19 Burst results for "Austin Smith"

"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

03:28 min | 2 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

"And i gotta <Speech_Music_Male> tell you after standing up <Speech_Music_Male> with them. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> Some of these people frighten <Speech_Music_Male> me. They <Speech_Music_Male> frighten me <Speech_Music_Male> when when you have <Speech_Music_Male> mainline candidates <Speech_Male> to turn around <Speech_Male> and say that. <Speech_Male> There's nothing off the <Speech_Male> table with respect. <Speech_Male> Iran that's <Speech_Male> code for using <Speech_Male> nukes <Speech_Male> nuclear devices. <Speech_Male> I gotta tell you. <Speech_Male> I'm president of the united <Speech_Male> states. There <Speech_Male> will be no preemptive <Speech_Male> wars <Speech_Male> with nuclear devices <Speech_Music_Male> to my <Speech_Male> mind. It's immoral <Speech_Male> and it's <Speech_Male> been immoral for the last <Speech_Male> fifty years <Speech_Male> has part of american <Speech_Male> foreign policy. <Speech_Male> Let's use a little moderator <Speech_Male> discretion. Here <Speech_Male> senator gravel it's <Speech_Male> a weighty charge <Speech_Male> who on this stage exactly <Speech_Male> tonight <Speech_Male> Worries <Speech_Male> you <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Male> much. Well i would <Speech_Male> say the top tier ones. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> They made <Speech_Music_Male> statements or <Speech_Male> joel. Include <Speech_Male> you to you have <Speech_Male> a certain arrogance you <Speech_Male> wanna you want to <Speech_Male> tell the iraqis <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> to run their country <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> you know. It's <Speech_Female> really pathetic. <Speech_Female> The new york times called <Speech_Female> him a an. <Speech_Female> He called him attention. <Speech_Female> Getting and grandstanding <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> in a little bit. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> will do anything <Silence> to get into the <SpeakerChange> news. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> it's so ironic <Speech_Female> of course because <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> the pentagon papers <Speech_Female> published by the new york times <Speech_Female> you'd think they'd have a little <Speech_Female> bit more appreciation <Speech_Female> for him <Speech_Female> these <Speech_Male> editor. So <Speech_Female> not these editors and <Speech_Female> they <Speech_Female> shout out to new york times <Speech_Female> also for having <Speech_Female> no bit that <Speech_Female> was written by someone who's <Speech_Female> died in two thousand <Speech_Male> eighteen. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> So i get <Speech_Female> that. People re <Speech_Female> pre rate obituaries. <Speech_Female> In fact man. We <Speech_Female> have to start doing that for <Speech_Music_Female> our enemies <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> they should have at least <Speech_Female> pretended <SpeakerChange> to <Silence> assign Yeah <Silence> yeah i mean <Speech_Male> it <Speech_Male> is. It is <SpeakerChange> not a good <Speech_Male> look when the person <Speech_Male> who wrote the obituary <Speech_Male> has been dead for <Speech_Male> a while. <Speech_Male> Yeah <SpeakerChange> three years <Speech_Male> yeah. <Speech_Male> I actually miss somebody who <Silence> had that job <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> didn't fit <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> for. Tv the <Speech_Male> person put obits together <Speech_Male> for tv <Speech_Male> like before <Speech_Male> they're sick <Speech_Male> or anything like that <Silence> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> like for instance. They <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> this <Speech_Male> this person did like five <Speech_Male> different versions <Speech_Male> of <SpeakerChange> yeltsin <Speech_Male> dying <Speech_Male> because <Silence> he kept <Speech_Male> getting <Speech_Male> sick over and over again <Speech_Male> so they kept redoing. <Speech_Male> The the <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> you're right but <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's an interesting <SpeakerChange> job <Speech_Female> now <Speech_Female> but he did you <Speech_Male> ever interview micro. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> No <Speech_Female> he is great. <Speech_Female> I interviewed him on my show. <Speech_Female> And i actually had dan <Speech_Female> ellsberg on this week <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> because he of <Speech_Male> course worked with rebel. <Speech_Male> Excellent <Speech_Male> will check it out <Speech_Female> a secure helper show <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> check us out guys <Speech_Female> if you're not watching <Speech_Female> us What you <Speech_Female> probably are. Make sure you <Speech_Female> rate and review us on <Speech_Female> itin. Subscribe <Speech_Female> to us on youtube <Speech_Female> and to hear the rest of our <Speech_Female> interview with <Speech_Female> austin. Please <Speech_Female> go to <Speech_Female> usefully subject <Speech_Female> dot com <Speech_Female> and. Please <Speech_Female> follow us on twitter. <Speech_Female> We have a new twitter account. <Speech_Female> It's at useful <Speech_Female> idiot. Pod <Speech_Female> keep using <Speech_Female> that hashtag <SpeakerChange> utility. <Silence> It's pod <Speech_Male> that's right <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> we'll <Speech_Music_Male> do all those things <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> stay off social <Speech_Music_Male> media completely otherwise <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Music_Male> We'll see misery. <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> my own book <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to <Silence> <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> okay. <Speech_Music_Male> What was that <Speech_Male> mosquito or <Speech_Male> something <Speech_Male> like that. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> so. <Speech_Male> Obama <Speech_Male> hailed <Speech_Male> it good. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> But <Speech_Female> here's here's my <Silence> <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> this has <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Female> show. Yeah definitely <Music> yeah.

The new york times Iran pentagon united twitter dan youtube austin Obama
"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

03:01 min | 2 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

"That <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> was great. Was <Speech_Male> man after my own <Speech_Female> heart. You offer like <Speech_Male> setting things <SpeakerChange> on fire <Speech_Male> setting things <Speech_Male> on fire inability <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> follow rules spat <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Get along <Speech_Male> with anybody <Speech_Male> consistently <Speech_Male> long-term any <Speech_Male> one place <Speech_Male> But <Speech_Male> like <SpeakerChange> constantly <Speech_Male> doing something interesting. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> the thing <Speech_Male> about the student loans. This <Speech_Male> really <Speech_Male> super interesting story <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> it was really the only <Speech_Male> one doing it for a really <Speech_Male> long time. So <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> it's it's fascinating. <Speech_Female> I was <Speech_Female> really surprised. I know <Speech_Female> obviously i have <Speech_Female> slate. Admiration <Speech_Female> of bernie sanders. <Speech_Music_Female> But i really <Speech_Female> thought he was going to say <Speech_Female> like it. Was the <Speech_Female> student <Speech_Female> loan staff to discourse. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Male> I thought the. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> You're you were hunting <Speech_Female> for that <Speech_Female> hunting for <Speech_Male> men out. <Speech_Male> He's coming <Speech_Male> from though <Speech_Male> it's not. It's <Speech_Male> not about cancelling <Speech_Male> it. It's about the <Speech_Male> fact that it's illegal. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I mean <Speech_Male> if you ask them <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> if you had a question <Speech_Male> what do you think student. <Silence> Generally <Speech_Male> he <Speech_Male> might have had an opinion along <Speech_Male> those lines. But this <Speech_Male> is this is a bad <Speech_Male> this one. <SpeakerChange> Subset <Speech_Male> of loans <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> illegal <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But it's interesting <Speech_Male> definitely <Speech_Male> in very similar <SpeakerChange> to the <Speech_Male> kind of <Speech_Male> two thousand <Speech_Male> mortgage <Speech_Male> stuff <Speech_Male> for these guys <Silence> were <Speech_Male> making <Silence> a calculation <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Silence> like we can <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> were busted. But we're <Speech_Male> going to keep doing this for <Speech_Male> a little while because <Speech_Male> it's gonna it's gonna keep <Speech_Male> making us money <Speech_Male> even if we <Speech_Male> lose a suit which were <Speech_Male> probably not going to. <Speech_Male> It's not <Speech_Male> gonna be as much as <Speech_Male> the money we're making <Speech_Male> so let's just keep doing <Speech_Male> it. I think <Speech_Male> increasingly <Silence> common phenomenon <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> in finance. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Female> yeah. I <Speech_Female> like that like very <Speech_Female> interesting story. <Speech_Female> Everything's <SpeakerChange> in <Speech_Male> the drama. <Speech_Male> The gracia anomaly <Silence> of thriller <Speech_Male> gladstone <Speech_Male> jones. That <Speech_Female> would lots <SpeakerChange> of jay <Speech_Female> is <Speech_Female> such a great name <Speech_Female> Track <Speech_Female> like you know. <Speech_Female> Near <Speech_Female> near tragedy. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Overcoming health <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> diversity <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> cycle really weird <Speech_Music_Female> euphemism <Speech_Music_Female> for cancer <SpeakerChange> health <Speech_Music_Male> adversity <Speech_Music_Male> adversity. <Speech_Music_Male> I suffer from <Speech_Music_Male> reverse. <Speech_Music_Female> Yeah i was diagnosed <Speech_Music_Male> with help <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> other in <Speech_Female> other news <Speech_Female> Mike roselle died. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> senator from <Speech_Female> alaska wanted <Speech_Female> to give him <Speech_Female> an rip <Speech_Female> and a shoutout <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> he ran for president <Speech_Female> twice. <Speech_Female> He <Speech_Female> read the <Speech_Female> pentagon papers <Speech_Female> into the congressional <Speech_Female> record. In <Speech_Female> fact it was. <Speech_Female> Tuesday marked the <Speech_Female> fifty year anniversary <Speech_Female> of his doing that <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> He was really <Speech_Female> great during the debates. <Speech_Female> He gives <Speech_Female> us. He <Speech_Female> gave us like a perpetual <Speech_Female> democrats. Suck <Speech_Female> spiel during <Speech_Female> the i think. Two <Speech_Female> thousand eight <Speech_Music_Female> <Silence> Primary debate <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> he just went after all <Speech_Female> the dams for sucking <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Male> being a bunch of cowards. <Speech_Male> Like going <Speech_Male> into the senate <Speech_Male> for the first time you get <Speech_Male> there. You're all excited. Like <Speech_Male> god huddle ever get <Speech_Male> year then about <Speech_Male> six months <SpeakerChange> later you say <Speech_Male> how to heal the rest <Speech_Male> of them get here

"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

05:58 min | 2 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

"These banks linden kids at private high schools to actually get a fair amount of students whose it's their parents. They borrowed money for the children's high. School and high schools are just not part of the department of education system pirates Flou- bob and then the third one is eligible expenses and so that was a little bit trickier but you know every school that is accredited by the department of education has to come up with what's called a cost of attendance and it's just it's sort of. It's as some of your tuition room board books living expenses. You know health insurance. It's sort of a package of. How much would it cost the average student to attend this college. So you know it's different for nyu in the university of brassica. Partly just because it's a lot cheaper to live in omaha it is live in manhattan and so when you borrow money through the financial aid office. They will sort of usually put this whole package together. And they'll sort of give you some scholarships and they'll give you some grants and they'll figure out some federal loans and a little private money and they put together a whole package in your pretty well protected but the thing that happened was in about one bank sort of said. Well you know we are always the last dollar in because the department of education is sort of putting up the majority of the money and you know not really interested in making three thousand dollar four thousand dollar loans. There's not enough margin there. So what they started doing was they started just doing direct mail called direct consumer loans. They would just take their list of customers who had borrowed small loans. You know sort of feel the gap between their federal loans and their cost of attendance and started saying. Hey you need an extra twenty thousand dollars. Thousand dollars. Eighty thousand dollars. You know. you're a smart kid. You're going to do well. No borrow it from us. And we'll send the check directly to your your fraternity or your dormitory or your apartment or wherever you live and you could borrow from multiple lenders in a single year. The aggregate limit was a hundred and forty thousand dollars from those from banks over a four year period. That's where you start running the kids who have borrowed a million dollars in student loans. And i have a couple of clients who are not doctors or lawyers indian chiefs. They just got an undergrad degree but they were borrowing forty to fifty thousand dollars a year and at thirteen percent interest. You know three years at a school. It's a million bucks and so those loans are discharged because they're not for eligible expenses because they were not sort of made through the financial aid office. you know. it's really no different than a credit card. But he think about it. Like you know i used to. I got a couple of credit cards in college. And you know remember. I don't know if you've got one too but my limit was five hundred dollars that in most my credit would but these kids were getting forty thousand dollars in cash. I mean it's just astounding when you think about it and you know what the serve conservative response is always will. Why would a bank make alone. They know could be repairs. They're short in the way. You're always good. Not only that. But you know what i have learned is. It's not only the problem. That sort of i think came about in two thousand eight whereas others securitising of it. You pass the risk onto the next guy all you have to do able the sell it sort of before the music stops well but they also do is as long as it's collateralized at navient they can borrow against that and what they do. Is they artificially keep these. Lowe's looking healthy. They intentionally do not default people so they say look. We've got three billion dollars in assets which are just consumer loads in negative position that are not being repaid but are being artificially kept out of default so naby it can borrow against that from other banks and so we know zombie dead this when i realized that i was. Oh my god. So they are happy that the loans are growing instead of being repaid because it gives them more collateral to borrow against. This is absolutely out of control out of control. And so that's what i tried to sort of force them into bankruptcy. Because i was like look. This is a total skim. since it. yeah you might have five billion dollars consumer loans under books but the true market value. That isn't anywhere near five billion dollars. Because you're never going to collect on it and a lot of it's been discharged and so you know netscape into that but that is what sort of led me to think that this whole thing was actually some kind of new form of ponzi scheme and And unsuccessfully tried to sort of drag them into bankruptcy court sort of you know get the courts to dismantle them. We didn't weren't able to do that just yet. I don't know that we will never ever be able to do it. But dem that so. Yeah i mean if you have if you've been through bankruptcy and got private loans it's always worth sort of looking at generally settle them and get on a better payment plan. But if you've got these loads and you've been thinking about bankruptcy or your physician where you know you're unable to pay these if they're private loans You know take a look and there are some lawyers. This is finally starting to come into the mainstream. And so when i started doing. This really weren't a lot of lawyers who willing to look at it. There are more now. You know you sort of have to google around but depending on where you live you could probably find someone who's got a little bit of knowledge about this and Hopefully gets it's great stuff Goes to your that. You're you're healthy and good luck in your campaign the check in with you again we. Are you know most of about raising money which is absolutely humiliate experience. And i'm so bad at it but Nakedly ask our listeners. To give all the remainder of the could still operated Fifty thousand twenty two dot com. We're also going to figure out a way for people to donate like junk Because you know i'm trying to figure out some creative way to cause people always a cash but there's actually. There's a lot of other stuff you can donate it sort of larger campaigns. Make use of that. They don't really do the smaller level. And then we can like have you know you..

department of education system university of brassica department of education linden nyu omaha manhattan bob Lowe netscape google
"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

03:06 min | 2 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

"Nights clip out the personal kids taking too seriously. Yeah so you're going to say that people because people take sports through seriously that they no surprise to you that they would do things like put somebody set up with a bottle. Yeah i mean if that's how they respond to like a little league game right. But yeah i could make them more anti sports argument. But i don't want to do that because i'm already in on thin ice with sportspeople. I can't piss him off. Because i know so much about sports that it triggers them. I mean i think let's just let's just put a curse to the table. It's not appropriate to act like that with the kids game but if you know you're a referee in you you call a game prematurely you should you know your life stake. I think that's fair. Yeah matters so But but i. I do feel for the twitter. Franz lady yemi to german right but but you know what the first bicyclist to fall. Apparently german to really this was some kind of it. Didn't work or to self-loathing. Yeah wonder what she's going to end up belgium. That's a pretty funny winterland switzerland because it's neutral neutral now. There's lots of cycling fans which alantic she's going to have to go to someplace like arizona. I mean we really wish that on her. No but i mean nobody's gonna recognize your toward a francis there right unless they watch useful idiots in which case we'd just blew her cover right right so we will we should. We'll put a picture of her up on tweet. Yeah so S- okay so that's no one died again like the guy in the guy who won to dramatically cross the finish line with some blood on his on his knee. Everybody did over themselves situation that matter. I think she should be made an honorary french. Citizen should more than that addition to give her a house in paris. Yeah okay so that's The the food groups this week. We have a really interesting interview. Coming up with Austin smith who is Has one of the more unusual biographies innovate usefully guests. He's a Former onion writer and lawyer. Who is known as the don quixote student loans for a really interesting reason that we're going to get to and he's also running for congress in the first congressional district of new york which is eastern long island Just announced his campaign super interesting guy. Us I i came cross him. Because i'm writing a story about this Phenomenon student loans at a lot of people don't know about but if you have lunch you probably want to hear this 'cause you you might be eligible to discharge them and not know it So.

Franz lady yemi Austin smith belgium switzerland twitter francis arizona paris congress new york
"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

08:34 min | 2 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on Useful Idiots with Matt Taibbi and Katie Halper

"Let's just go straight benja bent on this four food groups. Okay so In democrats sucking we have A story about nina turner. Friend of the show as people are aware. She's running for congress to replace marcia fudge marcia fudge by the way just to remind her. She is that black former member of congress from ohio. She said that she was tired. Of black people just being considered for department of labor and hud and joe biden delivered and named her to hud so he is now at hood because joe biden likes. That's gonna that's gonna miss the On both reports actually yeah. It's true she would double double on. I'm gonna blame him more than her. Because i think it's hard to turn down a cabinet position. Yes i guess so. Yeah but it'd be great for it to be principled when she would have gone into the private sector and mid fifty times the money. Yeah yeah know. Yeah so Nina sorry if you don't take the cabinet job then you're not gonna later get the bigger private. Yeah that's how the revolving door work right. So that's a tough one. Yeah so anita turner who was a state senator of ohio also people probably know the bernie sanders surrogate and then bernie sanders campaign chair coach campaign chair for president. She's running on a platform of medicare for all of them living wage housing to human ray and she has polling at fifty percent in the thirteenth candidate. It primary for ohio's eleventh district. Dave throat and julia rock have a great article. Dem's launch proxy war on medicare for all dem's bankrolled by big pharma. Suddenly targeting nina turner. Right after she aired and ad touting medicare for all obviously she's a threat to the status quo because she supports those good things and this means that what what has to happen because of that obviously has majority whip james clyburn who is by the way among the top recipients of pharmaceutical industry. Pack money in both the house and senate. Okay that's a pretty big deal right. He's a member of the house. He's a congressman but he's the biggest recipient of all of them. I was gonna say like is. He somehow both in the senate as well so he. He joined Luminaries like hillary clinton in supporting candidate shantelle brown and he told the new york times. What i try to do is demonstrate by precept and example how we are to proceed as a party now clyburn also of course famously intervened for He decided he decided the presidency. Basically right so. I want you know. Sometimes we do the useful idiots bump where we claim credit for something. We have a couple of those this week. But but i think that one of them this week that we can claim that Clyburn did not endorse nina turner. Because that would have been a terrible stand on her campaign to have such a corporate shell. You're trying to reverse mind. Forget what it's like. It's like when alan dershowitz like endorsed. Tom perez and threatened to lose the democratic party. If if keith ellison became the dnc chair like that is the best endorsement of brewing. Don't don't their bureau patch kind of a threat exactly. Yeah so but i thought you know we are about democrats suck and sadly the new york times is what would you. How would you describe the relationship between the new york times and democrats inseparable uncle. Yeah i don't. I don't even different institution actually so i thought it'd be worth reading the the article that the new york times put out on this story because it's one of those things where it's kind of. It's not just the story. It's not just that clyburn comes out of the woodwork to endorse nina turner's opponent. It's also the way it's presented by the media number three house. Democrats steps into ohio race to head off a sanders accolate. Which i think is an interesting way of putting it. This decision by represent james clyburn to oppose an outspoken ally. Senator bernie sanders in a special election. In cleveland highlights generational and ideological gulf in the democratic party. Now in a way that's honest right because he's framing it as a sanders related battle. And i think that for so many people this is about sanders. It's also about much like the sanders thing. It's about like progressive issues I think it's a little bit weird. I don't know what do you think accolate. I think it's a weird thing to describe her. As i'm not sure if i would love were her but it's like an accurate description are it. Depends i mean you're you're you're you're short handing it for an audience. That's not a cleveland audience. So it's technically right on south. I don't know it's a little weird. That's a lower right. I mean accolate. What is it. it's a person assisting in the celebration up assisting the celebration and a religious service or procession mean it sounds like like no. it's not upon. i don't know there's something weird. I think and judgmental about it like well especially because the new york times hates bernie sanders so much so right well again. They're framing this for their audience. Which alright yeah. The kids bernie sanders. So they're they're that's what they're trying to play this up because they want people to click on the story. Yeah it's right. So but here's what i like about this story. And it was written by john weiss jonathan weissman who's also a novelist. Apparently kind of novels i jon. Weisman is a congressional correspondent. Veteran washington journalists and author of the novel num- number four imperial lane and the nonfiction book. Semitism with three parentheses around. Semitism that were being jewish. In america in the age of trump his career in journalism stretches back thirty years of to check it out. Yeah we should have him on somebody. how many how. Many journalists have successfully made the jump Actually become good. I mean there's plenty. Actually michael connelly you. Detective novels in their lawyers who become novelist right. That's a different one. Some russians of combat goes course. Matt why does your head go there. Sorry want people start to come back to that subject anyway. go ahead anyway. So here's i mean. Basically the split between turner and her opponent chantal brown is between the two wings of the democratic party. So you see this in the endorsements also so the Janina turner was endorsed by ao. See i on the presley. Ilan omar rashid leib and then on the other hand shantelle was endorsed by clyburn. Hillary clinton richard cordray representatives joyce beatty of ohio and the chairwoman of the congressional black caucus and moderate democrats. Moderate democrats like representative josh. God heimer of new jersey and david tron of maryland one second. Let's just pause there. Josh scott heimer not moderate. He's like trump democrat. He's he's totally right wing. He's not moderate. He's bad on everything like he's trumpy on everything from the border to you know Solve he's obviously really bad on that. Actually that would make him. Non trumpy right. You know him you've written about him through in your that's right that's right. Oh forget it was. Because i was writing about the the fraternity. That didn't yeah exactly. Yeah yes right no. He's it's the other way was not trumpy. Now he's trumpy except on the salting. Yes right so ignore that part because and that is like an exception because even trump is an exception on that right like trump happens to be on the right side of that for the wrong reasons mean he was just doing it to mess with the democrats. Respect the work but yeah that hassle. Yeah now he's awful like he he i'll have.

nina turner bernie sanders james clyburn ohio new york times benja marcia fudge marcia fudge joe biden medicare anita turner clyburn Dave throat julia rock shantelle brown cabinet congress Tom perez sanders democratic party senate
"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:43 min | 10 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"And mitchell county over almost two thousand votes there as well so he outperformed kelley law flir in those places and so how many of these counties that you see here that the president was doing well in an luther did well and and that david purdue did do well and there's some here were kelly laughlin has performed better than what the president hitler formed in georgia. Not by a lot but where she performed a little bit better than the president of that so look these rural counties. There may be blue dog conservative. Democrats in those areas that are voting for the president and not voting. Republican down ballot. So what have we been told. Is that everybody down. Ballot was not going to be voting was going to be voting for republicans. But they weren't gonna go up. Donald trump. That's just not true. It's the exact odds exact opposite. These conservative counties are doing that that showed you that even in the most read counties. They're voting republican on the ballot. That's exactly right. And also in order for kelly laughlin. David purdue win they need trump. Supporters is also. That's all they need. And so those several counties were law thir- loss i'm gonna go back and look for david purdue and see how heated but off one of see because she's behind were also doug collins to conduct pollens took off about a million votes. Doug probably got a lot of trump's Who collins got nine thousand but there is still a camel driver here though yes so if these conservative counties which are you could call them blue dog democrat counties which i would refer them to. Those are the that performed well for the president but down ballot didn't so that's exactly opposite to be joined by alex marlowe but breaking right now everybody to fulton county election board members have just voted against certifying. The fulton county election results because signatures on absentee ballots. Were not electronically verified. But we are told that there's nothing to see what the election we have. Wayne county fulton county and maricopa. County got copa america. We'll go through that deck. It's a pretty good deck isn't it. It's very compelling austin. You've been working very hard. Yeah you got to go now. I wouldn't go through what we're talking about all of that the producer. Those if you're just tuning in you might mr. We went down and broke some of the counties that matched up with. They voted for trump. And the den. Down ballot voted for democrats. We just kind of wanted to see origin georgia. We just wanted to see what kind of lines up because the theory is what we were told For those of us we were taught. We were told that we were crazy. Is that there was republicans out there. That just voted for republicans down ballot. And they didn't vote for donald trump. Well that's not true..

Donald trump democrats president kelly laughlin fulton county david purdue doug collins mitchell county georgia hitler flir Wayne county kelley luther alex marlowe austin producer maricopa
"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:40 min | 10 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"The world now on twitter noviny monaco palmer and william hartman as two people completely racist and without an understanding of what integrity means or shred of human decency. You the laws and underside. History will be on your side. You're consuls lumpy. On your side and more knows when you go to meet your maker. Your soul is going to be very very war. Sounds like a pleasant guy is a nice thanksgiving. Let's jack i wanna play now. Democrat abraham i ash who threatened monica palmer's children. Yes and i want to. I have an affidavit from monaco palmer. Let's play abraham each. Who's an absolute thug. Play tape tells us. Is you miss manca palmer. From grosse pointe woods which has a history of racism are deciding to enable and continue to perpetuate the racist history of this country. And i want you to think about what that means for your kits. Probably gonna gross point north. And when this you other blacks classmates that is democrats abraham. Let's make that guy famous because he wants to make those kids famous and so now the subject. It's going to be a legal fight. They were definitely under duress. They had their. Do you want better as this guy. Ned stabler we. We actually started looking through his twitter account and his facebook account. This is a guy who in the lead up to the election. He was posting trump supporters home addresses that he was pulling from the from the voter donor. Databases from the fcc database. He was posting people's addresses and putting them up what his own facebook and telling people to shun them targeting. This dad's voter intimidation yet without a doubt. And now we have the wayne. County supervisors fine issue the president tomorrow. If i'm not mistaken at the president's request and so. I think that they should refuse to certify and they should sue and so we will not certify wayne county. Tell us in closing here. Jack 'cause we gotta keep the pace moving here. What's going on in wisconsin. You made somebody very famous last evening. Right well basically a very similar situation in the fact that we've got to republicans here in wayne county that are standing up and saying we're sick of it. Were standing up the mob. He saw the exact same thing in in wisconsin. Now this was the statewide for the recount. Their to folks. One by the name of denudes and an another very special individual by the name of bob spindle. They sat there charlie and they went line for line back and forth with these democrats for six long hours going subsection by subjects in through the rules. These guys saying you guys. You can't change this. You're not allowed to change this. You shouldn't change that. At one point. They were saying they were trying to institute social distancing rules and then bob spindle gets in there and he's just bob spindle this This financial analyst from milwaukee and he goes wait a minute. The law says that. I'm supposed to observe these ballots. I can't observed they're six feet away. I went plexiglas. Plexiglass like the hockey game. So i wanna play clip here. But before i do. Where's the republican party providing all this. Why don't we have platoons of people doing this. I don't understand it. Play cut twenty six. And then i want to get your feedback of here and uncovering day. That's still equally good stuff. But that's not the clip so we have..

twitter wayne county charlie facebook monica palmer wisconsin grosse pointe woods president abraham bob spindle william hartman Ned stabler republican party Jack fcc hockey milwaukee financial analyst
"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

04:43 min | 10 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"News we have darren beatty revolver dot news and we also have jack pacific. Who's an american patriot. And just on top of all things breaking news. It seems it seems he does a great job with that. I want to thank bruce from texas for supporting us. Only think roberto from california. For supporting as david from michigan. I want to think abby from california and marquette from washington. Thank you all for supporting us. A lend up from california and chris christine or kristen from california so we are going to be joined momentarily by jack pacific and please email us your questions in real time. Your thoughts in your feedback freedom at charlie kirk dot com freedom at charlie kirk dot com. But i want to go to a side angle here and i want to show you kind of our new board. We have here one of the most interesting ones that we've been following here. No one else has been talking about. This is dane county. Wisconsin university of wisconsin. madison is. They're mostly close people's republic of now. We were going to do an event. They didn't allow no because it's closed so dane county wisconsin in two thousand eight. Obama got two hundred and two thousand votes in dane county wisconsin in two thousand twelve. Barack obama got two hundred. Fifteen thousand votes in dane county wisconsin. Hillary got two hundred seventeen thousand doing a little bit better than obama. Joe biden got two hundred and sixty thousand votes in dane county wisconsin with the campus of uw madison being closed and so they've had more population growth but look at how hillary just did a little bit better and trump did worse than romney. So trump did worse than romney. Trump performed slightly. But trump's still did worse than ron in dane. County trump did almost as trump in sixteen did as well as mccain did an and day of tony. How is that biden. Got two hundred and sixty thousand votes in dane. County wisconsin with u w madison closed everybody. Granny farming and absentee ballot laundering ballots were sent out to previously registered students on campus. And i guarantee you if there was a criminal investigation. They could go through camera footage. They can do all sorts of evidence and they would find criminals. Well seasoned hardened criminals scooping up ballots and then submitting them and laundering them. Back into the system as this whistle blowers telling us..

dane county County wisconsin Barack obama jack pacific california Trump Joe biden Wisconsin university of wiscon romney wisconsin darren beatty Hillary uw madison roberto michigan bruce abby david washington mccain
"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

03:57 min | 10 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"And if we select your question you guys win a signed copy of the new york times bestseller the maga- doctrine sydney powell was mentioning antonio mujika or mugica. Probably mugica is how you say it. So we're going to show what city pal was talking about listening very carefully. This is the director of smart matic saying that they know without any doubt that manipulated results of elections go on in many countries that go on undetected play tape base on the robustness of our system. We know without any doubt that the turn out of the reason election for a national constituent assembly was manipulated. It is important to highlight that similar. Manipulations are mating manual elections in many countries but they go undetected because of a lack of electronic security and auditing safeguards. So listen carefully to what that was that was antonio mugica. The smart matic director with sydney powell mentions and now reinforcing. Her argument saying that without any doubt the manipulated results of elections go on in many countries that go on. Undetected sydney powell. Also that dominion voting systems and smart matic two different types of things. The owners are actually tied to the venezuelan. How is this not investigated by the department of justice or the federal bureau of investigation. So we have now here and this is where rudy. Giuliani made his best argument today. Let's go to cut thirteen or rudy said. The pattern of fraud repeats itself. This is this important and we're going to show this empirically. Mathematically on this board in just a second but this is really where you're able to prove this possibly in a court of law is that there was a pattern in these core cities. And austin you have some of those numbers to right and so we're going to ask you to die through them. It's a really important point because things do not work. Imperfect artificial patterns especially in defiance to the national trend. So if they were going to cheat the problem is the cheating and stealing and the cutting of the corners really exposes itself because republicans did so well nationwide play cut. Thirteen not a single voter fraud in one state. This pattern repeats itself in a number of states. Almost exactly the same pata which to any experienced investigator prosecutor would suggest there was a plan from a centralized place execute these various acts of voter fraud specifically focused on big cities and specifically focused on as you would imagine big cities controlled by democrats particularly focused on big cities have a long history corruption. The number of voter fraud cases in philadelphia could fill a library. Could fill a library now when you look at the voting irregularities austin you have some of these numbers year by your comparison can you help build out some of these numbers and just go through piece by piece sure. So let's go back to two thousand eight. When john mccain was running against barack obama for the first time john mccain took two million votes to brock obama's one point eight million in the state of georgia and i would say brock obama is a much more popular president in any state than what joe biden would be on the no doubt without question the only difference would be modest population growth but that wouldn't be percentage growth know and also would be the absentee ballot mechanical part in which actually proves argument so john mccain just took over just over two million votes. Compared to barack obama's one point eight million in two thousand eight..

barack obama john mccain sydney powell rudy director fraud antonio mugica sydney antonio mujika joe biden Giuliani department of justice austin the new york times bureau of investigation philadelphia georgia president investigator
"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

05:52 min | 10 months ago

"austin smith" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Three hundred percents of over votes. They say voter fraud does not exist. Let's go to cut fifteen rudy. Giuliani pittsburgh and philadelphia. They noticed there was something wrong with the ballot. They called the voter cure. It and it doesn't happen in. Pennsylvania is a very important point now before we go to cut fifteen. I just want to say why is the federal bureau of investigation. Not doing their job. Where is the department of justice. This is bombshell evidence. Everybody that could change the entire election results and we are going to be here this evening. Keeping the pressure on austin hasn't been amazing how weak republicans have been on this. Will you think about it. Were scrambling and georgia right now. Where's brian cashman. It's been three weeks. We can't find buying none of those guys the german name. It's yeah it's unbelievable. So austin you'll get the exact numbers on a play rudy here but look at the absentee ballot rejection request in prior elections in georgia. And look at the absentee ballot rejection request this year if that was applied to the election in georgia proudly in pennsylvania to just around the idea of absentee ballot rejection signature verification requests. Donald trump might have one just for all of you realizing this can still be done if you get a fair judge. There's plenty of fair judges. Thanks to president trump but just through absentee ballot signature verification request. President trump can possibly win a second term. Let's go to cut. Actually let's do cut fourteen and then cut fifteen cut. Fourteen is rudy. Giuliani saying look at the affidavits that they have where there was. No inspection of the mail in ballots cut fourteen. The reality is that we are now at account of six hundred. Eighty two thousand seven hundred and seventy ballots for which we have affidavits that there was no inspection of that valid at the time that it was entered in the vote. It was a mail ballot. Mail ballots are particularly prone to fraud. We will warned about that by jimmy. Carter president jimmy carter and secretary baker in a report about a dozen years ago in which they said that mail balloting is particularly susceptible of fraud that we should carefully consider ever doing it and yet. What did we decide to do. If you're incorporated you can gather outs outside. If you're celebrating the los angeles lakers you can gather but you can't for whatever reason go and vote in person and now you saw the casualty.

Donald trump georgia president jimmy carter Giuliani rudy Pennsylvania austin fraud brian cashman bureau of investigation department of justice los angeles pittsburgh philadelphia secretary baker
Mission Control announces partnership with Special Olympics

The Esports Minute

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

Mission Control announces partnership with Special Olympics

"Let's start with our friends at mission control after helping the Special Olympics out eastwards programs. This summer I had Austin Smith Co. bitchy on the sports network podcast. Morning the company announced a raise of one point seven five million dollars. Their goal is to build out REC league eastwards at schools, parks, and REC, departments and workplaces today. They felt Duke Mit the Dow's Parks Department and the Special Olympics in New York at Oregon. Graduations Austin if you want to hear more about the company hop over to the eastward style podcast feed listened to that show.

Parks Department Olympics Austin Smith Co. Duke Mit Austin New York Oregon
"austin smith" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"austin smith" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"What about in our conversation with Austin Smith at mission control so we went to the break a post but a couple of questions for you one question is is you know a whole lot you're probably the same age or even younger than my adult kids right so you came out of the VC kind of been a you know still in early stages done arranged around right but I'm guessing you already have some things that you wish somebody had given you as far as advice from the very beginning and it happens you know what I did thirteen start ups before I got my first IPO so there on the block a few times in the startup world when it buys that to anybody by the way medals will learn very well but you know what advice do you wish someone had told you when you were starting mission control what would you have done differently from the beginning that's a fascinating question a lot of ways because I feel like you know there's there's two different areas of of like wishing you did something differently like one is like true regret like you you know it turns you on the inside and then the other is like I look back and ask my co founder and I were talking last night about looking back and what we could have changed and that's something that we regret as much as I get some burning inside I get burns us but it's it's still something like I think we could have done better and I think that that the core of that is not over clad buyer and I are very focused on strategy and planning and we can you know we can you know we can do a really good job at putting together a plan and a strategy and executing except there's a point at which its too much planning and not and not executing and I feel like that totally makes sense and had we been able to plan last a more focused more work more on the actual product in the early days that feel like you know we could be in a different position maybe a little bit more prepared for the scale that we're seeing today is not something I'm sure they were granted more looking back and say Hey next time let's focus on doing it this way what is the course and then you environment change how you're going forward then is the pull back on you know to use use your earlier on about your your co founder right very detail oriented and wants to make sure everything's a line drive that execution fees you know I have both of you then had a kind of back off of what your natural skill is to say you know we just got to get those done we gotta get you know the seasons along we we we've we've we've got to make this thing come together it's it's more allowing us to go to our natural skills independently I think you know we worked together very closely and it was a little bit of that Hey you know we don't need to work together this closely let specialize you on that me on this and I think that's something that like buyer and I like you know we're we're very excited about working together in this and both having their school you know experience of starting a company grow in the company but there's also an element where in order to get stuff done you know we had a speech he's got a super focused on something over here and I've got a but over here and honestly the other thing is that it really helps to have good people around you can also specialize in other things really hard to build a company just two people when you got a couple of people and some interns who are really bright Albany out it's a lot of it is a big difference it's a big difference in the situation well I think I think this goes back to where we started the conversation by you and your co founder of the fact that you had many years of being together or working together being hired together right so the cross that that that you have established monsters you know you you met in a bar and then over the years thank you for your startup company and don't really know each other much about each other right I think you know there is that level of trust that has to be either in order to say Hey I want you to do this I'm gonna do this you go to that right I totally agree and it is the in terms of the other teams are they all from you're the same university near the front how do you how do you find yourself yeah it's a good it's a good thing I mean what we've kept it loose we have that cool you know cultural values that that we have but when it boils down to finding people's like can we find people who are intelligent driven and people are generally kind but also our and open and and I think are good teammates and basically when we when we get towards those things it's pretty easy to find the right person are perfect you can really find right amazing people and a lot of it has to do with you know some sort of person or for all or what I should do because a lot of good people stick together so we found that but St Louis university has couple of injured that I've seen my high school even has and I met people from mine at you are much younger than me but went to the same high school who ended up on the team but but you know some are just a random people we've met you know we think are really bright or like Hey you know how the network included in that you know some of our other executives that we've hired just really smart right people that are working okay great so awesome people want to keep track of lawyer what's going on the mission control where is the best place for them.

Austin Smith
"austin smith" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"austin smith" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"What about our conversation with Austin Smith at mission control so we went to the break a post but a couple of questions for you one question is is you know a whole lot you're probably the same age or even younger than my adult kids right so you came out of the VC I have been a you know you know it's still early stage you've done your range around right but I'm guessing you already have some things that you wish somebody had given you as far as advice from the very beginning and it happens in all like I did thirteen start ups before I got my first IPO so there on the block a few times in the startup world when it buys that to anybody by the way medals will learn very well but you know what advice do you wish someone had told you when you were starting mission control what would you have done differently from the beginning that's that fascinating question a lot of ways because I feel like you know there's there's two different areas of life which she needed something differently like one is like true regret like you you know it turns you on the inside and then the other is like I look back and ask my co founder and I were talking last night about looking back and what we could have changed and that's something that we regret as much as I get some burning inside I get burns us but it's it's still something like I think we could have done better if we had known and I think that that the core of that it should not over plant buyer and I are very focused on strategy and planning and we can you know we can you know we can do a really good job at putting together a plan and a strategy and executing except there's a point at which its too much planning and not enough executing me and I feel like that totally makes sense and had we been able to plan last claim more focused more work more on the actual product in the early days I feel like you know we could be in a different position maybe a little bit more prepared for the scale that we're seeing today is not something I'm sure they were granted more looking back and say Hey next time let's focus on doing it this way what is the question the interview environment change how you're going forward then is the pull back on you know to use you surely are on about your your co founder right very detail oriented and wants to make sure everything's a line drive that execution please you know I have both of you that had a kind of back off of what your natural skill is to say you know we just got to get those done we gotta get you know the seasons long we've we've we've we've we've got to make this thing come together it's it's more allowing us to go to our natural skills independently I think you know we worked together very closely and it was a little bit of that Hey you know we don't need to work together this closely let's specialize you on that me on this and I think that's something that like Byron I like you know we're we're very excited about working together in this and both having the school you know experience of starting a company growing company but there's also an element where in order to get stuff done you know we had a speech he's got a super focused on something over here and I've got to focus on something over here and honestly the other thing is that it really helps to have good people around you can also specialize in other things really hard to build a company just two people when you got a couple of people as an insurance you are really bright and helping me out it's a lot of it's a big difference it's a big difference in the situation well I think I think this goes back to where we started the conversation are you in your code problem the fact that you had many years of being together or working together being hired together right so that that that that you have established Moses you know you two men the bar and then over beers thanks to progress on a company and don't really know each other much about each other right I think you know there is that level of trust that has to be either in order to say Hey I want you to do this I'm gonna do this you go do that right I totally agree and it is the in terms of the other teams are they all from you're the same university you know they are on the ground how do you how do you find yourself yeah it's a good it's a good thing I mean what we've kept it loose we have that cool you know cultural values that that we have but when it boils down to finding people that can we find people who are intelligent driven and people are generally kind but also and open and and I think are good genes and basically when we when we get towards those things it's pretty easy to find the right person are perfect and you can really find them right amazing people and a lot of it has to do with you know some sort of person or for all or what I should do because a lot of good people stick together so we found that but St Louis university has couple of insured that our team my high school even has and I've met people from my **** you are much younger than me but I went to the same high school who ended up on the team but but you know some are just a random people we've met who you know we think are really bright or like a you know I wouldn't work for us included in that you know some of our other executives that we've hired just really smart right people that are working okay great so all people want to keep track of lawyer what's going on the mission control where is the best place for them to to find you.

Austin Smith
Taylor Swift’s (Apparent) Remake of ‘Look What You Made Me Do’ with Brother Austin Fires Up Fandom

Z Morning Zoo

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Taylor Swift’s (Apparent) Remake of ‘Look What You Made Me Do’ with Brother Austin Fires Up Fandom

"Over the weekend Taylor announced that she was very excited about a cover of look what you made me do which is used on the show killing eve now the cover is credited to Jack leopards in the golfing club a lot of people believe that the male singer is Taylor's brother Austin Smith he apparently used the name dolphin club in the past and the group has no other sound out also the co producers are listed as Jack Antonoff and nails forged Berg okay this it's the name Taylor use when she co wrote this is what you came for for Rhiannon Calvin Harris in twenty sixteen that name was on there that was Taylor swift is it commented yet but this is a very sneaky sneaky sneaky way to get around that whole rule about you bought the rights to my music yeah so on to a cover version yet yeah that's

Austin Smith Jack Antonoff Berg Rhiannon Calvin Harris Taylor Swift
"austin smith" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

14:30 min | 1 year ago

"austin smith" Discussed on How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

"Industries. Salam Business Coaches Alan Austin Smith and Alan came onto the podcast back in two thousand nineteen. We learned about the story behind him as well as what it takes to become a fantastic hairdresser linked by the way will be in the show if you WANNA go and check out that podcast. But he's coming back on Saturday because I'm hearing regularly that the hair industry is facing a crisis and by crisis. I mean that there are no young people coming into the industry. The Passion is gone out of young addresses silos. Not keeping onto their stuff. Maybe not I can't say I personally agree with us. Yes it's difficult. We got more challenges. We gotta get out a stronger message. We gotta get people engaged in our industry and we are battling against so many other industry sectors net time online a net time with digital is a different place to where it was twenty years ago but the hair industry is in a great place to make really push forward. We have got to get young people more engaged and we have to give them the right message. So this is what you're going to get from this podcast with Allen. E really is an interview off so much words of wisdom knowledge and I think just pule gold. Because it's going to help drive your solemn business forward is going to help the industry better. I think it's a clear message in there to how we rethink a market industry on all of it is a master class and I think you will love it too. So let's get straight into this podcast interview with Ellen Austin Smith of the fantastic hairdresser welcome back onto the hunter critique. Podcast the man behind a fantastic hairdresser are delighted to bring him back Allen Austin Smith. Welcome along Allen Dom how you doing yeah. We're all very very good. And all the benefit took it to you. Say we had a fantastic interview with you. Why back would you believe in September? Two thousand eighteen episodes sixty eight. Yeah how to be a fantastic hairdresser and what's happened since then mainly in the industry has moved on. And I mean you have been able to catch up. But one of the big things that we spoke about and it was inspirational month's two thousand nineteen and we had a great conversation it but it was about the hair industry and also really the crisis that is maybe in at the moment and do you see the industry and across these big question on now but that's get straight into it herron strict crisis. Yeah I do actually and it's actually wearing me quite a lot When I when I look particularly look forward into into the future five ten years down the line I think there's two issues One audio quite quickly and that is that I remember. Many many years ago we were in a similar situation and that was that sounds being too afraid to increase their prices and everything else around us coming up and up and up so you know you own my clients might not like it but but my prices up but you landlords putting the price up the company putting the price up the government's putting your prices up for everything's coming up around you and is is quite simple mass logic if if fuel prices and coming up but the But everything else around you is. Then the margin is shrinking literally year on year on year on year. And we've already got to do something about that and I think. Have some have some courage and you know what some belief in what we what we what we do for people and the strength do it. If we just prompt people I'm married. That would become shop selling costs. So you know colas or whatever and you have that belief. We're going to have that belief in ourselves allows us to to say you know what on Earth is. There's one thing that really struck me a few years ago. I this wonderful wonderful dog. Koto me and he's elaborate doodle. Which means yesterday his head Cup and I remember the shock when I took in time his head cup and the bill was about seventy quid scares me. But what the you make this person. And I'm sure they're very you know committed talented the agreement but you tell me a dog. Groomer is charging seventy five quid. Silence out too afraid to charge thirty five. That that to me sums it up. What is it scares us about? Putting our prices up the minority. I always say you should never run your business for minorities. I don't mean ethnic or social minorities You should shouldn't be running your business. One is sometimes people say all some clients wouldn't like that and I always say yes some. Come back to me when it's most all listen to you when he's like most clients wouldn't like it when you say some you're running your business you'll making decisions for minorities and one thing. I say sometimes say listen. If I was telling you your boss saying our prices are coming up tomorrow you little bit but dummy I bet you net right. Now you'll thinking of the clients that are going to cause a fuss the clients. I'm GonNa like it And so on and everybody nods. He added Arkansas. I say that's that's how fear there are. You can think of you actually know their names. And you're actually making decisions not making decisions because of a minority is crazy and I think we do that too much in the business right across the board we worry about the few instead of actually saying this is what I believe. This is where we're going and most people be fun. Yes some people won't like it. He called please everybody. You mustn't make decisions for minorities so I genuinely think that's it. We don't have the belief and because of that we're worried about the minorities and it's a major issue massive affecting our industry. We started off by literally gone straight into saying the hair industry is in crisis. Why is prices the first thing that you said because as soon as that that margin is being attacked then we don't have the money to invest in our people and it's the inefficacious isn't there to invest in training in marketing in inspiring and engaging doing all those things if we're having to those corners that will rebound on us? Which brings me of course to the second issue said. There was two issues the fuss one as the fact we stopped being brave enough to bond prices up and then the second one by the white anybody's listened to so it's not that easy if you operating in the right level if you're giving the full experience you're doing great hair plus. I talk about in terms of fantastic hairdresser. The other fifty percent. If you're operating at that level a if you really think all of your client's going to cause you process up then you've got the really seriously look. What sort of experience you're providing. Yes you'll lose some but you might lose some be manolas any Frankly it's not not the issue that everything's is is is becoming such a problem because it leads to the second issue and stopping that something the IC. If I look forward five years there is when I woke me the most is that I feel. People got their head in the sand with us. That's a bit of an issue is bit of a problem is difficult to get started. Young people now four five six seven years. We don't have the same churn that we used to have in this industry but is still a predominantly female industry which does mean we will stop to lose people and it's a young person's industry if forgot young blood coming through. You know what doesn't how many clients heading on if you haven't got the staff to do it. Then you got a problem and that really really concerns now at into that that some of the people we do have that people questioned the passion the development a rowing other learning etc and genuine. You Walk in. It's not just me. I'm speaking so many people about I was on the phone to android seminar. This monia this often and we about things and and he said he said Allen. I'm really worried about this industry. And so you know this is joyce our with absolute respect to Angelo. He's not on owner. He's working in a solemn seeing he's recognizing. Where's the young blood coming into this industry? We've always been dependent on it and if we don't do something we I think. Crisis is not too strong a word I think we got to start really getting out of the sand and talk about it. What are we going to start doing? Of course the the huge question and some things I think one thing. Which of course won't vote. What prompted this discussion was the presentation. I did inspiration lines and I decided to kick off the day quite simply because inspirational minds is out inspiring. We decided that we didn't we didn't want to just another sallow manager day. We wanted something that would inspire young people and you could bring you team along too. That's why I started with this and and for me. Where's The Passion Today on Young Club? Passionate young people are. Where's the passion okay? There's two issues of that number. One young people passionate that just not always passionate about the things. We want to be passionate about certainly passionate. I go twenty five year old. He's pretty passionate about tend to trust me so this passionate there but it may not be from what we went when I was there right. I'm out of the new Dome Pretty Much. It's not that much different. Probably yourself when young in this industry the competition so my attention you know I got the job I could watch one of five channels on TV Jock against the pigs about I you know. I don't know Yoga Class. I wouldn't have even know what Yoga was. I was seen as tinder. Unfortunate to be honest but there was no such thing as ten. Xbox there's no game of thrones. There was no box sweat. You sit there and watch ten episodes road. None of those things existed and by the way it's not being an old get actually quite the opposite. I'm actually saying I get it. I completely get it and frankly if that was made today I'd be wanting to do that stuff. What I think is that. We're not competing. It's almost we're expecting people to be passionate remember but what I did when I talked about. An inspirational minds was what's another word for? Passion is love. I said well. What's the term we use with love? We'd say the term we use his fall in love which means there's a process. We don't expect someone to love love us. You don't want a date and after thirty days I you should love me. You don't expect people to love it and you sell it down to mome people love and so for me. I think what's happened is is the we've got some owners managers etc industry leaders element of expecting it. I was talking to a prominent name in the industry and he was saying he said the problem is in funny. Where a big brand? And I'm an international educator said there was a a a a heterogeneous came to town halls. I'll sit and we're doing a seminar and I said to my team. Hey guys this person or we should go watch them. We should can't see them. Let's get tickets and I was immediately faced with our. What is it I think I've got yoga that night and someone else that's happening in myself on an industry leader and an international educator. One Earth is happening enormous. Owls Y- okay. How did you sell it to them? He said well I said how. Did you sell that show to the two? I should need to sell it to them and I get. That's the problem because we as the certain age. We have an attitude. I shouldn't have to say they should want to go to that. We expect them to go. Actually no you've got to sell it in you. Why do you got to sell it? Because we're in competition and we're in competition with tinder and facebook and Instagram. And game of thrones and and if just sitting there expecting people to be passionate then it's now. I also say to people. Why do you want your team to be passionate? They look at me rather strange is they will. Because I want to engage in my business wanting committed they. We've got my round. It's not passionate. People who engage is engaged people become passionate why I think is missing. If we have a generation that is respecting people to be passionate and is not going through the process of engaging them so they become passionate and I think that's an issue with the people. We have now sums of how we get people to join this wonderful industry of those. Well I start shouting about been on. I'm saying to everybody at the Mount Salon owners by the way. Remember them on sixteen years old. Frankly I shouldn't be saying this. They they should be tapping me not the other way round on.

Allen Austin Smith Alan Austin Smith Ellen Austin Smith Young Club facebook hunter Angelo Arkansas Mount Salon Yoga
"austin smith" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"austin smith" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Austin Smith is also a real tour with Dave Perry. Miller in Dallas Austin has served on the research committee with any are, and most recently, he served on the Dallas chapter for any ours young professionals, network, Brian, and Austin happy, Father's Day. Appreciate this. You're very welcome. So Brian you and your wife, Leslie Rueda Smith, who's now, the first vice president of any are we're experienced realtors, all the time that your daughter Kristin, and your son, Austin were growing up. When did you first realize that Austin was going to follow in your footsteps? When young lesson I gave them three goals, and that was to get their black belt a college degree and a real estate license. So that when they acquired a job and make some money they would know how to invest it. I'm gonna let Austin answer the second half of that because he had a differ perspective sitting in the backseat. You know. Wasn't sure about real estate? You know, up, we'd be on vacation that would get a call and turn around to me, and my sister and tells the shut up. Getting used to life as a child in that manner wasn't sure realized it was for me after college. I wanted nothing to do with it. I got a corporate job to work for three years, and in time, I realized cubicle not for me something a little more stimulating so moved on into real estate and look back it's been a great change. Interesting. So I know that you have different specialties. But do you talk about real estate India? Learn from each other. Yvette. And that's one thing I really enjoy. Is that teaching because it just real satisfying for both less than myself for spreading gone through what we have gone through and our previous mistakes, and experiences coupled with Austin's, desired Christmases are to learn. It's made them a better realtor. Hopefully sooner than I did or Leslie did from our past experiences, and it's very exciting to see when he realizes that he gets it watching his confidence and his passion, bro. That's so interesting. And, you know, Brian you just mentioned, teaching your kids about real estate. So let's bring it around to Austin, what have you learned about real estate from your father and mother, probably the biggest thing that I learned from him to understand contracts, and what to do with certain situations, every deal is different. You know, sometimes I need a little bit of a heads up on what to do. But. That's all helped me grow. And you know, the, the other deals that move forward and it's definitely expedited. My learning curve. That is awesome. And Brian, you are a lifelong real estate professional. But let me ask you this. What have you learned from your son Austin, it's a good reminder? When I go over something with him to help him get to the finish line. It's good reminder for me as well. So we weren't real well to get really excellent. And one last question for you. Do you have anything special planned for fathers day turned off the phones or we're going to go to the rich? That sounds wonderful. Well, again, Bryan and Austin happy Father's Day. I hope you have a great day and a great year ahead in real estate got prejudged. Even thank you very much for having a snake. You're very welcome. Brian in Austin Smith. Real tours with Dave Perry, Miller and associates in Dallas..

Austin Brian Austin Smith Leslie Rueda Smith Dave Perry Dallas Yvette Miller first vice president Kristin research committee Bryan three years
"austin smith" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"austin smith" Discussed on Here & Now

"Austin smith one of the people featured in the poster campaign he says this barrage of criticism has definitely been felt at the student level some of it even hostile i ended up on some pretty conservative blogs and found i wouldn't necessarily say it was like a they were credible threats but there were jokes being made about killing us that was new for me smith is a gay man and his interest in masculine ut came from his own personal experience with his late father smith says his dad had definitely fit those more traditional ideas of masculinity so whenever i came out to him that was tough for the both of us i think we both had to change some assumptions that we'd had smith says although he doesn't agree with a lot of what's being said about his friends and the program he can understand where it's coming from you grow up with an idea of who you ought to be this idea given to you by a lot of people it's just socialization i i just want to challenge folks to think really critically about where the ideas are coming from uc committee is scheduled to come up with recommendations on how to move the masculinity program forward by august i for here and now i'm not different in austin and here now is a production of npr in wbz association with the bbc world service i'm robin young i'm jeremy hobson this is here now.

austin npr jeremy hobson Austin smith wbz bbc robin young
"austin smith" Discussed on This Week in Startups

This Week in Startups

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"austin smith" Discussed on This Week in Startups

"Facebook fleas knew exactly as a uniform so it's part of your identity your joining religion djelic sense of purpose you haven't protestant or a catholic and so face suddenly become super cool and it destroyed society that got trump elected and all that yeah i think it would figure people's calculations actually is there a way out austin what would you do put you in that sucker burke see what do you do what is austin smith to take me into your thinking i mean i think that will yes so like like you're saying i think it's internal so i think that what that burg has to take an approach that gets his company behind him on the same page about what they're trying to do and what they've done wrong and how they're going to fix it and so i don't know if i know the exact answers on what should be fixed but i think that avoiding making statements and and like pushing out people who want to fix these problems and yeah i guess just like hiding is kind of what they're doing and don't think that that is doing them any favors and so i think that i don't know i can't say what i would do if i were him but i think that immediately some sort of of i don't know if it's a memo or an all hands meeting to talk about what actually happened and to start apologizing for the things that have gone addressed for sill much time and for like the sort of half half asked comments that they've made and to start actually stepping up and explaining what has been has gone wrong and what the path is out of the woods and i think a really good example that's a change in leadership but that's.

burke austin smith burg Facebook austin
"austin smith" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

NPR Politics Podcast

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"austin smith" Discussed on NPR Politics Podcast

"Support for npr comes from state farm helping american's who struggle with their finances by giving them the tools help an education they need to take control of their money find out more at let's start today dot com state farm here to help life go right this is austin smith recording in austin texas where i'm waiting to vote in the primaries this podcast with recorded that twelve forty one pm on wednesday march that things will likely have changed by the time you listen to this keep up with olive npr's political coverage at npr dot org the npr one app or your local public radio station all right here's the show hey there this is the npr politics podcast and we are here in your ears to talk about the first primary of the 2018 political season that was in texas and three quick things to know about a million democrats turned out to vote and about a million and a half republicans finally the women running for congress did really well last night so how much can we read into the texas results what does it tell us about future primaries and what we might see in november i must my followed political reporter i'm susan davis i cover congress and i'm dominican montinaro political editor all right i want to begin by just phoning a friend can we dial in bennett philpott he covers politics for the npr station in austin texas at k you t hebei hello hey how's it going.

npr austin smith austin olive npr texas congress reporter susan davis political editor