35 Burst results for "Auschwitz"

Israel: March of the Living Honors Medical Workers Battling COVID

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

Israel: March of the Living Honors Medical Workers Battling COVID

"Israel's most over the living this year almost medical workers battling because the nineteen thousands of people usually take part in the March on the grounds of the former Auschwitz death camp which had been run by Germany in Poland but for the second year in a row the event took place virtually due to the quota virus pandemic the online ceremony has included a special award to Dr Anthony Fauci special medical adviser to president Joe Biden who was recognized the moral courage in medicine that she said he believes that the heating alts lie in the path of goodness the same part all of you he says have chosen in remembering and listening to the voices of those who perished in the Holocaust I'm Charles last month

Auschwitz Death Camp Dr Anthony Fauci President Joe Biden Israel Poland Germany Charles
Massachusetts lawmakers push for mandatory genocide education in schools after football team used offensive language for play calls

ABC News Perspective

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Massachusetts lawmakers push for mandatory genocide education in schools after football team used offensive language for play calls

"Of the Ducks, very high school football coach for allowing the use of anti Semitic language for play Calling. Senate president Karen Spilka is pushing for the Senate to once again passed legislation requiring Massachusetts School District's to teach the history of genocide. WBZ Czart Cohen reports Massachusetts Senate president Karen Spilka was clearly incensed after learning that duck's very high school football coach Dave Memory on allowed the team to use Anti Semitic language to call plays during games as a Jew who lost family at Auschwitz. A daughter of a World War two veteran, I find the news about the deck spree football team appalling, she tweeted. Spilka says she wants this to be more than just a teachable moment. We need sustained increased education among administrators, educators, coaches, officials, referees and students, so that this never happens again. Bill requiring school District's to include the history of genocide in middle and high school curricula failed to make it to the governor's desk last year. Spilka says the Senate is likely to pass it again this year. Man, House Speaker Ronald Mariano says he looks forward to discussing it.

Karen Spilka Massachusetts School District WBZ Czart Cohen Football Senate Dave Memory Spilka Massachusetts Senate Ducks Auschwitz House Speaker Ronald Mariano
School fires football coach after anti-Semitic play calls

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

School fires football coach after anti-Semitic play calls

"Feingold has sent a new letter to the high school football team. He says he wants to meet with them after members of the team used anti Semitic language in their play calls. Feingold, who is Jewish, says he has heard a lot of line of scrimmage. Audibles is he played high school football and and over. But in the letter he says he has never heard anybody use the term Auschwitz before. In the letter to the students, he says he thinks it might be productive to have an open conversation with the team about the meaning of that term, and why it's so painful to hear. Meantime, the head coach of the program, Dave, Ma'am, Iran has been fired. Also placed on paid administrative leave for his teaching position. We're

Feingold Football Dave Iran
Holocaust survivor's lifetime of peace-seeking

UN News

03:54 min | Last month

Holocaust survivor's lifetime of peace-seeking

"Rabbi schneier was liberated in nineteen forty five by russian troops. He went on to finish high school in vienna and arrived in new york city. Two years later where he enrolled at yeshiva university and began the educational journey that would lead him toward his seeking path. Rabbi schneier did not take a survival for granted but rather his witness to the dangers of hate and disregard for human life ignited a sense of responsibility in the fight for religious protection and civic and societal peace over the decades he has convened meetings to bring relief to the suffering around the globe from seeking religious freedom in cuba te advocating for the release of victims from the clandestine. Detention centers of argentina's infamous sturdy. War rabbi schneier says the worrying trend of rising global anti semitism in general hostility will be overcome but it will require a unified effort to lobby successfully through the appeal conscious foundation. I protection of religious sites resolution in two thousand one which was adopted by the united nation in two thousand five. The united nations adopted. International holocaust remembrance. Day january twenty seven which was really the liberation auschwitz. Probably way as a graveyard of my grandparents. Both my family cemetery i go to auschwitz so That was a very important of the session. In terms of reminding the world of the potential cost survivors. Very few of your will diminishing try Willie eyewitnesses. We saw leo maps capacity to do evil. You hate jews just only the beginning. You can be certain that will be followed by racism followed by a kruschev phobia. It's an experience that has to be encountered in order to understand how i d you but as asian of a group of people can lead not only to the burning of houses of worship burning of human beings seeing rising anti semitism and intolerance Are you optimistic about our future. Generations will handle this firmly believe every conflict comes to the problem of the app. Today we are in the midst of a five love. People all kinds of technological changes when you have a crisis. Societal changes economic hardship and the evil and bottom. You'll have extremes. Take the place of the center. Them let is a fertile ground for any type of bigotry. So i think we shall overcome this one to unless we take united action united the gaps that by summit united against chrishell phobia in against racism. United neighbors say united. We prevail remote united. We fail

Rabbi Schneier Appeal Conscious Foundation Yeshiva University United Nations Vienna New York City Cuba Argentina Willie United Phobia
Auschwitz survivors mark anniversary online amid pandemic

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Auschwitz survivors mark anniversary online amid pandemic

"A U. S. senator marking the anniversary of the liberation of the **** death camp in Europe says the US needs to be more vigilant against anti semitic and other hate groups Illinois senator Dick Durbin noted the horror found at the Auschwitz Birkenau death camp seventy six years after its liberation place seven comprehensible suffering cruelty and depravity we're more than a million people primarily Jews were exterminated with factory like precision and senator Durbin warns it could happen again noting that among the heat full symbols displayed at this month's capital incursion was a man wearing a camp aus bitte sweatshirt despicable neo **** hate symbol shown during the capital insurrection and the chance of Jews will not replace us three years earlier in Charlottesville Durbin says he is again this year introducing legislation to monitor and cracked down against domestic terrorism groups Jackie Quinn Washington

Auschwitz Birkenau Senator Durbin Dick Durbin U. Illinois Europe United States Charlottesville Durbin Jackie Quinn Washington
Holocaust survivors in Austria, Vienna receive COVID-19 vaccine on Holocaust remembrance day

PRI's The World

02:53 min | 2 months ago

Holocaust survivors in Austria, Vienna receive COVID-19 vaccine on Holocaust remembrance day

"Six years ago today. January twenty seventh nineteen forty five soldiers from the soviet. Red army liberated the auschwitz-birkenau death camp in occupied poland. More than one million people. Most of them. Jews were sent a gas chambers of the nazi camp or died from starvation cold and disease this year most international holocaust remembrance day commemorations are being held online because of the pandemic in israel home to many holocaust survivors. Fewer will be present for such remembrances about nine. Hundred holocaust. survivors died of covid. Nineteen in israel last year. A fifth of the country's cova deaths in austria. The jewish community in vienna is marking the anniversary in a unique way. That's both symbolic and lifesaving they've arranged for more than four hundred jewish and non-jewish survivors to get their first dose of covid vaccine. Erica yakubovitch community. Vienna and organiz. Today's vaccination drive. She joins me from vienna. And i gathered. The drive right now erin. Described to us. What's going on. What have you been seeing today. So we had almost four hundred people already here for a vaccination day. Everybody's very very happy and relieved that they finally get the vaccination vaccination started in australia very late and is also not enough vaccine and we are happy to do something that we can do for holocaust survivors. I think it's our obligation to take care of our most vulnerable group in the community. What made you decide to arrange this event. I mean these survivors given their age. Aren't they already in the front of the line for vaccines in austria. No only the people who have been in old age homes where vaccinated Old you other people not yet. And as i am a daughter of holocaust survivors survivors of auschwitz. And my grandparents were killed there I think this is something that i owe to my family and other family like mine and the four hundred survivors who have been On the receiving under these vaccine today how they taken in this event. What does it mean to them. I would like to mention that. We have also some Elderly people at the age of eighty five plus who are non holocaust survivors who came from other areas like the former soviet union and minister of housing also offers us to Vaccinate them and i immediately say. Of course we do it. We had contact with each of those people. And they are very thankful and happy that they had a chance to get the vaccination and we have a chance to because they're with their family their children grandchildren and

Birkenau Death Camp Erica Yakubovitch Organiz Vienna Red Army Israel Austria Poland Erin Australia Soviet Union
Auschwitz survivors mark anniversary online amid pandemic

AP 24 Hour News

00:14 sec | 2 months ago

Auschwitz survivors mark anniversary online amid pandemic

"Survivors are Commemorating their lost loved ones as the world marks the 76th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz Birkenau. Pandemic means the international Holocaust Remembrance Day. Events have moved online for the first time to

Liberation Of Auschwitz Birken
Auschwitz marks anniversary virtually as survivors fear end of an era

Steve Scaffidi

00:19 sec | 2 months ago

Auschwitz marks anniversary virtually as survivors fear end of an era

"Holocaust survivors Commemorating their loved ones is the world marks the 76th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz the covert 19 pandemic, meaning that the international Holocaust Remembrance Day events have moved online for the first time, but What did remain unchanged this morning was the driver's survivors to deliver the message of never

Pope marking Holocaust warns another genocide possible

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Pope marking Holocaust warns another genocide possible

"Pope Francis who's bought Holocaust Remembrance Day by warning the warped ideologies could pave the way to another mass extermination boy gene and here's how you do it as soon as the company said media Francis insists on the need to remember saying it's a sign of humanity and civilization a condition for a peaceful future he adds remember also means to be aware that these things cannot happen again starting with ideological proposals that claim to say the people that end up destroying things he warns that the Holocaust began that way opening this fall off of death extermination and brutality the pontiff was commemorating the seventy sixth anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp in Poland I'm Charles the last month

Pope Francis Francis Poland Charles
Shoah survivors to get vaccine on Auschwitz liberation day

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Shoah survivors to get vaccine on Auschwitz liberation day

"Hundreds of Holocaust survivors getting that first a corona virus vaccinations the legend that pasta from with a special tribute seventy six years after the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp more than four hundred Austrian survivors will get the flu shots at Vienna's largest vaccination center some of being bored by shuttle or by ambulance while others will being brought in by their children the fittest among them were even planning on taking the subway the organized to take place on what is known as international Holocaust Remembrance Day vaccinations well not just being offered to survivors of the show but also of the Jews in the area older than eighty five the Jewish community of Vienna says we owe this to them they've suffered so much trauma unfilled even more in secu during this pandemic I'm Charles to the best month

Liberation Of The Auschwitz De Vienna FLU Charles
More people charged in Capitol riot

Mark Levin

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

More people charged in Capitol riot

"Arrests have been made in connection with last week's riot at the Capitol already believe Robert Packers, the man pictured wearing a camp Auschwitz sweatshirt during the unrest. He was arrested by federal authorities in Hampton Roads, Virginia and was taken to the Western Tidewater regional jail. He has a court appearance scheduled. Investigators also believe just SIA Colt is the man who was pictured hanging from the balcony in the Senate chamber. He turned himself in Tuesday night to the ADA County, Idaho jail boxes Rob Dawson,

Robert Packers Western Tidewater Regional Jai Hampton Virginia Senate Ada County Idaho Rob Dawson
A Special Conversation with Congressman Ritchie Torres

People of the Pod

08:08 min | 3 months ago

A Special Conversation with Congressman Ritchie Torres

"Representative ritchie. Torres is a freshman member of congress. From new york's fifteenth congressional district. He is proudly progressive and proudly pro israel and we had hoped to have him on to talk about how important it is to make that progressive case for israel the riot at the capitol changed our plans unfortunately and he joins us now to talk about what comes next representative torres so much for joining us and honor for me to be here. Last wednesday was extremely scary for all of us. But i can't even imagine what it would have been like to be in the capital for it and we're also not entirely out of the woods yet with possible. Threats still brewing. Think so let me start here and just ask this. How are you holding up. It has been the most draining and disorienting week of my life. If a year ago you had said that. I would become a member of congress during infectious disease outbreak and that i would witness of violent insurrection against the us capital during the electoral college. Vote count and that i would then impeach donald trump. Not only once but twice. I would have said that has the feel of movie. I'm still in a state of shock. And i'm in a state of shock that a sitting president would instigate a violent mob to storm the us capital in an attempt to overturn the results of a presidential election. You are among the members of congress calling for the house to impeach president trump again. Although i suppose this is your first time impeaching him and that's a process that looks set to move forward this week. People are also talking about a resolution censuring ham or demanding resigned or using the twenty fifth or the fourteenth amendment's to remove him from office. What would satisfy you hear. What kind of action do you think that this moment calls for will. The best outcome is removal. And we've presented the vice president would alternate him. Is you invoke the twenty fifth amendment or else. We have no choice but to move forward with impeachment. It is clear that the vice president refuses to invoke the twenty fifth amendment in conjunction with a majority of the cabinet so we have no choice but to impeach donald trump the violent mob. He unleashed on the. Us capital represents unprecedented assault on the separation of powers between the congress and the president. A represents an unprecedented assault on the peaceful transfer of power from one president to the next if striking at the core of our constitutional republic is not an impeachable offense. Then what is impeachment for no choice just moments before you and i connected. The new york times reported that senate majority leader mitch. Mcconnell is actually pleased with the impending impeachment. do you think with mcconnell. 's implicit blessing. There's actually a chance that the senate might remove president trump from office so there are three outcomes spouse majority is required for impeachment a senate super majority is required for conviction and then once impeach convicted a senate majority is required for disqualification so the ultimate goal is not simply removed donald trump from office but to disqualify him from ever pursuing federal office again because he has shown himself to be a lethal threat to the republic is clear and present danger to the constitutional republic and what about aside from president. Trump are their members of congress. Either with you in the house or in the senate who you think crossed the line in what took place last week. There were several enablers of donald trump in the united states congress and elsewhere who spent months inflaming the disaffected supporters of donald trump. One example is congressman. Mel brooks went to the march and instigated an armed angry mob to vote. Take names and kick ass. He should be held out. We as elected officials have to be mindful of the words believes. What does it mean to be held accountable in this instance though. What does that look like expulsion at the conduct of for me. The attempt to overturn the results of an election the attempt to instigate a violent mob to take over the us capitol if that is not grounds for expulsion. That i honestly don't know what it's these members of congress and donald trump inspired a violent mob that led to the murder of police office was bludgeoned to death by a fire. Extinguisher are their image. Is of a rioter in the senate chamber wearing tactical gear with plastic handcuffs. As though he were planning to take hostages right. I'm convinced that there were rioters. Who were intent on apprehending and assassinating members of congress. The majority leader the speaker and even the vice president is a video of rieter screaming. The vice president should be hanged a news and a gala were erected outside the capitol and the president was tweeting out against his own vice-president in real time while the capitol was under siege was pouring more gasoline on the fire above violence. He put not only congress at rescue. Put the life of his own vice president. Aris one of your fellow freshman members Also said something to the effect of when speaking to people who are concerned about the outcome of the election He said it's okay to threaten them a little right. It's okay to to threaten members of congress a little. This was madison cawthorn from north carolina in addition to representative brooks. Are there other people who you think you know. Their actions kind of rise to a certain level needs to be a conference investigation to determine which members of congress had a role in inciting insurrection. Against the us congress which is disqualifying which should disqualify you from holding office and it's worth pointing out that. There was a deep strain not only racism antisemitism among the elements of the violent bomb. If i recall correctly one or several of the writers had a shirt that read kim auschwitz. You had confederate flags who had symbols of racism and antisemitism white supremacy for aiding the violent mob. That attempted to take over the capital. It should be cause for concern and you know trumpism is going to have more staying power than trump. I worry that violent white nationalism. Violent antisemitism and racism is going to be a fact of life that will continue to haunt us. Now i think of politics as an alternative to violence. Politics is about the resolution of conflict by means other than violence and if there is a set of the population that loses confidence in politics that sees it as illegitimate and trump has convinced them. That it's illegitimate then. That segment is going to resort to violence. The d. legitimation politics is an open invitation to violence. And i think the jewish community in particular has the most state because history has taught us that paranoid. Conspiratorial politics is often a breeding ground fantasy sentences. I know if we have the most at stake or among the most at stake but certainly everything that we saw last week out of that riot was vile but certainly the racism. The anti semitism really terrible to our listeners. Who don't yet follow. Ajc dot global on instagram. I would encourage you to check out the instagram slider that our team put together detailing some of the anti semitism that the congressman talks

Congress Donald Trump Senate Representative Ritchie Infectious Disease Outbreak United States Israel Electoral College Torres Mcconnell Mel Brooks Mitch New York Madison Cawthorn Cabinet Representative Brooks The New York Times Kim Auschwitz
Capitol rioter seen wearing "Camp Auschwitz" shirt arrested

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 3 months ago

Capitol rioter seen wearing "Camp Auschwitz" shirt arrested

"It was one of the many disturbing images that came out of last week's assault on the Capitol, A rioter pictured wearing a sweatshirt that red Camp Auschwitz today. The man wearing that anti Semitic shirt was arrested in Newport News, Virginia, Robert Packer is charged with unlawful conduct entering the capital without permission and disorderly conduct. CNN says Packer's been convicted three times for driving under the influence. He also has a felony conviction for Forging public records.

Red Camp Auschwitz Robert Packer Newport News Virginia Packer CNN
Biden expected to announce Tony Blinken as secretary of state

BBC Newshour

04:53 min | 5 months ago

Biden expected to announce Tony Blinken as secretary of state

"And the person that is tipped to be his secretary of State. Antony Blinken Telesco years. So I'm not a blink monologist, but I have known him since high school. We were in the same class. 40 years ago, Maurine in Paris, And if biography is personality, I think Tony's biography tells the whole story. He was an American in Paris, living with a stepfather who was the youngest survivor of Auschwitz. And an international lawyer trying to build ties between them the eastern bloc and and the West. And in those four elements. I think it captures Tony's identity. He was an American, and he believes very strongly in America in America's role in the world. As you know, for him a country that can that can really change the landscape, the global landscape, But it wasn't Paris. And so he saw how others Europeans in particular. View the United States at times very unfavorably as a country that tries to bully in that tries to impose its way rather than to work with others. The fact that his step that was who he was, I think from knowing Tony, it imbued in him a strong feeling of, you know, fighting for human rights and fighting for the defense of people, vulnerable people, whether they're refugees or whether they're people who are affected by conflict. And lastly, an international lawyer who tried to broker ties between a time the Soviet Union and Europe. I think that is the diplomat and Tony, who tries to Put himself in other people's shoes and what is going to insist very much on a resumption of multilateral, very transatlantic view of the world. So all those people who have been so nervous on terrified by the damage that they perceived the Trump administration had done to international alliances, institutions internationally collaboration and so on. Will be very pleased that Antony Blinken is the man who is tipped to be the secretary of state. It is true, though, isn't it? That foreign policy may not actually be Joe Biden's pressing issue, given the impact of covert 19 in the United States. Correct. I mean his priority. I think the part of the administration is going to be domestic because of the health implications of the pandemic and the economic implications of the pandemic. I mean, we're facing a as much of the world is a severe economic crisis. And I'm not having mentioned that the racial tensions and the polarization of a country that has gone through an election, the result of which is still not been acknowledged by the by the sitting president and many of his followers, so the party's going to be domestic. Joe Biden is somebody who is a senator. As chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Foreign policy is in his DNA's A Tony Blinken is probably his closest partner. When it comes to Ah, colleague when it comes to foreign policy, So I think you're going to see a big emphasis on the themes that you just mentioned, which is re stitching multilateral alliances. Resuming U. S participation in some of the treaties and some of the organizations that President Trump withdrew from. But both the president and Antoni if he is, in fact, if he does become secretary of state are going to face a world that is very different from the world that they were they were participating in the Obama administration is short four years ago. Image of the United States the credibility of the United States the fragmentation of the world order. Everything has accelerated over the last four years. Well, let's talk about some of the treaties that he might decide to rejoin. We we know that on on climate change, he is going to rejoin the Paris accord. It's also been reported that Jake Sullivan, another Joe Biden adviser, is expected to be named his national security advisor. And in the context of the J C P o a the Iran nuclear deal. The combination Of Tony Blinken and Jake Sullivan. Pretty significant. And let's not forget that as you're buying himself, wrote an article not long ago in which he said that the U. S. Should rejoin the JCP away if Iran agrees toe come back into compliance with his provisions. So that has been a commitment that he made during the campaign. It's by the way, the position that I think every other maybe, with one exception, every other candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination made So I think it is. The intent of it would be the intent of the administration to come back in. Now That's easier said than done. They're going to be obstacles. Iran is not in compliance, President Trump has added and continues to add weekly a huge number of sanctions that are going to be Difficult to deal with. But the intense that projector I think has been clear. And as you say, with both Tony Blinken and Jake Sullivan again, if both of them if the rumors are confirmed, I think you have a pretty strong sense that That's what the United States is going to try to do, and we'll work with European partners and others to get there. Robert Malley, president and CEO of

Tony Blinken Tony United States Paris Antony Blinken Telesco Maurine Joe Biden Trump Administration Jake Sullivan President Trump Senate Foreign Relations Commi Obama Administration Soviet Union Antoni Europe Iran JCP Robert Malley
Global to commission original podcasts

podnews

03:10 min | 5 months ago

Global to commission original podcasts

"Jilani has powerful friends presidents bill clinton and donald trump. I just wish her well. Frankly hunting jilin global original podcast global the media. Entertainment group prevented a podcast commissioning. Partnership with denso's story lab they're ray content investor producer and distributor operated by advertising agency. The first podcast to be produced his hunting jalen her story about jilin maxwell it'll be presented by jones. We need in his first project since leaving the bbc. Paul bane have announced podcast wellness week a week. Daily panels and speakers about mental health meditation and a positive mindset from november thirtieth events. Free to watch live pod. Smooch is a new service allowing podcast is to have one place for that. Episode's merchandise and sponsor links megaphone now appears to support vast her method of allowing multiple third party companies to serve ads on podcasts nineteen and their support in september. A write up of the recent podcast day online highlighted. Some yougov studies into podcasting. Saying the bbc sounds the most popular podcast app in the uk. That app only includes podcasts. And a handful of third party the winners of the portuguese podcast awards were announced. We've the full list to which we've added. Podcast hosts as well. Congratulations if you're one of those winners pods claims to recommend podcasts. Specifically for you and allows you to keep your existing podcast player. Alana source now has been announced as the new head of marketing audience development for podcast one. And how discoverable is your podcast. Headliner has released the podcast. Discover ability greater a free tool to help. It gives us a score of ninety percent marking us down for not being with a cool kids on instagram. And podcast news. The piper is a new drama from something else for the bbc. A modern take on the pied piper fairy tale stars thames in auschwitz and a soundtrack by bat for lashes. Natasha khan the corona virus. Radio ideas awards took place yesterday. Two podcast awards in there the best podcast creativity and entertainment when to bbc. Radio four's comedy podcast. Now wash your hands while the best podcast long form. Storytelling went to the spanish language. Post scandal lose from podium. Podcasts produced by longtime pod news reader. Francesco is a sweetser. All of the witnesses links from our show notes now newsletter. Today race at work is new from the harvard. Business review you can hear leaders from business and governments trace their personal journeys with rice equity and inclusion and learn from their mistakes and their triumphs and the london philharmonic orchestra has launched lp offstage exploring the lights of castro musicians. Covers everything from how to keep your instruments in working order to life on the road as a classical musician.

Jilani Entertainment Group Jilin Maxwell Paul Bane BBC Jilin Denso Jalen Donald Trump Alana Source Bill Clinton Natasha Khan Jones Instagram UK Francesco Harvard London Philharmonic Orchestra Castro
Debra Messing; AJCs Groundbreaking State of Antisemitism in America Report

People of the Pod

12:01 min | 6 months ago

Debra Messing; AJCs Groundbreaking State of Antisemitism in America Report

"Messing is probably best known for her role as Grace Adler on the long running Sitcom will and grace. She has starred in movies and even been the voice behind cartoons. But for the past several months, she has been one of the voices behind a podcast called the dissenters since May Deborah and her co host Donna Damiani have interviewed men and women who have made their. Mark Challenging the status quo but the penultimate episode that aired this month was particularly powerful Deborah and her co host invited Dr Edith Eba eager a ninety three year old Holocaust survivor to share her memories of the past and thoughts on present day politics and the future Deborah is here now to talk about that episode and her own experiences with anti-semitism Deborah. Welcome. Thank you so much. So tell us about this podcast, the dissenters what you're trying to accomplish with each episode and how your conversation with Dr Eager Fit that theme. The dissenters created as a response to the suffering that we saw around our country over the last few years, and also in response to the activists that have stepped forward and taken it upon themselves to try and make things better. My friend Montana Diani, she is the CO host. She was a religious refugee came to the country at six years old she and I have both been very active in activism reading these pieces about these extraordinary people from around the world doing extraordinary things, and we would send them to each other in order to sort of buoy each other when we. Would start to feel overwhelmed and it always sort of kept us moving forward and one day we just realized that as much as was uplifting us it would most likely uplift other people to hear about the works of these what we call accidental activists we wanted to ultimately inspire and empower people to recognize that you don't have to have a certain education. You don't have to have a certain following and social media in order to be an activist all you have to do is just recognize something feels wrong and take one step towards doing something touted doctor eager fit into this lineup. She is a ninety three year old Holocaust survivor. Who came face to face with Dr Mangala when she was a teenager at the camps, she lost her mom and dad and went through horrible torture and trauma, and came to America and created a family and. Got A PhD and has used her experience and trauma in order to help people coming home from war to heal from their trauma. She has written two books and she decided to become a healer. And we just felt like she did not have any idea what her life would be. Once she got out of the concentration camp. Yeah and she was able to look towards the future to have hope and ultimately choose to do something that would help others. How did you first discover Dr Eager Montana and I are just really really curious people. So we are constantly reading. We are watching Ted talks. It was a Ted talk of her that we saw and ultimately we felt given the fact that there is this surge of anti-semitism and racial strife in our country that it felt particularly timely and important to highlight her and her journey because in our research, we discovered that three quarters of millennials who are people who are in their mid thirties do not know what Auschwitz is such a stunning statistic and kind of unimaginable that we felt like, okay. This it's incumbent on us to have someone who was there and lived it to assert that it really did happen and to celebrate her as well. You mentioned the lack of knowledge about concentration camps AJC. Of course, just released its first report on the state of anti-semitism in. America. And found that more than half of Americans don't know the meaning of the word anti-semitism. Some haven't even heard the word before. With Charlottesville and. Is seemingly explosion of white nationalism and Antisemitism Nazis everywhere in juxtaposition to the second wave of civil rights protesting it's very interesting that people don't protest against anti-semitism people flood the streets, for racism. And when you look at Charlottesville, the Nazis were screaming about two groups about black people and Jews. And we really are the most natural allies in the world and it really was just something that I just sat with for a while about like why is it that people don't protest four us? You're Jewish grew up in a predominantly non Jewish environment. Did you experience anti-semitism growing up I? Did? Can you speak to that a little bit? Sure. I remember I was in second grade and we were lining up. To go to Jim and I got in line and a little boy me and said, get to the back of the line Kaik And I didn't know what the word meant the teacher overheard and immediately grabbed the boy and sent him down to the principal's office I. Remember everyone looking at me like I had done something wrong. And as much as I didn't understand what was happening I understood that it would have been better if I just stayed silent and I just wanted the board to come back and everybody to just be normal and stop looking at me and a couple of years later it was Halloween and my grandfather was visiting and we woke up and a swastika was painted on his car. In our driveway. And I recall my mother just standing at the front door looking at it and I felt her fear I felt endanger and I, remember no one said a word. Just, you know my mom said get in the house. And somehow the car disappeared. And we didn't talk about it. and. So it became very clear to me from a very young age that I was an other. That I was different from everybody the community and that difference wasn't good. And Somehow I had taken on a sense of shame about the fact that I was Jewish and I actually recall in highschool. My father was president of the Temple President of the Jewish Federation. My mother was Vice President of the Jewish Federation very, very, very active in the community. And we would stay home obviously for the High Holidays and I remember coming back in after the High Holidays and someone saying, why were you out and I said, oh, it was yom. Kippur and. He got really mad they were like. How come you get that off and you get Christmas off? Why don't we get off and after that encounter anytime I would stay home because of a Jewish holiday I would lie and say that I had been sick. Wow. I WANNA, go back to your conversation with Dr Eager and I'd like for you to share what your biggest takeaways were. It's so powerful because she speaks about will lasting that her mother said to her in the cattle car. That essentially reality is whatever you have in your mind and in your heart. And bad things pass trauma passes and her first night there. Joseph Mangla went into the barracks and made her dance and she loved opera and she said that she got through it because she imagined that she was on a stage and they were playing Makovsky Romeo and Juliet. And she said and I danced beautifully and I loved it. That's how I survived. For me what was really remarkable was hearing everything that she went through and the fact that she landed. was that she was grateful for all of the terror and trauma and pain that she had experienced. She felt that she literally calls them a gift. That is something that is so amped medical to the way at least. I think about someone who has survived the Holocaust it really was a full paradigm shift for me to hear how she got there and ultimately how she healed herself. Yeah. Well, certainly, the testimonies of the survivors are a gift to all of us in terms of preserving the memory and the lessons that we can take from their experiences. So thank you for giving Dr, eager another platform to share that story with another audience that needs to learn and learn the lessons of her experience. I will tell you one of the most moving parts for me was the separation from her mother when they got to Auschwitz and how the experience of children being separated from their parents at the border was a trigger for her honestly I can't do it justice. Let's listen to a clip. Van. Is Show children being separated that their border? I had terrible night mash. Remember him and my mother was. Towed to go this way, I followed my mother. And this guy told me that I'm GONNA see my mother very soon. She just GonNa take a shower and promptly I was on the other side which meant life. So you see mandating trigger today for the me The time and everything was taken from me. Why was it important to include that in the podcast? I. Think when we witnessed that kind of wrongdoing that is really a crime against humanity, it reminds us how fragile we are. That we don't learn from the past potentially and we have to be vigilant every day in making sure that what we are putting out into the world is modeling compassionate. Inclusion.

Deborah Dr Eager Montana America Jewish Federation Charlottesville Dr Eager TED Dr Edith Eba Montana Diani Grace Adler Dr Mangala Donna Damiani Mark Vice President Kippur
Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

Jonny Gould's Jewish State

06:44 min | 7 months ago

Eva Schloss on Holocaust forgiveness

"This S Charlie Goals Jewish. States those who listen for those who are willing to listen. Now. Thank you very much. tweed action. and. I've. Lived a long time and have experienced a lot of wonderful things but Israel. I'm believable Bihar. And of course, it leaves it says sign on my way overlooking. World. Let's just bring it back to today in this country. I think it's fair to say that British Jews experienced a visceral form of antisemitism that they have never done before with the election of Jeremy Corbyn, the leader ship of the Labor Party and the genuine threat that should he have won the election in December twenty nine hundred thank goodness didn't that Future, existence in the united. Kingdom. was under threats. Can I ask you in this for years of quite quite considerable pain for the Jewish community here? Could you feel parallels with what she experienced in Vienna announced the damage as a child not at all not at all and no people's starting to be afraid he upset about it. But as always say Sicily announcing and you know unfortunately antisemitism has always been and always be I don't know why but it is affects. Who is essential his and? It does it's just. It's language. So it's subsequent assist inborn in the people, but it is thus Mention it just same. Like what this I'm doesn't. Nazi. Time. So I must say, it doesn't really bother me and mustard personally offend million may. Not experienced any antisemitism in again thank you for making that clear. Now, you lived in the same apartment block in Amsterdam and frank, and you were only a month apart in Asian. Playmates together in early teenage, and then in nineteen forty two, you both went into hiding to avoid the Nazi effort to capture Jews in Amsterdam. Now, you'll family was captured by the Nazis after being betrayed by double agent in the Dutch underground and transported to Auschwitz. You father and brother didn't survive the ordeal, but you and your mother were barely alive while you afraid by Soviet troops in nineteen, forty five. How Did it feel. To have left your home city of the Anna. To try and create new life understood them. And for that to happen to you, even as you fled from way you used to. Well as it was. At tangible tangible time. Have a very happy little girl in Australia had old plaza who was Like older process should be very protective for me. I have a sort of a viable child. It was much more at a bookworm and he had to be all his stories which he was dating Again. Pants. Kaslow's advice Elliott wonderful family life, and then to go to Belgium. Glad we got out of Australia Benny. Many of our family members didn't because it was spent thirty eight. It was very difficult to get past the German Jews had already gone to England and land, and France and everywhere, and most of those companies did the daily want any more Jews? So only if you're somebody special. got visas any more. But advising referenced in Jim and then Mefatha actually lift in Holland and remain Belgium, and of course, the war stock that my father had asked to get as well to Holland because in a war board as will be closed and view may not be able to see. So in in forties ewing's a wall that in February nineteen forty because visas to for three months to visit by Fassa in in Holland. So relief like you say on the same Dressy not an apartment block, it was a hold area of. More than it'll buildings and there was eleven years old. But of course, you know ahead on trust French said ahead to Dutch Andam. difficult to accept that Baz also children and even by the teaches and. So lost all my confidence. became shy Biz stone but friendly and eventually settled down. But of course, the Nazis invaded. And, of course, a measures Jewish people started to come. And for two years VI IN FIA to be arrested. And in nineteen forty two, then southbound young people go to call up notice have to come to a place respect pex given exactly start Schefter Blake to deported to Germany to work in German factories. But Zach to him benighted forty-two most of German Jews had been deported to get us or two camps. So why on Earth should your one more young Jewish be to Cup to Germany? So Zet sit time when Anna's Fazah auto frank and my father and many other Jewish feminists is cited civil send Sam young people, but we would go into hiding. While I was just sit at ten years old. And my father called us together. And he said, hence, you not going to set you we going to hiding. But we couldn't find a family who was to take it for people. So we have split up. I go visit my Mazda enhance feel bismuth files. And that started to cry. And did not want to be separated the game.

Holland Jeremy Corbyn Germany Australia Amsterdam Bihar Belgium Israel Sicily Frank Zach Anna Vienna Labor Party Auschwitz France Fassa Schefter Blake Ewing
A Little History- Based On A True Story

Rock N Roll Archaeology

05:13 min | 9 months ago

A Little History- Based On A True Story

"They were talking about. Songs that are based on true stories. And, What's interesting about this subject? Is that a lot of times? When you see a movie that says based on a true story, it literally might have one aspect of an event that they base it on, but when it's the song, it's actually a it seems like it's more valid. There's more. There's less at stake. That film. And there's more accuracy than movies claim to be sometimes. So. We're covering I. Think they're seven songs here I realize you probably left went out and he did it on purpose. Which one would be the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Gordon. Lightfoot Never bring that up in polite society, his based on a true event. It is one of the worst songs and don't get me wrong. I like Gordon Life. She said it. You heard it here. I like Gordon. Lightfoot care that song is. What are the worst songs ever anyway? please understand with some of these things like my very first one. There's literally no way I can tell you the entire story, so I'm having to kind of give you guys the abridged version, and so please forgive me for that, because the first one is waiting for the worms by Pink Floyd, which is about the Nazi death camps of the Holocaust. So right like starting right off the bat. There is literally no way in a single episode of a podcast. Can I explain to you the Nazi Holocaust? But what I will say is that there was this war called World War Two. In the thirties and the forties as we all know guys there. There's mass extermination and for years Jewish people and other other people like the Romani Gypsies. Homosexuals were sent to forced labor camps. And Ghettos and then this thirties in Europe, a yeah, and in nineteen, forty two, they were actually deported to extermination camps, or or other kind of forced labour camps, whereas like Auschwitz was was. A labor camp and the death camp we were there on. Didn't go on our honeymoon, but we went to. Visit Europe we went to Poland actually. Yeah, it was It was one of the most important things that I feel like I. Ever made us do I'm sorry, we. We were in. Leipzig, Germany for our son's graduation and. We decided that since we were so close to Poland, which was about? It's about a six hour drive. Didn't turn out to be. Another story altogether. There's like one road to Poland. But we we rented a car. We drove to Poland. And we went to Auschwitz and. It, if you ever have the opportunity to go experience at, please do because it's one of the most important things you can do is to just be in that space and exist in that space. And just close your eyes and just feel. And it was one of the most. I hate touching. But it was one those moments where I could feel the past. Choking me. And it's overwhelming. It's incredibly overwhelming and. Just, the the the size the scope the scale that they did things on. Were saying and it was a machine. And so. Auschwitz had. A cyclone be they would lead people into the gas chambers. Drop the cyclone being and. I think it would take maybe seven minutes, and then they would just go in clear the bodies. And put them into the. The furnaces and they're six camps that were purely extermination camps, and trebling was one of them that they didn't actually think. Treblinka existed because they had before. It, they had a chance to liberate. The literally tore everything down and planted trees. And they didn't think that it existed, but they found infrastructure like in the ground, and then they found mass. Graves and things like that well speaking of research on the Second World War the series. Band of brothers is probably at the top of things to see and my gosh episode I'm going to site. Is your favorite episode nine why we fight his capture, the discovery of this and the meaning of what it was, and they do a great job of sort of keeping in that time-frame, instead of looking back with the knowledge that we have now just imagine. Coming out of the woods in finding this. Cluster of buildings and there's barbed wire, and there's people and you're not sure what it is and I think they just did a masterful job catching the how these soldiers fell when they when they stumbled across this camp. Yeah,

Poland Lightfoot Gordon Life Auschwitz Europe Leipzig Edmund Fitzgerald Pink Floyd Germany Trebling
"auschwitz" Discussed on People of the Pod

People of the Pod

11:57 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on People of the Pod

"Last week. The English translation of the only novel written in Auschwitz was released last stop Auschwitz. My story of survival able from within the camp by Edwin was written. In the days immediately following the Nazi Death Camps Liberation Seventy five years ago scrawled in Pencil in a notebook used by SS. This officers. The book gives a third person account of the atrocities. They're based on true life events it is raw unedited and perhaps because of the circumstances under under which it was written shattering and Real Eddie wind passed away in nineteen eighty seven but since then his family has pushed to get the book published in its most authentic form warm today on the seventy fifth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. I have a tremendous honor to speak with Melchor de win the author son Melchior. Welcome to the show. Thank you you so tell me. When was the first time you read your father's novel and when was the first time your father mentioned surviving driving the Holocaust but perhaps those are two different moments in your life? Well the last one is not one moment and first one is also quite quite hearts to answer because out. She's always there. It goes nuts. Something there's was told to me on certain moments you just like an atmosphere Randolph's it was in everything and also in the scene said we're not in the house and independently so it's it's like something that you grow up with like a family member and my mother wants made a remark that's sticks to me and she says how our speech was always sitting at our kitchen each table and I think that makes quite clear how it was to grow up in family that had house which in its middle so it was always there yeah You Know Your father about the book for our listeners. Your father wrote the novel in the days immediately following the liberation of Auschwitz. And we're actually having having this conversation on the seventy fifth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. Told me was this day a monumental day in your your family would he hearken back to those days your mother as well or was it just one day like any other well. It was always a bit difficult Google Dave from my father my mother has not Jewish. My father remarried so so he forced from Frito he wasn't as sweet fetal and about two years after the war before and my father remarried. It's my mother and really cuts treat children. And how she's Memorial Day or Holocaust memorial. Jose was always a quite a bit tense day because there was a lot of sadness. Grief family those murders and there were meetings kind meetings where where former house spinner survivors mets and was always tension. There because of lots of things that have happened in the war and after the war. It's not like everybody. Who came back was befriends studios? It was more like a family people. There's five where like family members and you now how family members you will never leave them. But it's hard to love them as well so tell me you picked up this novel. When when did you discover that your father had written a novel It was always in the house as well. My father wrote this in a book that he took from let S. And I'll tell you more about that later. And this wasn't like a notebook and erodes the story with Ben Income uh-huh and that not forsee house in a bookshelf or sometimes on the desk. So when did you actually read the book that he had written based on those notes or what he had recorded in Auschwitz Duke cities printed now. It's published now is exactly what's written in the notebook so after the Germans left the Nashi slept account so I two days later he started writing even before the The associates liberators entered the camp and he wrote the booking I think only two and a half months or three months and the Texas been literally put into do and there was on purpose because my father wanted it to be realistic. Supposed all he didn't want people to be able to say well. This is nonsense. What's written in there or this is a false memory or whatever? What's your reading when you read a lawsuit species? Exactly what's my father wrote down in his own handwriting. The ink that he used in handwriting in Dutch and I I read the book I think when I was eighteen I I finished high school and I wanted to start studying history and it has to do with the story of my daughter and my motto is well I wanted to understand. Send more what's happened in the war and why and so. I decided to start studying history and my father said about your old enough now so now you read the book and I must say that many of storybook book I already knew because father talk quite much about his Experience this in house. We'd watch weeks. He's nuts quite normal normal. Most people that suffice didn't talk much about experiences but my father was a decent in. That's so I knew. Many of the stories already eighty. What inspired your dad to tell those stories early on as opposed to other survivors? Who who don't talk about their experiences until later? This is the longest story. The Russian army was surprising how she's quite rapidly and s. s. and the other night relief in a hurry and it took with as many the people as possible and they distort seeing they left behind then blew up the cost. Shame Bruce and Burns all the papers and they left behind about eight. Thousand people is where too ill to walk and they meant to kill those people as well but the Red Army says they couldn't kill them anymore they also took my father's wife Frito who was saying how she together with my father and my father was scared. He's supposed to go on these debts. Martius there in court later on I will. Oh certainly died. His wife was forced to go. But my father Vincent into hiding smarter people so it was one of the few stayed behind and when he came out of hiding to later the Nazis set the goal. And what's he saw there and then was even worse than the situation when the We're still there because there was foods people were dying literally dying everywhere to rape corpses everywhere. It was worse than Hell and my father was a doctor. He wanted to help. The people were dying but he couldn't run on medicines to us nothing so he went outside of camp any wants to lay down somewhere and wanted to died. He writes about the book as well and then he remembered woman said to him three days before women with a severe head wound that he had been tweeting and she starts. You have to say life so if we want what happens here so that everyone will know and that can never happen again and were those words from the power to stay alive but there's also meant that he had to start driving because he did away a promise to himself. It was the reason for him. Mm to stay alive. The reason that he started writing the recent that the state their life as well the same motivation the motivation to stay alive. And and this is what gives the book this enormous power. You feel in every word and every sentence you feel these urge to tell and then Well he was in the Fields Elson. Remember these words. He went back to Canton. went to a barrack of this s where they kept us stuff and he finds a notebook which was actually an S.. Snowed book the kinds of notebook. They used to write down. who had to go to the cost chambers et Cetera and to such book an empty bottle and you start driving and that Mason away a victory book And it was the same motivation that led him to write that also led him to share air his stories. While you were young with me. You mean why everyone really but you talked about how he was different from other survivors in that he did share talk about his experiences because he wrote the stories already. And outreach you had put him on pay it was easier for him to talk about him about stories than for his daddy was subside finalist and starts treating people with fear or directly after the war when he came back can Holland's and he has one lesson in mind and that is this always worse to let children after fantasies than to tell them to true however heart tooth. He's it's always less fear. Fool and scaring the defenses children so he does lots and he did this on a special way. It was very emotional for him so he told us a lot. I do wonder what you thought of of the English translation of this novel. I know that it had been published in Dutch for many years and your father actually rejected some publishers attempts to have him rewrite and Polish up. the book and he really wanted to keep it very raw very authentic. I'm curious. Es If you feel like the English translation preserved that authenticity well. My father died in eighty seven. And it's been says as this is just solve a year ago. David Calmer and I think David culminated wonderful job because lucky try to do when translates from Since late I try to make things as beautiful as possible in the new language but look take Omar thrives is to stick US gross as possible doors. You know aw so. He used if my father wrote on wrong awards. which you D I mean Washington Academy he rose instinctively eroded? You just see them simple. And he didn't start again just wrote on and Rosalyn actually knife and to engage time was working as a doctor. Signs people to survive is to stay alive and even heroes and what the latest trying to catch this spirit this originality because that makes the book different than an and Gupta this impoverished about how sweet scoring another camp and I have to say the English is all I know so. I don't know what the Dutch how how the Dutch reads or what. The difference is in the word choices but to me it was an incredibly moving incredibly raw and that really is the best word and to describe it So I'm glad that you believe that. The English as an authentic translation from the Dutch. It's definitely a lovely account of relationships. The human relationships and the power of that and I know that after reading the book I think a lot of people will agree with me that they missed the characters and they can certainly identify with just the loss the sheer loss of life. And yes. It definitely is the kind kind of book that you internalize and remember forever. Melchior thank you so much for sharing your father's work and for sharing this conversation with us today. Thank you for listening to now. It's time for our closing segment Shabazz. Table Talk Doc and joining us at archambault table. This week is Yaacov Schwartz. The deputy Jewish world editor at The Times of Israel. Jakko when you're talking with your family and friends at your table this weekend..

Melchior Frito Auschwitz Duke Holocaust memorial Google Eddie wind Edwin Melchor Russian army Red Army The Times Jose Yaacov Schwartz Fields Elson rape Randolph Ben Income Nashi Washington Academy
"auschwitz" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

"Survivors vers- of the Auschwitz death camp prayed and wept as they marked the seventy fifth anniversary of its liberation returning Monday to the place where they lost entire families and warning about the ominous growth of Anti Semitism and hatred in the world. About two hundred kemp survivors. -Vivor attended many of them elderly Jews and non-jews who travelled from Israel the United States Australia Peru Russia Slovenia Vigna and elsewhere many lost parents and grandparents in Auschwitz or other Nazi death camps during World War Two but were joined by children grandchildren and even great grand children. They gathered under an enormous heated tent. Straddling the train tracks that had transported people people to Birkenau the part of the vast complex. Where most of the murder Jews were killed in gas chambers and then cremated Auschwitz was liberated by the Soviet Army on January twenty seventh nineteen forty five Ronald Louder? The president of the World Jewish Congress spoke explaining planing. How often the end of the war when the world finally saw pictures of gas chambers? Nobody in their right mind wanted to be associated with the Nazis. He recalled old. But now I see something I never thought I would see in my lifetime. The open and brazen spread of anti-jewish hatred in Paris French President Emmanuel macron paid his respects at the city's show a memorial and warned about rising hate crimes in the country which increased twenty seven percent last year. The Anti Semitism is coming. Back is not the Jewish people's problem. It's all our problem. It's the nation's nations problem.

Auschwitz United States Australia Peru R World Jewish Congress Birkenau kemp Emmanuel macron Ronald Louder president Israel Soviet Army murder Paris
"auschwitz" Discussed on The Heat

The Heat

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on The Heat

"What was in store <Speech_Music_Female> for for <Speech_Music_Female> us? <Speech_Music_Female> I <Speech_Music_Female> had nothing to <Speech_Female> lose. <Speech_Female> I ran <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> to my sister's <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> no soon as as <Speech_Female> I get to my sister's <Speech_Female> line <Speech_Female> the I realize <Speech_Female> what I <Speech_Music_Female> had done. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> My <Speech_Female> two baby <Speech_Female> sisters live <Speech_Female> rolling to the <Speech_Female> chamber <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> Erin. Do you hear <Speech_Male> it. Very <Speech_Male> somber dramatic <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Really heart wrenching <Speech_Male> Except except <Speech_Male> we heard the <Speech_Male> Bronco Brandon <Speech_Male> is ninety. Two years old <Speech_Male> right now and like <Speech_Male> most survivors won't be <Speech_Male> with US much longer <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> How important <Speech_Male> do you feel that <Speech_Male> that <SpeakerChange> we keep abuse <Speech_Female> accounts alive alive? <Speech_Female> It's <Speech_Female> amazing that <Speech_Female> this generation <Speech_Female> has stepped up <Speech_Female> to bring us their accounts. <Speech_Female> I know <Speech_Female> a number of <Speech_Female> Holocaust survivors. <Speech_Female> Who are very aged aged <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> they still work tirelessly? <Speech_Female> They go <Speech_Female> to schools and talk <Speech_Female> with school children. <Speech_Female> They Day Do <Speech_Female> Media Interviews <Speech_Female> and they <Speech_Female> recognize <Speech_Female> that they <Speech_Female> themselves <Speech_Female> bear a certain responsibility <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> by virtue <Speech_Female> of having survived <Speech_Female> that they <Speech_Female> can testify to the <Speech_Female> people not only <Speech_Female> to their own <Speech_Female> experience chance <Speech_Female> which was invariably <Speech_Female> wrenching <Speech_Female> and emotionally <Speech_Female> and physically <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> arduous. <Speech_Female> But they could also testify <Speech_Female> to the <Speech_Female> to the loss of their <Speech_Female> entire communities indies <Speech_Female> and family members <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> as this <Speech_Female> generation <Speech_Female> is beginning to pass. <Speech_Female> You do see <Speech_Female> some <Speech_Female> willingness <Speech_Female> in the generation <Speech_Female> of their children <Speech_Female> And they're grandchildren. <Speech_Female> What we call in Holocaust <Speech_Female> studies the second <Speech_Female> and the third generations <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> to take on the responsibility <Speech_Female> of telling <Speech_Female> these stories <Speech_Female> filming <Speech_Female> their grandparents Aronson <Speech_Female> Grandparent's <Speech_Female> by <Speech_Female> visiting camps <Speech_Female> with them the the camps <Speech_Female> the former campsites <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and by recording <Speech_Female> their testimonies? <Speech_Female> And I think <Speech_Female> it's going to be up <Speech_Female> to us. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> Post Holocaust <Speech_Female> generations to carry <Speech_Female> the story forward. <Speech_Female> It's going to have to <Speech_Female> be something that we <Speech_Female> we take <Speech_Female> it upon ourselves quite <Speech_Female> consciously <SpeakerChange> to to <Speech_Female> do and to keep this <Speech_Female> story alive in the <Speech_Female> media. <Speech_Female> I wonder <Speech_Female> what's going to happen in <Speech_Female> the next twenty five <Speech_Female> years when we come to <Speech_Female> hundredth anniversary <Speech_Female> and we won't <Speech_Female> have any survivors at <Speech_Female> that point. <Speech_Female> What that story's <Speech_Female> going to look like <Speech_Female> and I'm really hoping <Speech_Female> that <Speech_Female> we can <Speech_Female> understand what happened <Speech_Female> in <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> what we considered <Speech_Female> at the time the the <Speech_Female> most advanced <Speech_Female> technologically <Speech_Female> advanced in <Speech_Female> civilized countries <Speech_Music_Female> on earth <Speech_Music_Female> What happened <Speech_Music_Female> there and <Speech_Music_Female> how brutal <Speech_Music_Female> human beings can be <Speech_Music_Female> to each other and <Speech_Music_Female> how we allow <Speech_Music_Female> it to happen in <Speech_Female> our own through our own <Speech_Music_Female> apathy or <Speech_Female> our our own <Speech_Female> lack of <Speech_Music_Female> care and <Speech_Music_Female> keeping <Speech_Music_Male> ourselves informed <Speech_Music_Male> Erin Karen <Speech_Music_Female> thanks so much <SpeakerChange> for joining us? <Speech_Music_Female> I was very <Speech_Music_Female> pleased to do this. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you for <Speech_Music_Female> bringing attention <Speech_Music_Female> to this issue <Speech_Music_Male> today <Speech_Music_Male> Erin. McLaughlin <Speech_Music_Male> is <Speech_Music_Male> an associate professor served <Speech_Music_Male> German and Jewish <Speech_Music_Male> studies at Washington <Speech_Music_Male> University in Saint Louis <Speech_Music_Male> Missouri. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> The heat is produced <Speech_Music_Male> by. CG <Speech_Music_Male> In America <Speech_Music_Male> Executive Producer <Speech_Music_Male> is tier of H.. And and <Speech_Music_Male> the senior producer is <Speech_Music_Male> John.

Erin Karen US Saint Louis Aronson producer America Executive Producer McLaughlin associate professor Missouri.
"auschwitz" Discussed on The Heat

The Heat

14:39 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on The Heat

"The Holocaust you've devoted a lot of time and energy to these studies. What are your thoughts on the seventy fifth anniversary Auschwitz is like a different world? It's it's it's a world in black and white people with funny clothes during a time of old fashioned technology in a war that is no longer so present in our memory and It's hard to imagine the scope of of such a devastating genocide that played out not only in Auschwitz that in a number of other other killing centers in Europe as well as ghettos and in in killing fields as well for me it's it's kind of a reminder that the work that I to do is even more important to keep the memory alive to remind my students why it's important that we studied this event for our present understanding of current genocides and other types of persecution. How do you keep this alive? How do you keep those memories alive as you say the war is no longer in the memories of many people people Time moves on. It's now seventy five years. How important is it for that memory to be kept alive? I think we have to remember to keep it in our or cultural memory. Part of that is the way in which we engage to bring it into the present rather than preach to young people about it. I think for many decades. It's that was sort of the approach especially in a place like Germany where the perpetration was Planned in where it happened. The idea was to preach to people in have them passively. Passively learned the lesson and I think it's more important now that we actively engage people to think critically about the connections between then and now and think about how things can so quickly go off the rails and turn into what becomes a mass persecution or a genocide. There are only few survivors of the concentration camps. Who are still living? How difficult does it make your job when they have passed on the sad story that every year at this this time we began to take note of how few survivors are left? the survivors. We have now are mostly people who were young children during the time and so they themselves cannot always give a coherent account of what they went through. The one fortunate thing with this is that In the beginning of the nineteen seventies especially we began to realize that these were very important personal stories that had to be collected so we have hundreds is in doubt of thousands of books about the Holocaust Thousands of survivor accounts. We have videotaped testimonies so now we have a an incredibly large archive. And the challenge with this archive is to actually have the voices be heard and to bring new listeners. In new viewers to these recordings thanks to us about the camps at Auschwitz How do they become established? You know I went through the Holocaust Museum here in Washington. DC A few months ago and one of the things that struck me it was very difficult for me to get my mind around the fact that these sites were people were killed in. Such large numbers were constructed with such intention and the intention was to exterminate as large number of people as they could. How would they built? And and how did they become established. Auschwitz was actually started as a concentration camp mostly for German criminals and for a Polish political prisoners. The construction of it was ordered shortly after the war began in ninety a to forty By Himmler head of the S S and only a few years later a couple of years later was it expanded into a huge industrial l. complex that as you said when you use the word camps it included a quite a number of of larger and smaller satellite camps but the main camp that we consider the killing center was What we call Auschwitz to or Birkenau which was open just a couple of kilometers from the original Camp Camp Auschwitz? One and this camp was envisioned as a place. To hold a large number of Labour's it was also the women's camp but it also so became the side of the large gassing and Crematoria facilities that went into operation in one thousand nine hundred forty two one unreason that Auschwitz is so present in our memory. Today is not only because so many people as you mentioned one point one or nearly one million Jews were murdered because the various camps housed about several hundred thousand laborers and among those laborers About Sixty fifty five thousand survived because of their labor because they weren't sent immediately to be killed in gas chambers we have actually survivors from Auschwitz pits because of these laborers whereas at some of the other major killing centers Treblinka sobibor embezzle sets which were located further their east and occupied Poland. There you had about one point. Six million European Jews were killed there and only about one hundred fifty fifty are known to have survived now as a scholar. You focused a lot on As a scholar of the Holocaust I should say you focused on this very dark doc period in history and you found a number of memoirs from survivors. Could you give us some idea of Of their experience there. I I wanted to talk about. was that of Primo. Levy whose account of Auschwitz is seen as one of the most important Primo Levy was an Italian Jew born in nineteen seventeen and he was a a a trained chemist and in early late nineteen forty-three early. Nineteen forty four he was sent to Auschwitz and lady rights after he arrives in Nashville and his head is shaved. He is given a shower. He Has D. licensed and he has given the infamous Auschwitz Tattoo. Do then he describes then for the first time we became aware that our language lacks words to express this offense the demolition militian of a man. In a moment with almost prophetic intuition the reality was revealed to us. We had reached the bottom. Nothing thing belongs to US anymore. They have taken away our clothes. Our shoes even our hair. If we speak they will not listen to us and if they listen they will not understand understand they will even take away our name and if we want to keep it we will have to find ourselves the strength to do so to manage some house so that behind and the name something of us as we were still remains imagine now a man who is deprived of everyone he loves and at the same time of his house his habits habits his clothes in short of everything he possesses he will be a hollow man reduced to suffering a needs forgetful of dignity and restraint straint for he who loses all often easily loses himself. It is in this way that one can understand the double sense of the term extermination camp and it is now clear what we seek to express with the phrase to lie on the bottom when he talks about the double sense of the term extermination. What does it mean by that? I think what he's trying to evoke there is. It's not just the human biological life that is exterminated of that people. People are actually murdered but that they are their sense of human nece is systematically deconstructed and broken down and and that once you deprive of human of any object of their associations with others their personality of their names even of prisoners owners Auschwitz were given numbers and often referred to not with their names but by those numbers. When all of these things happen even though they're still alive you rob them up there? They're essential humanness. Speaking of feeling human. What was the treatment of children lack of these camps most often When children were sent to killing centers there's will especially those in the east but also in Auschwitz? They were murdered immediately with their often with their mothers and other family members so there or a very few children who were in turned in Auschwitz With some exceptions Some children from the ghetto theriesenstadt were interned with their parents for a while before they too were murdered. Some aroma in Cinci of or Gypsy children were also Interact with their families Leeson Auschwitz before they were murdered and some children pass as adults in order to remain alive. And so you didn't really have children behaving like children being able to be children and Auschwitz if they weren't sent to the gas chambers immediately than they often had to participate in forced labour like the adults. What kind of awareness was the in Just in Europe and around the world about what was going on at the time. We didn't have the ubiquitous media that we have today and news did not circulate in the same way. That is certain circulates today. There weren't correspondents. In the occupied countries were filing reports daily but there were people who risked their lives to escape from ghettos and from concentration camps and they often traveled into the West went to London also went to the United States to Washington to report on what they had seen interesting. Sometimes I like to 'til go to the New York Times to their historical articles and look and see what the New York Times was reporting in nineteen forty one in forty two forty three. There was awareness fairness that there were ghettos they were camps and that large numbers of people were being murdered into the many tens and even hundreds of thousands certainly It was being reported in the allied countries that the European Jews were being systematically slaughtered in the Auschwitz itself were there any revolts. There was a quite a Famous revolt in October of nineteen. Forty four by the men of the so-called Zander. Commando our special squad. And these were the men who were chosen often when they were just got off transports themselves to Auschwitz. They were chosen to do the Labor involved in the gassing and burning of people so they would work bringing people into the gas chambers in clearing out corpses from the gas chambers and then burning their bodies And these men. They were prisoners themselves. Their life expectancy was two to four months and and they knew this they knew that at some point the entire squad would be liquidated a new men would be brought in and this particular Zonda commando in October are they were aware of this and when it became clear that they would soon be replaced they decided to revolt. They had collected some weapons and some gunpowder water and they blew up one of the CREMATORIA. They murdered a few guards and created a revolt that was heard throughout the camp And this revolt volt became kind of an inspiration to many prisoners after the revolt Allah the surviving members of the commando were were shot a immediately we so it did not change the camp Although shortly afterward the gassing the practice of gassing was halted in Auschwitz fits when the camp was liberated Auschwitz by the Soviet forces. How were Jewish survivors greeted by the rest of the world at that point when the Soviets I liberated the camp exactly seventy five years ago today what they found the people who were left in the camp were largely very ill and could not travel week two two weeks prior to that The camp authorities had begun to evacuate the camp of any an- any able bodied person was required wired to go on what were essentially death marches. Where in one of the coldest winters in Europe had seen in decades they had to march for for dozens sometimes hundreds of kilometers often wearing just light jackets? Sometimes wearing no shoes sometimes just wouldn't clogs with just a little bit of bread Ed. And they were marched into the interior of Germany and brought to other camps so many of the Auschwitz survivors when they were finally liberated it was closer to March April Even into may in some of the camps in the rice and the Western allies couldn't believe what they were seeing when they encountered these camps. My uncle was a liberator of Buchenwald and he described in a letter to me about how he couldn't believe the people he was encountering help emaciated. They were how he couldn't believe that somebody could survive that it took a some time but the allies began to organize relief relief efforts also through the United Nations and they created displaced persons camps in Germany and then there was a sense of. What do we do with this large survivor population? Many of whom. They didn't feel welcome when they returned to places like their original homes in Poland or Hungary they met quite a bit of anti he semitism so there was a sense that there was this population that needed care that needed to have some sort of stability and at that point wait. Some of the countries in the United States Canada Australia began to admit refugees as did British occupied Palestine at the time it didn't often admit refugees but refugees would illegally smuggled themselves there and so this large population of survivors began to then disperse burst to all corners of the earth. We have an audio excerpt here Erin from the Museum of Jewish heritage in New York. It's from a Polish Holocaust. Survivor named Bruna Brandman. And yes she tells us about how she and her sisters were awaiting a selection process for. Who would be sent to the gas chamber? Let's listen and it was our turn. He will watch love and he pointed this very of us to with the left. He pointed me La my oldest sister to the right you..

Auschwitz Camp Camp Auschwitz Europe Germany Washington Poland Holocaust Museum New York Times US DC CREMATORIA Cinci Primo Levy Museum of Jewish heritage Crematoria Primo Bruna Brandman
"auschwitz" Discussed on The Current

The Current

07:08 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on The Current

"In Auschwitz very formed the expression expression the guilt of the survivors. He was the so the loud house. Day It is the fourth of December in the evening Ivan vetoed. It was very hard to May to go to visit because and they didn't let the block you know. And I came in anti-soviet she was under floor on the under stone floor in a coma and and the do rats have had evoke. Could there and back in the loop beautiful good little of my father and she how David David fighting to to to take to school the someone who didn't want to take and how they were fighting and and the vert the students rose you know I had a picture. Maybe he because I was still young. She was woman and and I so her really like something something special and she stayed in my mind like some special person that that you could do something important but they cut off her life so it was inverse happened at the top deal. Now I can tell you that I that I do understand. They cannot understand. I don't understand anything anything coffee. Do you know how many think of it. How did you survive? After I mean an and find the strength to survive after your sister you know I came from the camp terminally ill will be stupid in my leg and eighty years ago to build Colossus Sterno internees so so it was a little bit concentration of the leg because it was very paid for and I was limping. And deducted UH Jewish. Your doctor came to me and said edit you cannot go to work like these limping. You will be the same theme the key in the Gus Chamber. I can take you in the hospital for a few days. Delay New Transporti's organized. Then I will said send you back and so about two months show. Every time took me for three days after three days. She said go back back to work. Because I heard that they aren't making can transport after the transfer took me again for a few days evils so Monte Chevelle Bova very nice woman and she I can say that she safe me. v V these because been deposed has begun to be chronicle so indeed hurt anymore and had you been ill then you would have been killed. The if you hadn't been able to do that work. They would have killed. He'll do that's exactly right and the other thing you know. It's that Edith had a dear friend whose name was L. Rosenthal and sisterhood was a big part of Survival and what happened with many girls if they lost a family member of sister close cousin is it. Somebody else often stepped into that place and I write about it in the book. You know you couldn't survive in Edith says this you couldn't survive Auschwitz on your own. You had to have somebody with you. Who had your back and and helped you look after yourself and somebody you could look after and edith talks about how Elza says to her L. says to her I I can't survive without you and Edith says so I had to live that they needed each other? Yeah diva's I was fighting. I don't know if it was gotten nature my veal. I don't know it was something that pushed me to survive. Um and I want to tell you something very young and weaver full of live with all these terrible situation. Russian these these fear to fear every second in twenty four hours you know it was terrible but reverse reverse on Sundays on the bed and singing onto Don's we've wanted to sing. We won't be very young you know and you cannot stop these energy even not if you don't have enough food for Breezing v very young and and we be oh then somebody will survive the old bef- fight and on two end region. We are stronger than hate. It's a real pleasure to meet you. What a story you have? I'm glad that you survived. And it's important to hear you. I tell you the truth. I am glad all so for them but not for me. It's a hard life if you if you are sensitive very sensitive for a lot of things you know. So it's a hap life so dense vago entice speak. He tired sometimes because with children. You cannot tell them the whole twos visit the gas chambers with Gosling people we say woman a a beautiful clear lying in on the floor on the stone in in a coma she looked I when I super now she looked like it did cut. You know she was there with the hands like these so you cannot you. You know you you you cannot tell them everything so that you can you tell for other outside. Tell I'm but I cannot tell myself the true pet. You've done an amazing job easy to you. Have you have spoken truth. Thank you very much. You've any veil coming. Thank you thank you thank you had. Their mcadam is the author of nine nine nine. The extraordinary young women of the first official Jewish transport to Auschwitz. She was in New York. City Edith Grossman was one of those extraordinary young men. She's ninety five and she was with me here in Toronto for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS GO TO C._B._C. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

Edith Grossman Auschwitz coma mcadam Don David David Ivan Colossus Sterno Gus Chamber Breezing official L. Rosenthal weaver Toronto Gosling New York Elza
"auschwitz" Discussed on The Current

The Current

09:34 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on The Current

"Sorts of began with World War One tournant which was a global thing and many places including The what at that point was Bolshevik Russia before it became the Soviet Union After after World War One or when countries left one they simply started rounding up other groups of civilians and with the Soviet camps. The singular thing there the thing that was new the innovation was instead of taking enemy aliens. Foreigners who happen to be on your soil when the war began they took their own citizens they took their own Population and identify target groups whether they were religious groups or political groups and they began locking up their own citizens with the idea of re educating them in Canada and the United States as we know the people of Japanese heritage were interns during the war. with would you call knowing what you know. Would you call the facilities that they were interned in concentration camps. Yes ask because again. You know it's important to remember in the US the that population that was rounded up the Japanese American population during World War Two most of them were American citizens And even those who weren't were arrested against the wishes of military intelligence at the time it was really a political decision. That was made to do this. And I also I think in Canada during World War One the Ukrainians that were here were treated really terribly with some pretty bad forced labor that they were put to. I think we have to include those certainly certainly not on the scale or the kind of Auschwitz Camp you know they were not death camps they were not extermination camps but even Auschwitz rose out of exactly these other kinds minds of camps that were discussing and to your point the language matters that have in some ways if we call them interment camps that can diminish what was happening in in those facilities. I think it's fine to call terminates one of the things that were there but if we use that term as a way to minimize what happened. That's where I think the dangerous they are concentration camps if we step into the present and last year the specter of and that phrase concentration camps was raised again in connection with what's happening along the US Mexican border the detention detention centers. There were designed to hold South American refugees who are trying to cross into the United States. Have a listen to what's the Democratic Congresswoman Alexandra Akhazia Cortez Hortas had to say the United States is running concentration camps on our southern border. That is exactly what they are. They are concentration camps the fact that concentration camps are now in institutionalized practice in the home own free is extraordinarily disturbing vendor pictures. She Alexandria accustomed Cortez faced heavy criticism for calling those detention attention centers along the US Mexican border concentration camps. What was your reaction to that criticism? Well I had been calling what was happening on the border with putting detention at the heart of this immigration policy A concentration camp approach for months before she did so I would not disagree with what she said. I think some of the flat came from the fact. That people don't know this other history this forty years of history prior to Auschwitz camps that happened after Auschwitz. And so I think if you you hear what she said and you think she is saying that these camps are like Auschwitz. Then it's reasonable to be upset and concerned and think that that's an inappropriate comparison person but I think that response is because people don't actually know the larger history they don't know that Auschwitz in these camps were extermination camps but that concentration camps are a much larger much more ongoing project which is quite dangerous at the pushback in part to. Your point came because people said that she was trying a false equivalency that she was putting those detention attention camps in the same category in the same box as the Nazi concentration camps. Right and I can't speak to. What's in her heart? I've never met the representative. But what I will say I. I was one of the people she cited and so if she was in fact reading the things I was saying about these border detention sites then I think she was probably using the term correctly but he and I see how the misunderstanding rises. Because there are people out there looking to deny or minimalized. The Holocaust I just said someone me about my book yesterday saying I really spent too much time. I'm on Jewish suffering during World War Two so I mean that perspective is out in the world we have to be aware of it and be sensitive to it but my sense is that that's not what she was doing in that moment. If you even move beyond that into into the more present time we're in right now was a leak of thousands of documents. Recently detailing what the Chinese government is doing in terms of rounding up and turning members of its Muslim Leaguer community in what it calls reeducation camps in Xinjiang. Some people have called those concentration camps as well. How do you see what's happening in China? I think what's happening in China also fits in this tradition. It's very much inside. The history of Chinese forced labor detention and concentration camps in this case. Now it's targeting targeting a minority in a border region and that targeting of minorities and border regions. We see that. In in India Today we see it in Myanmar with the hinge. We see it in China with the weavers and it's not that different it's it's a level of degree of cruelty higher but it is not that different than what we're doing on the US border camp so we have a border camp concentration camp detention crisis rising in the world right now that we really need to be paying attention to climate change is is only going to make this much much worse. Do you think that more people would pay attention to the situation happening in China. If the phrase concentration camp was used to describe what's happening in John John I think thank you see it used more and more and I think it is raising the The profile of those camps which you know with more than a million people detained in them. I hope that we will be able to raise. Is it further. But the China keeps a lot of that information. Guarded and a lot of things are founder people who get out through satellite photos. We have a really incomplete picture so I think we yes we should. He's that term. We should press for more information one of the things that becomes clear in reading your book. Is that concentration camps in one form or another over the span of history were embraced by Communists they were embraced by capitalists. There embraced by fascists as well. What is it that is so attractive to this system system across ideological lines? It really has to be manipulated by government so it doesn't just rise organically there has to be somebody sort of pushing for it and propagandizing but labelling one group as outsiders and dangerous to public health or criminals or destroying. Your society can be a really great way to motivate motivate people who are frightened and angry. Maybe for other reasons and so you find it used again and again what I will say is that the more checks and balances system has Typically and democracies you can undo some of that more quickly you don't tend to see the camps that last thirty forty fifty years in societies that have some mechanisms ECHINACEA by which the people can vote people out our undo things but yes every system is capable of generating a concentration camp system earlier in the program spoke with Youth Grossman who is on the first official official transport of Jews to Auschwitz and see talked about what it was like to be there at that time and talked about how in some ways people felt and she felt that this was happening. In broad daylight that people knew about this And didn't do anything. And that she finds difficulty in reconciling. Not just that she survived. She survived in the face in some ways of People around the world turning their backs we hear this phrase again and again Never again when you look at the world since then through through your research of concentration camps what does that phrase me ever again. I think it has to mean two things. I think that what happened to it. Bitten people Like her that were sent Auschwitz in either came out or it didn't Is a horrifying sign of how we can take technology and and cruelty and and just commit unbelievable unimaginable atrocities and so never again should on one hand be absolutely specific to that moment but if the again and never again means. We don't want this to happen again then it can't just be never again. Well Jews in Europe be rounded up and killed under Hitler in the Nineteen Thirties. It has to mean a broader martyrising as well and I think that broader thing is let us not take steps like these camps that are open in so many countries right now around the world. Let us not take. Even these he steps closer to Auschwitz let us not imagine what other unimaginable horrors. We can't yet picture that could develop out of these situations that are happening funding in broad daylight right now Refusing to let that go further. I think is really important. Part of never again. And do you see the bricks for that foundation. Just finally do you see the brick for that foundation being laid now in terms of how people are acting around the world I do and I think that people say again and again this is not what's happening in my country with these. These people is not the same as those other camps but looking a century of camp. History what I can tell you is that is always what is said when a camp system rises. No I know our camps are for people who deserve it they are not like those other camps and never is that true. It's a bracing message on a moment and a morning like today a an in a moment like the one. We're in right now. Well I think it's an important one. I think that this is a really good moment to make sure that never again you know vow is something that we actually really carry out and rip it Sir. It's great to speak with you this morning. I appreciate it thank you. Thanks for having me on. Andrew Pitzer is the author of one long night a global history of concentration caps. She was in Washington.

Auschwitz Auschwitz Camp United States China Canada Soviet Union Russia Alexandra Akhazia Cortez Horta Alexandria India Myanmar Europe Andrew Pitzer John John representative Chinese government Washington
"auschwitz" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

09:55 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Today's episode is very special. There are now few survivors of the Nazis largest concentration camp Auschwitz on the seventy fifth anniversary of its liberation. Iva Pearl and Susan Pollock who had children just twelve and thirteen when they were taken there. Tell us their stories from the Guardian ionised Gristana today.

Iva Pearl Susan Pollock Auschwitz
"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

HISTORY This Week

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

"Picture <SpeakerChange> began to change <Speech_Music_Female> in the early <Speech_Music_Female> nineteen sixties <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> both Auschwitz <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and the Holocaust. I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> came back into <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> world. News thanks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to the Frankfurt <Speech_Music_Female> trials as <Speech_Music_Female> well as the trial of Adolf <Speech_Music_Female> Eichmann in nineteen <Speech_Music_Female> sixty one. <Speech_Music_Female> He was responsible <Speech_Music_Female> for sending thousands <Speech_Music_Female> upon thousands thousands <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of Hungarian <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Jews to Auschwitz <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in nineteen forty four. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Most of <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> whom were gassed. <SpeakerChange> Immediately <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> upon arrival <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the killing of millions <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of Jews <Speech_Music_Male> as the person responsible responsible <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> execution of the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Nazi plan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> known as the final <Speech_Music_Male> solution of <Speech_Music_Female> the Jewish problem <Speech_Music_Female> and these <SpeakerChange> trials <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> those world <Speech_Male> events <Speech_Male> and it was at <Speech_Male> that point. Really <Speech_Male> that's the <Speech_Male> Holocaust became <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> all pervading <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> historical event <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> that <Speech_Male> we think of now now <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> and Auschwitz <Speech_Female> at the center of it <Speech_Music_Female> all <Speech_Music_Female> became the symbol <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that we know it as <Music> today <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> but <Speech_Female> for survivors like Bill L.. <Speech_Music_Female> It's <Speech_Music_Male> not just a <SpeakerChange> simple. <Speech_Male> I got <Speech_Music_Male> a breakdown <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and did all the <Speech_Male> cry for three <Speech_Male> months and <Speech_Male> difficult time <Speech_Music_Male> and I'm <Speech_Male> very grateful. <Speech_Male> Thank <Speech_Male> God Gardini <Speech_Male> Common <Speech_Male> Sense <Speech_Music_Male> to know <Speech_Music_Male> that you have one life <Speech_Music_Male> to leave and <Speech_Male> I had the <Speech_Male> little to no hope. <Speech_Music_Male> Hold to proceed <Speech_Music_Male> with my life <Speech_Music_Female> bill <Speech_Music_Female> and so many others <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> found <Speech_Music_Male> a way to go on <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the best revenge <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> in life is <Speech_Male> success so <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I was determined <Speech_Male> to make a success <Speech_Male> out of my <Speech_Male> life <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Music_Male> I did. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Bill picked up English. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> He <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> became highly skilled <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in the art <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of beauty. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> He ended up doing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> hair and makeup <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for movie stars. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Like Judy <SpeakerChange> Garland <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and the Kabore family. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> can't hate your I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> am is because <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> when you hate <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you leave <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> that today. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Bill <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is <SpeakerChange> worried. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I don't and <Speech_Music_Male> believe that <Speech_Music_Male> the world <Speech_Music_Male> learn the <Speech_Music_Male> lessons on <Speech_Music_Female> the Holocaust <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> that study from twenty <Speech_Female> eighteen polled <Speech_Music_Female> Americans about <Speech_Music_Female> the Holocaust <Speech_Music_Female> it also asked. <Speech_Music_Female> Could the Holocaust <Speech_Music_Female> happened <Speech_Music_Female> again <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> over. Half <Speech_Female> of the participants <Music>

"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

HISTORY This Week

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

"So on the day of liberation though the evidence of the crimes committed at the camp was in plain sight at the time it hardly made the news in in the middle of nine hundred forty four? They had liberated mushed neck. A death camp in eastern Poland and that had been a major international news story but by January on your in nine hundred forty five and the liberation of Auschwitz the discovery of a large ss concentration camp and death. Camp was overshadowed by the news coverage of the Yalta to conference where the big three powers. We're going to be deciding the fate of Europe after the war and hardly any attention internationally was given to ash fits. What's the war was still raging? In most of Europe Germany had yet to be defeated. So at the time to most people all the name Auschwitz carried no meaning and for those who lived through Auschwitz and survived. Liberation was just beginning. Liberation was another struggle to survive to survive long enough to eventually. Somehow if it was possible. Make your way back. A code. On a practical level survivors had to fight for their health in the immediate days following the liberation at Auschwitz and at other liberated camps allied forces. Repurpose the camp facilities to set up infirmaries but the problem was too big. The allies weren't prepared for liberating getting these millions of displaced persons survivors. They just didn't have the resources. The facilities treat the majority of them in the humane manner that they needed and many died in the period off with because of lack of medical care manual unsafe. -able and I don't know that anyone don't necessarily could have prepared adequately.

Auschwitz Camp Europe mushed neck Yalta Poland Germany
"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

HISTORY This Week

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

"Hunger you never forget it. Mindy was transferred to a different labor camp camp soon after arriving at Auschwitz. That's what I love came because there is no way you could have survived for a long time in our shoots despite its horrors. Auschwitz had a high number of survivors compared to many of the other camps in Germany. An estimated one hundred thousand when people were alive by the end of the war but many of them were not actually liberated at Auschwitz on the day that we honor this week Russian tanks crush Nazi resistant and German dead middle of the road. There's a great Red Army. Sweeps from January of Nineteen forty-five Germany was was losing. The war and the Red Army was closing in so the Nazis were hurrying to hide their atrocities destroying the gas chambers burning records and forcibly sending the sixty thousand prisoners who were healthy enough on what we call today. The death marches. The prisoners has walked for many miles and for days on end two camps deeper in German territory. This was the dead of winter. Thousands of prisoners died. Those who survived ended up in other camps riddled with disease and packed with prisoners on January. Twenty seven th nineteen forty-five the Soviet army discovers the camp but not the tens of thousands of prisoners who had been held there just weeks prior this is essentially what they an at an abandoned camp with the remaining evidence of the trustees that had been perpetrated there and just about seven thousand prisoners.

Auschwitz Red Army Germany Soviet army Mindy
"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

HISTORY This Week

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

"This man knew her brother's I wouldn't pass the inspection. They were too young and he had seen what happened to families. Arriving with young children they wouldn't want to separate. They would make a quoting scene and they would all be sent to the left and I think that Capo must have no that. This strain reign of mothers and children. That were no use for work would end up in the gas chambers. And that's why you must have looked in the coach himself. Well perhaps I'll try and save a couple so men to intercessor went ahead and they were sent to the right. We look back. Can we saw mother was spotted scarf or we wave and we went ahead their mother and brothers others were sent to the left. This man promise. We will see Martha and they told how. Can you see this terrible smoke. Smoke and dirt that you are warning to know what the dirty smells. That's where you must this nine. Nine hundred thousand Jews of the one point one million who died at Auschwitz were killed immediately upon arrival. Those who passed inspection were not killed immediately but going to the rate meant a different horror. Once we enter there. We thought we dented. Hell they will body seventy where yeah and there were these Watchtowers was machine. Guns pointed at us. We just couldn't couldn't breeze we couldn't we didn't know where we were. We didn't know what was happening. Prisoners were stripped of everything they came in with and given prison garb. The milestone into showrooms to be allows had shaffer. We had to sit there naked for men shaving our heads shaving hands off and the the dexterity for young girls like I'll cells. Possibly I believe my mother didn't see our suntrust. You couldn't believe that was actually happening to you. They were subjected to beatings. Are Physical Labor..

Capo Martha
"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

HISTORY This Week

08:49 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

"At the height of World War Two trains from all over Europe left their stations with Uh uh single destination Auschwitz MINU Hornak a twelve year old Jewish girl from Czechoslovakia was on one of those trains. They House today. We line and put us in a cattle truck and done and they must have been seven seventy of us in a word. I mean they were body to body and all the head is a bucket in the middle and no water. No uh-huh sanitation. That bucket will only substation we shunted forward couple of two or three days and suddenly suddenly we arrived at the place this place was Auschwitz. We spoke with historian Dorian and author Jeremy Drone field. Who says that? Even at the time amongst those in the concentration camps Auschwitz was the most notorious in other concentration camps you had a chance of surviving but they believe transfer to Irish fits with certain death sentence how did Auschwitz become a place whose name alone carried so much fear. The groundwork was set decades before German do board at that train treachery and incompetence had do relation that only a decade ago had been leader of Europe. Germany had been great in the previous century being great and powerful and influential and in World War One at being betrayed and let down and it was no week in the early nineteen thirty S. The Great Depression hit Germany and further weakened its economy people were fearful and angry. Ah Adolf Hitler saw an opportunity. AUTOMO- Dr Dr Tap Economic Kings -iety and he rose dominance. He gained the most votes of any party in the nationwide elections. He came to power within a deep young but established democratic system and then became a dictator. Hitler's goal was to make Germany powerful again and to make Germany. Strong and forceful. You had to clear out these. He's malign influences and that meant getting rid of the Jews Hitler mobilized the Anti Semitism that had existed in Germany for centuries he's and painted the Jewish people as a common enemy every international finance Jews with him and without your reviewed again and plunging people and another World War Nazi propaganda claimed that the Jews had shirked service during World War One that they were the children of the devil that they were a race inferior and poisonous own German related blad willing to serve the German right and people bought into these lies. Jim In society under the Nazis was intensely anti Semitic and Jews were persecuted from day. One but it wasn't really until the late thirties. They began to be sent in large numbers to the camps they were being sent to camps mostly within Germany but in nineteen thirty nine. The Nazis invaded Poland Germany. The attack one hundred seventy five divisions of young German soldiers gathered and World War Two began destructive preliminary. They hit learner. Wanted somewhere to send thousands of Polish prisoners. He deemed a political threat. Most of them weren't Jewish. And he found a vast complex acts of barracks from the eighteen hundreds in the town of Swinton in German Auschwitz Auschwitz. One was core camp. That was the headquarters quarters. It was a holding place. And that is the camp with the famous slogan over the gateway by marked fry or in in English work sets you free. Concentration camp began in this complex. At first it was mainly a a detention center but should soon became the site of persecution and murder for several groups. who were considered undesirables for example? The Roma the people known to Germans as Gypsies also Germans who were gay and anyone who was considered disabled and of course Jewish people. They initially Hitler's plan was to force all the Jewish people to flee Germany and German occupied territories to countries like the US the UK and Palestine. This would have meant huge numbers of refugees and those those countries wouldn't take them at least not insufficient numbers when Jewish people didn't or couldn't emigrate on Mass Hitler's solution shafted. Things changed drastically in nineteen forty two the Nazi regime enacted a policy called the final final solution to the Jewish question it aimed to exterminate all Jewish people and any memory of Jewish life and it wasn't really elite until nine hundred forty two that large numbers of Jews began being sent to ash fits and the lodge extension engine confidential. It's Birkenau was established which eventually became the major death camp. All the shvets complex with the gas chambers and Crematoria Toria will build the gas chambers were structures designed for mass murder Crematoria were designed to burn the bodies and there is a absolutely shocking piece of aerial footage. The Red Army took of flying over Ashford's Birkenau at low altitude and it seems to go on forever during this time. Many people risked their alive to hide their Jewish neighbors. But many more states silent so that the public's eyes and ears turned away train after her train. Left from stations all over Europe with people packed shoulder to shoulder and when the trains arrived at Auschwitz The thing that would define your existence will be what you've got sent to the left or the right. Those deemed fit to work were sent to the right. Those deemed unfit the old. The young the sick the disabled or anyone who made about the regards considered to be a scene they would be sent to the left survivor. Mendi Hornak with her older sister her mother and her two younger brothers when the train stopped we were acid- right by the door. And they were these little space in between those carriages and my my mother said to be I took away we all and I looked through and I could see police or fear chain. It wasn't The German scolded ended Auschwitz. When the door so I mean there was just all held at loose? They were the barking dogs vicious Lee walking around. They will loudspeakers always and these S.. MEME walking around with shiny boots and gums on their back and one of these stripe to uniform men came last couple. They called couples and he came in. He looked trumped. I and he said to my mother ish to let these girls go ahead that we will see later. He was a prisoner on our already. His job was to direct people out of the train when they arrived at Auschwitz and he was so convincing because of where we were and her fear. What's going to happen? She said you better do. Is.

Auschwitz Germany Adolf Hitler Auschwitz MINU Hornak Europe murder Poland Germany Dr Dr Tap Economic Kings Crematoria Toria Dorian Czechoslovakia Mendi Hornak Birkenau Jeremy Drone Red Army Swinton Jim
"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

HISTORY This Week

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

"Today. The camp has become a symbol for the Holocaust itself synonymous but the Nazis systematic state sponsored mass murder but back in early nineteen forty-five when Auschwitz was liberated. The story. The only made page three of the New York Times. It was summarized in just two sentences and was overshadowed by other news Twenty eighteen a survey asked a random group of young Americans about the Holocaust. Can you name one of the forty two thousand Nazi run camps or ghettos and almost half of the participants couldn't name a single one. This week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. A Day of remembering but anniversaries are strange. They pick one day out of a huge complicated story. In the story of the Holocaust the liberation of camps like Auschwitz was neither the beginning nor the the end. The Holocaust didn't begin at Ash. Smith didn't begin with gas chambers. It didn't begin with concentration camps hands it began with the other and the dehumanization of large high profile group of people. I'm Sally Alley home. And this is history this week as we commemorate the liberation of Auschwitz. We ask what exactly are we remembering. And what have we forgotten.

Auschwitz New York Times murder Sally Alley Smith
"auschwitz" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

09:34 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Absolutely plainly. Now I think is a result of a lot of new research around Pearl Harbor that that the killings going on before Pearl Harbor notably in the in eastern Europe in behind the lines in the war against the Soviet Union. But there's nothing there's no major death campaign operation but what happens is a soon as Pearl Harbor happens. You see Hitler's rhetoric change and he starts talking about right now. It's a world war and you remember my prophecy of nineteen thirty nine in which he stated. If the Jews succeed in causing a world war the result will be their annihilation he sees this as a fulfillment of prophecy. He said if the JEWS GET INVOLVED INVOLVED IN CAUSA World War America coming into the war is day factor a world war simultaneously. Think the Jews and not just behind stone and and but they're behind Roosevelt as well is pathological this stuff They Act but they absolutely believe that I think And so as a result of that he they absolutely push forward with a with a massive give expansion In the killing around that time immediately after Pearl Harbor when the Nazis I began executing Jews in large numbers. They did it really at with with firing squads. Wh what was the impact of that kind of close quarter execution on the Germans who who carried it out the impact for for quite substantial proportion of them was was terrible. They were emotionally May distraught by this That having to shoot women and children at very close range and this this I believe begins this journey to the gas chambers that we that we know of the infamous gas chambers. And it's because we see when hemlock visits Minsk in in August nineteen forty one. He's told of the emotional problems the killing in this way. The shooting killings are doing to his men and he puts in train as a result a whole series series of experiments to devise a way of killing that he's not so emotionally disturbing to his men. I'd always thought that the reason that The gas chambers were devised was primarily to kill people in large numbers. It wasn't just that at all. It was actually so that there was a a less emotionally stressful way that the killers could commit murder in the beginning. Initially by by putting people into a I guess in a in a cabin of some kind and and piping exhaust fumes into it. That's right well. What happens now again again and we can see this? As an example of both cumulative radicalism and competition within the Nazi stayed is is various people at various different locations. Sion's come up with different initiatives. What happens is there's an initiative which is the gas van which is a van where you connect the exhaust back into a compartment hermetically sealed in the rear where people guest those The building off the campaign bells etch which is the first stationery gas chambers again. Using large engines with common gases going into to gas them and then at the same time in September nineteen forty. One you you find a totally different initiative beginning I Schwartz. which is the only camp where this initiative begins? which is the use of Zyklon B Zyklon B is a powerful Flint sectocide using used for disinfecting rooms and it was already in Auschwitz and they used it for delousing prisoners clothes and and rooms because they had hera a terrible problem with lice? Because of the inhumane conditions not least that prices were captain and one of the functionaries. There thinks to himself. Well it's it's got printed on on SICOM PECANS dangerous to life. Don't go in in the room while this is is being let off new goes well actually of course if you want to kill people they should be in the room so he starts experimenting not on Jews but on the sick and on Soviet prisoners of war dashes and he starts with cyclone be the experiments go wrong to start with the play they alter doses they do experiments and eventually they evolve a different method of killing to the ones used used in the death camp Treblinka Sobibor Belzec now as you noted Auschwitz was not originally conceived of as a the death camp but as a labor camp which meant that? It was large and had lots and lots of barracks and you note that when the killings of Jews really accelerated in nineteen forty forty two. This was done not so much. At how switch but three other camps at BELZEC SOBIBOR and Treblinka and they specifically set up as death camps. And you've made the point that when and visitors go to those sites they are always shocked at how small they are. Even though these three camps alone accounted for one point seven million deaths. Why were these deaths camps so small? How did they function because they had no other function than killing Auschwitz is unique in the history? The Nazi state is unique in the history of the world. It's it's it's not just the site of the largest mass murder the world's ever seen as a physical site it's also unique in the Nazi. Let's see state in that. It's the only camp that combines two functions it's both a concentration camp and a death camp and those functions vary at different times in its in its history. What's happening at places like Treblinka BELZEC SOBIBOR is? They are set up in nineteen forty to all of them opening nine hundred forty two. They are set-top tab purely to murder Jews And if you plan on just just I say just murdering people one of the shocking things things you need no no real space at all. These places are a few hundred yards square. Nothing left of them now. Because the Nazis themselves destroyed these camps in late nineteen forty three. They knew that they wanted to keep this secret. And they were essentially places where trains would arrive and the Jews will be taken off and ninety-nine in more than ninety nine percent of these people would be dead probably within two hours so there was no stay of any age Giovanni kind really at all account Treblinka which was capable of killing. Three hundred thousand. Isn't people in little more Iran less than two months in the summer of nineteen forty two three hundred thousand people in that one small space. It was run by around twenty Germans and about one hundred. Ukrainian gods and these Ukrainians had been mostly selected from prison camps. They had been people fighting on the Russian side. White who in the horror of the prison camps that the Germans set up for these Russians where millions died were offered this chance of saving themselves to go and work on the German side and then there was the third category of people working in these camps who were tragically Jews themselves. The Nazis selected very occasionally occasionally from incoming transports a number of fit Jewish people and force them on pain of their own. Immediate murder to participate in the process by cutting people's was half by showing the way to the gas chamber by cleaning the Gas Chambers by burning the bodies and so on and the toll man these people went trees is scarcely imaginable so so the actual horrific task of murder of cleaning the bodies of cleaning out. The chambers after the killing has occurred is by and large not done by adjournments. Never done by Germans really know and that was to announce which is well. That's right so they end up at the huge industrial style. Killing factories reserve is shorts. Birth Canal you have a a crematorium gas chamber complex that's capable in the summer of nineteen forty one of killing ten thousand people in one day. Ten thousand is in people in one day and it's run by between two to four Germans and around about one hundred Jews now. The Nazis Save the absolute moment of moded. Oh to themselves. They're the ones who dropped the canisters of Zyklon B actually into the gas chamber but pretty much all the other tasks involved in making this operate all run in by Jewish son to commander who we know both rented viewing some The few people who survived this and also from documents that Jewish onto commander Rotin written hid in the foundations of the building often at the time the toll meant these people went through was was practically indescribable. I was struck by your description of the arrival arrival buildings at the death camps that they often were fairly pleasant looking. I mean with flower plantings in the kind I designed to reinsure the incoming inmates inmates exert. That was not what it was going to be. Again this is. This is all part of the cynicism. But it's also part of the learning curve these Nazis going because what happens at Treblinka which was the most deadly? If you like of all of these death camps outside of Schmidt's they were killing so many people at the system broke down so some of ninety forty two that the system system broke down The bodies everywhere the was just made a ham people being shot it was chaos so they actually to shut it down and reorganize is it and the new commander of Treblinka what he managed to do as he pushed. It forward was come up with all of these devices like the fate railway station. Fake timetables lovely flowers. Same thing SOBIBOR. One of the most extraordinary individuals. I've ever met Toy Blatt who survived sobibor said actually when he got off the. I've been expecting some horrible horrible place. He said it was always beautiful. And as you say it's all designed so that when say Jews coming from Holland derive their told you were to transit station hygiene stop op while we just need to need to take a shower. Have you had cotton. We're going to move on East. And it's deliberately designed to do that. Laurence Rees book is Auschwitz. Fits a new history. We'll hear more from him after a break and we'll hear some of Terry's nineteen eighty-eight.

Gas Chambers murder Auschwitz Pearl Harbor Sobibor Belzec BELZEC SOBIBOR Soviet Union commander Europe Hitler Roosevelt Laurence Rees Wh Minsk Sion Holland Schwartz. Terry Giovanni
"auschwitz" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:55 min | 1 year ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on AP News

"The move follows an appeal by the Auschwitz Birkenau state museum to remove the merchandise which included and I'll Schmitz bottle opener Anna Birkenau massacre mouse pad the museum says selling ornaments with images of outfits doesn't seem appropriate and that ouch fits on a bottle opener is quote disturbing and disrespectful the museum once another online shopping outlet way shopping to stop selling the products Amazon says all its sellers must follow the company selling guidelines and those that don't will have their products removed I'm my campaign

Amazon Auschwitz Birkenau Anna Birkenau
"auschwitz" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on WLAC

"Load why watch it not on demand now the story of kurt garonne um it is truly remarkable but here's a guy who in the end uh compromised and was commissioned by the nazis to make a film taking a concentration camp and turning net concentration camp into a jewish paradise uh and the movie is out and abuse watching you watch it on youtube and it's it's terrifying when you know the truth the movie is called the fuhrer gives a city to the jews and it showed the jews laughing and playing an enjoying life but when the cameras weren't rolling they were all being tortured uh they were murdered in fact every buddy in that film was dead within a month in the ovens of auschwitz in the gas chambers of auschwitz every single person you don't go to the town of auschwitz and say you know look hit this beautiful little town lookout colorful it is when you know that there are concentration camps down the street nbc news you are dangerously close to guarantee movie evil exist when good men do nothing w what did you get out of that that you can show to the world this is what this regime is like showing the colorful buildings and thus sturdiness in stonking us of the people my gosh well wellbuilt ejceear because they're so wellfed showing their colorful buildings does nothing those buildings were built by slaves darkness rains when people and especially the media fail to speak a murmur.

nazis nbc news concentration camps chambers auschwitz people little youtube paradise
"auschwitz" Discussed on BBC Let's Talk About Tech

BBC Let's Talk About Tech

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"auschwitz" Discussed on BBC Let's Talk About Tech

"I'm very often surprised by the range of games and vr experiences that i see but one in particular the stood out for me a games come this year was witness auschwitz david gallo is part of the creative team has been putting this together and i spoke to him on this stand in one of the titles witness auschwitz now of all of the things to pull into a vrc malaysia auschwitz is not the one i would go to won't white that choice first of all la we decide to do this project because the people that they had had this idea had the relatives that that there and the weather we went there to visit we understood that it's no easy to understand how it was the place at this age 94 344 because now is completely different of course if you go to visit for example in a sunny day you see the green grass you'll hear the birds you see the flour and is not how it was the life in that in that spirit and so we spoke with the jewish community in rome we spoke with a jewish company that we work with the our our partner and we decide to coproduce the first part to show today investor to create a dramatic failed to reality journey for the school and for the museum of course not for the money because he's nonprofit action we went there with the the fault of roma tree we started to speak with some weakness of we we have to meet a lot of other witness because we have to build exactly how it was the place you know veto realities a really powerful objector you really can leave the place in a safe way and you you can see what is not possible to to imagine reading the book when we went to to the to the kemper the guy the explain as a lot of stuff we read a lot of the communication that the jewish community gift to us what is not the same if you can see what happened there under the reality is the the memory of wore him down schmitz she's actually literally dying because people are not going to be with us forever yet it's really difficult to find a lot of witness because they are becoming old does not a lot.

david gallo vrc malaysia auschwitz rome partner museum of course