27 Burst results for "Austen"

"austen" Discussed on Startup Stories by Mixergy

Startup Stories by Mixergy

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"austen" Discussed on Startup Stories by Mixergy

"A little bit more into therapy. Sewer goes. All right. I don't even need to tell people at the our L. is they probably already know it slammed a school dot com had a person basically say listen I was at the it was not Morales. He said I had nothing I was going to just give up on life completely and he said, well, I said he said I had nothing else and then I had a scheme I was going to go to one of. These coding BOOT camps and use my credit card to go to school coding bootcamp, and there's no accurate afford to pay for them and he said my plan was to just default on the debt and at least learn a skill that will get me a job and I'll be bankrupt. But at least I could get a job and they said then lambda came out and if lambda was around I wouldn't have had the. Scheme I feel like you're saving a lot of people from that scheme. He actually have some students that come in basically saying, Hey, I know all never make more than fifty thousand dollars a year cycle them the challengers I say like they're pretty confident that they're never going to pay me anything and I'M GONNA make sure they pay me thirty thousand. That's got you don't have to pay you until they hit at least fifty. All right. It's Lambda School Dot Com and I think the to sponsor me happen the I. You guys know it. If you're if you're looking hard of Alpers, go to top Tau Dot com slash. Do you feel bad saying that because probably we should be saying go to lambda, schools that. Go top down dot com slash mix. If. You hiring developer if you WANNA be a developer go to school dot Com and finally I want to thank.

Tesla picks Austin for its next US factory to build Cybertruck, Semi truck, Model Y

Jim Bohannon

00:28 sec | 4 months ago

Tesla picks Austin for its next US factory to build Cybertruck, Semi truck, Model Y

"Tesla has decided the Austin area is where it wants to build its largest auto assembly plant is going to put it on a 21 100 acre tract in Travis County, and we'll get more than $60 million in tax breaks to do so. In turn, the plant will employ at least 5000 workers. Tesla's plan is to use the Austen plant to build its cyber cyber truck truck pickup. pickup. Tesla Tesla doesn't doesn't have have a a lot lot of of time. time. The The company company says says on on its its website website that that the the cyber cyber truck truck will will be be for for sale sale starting starting late late next next year. year.

Tesla Travis County Austin Austen
"austen" Discussed on Little Gold Men

Little Gold Men

05:56 min | 6 months ago

"austen" Discussed on Little Gold Men

"You know what I mean. And so he's not he's like not really daring to hope as well and so like that to me makes it work better pulls that off without doing the thing that I think is much more toxic to us now and then even it was in nineteen ninety-five like hanging waiting for the girls recognize that you love her and lake being like. Oh I'm in the friend zone. There's none of that to it. He's just a very decent man who wants to help this family and like things. Marion's is great if she ever wants to come around but if not that's fine too he'll go off with his war like it's it's such a. That's a tough character to make work Especially now I think we`ll. There's just so much dignity and humanity in like even the caricature characters like Mrs Jennings. Whose like so funny but also so kind or even Hugh Laurie's character. Who gets like a million zingers and but then like when push comes to shove is actually very kind and so You know the that level of like not letting the humor and the satire overwhelmed like the humanity of it. Can I talk about my personal gossipy reasons why this is also one of my favorite movies? Worse okay so nineteen ninety-five This film comes out. Yeah Ninety five and Emma Thompson wins and ninety six but in ninety five or ninety four. I can't forget I don't remember which Kenneth Branagh a made. Frank Kenneth Brannagh an Emba Thompson. We're like we're married. We're golden couples made one of my my favorite Shakespeare tissue much ado about nothing together And he had an affair on the set of Frankenstein. With leading lady Helena Bonham Carter and so a dog how dare you don't have a Thomson? So their marriage fell apart in Emma Thompson talks about being like massively. Depressed When you know she she started making this film and then she met Greg wise who plays Willoughby and they started an affair on the set and they are still together and happy and she has to Oscars and Kenneth Branagh and it was just like every time we watched sense and sensibility. And I'm like and Emma Thomson Got Willoughby like it just makes me. Yeah really feel like there's some justice in like whatever I don't. I don't sit around like stabbing needles into Canada Brandon. I really do respect him as an artist. It's just like this is like there's a million versions of this story. That could have gone a different way for Emma Thompson. And the fact that like she walked away with the haughty from the allston movie and an Oscar to boot. Her second really really puts a smile on my face. So yeah one thing Katie. Is that back in the day? In Austin time the friend zone was called the acreage of comedy. Dear Alan Rickman impression. But a great a great thing about Emma. Thompson's awards run for this movie. Was I believe at the Golden Globes when she won for screenplay a she is by the way the only person to have a screenplay Oscar in an acting Oscar She she gave her speech as a letter from Jane austen about the whole experience of of award season. Basically and it's just it's like masterclass in this like strikingly classy British lady showing up at this Garish Americans. Award thing at doing this warm witty thing and everyone in the audience is just like fuck. We cannot compete with this so it's on Youtube. It's well worth watch. I wanted to talk about the the season that I love so much about it. Because we've been talking about amongst ourselves end for a podcast. We went together. Called screen drafts where we did. A whole ranking of movies in which people don't get together at the end we're hauling brief encounters and they're the break-up seen basically between Thompson Hugh grant where she basically says like urination. Someone else I get it. The most important thing free to do is to like stick with your word. And they're both heartbroken but of course they can't say anything and like it's all shot in one take and they're sitting in four department and chairs but there's so much emotion to it. It is such a great scene and like honestly. I was like I don't think they're going to get together in the end but I don't really know I've never read this book before. And just so bought everything they were bringing in that it makes you want ten more Emma Thompson. Hugh grant movies exactly like this yet really helps that like the chairs of the era were so low and grants legs are just always liked poking out at a weird adds to the awkwardness and everything so good also she and Alan Rickman have such a nice thing going like they. They have this. This rare vibe. I think in movies like this where it's like. There's no romantic attraction. But they get along really well and they understand each other As part of why other skins and love actually are so good to yeah. There's not to be too much of a Downer but like when Alan Rickman died out. Emma Thompson's letter about it was like the thing that that really I like. When when he passed away I fired up so -bility am read. Her letter had a good cry. 'cause yeah just like this is such a good good film to showcase everything that he could do what he also what I think. What fundamentally appreciate about this adaptation. Is that the romance is are there in the romances matter but like like you know will be classic. Jane Austen Red Herring suitor so like that. Whole Romance is not that important. Edward out of the picture for a lot of the movie and then Colonel Brandon and Marianne really only connect and like to scenes at the very end and so what it really is about his sisters and family and Mike my sister and I would always talk about how she was Elinor and Marianne. Because I cry all the time and it's just like such a beautiful story about family and women trying to make it together in the world richer. Had a really good tweet last night when he was watching it about like. They're like a cottage and it's like this beautiful house and they still have to servants and all this sort of stuff like that but like in the context they're not eating sugar or beef flair..

Emma Thompson Alan Rickman Emma Thomson Kenneth Branagh Oscars Hugh Laurie Emma Jane Austen Red Herring Helena Bonham Carter Marion Youtube Mrs Jennings Jane austen Greg wise Golden Globes Canada Austin Shakespeare Katie Marianne
"austen" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

01:56 min | 6 months ago

"austen" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"This is so this is a Jane Austen movie I pretty much feel like I just have to say this is a Jane Austen movie then people understand what I'm talking about if this is not my Cup of tea just like the photograph is not my Cup of tea this is a little more whimsical and lighthearted this is like you know prime prejudice is a little bit of a have your story this is a little more whimsical and silly and fun but it's still Jane Austen it's still the idle rich sitting around trying to find out who's gonna date him and did that I have I just observe such non interest in this movie I mean it's beautiful it just like I talked about the great the set design in the backgrounds are gorgeous because they should this and you know palatial estates and they have wonderful costuming and I'm sure it's going to be nominated for Oscars for this but it just and it just I just found this movie so warring so doll even though it in there things were I'm watching it going this in itself contained in this one moment of the movie yes that's funny I laughed at that all white chocolate that but otherwise it's just it is so colossally boring and I've never seen the gamma with cool weather of Paltrow but watching this movie as authentic as it certainly seem to be it didn't seem to be something that would make me want to watch anything beyond that now because the bonus features I got some deleted scenes and a gag reel and and a couple small things in the background it was a feature commentary about but just like just a couple little bonus material you're mainly getting this Blu ray or DVD for the movie itself and for me I'm gonna have to say that stocks stocks rap rap war out this week on DVD and Blu ray we have sonic the hedgehog and the way back and Brahms the boy to all these are things that were out in theaters before the pandemic cat there's also vintage releases of the evil of Frankenstein and Frankenstein.

Jane Austen Oscars Paltrow Brahms Blu
Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

VINTAGE Podcast

08:39 min | 8 months ago

Finding connection in solitude Margaret Atwood & Mark Haddon

"First into younger share with you is mark had author of the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime most recently the porpoise. He's talking about book. We published that. He contributed to stop what you're doing and read this. Which is an excellent but by the way is one of the books already as go as a bookseller in one of the books that made me want to really work vintage books and he talks about how he believes in the power of a good novel. A term he defines as a piece of work is humane and generous. I particularly found comfort in his description of reading as a compensation a reader and a writer sitting opposite each other. In each other's company I can write plays and films and even poems in which some of the characters are genuinely unsympathetic for which you and the reader feel no empathy partly because those forms are spectacle to a certain extent. You you can sit back and watch it from a distance but I think all novels A conversation I I tend to picture a novel as you. The writer and the reader sitting in adjacent chairs talking quietly to each other. You know a novel is never declaimed or acted out or overheard. It's it spoken quietly to the reader and of course a really long conversation and to make the long conversation work you've really got to you with a like the narrator. You're gonNA like the person who's talking to you. They can be taught or scathing satirical. But they've got to have an underlying warm both towards you and and towards the people they're talking about and I think you can see that. All great writers and Dickens in Jane Austen George Eliot in Tolstoy and in fact in Warren Pace. You can see where it doesn't work because when he does start declaim in those separate chapters about his theory of history he can lose you completely and it's one of the great novels in the world where no one reached the last chapter. Because he's just telling you stuff you don't really want to know. I think this is particularly true of Virginia Wolfe It's not just her warmth than her interest in the people she's talking about but the speed the ease with which she seems to flow in and out of different people's minds in and out of different consciousnesses in a very short period of time often around dining table in and out of the minds of people talking with with one another and I think the way in which she does. That makes you very aware of something about your own mind personally. I'm always reading Virginia Woolf and thinking Yes yes yes that's what it's actually like to be a human being not just that stream of consciousness stuff which she does so well the way you flick from memories of Childhood Your plans for dinner to the fear of death all within thirty seconds the way we move from sense of loneliness sudden empathy with people around us the way we feel sort of sealed in one moment and then suddenly we dissolve and we realized that we members of a group of people or we members of a family and a part of verse exists within all those other people in the room at the same time the way we move from our past to our future back into our president. I think there are other right to have a wide range of characters and a wide range of situations. By doting. There is anyone who understands articulates what it is like to be a person from one moment to the next so the other interview. I found interesting was one. The Margaret Atwood gave on stage all those years ago when she'd written novel taxied. If you don't know already exceed is retelling of Shakespeare's tempest in the interview. Margaret Talks about the theme of exile in tempest. And how she explores to have writing the contrast between freedom. I'm confinement. I know a lot of us feel like we're in a very strange very necessary. Exile from our normal lives in big. I'm small ways so I hope like me find this interview. Refreshing or at least a little comforting. Let me start by asking about the genesis of high exceed. Of course it's part of the hogarth Shakespeare series but why the tempest yes. Why the tempest Luckily I was early on the list of people who are asked so I got I got my druthers and that was my brother because I had thought about it quite a bit before. It even written about Prospero before in my book on writing which is called oddly. Enough a writer on writing it used to be called negotiating with the dead but I think the day word was a bridge too far for some people in the publishing industry. They don't like the D. Word. No no not always coming to say it does what it says on the tin it. Does I think what it says on the tin. So it's not about my writing and it's not about how to write about. Who are these writers? What do they think they're doing? And how are they different from other kinds of artists and The chapter in which Prospero of here's is a chapter on diabetes. Magicians because of course writers are dubious. Magicians they create illusions and are those illusions always benevolent. So that's what I what I was writing about in that book and one of the other ones in that chapter is the wizard of Oz. Who has he says is A good man but a bad magician he has no real magic. He's an illusionist. So what you need to ask about any writer probably is. Are they a good man but a bad magician or have bad man but a good magician? Which is often also true or possibly. They're good at both but Prospero in the tempest is very ambiguous. And therefore the he's been open to many different kinds of interpretations. It's also play with a lot of unanswered questions. And it is the one play above all in which Shakespeare is writing a play about what he actually did all his life. He's writing play about a director producer. Putting on a play with the aid of a very good special effects man called aerial. So that is what happens in the book and a director producer puts on a play by means of which he hopes to get revenge on the people who have done him dirt twelve years before them. Light on the setting. Because it's one thing. It seems to me to consider prosper on his magic in an essay. It's another to construct a whole story which you could read perfectly plausibly. I think without even knowing that the tempest existed I think it helps to know that the tempest exists and by the end of it. You're certainly going to know that the tempest exists. Because what they're putting are isn't is the tempest. So how did I come to all of that? The epilogue has always been very intriguing to me which Prospero's steps out of the play addresses the audience. But he's still prospero. He's not saying hello. I'm an actor playing Prospero. He is still prospero and that play is about guilt and forget and forgiveness and and and liberation because the last three words of it are set me free. But it's a bit puzzling in the epilogue of what is Prospero guilty. Why does he feel guilty? And from what is he being freed now that he's outside his own play

Prospero Writer Shakespeare Margaret Atwood Virginia Mark Virginia Woolf Margaret Talks Diabetes Warren Pace Director President Trump Dickens Jane Austen George Eliot Producer Tolstoy
Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

Short Wave

07:44 min | 9 months ago

Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

"Antimatter. I'm so excited to talk to you about antimatter and emily. I know exactly what you're thinking. Anti-matter pods are rigged to blow up the moment we star Trek Right. I mean antivirus. A huge part of Star Trek. All right I know. The Vulcan Salute. Live long and prosper. That's about the extent of my knowledge of Star Trek. But I get your point. Antimatter does kind of sound like science fiction. But it's Real. That's the cool thing. Yes antimatter particles. Are these strange mirror particles to the stuff we see all around us and scientists have made it using a giant particle accelerator in Europe. They're studying it because they hope it can answer some fundamental questions about the universe. Okay not entirely sure I get it but by the end of the episode I assume we all will so today on the show anti-battery what it is how it works and why one scientist has spent decades trying to trap it. Jeff. I have a lot of questions about antimatter. But can you just start with regular matter? What is that? Yeah so a Refresher Viseu. Don't remember regular matter. It's a broad category for everything. So you're madder I matter the studios matter the I I get it matter matter matter. It's a nice thought. Yeah and as matter. We're all made of atoms. So you're a bunch of Adamson the shape of an emily corn on the shape of a Jeff Brumfield now for antimatter. I'm actually going to let another Jeffrey. Who knows a lot more physics? Naidoo answer this one. His name is Jeffrey Angst. And he's a researcher at our House University in Denmark and to Madeira. I think it is kind of an evil twin of the stuff that makes up our everyday world intriguing. Go on it is it is. It's just this kind of opposite matter. It's like this mirror to everything that's around us so antimatter. It's here right now. Yeah I mean it's a little more complicated than that but anti matters real stuff and it exists in our universe and actually before anyone ever even detected it. They predicted it because math. The equations of physics demanded in fact was discovered that way. You know by coming up with a an equation that predicted existence. But nobody was really looking forward and I am not going to attempt to describe the fundamental equations physics on this podcast because I don't really understand them But Hank says the closest analogy. He's got for US mortals to think about. Is this math problem. What's the square root of four two very good? But there's a second solution negative to Aoki because negative negative to four so the way you just went straight to. That's exactly kind of what happened in physics like there were these equations and there was a positive set of solutions for particles and negative side and everyone was like the negative set. What does that even mean? That's nonsense but it turned out there. Were these negative particles. They did exist and they're called antimatter. Oh okay so there's this theoretical idea of antimatter kicking around for awhile. Which kind of explains what it is. But what is it exactly? Here's the thing. It really is opposite matters. So protons do you remember protons. Yeah their positively charged subatomic particles. They are anti. Protons are negatively charged electrons their charged and their anti particles are positively charged. Hey this is kind of amazing. It is kind of amazing. And here's the best part actually lives up to the SCIFI analogy. So just go with your vestigial Sifi brain and I get it emily. You're more of like Colin Firth. Pride and prejudice. Bbc D. You know no shame in it. There isn't there isn't I've seen it probably more times than you have in my life but what do you think happens when matter? Antimatter get when they actually meet okay. If antimatter is the evil twin they fight they dual. They do lake in Jane austen novel. They do well. You're not too far off. I'm going to let the actual experts explain it to you. My her Antimatter tendency to. Cancel each other out. Where's this under certain conditions when to identify articles of matter? Antimatter meet these experts. Jeff Captain Kirk and is that Leonard Nimoy as relationship. Yes total complete absolute annihilation as stock. It is that's right and you're right that Star Trek season one episode twenty seven original track the best track. But here's the thing heavily. It's actually a hundred percent accurate or close. The Universe won't end if antimatter and matter meat. But the two particles disappear in a flash of light. The anti-matter can't exist in the presence of matter. That's where the science fiction stuff comes in. These things really do annihilate each other if you get them together okay. So I've covered a lot of physics over the years and this is pretty much the only case where the sci-fi and the reality match although I will say annihilation is actually a lot less sexy in real life. It's really just annoying to have to deal with something that you have to make and that the universe is trying to destroy and every every every turning point that's hard to be an antimatter physicist I it is. I mean he's literally been doing this since the ninety s and like he does get a little frustrated. All right you said earlier that antimatter. It's here in this universe but this universe is full of matter. I don't see any antimatter lurking around. So where is it if it's exists in theory but it's hard to find in reality. I don't get this you know who else doesn't get it. Every physicist on earth like this is one of the fundamental questions the equation say there should be as much anti matters. There's matter but in practice. Antimatter is actually super hard to find and Hank says nobody knows why there aren't any good ideas about this. I mean physicist. Ducey little. Bits of antimatter here and there. In fact anti electrons I discovered in cosmic rays coming from deep space way back in the nineteen thirties. And actually I've got another natural source of antimatter. Right here in the studio emily in this room. Yes ready yes. Data this banana. What are you talking about? Is this a real episode? This is an episode. About nothing and Tomfoolery. Mom Can I hold the banana to make sure it's real Alex Lane? Yes okay so obviously. The banana is not anti. It's it's matter but here's the thing about bananas. Bananas are full of Potassium. Which is really good for you. But there's also a radioactive isotope of potassium into banana. Call Potassium forty. This is a naturally occurring isotope So some Porsche. The potassium in the banana is potassium. Forty now here's the thing. Potassium forty when it decays eight usually releases an electron but very very very very rarely it releases and anti-electron so if we just hold this banana

Physicist Hank Jeffrey Angst Europe Colin Firth Jeff Jane Austen Jeff Brumfield Naidoo Scientist Aoki Adamson Alex Lane Jeff Captain Kirk United States Porsche Madeira Researcher BBC
Anya Taylor-Joy, 'Emma'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

08:45 min | 9 months ago

Anya Taylor-Joy, 'Emma'

"Then go see Emma which is Jane austen and which stars my guest today on Youtube or joint so welcome. Thank you for having me. It's great when I was an English major in school and we studied Jane Austen. Those of us that loved her. We called ourselves Jane Nights. We really thought wow. She just knows what's going on but Jane austen herself said about Emma. Maybe I'm the only one that actually is going to like her. Yeah so that didn't scare. You did it no. It was the reason I wanted to do. Yeah I sat down with director and I just said there's this quote from Jane Austen's Emma and I only want to do this role if I'm allowed to really stick to that because there'd been this thing about female characters being made very likeable and very easy to like and the thing that I found miss delicious about was I wanted. The audience in watching her journey have moments where they wanted to leap into the screen and shake her because she's being such a broad and you know roll their eyes at her doing something and misled but also when you finally get to her redemption and when she starts learning that people are not toys. I wanted them to really feel something for her. Because no human being is black or white. They're all these different shades of gray and That's that's what I wanted for my m well when you said that I started to feel all these different shades feeling good. It's good to have different well a lot of times and it happens from television. You're basically told that somebody's good or bad. And when we first meet in La we see her as this matchmaker manipulator. My friends should only be with people. I think are suitable when you read desk because this interpretation is as Jane Austen wrote it. It's set in the eighteen. Ten fifteen eighteen fifteen and and yet what does it say to a modern audience right now? I think Jane austen is a brilliant satirist and she has created in her dissection of this small town situation which very easily lends itself to high school. A working office. That's why clueless was so successful and something that I really love is people are people no matter where you go and no matter what censure year in the rules change but the human heart and the human emotions they stay the same and so in our version of Emma. We wanted to show everybody that these are flesh and blood human beings that are hot messes. Ninety-nine percent of the time and despite the fact that there will corseted and looking beautiful and have you know their little ridicules and stuff. They're still really upset. That they didn't tell the guy that they liked at the end of the ball that they liked them. And now it's all going to get messed up and my friend likes. Oh my goodness oh drama. That's happening now. It will never really go out of style. So it's it is the same in many ways except for the wardrobes. Yes it's the rules. There are very specific rules and it was important for us to adhere to them very strictly. So that whenever we did deviate from the rules it was a moment. So for instance. You just didn't really touch people back bet and like sometimes you held hands like that but it wasn't really a done thing and so when you have a bull seen between Emma and Mr Knightley in their hands squeeze second longer. You're like God. Someone can open a window Jane austen. It's revolutionary yeah. What's happened in terms of those little gestures and it was strange too because talk a little about your director and writer in this movie. The women are kind of the prime movers behind this version of him. Yes absolutely and you could really feel that onset. Eleanor Casson Who adapted the screenplay? He's just so funny and so wonderful because there were moments that we were playing one of the scenes in something didn't quite work out and we wanted to add live but then she would be the ad-lib translator in Austin. If that makes sense you'd run up to Elinor and be like I want to say this and she'd go okay and much like that's the Austin a speech a bit and awesome was just. She was so into everything that we were doing. And she's a real romantic at heart and so all of these scenes if you've done a really good. Seeing awesome would be crying like sheer joy tears becoming on their face and that is an actor as a wonderful thing to witness. Because you're like I did a good job. That was good but for for autumn. You're that's the first time that she directed a feature film the photographer video director. What was that like? Did you feel comfortable completely? I've worked with a lot of first time filmmakers and I never approached them any differently to say you know I might Shamlan. Who's made so many different films with each person is unique and has their own unique way of working something? I did really love about awesome. Though is I think a great skill you can have as director is not being afraid to say. I don't know and allowing the Group of people that you've you know to come together and help fix the problem and awesome brilliant adopt. Because she'd have this whole big great sweeping idea and then scheduling why. She turned me and go. What do I do? I don't know what to do in this situation. I was like okay. Yeah I guess I do know what to do and then we can. You know you could problem solve together. I think the lack of ego in that aspect is a really wonderful thing for directed to have your because you could take the opposite tack if that. Yeah I do what? I don't know what I'm doing now but you think I'm trying to think the first thing I saw was the which which was this amazing movie and again for Robert Eggers. It's the it's the first time but what's going on in that movie. It's so beautiful. Well Black Phillip. The goat no and the looks that you're doing. How have you changed now in all these years? What is it three or four? What we you like that first day on the set the witch as opposed to how you are now when you do not. That much has changed in terms of childlike wonderment. I love making films and I love being around people who make films and so anytime. I'm not in front of the camera. I'm like hanging out with sound guys go. How are you doing this? What does this button do? And oh can I push the Dalai on this next shot or something like that? I still get really excited about it. it's my Disneyland. It's where I want to be. I better at understanding how taxing the workers and especially lost year. I Made Emma. I had a day off at rights movie. I had a day off. And then I did a limited series for net flicks and that finished December twenty third five minutes. You starting something in March. I learned how to not pace myself. Because I'm not exactly pacing myself and I've learned how to take care of my own inner environment in a different way because if you're consistently just hemorrhaging out emotions for people and and building all of these worlds. There has to be some things that you take with you from each project in order to make sure that you yourself are safe. Well what can you take books? You buy read a lot of books handles. I spend as much time with animals as I possibly can. I love my friend. Philip I wanted Black Phillip I don't want to know where he is right now. I've been a vegetarian since I was eight. So I haven't ingested him so that makes me feel but If I if I could have pet that I could travel around with. I would love that but Spending lots of time in my own head writing music writing poetry just feeding myself or feasting on art that that gets me going. I don't know when you have the time to do all that you're doing because a lot of times you're living with that character and you don't want to get out of that character's at Yeah. I mean at the beginning so I always used to read a lot and then when I first started acting I found it hard to read and then in this lost year because I was jumping from Amazon head to my characters. Sandy's head an inhabitant of these different worlds reading a book was actually the only way that I could get people to not touch

Jane Austen Emma Director Jane Nights Youtube Austin Eleanor Casson LA Philip I Elinor Amazon Sandy Robert Eggers Dalai Mr Knightley Writer
A History of Seduction

The Book Review

15:04 min | 10 months ago

A History of Seduction

"Clement. Knox joins US now from London. His new book is called Seduction History from the enlightenment to the present Clement. Thanks for being here so your day job. I want to start there. Because you have a book oriented day job you work as a nonfiction buyer at waterstones which is of course a major British bookstore teen. What's your job like there? What do you do so their tour of managing nonfiction and about two hundred and eighty stores? My job really is just to get the the right books and the right stores. I'm responsible for history philosophy politics Papa. Johns I mean about nine categories overall and so. We do a lot with the publishers booksellers as well. Did you get to pick which categories you're responsible for? No when I got the job I was just assigned and then they'll kind of a reshuffle if he has got a few more categories as well they kind of work perfectly because it more or less alliance with what I'm interested in reading and what I'm interested in writing see you're deciding which books go into waterstone's the chain into which stores and how many copies are ordered exactly that to you. So that's a very powerful position. It's very structured is a very fair how we how we do it and is a constant communication publishers stores and sometimes even the authors as well we very even-handed brushing away and there's no kind of mysterious. What would probably shooter who understand. What's your typical day? Like a lot of meetings a lot of looking at science because a lot of reading of publicity plans and back and forth people. He wants us to buy their. Berko by book or by even more so. Are you living months ahead of time looking at? What are the books coming out this fall? Oh Oh yeah. We're tasked with trying to look as far as possible. So wig about to start. Looking at the timber Tiber November on average would normally thinking three months ahead of the east. And what happened with your book? The decider like we're going to order a hundred thousand copies of seduction. Yeah I I wish it was it by my boss has taken over that completely and utterly redeem. Oh look thing I try and pretend you know having to stay in a total of ignorance about one's own buck. I agree. Yeah but let's talk. Let's talk about your book. This may seem like perhaps a silly question but let's define seduction exactly. How is it action separate from courtship? How is it different from something? Maybe more creepy and less mutual like sexual harassment. Like what is seduction? I think the crucial aspect is selection. It's psychological and fumes kind of like confrontation between the minds and the passion of two different individuals in English law. That was a whole body of law do seduction discussing in some detail and wish would later it was. It came to America with with the mayflower that was developed in an extraordinary way and in those laws there was a distinction made between between rape which is obviously a What is coercive violent and seduction was seen as distinct from rape and she assumed that consent had been obtained that consent was in some way vitiated or somehow degraded by the techniques by which it was one so seduction carry that burden. That somehow someone's being over and perhaps the method used to win them over the Underhand but that's only one definition. There's a whole other definition which would say you know. It's just about courtship and game playing and it's fun and this is dawn which is dawn sexual freedom. Did you focus on that fun? Dance in this book or did you cover the full gamut the way the book is kind of structured is the. There's like a dialectic. Going on and one half of the history of seduction is about people worrying about sexual freedom worrying about things going wrong about the collision desire empower the capacity for abuse and wrongdoing. That is one of the history and the other half is about sexual freedom being this exciting enjoyable thing which which is buried lighthearted and people Is The insurance of the church. Will the government so the book kind of structured around the kind of dichotomy and not conflict between our two years of war sexual freedom is and what that means deduction your subtitle is history from the enlightenment the presidency? You're focusing mostly on the modern era. But let's start just briefly with that premodern era talk about what our earliest ideas of seduction were. Maybe perhaps grounded in with Allah G. And then how that changed as you moved into the Judeo Christian era the reason I start in the enlightenment. There's no because seduction didn't exist before seventeen hundred is because that's when seduction narrative as we understand it was born and the book is about this very powerful strange and modern thing seduction narrative which was basically invented in the eighteen th century and the product of a response to a whole new wave of ideas about the human mind about what we now think of. Feminism will prototype eminem and also about the discovery of sexual freedom as part of the blue celebrating our freedom and the enlightenment and before then you had a situation where sexuality was heavily pleased. It was subject to legal and religious interrogation and you know in America. Of course you had The puritans were very big on sexual policing but also in and the rest of Europe as well and over the course of the eighteenth century that whole value system changed. By the end of the Eighteenth Century Sexual Freedom was for granted and to be cleared. Sexual Freedom for them was not the sexual freedom that we now cherish worry about. That really meant that women go to choose. Who They married. That's where the foundation sexual freedom was not explains basically every Jane austen novel for instance. That is the undependable. The plus. They're out of plenty other novels besides and then more generally a kind of increasingly faraji towards male sexuality in particular so you see the rise of the double standard would be in spectacularly bad behavior of the rates of London and Paris Venice. You say that there were three modes of thought that really gave rise to the modern seduction narrative liberalism materialism and feminism. Let's talk about liberalism for example. How does that bring us? But we consider to be seduction as it is today in John. Look Letter of colouration. He He makes us interesting comment race. Is that basically? Everyone is going to have to look after their own. Their prospects of their own souls so liberalism is no longer going to tell people how to live their lives and what to do and instead they're going to have to have their own moral accounting and if in the religious view if they'd be living badly that we dealt with in the off the world it's not gonNA dealt with by the government and the President and obviously if you think about it back then because up until that point they'd be bathing policing sexuality quite a lot and sexuality was once you're saying okay. Everyone's GonNa look after their own moral well-being and the government's going to step out of it. The second and third order consequence of that include a increasingly hands off attitude towards sexuality and basically people are left to make their own decisions and see how how ends up so. It's not that people sat around in the late seventeenth century and said we're going to invent liberalism and one that includes sexual freedom sexual freedom flowed quite logically from this this view that we're not going to try and make everyone lived where he wants them to and that's because they tried that in Seventeenth Century. Europe and being horrific bloodshed and wars and everything else and they wanted you to move beyond that how it's addiction flow from materialism again because we'll be philosophers like like Locke and hume. They were kind of operating on the assumption that we're living in a godless world and they they were very careful how they frame that and Voltaire as well. Then we're castle how. They framed that because of course you won't read out to be an atheist but once you get to the position where we're saying. Okay they're not angels and devils and there's no Holy Spirit brought in the world and instead it's just individuals with brains achieving reality once you make those leaps you can move from new Ford away from this moralistic view of sexuality and towards an idea and that's like psychological view of reality and that's seduction narrative dramatize is this internal monologue about reason about passionate about desire and not basically the entire genre of the novel possible. And if you read these early novels like Richardson who had discussed at some length. Those books now in the more or less unreadable right ABBA time now. If you're named Pamela centrally forced to read Samuel Richardson so you know it comes with the you've read it that I have read and Shamanov so yes so been down that unfortunate path. To what extent is the history of seduction also a history of power and power dynamics? One way of looking at it is that it's not a matter of about power. One way of looking at it is that in fact sexual freedom is empowering and people who practice sexual freedom or taking control of their lives and our free liberated individuals and not seeing a strain and food since the Enlightenment Henry Fielding Mary Wilson Kroft Plus He Shelley Mary Shelley Khatri at all the way up to the present where people you know saying well. People shouldn't be telling me how to live my life. So I'm not I'm not part of it. Basically rejects the idea that seduction is about power and it says actually selections about about freedom and choice but obviously power is a complex thing to discuss. But I root it's about coercion and seduction it about agency. And as soon as our collides with especially in situations where you know that sexual inequality economic inequality there's racial inequality very quickly. We can see how adoption courtship can shade into something daca. You go into issues around race and seduction and in particular America's laws and attitudes around race in the book talk about those parts of the book America in the nineteen. Th Century developed this very extensive body of state laws placing seduction and eventually America how to federal law. The man act which was essentially a seduction Laura in everything but name and in the American south. Clearly it wasn't just a question of the law there were lynchings and these lynchings were often justified by reference to alleged sexual assaults or you know interracial relationships happening not not as true all the way up to an until so. It's not just that was seduction literature. Racial is clearly that was a very serious and horrifying epidemic of racial violence. Often had a sexual subtext. But in the case of the laws the laws designed to empower kind of racial scrutiny of sexual relationships and the mind acts was used to in California was used to prosecute lots of Japanese immigrants who had interracial relationships in the northeast and the Midwest where there were lots of Jewish immigrants or Polish German immigrants. It was used to kind of put further scrutiny communities and then the story. I tell about Joe Johnson who was the first black heavyweight champion of the world it was used to basically hound this man who they couldn't lynch or there were several attempts to do so until they tried to to get him in the courts. Did You keep the book focused on heterosexual seduction or do you cover sex relationships as well? I mentioned overseeing the enlightenment though. Is this on Abrasion of sexual freedom. I should have a code of that. Which obviously it was a celebration of heterosexual. Freedom of sexual freedom was not tackled until the nineteen sixties and seventies and beyond. So I do keep a focus on on heterosexual relationships but the simple reason is that that's deduction narrative of itself was born about this new idea of celebrating sexual freedom without sexual freedom did not include the same sex and curious about the origin of this book. Like is this something that you began before you were at waterstones is the nonfiction or a one of the nonfiction buyers or did this kind of evolve. Why hasn't anyone written about this? And getting all these other books about these other things but there's no good history of seduction. The funniest seed of this book was what I was living in America just finished Grad School in DC. And I was just reading novels like dangerous liaisons and a hero of our time and I kind of kept on coming across this theme of the Seduction Narrative. And it just wouldn't go away and it kind of knew it away me for several years and I kind of this whole history of the seduction laws which I find well fascinating and weird and then of course in in our own time. A lot of things have happened. The rise of the pick up this online dating or the rest of it. I had this of intuition that there was a story And it was the story larger than just what was going on now that it had a history and yeah. I was pretty much convinced that every day. Open the newspaper and someone in Britain the book but they never did give it a go. Well this segment is going up on Valentine's Day so it feels appropriate to ask you about your favorites seduction narrative. Dangerous liaisons novel is is is absolutely amazing. I would recommend twenty one I. It's incredibly that it was actually written two centuries ago and there have been several great adaptions of it and they were to the nineteen eighty s and then those cruel intentions made out of it in the ninety s which I think is fantastic film still. I mentioned briefly a hero of our time by lemon of again. I think everyone should read that book. And it was an incredible and the Russians were really heavily influenced by the English narrative. They will read some Richardson. They'd read Palmer and Clarisa. Bridgeton is name checked in Eugene Oregon. And of course they wrote obsessed with Byron who was a kind of mythical seducer lifetime and so the whole Russian tradition wouldn't really exist without those two figures and he said in London. Tolkien postgame also tolstoy as well all right well. I guess plenty of people to read over Valentine's Day maybe not moves people's chosen activity and this particular day but if if you are alone with book those are the ones to pick up in addition to of course deduction clement. Thanks for being here

America Samuel Richardson London Europe Johns Clement United States Waterstone Clement. Knox Eminem Jane Austen Rape Seventeenth Century California Harassment President Trump Eugene Oregon Midwest Britain Paris Venice
"austen" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

10:08 min | 11 months ago

"austen" Discussed on EconTalk

"That whole movie. It's it's it's a lovely movie but it's it's worth sitting through just for the last five minutes. We're not gonNA talk about them but for me. I found that it's a it's a moment of of Movie Magic that Just it just so all done so world at it is wonderfully well done in the every part of it. I think is terrific rather than just the last five minutes. So let's talk about about your book. the lost books of Jane austen which is part of the story of how Jane Austen came to be Jane austen which Tell us what you did. And what you what your enterprise was in that in that in that project squarely quite a quite unusual quite beautiful thinking I say I have to admit I didn't set out to write a book about books Certainly not a book about sort of shabby cheap schlocky. Additions of Jane Austen It came about as kind of a local curiosity where I found one copy from the Victorian era that had been published just by Lever Soap Company And I thought how odd and began sort of scratching away at the history of this addition and that was really kind of a white labeled imprint That had been used in the end. Does it give away in the eighteen nineties for soap wrappers to readers Of a very working class status and it had been part of a long list of books. Wchs am this was practice and sense and sensibility. Were both kind of soap additions. And once I started looking into the history of this edition I realized over time that not only had this particular edition not being recorded and why would it was a giveaway It wasn't wasn't a significant addition. It didn't end up in major bibliography didn't end up in any library. But at the same time I began to discover other additions and Also from the nineteen especially the nineteenth century that had never been recorded that we're all cheap editions and that were at the bottom demand of the book market and because they were at the bottom end printed on bad paper and probably included some misprint. CIN they didn't count and I began to sort of collect them and count them and found a number of Collectors A who were interested in one thousand nine hundred publishing nineteenth century publishers bindings. Or who'd been interested in Austin for many many decades and had acquired along the way various quirky additions nations and putting all of those collections together and doing a lot of sort of Unconventional ebay hunting for for various kind of FLOTSAM and floats in the book. editions or bookish additions of Jane austen's had been neglected discovered a kind of whole inventory of works that hadn't been accounted for and these works. Were all cheap. And it was their cheapness S.. That seemed to have been offensive to those who were collecting and recording and studying Jane austen and some of them many of them I think were Were railroad additions of talk about that whole industry and how that came about so one of So Jane Austen was as I said to sort of a bit of asleep during her lifetime and then in eighteen thirty three so about fifteen years after her death A man man named Richard Bentley. An enterprising publisher decided to reprint a bunch of novels He approached the Austin family. Got The right to reprint a her Six novels and so in eighteen thirty three he is now or he's kind of Treated as the prince charming if you will of the sleeping beauty story that is. Jane austen's lumbering reputation that gets reawakened in eighteen thirty three in these editions. That are The cost six shillings which was a huge drop in price compared to a first edition but the bentleys activities. He's created these railroad editions. These other publishers that began printing at a much lower price point one shilling two shillings I and selling them these books at Railway stations depots Book stalls in in venues. That that were not as elevated as where Bentley was selling his wares and create an entirely new market. Because he's got I don't know if it's perfect storm warm or you've got sort of this perfect elements that all influence book prices and make them drop. In the middle of the nineteenth century pulp paper stereotype printing steam impress and of course the steam engine of trains and the new distribution networks. That trains make possible for books. Everything lowers price along with A cloth covers which become a standard in the eighteen thirties. As well so here we have people all of a sudden having access to transportation The Wi fi on those trends wasn't so good no really wasn't so they won't look for for something to do and what they did is they stood around in the train station was there was a bookseller for this long journey. Who are them a book that was often I think thank you said Tuppence or threatens? A word I'd never heard before I didn't know there was three pence. Yeah three pennies a threat and I don't know what that amount would translate to in terms of an hourly wage of a worker at the day. But it's a small amount so that so that if you're comparing impairing this you know this elite guiding Bentley and his six shilling editions that are kind of high middle class and and Genteel at six shillings. If you're dealing with an unskilled worker who's earning ten or twelve shillings. A week That that that that's it's not affordable and so this. This new category of books at railway did give people kind of an ability to binge-watch watch and ability to buy You know binge read The kinds of books that had been parked published At the lower price point point in cereals and magazines but binge reading was for toffs for the elite for people who could buy a whole book and suddenly finally Working People could buy an entire book for Schilling or half shilling and then in the eighteen nineties drops even to three pennies two pennies one one penny and suddenly you have Austin being binge read by everyone and that phenomenon of her being read by coal miners. Listen school children and Ordinary working people is not something. We usually have accounted for in our reception histories of Austin simply. Because we've been looking at the wrong books. was she serialized. Originally I know she was not she listed listed in three volumes at a time. So these were three three decker novels. that the early version of that And so they were quite as what. What do you mean three decker novel? meaning that Novels and no one knows exactly why. This phenomenon began was at libraries. That could that liked books in parts. Three large parts for a long novel so that three lenders could borrow at the same time Or did the fact that anomalies were suddenly being published in three volumes at a time Even something nets glorified short story like On Mary Shelley's Frankenstein was published in three volumes. But a lot of wide margins in the case of Frankenstein Because that was the convention that a novel that Genre era was inhabiting three volumes at a time I mean there are some exceptions people who are very long winded Francis Bernie Samuel Richardson They don't fit into three volumes games. But yeah the three volume novel became a phenomenon in Austin was at the at the forefront of that but that also made novels very expensive items items until she paper comes along mid-century and cheaper versions so just to speculate. I think Dickens Dickens was serialized so if you were dickens reader reader you read a chapter at a time in a magazine the later got put into a book Presumably some of the technological changes you talked about that made those railroad editions possible made magazines possible and affordable which led to the potential for civilization. That didn't exist in Jane's time but Just interesting but the the point is is that scholars looked at fancy leather bound editions of books to look at how authors reputation you might rise and fall. What you've done for? Jane Austen is tried to find as many of these less expensive additions. There's Zillions of them and and what's interesting. Of course is that most of them should have been thrown away. Most of them were. They fell apart. They they were helped for for a variety of reasons. Sounds but you found enough. Can you say how many of you dug up on this project. It's been going on sort of slumbering in background of other things for about ten years and then I found a few years in people who'd been collecting for decades for four decades. It's each and so altogether we found yet. Hundreds.

Jane austen Austin Richard Bentley Dickens Dickens Wchs Lever Soap Company Railway stations Bentley Mary Shelley publisher Wi bentleys Austin family Francis Bernie Samuel Richards Tuppence Schilling
"austen" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:33 min | 11 months ago

"austen" Discussed on WRVA

"In the rolls off the sides of those of only been on the line for three shots now they missed a missed a lunatic comes out of the game is replaced by the much smaller three point seven six six four seven four four six four player in second free will roll over the ironing drops illegals one for two thirty five points apiece region trailed by seven of the break here's Williams in the front court merely turns over like reflexes on the defensive end Braxton key you get to hand on it but it goes off of his hand and out of bounds the boy was Tony can you check on whatever he said I missed the Williams up in full court it's beat off the dribble that puts pressure on everybody else our with the flexibility so here's a here's Williams pulling up just inside the arc contested shot they won't go nice rebound attorneys for Jane Austen aborigine has a chance for its first lead in the second half Cavaliers led by four until eight eleven scorn to close to half for Florida state now they get a chance to get it back is a little tense silence while going to happen is the plan now is to the near corner one with a left hand dribble he only trying to pack his way in in traffic all right thank you bye six inside again as in the way and the shot clock was Lachlan often I thought the ball hit the room Tony Bennett is screaming right now there's a look at this I think the ball do Victoria the room the I thought so too I mean that's called Virginia two points now as a result well now you know we're was the ball recovered related story position finished with the with the lady and right the scramble to house late it is what is that because I was so I think the whistle was blown maybe they backed up maybe I'm wrong either way I think Virginia is going to have the ball to you know get the ball back as a result of that blowing the whistle it should the visual basic reset yeah so it it so my question is this do not maybe I'm wrong on this but did Florida State Bank on defensively because they blown the whistle for the stock longer the Hornets sounded I don't I don't think we do off alone I don't I don't think so I think the blue was I I didn't hear the whistle to out of the basket are we gonna time out on the on the floor so we're gonna take more than twelve twenty one to play here we are in half number two with thirty five thirty five.

Williams Braxton Cavaliers Lachlan Tony Bennett Virginia Florida State Bank Hornets Jane Austen Florida
Interviewing Joe Darowski from The Protagonist Podcast

The Fandom Podcast

10:11 min | 1 year ago

Interviewing Joe Darowski from The Protagonist Podcast

"Now on the one hand just doing it is the way you're gonNA learn so there's no other way to figure out how to do it other than saying I want to be podcast and therefore I will cast my name is Joe Girardi and I host the protagonist podcast previously I co-hosted we'll get into that I am sure we definitely will but I i WanNa know what got you into the podcasting game what made you become a podcast so in uncut somewhere in late two thousand fourteen one of my best friends from high school reached out to me and said delisted podcastone yes hide I listen to podcasts for years now and he's like I think I want to start one and I said I've batted around the idea starting one for a while and never committed and he's like let's commit and then within a month or two we had recorded our first episode and then a little bit after that we we've dropped the weekly episode of the protagonist podcast ever since What's never missed week which has been difficult at times there's always hurdles that come up in this case both my former co host todd Mac and I okay work in academia and he had a semester abroad in Spain and that was a little rough and making sure that we got a weekly recording done and we are back is to find work arounds dull recording when could but there were definitely times where we were starting recording very late might live and very early his time to make it work and we struggled through and and made it what is the premise of the protagonist podcast the premise of our podcast. I took a few rough drafts you know we've added a few ideas back and forth eventually we settled on What is the protagonist podcast where each week we talked about a great integrate story and we try and make sure that we mix it up our goal is basically we don't hit this one hundred percent of the time but but basically we wanted to talk about a character from a TV show a comic book a film and a novel every month so that's kind of the rotation we sprinkled some other things and we've touched on some other forms of storytelling podcast in there as well eventually we said well let's just talk about some great characters in great stories and we do try and mix it up between kind of the Classic Canon Story so we've definitely talked about some Shakespeare Jane austen with more pop culture stories we've done the planet hulk graphic novel which I think that Kinda grab bag at has its pluses and minuses I think it keeps some people will get up because they're just like that one's not for me interested but at the same time it might may expose listeners to things that are unfamiliar with it definitely has exposed me the host of the pot podcast to some stories that found from listener requests or things at todd suggested we have patrons at a certain level can request the topic to talk about and so in doing at this point we have released two hundred twenty episodes I think we've recorded about two hundred thirty 'cause we try ours is evergreens we try and keep a back catalog going there's just a lot of threat of material has been covered so one of my favorite things is finding a new story that I probably wouldn't across because of one of those suggestions saying Oh this is great I love this I'm so glad that I've been introduced to that I hope that we've been able to do that for listeners at some point as well I've been listening to your show for a few years now and I tell you that isn't that is one of the reasons why I it's because I get exposed to things that I never would have known about otherwise absolutely never would have known and it's a lot of fun there you and your your one hundred percent right there around Mike I don't even think I'm going to be interested in this and I I never deleted I just like okay I'm gonNA listen to that one finished these other ones and then and then I listened to what it was I should listen to that right away because I think I'm GonNa go watch that one of the first one that comes to my mind that you did a really deep dive on and it was it was an amazing episode food was watership down and I have no idea why because the cover has bunnies on it but I always thought that was like Mabel Battle Story I heard you talk about it was like Oh that's what I thought it was at all I well I didn't think it was I thought it was about sailor bunnies because as a child I caught five minutes of the animated adaptation and it was like this is very brief passage in the novel where they float down the river some but that's part and it's called watership down so I assumed this was all about seafaring rabbits for some reason and tell I'm pretty sure that one was a a patron request that came in and I started reading I was like Oh this is good it's not about see very rabbits and I got really into it and that was one of the episodes of kind of blew up for US view stick with podcasting while you know you kind of get the numbers that you expect for a number of downloads like you you kinda get your but then every once in a while you hit on something and it's like catching lightning in a bottle you're not quite sure why but it blows up and watership down for us like blew up on our facebook page we had thousands of likes on that one episode when we had done things that we would have thought would have a much larger fan base like we do Harry Potter episodes every year I'm you know we're we're going through one book per year kind of what we're doing we've done episodes on Star Trek and star wars and popular TV shows that you know do all right folks but watership down I think the combination of having a much broader and deeper fan base we knew seems like a lot of people from the comments we were getting on our facebook page like read this as in their adolescence or whatever and and just never forgot and it's stayed as a favourite and they've gone back to revisit it and a combination of that with no one talking about it on podcast whereas I think that's a big secret right there is everybody I everybody out there is talking about star wars and star trek and it's really hard to get really hard to get noticed on that but when you're when you're talking about something that nobody else is yeah I think that's I think that's something that really worth a magic happen yes absolutely and and also I mean it is a great book and it holds up to a lot of scrutiny and e easily we're able to do our our long discussion the episodes tend to be about an hour in length sometimes you know fifteen minutes sometime seventy minutes but about an hour is what we're shooting for and I delightful surprise both to say Oh this is something that's so good that I had never engaged with and I probably wouldn't have engaged with podcast and then also to discover that it kind of caught fire for a podcast and spread so you mentioned that it's a book that holds up to a lot of scrutiny and you you keep saying that you work in academia but let let let's throw this out there you're you're commercial that you have or that you had when it was you and todd were a couple of fan boys with PhD and that wasn't just that wasn't just fluff that was that's a fact correct yeah so I have a PhD Michigan State University in American Studies and at Michigan State they they have kind of a threat of HD? emphasis on American Popular Culture and my PhD dissertation was on race and gender in the X men comic books most of my academic publishing has either been on superhero comic books or on TV shows like the office or frazier or cheers so those are kind of my veins of research which todd has a PhD from Stanford and he studied the literature of Spain it's peninsula literature is what his PhD was and so you're taking this experience that you have with American pop culture PhD's literary background and you're diving into things like planet holck and and I always forget the name of it but it's the it's the youtube adaptation the Lizzy Lizzy Bennett Diaries yes yes that was a patron requested they've requested something that was more like classic literature I can't remember what it was now but then they switched at the last minute never mind I want to hear you guys talk about high school musical for an hour that was a fun episode as well and one of the strangest complaints I guess August complaints we've had because if you're going to be putting the material out there on the Internet do not just GonNa get bracelet with people who aren't fans of what you do but one of the biggest complaints we had is when we did an episode on Catcher in the Rye classic American Cannon Literature You know it's the signed in high schools or colleges all the time and both have literature you know backgrounds and and academics grounds but the person complained because we were making jokes while we talked about catcher in the Rye and that really upset them and in response we kind of Said look we we are GonNa talk about classic cannon things and we're also gonNA talk about light pop culture things and the combination that we think listeners or they are going to have is that we're going to try and living deep in the lighter pop culture things we're going to try and have some fun when we're talking about the classic deep literature you know the the cannon with a capital c ideas of literature and we want to always maintained that mix of having some good insights but also having some fun with the topics we're talking about not taking ourselves or the texts too seriously so you mentioned that you now hosted hosted the protagonist podcast by yourself todd todd went off he moved out of state and and pursued other projects projects yeah we made it for four years together he left on the two hundred episode he's been back a couple of times since then it's not like we had a big talk when he's gone he just said with with his career in studying peninsula literature is that I can't take the time commitment that this the maintaining this podcast is taking away from the studies I need for for his career he he just couldn't do it we we as he I mean he did it for four years so there's a lot of podcasters can't make

Joe Girardi Todd Mac Spain One Hundred Percent Four Years Fifteen Minutes Seventy Minutes Five Minutes One Hand
"austen" Discussed on The Mortified Podcast

The Mortified Podcast

15:55 min | 1 year ago

"austen" Discussed on The Mortified Podcast

"Rule of Jane. Austen fandom never go fo- pride and prejudice. So I'm Jan. I grew up in West Virginia. But as a teenager I read a lot of books and most of them were from the nineteenth century. So as a result, I had this vision of love that was kinda straight out of a Jane Austen novel by the time, Jen, enter Thais, cool, her love nineteenth century, lit was setting her part from her peers. So in high school I, I wouldn't say that I fit in easily. I also wasn't a total outcast, but I was definitely shy. I mean, honestly, I was a lot more comfortable. Just staying home reading Madame Bovery or something like that. In fact, it showed up, inter fashion, I had a lot of long kind of florally dresses. I had this one blouse that I still remember, you know, super Lacey and I had this cameo broach that I wore way too often. I'm sure I aspired to look like a true Victorian, and that wasn't easy and West Virginia and it showed up in her musical taste, while my peers were listening to eighties. Pop not that I didn't listen to that, but I was really into classical music. And I developed this huge fascination for Mendelssohn. I thought he was the best and I loved his music, so romantic all of which may dating or as she might have called it courtship that much harder. I honestly, think that kind of having these Victorian novel narratives in my head and trying to fit boys into that was kind of safety valve for me because I think I was really afraid of a lot of that stuff. And so yet that made my dating life, rather complicated and mostly non existent..

Jane Austen West Virginia Lacey Mendelssohn Madame Bovery Jen
Fifty Shades author E.L. James' releases new book and the reviews aren't good

Hysteria

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Fifty Shades author E.L. James' releases new book and the reviews aren't good

"You gave I understand your first effort view. Yeah. I left with a with a with a bomb. I just wanted to to leave with my first and last ever review. What was it? It was a book called the Mr. from fifty shades of grey author James, and though it's called the Mr. it is not like a BSN say, it's not a sexy book. It's. Not like a erotic. I was picturing like winning. Yeah. We gets hot. And you missed your song like with some like lemon infused water like wasn't very clever title. Yeah. It has so many interpretations. Yeah. So it's a bad book. It was like not just bad. But like actively offensive it. It's about hey. And they'll Bainian woman who is accident, we sex traffic to the United States, but escapes her sex traffickers, and is rescued by a model slash DJ slash Earl and model slash slash. I do not being like his title. He's like a British Earl. Yeah. A little bit of Jane Austen. Yeah.

Jane Austen United States James Bainian
‘Clueless’ Movie Remake in the Works

Collider Movie Talk

02:05 min | 2 years ago

‘Clueless’ Movie Remake in the Works

"Studio, how do you feel about a clueless remake like how do you read make this about the nineties because clueless is so it's the nineties movie to me, it's it's Emma from Jane Austen. So yeah, of course, you can remake it. I don't know if it'll be as I comic. I mean, there was mean girls that was like conic from the ninety s and we had no mean girls from the two os clues clueless from the nineties did we have one in the mid. One's eighties or fifteen twenty fifteen. We have had that wake one coming of age film that so encapsulates the current time period that we're in. I don't know if we're able to be able to put our finger on it at the time and say, oh, this is definitely the Moby of our generation. We might look back in ten years and say, I don't know something like on a love Simon. Oh, no. That was the movie of our time, Mark Riley. Will this clueless movie may be the film that Kim is talking about it could be the movie that reminds us not of the nineties, but of the two thousand teens I think it has absolutely has a chance because of what Kim said in reference to Emma? It's a it's a story that you can remake and shine a light on the on the culture. And that's what clueless did so. Well, is that that's a staple nineties culture. You know, you feel it you watch it rewatch it you're like, oh, I'm right there in the nineties you can do it now. And I think the team that they have I finally saw girls trip like a few months ago. And I was like this is great good for you. That was a great movie. And so when you tell me that the right? Is coming on produce it and we get the glow, which I did watch few episodes aglow. This is a great team to bring it who knows if it'll land like the clueless of the nineties did. And I'm wondering if they could do this nostalgia thing that they've been doing in movies, which is it's a continuation. So maybe Alicia SilverStone share can come back somehow just reprise her role for a cameo. That's like it. It

Emma KIM Alicia Silverstone Jane Austen Mark Riley Ten Years
"austen" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"austen" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"A john austin usually a jane austen we'll be done by your you know your michael app i he never did but you know what i mean like mike newell's right exactly but even though the road british ernie met director guy tv theater guys would sort of risen through the ranks thompson becomes such a big movie star kimiko film from a first time screenwriter sure like everyone was still holding that it it also kind of a big budget sixteen million a decent sized budget and that was because this was post little women vets right so they were like oh good point they was all right so now we've oriented ourselves host little women free post this episode is posted a women postponed yet crack postponed but pre our little women episode women who directed that one that wasn't mike newell right it was that was no was it on one of you to oh directed by female right it's not it's not killing innocent as it's no that's an actor i'm sorry what it's gillian sorry sorry policy except okay any pascal is the one who gets this movie grandma 'cause she's got some juice at sony at this time yes and she goes like we should take the shot on this swing in pays off handsome at columbia guess does pay off handsomely was a a hit the oscar nominations and it sparked a ongoing jane austen trend that they've done fluctuates it does actuate middle come back with your right and also then sometimes like jane austen bio pic out of books like becoming into that people know right and the genus in book club vicky trying like these pride and prejudice yeah there's only one truly great austin film and it's this mafia over because then there's like emma is like pretty good but you could just watch this again the joe wright pride and prejudice is kind of really really joe right one yeah but also take so many exactly it's a pretty good movie that's ripping off this movie and then like taking stuff out of it that's like to jane austen also fucks up the ending in my opinion so extremely but whatever is this because it's too like romantic he's turning it into a bronte movie when it shouldn't be you know what i mean and it's wasn't that an ending that only some audiences it was two endings clue no no it's just like the very last thing with lizzy darcy some people didn't see that maybe lying cut that out well it's just shown interest yes look this up on your laptop in the us release of the film which is america big country right an additional last hall yeah outside of him really happy together crazy did not know they didn't even more insulting with the americans get that they like each other also kind of a whip blanket that movie i actually like him in that movie but that he's playing that character which stroll jerk and he's he's dialed into ninety so good in that though she's good she is yeah i don't hate that movie i think it's a soso austin sherry if that makes sense it is good watch but then this was i was looking at this right which is this is right after he does his henry score and it kept on sounding like it was about to go into the big or the tristan yeah right yeah it's constantly like teetering on that i was gonna say though is there was a lot of controversy at the time that we didn't get ninety for best director because this movie kind of got the across the board nominations and he got the golden globe nomination and the nomination so it was like who did he get replaced by and this is one of those years where all three of those didn't line up at all run coward windy but doesn't get nominated for the oscar that is a weird year chris noonan for babe and michael radford for il postino fucking dumb.

john austin jane austen mike newell
"austen" Discussed on Rough Translation

Rough Translation

05:05 min | 2 years ago

"austen" Discussed on Rough Translation

"To her own surprise d had come to admire the very thing about jane austen that she'd always hated that the heroine's accept these oppressive rules now she and men were taking advantage of those same rules of decorum to try and get what they wanted but there is also the contrasting fema jane austen in pride and prejudice one of the bennet sisters lizzie despite her mother's wishes turns down a marriage proposal you cannot be serious in your rejection from a very eligible suitor i thank you for the owner of your proposals but to accept them is absolutely impossible my feelings forbid it in every respect this scene of defiance it happens again again austin books where heroin stands up for principles despite everyone telling her that the do so is imprudent and it happens also in leans fan fiction story she's let her heroin avoid the ending that she so miserably blended into which was this unhappy marriage she needed jane austen she needed that prism to help her understand her own life as it was and i think that gave her the confidence to do what she did next which was asked her husband for a separation do you think we should have separate houses adjoining houses and share the children and then he came to me and he said he came back locked the door and he pretty much broke down and he said i've taken the kids and don't give you permission to take them away he said i'm taking them away so i went to a police station and i said i wanna report something and they said what's her name what's your phone number what's your husband's name and when i was writing down just looked at me in the picture of the phone recalling to take me to come and pick her up from the station that's what she thought was happening she goes to court she gets custody but even though the court orders the children to be returned to her she says that he keeps taking them and not returning the kids and she silently enjoys and then she says one day she decides to fight it's not an easy thing but it's not impossible should record this video just because it didn't work today does amuse gonna work work i have faith in on the map she's been doing this all year this is not the first time it's only the first time that have gone public she posts the video on facebook and her system malia immediately calls and tells at a take it down nothing no penalty anything is possible in this country and why put yourself out there i kept telling her wait wait wait wait lean had married really powerful person be cautious lillian actually disregards molly's advice and she ramps it up she crushes through the limits of convention i'm here buddy gallipoli station i'm here to file a complaint against a the father of my children she posts another video on facebook and this time she's confronting the police court order just midi but you'll media chill demanding they enforce the coda gorge going they keep killing put the camera away they will not she says i don't want to eat i just want my children and i say give madame's mortar she says i don't want water i only want justice g i have a court order in front of you which says that i have legal custody of my daughters lillies facebook post gets thousands of us and despite her sister's warning the comments are almost all positive also gets her kids back though it's not clear whether it was the pressure from the video or just the legal process doing its thing what is clear is that the lien herself has changed i've completely rejected certain social codes i've rejected them for my life look a hanging what will people think i have rejected it from my life and keeping up appearances i reject that completely now on his last reporting trip she encountered an entirely different lean leads holding a press conference for the launcher for book it's a collection of stories she's convinced six other pakistani women to contribute their own jane austen theme stories spacing even her older sister malaya written one i asked my husband permission to make it more racy he said gopher it and the books cold aisle stone stone thank you to us lean is celebrated at the british embassy in it's a cool eight ning you can hear a fountain in the background there's a swing chair that's dawn with roses she and her sister malia opposing in front of lodge posters of the table taking with them what more.

jane austen one day
"austen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"austen" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Their cousins and bob lives here in austin he's a pro golfer and she went to the university of texas well look at a lot of austen connection here we're not doing so hot no let me give you let me give you one kevin i think too i think you mega this kevin under the same light of the supreme court while the president was appointing and announcing his supreme court nominee this woman was performing a mile away at a gentlemen's club in washington dc kevin i know you do you know i'm sure i'm sure that jeff use her real name would use your real name will new were at i know who you're talking about but i can't even think of her name her name would want weather fake weather think what kind of weather we had last couple of days it was stormy dan stormy daniels i heard she did not have a sell out either imagine that she was here in texas not too long ago like last week or something in edinburgh i think i know and she didn't care draw very well she got well they were charging like a fifty dollar cover charge really go in and see her for fifteen minutes it's there's not much to see i mean just go video five dollars why would you pay fifty i guess to get an autograph or something i don't know i can't believe she's doing that yeah this is what is her what does she call it the trump tour the trump tour the trump tower walk away with their fifteen minutes of fifteen you can't walk team minutes have already walked away from her kevin you've got some right you got some wrong but you know what you're gonna win those four tickets to see the round rock express play later this summer.

austin kevin president edinburgh bob university of texas austen washington jeff texas fifteen minutes fifty dollar five dollars
"austen" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

VINTAGE Podcast

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"austen" Discussed on VINTAGE Podcast

"Hello and welcome back to vintage podcast with me leaning homes today we are going off book with henry james when james died he left behind a series of notebooks filled with ideas for novels and stories but never wrote them not one to call it over before it's over we got ten of our best contemporary authors and james enthusiasts to write some short stories based on these little germs of ideas they all differ dramatically in setting and style but henry james very these really rich suggestive enticing notes and here vintage will of messing with and expanding the cannon so tales from a master's new book was born contributors include very tremaine cone tobin jonathan co and lots more and we got three of the country is in a room with the guardian journalist john mullin to talk about the book so you're about to hear from suzy boyd lynn trust and the editor of the book philip horne in conversation about this wonderful new old idea hi thank you very much coming to this event to regular stories and games that are roads of my mom charing the session with vin trusts hall there was the answer all say this i'm cg boys all three contributors to the body which means it's phil's debut as a fiction writer and very fine story he's with team fox files how he got this idea that how he managed to entice so many of leading conviction rogers to contribute to it required no the idea probably stood it it's okay okay but but from if i did always been interested in things james didn't get round to rising like abrahams interesting is that as a whole way pitch through an up jane austen and reviewing jane austen's letters didn't respond so we have to say about james mitchell multiple thing to have all the american scene is travel book about the market was going to write a second one percents the west about convoy near around writing out of we've been curious these gaps the new books are always been interested in but one of the things about the way people tend to use the books as they don't very often read them getting to they look in the index what meeting you whatever they look back and see what games recorded what made you therefore they never look at the bits about stories that he didn't complete so when i started getting books and working through my realized again just how many of these unfinished so world jeanpierre top forty and then send them out to you is central that he didn't in the right built mineral big document and then i started sending about gradually to a few people with friends like jumping coat it was a sloop basis maybe we could give the ideas that you chose well big donors of choices than try.

henry james john mullin editor philip horne writer abrahams jane austen suzy boyd lynn vin rogers james mitchell
Audi recalls thousands of vehicles; coolant pumps can overheat

24 Hour News

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Audi recalls thousands of vehicles; coolant pumps can overheat

"Of every purchase german automaker audis recalling hundreds of thousands of vehicles worldwide ap's rita foley reports the recall covers many different models what he says the problem with the almost four hundred thousand vehicles it's recalling the electric coolant pump aitken overheat and may cause a fire the recall covers late model q five suv's and a fives and fours from twenty thirteen through twenty sixteen a six models from twenty twelve three twenty fifteen are also being recalled there have been no reports of fires but audi says the pump can become blocked or moisture inside it can cause an electrical short dealers will replace the pumps at no cost to owners i'm rita foley the first woman to be commemorated outside of britain's parliament with a bronze statue was unveiled on tuesday with a lightness of women's rights campaign will listen force it joining those of nelson mandela abraham lincoln winston churchill force it was president of the national union of women's suffrage societies and the key campaign in the movement that secured british women over thirty the right to vote in one thousand nine hundred eighteen the statue was erected in parliament square after petition was started by feminist activist caroline creative perez who previously led a successful campaign for jane austen to be depicted on a british banknote this statue by artist gillian wearing shoes forcet holding about not proclaiming courage cools to carry jeffrey where a phrase from one of his speeches the new leader of one of germany's governing parties says she plans to join the protest against working conditions at amazon during a visit by company's ceo jeff bezos does to berlin andrea knowle's the chairwoman of the center left social democrats said she would take part in a demonstration outside publisher axel springer berlin offices bezos is being presented with an award for his visionary entrepreneurship now let's says that amazon's tax practices and working conditions aren't worthy of a prize she is seeking to boost hippocrates profile after disastrous election result last year and its decision to enter the new jim and government as.

Andrea Knowle Axel Springer Publisher Berlin CEO Germany Gillian Perez National Union Of Women Abraham Lincoln Winston Church AP Jeff Bezos Amazon Jeffrey Jane Austen Caroline President Trump Britain Audi Rita Foley
"austen" Discussed on The JJ Redick Podcast

The JJ Redick Podcast

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"austen" Discussed on The JJ Redick Podcast

"That's a that's a tough one to present on yes sure because it's it is sort of an individual thing yeah and then at i told him i wanted to do a presentation on on tacos because i think they're the perfect food and somehow on the east coast there's no there's no breakfast taco culture and about at all so i was going to do because there's a breakfast breakfast jay do like a a whole a whole tasting menu of breakfast vest one austen style like west coast style and and then somehow i ended up doing are we living speaking of tacos breakfast eric from san diego jj always been super intrigued by the end of games that are not in doubt coaches go over with the expect from you whether you should dribble out fell etc players aware there are millions of dollars wagered on these games and last drivel out or meanness three or foul down five with ten seconds left is a meant for some of us why if one team dribbles out and absorbed the turnover the other team then host of thirty splitter on the ultimate possession what is the quid pro quo eric great question that is a great question so first of all every year we are required to get antigambling training so we're not allowed to every year so it's not like when you go to the league every year so we are not allowed to to sort of tip in any way so is my brother asked me questions and i'm like i can't give you that information he doesn't gamble like even to family members like.

austen san diego ten seconds
United Airlines mistakenly flies Kansas-bound German shepherd to Japan

All News, Traffic and Weather

02:07 min | 2 years ago

United Airlines mistakenly flies Kansas-bound German shepherd to Japan

"F b i did not record salman's interrogation at the i never thought in those twenty hours to audiotape videotape they could have turned on a cell phone they didn't do any of that has to call into question what kind of tactics they were using this poor woman prosecutors say salman helped mateen's scope out possible locations to attack and knowing of his plan when he left the house and the hours before he opened fire wbz news time three twentyone police in austin texas say they've responded to nearly four hundred calls reporting suspicious packages but they found nothing dangerous this following three package bombs that exploded killing two people more than one hundred of those calls have come in just today a bomb exploded at a home on march second killing a man then on monday similar package bombs at two other austen addresses went off a teenager killed in those explosions so far no arrests just days after a dog died after being placed in an overhead compartment on a united airlines flight that airline makes another mistake with a patch swindle egner two children flew on united airlines from oregon to kansas city missouri this week their dog ergo was supposed to make the trip with them instead he made a trip to japan so says when the family went to pick up the ten year old german shepherd at the cargo facility they were given a great dane instead that dog was supposed to go to japan united says it will get to the bottom of it and we'll get the dogs to their owners at some point daria albinger abc news wbz news time three twenty to a new survey says millennials are buying homes faster than any other generation for the fifth consecutive year millennials are the largest generation of homebuyers jessica louts national association of realtors she says a large percentage of millennials though are still living at home but they're saving money and they're actually living at home and moving directly into ownership they want to own a home so even if they can't get their today they're planning to get there tomorrow that american dream desire is still there absolutely one hundred percent jim taylor cbs news is.

Salman Mateen Texas Oregon Missouri National Association Jim Taylor Austin Austen Kansas City Japan One Hundred Percent Twenty Hours Ten Year
"austen" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"austen" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Yeah the interesting we've had people on who flicked in jane austen and like jane austen the 17th century little she's a spinster basically didn't would never married her whole point of summer books was like you mary for fit first and then provisioning later lot of the characters in her books they were like going for the guy who had the status the prestige the money in the end up miserable and she was arguing her hair ones are always the the ladies who found the guy that was really great but also could provide for them that was this after thought i yano nothing about jane austen us check her out now and i'm glad to know that this isn't a new idea so let's talk about fit okay so are so we're a start off with looking for a partner who fits us well and then from that pool we're going to near chew some were physically attracted that's important so how do you how do you figure that out what is fit how how do you know for woman is a is a good match for you well let me little we'll structure the book i spend the first less twothirds of the booker out what kind of woman is is has what it takes to succeed in relationship and how to avoid just the basic tactical errors and don't screw your life up by bringing the wrong person in but the first sir the book is really about you the the male reader of this book and getting a few things i'm making sure that you have a few things in order for you and start considering settling down with woman and and one of those is values and that i'll use being the things that driving on life like immersed talking about dave one of his biggest values life was freedom and autonomy and so he built that into his life and.

jane austen partner booker dave
"austen" Discussed on SRSLY

SRSLY

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"austen" Discussed on SRSLY

"Hello and welcome to seriously the knee statesman costs it takes pop culture seriously i'm caroline crompton and i'm on a less of it this week it's a seriously jane austen special all about emma and the different ways it's been adopted over the years we'll be talking about the gwyneth paltrow movie the tv adaptation starring cate beckons rome in the garage and of course clueless with our guests emma whip date an alice vincent whoa hello hello and welcome to a very special episode of seriously i'm so excited this is a jane austen special episode of seriously jane austen i feel like it's a figure the is very looms large in both of our lives caroline but maybe one that we have a national grow into seriously discussions very often no and i guess that may be because the real mania for adopting austin novels got hasn't really happened while we've been doing this podcast i like to think of it as a like from about ninety ninety five two thousand and five tv networks maybe polices and so all for like whereas my colin firth in pride in prejudice delivered me that etc so yeah there is a great big cannon of austin adaptations that you can access but not that many contemporary ones coming out guys so true and i i have to say light the austin mania the peak really in 1995 is one of my favorite topics ivory emini statement about this.

caroline crompton jane austen emma colin firth cate rome austin
"austen" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"austen" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"Was jane austen jane killed right now we mentioned this because carry it you are in an improvised comedy group called ostentatious jane austen yeah i am a great series and not wait may purge rival pogue are yet vagaries perez and he's a great comeback as an each other and everything does very well and these olsen everything i am or mental so yes as you guys agusan pick shows and we have against the westend for three dates typically theater face tanya 23rd and special valentine's day factory 13th today before this model the fast mobile coupled with on february fawzi you can do something actually fun at the peak of data at seven thirty thousand haitians applying their peak estates yet and we've both see that is amazing is fantastic yeah so sponge cake that we know are jane austen landi know adjusted but she coling the woods bunch kagicha confused locations in the arctic dictionary and this is so it doesn't mean that she invented the sponge cake she's the first passengers to buy it on the foot willing called it something else before her did they call cake sponge so were the first record of the word that comes from her writings won't even convinced as a word will is it to others it will merge though she vitamin hyphenated she rooted in lots of disaster she said you know how interesting the purchase of a sponge cake is to me i like i think it a famous jane austen sense of humor career interesting the first mention of a sponge punchbag is it being given a sick burned alexa which is schenker's punching is a great thing but you know other words the she either koindu first usage the first evidence of it comes from her i went through the oecd and found who goal as many as i could read the whole thing well i haven't sought the beginning of partner unsee bilious.

jane austen jane pogue tanya schenker oecd partner jane austen perez valentine
"austen" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"austen" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"They wanted to make sure that it was preserved for the nation and is indeed now a museum of jane austen's life so the jane austen society of the uk was centrally existed for about thirty thirty five years before the founding of the of the american jane austen society the uk jane austen society historically tended to be much more sort of decorous and academics nervous of his more british them the american won and they had have this annual meeting on the lawn at shotton and people would drink tea in each scones and listen to some academic papers on jane austen than then they would go home and they published newsletter americans were allowed to join if they wanted to but they would have had to come to england to to go to an event and a couple of american jane eits met each other at the bicentennial jane austen's birth which was nineteen 75 and i decided that they wanted to found a unamerican version of the society and the american societies now larger than the british one well how so next week as the two hundred aniversary of her death and death of her serie i guess are those very special occasions are there are annual meetings right of gaza yet i'm assuming that this is like going to be a big one this year the annual meeting is not in july the annual meeting is in usually september october and this year the theme of the meeting it's being held in california and the theme is jane austen in paradise so it's obviously picking up on the fact that she is no longer with us and has gone to her eternal reward but it's not specifically about her death it's about her legacy and that kind of thing um but a lot of local jane austen chapters there's there's regional groups of the dean austin citing they are certainly organizing events in my own in central new jersey's in fact.

jane austen jane austen society uk uk jane austen society jane eits gaza california dean austin new jersey thirty thirty five years
"austen" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"austen" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"We'll certainly not really during her lifetime because she published anonymously her identity was not officially publicly known until after she had died and her books actually went out of print after her death for maybe ten years or so and then came back into print in the eighteen 30s usually the conventional wisdom is to say that in eighteen seventy her nephew james edward austin lee who had known heroin here's a teenager and then by this time was in his seventies decided to publish a collection of family reminiscences of jane austen the margin austin and um and this definitely promulgated the view of her as kind of the sweet sweet made nantu you know was very domestic and also wrote these little books on the side and on this book was wildly popular and it really did create a new interest in jane austen in novels even though they had certainly been in print and had been being read for about thirty or forty years before that that when jane austen really started to develop a fan base and then as the as english literature became part of the university curriculum over the next decades she avenge lee became part of that as well and then of course contemporary jane austen fandom often we tend to date from the 1995 bbc production of pride and prejudice have stylists say yes how much is has colin firth responsible for this mood match conference does have a lot to answer for specifically often is mentioned the scene in which colin firth simister darcy emerges from a lake in a dripping weight which hurt clinging provocative lead to his mainly chest that's often seen as being i describe it in among the daynight's has kind of the big bang of contemporary austin fandom it's kind of the moment that a lot of people simultaneously saw jane austen is dislike exciting vital sexy writer and also i think this is important the internet was just getting started right around the same time so they were also able to talk to each other about how they felt about this and that is a way of really keeping phantom going has colin firth ever been to jaffna and tell us which asthma is so jazzed as the jane austen society of north america which was founded in meme tournament on 1979 think.

heroin austin jane austen writer jaffna james edward austin lee colin firth jane austen society of north a forty years ten years
"austen" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"austen" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"But i would say all long there's all there have always been people who could see that in jane austen on the nineteenthcentury margaret alafandi who is a writer rates an essay about jane austen when she talks about her fine wien feminine cynicism on they're always been people who saw that just sort of the prevailing view may be tended to be a little more rosecolored in the past right so is more about an argument that occurred may be at the within academia on in this sort of literary criticism than in the popular yeah you know it's hard to say because there hasn't been as much attention to the popular popular tones of tone of fandom as may be there could be on the another book in that in the same essay that mine is in this week is by above a book by dmc lows called the making of jane austen which talks about the fane reception of jane austen on in much earlier times phnom and it's interesting to see the extent to which there were plenty of people who saw jane austen as writing really strong women who stood up against prevailing currents and their citing insisted on getting things for themselves that they were entitled to so there are always clearly have been fans who saw that as well but whether if you stop somebody on the street and ask them about jane austen first of all whether they would have any thoughts about her at all is a question but you know if they had any they might especially nowadays be influenced dairy much by the movies of jane austen's brace and you know and that would be kind of sweet rosetinted romancenovel kinds of kinds of an impression of her let's go to the time line of not jane austen but jane eits i mean when did her base of fans did exist during her lifetime did it start soon thereafter.

jane austen margaret alafandi writer