iran Imprisoned Australian AcademicAustralia Raises With Iran Imprisoned Australian Academic

"Australia's foreign minister say she raised with her and rainy and counterpart the fate of an imprisoned Australian British academic was gone on hunger strikes and she urged the Australian government to do more to free her a recent pain declined to detail our conversation with Mohammad Javad Zarif about convicted academic Kylie more Gilbert on the sidelines of a

Australia Australian Government Mohammad Javad Zarif Gilbert Kylie
"australian government" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

Rich Dad Radio Show

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"australian government" Discussed on Rich Dad Radio Show

"Is is an insurance policy against a collapse against a crisis financial missile crisis and that's a real possibility so now more than ever. I think you should learn about gold and go well. Let me say this. If you trust the government you know the U._S.. Government the English government the Japanese government Australian government then then just save your silly money you know save the Aussie dollar say the yen save the peso say the Canadian loony save the euro. If you trust your government I don't trust him. So that's why Timon I save goal widow gold. It's not an investment and by the way rich does not recommend anything where an education company so. If you want an investment you have you should talk to Brian as well as Dana but we don't recommend anything and when people say how much goes you own well Kim and I own a lot of it because if you read fake without need money we've we've figured out in fit called an infant return. We can just print our own money but that takes some skill anyway depends on who you are but the multiple say five to ten percent. I don't know how you measure that but most financial planners will say five ten percent the reason that don't say twenty five percent is because they don't get commissions on gold if you understand US always self interest and everything on the world and that's why the Rich Dad company okay makes we take no commissions. Make no recommendations of what you should buy so once again when now ask Robert Most popular program you can submit your question to ask Robert at rich DAD RADIO DOT COM. Some Melissa was the first question for us Robert. Our first question today comes from common in Australia Favorite Book Rich Dad Poor Dad Ozzy Ozzy Ozzy boy this hi Robert Thank you for sharing your wisdom with the world and your.

Japanese government Australian Ozzy Ozzy Ozzy Robert Most Melissa Australia Kim Brian Dana twenty five percent five ten percent ten percent
"australian government" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"australian government" Discussed on KGO 810

"All right. Good afternoon. Okay. That last caller, I just want to set a few things straight, that guy with the Australian government, the ambassador with the Australian government. This guy did not make a contribution to the Clinton foundation. I had to look this up because I hadn't heard that before, but this is the stuff that conspiracies are made of what happened was that he worked with his government, a, he was a fundamental part of working with his government. And in order to get his government to contribute twenty five million dollars in aid from Australia to help the Clinton foundation fight aids. So this is yeah, he it was him. He was a he had a role in securing this twenty five million dollars in aid from Australia to the Clinton foundation in their fight against aids. This happened in February of two thousand six okay? So what happened with popadopoulos is they were getting drunk? It was a night of heavy drinking in London in twenty-six, teen ten years later, George popadopoulos, who was a foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign and this Australian diplomat whose name is Alexander Downer. So they're drinking together. And in the course of their drunken night. He popadopoulos revealed that Russia had political dirt on Hillary Clinton, and that they were going to provide it to the Trump campaign, and he said that he had learned this about three weeks earlier that they had thousand he told him it wasn't just when we go it, he told the ambassador that Moscow had thousands of e mails. That we're going to embarrass Mrs Clinton and so that happened and then Alexander Downer apparently didn't say anything immediately two months after their drunken night, democratic emails began appearing online, at that point, he revealed the information Australian officials passed that information to their American counterparts, which would be the FBI that is, according to four current and former American inform. Foreign officials with direct knowledge of a stray Ilyas role. Now you're gonna tell me that, that constitutes evidence that Hillary Clinton was colluding with Russia. I think you need a drink. Eight hundred eighty eight ten is the number. This is cagey, Al Pat Thurston on K G O eight ten. New subsidies, someday, noon..

Hillary Clinton Clinton foundation Alexander Downer Australian government Australia FBI Russia Al Pat Thurston George popadopoulos Ilyas Moscow London twenty five million dollars three weeks two months ten years
"australian government" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Breaking news from the banking commission the banking inquiry. This is where the news conference is going to take place read headlines, Australia, banking, quiet recommends against structure separation. I mean, this is a long going arduous investigation. There is a t live. So they Australian banking quarry recommends against structural separation. Yes. So this is in reference to misconduct cases. Twenty four cases to regulators that have been referred the Australian government is saying it supports all seventy six recommendations. I mean, it's it's interesting. How much of an upheaval this is because it's the biggest in decades. This wide-ranging inquiry intimacy conduct and basically how the financial industry should pay for what they've done wrong. I mean, this report was highly anticipated and the speculation was that they would be looking at changes for compensation, maybe change, some of the lending standards. But again, the key line as you mentioned. Madness was that they recommending against these structural break up these banks. Yep. So this is the final piece it's been a thirteen month inquiry and the inquiry essentially focusing on rampant as we've called it in our store years of rampant misconduct in the biggest banks and financial firms, and it's certainly going to set the tone for the regulator. And indeed if you go to if you go to the t live, you can see that the opposition. There's a couple of different political flavors there on the t live that the opposition labor party, which may win may wind power in may has indicated that it will support all recommendation, and you can follow. Of course, the latest on the T live blog on your Bloomberg another line is that the new regulatory oversight body.

Australian government Australia Bloomberg thirteen month
"australian government" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

Mac OS Ken

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on Mac OS Ken

"Apple has a message for the Australian government. This is no time to weaken encryption. The age of Australia says the Cupertino company has be raided apples proposed Bill, dealing with encryption, calling it dangerously ambiguous and the l'armee to every Australian. We heard a couple of weeks ago that up was likely to find the proposed access and assistance Bill. The age says that bit of legislation would see tech companies like apple compelled to help federal authorities gain access to encrypted communications, which the government has said are increasingly being used by terrorist groups and criminals to avoid detection and disruption. That would mean weakening Apple's own. I message encrypted messaging service, which the company's not too keen on an Esa mission to Australia's federal parliament. Apple said, this is no time to weaken encryption rather than serving the. Interests of Australian law enforcement. It will just weaken the security and privacy of regular customers while pushing criminals. Further off the grid, apple sees the breadth and they -ness of the bills thority coupled with ill-defined restrictions as troubling. It argues that the rules are so big companies could be required to turn smart speakers. And the open mics for spying on citizens could turn health devices into snitch is around possible drug use and could require a back door for one device that could be used to open every device like it would like to see assurances that such actions would not be required ever according to the company. Submission software and evasions of the future will depend on the foundation of strong device security to allow for those protections to be weakened in any way slows our pace of progress and puts everyone at risk. Apple Pay has made its way to the land of sodas Sudafed and starbursts. Apple insider says, CBS has completed its Apple, Pay rollout. Wondering what took so long. The site recounts the tale saying CVS was a longtime, hold out even once its chief rival Walgreens came on board. This was partly because CVS was one of the backers of currency. A merchant supported payment platform that ultimately failed to launch. And finally, today, apple is donating more money for natural disaster relief macrumors says, apple CEO, Tim cook announced mid week last week that apple will be donating to relief efforts around hurricane Michael. That storm is left at least seventeen people dead as left. One point, three million people without power as recently as Saturday and has decimated towns on Florida's panhandle and points, northeast and. Pair of tweets on the evening of the tenth. Apple CEO said, I grew up on the shores of the Gulf Coast near Pensacola and mobile, and that region holds a special place in my heart. That's never been more true than now to all those communities in the path of hurricane, Michael, you're in my prayers. Please stay safe. Apple standing with our friends and neighbors and the Gulf Coast region and will be donating to recovery and relief efforts. Cook did not say how much apple plans to donate, though. Macrumors points out that for other recent hurricane disasters, the company has provided one million dollars in aid. As of now. Apple does not appear to have set up

Apple Australian government Bill Australia hurricane Michael Macrumors Tim cook Gulf Coast CEO Cupertino Walgreens Florida Esa Pensacola CBS one million dollars
"australian government" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Com. Slash twit. Apple has sent a letter as you know, the Australian government wants apple to put a back door in its encryption. Apple has sent a strongly worded letter responding to the parliaments assistant and access Bill, which was introduced late last month designed to help the government more easily access to. Of course, is going to happen in the United States to. Apple writes in the letter is by the way available online in a website hosted by the Australian parliament that devices you carry not only contain personal emails, health information. Photos put are also condu-. It's to corporations infrastructure and other critical services, vital infrastructure like power grids and transportation hubs will become more vulnerable. When individual devices get hacked criminals, and terrorists who wanted infiltrate systems and disrupt sensitive networks may start their attacks by accessing just one person smartphone in the face of these threats. This is no time to weaken encryption. There's profound risk of making criminals jobs easier, not harder, increasingly stronger, not weaker. Encryption is the best way to protect against those threats. Agreed. Definitely who wouldn't sure on force. But here in the states pushing for the same thing, they want Australia, it's the US or China get apple to give up or putting back doors, hope to Australia, have respect abroad. Providence of asking. Well, that's us trillion for you're right there in a nutshell, gonna get it right. It's like, no, we won't be doing that. Thank you. Thank you for your interest. Scary a story in wired this week in starts in two thousand thirteen. A young computational biologist named Yana if Airlec shocked the research row by showing it was possible to unmask. The entities of people listed in anonymous genetic databases using only an internet connection, fast word, five years. The amount of DNA information housed in digital data stores has exploded. Thanks to consumer companies like our former sponsor twenty three and me and ancestry dot com..

Apple United States Australian government Australia Yana Airlec China five years
"australian government" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Dot. Com studios on the east. Coast I am hopefully That's. Right looking for Oh the. Australian government. Fell overnight Food but they reassembled it's. Their, prime minister in five years It's their six government in ten years so if you're thinking that In fact our politics are a. Little unusual in the United States be glad you're not, show you the new prime minister is the former. Tourism industry executives Scott Morrison who is behind their tough refugee policy they're the one that can find thousands of men and women children to government run centers in Papua. New Guinea and the Pacific island nation. Of NAR ru for years They. Booted Malcolm Turnball because he wanted to go heavy into global climate change restrictions and Scott Morrison is viewed as the cover my candidate between the heart right and the Centrists in the Australian conservative party which is known as. The liberal party so? I hope I made that clear for you most important story. The day of course the, Cleveland Browns beat the world champion. Philadelphia Eagles five to nothing you heard that. Right five, to nothing a safety, and the feel very inspiring game. I, watched most of it tweeted. It and very inspiring game but now let's get to the president himself, in fact. The president United States even though it is only six oh nine is. Already? Tweeted twice.

prime minister Scott Morrison United States president Australian government Malcolm Turnball Dot. Com studios Cleveland Browns Philadelphia Eagles New Guinea NAR Papua Pacific island five years ten years
"australian government" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Oh well and because of that it can be really dangerous well said but i know about you but i'm terrified of people have got guns you'll learn people up allowed on trains because they've been bad people i'm just terrified walking down the street in america knowing that people are led to have guns some of those people are nuts do you feel do you actually feel when you come to the states you live in the uk we should say you're a stray in australia has really interesting story there was a terrible mass shooting was at in tasmania i think he went into a theme park fundamentally and showed up a hundred ninety six people killed them and durant hours killing people and australian government decided that's it we're not going to do it anymore they changed the laws but they also did a massive gun buyback which was very successful they took millions of guns out of circulation and there hasn't been another mass shooting since american they're crying level in australia went down starkly there now higher than candidates for safety and canada's in the top ten american would say though that's great as long as you've got really good government that you trust yeah but i got to be the government be honest with you are teens you wait you the government anyways it's got cruise vessels this is what i'm not advocating that point of view you guys i'm just saying this is what americans is the way americans mindset that's the first place.

uk tasmania australian government canada america australia durant
"australian government" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on AP News

"School shooting i'm rita foley with the navy newsmen at police in los angeles say a shooting at castro middle school was an accident two student shot one of them shot in the head you esi emergency dr carl should not ski motive was very good i'm always always a little bit hesitant to speak to too quickly but that his vital signs are stable the other wounded student expected to fully recover as well a 12yearold girl was booked on suspicion of negligently discharging a firearm on school grounds the white house says president trump will allow publication of a classified memo on the russia investigation soghra magons he reports the fbi says it has grave concerns about the documents accuracy and senior bureau officials have directly appealed to the white house that the memos released could set a dangerous precedent texas has executed a man who shot and killed his two young daughters while their mother listened helplessly on the telephone i'm rita foley australia's tightening controls on foreign investment in electricity grids and farmland this comes two years after the australian government blocked chinese bids for us trillions largest cattle empire and to sydney electricity grid the australian government says the new restrictions will apply to foreign companies bidding for australian 'electricity transmission infrastructure and some generators it says diversity of ownership of such critical national assets safeguards national security the government says companies selling australian farms and ranches left to advertise to us trillions first treasurers cut morrison's as the country welcomes foreign investment and australian agricultural land where it's not contrary to the national interest a chinese foreign ministry officials as beijing hopes countries will provide a favorable open fair and transparent environment for chinese enterprises investment a case involving nude art and facebook is working its way through a court in paris ap correspondent charles deal dust my has the strange story a french teacher frederik do am base s is suing facebook full alleged censorship because his account got suspended in 2011 off he posted an image of the famous nude painting.

charles paris beijing sydney russia president facebook rita foley morrison australian government texas fbi trump white house castro middle school los angeles two years
"australian government" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on AP News

"The australian government blocked chinese bids for australia's largest cattle empire and the sydney electricity grid the australian government says the new restrictions will apply to foreign companies bidding for australian 'electricity transmission infrastructure and some generators it says diversity of ownership of such critical national assets safeguards national security the government says companies selling australian farms and ranches left to advertise to us trillions first treasurer scott morrison's as the country welcomes foreign investment and australian agricultural land where it's not contrary to the national interest a chinese foreign ministry officials as beijing hopes countries will provide a favorable open fair and transparent environment for chinese enterprises investment the battle of words to absorb between two costars of an old tvs sitcom a p entertainment editor oscar was gabril reports it's all about what happened and didn't happen between the claims counterclaims denials and accusations all part of the recent back and forth between actor scott bail and it call eggert they start together on the sitcom charles in charge and depending on who you talk to the either had consensual sex when they both were of age or bail molested edgard as a teenager both have repeated claims that point the other as the bad guy or gal bail was on tv denying the comments at egger made the day before that he molested her when she was just fourteen and had intercourse with her before she was legal bales response it was egger who seduced him in that they had.

australian government australia scott morrison eggert charles edgard egger sydney treasurer beijing editor
"australian government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"How do you how do you counter his view of this working currently it's all very well for patients who are elderly and complex that those are the ones on my because they're the ones that are most needy and to be able to speak to a doctor from the comfort of their at home and my practice office that service and many g peace edry's coward elderly patients within half an hour usually trash them nice for them to be seen the same day will visited at home by just nayef if patients do not have continuity of care to not have somebody who is able to take care of their conditions comprehensively they may be suffering a less high quality that medical treatment of rural white yesterday nature all on pole melli as we turn our attention to events in australia with particular reference to refugees the maps island of poppy crops been in the news over the future of hundreds of grenades stock at a former tension center the australian government is shutting down that many of those left behind are still waiting hoping to find a way to australia were one person who considers himself unlucky refugee is pera here he story began in sri lanka where he was one of thousands of tamils targeted during the 26 yang civil war he eventually boat for us hoping to gain asylum there but the boat boats sank and he was rescued and then taken to a detention centre on christmas island were there he struck up a friendship with an australian pen pal allison coke who helped him to come and join her in australia when i saw two men to addison and paris started by telling me about the moment he was left stranded at sea before the gas than at i'd the scene allen vessel sank into the ocean nato and people lost their lives i was the one person was killed with john young people uh how vibe in the water for that long it is it is hard because i go to know how still i don't know how likely needs and it is middle of india knows and this massive and the xiaoping end was in the four number novel as i was swimming with them like gene can but i called them i didn't think about that i could survive but i survived after never never soon mean but still.

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"australian government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Australian government's has lost its majority in parliament sandra kill off will tell us more in wild news in just a moment alongside the dollar we're also seeing the 10year treasury yields rising a little bit this morning fairly steady though at two point four six four percent now we have some other earnings so to tell you about this morning just breaking on the bloomberg among these third quarter net inflows thirty one billion euros mod the french asset managers confirming that cost revenue synergy targets former pioneer deal is says they are underway among these third quarter net income at one hundred eighty four million euros which is up from one hundred thirty seven million euros a year earlier in other breaking news on the bloomberg this morning we also have huntsman clariant a mutually agreeing to abandoning a planned merger lafarge wholesome stud quarter net sale coming in at six point nine four billion swiss francs buses the estimate of six point eight nine billion swiss francs salah false wholesome 2017 in twenty 18 outlook are also reset so all of that breaking all the balloon bag as we speak let's delve into our top stories that this morning a european central bank policymakers see their newlyextended bondbuying program halting by the end of next year so long as the inflation outlook improves that's according to officials with the knowledge of the discussions that comes off mario draghi warned that the ecb will remain cautious even he put his signature stimulus measures on the road toward an exit monthly.

Australian government bloomberg mario draghi ecb lafarge central bank four six four percent 10year
"australian government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"On its look eight aides involved but it doesn't have a large number of troops there so the people who are going to be participating are participating on a tactical level and what malcolm turnbull has said all along and indeed this is being borne out in recent u s led conflicts in the middle east is that australia will generally contribute expertise rather than a large number of boots on the ground night so they are involved in the games but the number of people coming from australia certainly not the same as coming from a career or the us are you mentioned and fan i wonder how how you believed the australian government might respond to encode for military action at given ansel's hit history in iraq ulster done during a conservative liberal government well you know the trees he does a state to that any military action entered into war any you know you are a threat of war that air is born against australia new zealand or the us that the the other two countries in the partnership are obliged to come to the two to their defence will be involved on as i said what ustralia generally tries to do is provide expertise rather than a large number of troops on remembering of course that they're running twenty five million people in australia so phnom if you if you're talking about a large number of troops its disproportionate to the contributions of other countries but i think there is no.

malcolm turnbull middle east australia australian government ansel ustralia iraq
"australian government" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"According to the australian dollar well i don't know probably a lot of money mr plus costs plus legal costs which is essential which was which was really great because the legal costs could have been times a lot more debt so there's another outfit in australia called brouwer which now there was james ready held up a packet yesterday highlands at the equivalent when you go to a pharmacy in australia and you go to natural section or whatever it's the brower range you'll probably find and when i popped the pills back in australia in public talks each the brouwer sleeping pills that guzzle down an gets amazing reactions when people don't realize what we know they're they're really harmless so the australian government the national health and medical research council which is the nominee the government released a paper about two in 2015 on alternative medicine in one of the conclusions was the national health and medical research council today released a statement concluding that there is no good quality evidence to support the claim that homeopathy is affective in trading health conditions that was pretty dramatic again that's something we've got in our arsenal now and not so long ago earlier this year these therapeutics goods administration an again and government arm was seeking comments by the general public and concerned people for a new framework about regulation on low risk products which homeopathy falls into that category low risk products that's how they can get away putting all sorts of things in the pharmacy because there are a list regulations.

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"australian government" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

WIMS AM 1420

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"australian government" Discussed on WIMS AM 1420

"People working this is a large center this were funded by the pentagon and this is this indictee report it's called the american face of isis of if any of your listeners will just simply google the american face of isis the chicago project on security and threats you'll be able to read the thirty page report on line it's published in part of with the an arm of the australian government so this study is not just kind of randomly collecting information from the internet this was eleven people who spent six months to gather all the information of the complete set of individuals who have been indicted in the united states for isis related crimes and one of the things the jumps right out is that isis appears to be radicalising more people inside the united states at an annual rate than al qaeda did before why it looks as if it's their propaganda that propaganda inspired attack it seems to be working nearly all of those individuals sitespecific propaganda videos as critical in the radicalization process who are the most susceptible to being seduced by isis we see chu patterns in this data the number one is convert so one of the things it's very different than with alqaeda in the past is that isis is appealing to people who are recent converts to islam not longstanding members of the of muslim communities second what we see is a striking number are americanborn so of the numbers i just cited for you two thirds are born in the united states the other one third that are not born in the united states nearly all of them have been in the united states for many years there naturalized citizens their green card holders so what you what you see is a small number were radicalize imprisons isis is using not one strategy to radicalize you see a small number in prisons yet smaller from who were imprisoned and then radicalize what i'm saying is that isis is in pursuing a the old al qaeda strategy which is find the most about individuals what's really striking here i just two weeks ago i presented or data to our national counterterrorism center in front of two hundred fbi agents who are the undercover folks doing sting operations so we presented the all these findings.

pentagon australian government united states al qaeda google chicago green card fbi six months two weeks