35 Burst results for "Austen"

'Notting Hill,' 'The Duke' director Roger Michell dies at 65

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

'Notting Hill,' 'The Duke' director Roger Michell dies at 65

"Director Roger Mitchell has died at the age of sixty five according to his family details on his death were not given our margins are a letter with a look at his career you have a stomach bug I could have a step up Roger Mitchell's most famous film is Notting hill with Hugh grant and Julia Roberts for a time it was the highest grossing British film ever Mitchell also me changing lanes with Ben Affleck and Samuel L. Jackson as well as Venus with Peter o'toole Mitchell also directed for British theatre productions his TV adaptations include Jane Austen's persuasion and the Buddha of suburbia in the nineteen nineties

Roger Mitchell Hugh Grant Notting Hill Julia Roberts Peter O Toole Mitchell Ben Affleck Samuel L. Jackson Mitchell Venus Jane Austen
"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

02:06 min | Last month

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

07:32 min | Last month

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"Then with expressions of laughing kindness a bitty each other good night who one by one take a candle from each corner in precede separate patron chain wound sleep billion to high him across place. This heck handle down upon the windows now. It's beside a framed portrait of has sound patron. By cassandra ooh presented as again. She changes in fitting nightgown hanging had cried xaver and placing her jewelry upon the dressing table. Back to why. Trains have four post ban. Jane reveals the stunning patchwork quilt. This is the in family which increased sixty four different patterns Take me sign in diamond. shapes across. Safm jane cassandra and their mother. It was an ambitious project and it took them in age to complete it. Hit was a wife. One affect just cited now offers warm comfort and the touch his even at she slides into bed snuggling. Benny this whose equality and offering silent and food jeans mind. Scans back the day she recruits. Please cotton truly to writing and then selling charity and evening. Sharon and the taste f mathis cheesecake have body lack and how lift gratitude. She traded away into it. The peace clean A you yeah.

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

05:51 min | Last month

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"Half of the fabric and down again through the other side cheer forbade some trade in through the window putting the finishing time on this calm tranquil scene chains spend our in this fashion until the sound of has. This is approaching footsteps at the dinner. Just before four o'clock she returns to the partner sitting down beside have family to a three course and reaching deny as it has done has out if asked. Is it for chestnuts. Gnashing seconds thank meat pie with pastry. Leaves is not unlike decorate. The walls of the ponder saved with a variety of vegetables grown in the cottage garden including cauliflower flora. And sny is if cabinet laughingly pickled by matha in tangy flavor from brine era a car and potato tripping with hunt ronnie button. It's a meal so delight at conversation on pets. Tom and a wave satisfaction washes over room. A final dash is designed triumph for free and marzipan accompanied by mathes cheesecake famed within these jane jewish decay allies from belly tax chan ensuing creamy tanks. She eats intel every last crumb is gone. Take this from how wine glass then. Fantastically praised as math is scaling. The kitchen after dinner creeped retires ups tagged the family room. Jane takes place on an elegant shays known as one might expand of the family room with family. Portraits hung upon paper chain is really funder and white diagonal patterns swell nyc vine the king upon these wounds chain is taken right beloved and in the garden only this morning. She down the sense of roses as ing out of the window. Now who wounds that very she knows.

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

02:36 min | Last month

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"Austin want sand and draft his salmon it's exquisite piece fanta chat adapts. Could now glass cabinet at the app through the trailer pass tones. She can make out the tie tones. They've have fathers extensive library. James unrestricted access to these books. From whom the basis of infant and it hosts a. I did a passion for reading at would last a lifetime. She takes a see. Now has dishing dim between half fathers bureau and along bryant window looks out onto the garden carefully. She arranges hassling gone.

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

05:05 min | Last month

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"And quinn and pickens ryan today. She's working on half novel cooled mansfield. She reads and ryan and she revised and repeat occasion any pausing to thing all gays out the window writing of pleasure. Jane and activity attorney absorbing loses his own san of time and play when she puts pen to paper. She's transported faraway appearance. She is presently seated in the dining on in shorten hampshire mind however is one hundred twenty miles north in northamptonshire specifically cheese. In the grand touring grim. The fictional man's hailed pa by the shy smi found primes makes quit conversation with how rich ballot way to spend the morning and the afternoon that eventually jane has written that she can write today. Tidies pao woks page paper and panel. Way she then stands up. Stretch his oems to woods. This gives a hands that gentleman shane. She feels and accomplished and keen to move on to other piston. Thankfully today there are no pressing house calls to me may visit expected hand and not even any latin to read and respond. Day is intriguing..

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

04:35 min | Last month

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"To eight hundred by the sounds. If any conversation wandering across the stone floor of the kitchen chain is matt by the marry faces of her family and a marvelous brag. Lay down to the wooden table in the center of the room. And cassandra have already performed chains cheat on hab home and deranged if he if brands.

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

05:37 min | Last month

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"From it stem and examining it more class of. It's gone it. Flat is decorated with a pattern of tiny light. Greens sunken ever say slightly into position. Skin sake glossy. It reflects patches of sun night from bound chain hans in half finger. Ching the patents. Change with one bringing a she takes in its fruity. Send the now hesitation. She intas tsui chief see flach and then wearing an expression of contentment and mischa. She wonders on reflecting gone. Another reason behan novice at time of year the garden is thriving trees abundant with rich emerald leaves and the flowers during bloom showcasing spectrum of vibrant khanna alight popham and the d. c. Believe coon flying a stand aside the powder pink and puled white dangling snowdrop. A particular favorite have changed the antique rises. Which will become the ancestors of the roses imprecise. Cotton centuries later an displace stunning shame if cream own and crimson. She pauses by them now. Sitting down at one half favourite spots in the garden stein been surrounded by races magical chain since she's aware unique a minneapolis few patches and didn't live in the sense in in various e san and flows on the brain every so often a gust of win hits the balloon and caused his tidal wave for fragrant to share. Its place. is jane sanctuary. She could sit around. Just contemplating the beauty of these fines crisis to have shade if pastoral leanna reminiscent of anani mornings anrei climbing towards the sky on thorny stem upon the in bundles of swain connor. Kilani striking. I happen to be on the burn seeming combined father inspection seeing the chain leans in and touches like she chen please try is so that he pattern the fool moving smell the irresistibly tarim e fragrant of the chain sits upon the band gain has surroundings some time longer. They king gave the cotton in how building it in break. Cottam reef times leeming wide window frame and doing ways complete and hunt. The wounded decorated with lunch is that china's auto green in.

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

02:21 min | Last month

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"Countryside occasion any. She closed his listen to the passing. If pe- chatter of ban rustling leaves in the morning breeze nicely there xi mu tabs on taking sign if this sun trenched cotton. She admires flournoy.

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

Get Sleepy

05:28 min | Last month

"austen" Discussed on Get Sleepy

"Letting it all go away just notice the sensations in your body now as you relax more deeply into back if there's still some areas of tension continue if those graphs releasing.

"austen" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:59 min | 3 months ago

"austen" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Elizabeth..

North Korean Defector Evaluates American Education System as 'Anti-American'

The Dan Bongino Show

01:58 min | 4 months ago

North Korean Defector Evaluates American Education System as 'Anti-American'

"Korean defector. From North Korea. Kim Jong un the I mean maybe. And if you were ranking the worst people on Planet Earth easily top five Probably on the medal. Stand. Top three, maybe gold. Worse people Earth, right? She comes from North Korea. The facts comes here goes through college, and she says, This is the story orientation. This North Korean defector was scolded by a university staff member for admitting she enjoyed classic classic literature such as Jane Austen. The woman from North Korea said. I love those books. I thought it was a good thing. Then the professor center. Did you know those writers had a colonial mindset? They were Racists and bigots center subconsciously brainwashing you. It only got worse from there, as she realized that every one of her classes at the Ivy League school was infected with what she saw as anti American propaganda reminiscent of the sort she'd grown up with. This story is stunning. She's a North Korean defector from a sworn nuclear powered enemy, the United States, one of the worst human beings on planet Earth. Kim Jong UN Tubs. What is the worst guys ever? Ever. Yet she comes over here, where people starved to death by the tens of thousands. If not hundreds of thousands don't even know the nobody's bury the dead and mass graves. And she says, Yeah. You know, the North Korean school system wasn't as bad as you guys here, folks. This is stunning. As I said in the beginning when we opened up the show, and I meant it. Isn't it frightening? That attacks being promoted by foreign enemies of the United States to destroy the United States from within. Are being absorbed and used by left this within the country to do exactly that. Anti American propaganda critical race theory.

North Korea Kim Jong Ivy League School Jane Austen North Korean School United States
Biden announces creation of Defense Department China task force

News, Traffic and Weather

00:35 sec | 8 months ago

Biden announces creation of Defense Department China task force

"House says President Biden's held his first official phone call with China's President XI Earlier today, Mr Biden revealing the formation of a new task force to renew review rather the administration's posture toward China Task force for work quickly. Drawing on civilian and military experts across the department to provide within the next few months, recommendations to Senator Austen on key priorities and decision points so that we can chart a strong path forward on China related matters. The focus will be on technology, alliances, partnerships and intelligence.

President Biden Mr Biden China Task Force Senator Austen China House
"austen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:55 min | 9 months ago

"austen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"90 a M and K 259 a. J. Austen 99.7 F them getting America Vaccinated. I'm Pam who? So Fox News? That's the promise from President elect Joe Biden, who hopes to use his 1st 100 days in office to vaccinate 100 million people against the coronavirus. Here's his plan expand vaccine eligibility to people. 65 up also include frontline workers. He wants to deploy the National Guard and FEMA to help states distribute those Vaccines and also make them available in pharmacies as well as launch mobile vaccine units. But these plans on Lee work if there are more vaccines available to administer Fox is Hilary von. Beating the virus will cost money. The president elect has proposed a nearly $2 trillion relief package that Republicans worry will contain unrelated items. We can't be cutting trillion dollar tracks like they're going out of style specifically on minimum wage. What does that have to do with reopening our economy and get things going again? House Republican Tony Gonzalez of Texas proponents say raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour could raise millions of people out of poverty. Between now and the inauguration. Washington D. C is being sealed their security barriers all over the city. Here. We're seeing more security than even most D C residents are used to seeing Washingtonians are used to heighten security. This is a different kind of level with 7 21,000 National Guard troops stationed throughout the city, including some 5000 active duty troops all coming, of course, in the wake of last week's riots up on Capitol Hill, the National Park Service enacting a temporary closure of the National Mall. Boxes Mark MEREDITH around the capital fencing has been installed along with razor wire and barricades made of concrete blocks. The nation's capital isn't the only place locked down. All federal prisons went into lockdown mode at midnight. Officials say the measure is precautionary, not prompted by specific information about violence..

National Guard Joe Biden President Fox Mark MEREDITH J. Austen National Park Service National Mall Tony Gonzalez America Lee Texas FEMA Washington
"austen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:58 min | 10 months ago

"austen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And K. 259 a. J. Austen 99.7 Aftab, one for the president won against. I'm Carmen Roberts, Fox News. House sides with President Trump and votes to increase stimulus checks to $2000 on this vote. The yays are 275. The nays are 134. But household makers also voted against the president to override his veto of the defense spending and policy bill on this vote, the E A. C 322. And they saw 87. Both measures move on to the Senate, where the fate of at least one of them is in question. The one for covert relief on Lee 44. Republicans supported the president's plan. Many worried about the price tag. This proposal cost $463 billion, according to the Joint Committee on Taxation. One Republican told me their anger is incandescent at the present tonight Boxes Chad program. The increase on covert relief may not even make it to the floor in the Senate. While the override on the defense bill is likely to get a Senate vote Wednesday, California is expected to extend its strict stay at home orders Tuesday or areas where hospitals are running out of ICU beds. This comes ahead of what's likely to be a post holiday. Covitz surge with more virus case is expected to come in the next few weeks after Christmas and New Year's travelers return home boxes, Jeff Man also the Corona virus has killed more than 24,000 people in California and nearly 335. 1000 nationwide and our record day on Wall Street, all around with the three major benchmark index is closing at record highs after President Trump signed the spending bill this weekend, averting a government shutdown. The delle Rose 204 points to close at 30,004 03, the NASDAQ posting its 55th the record close of the year. America's listening the Fox News.

president President Trump Senate Fox News Lee Carmen Roberts California J. Austen delle Rose Joint Committee on Taxation America Jeff Man
"austen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:59 min | 10 months ago

"austen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"M. Austin 5 90 A, M and K. 259 a. J. Austen 99.7 f them to a rather large explosion near Nashville's River. One. Witness reports say there are damaged buildings and that evacuations are underway. No word yet on injuries or what truly might have caused it at the Vatican this morning, I leave a note on among the appropriate parties, Francis gave his or be it. Orbi blessing for Christmas Day is for the tradition, but not as per the tradition he gave it from indoors. With just 100 congregants present, the pontiff would normally greet thousands from his balcony of ST Peter's The Cove it pandemic rules won't allow that Both Francis message this year focused on the pandemic and the need for people to recognize each other's difficulties. The giant spending bill passed by Congress, which includes coronavirus relief payments is still in limbo. It's unclear President Trump will sign legislation providing $900 billion in Corona virus relief at $1.4 Trillion in full government funding. Perhaps the only missed a quiz believing the president and secretary Mnuchin when we were told The bill we passed would be signed by the president. United States House Democratic leader stay. Hoyer's This provision took months to negotiate in a bipartisan manner and with White House input. President Trump is now demanding Congress increase stimulus checks from $600 to $2000. The president also wants foreign aid reevaluated, but Republican Senator Roy Blunt's is the $2000 payments will not be approved in the Senate and re opening the funding bill threatens a government shutdown boxes. Jared Helper and reporting from Washington. The president is spending his Christmas holiday with his family at their residents of the Mar a Lago Club. In Palm Beach, Florida He has already tweeted. Merry Christmas. America's listening to Fox News. Jeep Big finish event is here and.

president President Trump Congress Senator Roy Blunt Jared Helper Francis United States House Nashville J. Austen M. Austin Fox News Hoyer Peter White House America Florida Palm Beach Lago Club
Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

Short Wave

10:06 min | 10 months ago

Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

"Jeff. i have a lot of questions about antimatter. But can you just start with regular mater. What is that. Yeah so a refresher for who don't remember regular matters abroad category for everything. So you're matter i'm matter. The studios matter the microphones. Yeah i get it matter and we matter. It's a nice thought. Yeah and as matter were all made of atoms. So you're bunch of adamson the shape of an emily corn. And i'm tabatha the shape of a jeff brumfield now for antimatter. I'm actually going to let another jeffrey. Who knows a lot more. Physics denied to answer this one. His name is jeffrey hengst. And he's a researcher at our house university in denmark. And to i. I think of it as kind of an evil twin of the stuff that makes up our everyday world intriguing. Go on it is it is. It's just this kind of opposite matter. It's like this muir to everything that's around us so antimatter. It's here right now yet. I mean it's a little more complicated than that but anti matters real stuff and it exists in our universe and actually before anyone ever even detected it. They predicted it because math. The equations of physics demanded in fact it was discovered that way by coming up with an equation that predicted his existence. Nobody was really looking for it. And i am not going to attempt to describe the fundamental equations of physics on this podcast. Because i don't really understand them But hank says the closest analogy. He's got for us mortals to think about. Is this math problem. What's the square root of four two very but there's a second solution negative to allocate right because negative negative to is four so the way you just went straight to two. That's exactly kind of what happened in physics like there were these equations and there was a positive set of solutions for particles and negative said and everyone was like the negative set. What does that even mean. That's nonsense but it turned out there. Worthies negative particles. They did exist in. They're called antimatter. Oh okay so there's this theoretical idea of antimatter kicking around for awhile. Which kind of explains what it is. But what is it exactly. Here's the thing it really is like opposite matter. Protons remember protons. Yeah their positively charged subatomic particles. They are anti. Protons are negatively charged electrons their negatively charged and their anti particles are positively charged. This is kind of amazing. It is kind of amazing. And here's the best part. It actually lives up to the sci-fi analogy so just go with your sifi brain and i get it emily. You're more of like colin firth. Pride and prejudice bbc. You know no shame in it. There isn't there isn't i've seen it probably more times than you have in my life. But what do you think happens when matter and antimatter Get together when they actually meet okay. If anti matters the evil twin the fight they do will. They do like in a jane austen novel. They do. Well you're not too far off. I'm going to let the actual experts explain it to you. And i have a tendency to cancel each other out a minute. Where's this under. Certain conditions when to identify articles of matter. Antimatter meet these. Are your experts. Jeff captain kirk and is that leonard nimoy as relationship. Yes total complete absolute annihilation. Spock it is. That's right and you're right. That's star trek season. One episode twenty-seven original track the best track. But here's the thing eveline. It's actually a hundred percent accurate or pretty close so the universe won't end if antimatter and matter meat. But the two particles do disappear in a flash of light. The anti-matter can't exist in the presence of matter. The science fiction stuff comes in these things really do annihilate each other if you get together okay. So i've covered a lot of physics over the years and this is pretty much the only case where the sci-fi and the reality match although i will say annihilation is actually a lot less sexy in real life it's really Just annoying to have to deal with something that you have to make that the universe is trying to destroy and every every every turning point be an antimatter physicist it it is. I mean he's literally been doing this since the ninety s and like he does get a little frustrated. All right you said earlier that antimatter. It's here in this universe but this universe is full of matter and i don't see any antimatter lurking around. So where is it if it's existing theory but it's hard to find in reality. I don't get this you know who else doesn't get it. Every physicist on earth this is one of the fundamental questions the equation say there should be as much antimatter matter but in practice. Antimatter is actually super hard. To find and hank says nobody knows why there aren't any good ideas about this. I mean physicists. Do see little bits of antimatter here. and there. In fact anti electrons for i discovered in cosmic rays coming from deep space way back in the nineteen thirties. And actually i've got another natural source of antimatter right here in the studio emily in this room. Yes ready yes this banana. What are you talking about this real episode. This is an episode about nothing and tomfoolery. Hold the banana to make sure it's real. I'll explain yes okay so obviously. The banana is not anti matter. But here's the thing about bananas. Bananas are full of potassium. Which is really good for you. But there's also a radioactive isotope potassium into banana called potassium forty. This is a naturally occurring. isotope So some porsche. The potassium in the banana is potassium. Forty now here's the thing. Potassium forty when it decays releases an electron but very very very very rarely it releases an anti electron. So if we just hold this banana and wait for for. How long are we waiting. Okay we'd have to seventy five minutes. We're at ten minute podcast. Geoff just sit here for seventy five minute. What i'm hearing is seven part series on antimatter. Emily kwan and a meditation silence. That's right no so. On average this entire banana will spit out. One anti-electron every seventy five minutes. I think this really makes the point. Well right like antimatter exists. It's not some parallel universe but one tiny anti trump for trillions of banana adams is like even. That's a pretty rare thing to have. Happened and jeffrey wants a lot more than that. That's why he's at this giant particle accelerator cernan switzerland. Okay so tell me what. He's up to their well. Hanks wants lots of anti electrons. And in this is key anti protons. Hey so it turns out the anti electrons are kind of easy. You can find other radioactive sources Besides bananas that can make a lot more of them and then the elevator makes anti protons. And here's the thing so you have to very carefully hang us to bring the anti protons in the anti electrons together we call it s- merge it's a smooz merge merge but even after that merge they still end up with a lot of antimatter just disappearing. Thirty million anti protons. That's converted two hundred thousand or so trapped. Anti protons of those will get twenty or thirty that actually make anti hyphen that we can use well. Willow anti-hydrogen is that what i just heard. Jeff what is that. Anti-hydrogen is just one anti electron orbiting one anti protons and it's the antimatter. Equivalent of the lightest element on earth. So that's regular hydrogen willing to go to all this trouble just to get a few atoms of anti-hydrogen but why go through all the trouble you know of making andy hydrogen okay. So here's the thing. He's hoping to get some clues from anti-hydrogen about matter antimatter and the thinking goes like this. Hydrogen is the lightest element in the universe and hydrogen is probably the thing we know best. We've been studying it forever. We really understand it. So by looking very very carefully at anti-hydrogen. He's hoping that they can learn more about what's going on with antimatter. And that's basically what he's doing he's using lasers all kinds of stuff to probe this anti-hydrogen to see how it behaves. Well has shed any light on where the rest of the antimatter is. Not yet not yet. And so far. Anti-hydrogen is behaving exactly as predicted by all those fundamental physics equations. And so far with the places that we've looked and to the precision with which we've looked they're the same and that's kind of a problem because they also say there should be much matters antimatter unless they can find some sort of deviation it may not be possible to figure out you know where the antimatter went. So we don't have any clues but that's okay because he's just

Jeff Brumfield Jeffrey Hengst House University Jeff Captain Kirk Tabatha Hank Adamson Jeffrey Colin Firth Denmark Eveline Leonard Nimoy Jeff Jane Austen Emily Kwan Spock Emily Banana Adams BBC
As Texas schools reopen, little is normal for students

Todd and Don

01:20 min | 11 months ago

As Texas schools reopen, little is normal for students

"Across central Texas. They returned to campus starting today to take their end of the year course assessments. You know, the state of Texas assessment of academic readiness that's called Star Test. The Texas Education Agency is requiring students return to campus for this test, and for many, this will be the first time they've been on campus since virtual learning took over earlier this year. Because of this pandemic. Now on each campus, one of the area's largest district's Austen inhabited school district will have AH, covert 19 guidelines in place. You no longer have to say that we know that that's just the mainstay. Very similar story up in Georgetown. I SD Yeah, the Georgetown I SD representives, according to KFC, and said that the plan is to spread Off the students at each campus to ensure safety. They have nearly 900 tested minute to to administer the GSD. Officials say One students may have to test in various courses for English example in algebra, and that would what would account for to test the GSD parents said that was initially concerned about the on campus requirement for his 10th grader who was, you know has to take that star test today because his wife is battling lung cancer. However, he remains hopeful that everything will be safe. Here's a quote tells cakes again. I'm confident school is taking precautions. My daughter will wear her mask a face shield in hand sanitizer. I'm not worried.

Texas Texas Education Agency Georgetown GSD KFC Lung Cancer
Biden to nominate Lloyd Austin as defense secretary

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

00:19 sec | 11 months ago

Biden to nominate Lloyd Austin as defense secretary

"View view On On Daybreak, Daybreak, at at the the President President Olympics. Olympics. elect elect How How many many times times Joe Joe Biden Biden can can I I is is say say ready ready break? break? to name another nominee. Breaking Biden will nominate his wish. retired TV four also star Army on 93, General Lloyd w J. Y VC Austen Mobile to News be secretary and of defense Indiana's only is confirmed statewide by the Senate. TV news Austin network. would be the first black That united Pentagon chief. Concordia Dental. Also We retired bring a personal from the Army approach and to 2016, our seven dental which plans. means he would That's require why comprehensive a congressional dental waiver coverage to starts take the with job. you

Biden Olympics General Lloyd W J. Y Vc Austen Joe Joe Daybreak Indiana Senate Pentagon Army
Biden to nominate Lloyd Austin as defense secretary

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:40 sec | 11 months ago

Biden to nominate Lloyd Austin as defense secretary

"Elect Joe Biden is expected to nominate retired four star Army General Lloyd J. Austen to be secretary of defense. Retired Army Colonel Jeff McCausland says Austin could have trouble getting confirmed off is likely to face opposition from some in Congress. And the defense establishment more broadly during his confirmation hearings. Many believe it. Clear line should be drawn between civilian and military leadership in the Pentagon. This is viewed by some as a matter of civil military relations and a bedrock of the democracy. If confirmed, Austin would be the first black Pentagon chief.

Army General Lloyd J. Austen Jeff Mccausland Joe Biden Austin Army Congress Pentagon
Biden to nominate Lloyd Austin as defense secretary

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:17 sec | 11 months ago

Biden to nominate Lloyd Austin as defense secretary

"Elect Joe Biden will nominate retired four star Army General Lloyd J. Austen to be secretary of defense. That's according to The Associated Press. If confirmed by the Senate, Austin would be the first black Pentagon chief.

Army General Lloyd J. Austen Joe Biden The Associated Press Senate Austin Pentagon
Nick Monroe on his passion for working the hardest

The Tennis.com Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Nick Monroe on his passion for working the hardest

"Hello everyone welcome to another episode of the tennis. Dot com podcast. I'm one of your hosts nina pantic. I'll be joined by irena falconi as usual. Our special guest is doubles. Pro nick monroe. He's currently ranked inside. The top hundred in doubles has been as high as number two hundred fifty three in singles and number thirty doubles. He recently reached the quarterfinals of the french. Open with tommy paul. And he's probably one of the most motivated guys on tour. The bodies having a passion for the game in our interview with him he shares what keeps him going and it's really really impressive. He tells us what's been the hardest part of twenty twenty. What cova testing is like all. The different tournament bubbles that he's been a part of why he's been teaming up with singles players so much lately including frances tiafoe at the upcoming australian open and he shed some insight into what it's like working with his father from a very young age and even now after twenty years on the atp tour and he also tells us why austin is such a good home base for him. He's become one of the newest faces on tennis john alive and doing some commentary. We ask him all about that experience. Let's get into our interview with nick. Monroe all right nick. Monroe welcome to the podcast. How you doing great. Thanks for having me tell us where you are you back home with where we're in the world are you. Yes i'm in austin texas right now. discuss back a few days ago from europe so i spent almost two months over there. playing the french open alone and antwerp so few events over there and and so yeah just happy back home but i feel like it's been awhile since i've been back home but but it feels good to be able to play tennis again but now back home and enjoying that side of it. Are you shutting it down for the year you done. Yes shutting down for the year. I think there's only a couple more tournaments left on the calendar. Atp wise in a few challenges but we Were having to go to australia. Kinda mid december like december fifteen. Sixty something like that suspended down for the year and then and then gear up for heading over there was for you the hardest part of the shutdown and where did you spend not period. What ours far. The shutdown was just not having any idea. When we're gonna play again you know and just kind of trying to figure out schedules and you know. Should i practice this week or next week or you know what kind of preseason should i have leading into whatever. The events might be But i spent my entire time in austin. Texas home base Might you're at my wife. My dad lives here. My brothers use a lotta a lotta time And yeah i mean it was actually. A joke is is a longest time that i've spent in austin in ten years. I've been here ten years the longest you know few months. I was here back to back. Which norma down for a few weeks a month or something but you know to be here for two and a half months was fun you know. I got to see a different side of austin. I got see the hot side of austin. I never really been here. Got it in the beginning of summer. He's it's hot here. You know people are like yeah. Living for ten years. I was like i never. I never knew the side of austin so this is new yaser. Yeah this is normal. Wasn't normal for me so he asked the great. It's been great. I mean you just have to kind of just roll with the punches and take the positive out of family's not a bad thing. Yeah no hanging with family was great and again it was just. It was more decided. Like oh wait when training. Or what do i start doing you know and just not having an something to work for but but then once we on a new term coming back in a certain date that yeah we get back it knowing you though you probably never stopped working out yeah. I didn't really stop working in the gym. I love that side of it. I love this kind of trying. Stay as fit as i can be. Try to be the best athlete that i can be. Which winston can help on a tennis court whenever you start actually hitting balls so it shows where creepy where a lot of players that we talked to your base in florida and california. Tell me why austen what drew there. You know what i moved here. Ten years ago there was a coach. Grant doyle who worked the same query and ryanair said Back in a day so coach grant who i knew from a long time ago. So he was he was here and so ten years ago. I wanted to work with him. my best friend from college jeff boyd weights on his way to carolina was living here. So kinda worked out. I was like all right. I'll work with gran. If my buddy jeff and i'll just kind of dry i was doing and and yeah so it really worked out fell in love with the city You know and brain actually left after few years by the city stayed here ever since so and the next thing you know. My brother moved here about four years ago. My dad was here a couple of years ago and my mom lives in dallas. So everyone's kind of close by that's really cool. So who do you ain't with now. So now i mean my dad. So my dad coach we from years old So yeah so. I'm i'm working with 'em and and then A lot of beauty players are close by in downtown austin so ut is just the two minute drive away. So i hit with a lot of the guys there in an initial local as with. But it's very. I mean it's great training base. I work with land sutin. Who worked with. Andy roddick on the Business side of things so career so lance my fitness trainer. He works major league. Baseball guys will have a good team here. in just yeah i mean i just really enjoyed austin very laid back and It's a great spot to be.

Austin Tennis Nina Pantic Irena Falconi Nick Monroe Tommy Paul Frances Tiafoe Monroe Nick Antwerp Grant Doyle Norma Texas Europe John Jeff Boyd Australia Winston
Tesla picks Austin for its next US factory to build Cybertruck, Semi truck, Model Y

Jim Bohannon

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Tesla picks Austin for its next US factory to build Cybertruck, Semi truck, Model Y

"Tesla has decided the Austin area is where it wants to build its largest auto assembly plant is going to put it on a 21 100 acre tract in Travis County, and we'll get more than $60 million in tax breaks to do so. In turn, the plant will employ at least 5000 workers. Tesla's plan is to use the Austen plant to build its cyber cyber truck truck pickup. pickup. Tesla Tesla doesn't doesn't have have a a lot lot of of time. time. The The company company says says on on its its website website that that the the cyber cyber truck truck will will be be for for sale sale starting starting late late next next year. year.

Tesla Travis County Austin Austen
Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

VINTAGE Podcast

08:39 min | 1 year ago

Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

"First into younger share with you is mark had author of the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime most recently the porpoise. He's talking about book. We published that. He contributed to stop what you're doing and read this. Which is an excellent but by the way is one of the books already as go as a bookseller in one of the books that made me want to really work vintage books and he talks about how he believes in the power of a good novel. A term he defines as a piece of work is humane and generous. I particularly found comfort in his description of reading as a compensation a reader and a writer sitting opposite each other. In each other's company I can write plays and films and even poems in which some of the characters are genuinely unsympathetic for which you and the reader feel no empathy partly because those forms are spectacle to a certain extent. You you can sit back and watch it from a distance but I think all novels A conversation I I tend to picture a novel as you. The writer and the reader sitting in adjacent chairs talking quietly to each other. You know a novel is never declaimed or acted out or overheard. It's it spoken quietly to the reader and of course a really long conversation and to make the long conversation work you've really got to you with a like the narrator. You're gonNA like the person who's talking to you. They can be taught or scathing satirical. But they've got to have an underlying warm both towards you and and towards the people they're talking about and I think you can see that. All great writers and Dickens in Jane Austen George Eliot in Tolstoy and in fact in Warren Pace. You can see where it doesn't work because when he does start declaim in those separate chapters about his theory of history he can lose you completely and it's one of the great novels in the world where no one reached the last chapter. Because he's just telling you stuff you don't really want to know. I think this is particularly true of Virginia Wolfe It's not just her warmth than her interest in the people she's talking about but the speed the ease with which she seems to flow in and out of different people's minds in and out of different consciousnesses in a very short period of time often around dining table in and out of the minds of people talking with with one another and I think the way in which she does. That makes you very aware of something about your own mind personally. I'm always reading Virginia Woolf and thinking Yes yes yes that's what it's actually like to be a human being not just that stream of consciousness stuff which she does so well the way you flick from memories of Childhood Your plans for dinner to the fear of death all within thirty seconds the way we move from sense of loneliness sudden empathy with people around us the way we feel sort of sealed in one moment and then suddenly we dissolve and we realized that we members of a group of people or we members of a family and a part of verse exists within all those other people in the room at the same time the way we move from our past to our future back into our president. I think there are other right to have a wide range of characters and a wide range of situations. By doting. There is anyone who understands articulates what it is like to be a person from one moment to the next so the other interview. I found interesting was one. The Margaret Atwood gave on stage all those years ago when she'd written novel taxied. If you don't know already exceed is retelling of Shakespeare's tempest in the interview. Margaret Talks about the theme of exile in tempest. And how she explores to have writing the contrast between freedom. I'm confinement. I know a lot of us feel like we're in a very strange very necessary. Exile from our normal lives in big. I'm small ways so I hope like me find this interview. Refreshing or at least a little comforting. Let me start by asking about the genesis of high exceed. Of course it's part of the hogarth Shakespeare series but why the tempest yes. Why the tempest Luckily I was early on the list of people who are asked so I got I got my druthers and that was my brother because I had thought about it quite a bit before. It even written about Prospero before in my book on writing which is called oddly. Enough a writer on writing it used to be called negotiating with the dead but I think the day word was a bridge too far for some people in the publishing industry. They don't like the D. Word. No no not always coming to say it does what it says on the tin it. Does I think what it says on the tin. So it's not about my writing and it's not about how to write about. Who are these writers? What do they think they're doing? And how are they different from other kinds of artists and The chapter in which Prospero of here's is a chapter on diabetes. Magicians because of course writers are dubious. Magicians they create illusions and are those illusions always benevolent. So that's what I what I was writing about in that book and one of the other ones in that chapter is the wizard of Oz. Who has he says is A good man but a bad magician he has no real magic. He's an illusionist. So what you need to ask about any writer probably is. Are they a good man but a bad magician or have bad man but a good magician? Which is often also true or possibly. They're good at both but Prospero in the tempest is very ambiguous. And therefore the he's been open to many different kinds of interpretations. It's also play with a lot of unanswered questions. And it is the one play above all in which Shakespeare is writing a play about what he actually did all his life. He's writing play about a director producer. Putting on a play with the aid of a very good special effects man called aerial. So that is what happens in the book and a director producer puts on a play by means of which he hopes to get revenge on the people who have done him dirt twelve years before them. Light on the setting. Because it's one thing. It seems to me to consider prosper on his magic in an essay. It's another to construct a whole story which you could read perfectly plausibly. I think without even knowing that the tempest existed I think it helps to know that the tempest exists and by the end of it. You're certainly going to know that the tempest exists. Because what they're putting are isn't is the tempest. So how did I come to all of that? The epilogue has always been very intriguing to me which Prospero's steps out of the play addresses the audience. But he's still prospero. He's not saying hello. I'm an actor playing Prospero. He is still prospero and that play is about guilt and forget and forgiveness and and and liberation because the last three words of it are set me free. But it's a bit puzzling in the epilogue of what is Prospero guilty. Why does he feel guilty? And from what is he being freed now that he's outside his own play

Prospero Writer Shakespeare Margaret Atwood Virginia Mark Virginia Woolf Margaret Talks Diabetes Warren Pace Director President Trump Dickens Jane Austen George Eliot Producer Tolstoy
Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

Short Wave

07:44 min | 1 year ago

Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

"Antimatter. I'm so excited to talk to you about antimatter and emily. I know exactly what you're thinking. Anti-matter pods are rigged to blow up the moment we star Trek Right. I mean antivirus. A huge part of Star Trek. All right I know. The Vulcan Salute. Live long and prosper. That's about the extent of my knowledge of Star Trek. But I get your point. Antimatter does kind of sound like science fiction. But it's Real. That's the cool thing. Yes antimatter particles. Are these strange mirror particles to the stuff we see all around us and scientists have made it using a giant particle accelerator in Europe. They're studying it because they hope it can answer some fundamental questions about the universe. Okay not entirely sure I get it but by the end of the episode I assume we all will so today on the show anti-battery what it is how it works and why one scientist has spent decades trying to trap it. Jeff. I have a lot of questions about antimatter. But can you just start with regular matter? What is that? Yeah so a Refresher Viseu. Don't remember regular matter. It's a broad category for everything. So you're madder I matter the studios matter the I I get it matter matter matter. It's a nice thought. Yeah and as matter. We're all made of atoms. So you're a bunch of Adamson the shape of an emily corn on the shape of a Jeff Brumfield now for antimatter. I'm actually going to let another Jeffrey. Who knows a lot more physics? Naidoo answer this one. His name is Jeffrey Angst. And he's a researcher at our House University in Denmark and to Madeira. I think it is kind of an evil twin of the stuff that makes up our everyday world intriguing. Go on it is it is. It's just this kind of opposite matter. It's like this mirror to everything that's around us so antimatter. It's here right now. Yeah I mean it's a little more complicated than that but anti matters real stuff and it exists in our universe and actually before anyone ever even detected it. They predicted it because math. The equations of physics demanded in fact was discovered that way. You know by coming up with a an equation that predicted existence. But nobody was really looking forward and I am not going to attempt to describe the fundamental equations physics on this podcast because I don't really understand them But Hank says the closest analogy. He's got for US mortals to think about. Is this math problem. What's the square root of four two very good? But there's a second solution negative to Aoki because negative negative to four so the way you just went straight to. That's exactly kind of what happened in physics like there were these equations and there was a positive set of solutions for particles and negative side and everyone was like the negative set. What does that even mean? That's nonsense but it turned out there. Were these negative particles. They did exist and they're called antimatter. Oh okay so there's this theoretical idea of antimatter kicking around for awhile. Which kind of explains what it is. But what is it exactly? Here's the thing. It really is opposite matters. So protons do you remember protons. Yeah their positively charged subatomic particles. They are anti. Protons are negatively charged electrons their charged and their anti particles are positively charged. Hey this is kind of amazing. It is kind of amazing. And here's the best part actually lives up to the SCIFI analogy. So just go with your vestigial Sifi brain and I get it emily. You're more of like Colin Firth. Pride and prejudice. Bbc D. You know no shame in it. There isn't there isn't I've seen it probably more times than you have in my life but what do you think happens when matter? Antimatter get when they actually meet okay. If antimatter is the evil twin they fight they dual. They do lake in Jane austen novel. They do well. You're not too far off. I'm going to let the actual experts explain it to you. My her Antimatter tendency to. Cancel each other out. Where's this under certain conditions when to identify articles of matter? Antimatter meet these experts. Jeff Captain Kirk and is that Leonard Nimoy as relationship. Yes total complete absolute annihilation as stock. It is that's right and you're right that Star Trek season one episode twenty seven original track the best track. But here's the thing heavily. It's actually a hundred percent accurate or close. The Universe won't end if antimatter and matter meat. But the two particles disappear in a flash of light. The anti-matter can't exist in the presence of matter. That's where the science fiction stuff comes in. These things really do annihilate each other if you get them together okay. So I've covered a lot of physics over the years and this is pretty much the only case where the sci-fi and the reality match although I will say annihilation is actually a lot less sexy in real life. It's really just annoying to have to deal with something that you have to make and that the universe is trying to destroy and every every every turning point that's hard to be an antimatter physicist I it is. I mean he's literally been doing this since the ninety s and like he does get a little frustrated. All right you said earlier that antimatter. It's here in this universe but this universe is full of matter. I don't see any antimatter lurking around. So where is it if it's exists in theory but it's hard to find in reality. I don't get this you know who else doesn't get it. Every physicist on earth like this is one of the fundamental questions the equation say there should be as much anti matters. There's matter but in practice. Antimatter is actually super hard to find and Hank says nobody knows why there aren't any good ideas about this. I mean physicist. Ducey little. Bits of antimatter here and there. In fact anti electrons I discovered in cosmic rays coming from deep space way back in the nineteen thirties. And actually I've got another natural source of antimatter. Right here in the studio emily in this room. Yes ready yes. Data this banana. What are you talking about? Is this a real episode? This is an episode. About nothing and Tomfoolery. Mom Can I hold the banana to make sure it's real Alex Lane? Yes okay so obviously. The banana is not anti. It's it's matter but here's the thing about bananas. Bananas are full of Potassium. Which is really good for you. But there's also a radioactive isotope of potassium into banana. Call Potassium forty. This is a naturally occurring isotope So some Porsche. The potassium in the banana is potassium. Forty now here's the thing. Potassium forty when it decays eight usually releases an electron but very very very very rarely it releases and anti-electron so if we just hold this banana

Physicist Hank Jeffrey Angst Europe Colin Firth Jeff Jane Austen Jeff Brumfield Naidoo Scientist Aoki Adamson Alex Lane Jeff Captain Kirk United States Porsche Madeira Researcher BBC
Anya Taylor-Joy, 'Emma'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

08:45 min | 1 year ago

Anya Taylor-Joy, 'Emma'

"Then go see Emma which is Jane austen and which stars my guest today on Youtube or joint so welcome. Thank you for having me. It's great when I was an English major in school and we studied Jane Austen. Those of us that loved her. We called ourselves Jane Nights. We really thought wow. She just knows what's going on but Jane austen herself said about Emma. Maybe I'm the only one that actually is going to like her. Yeah so that didn't scare. You did it no. It was the reason I wanted to do. Yeah I sat down with director and I just said there's this quote from Jane Austen's Emma and I only want to do this role if I'm allowed to really stick to that because there'd been this thing about female characters being made very likeable and very easy to like and the thing that I found miss delicious about was I wanted. The audience in watching her journey have moments where they wanted to leap into the screen and shake her because she's being such a broad and you know roll their eyes at her doing something and misled but also when you finally get to her redemption and when she starts learning that people are not toys. I wanted them to really feel something for her. Because no human being is black or white. They're all these different shades of gray and That's that's what I wanted for my m well when you said that I started to feel all these different shades feeling good. It's good to have different well a lot of times and it happens from television. You're basically told that somebody's good or bad. And when we first meet in La we see her as this matchmaker manipulator. My friends should only be with people. I think are suitable when you read desk because this interpretation is as Jane Austen wrote it. It's set in the eighteen. Ten fifteen eighteen fifteen and and yet what does it say to a modern audience right now? I think Jane austen is a brilliant satirist and she has created in her dissection of this small town situation which very easily lends itself to high school. A working office. That's why clueless was so successful and something that I really love is people are people no matter where you go and no matter what censure year in the rules change but the human heart and the human emotions they stay the same and so in our version of Emma. We wanted to show everybody that these are flesh and blood human beings that are hot messes. Ninety-nine percent of the time and despite the fact that there will corseted and looking beautiful and have you know their little ridicules and stuff. They're still really upset. That they didn't tell the guy that they liked at the end of the ball that they liked them. And now it's all going to get messed up and my friend likes. Oh my goodness oh drama. That's happening now. It will never really go out of style. So it's it is the same in many ways except for the wardrobes. Yes it's the rules. There are very specific rules and it was important for us to adhere to them very strictly. So that whenever we did deviate from the rules it was a moment. So for instance. You just didn't really touch people back bet and like sometimes you held hands like that but it wasn't really a done thing and so when you have a bull seen between Emma and Mr Knightley in their hands squeeze second longer. You're like God. Someone can open a window Jane austen. It's revolutionary yeah. What's happened in terms of those little gestures and it was strange too because talk a little about your director and writer in this movie. The women are kind of the prime movers behind this version of him. Yes absolutely and you could really feel that onset. Eleanor Casson Who adapted the screenplay? He's just so funny and so wonderful because there were moments that we were playing one of the scenes in something didn't quite work out and we wanted to add live but then she would be the ad-lib translator in Austin. If that makes sense you'd run up to Elinor and be like I want to say this and she'd go okay and much like that's the Austin a speech a bit and awesome was just. She was so into everything that we were doing. And she's a real romantic at heart and so all of these scenes if you've done a really good. Seeing awesome would be crying like sheer joy tears becoming on their face and that is an actor as a wonderful thing to witness. Because you're like I did a good job. That was good but for for autumn. You're that's the first time that she directed a feature film the photographer video director. What was that like? Did you feel comfortable completely? I've worked with a lot of first time filmmakers and I never approached them any differently to say you know I might Shamlan. Who's made so many different films with each person is unique and has their own unique way of working something? I did really love about awesome. Though is I think a great skill you can have as director is not being afraid to say. I don't know and allowing the Group of people that you've you know to come together and help fix the problem and awesome brilliant adopt. Because she'd have this whole big great sweeping idea and then scheduling why. She turned me and go. What do I do? I don't know what to do in this situation. I was like okay. Yeah I guess I do know what to do and then we can. You know you could problem solve together. I think the lack of ego in that aspect is a really wonderful thing for directed to have your because you could take the opposite tack if that. Yeah I do what? I don't know what I'm doing now but you think I'm trying to think the first thing I saw was the which which was this amazing movie and again for Robert Eggers. It's the it's the first time but what's going on in that movie. It's so beautiful. Well Black Phillip. The goat no and the looks that you're doing. How have you changed now in all these years? What is it three or four? What we you like that first day on the set the witch as opposed to how you are now when you do not. That much has changed in terms of childlike wonderment. I love making films and I love being around people who make films and so anytime. I'm not in front of the camera. I'm like hanging out with sound guys go. How are you doing this? What does this button do? And oh can I push the Dalai on this next shot or something like that? I still get really excited about it. it's my Disneyland. It's where I want to be. I better at understanding how taxing the workers and especially lost year. I Made Emma. I had a day off at rights movie. I had a day off. And then I did a limited series for net flicks and that finished December twenty third five minutes. You starting something in March. I learned how to not pace myself. Because I'm not exactly pacing myself and I've learned how to take care of my own inner environment in a different way because if you're consistently just hemorrhaging out emotions for people and and building all of these worlds. There has to be some things that you take with you from each project in order to make sure that you yourself are safe. Well what can you take books? You buy read a lot of books handles. I spend as much time with animals as I possibly can. I love my friend. Philip I wanted Black Phillip I don't want to know where he is right now. I've been a vegetarian since I was eight. So I haven't ingested him so that makes me feel but If I if I could have pet that I could travel around with. I would love that but Spending lots of time in my own head writing music writing poetry just feeding myself or feasting on art that that gets me going. I don't know when you have the time to do all that you're doing because a lot of times you're living with that character and you don't want to get out of that character's at Yeah. I mean at the beginning so I always used to read a lot and then when I first started acting I found it hard to read and then in this lost year because I was jumping from Amazon head to my characters. Sandy's head an inhabitant of these different worlds reading a book was actually the only way that I could get people to not touch

Jane Austen Emma Director Jane Nights Youtube Austin Eleanor Casson LA Philip I Elinor Amazon Sandy Robert Eggers Dalai Mr Knightley Writer
A History of Seduction

The Book Review

15:04 min | 1 year ago

A History of Seduction

"Clement. Knox joins US now from London. His new book is called Seduction History from the enlightenment to the present Clement. Thanks for being here so your day job. I want to start there. Because you have a book oriented day job you work as a nonfiction buyer at waterstones which is of course a major British bookstore teen. What's your job like there? What do you do so their tour of managing nonfiction and about two hundred and eighty stores? My job really is just to get the the right books and the right stores. I'm responsible for history philosophy politics Papa. Johns I mean about nine categories overall and so. We do a lot with the publishers booksellers as well. Did you get to pick which categories you're responsible for? No when I got the job I was just assigned and then they'll kind of a reshuffle if he has got a few more categories as well they kind of work perfectly because it more or less alliance with what I'm interested in reading and what I'm interested in writing see you're deciding which books go into waterstone's the chain into which stores and how many copies are ordered exactly that to you. So that's a very powerful position. It's very structured is a very fair how we how we do it and is a constant communication publishers stores and sometimes even the authors as well we very even-handed brushing away and there's no kind of mysterious. What would probably shooter who understand. What's your typical day? Like a lot of meetings a lot of looking at science because a lot of reading of publicity plans and back and forth people. He wants us to buy their. Berko by book or by even more so. Are you living months ahead of time looking at? What are the books coming out this fall? Oh Oh yeah. We're tasked with trying to look as far as possible. So wig about to start. Looking at the timber Tiber November on average would normally thinking three months ahead of the east. And what happened with your book? The decider like we're going to order a hundred thousand copies of seduction. Yeah I I wish it was it by my boss has taken over that completely and utterly redeem. Oh look thing I try and pretend you know having to stay in a total of ignorance about one's own buck. I agree. Yeah but let's talk. Let's talk about your book. This may seem like perhaps a silly question but let's define seduction exactly. How is it action separate from courtship? How is it different from something? Maybe more creepy and less mutual like sexual harassment. Like what is seduction? I think the crucial aspect is selection. It's psychological and fumes kind of like confrontation between the minds and the passion of two different individuals in English law. That was a whole body of law do seduction discussing in some detail and wish would later it was. It came to America with with the mayflower that was developed in an extraordinary way and in those laws there was a distinction made between between rape which is obviously a What is coercive violent and seduction was seen as distinct from rape and she assumed that consent had been obtained that consent was in some way vitiated or somehow degraded by the techniques by which it was one so seduction carry that burden. That somehow someone's being over and perhaps the method used to win them over the Underhand but that's only one definition. There's a whole other definition which would say you know. It's just about courtship and game playing and it's fun and this is dawn which is dawn sexual freedom. Did you focus on that fun? Dance in this book or did you cover the full gamut the way the book is kind of structured is the. There's like a dialectic. Going on and one half of the history of seduction is about people worrying about sexual freedom worrying about things going wrong about the collision desire empower the capacity for abuse and wrongdoing. That is one of the history and the other half is about sexual freedom being this exciting enjoyable thing which which is buried lighthearted and people Is The insurance of the church. Will the government so the book kind of structured around the kind of dichotomy and not conflict between our two years of war sexual freedom is and what that means deduction your subtitle is history from the enlightenment the presidency? You're focusing mostly on the modern era. But let's start just briefly with that premodern era talk about what our earliest ideas of seduction were. Maybe perhaps grounded in with Allah G. And then how that changed as you moved into the Judeo Christian era the reason I start in the enlightenment. There's no because seduction didn't exist before seventeen hundred is because that's when seduction narrative as we understand it was born and the book is about this very powerful strange and modern thing seduction narrative which was basically invented in the eighteen th century and the product of a response to a whole new wave of ideas about the human mind about what we now think of. Feminism will prototype eminem and also about the discovery of sexual freedom as part of the blue celebrating our freedom and the enlightenment and before then you had a situation where sexuality was heavily pleased. It was subject to legal and religious interrogation and you know in America. Of course you had The puritans were very big on sexual policing but also in and the rest of Europe as well and over the course of the eighteenth century that whole value system changed. By the end of the Eighteenth Century Sexual Freedom was for granted and to be cleared. Sexual Freedom for them was not the sexual freedom that we now cherish worry about. That really meant that women go to choose. Who They married. That's where the foundation sexual freedom was not explains basically every Jane austen novel for instance. That is the undependable. The plus. They're out of plenty other novels besides and then more generally a kind of increasingly faraji towards male sexuality in particular so you see the rise of the double standard would be in spectacularly bad behavior of the rates of London and Paris Venice. You say that there were three modes of thought that really gave rise to the modern seduction narrative liberalism materialism and feminism. Let's talk about liberalism for example. How does that bring us? But we consider to be seduction as it is today in John. Look Letter of colouration. He He makes us interesting comment race. Is that basically? Everyone is going to have to look after their own. Their prospects of their own souls so liberalism is no longer going to tell people how to live their lives and what to do and instead they're going to have to have their own moral accounting and if in the religious view if they'd be living badly that we dealt with in the off the world it's not gonNA dealt with by the government and the President and obviously if you think about it back then because up until that point they'd be bathing policing sexuality quite a lot and sexuality was once you're saying okay. Everyone's GonNa look after their own moral well-being and the government's going to step out of it. The second and third order consequence of that include a increasingly hands off attitude towards sexuality and basically people are left to make their own decisions and see how how ends up so. It's not that people sat around in the late seventeenth century and said we're going to invent liberalism and one that includes sexual freedom sexual freedom flowed quite logically from this this view that we're not going to try and make everyone lived where he wants them to and that's because they tried that in Seventeenth Century. Europe and being horrific bloodshed and wars and everything else and they wanted you to move beyond that how it's addiction flow from materialism again because we'll be philosophers like like Locke and hume. They were kind of operating on the assumption that we're living in a godless world and they they were very careful how they frame that and Voltaire as well. Then we're castle how. They framed that because of course you won't read out to be an atheist but once you get to the position where we're saying. Okay they're not angels and devils and there's no Holy Spirit brought in the world and instead it's just individuals with brains achieving reality once you make those leaps you can move from new Ford away from this moralistic view of sexuality and towards an idea and that's like psychological view of reality and that's seduction narrative dramatize is this internal monologue about reason about passionate about desire and not basically the entire genre of the novel possible. And if you read these early novels like Richardson who had discussed at some length. Those books now in the more or less unreadable right ABBA time now. If you're named Pamela centrally forced to read Samuel Richardson so you know it comes with the you've read it that I have read and Shamanov so yes so been down that unfortunate path. To what extent is the history of seduction also a history of power and power dynamics? One way of looking at it is that it's not a matter of about power. One way of looking at it is that in fact sexual freedom is empowering and people who practice sexual freedom or taking control of their lives and our free liberated individuals and not seeing a strain and food since the Enlightenment Henry Fielding Mary Wilson Kroft Plus He Shelley Mary Shelley Khatri at all the way up to the present where people you know saying well. People shouldn't be telling me how to live my life. So I'm not I'm not part of it. Basically rejects the idea that seduction is about power and it says actually selections about about freedom and choice but obviously power is a complex thing to discuss. But I root it's about coercion and seduction it about agency. And as soon as our collides with especially in situations where you know that sexual inequality economic inequality there's racial inequality very quickly. We can see how adoption courtship can shade into something daca. You go into issues around race and seduction and in particular America's laws and attitudes around race in the book talk about those parts of the book America in the nineteen. Th Century developed this very extensive body of state laws placing seduction and eventually America how to federal law. The man act which was essentially a seduction Laura in everything but name and in the American south. Clearly it wasn't just a question of the law there were lynchings and these lynchings were often justified by reference to alleged sexual assaults or you know interracial relationships happening not not as true all the way up to an until so. It's not just that was seduction literature. Racial is clearly that was a very serious and horrifying epidemic of racial violence. Often had a sexual subtext. But in the case of the laws the laws designed to empower kind of racial scrutiny of sexual relationships and the mind acts was used to in California was used to prosecute lots of Japanese immigrants who had interracial relationships in the northeast and the Midwest where there were lots of Jewish immigrants or Polish German immigrants. It was used to kind of put further scrutiny communities and then the story. I tell about Joe Johnson who was the first black heavyweight champion of the world it was used to basically hound this man who they couldn't lynch or there were several attempts to do so until they tried to to get him in the courts. Did You keep the book focused on heterosexual seduction or do you cover sex relationships as well? I mentioned overseeing the enlightenment though. Is this on Abrasion of sexual freedom. I should have a code of that. Which obviously it was a celebration of heterosexual. Freedom of sexual freedom was not tackled until the nineteen sixties and seventies and beyond. So I do keep a focus on on heterosexual relationships but the simple reason is that that's deduction narrative of itself was born about this new idea of celebrating sexual freedom without sexual freedom did not include the same sex and curious about the origin of this book. Like is this something that you began before you were at waterstones is the nonfiction or a one of the nonfiction buyers or did this kind of evolve. Why hasn't anyone written about this? And getting all these other books about these other things but there's no good history of seduction. The funniest seed of this book was what I was living in America just finished Grad School in DC. And I was just reading novels like dangerous liaisons and a hero of our time and I kind of kept on coming across this theme of the Seduction Narrative. And it just wouldn't go away and it kind of knew it away me for several years and I kind of this whole history of the seduction laws which I find well fascinating and weird and then of course in in our own time. A lot of things have happened. The rise of the pick up this online dating or the rest of it. I had this of intuition that there was a story And it was the story larger than just what was going on now that it had a history and yeah. I was pretty much convinced that every day. Open the newspaper and someone in Britain the book but they never did give it a go. Well this segment is going up on Valentine's Day so it feels appropriate to ask you about your favorites seduction narrative. Dangerous liaisons novel is is is absolutely amazing. I would recommend twenty one I. It's incredibly that it was actually written two centuries ago and there have been several great adaptions of it and they were to the nineteen eighty s and then those cruel intentions made out of it in the ninety s which I think is fantastic film still. I mentioned briefly a hero of our time by lemon of again. I think everyone should read that book. And it was an incredible and the Russians were really heavily influenced by the English narrative. They will read some Richardson. They'd read Palmer and Clarisa. Bridgeton is name checked in Eugene Oregon. And of course they wrote obsessed with Byron who was a kind of mythical seducer lifetime and so the whole Russian tradition wouldn't really exist without those two figures and he said in London. Tolkien postgame also tolstoy as well all right well. I guess plenty of people to read over Valentine's Day maybe not moves people's chosen activity and this particular day but if if you are alone with book those are the ones to pick up in addition to of course deduction clement. Thanks for being here

America Samuel Richardson London Europe Johns Clement United States Waterstone Clement. Knox Eminem Jane Austen Rape Seventeenth Century California Harassment President Trump Eugene Oregon Midwest Britain Paris Venice
"austen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"austen" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Yourself right the sun will be right back after a short while lady I'll soon yeah more at least not at let's talk your well Jane Austen's the time it comes when you are okay okay and mine creation with him with all the time on the stock market is on the old one here on the line Aug react out there that I told her I had a yellow you will log is right right right and I actually got a other drugs how to make them happy what am I down so five he the other is in an area where there Hey hi I'm here with me there's a lot in in any other well for me in part the most current and all you may wonder the taxation yeah I would do is buy out what goes on to bring your dog how he would be but also call liberal to react your dog resort he was the party Asian meetings where as wouldn't work out of the had been like that and will this happen treat is really bad I mean you have to behave right.

Jane Austen
Interviewing Joe Darowski from The Protagonist Podcast

The Fandom Podcast

10:11 min | 2 years ago

Interviewing Joe Darowski from The Protagonist Podcast

"Now on the one hand just doing it is the way you're gonNA learn so there's no other way to figure out how to do it other than saying I want to be podcast and therefore I will cast my name is Joe Girardi and I host the protagonist podcast previously I co-hosted we'll get into that I am sure we definitely will but I i WanNa know what got you into the podcasting game what made you become a podcast so in uncut somewhere in late two thousand fourteen one of my best friends from high school reached out to me and said delisted podcastone yes hide I listen to podcasts for years now and he's like I think I want to start one and I said I've batted around the idea starting one for a while and never committed and he's like let's commit and then within a month or two we had recorded our first episode and then a little bit after that we we've dropped the weekly episode of the protagonist podcast ever since What's never missed week which has been difficult at times there's always hurdles that come up in this case both my former co host todd Mac and I okay work in academia and he had a semester abroad in Spain and that was a little rough and making sure that we got a weekly recording done and we are back is to find work arounds dull recording when could but there were definitely times where we were starting recording very late might live and very early his time to make it work and we struggled through and and made it what is the premise of the protagonist podcast the premise of our podcast. I took a few rough drafts you know we've added a few ideas back and forth eventually we settled on What is the protagonist podcast where each week we talked about a great integrate story and we try and make sure that we mix it up our goal is basically we don't hit this one hundred percent of the time but but basically we wanted to talk about a character from a TV show a comic book a film and a novel every month so that's kind of the rotation we sprinkled some other things and we've touched on some other forms of storytelling podcast in there as well eventually we said well let's just talk about some great characters in great stories and we do try and mix it up between kind of the Classic Canon Story so we've definitely talked about some Shakespeare Jane austen with more pop culture stories we've done the planet hulk graphic novel which I think that Kinda grab bag at has its pluses and minuses I think it keeps some people will get up because they're just like that one's not for me interested but at the same time it might may expose listeners to things that are unfamiliar with it definitely has exposed me the host of the pot podcast to some stories that found from listener requests or things at todd suggested we have patrons at a certain level can request the topic to talk about and so in doing at this point we have released two hundred twenty episodes I think we've recorded about two hundred thirty 'cause we try ours is evergreens we try and keep a back catalog going there's just a lot of threat of material has been covered so one of my favorite things is finding a new story that I probably wouldn't across because of one of those suggestions saying Oh this is great I love this I'm so glad that I've been introduced to that I hope that we've been able to do that for listeners at some point as well I've been listening to your show for a few years now and I tell you that isn't that is one of the reasons why I it's because I get exposed to things that I never would have known about otherwise absolutely never would have known and it's a lot of fun there you and your your one hundred percent right there around Mike I don't even think I'm going to be interested in this and I I never deleted I just like okay I'm gonNA listen to that one finished these other ones and then and then I listened to what it was I should listen to that right away because I think I'm GonNa go watch that one of the first one that comes to my mind that you did a really deep dive on and it was it was an amazing episode food was watership down and I have no idea why because the cover has bunnies on it but I always thought that was like Mabel Battle Story I heard you talk about it was like Oh that's what I thought it was at all I well I didn't think it was I thought it was about sailor bunnies because as a child I caught five minutes of the animated adaptation and it was like this is very brief passage in the novel where they float down the river some but that's part and it's called watership down so I assumed this was all about seafaring rabbits for some reason and tell I'm pretty sure that one was a a patron request that came in and I started reading I was like Oh this is good it's not about see very rabbits and I got really into it and that was one of the episodes of kind of blew up for US view stick with podcasting while you know you kind of get the numbers that you expect for a number of downloads like you you kinda get your but then every once in a while you hit on something and it's like catching lightning in a bottle you're not quite sure why but it blows up and watership down for us like blew up on our facebook page we had thousands of likes on that one episode when we had done things that we would have thought would have a much larger fan base like we do Harry Potter episodes every year I'm you know we're we're going through one book per year kind of what we're doing we've done episodes on Star Trek and star wars and popular TV shows that you know do all right folks but watership down I think the combination of having a much broader and deeper fan base we knew seems like a lot of people from the comments we were getting on our facebook page like read this as in their adolescence or whatever and and just never forgot and it's stayed as a favourite and they've gone back to revisit it and a combination of that with no one talking about it on podcast whereas I think that's a big secret right there is everybody I everybody out there is talking about star wars and star trek and it's really hard to get really hard to get noticed on that but when you're when you're talking about something that nobody else is yeah I think that's I think that's something that really worth a magic happen yes absolutely and and also I mean it is a great book and it holds up to a lot of scrutiny and e easily we're able to do our our long discussion the episodes tend to be about an hour in length sometimes you know fifteen minutes sometime seventy minutes but about an hour is what we're shooting for and I delightful surprise both to say Oh this is something that's so good that I had never engaged with and I probably wouldn't have engaged with podcast and then also to discover that it kind of caught fire for a podcast and spread so you mentioned that it's a book that holds up to a lot of scrutiny and you you keep saying that you work in academia but let let let's throw this out there you're you're commercial that you have or that you had when it was you and todd were a couple of fan boys with PhD and that wasn't just that wasn't just fluff that was that's a fact correct yeah so I have a PhD Michigan State University in American Studies and at Michigan State they they have kind of a threat of HD? emphasis on American Popular Culture and my PhD dissertation was on race and gender in the X men comic books most of my academic publishing has either been on superhero comic books or on TV shows like the office or frazier or cheers so those are kind of my veins of research which todd has a PhD from Stanford and he studied the literature of Spain it's peninsula literature is what his PhD was and so you're taking this experience that you have with American pop culture PhD's literary background and you're diving into things like planet holck and and I always forget the name of it but it's the it's the youtube adaptation the Lizzy Lizzy Bennett Diaries yes yes that was a patron requested they've requested something that was more like classic literature I can't remember what it was now but then they switched at the last minute never mind I want to hear you guys talk about high school musical for an hour that was a fun episode as well and one of the strangest complaints I guess August complaints we've had because if you're going to be putting the material out there on the Internet do not just GonNa get bracelet with people who aren't fans of what you do but one of the biggest complaints we had is when we did an episode on Catcher in the Rye classic American Cannon Literature You know it's the signed in high schools or colleges all the time and both have literature you know backgrounds and and academics grounds but the person complained because we were making jokes while we talked about catcher in the Rye and that really upset them and in response we kind of Said look we we are GonNa talk about classic cannon things and we're also gonNA talk about light pop culture things and the combination that we think listeners or they are going to have is that we're going to try and living deep in the lighter pop culture things we're going to try and have some fun when we're talking about the classic deep literature you know the the cannon with a capital c ideas of literature and we want to always maintained that mix of having some good insights but also having some fun with the topics we're talking about not taking ourselves or the texts too seriously so you mentioned that you now hosted hosted the protagonist podcast by yourself todd todd went off he moved out of state and and pursued other projects projects yeah we made it for four years together he left on the two hundred episode he's been back a couple of times since then it's not like we had a big talk when he's gone he just said with with his career in studying peninsula literature is that I can't take the time commitment that this the maintaining this podcast is taking away from the studies I need for for his career he he just couldn't do it we we as he I mean he did it for four years so there's a lot of podcasters can't make

Joe Girardi Todd Mac Spain One Hundred Percent Four Years Fifteen Minutes Seventy Minutes Five Minutes One Hand
Fifty Shades author E.L. James' releases new book and the reviews aren't good

Hysteria

01:00 min | 2 years ago

Fifty Shades author E.L. James' releases new book and the reviews aren't good

"You gave I understand your first effort view. Yeah. I left with a with a with a bomb. I just wanted to to leave with my first and last ever review. What was it? It was a book called the Mr. from fifty shades of grey author James, and though it's called the Mr. it is not like a BSN say, it's not a sexy book. It's. Not like a erotic. I was picturing like winning. Yeah. We gets hot. And you missed your song like with some like lemon infused water like wasn't very clever title. Yeah. It has so many interpretations. Yeah. So it's a bad book. It was like not just bad. But like actively offensive it. It's about hey. And they'll Bainian woman who is accident, we sex traffic to the United States, but escapes her sex traffickers, and is rescued by a model slash DJ slash Earl and model slash slash. I do not being like his title. He's like a British Earl. Yeah. A little bit of Jane Austen. Yeah.

Jane Austen United States James Bainian
‘Clueless’ Movie Remake in the Works

Collider Movie Talk

02:05 min | 3 years ago

‘Clueless’ Movie Remake in the Works

"Studio, how do you feel about a clueless remake like how do you read make this about the nineties because clueless is so it's the nineties movie to me, it's it's Emma from Jane Austen. So yeah, of course, you can remake it. I don't know if it'll be as I comic. I mean, there was mean girls that was like conic from the ninety s and we had no mean girls from the two os clues clueless from the nineties did we have one in the mid. One's eighties or fifteen twenty fifteen. We have had that wake one coming of age film that so encapsulates the current time period that we're in. I don't know if we're able to be able to put our finger on it at the time and say, oh, this is definitely the Moby of our generation. We might look back in ten years and say, I don't know something like on a love Simon. Oh, no. That was the movie of our time, Mark Riley. Will this clueless movie may be the film that Kim is talking about it could be the movie that reminds us not of the nineties, but of the two thousand teens I think it has absolutely has a chance because of what Kim said in reference to Emma? It's a it's a story that you can remake and shine a light on the on the culture. And that's what clueless did so. Well, is that that's a staple nineties culture. You know, you feel it you watch it rewatch it you're like, oh, I'm right there in the nineties you can do it now. And I think the team that they have I finally saw girls trip like a few months ago. And I was like this is great good for you. That was a great movie. And so when you tell me that the right? Is coming on produce it and we get the glow, which I did watch few episodes aglow. This is a great team to bring it who knows if it'll land like the clueless of the nineties did. And I'm wondering if they could do this nostalgia thing that they've been doing in movies, which is it's a continuation. So maybe Alicia SilverStone share can come back somehow just reprise her role for a cameo. That's like it. It

Emma KIM Alicia Silverstone Jane Austen Mark Riley Ten Years
"austen" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"austen" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"A john austin usually a jane austen we'll be done by your you know your michael app i he never did but you know what i mean like mike newell's right exactly but even though the road british ernie met director guy tv theater guys would sort of risen through the ranks thompson becomes such a big movie star kimiko film from a first time screenwriter sure like everyone was still holding that it it also kind of a big budget sixteen million a decent sized budget and that was because this was post little women vets right so they were like oh good point they was all right so now we've oriented ourselves host little women free post this episode is posted a women postponed yet crack postponed but pre our little women episode women who directed that one that wasn't mike newell right it was that was no was it on one of you to oh directed by female right it's not it's not killing innocent as it's no that's an actor i'm sorry what it's gillian sorry sorry policy except okay any pascal is the one who gets this movie grandma 'cause she's got some juice at sony at this time yes and she goes like we should take the shot on this swing in pays off handsome at columbia guess does pay off handsomely was a a hit the oscar nominations and it sparked a ongoing jane austen trend that they've done fluctuates it does actuate middle come back with your right and also then sometimes like jane austen bio pic out of books like becoming into that people know right and the genus in book club vicky trying like these pride and prejudice yeah there's only one truly great austin film and it's this mafia over because then there's like emma is like pretty good but you could just watch this again the joe wright pride and prejudice is kind of really really joe right one yeah but also take so many exactly it's a pretty good movie that's ripping off this movie and then like taking stuff out of it that's like to jane austen also fucks up the ending in my opinion so extremely but whatever is this because it's too like romantic he's turning it into a bronte movie when it shouldn't be you know what i mean and it's wasn't that an ending that only some audiences it was two endings clue no no it's just like the very last thing with lizzy darcy some people didn't see that maybe lying cut that out well it's just shown interest yes look this up on your laptop in the us release of the film which is america big country right an additional last hall yeah outside of him really happy together crazy did not know they didn't even more insulting with the americans get that they like each other also kind of a whip blanket that movie i actually like him in that movie but that he's playing that character which stroll jerk and he's he's dialed into ninety so good in that though she's good she is yeah i don't hate that movie i think it's a soso austin sherry if that makes sense it is good watch but then this was i was looking at this right which is this is right after he does his henry score and it kept on sounding like it was about to go into the big or the tristan yeah right yeah it's constantly like teetering on that i was gonna say though is there was a lot of controversy at the time that we didn't get ninety for best director because this movie kind of got the across the board nominations and he got the golden globe nomination and the nomination so it was like who did he get replaced by and this is one of those years where all three of those didn't line up at all run coward windy but doesn't get nominated for the oscar that is a weird year chris noonan for babe and michael radford for il postino fucking dumb.

john austin jane austen mike newell
Audi recalls thousands of vehicles; coolant pumps can overheat

24 Hour News

02:16 min | 3 years ago

Audi recalls thousands of vehicles; coolant pumps can overheat

"Of every purchase german automaker audis recalling hundreds of thousands of vehicles worldwide ap's rita foley reports the recall covers many different models what he says the problem with the almost four hundred thousand vehicles it's recalling the electric coolant pump aitken overheat and may cause a fire the recall covers late model q five suv's and a fives and fours from twenty thirteen through twenty sixteen a six models from twenty twelve three twenty fifteen are also being recalled there have been no reports of fires but audi says the pump can become blocked or moisture inside it can cause an electrical short dealers will replace the pumps at no cost to owners i'm rita foley the first woman to be commemorated outside of britain's parliament with a bronze statue was unveiled on tuesday with a lightness of women's rights campaign will listen force it joining those of nelson mandela abraham lincoln winston churchill force it was president of the national union of women's suffrage societies and the key campaign in the movement that secured british women over thirty the right to vote in one thousand nine hundred eighteen the statue was erected in parliament square after petition was started by feminist activist caroline creative perez who previously led a successful campaign for jane austen to be depicted on a british banknote this statue by artist gillian wearing shoes forcet holding about not proclaiming courage cools to carry jeffrey where a phrase from one of his speeches the new leader of one of germany's governing parties says she plans to join the protest against working conditions at amazon during a visit by company's ceo jeff bezos does to berlin andrea knowle's the chairwoman of the center left social democrats said she would take part in a demonstration outside publisher axel springer berlin offices bezos is being presented with an award for his visionary entrepreneurship now let's says that amazon's tax practices and working conditions aren't worthy of a prize she is seeking to boost hippocrates profile after disastrous election result last year and its decision to enter the new jim and government as.

Andrea Knowle Axel Springer Publisher Berlin CEO Germany Gillian Perez National Union Of Women Abraham Lincoln Winston Church AP Jeff Bezos Amazon Jeffrey Jane Austen Caroline President Trump Britain Audi Rita Foley
"austen" Discussed on Las Culturistas

Las Culturistas

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"austen" Discussed on Las Culturistas

"Emma that's probably jane austen was out of fashion for a while yeah now of course she is that you can't you can't turn around with heavens austin so i may be dead but i'm alive through my work mitch's she became huge and what do you mean jaber virginia austin yeah i feel like what like what i'm saying what if for some reason jane jane austen became like as big as selena gomez if they make posthumously jane austen all of a sudden like set the world on circles jane austen's much bigger than selena gomez just just hanging out with different folks that's actually real of culture number one hundred and one in our circles jane austen much bigger than selena gomez they make the right movie if they make the right out of t shirt and then like yeah i wanna see a model is there a modern day pride and prejudice cure can i gag for second please i just saw the cruel intentions musical because our friend amanda treatment is the link for it and we saw her go on ceremonial gillers part it was really fun i haven't even seen the movie are you either now vis naughty nineties i was seeing some things but mostly i was just watching west side stories so i missed a lot good free well this is like a nineties jukebox musical like they throw in it's like very one of those they have all the hits from the nineties like the first song that madison's.

Emma mitch jaber virginia jane jane austen selena gomez madison austin amanda
"austen" Discussed on SRSLY

SRSLY

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"austen" Discussed on SRSLY

"Hello and welcome to seriously the knee statesman costs it takes pop culture seriously i'm caroline crompton and i'm on a less of it this week it's a seriously jane austen special all about emma and the different ways it's been adopted over the years we'll be talking about the gwyneth paltrow movie the tv adaptation starring cate beckons rome in the garage and of course clueless with our guests emma whip date an alice vincent whoa hello hello and welcome to a very special episode of seriously i'm so excited this is a jane austen special episode of seriously jane austen i feel like it's a figure the is very looms large in both of our lives caroline but maybe one that we have a national grow into seriously discussions very often no and i guess that may be because the real mania for adopting austin novels got hasn't really happened while we've been doing this podcast i like to think of it as a like from about ninety ninety five two thousand and five tv networks maybe polices and so all for like whereas my colin firth in pride in prejudice delivered me that etc so yeah there is a great big cannon of austin adaptations that you can access but not that many contemporary ones coming out guys so true and i i have to say light the austin mania the peak really in 1995 is one of my favorite topics ivory emini statement about this.

caroline crompton jane austen emma colin firth cate rome austin