17 Burst results for "Aurora Award"

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

04:56 min | 1 year ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to episode 67 Believe It or Not of the world Shapers the podcast for I talked to other Science Fiction and Fantasy authors about their creative process. My name is Edward Willett. I'm your boss. I am myself an author of The Science Fiction and Fantasy and this week. I have three of my own projects. I want to talk to you about before we get into the meat of this episode. Now the first one of course I mentioned before but if this is your first time listening you may not be aware of it beginning of this year back. Well, not quite March. I kicked started an anthology featuring some of the authors who were guests on the first year of the podcast wage and I asked everybody that year from that year and ended up with eighteen stories of mixture of original fiction and reprints. So if you are interested, you can find the e-book version of Shapers of Worlds available everywhere. It features new fiction from Shannon McGuire Tanya Huff David Weber LD modesitt Jr. DJ Butler Christopher Rahi, ho Jaan see right off. Shelia Dina and reprints by John scalzi David Brin, Joe Haldeman, Julius. Turn Ada. Jual. Evo7 Ada. Try that again. Fond of the Doctor Charles egad and Gareth El Pollo Loco Chicken and tire among that group of authors. There are Hugo Award winners. Nebula Award winners British Science Fiction Award winners debt more Award winners, Aurora Award winners winners of all the major science fiction fantasy awards from around the world and nominees as well. So please look that up. You can find it. As I said everywhere. You can also download it directly from Shadow Papyrus. That's my little publishing company that published it. If you go to Shadow press.com, you can purchase it directly from there and download it directly from there. There will be a commercial print read the print version of the book will be out November 17th at which point you'll be able to order that of course online as well or any bookstore if they don't have it will be able to bring it in. So please check that out. Second project mind to mention is of course book three in my own series World Shapers which not surprisingly shares the name with this podcast as they started at the same time book one was World shaper took two mastered the world and book 3 is the moonlit world..

Nebula Award Edward Willett British Science Fiction Gareth El Pollo Loco Chicken World shaper Tanya Huff David Weber LD Aurora Award Shadow Papyrus Doctor Charles egad The Science Shelia Dina Butler Christopher Rahi Shannon McGuire Joe Haldeman David Brin John scalzi Jaan
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"And honestly I talked myself out of it by the time they announced it. As you do you're just like I'm not going to be disappointed I know I haven't won and so when I won I, it was just really Very cool. Yeah you've been nominated before, but that was the first time you'd run of is the first time I want and I'd actually I had been nominated. Want and stayed on the ballot. Then I had been nominated once in there was a unfortunate issue with it having. been put in the wrong category. And I ended up withdrawing from the ballot that year because if I had moved categories, I would have bumped three people off the other ballot and I. Because they were tied and I didn't WanNa do that. You've been nominated for Roy fantasy where to do you think. Do you think of words are valuable. Oh No. I mean aside from the it's really nice to win win because it makes you feel good that. I do know that. I think it increases your stock a little bit I know that I've talked to an Leckie of who was a classmate at Clarion, west and sort of irritated us all by winning every single award that she could the first year she published a novel in and she said, yeah, it's it's made a difference to her career that she won. The Hugo Nebula one I forget what Pompton Crook she won. Clark aboard she just disgusting and I love a but if didn't I have to kill. Waiting talented. I, mean. The what one is the Aurora award here in Canada. And what for this podcast? Actually the first time I went in for novel but then I went for the podcast urine and and it's really nice. It gives you something. But especially in the case of the Aurora, which is a pretty small market up here I can't say have noticed any and notice any uptick in sales. But every time a book comes out, they'll put you can. You can not legally but morally say award winning author so there is that Get An award like I, have my Nebula sitting on my shelf I can look at it and It's really pretty and it reminds me. That people read my books in like them because writing is so. Solitary as you know. This might be reminded that it's not entirely. What on that? That's kind of the the big. Question which. was headed to. Which is, why do it then? Why do you and what do you think any of us right and why right this kind of stuff in particular. I think to certain extent. At least I need a lot of writers who like myself we right because we kinda have to we are always making stories we are watching A. Paper Cup floating down in the gutter kind of going along the street and we're constructing narrative in our head where it's the brave little paper Cup in. It's you know it's sort of I mean we just we make stories all the time. And we like. Making them because making artists pleasurable. Making artists very pleasurable when it when other people like kid build store ego but making art is simply pleasurable for the sake of making art. and. Knowing that you created something cruel that nobody else could create. But I think most writers would her have actually he's proud of their. wrote without any particular expectation that anybody was going to you know wasn't going to get published. And even if you're getting published, which is.

Aurora award Pompton Crook Aurora Leckie Roy Canada Clark
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the World Shapers podcast I talked to other science fiction and fantasy authors about their creative process. My name is Edward. Willett I say other science, fiction and fantasy authors because I. AM myself an author of science fiction and fantasy, and actually have quite a bit of stuff coming out myself which I thought I would mention off the top here the latest thing I've put out is My Five Book Young Adult. Fantasy series the shards of excalibur. Originally published by Cacho books to books Alaska's no longer with us, so the rights have come back to me so I have now put them out for the moment only in a book Through my own company shadow pop press that's shadow press dot com named after our lovely Black Siberian cat shadow pop. You can download them there. You can download them pretty much anywhere. You can find e books. Just look for my name, or if the shards of Excalibur Song of the sword twist, the Blade Lake in the Clouds Cave beneath the sea and door into fairy in the premises very simple one. A local teenage girl, local of meaning She's here in Regina Saskatchewan within the story starts discovers that she is heir to the power of the Lady of the lake, and she in this slightly younger boy, who just happens to be with her at the time that they meet the Lady of. are set out on a quest to find the scattered shards of Arthur's sword excalibur before cannon Merlin is the bad guy. My story and he's in the guise of a modern day. Computer Magnet SORTA like Bill Gates or Steve Jobs going by the name of Rick's major. so that's the premise. Their quest takes them all over the world. Thanks to magic, they can get around, and they always keep coming back to Cisco which was kind of fun. The first book Song of the Sword Log misted for the Sunburst Award for Canadian literature of the fantastic and the young adult division. And both twist, the blade endured a fairy. The second and fifth books were shortlisted for Aurora Award, so I like to think it's a really good series, and if it sounds like it would appeal to you, you can certainly find it now. On Mine e-book there.

Blade Lake Willett Edward Sunburst Award Regina Saskatchewan Aurora Award Bill Gates Alaska Cacho Cisco Clouds Cave Steve Jobs Arthur Rick
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

07:27 min | 1 year ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the World Shippers podcast where I talked to other science fiction and fantasy authors about their creative process. My name is Edward Willett Tendai. Say other authors because I am myself an author of science, fiction and fantasy. I actually have a brand new release. It's from my own publishing company, Chateaux press and it's called the from the street to the stars. It's book one in my young adult. Far Future Adventures series called the Andy. Nebula Interstellar Rockstar, which was the original title of this book this is. Is a revised edition of a book that came out a few years ago. It was short listed for a Manitoba Young. Reader's choice award and it was named to the our choice list of the Canadian Children's book. Centre and I think my favorite review of it actually came from a young reader who captured it pretty well. I think he said that to. This book is like Star Wars Plus Drugs Plus rock and roll awesome set in the far future, and that's pretty much. It as you might tell from the title. It's a lot of fun. It's out now in A. Book and A kindle sorry Amazon version of the paperback. With. A more generally released paperback version yet to come. And sit is book one and there was a second book called double trouble, which I'm working on right now. other things I have coming up the mass market release of master of the world, which is a book, two of my world shaper series. Comes out in August from Daw Books and then in September book three, the Moon World will come out as I often say that's the one that can be summed up as werewolves and Vampires and peasants. Oh, my. The world shape or series, of course, which I mentioned many times on here takes place in a labyrinth of shaped worlds. The people who shape those worlds live inside them. They're sort of like authors living inside their own books, and my protagonist who's been chased out of her own shaped world by the adversary is trying to go from world to world with her companion Carl Yachts, or her name is Shana Keys and together the knowledge of the making of those worlds, the shaping of those worlds to take to agreer the mysterious woman at the center of the Labyrinth order to save all of these worlds from. Eventually, being destroyed by the adversary. So the book one was set in the version of our world. It was called world. Shaper book to which is the one coming out in mass market paperback in August Master? The world is set in a Jules Verne like world and book three as I just said, is that a world with werewolves and vampires peasants so? Look for those and also look for from the street to the stars which just came out. The other project of course closely connected to this podcast is shapers of worlds. That's the anthropology of short stories by authors who were guests on the podcast. During the first year there are original stories and reprints kind of mixture and big names involved from John Sculley to David Brin to. Dr Charles E. We got Joe Haldeman. Tanya huff. Jewish Anita is a wonderful collection of short fiction and still waiting on a couple of stories to come in, but then I'll be putting that together. Hope to have it out I. Hope for Aug it might be a little later. Maybe this fall, but it's definitely coming. All Right? That's the introductory material out of the way except to say that this podcast is part of the CISCO PODCAST network. Now. Let's get to this episode's guest Adria lay craft. Pre Nights editor fiction author. End would artisan. Adria craft earned honors in journalism and ninety two, and has always worked with words and visual arts. She Co edited the urban. Green Man Anthology in two thousand thirteen, which was nominated for an Aurora award and launched her debut novel, jumped ship hope which will be talking about as an example of her creative process in twenty nineteen. Look for her short stories in various magazines and anthologies both online and in print, Adrian is grateful member of Calgary's imaginative fiction writers association if one I think I'm kind of. Honorary member maybe. The proud survivor of the Odyssey writer's workshop and you can find out more about her online. We'll talk about where you can connect with her soon. She also has youtube channels. Carving the Cottonwood and girl gone bag abondoned, which says soon to be renamed girl gone to ground, so maybe that's already happened I. Don't know Adria welcome to the world shapers. Thank you. It's wonderful to be here now. I say I'm kind of an. I feel like I'm kind of an honorary member. The F. Word because we've known each other for a long time through conventions in Calgary and. So, although I've never really been a member of the organization, I've been part of the writers at the Improv that that group does every year for many many years now. That is so much fun writers at the Improv. I've done it a couple of times as a program. In fact, I did it. When I was writing residents that through of public, library, and I did it again this year at the Saskatoon Public Library except. Did. Show it was just before everything closed down and I think people were little, if he. And I had all I had was an English as a second language class, and none of them wanted to compete so what I did was I just took? Words from them, because for those I guess I should explain registered the Improv is like any Improv. You get worse from the audience and you write a story using those words. I wrote a story on the words that they gave me so that was kind of fun for me. It wasn't quite the usual kind of a process though it. Enough about me actually here to talk about you, so we have known each other long time, and you've been a writer all that time that I've known you, so let's take you back into the mists of time as I like to say, how did you get interested? Well first of all in science fiction fantasy, and ended writing, which which came first, or how do those two things come together for you? I I have definitely been a reader and a fan of science, fiction and fantasy. Since before I could even read According to my mom I demanded to be taught how to read before kindergarten. because I was tired of waiting for people to have time to read to me. So. I I've always been a reader I read Laura the rings at age eight for the first time and I reread it several times and launched that launched me into reading Heinlein and stuff that I. Hadn't even. Thought it was old, enough or yet, but always always been a very avid reader, and then somewhere along the way when I realized I had to have a job in the big wide world. I realized that. That writing the books that I love so much. Could be a thing. Well! Did you studied well first of all? You grew up in Calgary. I presume, or is that correct? Or they're number two. So when you went to When you were in school, did you start writing stories and sharing them with your friends and that sort of thing? Yeah and I was I was attempting to write novels at that point I I am. I was still. Still Uncertain about short fiction, but I was always a book lover, and I I was attempting to rate at.

Calgary writer Adria Edward Willett Chateaux press Daw Books Jules Verne Tanya huff Amazon Manitoba Canadian Children youtube John Sculley Saskatoon Public Library Carl Yachts Anita Shana Keys Aurora award Pre Nights Green Man Anthology
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Just reminder that <Speech_Male> you can find the <Speech_Male> world shapers online <Speech_Male> at the world <Speech_Male> shapers DOT com. <Speech_Male> You can find it on <Speech_Male> twitter at the <Speech_Male> world shapers <Speech_Male> you can find me <Speech_Male> online at <Speech_Male> Edward Willett DOT <Speech_Male> com. Edw <Speech_Male> Air D. W. <Speech_Male> I L. L. E. T. <Speech_Male> T. dot com. <Speech_Male> Don't forget that. Second <Speech_Male> t you <Speech_Male> can find me on twitter. <Speech_Male> At e Willett <Speech_Male> you can find <Speech_Male> the world <Speech_Male> shapers podcast <Speech_Male> on facebook. Apps the <Speech_Male> world shapers you can find <Speech_Male> me on facebook <Speech_Male> at Edward Don Willett. <Speech_Male> There's also <Speech_Male> a facebook discussion <Speech_Male> group for the world. Shapers <Speech_Male> podcast if <Speech_Male> you check that out <Speech_Male> Not terribly <Speech_Male> active. But I'd love <Speech_Male> to get more people in there <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> talk more about some <Speech_Male> of the episodes <Speech_Male> of the world shapers. <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> failed to mention <Speech_Male> the but I should mention <Speech_Male> now that the world shapers <Speech_Male> is part <Speech_Male> of the show <Speech_Male> and podcast network. <Speech_Male> There number of great <Speech_Male> podcasts. Here in the province <Speech_Male> of Saskatchewan <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> hope this is one. Of <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and we have some <Speech_Male> great guests lined <Speech_Male> up for future episodes. <Speech_Male> So I hope you <Speech_Male> keep coming back <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Up Next we'll <Speech_Male> be Brian <Speech_Male> Thomas Schmidt. <Speech_Male> I've got <Speech_Male> Adria Lake craft <Speech_Male> lined up <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> confirmed <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Kelley Armstrong <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> like very excited <Speech_Male> about that <Speech_Male> and I also wanted to mention <Speech_Male> just here before it <Speech_Male> closed that I'm <Speech_Male> Very <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> proud be able to say <Speech_Male> that the world shapers <Speech_Male> podcast is <Speech_Male> once again shortlisted <Speech_Male> for best <Speech_Male> fan related work <Speech_Male> in the Aurora awards. <Speech_Male> This is the award that <Speech_Male> the podcast one <Speech_Male> last year. <Speech_Male> Best related work. <Speech_Male> The Aurora awards <Speech_Male> are kind of Canada's <Speech_Male> equivalent to the Hugo <Speech_Male> awards. They are <Speech_Male> Nominated <Speech_Male> on <Speech_Male> and voted on <Speech_Male> by Canadian. <Speech_Male> Fans <Speech_Male> Those will be presented <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> August in a virtual <Speech_Male> server like pretty much. <Speech_Male> Everything else is <Speech_Male> At the moment. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> that's it for this <Speech_Male> episode of the <Speech_Male> World Shapers. I hope <Speech_Male> that you will come back. Many <Speech_Male> more times in the future <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> Here <Speech_Male> more conversations <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> with the authors <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> who have <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> created the world's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and characters and adventures <Speech_Music_Male> that. We have <Speech_Music_Male> much enjoyed over <Speech_Music_Male> the years. <Speech_Music_Male> That's it for now <Music>

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

13:27 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"All of them were science fiction and fantasy really or slipstream or kind of surrealism. Or whatever. There they were. There wasn't much in the way of of realism. But I just thought of myself. Best as a writer no not not particularly as a writer and I didn't have any trouble with those markets. Either like you know. There's a certain kind of town and gown kind of thing. You know the Limerick Eric World looks down on us. But I've I've been. I had no hesitation in submitting to those markets getting published places like come. I'm a room of one's own and Perry fire and Various magazines that no oh longer exists of blue buffalo and solar And I also had no hesitation in applying for grants. I just thought well I'm a writer. That's bigger therefore and I would apply by large I would get them. I think You know the odds of getting a literary grant who somewhere between one and six and one in Tannan probably more by now but I figured that was pretty good odds for spending an afternoon on an application and so I would say that I probably go out over half of those that I applied for and was fairly philosophical about the ones. I didn't definitely urged you know if listeners are Canadian writers almost all the provinces and the candidate council have these grant programs and many cities do as well now I live in Edmonton Edmonton Arts. Council has grant programs and I would really urge people to apply and not be not be weird and river snobby about about about how those are for literary writers they will discriminate. They're all decided by juries. The jury is differ from time to time so when jury may love your work the other jury may put you a little bit below the red line you have to think of it as buying a lottery ticket in essence you then you forget about it and if a nice letter comes in the mail down the road yeah you won the lottery if it doesn't then okay you hadn't counted on it anyway and you know I don't. I don't think artists have a right to I mean. I think we're very lucky to have a grant system but I have to recognize that historically the state as it were and private patrons who had a lot of money where the where the reasons why the arts even got made us think about the renaissance and all those huge paintings of of Saint Sebastian taken on the arrows that are now in the Louvre. They were all in private castles and artists went from castle to castle making their daily bread by painting or they wrote a A long poem and they dedicated it to the guy who was gonna pay for it right and I don't think that government is the best patronage system there is because it's object so I really strongly feel that developing writers should look at all the options nation. Think of themselves. As being especially developing speculative writers developing genre writers. They shouldn't think of themselves themselves as being the little match girl outside the outside the House while party goes on inside. We're all part of the same thing. Well well let's move onto a your current collection of short stories. Your first book was a collection of short stories. That machine machine sex and other stories and now you have ice and other stories which also starts arts with machine sex but I know you can't really synopsys short stories but tell us about the book. Well mm book started as all the stories that had been in something but not in a book so we're thirteen or fourteen in stories and every couple of years I'd get a story published a very slow and And sometimes that was because of life and reasons and sometimes it's just 'cause it takes takes me awhile to develop a story so So I had these stories and I went through a period when my mother was aging and she was in a nursing home and I I had some health issues and it wasn't the best time for getting things go into the world but I had this collection so every now and then I would I would think about poor. Should I send and it's hard to get short story. Collections published it some. It's not easy to style them so only certain publishers want to do do them so I did Ursula flu. Did a book of short stories with PS publishing in England Pete and Nikki. crowder run it and they do these beautiful hardcovers and they do a limited assigned limited edition and so on and she asked US meteorite the forward or it so then I was in touch with these people and they seemed And then I went to the London world corn and there were other books and they were just beautiful beautiful. There wasn't a small literary press death. Wish cover among them. They were all just beautiful and beautifully produced reduced in a lot of hardcovers and And they were really sincere people and I still can't figure out their business model because they do these beautiful books in small editions they bind them beautifully. The signed editions are still well within a collectors. Regular collector's some budget and And they ship their authors copies to me without charging for shipping being so. I'm kind of amazed that they're at their business model but dog cocoa so I got in in touch with them and I sent them a a manuscript in the Nate gevers is the is the short fiction editor that works with them and he lives in South Africa. Gotcha and nothing really happened to this book for a while and so finally when I was In a little bit or state ice accent reminders. Saint Louis is guys book and he sent me back a message interesting. My mother had just died. Which is why and I was sort of getting back? Knock into into having more time in my life and and So he sent a letter about letter in his mother had also been in care and and dying and at a similar elderly age in their nineties and And so he said I I haven't read Reggie manuscript yet but I will and within a week I had a publication offer So so that was that started out one of the New Year's very well and then we worked on what what stories from previous books might be known to people that we should put in. To a retrospect because as his thirty years of stories they wanted a new story took me awhile. I must say But so then what would be kind of the first one so we decided to put machine sex learning about machine. Sex Is it's real name put that into it as the first story. Because that's the story of mine the has been most anthologized and we've put in sleeping in a box which won the what was then the Casper award in is now the Aurora Award and And there were a couple of others that that I felt kind of still had still should be seeing there and we ended up with. I think it's twenty one stories now if I'm not mistaken For a while was seventeen and then it increased again And basically they cover thirty years and so when I was writing writing the notes for it I started writing the notes with a little bit of an eye toward the history. So if you read the notes you get a little bit of the secret history of Canadian sa by talking there about about the SF Canada workshop in nineteen eighty. Six heater borough and Michalski was there. I was there Sean part trying to remember Pearl Schroeder. Anyway have all the names in the book and there were eight people there and they're very spouses or slow. Flu was there Wendy Pearson was there. Who's now mainly an academic? But she was writing fiction in those days. She's Western University of Western Ontario. I think think it is and her partner. Susan cannot be who's also an academic in the field now and I was there with her baby and her husband. Who's the filmmaker and Michael was there and learn tulips course librarian at the Merril collection for all those years? was there when she could be she at the work and Judy Merrill ran it. So that was then a man Things have changed considerably considerably over the time and so each we decided to arrange the stories in chronological order by publication. And just I would talk about about what was going on at the time in the notes. So it's been actually I think an interesting exercise if people really want to start thinking about How how the network fit together? who was who was helping whom who was talking to him in the field They will find find some good information in the back pages there and also they'll find all these thirty years of short fiction and and the last story is actually brand new story probably it has some I mean I. I know that some of my stories were more intense than others and And there's some that I particularly love the one that I wrote for Ursula Flu Anthology and Carol Carleen Anderson sent volatility playground of Lost Toys. is is one that I'm particularly to kill proud of it's a it's a real example of me as a slow writer though because I started writing that story when Nello Hopkinson put without a call for her anthology called Mojo conjure stories which were stories about in essence everyday magic and people doing folkloric magic and it always bugs me that Writers in the fantasy field. We'll we'll swiped the folklore of other people and turn it into their plot devices and they won't look necessarily to their own hair heritage. 'cause you know Wendy Indigo is cool. So I'm going to write a story but Winco kind of thing and some of those stories you need to be given and if you given them if you do the work if you go the people who own them and you ask then that's a different matter but just to say oh I think is really interesting that you know who says this or you. You know kanton blade is based on this. And I'll just use it in my in my story You're walking the fine line between Colonialism or imperialism of some kind and and true mosh and so I I would look at. What's kind of magic that my people would do? You know I'm a third or fourth generation settler on the prairies from Scots English background. Almost almost completely that. I'm I have a few random I have. I probably a random mennonite several couple of hundred years ago and and so on. But it's mostly Scots and English. So I'm saying can what let what's the heritage I have and I and so I started thinking about my relatives and and the kinds of things that prairie the people do like make flapper pie and eat kraft dinners and put together Jigsaw Puzzles and where legs pantyhose and I we're at the dollar store and and so on and an I crafted those into a story about. What would the every day magic doc be for for those people so it's around putting together? Jigsaw Puzzles Nate's magic and it ended up being a lovely story but it was also like many years after Mojo conjure stories was gone and published and so on and it just never made it so when playground lost toys came along. I figured Jigsaw Puzzles. Equal Toys. Hey and I finished the last little bits of it and send it in and I'm very pleased.

writer Jigsaw Puzzles Edmonton Edmonton Arts Ursula flu Saint Sebastian Eric World Tannan Perry US Flu Aurora Award Winco Mojo Nate gevers Carol Carleen Anderson Saint Louis Michalski Western University of Western Wendy Indigo
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"About This podcast world-shapers. I'm honored to say one. The Aurora Award for Best Fan Related Work in twenty nineteen The Aurora awards are Fan nominated voted on awards here in Canada sort of the equivalent to the to the hugos in the United States. So I was very honored to win that award. And I'd like to tell you about something that's coming up with the world shapers now. This is the final podcast of twenty nineteen. So my next one which will feature candice chain Dorsey. We'll be the first one of two thousand twenty Eddie and something else I wanted to see happen in twenty twenty or a couple of books related to the podcast. I have my own little publishing companies shadow. Press which you can check out at shadow press dot Com and jess. It is named after our cat and that's his pictures is our logo. I am hoping to put out an anthology of original fiction. Some reprints from guests of the first year of the podcast which was from August twenty eighteen to August two thousand nineteen. So Oh that's people like Sean. Maguire Tanya huff four and the number of others of that ilk in and level who have said they will take part in that I will most likely be doing a kickstarter for that sometime in the new year. So keep your ears and is open for that and I will certainly of course talk it up on the podcast as I get more details and also in the new year. I'd like to bring out a collection collection of nonfiction based on the interviews on this podcast of writing advice and and writing related topics so I hope to find time to work on that during the New Year and bring that out in that again would focus on the first year of the podcast and as the podcast reaches its second year which will be August twenty twenty now then I'll look hopefully At doing an anthology and also nonfiction book based on the second year. That's my plan. Anyway I am of course a one man operation and I have my own books extract the aforementioned World Shaper series is up to book three. I'm writing well editing. It right now revising it for submission it will go to my editor in January very so. That's taking up a bit of time right now. It's called the moonlit world and if you go to my website that I mentioned previously you can see cover art for that and read a bit of a description and the working title for a long time where Vampires and peasants. Oh my so. That's the kind of world that my character Sean. McKee's WHO's traveling from world to world and tried to gather the knowledge of these shaped worlds within this vast labyrinth and take them to ige rare. WHO's the mysterious figure at the center of A? She's going to be in a lot of different worlds in this time around. It's a vampire empire and Werewolf sort of world so that's kind of fun. I should also mention before we get onto the meat of this podcast that Despite despite cast is part of the subscription podcast network we are supported by connects his credit union. All right. Let's move on to this episode's interview Mary Robinson Cole Mary Robert. Cole is the author of the Lady Astronaut Theology and historical fantasy novels the glamorous history series and goes talkers. She's a member of the award. Winning podcast writing excuses and has received the astounding award for best new writer for U. Awards the RT Reuse Award for best fantasy novel. Double the Nebula and locus awards stories have appeared in strange horizons Asimov's several years best anthologies enter collections. Word puppets and sending the Dark Arken other stories. Her novel calculating stars which we will be focused on. This podcast is one of only eighteen novels to win. The Hugo Nebula and locus awards in a single year as professional puppeteer invoice actor and Mary Robinson has performed for Lazy Town at the Center for puppetry arts. Jim Henson pictures and founded other hand productions. Her designs have garnered to USA citations of excellence. The highest word in American puppeteer can achieve and she records fiction for authors. Such Sean Sean Maguire. Who's been a guest on this program? John Scotty who's been a guest on this program. Doctoroff who hasn't yet been a guest on this program but maybe someday lives in Nashville Bill with her husband rob and over a dozen manual typewriters. Welcome to the world shapers. May rapid death. Thank you so much for having me glad to have you and I have to confess. I haven't quite finished calculating stars. I was working on it so I'm about. I don't know three quarters of the way through but you won't give spoilers anyway because I'm going to get you to do synopses. I sit here and a little bit. So the For people who read it so okay but I've I'm enjoying it very much and not least because I'm married to an engineer. So yes identifies with some of the situations starring. Yes yes I found that people instead. That have a strong connection to certain aspects especially women it instead. Well before we get to that. I'll take you back into as I always say this. It's it's becoming cliche on the podcast out. We'll take you back into the mist of time to find out how you first of all became interested in writing and specifically writing science fiction. And you know how you got started in other words and maybe a little bit about where you grew up and all that kind of stuff. So I I grew up in North Carolina my dad worked for IBM and he used to take me to to visit him at work sometimes They had the it was. It was in the days when the computers were still cajal rooms and we didn't yet have personal computers. There were tubes connecting. The building at the first programming that I did did was my name with punch cards and should not was The it felt very science fictional It felt very much. Like what you'd see on the jetsons and things like that and then we also would watch I like I got connected to doctor who Tom Baker. It was my doctor and and we listened to hitchhikers guide to the galaxy on the radio so there is not a point in my life where I remember birther like I remember. Discovering science loses something that was just always present. I unlike the earliest books that I read that I have concrete memories of things like in chances from the stars I remember that one and Lasko good and you know of course. Other things like wrinkle in time and all these books that were just shelved as books but I gravitated to ones that had a fantastic elements. When I started writing which I did pretty young my mom sent me too a writing workshop the camp and And I I would was basically writing the things that I was reading and since I was reading science it's fiction and fantasy. It seemed only natural that that's why I was also writing My friends also were into that so some of the earliest stuff off.

Sean Sean Maguire Aurora Award Mary Robinson Cole Mary Robert Tanya huff Dorsey Mary Robinson Eddie United States Canada Tom Baker Jim Henson North Carolina Lady Astronaut Theology Lasko McKee editor John Scotty writer Nashville
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

11:04 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Mm-hmm welcome to another episode of the world shapers winner of the two thousand Nineteen Aurora Award for best fan related work work. I'm your host Edward Willett. I started this podcast where I talked with science fiction and fantasy authors about their creative process. Because I am myself a science fiction I and fantasy author author of Os Twenty novels at this point with The latest one master of the world being tenth novel For New York's DA books Master of the world is the second book in my World Shaper Series which started with world. Shaper the year before. And it's a it's a fun series right It said in a labyrinth of shaped worlds where the people people who shaped those worlds actually live within them rather like authors living inside their created worlds My main character. Shana keys is the shape of the world. She lives in which is very much like ours though. There are a few differences. But she doesn't know that she has somehow forgotten that she shaped this world until a mysterious stranger. Carl yet so shows up and tells me this and then next thing you know. They're running for their lives across her version of our world pursued by the adversary who has stolen the knowledge of the making of her world and can take over complete the if he can just kill her Shawna and Carl escaped spoiler in the first book. And then she's on a quest to travel to as many of these shaped worlds as she can in the vast labyrinth And take the knowledge of they're making a greater the mysterious woman at the center of the Labyrinth. So in the second book she ends up in a world that is inspired by Jules. Very shape was a big fan of Jules Verne. And that's the title master of the World Comes from of course and so it's a world with lots of steam punk elements with submarines and strange flying devices uses and floating islands. And all kinds of things like that. I had a lot of fun writing it. And he's a first person Character and oddly enough she shares my sense of humor. So there's a lot of. There's a lot of Geeky pop culture references and jokes in these books. I'm just finishing up the writing of three Nestor sorry the moonlit world. Yes master the world is the second one the moonlit world which is where Wilson Vampires and peasants. Oh my and that will be out next. September the first two books are out in a trade paperback AUDIOBOOK and e book and mass and World cheaper is also out in mass market. Paperback master the world. Mass market. Paperback should Out in August. I should also mention another book project coming up that to. You might want to help me out with. I plan to to start in January launch a kickstarter to fund an anthology featuring some of the guests from the world shapers first year and we have have some major major names who have said they will contribute a story including Sean Maguire. Tanya Huff Christopher Rocky. Oh He's already he's already ridden run for me. Charles Gannon we also have some reprints from John. SCULLEY has agreed to provide a reprint and there might be some others. Those rose and Joe Haldeman is even said he will provide a poem so it should be a very exciting anthology if we can fund it. So I'll provide more details on that as we get closer to the launch date which should be in mid January twenty twenty. I hope and then one more thing I should mention. Is that the world shapers. PODCAST is part of these Lisa schedule and podcast network which is supported by connects his credit union that is the introductory material out of the way. Let's get onto this episode's guest guest Rebecca Roan Horse Rebecca. Roan horse is a Nebula Hugo and locus award winning speculative fiction writer and the recipient of the two thousand eighteen astounding formerly Campbell Award for best new writer. Her novel trail of Lightning Book. One in the six th world series which is the one we will talk about. The most today won the locus award for best first novel and is a Nebula Hugo and world fantasy finalist it was also selected as an Amazon Barnes and Noble Library Journal and NPR Best Book of two thousand eighteen eighteen among others book to in the six. Th World Series Star of locusts has received starred reviews from Publishers Weekly and Book List and her next novel resistance reborn as Part Art of Star Wars journey to the rise skywalker in his out in November. Twenty nineteen be about the time this goes live her middle grade novel race to the Sun for Rick reward and presents percents. Imprint will release January and twenty twenty and her epic fantasy novel between Earth And sky will follow late twenty twenty s off a few things out there. Her short fiction can be found at APEX magazine. New Sons the mythic dream and various other anthologies and she also writes nonfiction which can be found in uncanny strange horizons than how I resist in hope for new generation published by Macmillan She lives in northern New Mexico with your husband bought her and pups and it says in her bio here from her her website that she drinks a lot of black coffee. Which I'm having some right now? So they go. You can't we'll talk about where you can find her online later on but to welcome to the world shapers Rebecca look for having me I always look for connections and we have A. We haven't met but you were born in Arkansas Lived in Texas and went to university in New Mexico and I was born in New Mexico lived in Texas and went to university in Arkansas. So there's a certain certain certain. Although I live in Canada and I was born in Silver City New Mexico my parents were living in a little town called bared down there so but didn't live there. Yeah that is south that I'm in the north but I know where it is so Let's go back into the mists of time as I like to say to my guests and talk about where you grew up how you got interested in writing. And in speculative fiction in particular Most of US start with readers and I think from reading leading and I think for meeting some of our other interviews that suck. I was kind of the case for you too. Yeah absolutely always a huge science fiction. Fantasy Fan As long as I can remember I've been reading in the genre and I seek really my first sort of big. Wow book was Dune by Frank. Herbert read that one in that blew the doors wide open. You know in the fantasy room I of course I read that Bulgaria. I read All wheel of time books like those were well. Okay not all of them. That's true good point. I haven't read the last few I think I'd tapped out like I don't the probably book five or six or something now. I can't even remember but I'm very excited for the Amazon show. That is coming. I'm really curious to see what they do with it So you you were born in Arkansas. You grew up in Texas But then you ended up in in New Mexico and you didn't and actually studied writing university. Were you writing as a kid. Yeah absolutely so oh Grew up in Fort Worth Texas. M My mom is actually from okay when gave Pueblo which is in New Mexico And so I. I didn't return into New Mexico into law school actually so I did my undergraduate on the East Coast and a master's degree But when I was in Fort Worth I was already writing. I think I wrote my first I would say my first science fiction short story when I was in seventh grade. I always joke about. We had a science if I answer report and we were supposed to like is some very dry facts about the planets like you know how big they are and how far apart they are and that sort of thing and I turned added into this very dramatic telling of this astronaut doing research. Who for some reason? I can't remember now to like commit suicide by driving giving into the sun at the end so it was very much like tell my wife and kids I love them. You know dead and I turned that in for my science project checked and my that is impressed as I had been with my own work and I think I gotta be a B. Plus or something because because that was not the assignment but Yeah you know from there. I was hooked and I've been sort of writing my own stuff every since I kind I only got serious about writing. I just did if my own pleasure I was a practicing attorney for ten years before that I was A computer programmer programmer. Actually for ten years and Just writing was in the background. It was just something that I love to do for myself. I never even thought about getting published Until about two thousand and sixteen when I decided to take it a little more seriously now Did you show. You're you're writing to your friends when you're writing as a young writer. I often ask that question because it's something. I urge young writers to do when I'm teaching writing because it's the way to find out if you can tell stories that people back. Apparently your teacher was not completely impressed with your first effort. Did you share your stories with other people so in eighth grade. I had a great great eighth grade English teacher and we actually did a group novel like each week. You know came up with the whole story as a class. And then we each were responsible for chapter and It was I don't know there were some. I gotTA dominated the as I recall a lot of the The world building. 'cause I was really into it and there was an smugglers and there were some You know sort of Galactic police said this sort of thing and I definitely share shared that one I probably over shared that I fought morstead on people and then am all through high school or at least my last couple of years of high school. I guess I was as an editor for our creative writing magazine. And so not only did I get to do some editing and which was basically like picking what stories we're going to be in a magazine but I put a lot of my work into that as well and a lot of that was poetry or short fiction. Like excerpts of you know I I don't know what you would call vignettes or something maybe a little flash fiction but I don't think we called it back then but yes I think those years I was always sharing probably probably over sharing and then I'm I guess for some of my time I had a friend who wrote as well. And we you would share stories like she would write something we'd be critiqued partners But only for fun and it was never really serious But I was never I I about showing my work per se. Well I was also interested when you you didn't study writing but what you studied is very interesting because you received a B in religious studies from Yale and a masters in theology from Union theological seminary..

New Mexico writer Texas Arkansas Os Twenty Jules Verne Aurora Award locus award twenty twenty Edward Willett Shana keys New York Sean Maguire Joe Haldeman APEX magazine Nebula Hugo Rebecca Roan Carl Tanya Huff
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

13:04 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the world shapers winner of the Aurora Award for best fan related work in two thousand eighteen eighteen. My name is Ed Willett. I am your host and I should mention also that the world shapers is part of the schedule and podcast network work which is supported by connects US credit union. I started the world shapers because I am also a writer of science fiction fantasy and I've always enjoyed talking to other authors. About how how they create things I will mention as I usually do my latest book. which is a master of the world? This book to a series called world-shapers. Much like this Sir podcast The first book was World Shaper came out last year. master of the world Carries on the story and I'm currently working on the third book called the Moon World which will be out next year world-shapers takes place in a labyrinth of shaped worlds in shapers or people who have the ability to shape these. These worlds that are studied in the labyrinth like I don't know chocolate chips in a muffin against our main character. My main character Jonah keys Lives in the world very much like ours and in the first book she discovers that in fact although she doesn't remember it she actually shape the world's to be the way that it is but an adversary and enemy has come into her. World has touched her in an during an attack that kills her best friend and has stolen her knowledge of the making of a world which means he can. Now Start to unmake it or change the the way that it works and this puts her on the run in the company of Carl Yachts early mysterious stranger who shows up and explains all this to her and he also says that she has the power which she she demonstrated during the attack to Possibly save all of the shaped worlds if she can travel from world to world and take their knowledge to the mysterious AG- rare at the center center of the labyrinth. The woman who opened up the labyrinth in had trained to the shapers in our world the first world and then put them into these worlds to do with as they please. So Oh the first world they get The first book world-shapers Sean and Carl Get chased across a something that's somewhat like our world In the second book master the ruled out up. Now Sean ends up in a world Shaped by someone with a great love of Jules Verne so it's very steamed punky with submarines needs and Flying Machines floating islands. And all that kind of good stuff in the third book The movement world which I mentioned working on now Well the the title title in my head for a long time it was actually where Wills Vampires and peasants ally so That's what you look for in. That was what she can look for. When we get to book three of world-shapers which will be out next year? And if you'd like to know more about my fiction you can check out my website which is Edward Well it to dot com. EDW Ard W. I. L. L. E. T. T. dot com. It's quite complete and you can find out all about the what twenty seven novels and all the nonfiction that I've written over the years. All right. That's enough about me. Let's move onto this episode's guest. Garth Nix New York Times. bestselling novelist garth. Nix has been a fulltime writer since two thousand one but has also worked as a Literary Agent Marketing Consultant Book Editor Book Publicist the book. Sales representative bookseller lot of books in there and has absolutely as a part time soldier in the Australian Army Reserve. He has written numerous books. Books including the old kingdom series beginning with Sabe real the keys to the Kingdom series frog kisser and many others he also writes short fiction with more than sixty stories as published in anthologies and magazines or than six million copies of his books have been sold around the world and his work has been translated into forty two languages. That's a lot welcome to the world. shapers guard thank you. It's great to be talking to. We've only met once I think. And that was that a world fantasy convention in Toronto will actually technically. I think it was in Richmond and Hill. But you could see for auto in the distance you could. You could say it very vaguely the distance it was. It was a shock. I think to quite a few international persons. It's such a muscle to discover that it was not quite in Toronto a bit about being pulled. Toronto them a shock to me. Even though I live in Canada I was expecting take a little closer to downtown as well while I think we we did have the misfortune that the railway was being worked on and out a public transport. So I think think of everything everything up and running it would have been wouldn't have failed quads a far away but of course we were just talking about now with world fantasy. It doesn't really matter. Now that convention is is a traveling community that that the two POPs up and Tend to spend all your time with all the other. Rodriguez and publishes netted as an agent soul hanging up anyway. So it doesn't really matter so much he was still a fun convention. Interesting even Yeah it was very good though. It wasn't right downtown And the other thing. I always liked mention when I'm looking for connections. Might this is not exactly a connection with you but I wrote a fantasy trilogy called Masks of agreement as e c Blake and some reviewers said that they liked my fifteen fifteen year old female protagonists they. She was chirp their favorite Female heroine since Abriel. That's an awesome to say that is a connection action. Yeah I consider that a great a great couple because I really love working. We're going to start as I always start with with a Mike. Guess by taking you back in time How well first of all where did you grow up and all that sort of thing? But how did you become interested in writing and a fantasy in which came first interested in the fantastical in science fiction. Before you started writing. Did the writing come first and then you migrated into it. How did that all work out for you? Show it's a good question I grew up in Canberra which is the federal capital of Australia But it's still. It's still a very small city but it was a very small city when I was growing up there in the sixties and the seventies Canberra is kind of like the Washington they say equivalent accepted. It's a plan city. It really was only built from the thirties. Onwards when I was growing up there it it had about two hundred thousand people quote a small city. And it's also in the middle. It's in the Bush administration. Bush sometimes called the bush capital. Because it's got some how many trees So it was kind of like a country town but then in the head the we'd extra layer of all the federal government stuff and also the things like Washington they say has on a smaller scale like the National Library and the National Museum and Parliament House and all that sort of stuff as well. So it was an unusual city the It had a very very good public education system. Then it's still does perhaps not quite as good Which I benefited from on a very good library system which also benefited from And my Parents Arabia's my both both my parents Science fiction and fantasy rate it is amongst many other things. My father is a scientist and my mother is an artist So from a very early gels expires to will will conduct. Books House was is full of books. those library between my home and my school which I stop that every afternoon as a children's library specialist children's library an irate. Everything I'm in a I. I love all kinds of books. I love fantasy and science fiction but I also love historical novels thrillers and and Contemporary for literature and classics all kinds of stuff and nonfiction. As well I've always been fascinated with All kinds of nonfiction. I noticed that you've written a lot of nonfiction looking at. You're looking at you'll buy before I stopped to talk to you basically. Yeah but I love that stuff. I've yeah earning about in writing about them and I think it's good for rods to the united nonfiction as well as fiction To to affiliate mind with all kinds of information you can draw upon Integrate fiction and nonfiction is very very good. Feel for that so I was always. I was always reading reading the books every way my parents read Science fiction and fantasy. I probably had more than most people in part because my father they used to spend quite a lot of time in the. US working full The US Department of Agriculture and the United Nations and lots of International National Project Program. Some some of which run out of the US One Mysterious Leo was had to meet in Hawaii every I wonder why that was but he would bring back American paperbacks which would not otherwise get because strider particularly in that period. Most of the books came I'm from the UK So I was actually exposed to many American authors that Nautilus Ryan's would necessarily have Bain and would not have been nine in the guy so I guess in a way Had A perfect environment to become a writer of fantasy and science fiction because because of that rating and I was always very keen on making up. Stories I was up. Always love making stuff up and trying to get people to believe it And sometimes I had enough. I wasn't Roger. Probably be in jail as a confidence. trickster because I like to make people believe and stuff so I like got to write stories that feel reelected till stories that feel real and not a big step I think from making up those this contradictions to To some kind of complex scam making people believe things but luckily I. I haven't gone down that road as yet. I'm sticking taking to fiction so you started writing pretty young then as a child I did actually I I I I love the idea of my own book since I I might little books of my from a very young age in fact I I have one from when I was about six. Well I actually do have one about six hundred tiger with me. I have a sort of replica that I bring with me. I'll use in Toke sometimes to to To demonstrate half hour. I've come in my writing since it's all a waste I hype hype. I have So yeah I was making a little book says rotting stories Write stories in school But I didn't actually plan can't be a writer I love books I loved. I loved writing But actually run up until the end of high school. When I'll sing it? What what I am going to do in the last few years I was thinking I would actually join the regular astronomy and go to a AH quivalent of West Point But actually joined that reserve and I was a part time soldier for about five years and that convinced me. I didn't want to be Regula I saw I was actually. It was a very good experience. I I agree. Mostly enjoyed it with some some reservations but I also realize that that the life that I would lead as regular army soldier would be more all contained and closed the environment more clouds. And if I did something else So if fees I think that's what I would do I would the GO-TO What was in the role destroy military college and being offsite and I learned a university degree? And and become a commissioned officer But then I realized that hang actually done WanNa do that. What am I gonNA do instead and I I worked? I got a job. I left school. I worked in a government job for a year and I saved my money and then I went travelling in the UK and Europe. And while I was doing that I read read. Lots of my favorite books particularly children's book simply English ones and I write them in the way that was set so a lot of classic fantasy. Lock Alan Ghana's the weeds thunderbirds Ingram. And I rated. Yes it's fantastic TRICIA my right other children's classics lock author author ransome's swallows and Amazons in the district. You so much for the wonderful books and we're not story rate them on and That will say that those books might be interested in sailing You get much from from those books And then resume sutcliffe cliffs that Eagle of the ninth children's stark novels also very much part of my rating..

Toronto US Garth Nix UK Washington Ed Willett Canberra Carl Yachts Aurora Award Sean Jonah keys Australian Army Reserve Jules Verne Bush Europe Ard W. I. L. L. E. T.
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

11:14 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the world shapers. I talked to science fiction and fantasy authors about their creative process. <hes> my name is edward well i hi i am your genial. I hope host and i'm also a science fiction and fantasy author and in fact is a special week for me because <hes> this is going live on september eighth in september tenth tuesday <hes> my latest novel master of the world my tenth novel for new york's daw books comes out. It's book to in my world-shapers series from which this podcast also takes its name book. One world shaper came out last september in trade paperback and the mass market paperback just came out in august so it's out there on the shelves for you to find as well <hes> the series takes place in what i call the labyrinth these are worlds serve a maze of interconnected worlds. All of these were shaped by someone who lives within the shapers and <hes> so they can be anything. It's very much like the authors that i interview on this program living inside their own worlds in the first book <hes> shana keys my main character discovered that she was a shaper which she had forgotten but she had to flee her shaped world which was very much like ours ars but not quite because an adversary enemy had appeared who's trying to basically take over the labyrinth and eventually snuff out all of these shaped worlds in order to get to <hes> ige rare. Who's the mysterious woman at the center of elaborate. <hes> carl yasser shows up in <hes> shawna's world in the first book and tells you what's going on and guides her out of her world old and also says that she has the power to gather the knowledge of all these shaped world many she can get to and take them to share in the hopes of saving them and the labyrinth auburn from the adversary so that's kind of the overarching question the book so each book will take place in a very different kind of a world and book to actually takes place in as you might guess from the title a world world that is inspired by jules verne. The shaper of this world really liked jules verne so it's full of airships submarines and all sorts of great things like that. It's had a good good reduced so far from publishers weekly book list and and others are starting to pop up and i hope you'll check it out. It's available now in mass market sorry in and trade paperback audiobook and e book formats. You can find it three or favorite online bookshop. Hopefully in your physical bookstore close to you or you can order direct trek from me if you like <hes> through my online store edward willett shop dot com if you want to get an autograph copy. That's the best way to do that the other thing that i want to mention because this is <hes> going out on september the eighth is that next saturday september the fourteenth at eleven fifty nine eastern daylight time. PM is the deadline for voting for candidates aurora awards. These are the awards that are given out annually by the canadian science fiction fantasy association they are <hes> voted on by fans and they're for the best canadian science fiction and fantasy and i'm very honored that this year the world shapers podcast is up furniture. Aurora award in the category of best fan related work <hes> if you go over to pre aurore awards dot c. a. p. r. i. X a u. R. r. a. w. a. r. d. s. dot. CA prix aurora awards dot CA you can join for a mere ten dollars canadian science fiction fatty so fat association in which gives you the right to vote for this year's auroras and access the voters package. You only have a week <hes>. If you're hearing this other day it comes out and if it's after september the eighth and i'm afraid you're <hes> too late this time around but you can still join and nominate in vote next year provided of course that you are a canadian citizen or or resident <hes> the other thing that i wanted to mention. Is that <hes>. I'm starting a term as the writer in residence at the saskatoon public library this this coming week. It's a very busy week for me if you are listening to this in saskatoon are environs. Please come see me. If you have questions about writing like me to help you through providing or answer questions you might have about publishing you can contact me through the saskatoon <hes> public library okay so i think that's it for all the stuff talk about myself this time so let's get onto this week's guest john kessel john kessels most recent book is the twentieth novel oh pride and prometheus. He's the author of the earlier novels. The moon entity other good news from outer space and corrupting dr nice ad in collaboration with james patrick kelly freedom beach is short story collections are meeting in infinity a new york times notable book the pure product and the bow plan for financial independence kessel stories have twice received nebula award given by the science fiction and fantasy writers of america in addition to the theater theodore sturgeon memorial award the locus poll and the james tip tree junior award award is play faust feathers on the paul green playwright prize and his story a clean escape was adapted as an episode of the ABC TV series masters of science fiction in two thousand nine his story pride and permit ious on which the novel is based received both the nebula award and the shirley jackson award with jim kelly he has edited five anthologies of stories revisiting contemporary short SF most recently digital rapture the singularity anthology born in buffalo new york <hes> john holds a b a in physics physics and english and a PHD in american literature he helped found and served as the first director of the MFA program in creative writing at north carolina state university where he has taught since nineteen eighty two and he and his wife the novelist <unk> an fowler live in work in raleigh north carolina so welcome to the world shapers john. Thank thank you glad to be here now. We've never met in person but <hes> the the way you ended up on this show. I've been aware of your time with your record. It's you know and being the field but <hes> i've never run across you at a convention or anything like that but christopher rocky. Oh who was a guest on the program <hes> the while ago was one of your students and he you mentioned your name and i you know i should have a month well. I'm glad you had him on. <hes> you know for seems to be well launched now with his his first now. I guess the second novel in that series is coming out. Is that right yeah. Just just came out doing very well then. He's a fellow daw books author so i met him. I'd met him at a dod inner world con- last year so that's made that connection so it's and this field you you know you sort of you know somebody and then they know somebody everybody's connected even though it's much bigger than it was when i started it's still a fairly small pond and you will run into people and everyone eventually knows everyone else. In some connection well we'll sparked the way i always start which is by taking you back into the mississippi time find out how you became interested in science science fiction fantasy and specifically in writing to most of us. It starts with reading kids is is that how it worked out for you pretty much. Yes i was reading science fiction and fantasy in really from seems like from the beginning. I cannot remember the first book i ever read that was science fiction. <hes> there were <hes> children's books are now is born a long time ago four nineteen fifty so so we're talking in the late fifties early sixties i was i was i definitely already hooked on science fiction fantasy. I liked fairy tales an awful lot. I i somehow you know went to. I went to the library and got <hes> books from the science fiction section of the library and back then they had a number of publishers had severely serious attempts to write <hes> published waie science nine six and robert heinlein wrote a series of juvenile novels that i really snapped up and also andrew norton who was <hes> alice mary norton morton rhoda a whole series of why a science fiction novel said i loved it was quite a shock to me when i discovered that andre norton was a woman <hes> <hes> was years later and then and then around think was nineteen sixty three eggs action of pretty much exactly what it was i was at my grandfather's house on sunday and i had my library book there and finish it and had nothing else to read and i was bored and i asked if i could go down around the block us is in buffalo new york <hes> to see if i could buy some comic books and they said okay and so i walked down to this delicatessen cosentino delicatessen contests and they had comic books but they also had science fiction magazines which i had never seen and i knew they existed but i had never seen one and immediately i bought my first science fiction magazines and then i was well and truly hooked pretty much ahead subscriptions to galaxy and fantasy and science fiction and analog <hes> <hes> starting in the early sixties so i was. I was really much a pretty much a science fiction nerd from day one so it's interesting because i'm a little bit younger than you. I was born in fifty nine right but that's exactly my list of books that got me into the interested in it is high mine and andre norton is somehow i knew andre norton a woman i don't know i don't remember ever being surprised to find it out so i must have read a bio or something of her early on it became much more public knowledge by the late sixties but up until the mid sixty s. I think <hes> you know basically kept her. Her identity <hes> coast to coast of the best. There was james tip tree junior. I was surprised if i it yes me too really yeah well. By the time i was reading it would have been the late sixties so that's probably why i i knew from the beginning but that's sort of the same list of things that i had <hes> became interested in as well. So when did you start trying your hand at writing. Well you know i often tell <hes> <hes> students in my writing students that one of the seven warning signs that you might become a writer is that you are writing fiction which is not on command by your english teacher before the tan and indeed i was writing a a <unk> stories in and and i and i actually made a little magazine i would compel my my friends to write them and i would illustrate stories myself alf probably maybe i was eleven or twelve and and <hes> so i was i was trying to do that and i remember there was a contest in fantasy science fiction in the mid sixties <hes> that asked for a submission i submitted a an entry there and i got my first rejection slip and i still have it <hes> and so i was edit pretty early i was you know in my early teens when i i submitted my i. I didn't ever submit another story until i was in college but <hes> you know i i really i knew that there was the possibility of an ordinary ordinary person writing stories and sending off it was really quite a i was felt empowered by the fact that they had sent me a rejection slip the the idea that i you know i'm john kessel kid from buffalo new york could write a story and send it into the magazine and they would read it and say no but they would send me.

john kessel buffalo new york andre norton jules verne writer nebula award canadian science saskatoon Aurora award new york edward saskatoon public library carl yasser andrew norton ABC robert heinlein christopher rocky shawna MFA north carolina state universit
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to the world shapers conversations with science fiction fantasy authors about the committee made a process. I'm your host every and this episode's guest cameron hurling relief <music> welcome to another episode of the world shapers. I am as i just said a minute ago over the music. I'm your host edward bullet and i write science fiction and fantasy and i've always enjoyed talking to other authors of science fiction fantasy about their creative process. That's what this podcast is all about it. It takes its name from the world shapers series which is my latest series of models from books book. One world shaker just came out on august the the sixth in mass market paperback already out in trade paperback audiobook and a yearbook and the second book master of the world will be out on september timber tenth which is a couple of weeks away as this episode goes live and it will come out to simultaneously and e book and audiobook and trade paperback with the mass market computer back to <hes> follow later. <hes> one reason that this podcast takes its name from the world shapers is that the whole premise of the world shapers is that there are a potentially the infinite number of shaped worlds which are worlds that <hes> have been shaped by individuals who now live within them so it's a bit like authors <hes> giving inside the books that they've created the main character's name is shana keys. She's in a world that she thinks is the only world she thinks it's <hes> our world basically although there are are some differences that readers from our world will pick up on <hes> but then suddenly something happens that <hes> shosha that something weird going on. There's an attack in her. Best friend is killed and she. She can't believe any of this is happening and just like that. It isn't happening because she actually has the power to shape this world mysterious stranger named carl yasser shows up and explains to her that she is the shape paper this world and that is just one of many many shaped worlds and elaborate shaped worlds. He also tells her that <hes> the adversary who is the one who attacked her is trying takeover her world and already has the knowledge how to do that. She can't stop it. All she can do is try to escape her own world and he says if she can travel from world adds to rolled through the labyrinth and retrieve the knowledge of the shaping of each of those worlds she can take that knowledge to agree or the mysterious woman at the center of the labyrinth and onc- ziegler has that knowledge she can protect labyrinth from the adversary who's trying to take over and eventually destroy all of these shaped worlds so the the first book takes place in the world is very much like ours book to master the world which comes out september tenth from books takes place in a world inspired by jules verne so i had a lot of fun doing the steam punk thing in that book it has you know submarines and flying machines and mysterious islands and all that great stuff you'd expect from a jules verne inspired world book three which doesn't have an actual title yet but my working title is where wolves vampires peasants so my. I don't think they're gonna let me keep that one. I'm working on that now and as you can probably tell from that it will indeed have werewolves and vampires and presents so that's going to be a lot of fun and it will be out about about this time next year. I would imagine the other thing. I wanted to mention before we get into the episode. Proper is that <hes> this podcast is up for an aurora era award this year. The aurora awards are the fan voted awards for best canadian science fiction and fantasy and if you sort of like the hugo's only limited to canada. If you are a canadian resident or citizen you are eligible to vote for the aurora awards. All you have to do is buy a membership in the canadian science fiction and fattest association for a whopping ten dollars. Most of us can afford that and you can do that by going to the website pri aurora awards dot c._a..

jules verne carl yasser canadian science ziegler cameron edward bullet canada ten dollars
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

14:53 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the world shapers. I guess you could say this is the world science fiction convention episodes since i am. I'm recording this introduction and this episode will be going live while the world science fiction convention is going on in dublin in fact this week's guest <hes> condo lee is actually. I happen to know in dublin at this very moment. Unfortunately i am not in dublin and i will refrain from inflicting my version of an irish accent talk you therefore i am i always am in regina saskatchewan canada and i started this podcast i if you're new to it because i'm also the writer of science fiction and fantasy. I've always enjoyed talking to other authors about their creative process. My own creative process is currently focused on a new series that started last fall from daw books. It's called world shapers <hes> the same name as this podcast really and the first book also called world shaper without the <hes> came out in trade paperback last september and just last week in fact came out on august six okay. That's a little bit more than one week ago but thought august sixth came out in a mass market paperback so if you go into your bookstore or go online you can find the mass market paperback version of world shaper by ed willett <hes> publisher's weekly gave it a starred review you booklets said it was quickly quirky and fun and highly entertaining i and did some all set in a labyrinth of shaped worlds in which the shapers of of those worlds live inside the world's they have shaped rather like authors living inside their books. My main character shawna keys you'll see here on the cover art. Few look for <hes> live in a world very much like ours didn't realize she was the shaper of it until a mysterious stranger call yasser showed up and told her and also told her that this <hes> adversary had entered her world and was now after her she knew something was amiss because her best friend had been killed and it seemed like a terrorist attack and then when she said this can't be happening it. It hadn't happened <unk> but her best friend was still dead. She knew something weird was going on karl kind of explains it and then they have to flee her world ahead of the adversary get into the next world and then begin quest to gather the knowledge of these shaped worlds and take it to a greater the mysterious woman at the center of the labyrinth in order to shape save other worlds from the depredations of the adversary book to master of the world will come out on september tenth and trade paperback and e book and audiobook doc also from dot books it is set in a jules verne inspired world so it's got to you know lots of steam punk stuff the weird <music> air ships and submarines and things like that floating islands looking forward to it hitting the hitting the bookshelves and not very long now now at all and i am currently writing book three which is called <hes> well. It doesn't have a formal title yet but i think of it as where wilson vampires peasants ovalles ovalles which fairly much describes the kind of world that it takes place in so i'm working on that right now i would also like to mention that this podcast <hes> the the world shapers has been nominated shortlisted for a <hes> aurora award that same canada's top science fiction fantasy word. It's the equivalent of the hugos. In the united states states voted on by fans is a finalist in the category of best fan related work. If you would like to vote for the auroras and you are canadian citizen or resident you can do so simply by paying ten dollar membership fee to the cadence science fiction fantasy association and you get a very nice <hes> voters package of some of the <hes> shortlisted works if you do become a member and decide to vote voting is closing in the not too distant future so you you might wanna check that out right away and the website is w._w._w. W._w._w. Dot prix aurora awards dot c._a. So that's p. R. i. x a u. R. o. r. a. w. a. i. d. s. dot c._a. Prix aurora awards dot c._a. As i hope you'll check that out if you're kadian citizen resident and help promote <hes> canadian canadian science fiction and fantasy right i think that will cover off the introductory material this week very excited to to get onto this <hes> episode episode <hes> this episode's guest who is fondly finally is the author of the green bone saka beginning with jade city which won the two thousand eighteen world fantasy the award for best novel and continuing in jade war which is out this month. She well this month being july which is when this interview is taking place. She is also the author of the acclaimed claimed young adult science fiction novels zero boxer exo and crossfire found his work has been nominated for the nebula on norton and locus awards and been named to best of year your list by n._p._r. Barnes and noble powell's books and sci fi wire among others. She won the aurora word canada's national science fiction and fatty issue a word twice in the same year here for best novel and best young adult novel. Fonda is a recovering corporate strategist black belt martial artists and action movie aficionado residing in portland oregon oregon so find a welcome to the world shapers. Thanks that we're it's great to be here now. We kind of almost cross paths last year to win. Words collided calculate. Which is where you were born right. You're burning yes yes. Was that your first time at that. <hes> that conventional i've been to that convention a few times and i'm gonna be there. Next year is the guest of honor. I still have family in calgary so it's always a great opportunity for me to combine visiting family with making it out to <hes> woodward's collide i. I always like to plug windwards collide because it's such a great event so we go here and yeah. I like the fact that it's <hes> it's a great size. It's not too huge but it's still very environment and i like the fact that it's very much modeled after at s._f. Con but it is cross genre and so i always end up seeing some the panels and talks about mystery thriller and romance and and <hes> other congress besides my own even poetry pops up yeah uh yeah i i like it. A lot does so since i liked it now as we have. We should mention that the website for it is win. Words collide dot org. It's it's captain seven fifty or something like that five hundred number what it is yeah and unfortunately it won't be there this year because i'll be traveling in ireland before war world con- in dublin but i will be there next year and i'm always happy to make it over there when i can. Will you be world fantasy this year in los angeles. I'm clear smell still up in the air. I've got a bunch of travel for the rest of the year so i'm trying to parse sit out so that i'm not totally overloaded. I actually have to write a book sometime this year south such nuisances all all these other things you can do that. Oh yeah you still got the book. It's right well speaking of writing books we were. We're going to talk primarily about the jade <hes>. I guess it's called the green bone. Saga is the name for the series. <hes> i am reading jade city. I haven't finished it but i've read quite a bit of it so i have a good sense of the setting and the join it very much and jade warrior is out now. This is july fifteenth. I guess and we're conducting this conversation. Is it out or is it coming out not <unk> out quite yet. It comes out next week. We are one week away from release. It'll definitely be out when this goes live so yes so we'll talk about that and how it came about <unk> to start with i always take my guests <hes> back into the mists of time for their back for some of us than other men my i missed quite far back to find out how you first of all became interested in writing science fiction fantasy and secondly how you started riding now you were you were born in calgary but as i know that you moved to the state so how did that all work out in winded writing kickin for you there yeah yeah so i wanted to be a writer. When i was quite young i think i was probably around ten or so and i was a voracious gracious reader as a child and loved to make up stories so at some point i told my parents so i want to be a writer and i think think they said oh that's nice and patted me on the head and encouraged me to get a real job that would allow me to support myself as is a functional adult when i grew up and so over the rest of my childhood writing was something that i still love to do. I always <hes> <hes> was do we get my spare time. I had an extremely boring and long forty five minute bus ride to school and then another forty five minutes back and did not have that time gameboy or an ipad and whatever else kids have these days to distract themselves so i had a very large pad of paper and i wrote my first novel i wrote when i was in in fifth grade and it ended up being three hundred pages of handwritten pros about a young dragon and his motley crue assorted magical forest friends on a quest for a magical amulet and that that was my very first novel which is possibly still bound with elastic bands in my parents attic and so i i then wrote a second novel when i was in high school that was a pulpy superhero. Hero saga were cast all of my classmates in to the story about a cyborgs in superheroes and the various corporate tycoons tycoons and printed printed it out as eight graduation gift to all of them. I brought it co wrote it with a classmate of mine during biology class passing a graphing calculator tucker when you use names in your yes so so that was that was that and then i i didn't really think that writing whatever amount to more than that for me went off and got up business degree you and then an m._b._a. And i worked in management consulting and corporate jobs and eventually ended up <hes> will live to toronto for a while ended up moving to portland oregon to work nike which is located here and <hes> wasn't it wasn't until i was in my thirties when i kind of had this epiphany that i wasn't writing anymore because i just gotten way too busy. I had a fulltime job. I had two small children. Dan and writing hedges completely fallen off to the wayside and that's when i realized while something really feels like it's missing in my life and i need to get act to what i really enjoy <hes> so i took writing much more seriously than ever had before and may changes to my work schedule to what my priorities were in life and then once i did that is like now i'm. I'm in it for the one hundred percent. I i want to be published and i want to make this my career where you mentioned that you were veracious reader. What were some of the books that you read that because clearly you were beating the kinds of books that leads you to write your first story as the fantasy yeah yet so i was a fantasy science fiction reader from the start i loved the chronicles of dane is one of my favorite in early books. I read monica hughes. I don't know many readers remember. Monica hughes books use a canadian science fiction author. The l. devil on my back was quick. I really loved when i was a kid. I read <hes> narnia of course susan cooper's dark is rising almost with those books and i also love animal stories have read like all of those black stallion mr bush in you know i always he's like to point this out. Walter farley actually wrote fiction in that arc with the island stallion books actually haven't science fiction twist so i i loved those stories as well so i agree aided later on in my teens to isaac asimov ray bradbury and mccaffrey not all the science fiction fantasy greats at that time <hes> so i've been very much in this genre as a fan since insa starts well. Those are all the same books i read which <hes> and i also wrote my first of all. I didn't write a novel quite agendas did you but you were mentioning the and i just happened to have it it on my desk my first novel which i wrote when i was fourteen and yours yours is three hundred mines only two hundred one when i hit so did and it's a binder that says eddie willett algebra on the front of it that's great and has act drawings of race cars on its right. I sometimes take it to school readings to show off and <hes> so how did the first you was the first this book you wrote trying to get published published or did you have some false starts or along the way so yeah i wrote a eh practice novel that i knew would not be published. I just wanted to teach myself how to write a novel. So i wrote a the novel that you never saw the light. At all. Then i wrote a young adult fantasy novel <hes> that i wanted to see published began querying it after it was done it went through quite a few rounds of queering in a picked up some interest from agents but nothing <hes> but didn't go anywhere beyond that and while i was querying that novel i wrote zero boxer which would become my debut and and i took that novel as well as the one i had been querying previous to it to writing conference here in portland called willamette writers and i didn't really know which these projects i should pitch but zero boxer was hot off the press had just recently finished writing being revising it and felt like it was in shape to start being sent out so i am pitch.

writer dublin portland oregon canada calgary ed willett monica hughes aurora award Dot united states regina saskatchewan canada jules verne susan cooper shawna keys publisher yasser los angeles Walter farley eddie willett
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

12:58 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the world shapers. I'm Edward Well. It's your host. I started this podcast because I am a writer of science fiction and fantasy and I've always enjoyed talking to other writers about <hes> how they work and that's what this podcast is all about. I talk with a science fiction fantasy authors about their creative the process <hes> this is an exciting week for me. Today is August the third as I get this episode ready to go out and on August the six twenty twenty nine hundred in case you're listening to this truth years down the future <hes> on August sixth by <hes> Book World Shaper Book One in the World Shaper series from which this podcast cast takes its title. We'll be out in mass market paperback from Daw Books. <hes> it came out in trade paperback last September and then in September on on September tenth to be precise the trade paperback plus audiobook and e Book of Master of the World Book to in the world shapers series. We'll be coming out and I N during a giveaway for or a in paperback copy of world shaper and a autographed A. R. C. Advanced Reader's copy of master of the world. If you are hearing this almost as soon as it comes out because <hes> the deadline is coming up but if you're hearing this before August seventh which is when I'll do the draw just send be an email with the master of the world a R._c. and the subject line and the email address is e Willett e. w.. I L. L. E. T. T. at gmail.com so sent me that email you in the dry and maybe you we'll be lucky. Winner of the first two books in the world shapers series that I'm writing in book three right now. The premise of the books is <hes> that there is a labyrinth shaped worlds and that within these worlds the people who've shaped them live they they have designed them to their liking. They all came from the first world originally our world but they're all in this labyrinth now and my main character Shana keys was driven out of her chic- world which she didn't even know she'd shaped she'd somehow forgotten it until Carl Yasser came and told her <hes> he also told her that there was <hes> this adversary who's trying to destroy the labyrinth and all the shaped worlds is taking them over one by one and that the adversary is now in her world and she ends up having to flee her world. <hes> that's the substance of the first book in the second book <hes> She's in another world which is what inspired by Jules Verne's which is why the book is called Master of the world after the Jules Verne title and that that one they have to deal with completely different situation and then the third book which I'm writing now will take place in a world that features empires and the wet liberals so I'm really having a lot of fun with that and I hope readers enjoy it to master the roads getting great reviews at a great publishers. Weekly review just had a great one from from book lists that basically said anybody who's interested in Geek Culture will enjoy this book because there are a lot of of Geek culture references Star Trek and star wars and all all sorts of things plus some musical theater stuff too because that's another one of my interests. I also wanted to mention that this blog has been shortlisted for an Aurora award. That's Canada's is a top science fiction award similar to the Hugo's voted on by the fans for best fan related work. <hes> the voting is open now so if you go to pre Aurora awards dot C. A. P. R. I. X A U.. R. O. R. A. W. A. R. D. S. Dot C._A.. You can enjoy if you are Canadian citizen or resident you can join the Canadian Science Fiction Fantasy Association for a mere ten dollars Canadian and then you will be eligible to vote for the AURORAS and if you maintain your membership to nominate for the next year end you will also receive a great voters package with many of the nominated works novels in short stories in and so forth so check that out if you're Canadian and <HES> and if you like this podcast <hes> feel free to vote for it for best fan related work right. I think that <hes> covers off everything I need to say off the top of the hour so let's get on with this episode's Guest Shelly Edina Shuttling Edina China is the author of twenty four novels published by Harlequin Warner and hatchet and more than a dozen more published by moonshell books our own independent press. She writes the magnificent devices Weiss's steam punk series which is what we'll be talking about. Primarily and Charlotte Henry also writes the rogues of Saint just series of Classic Gra Regency Knob Romance and as Edina sent sent writes the Lindbergh Township Amish series. It's an interesting mixture. She everything correctly. That's a miracle. She holds an M._F._A.. And writing popular fiction from Seton Hill University and is currently at work on a P._H._d.. In creative writing at Lancaster University in the U._K.. She won the Romance Writers of America Rita Award for for best inspirational novel in two thousand and five and was a finalist in two thousand and six and when she's not writing shelly is usually quilting sewing historical costumes rooms are enjoying the garden with her flock rescued chickens and yes chickens do come into the steam pipe puck. We're GONNA talk about today so welcome to the world shapers thank you. Thanks for having me over now. I wanted to tell you how I ended up reaching out to you. <hes> my wife is an engineer and one of her former classmates who is also an engineer Carol Basha who is a fan of the podcast and she said you know who you should get on there. There's this steam punk author that I really enjoy joy and you should reach out to her and so I did and so so you are so you were recommended to meet by <hes> a woman engineer which makes perfect sense it does actually you'd be surprised how many engineers are in my leadership witnessed all having read the book and I've hung out with a lot. I'm not an engineer myself but I I've written history book about the engineering in Saskatchewan and hang out with a lot of engineers because of my wife is former president of the association professional engineers and Geoscientists of this is Katrin so I have a lot of engineers in my circle of acquaintances and I married to one so there you go go well so <hes> we'll start by going back into into the past which is where you right so that kind of make sense but won't go quite that far back. We'll go back to win you. I became interested in writing in general and in writing the kind of thing that you write in particular so how how did that all begin for you. It began in third grade as a matter of fact we were given a writing assignment and I wrote this little story about a ghost dinner graveyard and my teacher Miss Gil Stein bless her heart wrote across the top in reading after giving me like ten out of ten she said Ooh you have me scared. which is you know what a lovely teacher would right there but the thing is I had never realized before that what went down on paper could affect people's emotions and yes it wasn't real but to my eight year old mind it was very real and I decided right then and there that this is what I was going to do when I grew up wispy writer so that's interesting to me because one thing I often ask riders on this podcast is if if when they started writing if they showed what they wrote two people <hes> does to see how they react to that kind of it all started with that and I'll get authors he'll say now? I never everyone to show it to anybody but I always think it's a it's it was precisely that it was sharing it with my classmates a little older than five and finding out that I was reading stories that they enjoy that actually kind of let me thank you know this kind of thing. Yeah I can tell stories of other people like and and clearly it happened for you very early and this is why neither of us has any fear of reviews. I guess that's it yeah Mike. My classmates were reviewers for sure that's for sure <hes> so after you were five how to progress from there well that that was eight years old and then in our in our neighborhood we used to two. We never played house that was for kids in the city. We played like adventure and so we'd watch episodes of the wild wild west with James West and Artem Est Gordon and as you know that was like steam punk back in the sixties soda at show I know me too so I always had to be James Sweat because I was the oldest but I really wanted to be artists. Gordon coming up with the cool tech so that's kind of where it embedded embedded itself in my mind and and time went on and I got educated and went through a couple of writing degrees and finally I came came up. I got the flash for book one of this steam punk series and it just took off from there all that sort of desire and and interest in in Victorian technology just came to the floor now you grew up on Canada's west coast. I'm young candidate but it a long way from there. You're in the cold part. That's for sure <hes> but did you would you went to the university that you go straight in with the the idea of going into creative writing or or did you start somewhere else well. I sort of had a circuitous way of getting there. My family was very blue collar so so my mom always wanted me to go to university but I wanted to travel so I moved to Alberta and saved up my money as much as I could and I went to Europe up and multiple times you know the backpacking trip to Europe that you do in your twenties and that kind of opened my mind a little more to other other cultures other languages I love languages and they come fairly easily so you'll notice that there's a lot of German and French as you progress through the series because it's a very multi national sort of series and and so once I had the traveling done I went to school. I emigrated added to the States and I started college when I was oh I don't know thirty or something and I always said I was going to get a license plate that said B._A.. By the two K. I was on the you know one classic quarter plan but I got it in ninety five and then I went into a masters program after that got two masters degrees in writing in that now I've I told my mom I was taken. This education trained at the end line so we're getting a P._H._d.. Now we're your undergraduate. Degree was in literature yeah. What what did that entail well? I had a creative writing minor so my my Undergrad thesis was a novel that will never see the light of day but it it gave me the confidence that I could finish a book so that it would be the very first one that you wrote to completion first of all you have to completion now. The first novel I wrote to completion was when I was thirteen. A Nancy drew real rip-off very adventurous. Did you write other longer things while you were still growing up other novel attempts are yeah well it took. It took me five years to write the Nancy drew rip off just because that's what you turn to when you're really introverted kid and you grow oh up in a religious group. That's closed and you don't have any friends that are outside the church and yet you want a larger life than the one you have so you make it on on paper. That's what I did. I think <hes> I think at that age when I first bought my very short story was called castor glass hyper ship testify because I had hit the science fiction thing really early cow but <hes> I also wrote. I you know I was reading Mike. <hes> there was a fella named William Galt. I think his name aim was and he wrote auto racing books in the fifties and so I went through that was my rip off. I tried to ride auto racing books never having driven a car. He's been to an auto race that I did. My best well I know and I was doing like massive. Adventures taking cruises in going to foreign countries in my characters are fourteen fourteen. My favorite vintage of Alia was the one I wrote called a ship from the unknown in which this strange ship shows up in my seaside seaside town which of course I'd never lived in either my characters were and they end up then there's a whole hidden high-tech civilization in the middle of the Amazon jungle which nobody knew about until until they got there and even I think you know we had satellites then. You couldn't hide something like that. What was I thinking that it was a lot of fun to write so we've been right when you're young? That's the main thing it's an an it's exercising your brain and giving it those muscles that it's going to need later on..

engineer Shelly Edina Canada writer Aurora award Jules Verne Canadian Science Fiction Fanta Edward Well Daw Books. A. R. C. Seton Hill University Lancaster University Europe Charlotte Henry Shana keys R. O. R. A. W. A. R. D. S. Dot L. L. E. T. T. Artem Est Gordon Classic Gra Regency Knob
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

11:36 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"A._r.. See in advanced reader copy of master of the world to one lucky listener of world-shapers if you are hearing this before I think I was saying August. I I'm going to say August sixth because that's when book one world shaper comes out and mass-market paperback so before August sixth <hes> send me an email at e Wallet E. W. L. E. T. T. at g mail dot com with the subject mind master of the World A. R. C. Or if you just put master of the World I'll figure it out and I will do a draw and we'll send out that autographed Air Sea to one lucky listener and I think I'm going to throw in a copy if the paperback of world shaper as well so that we had the first two books in the series. I'm currently writing the third book I should perhaps just explain a little bit about what it's about it all takes place in a labyrinth of shaped worlds. The people who shape these worlds live within them so they're a bit like authors like the authors I interview on this podcast living inside the universes they have created the main character Shawna keys as she lived in a world very much like ours although with the few significant differences but she didn't know that it was a shape squirrel she had somehow forgotten that she was shaper. Carl yet mysterious stranger shows up and explains to her that in fact she did shape the world and now she has to get out of it because the adversary who's going from role to world and trying to <hes> take over so that he can eventually take over the whole Abirin is now in her world and has already stolen her knowledge of the world and she has to get out of it before he kills her because that's why he's aiming to do. He's already killed her best friend so she flees her world. In that sets the whole series in motion. The second book master of the World Takes Place in a world. That's inspired by Jules Verne so it's very steam punk with lots of you know submarines airships and and all that sort of thing and the third which I've just started writing <hes> takes place in a world where wolves vampires so under the great things about the series is that <hes> I get to write stories set in any kind of world that I I want to so I hope readers will come along on the journey and I hope you will be one of them. That does so again if you'd like to enter for an R._C.. Of Master of the world semi that email at e Willett T._W._a.. L. L. E. T. at g mail DOT COM and with the master of the World A._R.. See in the subject line and I will enter you. I I should also mentioned that this podcast is a finalist for an Aurora award in the category of best fan related work. The AURORAS are the fan voted awards in Canada for best science fiction and fantasy as sort of like the Hugo's in the United States dates and if you are Canadian citizen or resident you can buy a membership in the Canadian Science Fiction Fantasy Association for Amir Ten dollars Canadian that will give you the opportunity to vote for the AURORAS and you will receive a voters owners package with many of the shortlisted works novels short stories artwork all that kind of thing included in it so it's a very good deal if you are interested and if you are Canadian citizen or resident you just have to go to pre Aurora awards dot C._A.. That's P._R._I.. Ex a U. R. R. A. W. A. R. D. S. Dot C._A.. And you can find all the information there for buying a membership and then <hes> for voting for the works of the Aurora awards towards this year will be handed out at to Cancun in Ottawa in mid October. I will in fact be there in person so if you happen to come to Cancun be sure to to look me up all right well. I think that <hes> gets all the preliminaries out of the way let's skit on to this episodes. Guest Dr Charles e Gannon Dr Charles e Gannon's Cain reward and Terron Republic Hard S._F.. Novels have all been national bestsellers and include three finalists for the Nebula to for the Dragon Award and a Compton in Crook winner. The fifth mark of Cain is forthcoming in July twenty nineteen that would be next month as we regard this is epic fantasy trilogy the Broken World Launches Twenty twenty he collaborates with Eric Clint at say who we just had that episode go live 'cause I'm recording this <hes> so check that one out if you're interested in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling Ring Afire series and has worked in the star fire black tide rising on averse and Manson universes and also talked to David Weber and other collaborator the rest of his bibliography includes many works short fiction and venues such as analog numerous gained design writing credits and television productions from his past career as a script writer producer New York City formerly a distinguished professor of English at Saint Bonaventure University and recipient of five Fulbright Grants his book rumors of war and infernal machines when the two thousand six A._M.. L. A. That's the American Library Association Choice Award for Outstanding Book is a frequent subject matter experts both for national media venues such as National Public Radio and the discovery channel as well as for various intelligence and defense agencies contractors so welcome to the World Shaper Charles are chuck. I guess I can call you chuck. Can I absolutely call me chuck and it's great to be here now. We've run into each other once in awhile at conventions and we actually sat at an autograph table together at Dragon Con last year <hes> I can't remember who is to my left. It was an urban fantasy author with a huge following. You had eight line out the door. I didn't but it was. It was nice. Talk with you. What we were sitting there anyway? Absolutely mine mine was <hes> was a a humble and intermittent line so we're going to talk <hes> the primarily about <hes> the the cane reward in a series as an example of your creative process but I I I was like to take the guests back into the dark recesses of history <hes> when you're young and find out how you you mean before electricity yeah exactly yeah back then I was there to <hes> how you got first of all interested in science fiction and and fantasy and then how specifically you got interested in <hes> writing it also you know where you grew up and that kind of thing <hes> <hes> so where I grew up as about <hes> I'll start with that. I is about thirty miles north west of New York City and I say that and people envision a sort of endless domino's structure of high rises in receiving into the gray distance and in actuality holiday our biggest problem was keeping a deer at out of our tomatoes. <hes> of course that was a long time ago but still <hes> The New York Metro sprawl is is is pretty much constrained a lot closer than that so I had a kind of <hes> <hes> I didn't an upbringing which brought me in close contact with the city fairly frequently and yet was <hes> was pushed right up against the state park which was inviolate to development so <hes> so it was a mix of two worlds not a city person. I learned that early but in the city there was something that probably was one of the earliest sparking <hes> in me towards what science fiction or just notions of all territory in general the Museum of Natural History in New York City they had a <hes> at that time a <hes> a really really extensive for that time <hes> dinosaur exhibit I think past now that's been massively uh-huh passed by others that are much more invested in that but <hes> I could spend an inordinate amount of time amongst the amongst the various reassembled fossils and <hes> and there was that was where I conceived of the notion ocean that I wanted to be a paleontologist right about it well as time went on I wanted them to be as Walla Gist and write about it and then I wanted to be an astronomer and write about it and then briefly I wanted to be an astronaut right about it but that was a little more dangerous than I was aligned for and and <hes> and at about eleven or twelve I realized what the constant was was wanting to write about it. The other constant was to to be involved with cool things but this was about also the age when you start getting enough of a sense the way the world works at eleven twelve. I was starting to realize you have ninety five percent of the time spent in those jobs if not more is solitary and to my mind kind of dull repetitive and almost almost purely for every for every ounce of creativity in it there was a ton of of <hes> of essentially quantitative <hes> assessment proving analysis etc not that I don't enjoy that to a degree but my obviously I think <hes> given my chosen career <hes> my my advocation <hes> look enough now to be my occupation was to move on the creative side of things so I kind of realized what what I WANNA do is be and talk about all those things but <hes> but to write about them and that's really been the best of all worlds because literally I can go to all worlds <hes> and that's that sense of all territory that sense of <hes> of if you will unlimited possibilities and a total lack of of <hes> restriction there are no no-fly zones there there. Are you know they're no construction barriers up when it comes to the human imagination so that's a that's how I got here. I often say when I'm doing talks and you know sometimes people say. Why do you write this stuff in fact? I'm going to ask you that question later on but <hes> but if it's coming from like <hes> people who look slightly lately askance at a science fiction earl the alternatives you call it alternate world kind of fiction is my response always well. Why don't you write it because it's such an unfettered place for the imagination to play yeah? I think there's a lot of L.. There's a lot of what I'll coil <hes> if you really grown up if you're really an adult I think there's there's no reason to feel that you have always act in a way that is socially coded as if you will adult action and I think the the notion of if you spend a lot of time in all territory in alternate places in thinking about things that are not connected to to you know what's happening putting in the stock market right now and what's coming across our feed from Reuters or whatever your chosen your chosen dubious news sources and I'd say that that I'm not saying Reuters is dubious. I'm saying that right now I I can't figure out what isn't <hes> and and in consequence to me. I think if you're really secure with yourself <hes> why if you have the kind of mind which is naturally one that wants to go over the next hill to see what hasn't been seen yet then of course do that which is which is an entirely adult activity anyhow it's just not always coded that way and and I think that <hes> so for me I understand exactly what what you're saying about that and and <hes> but I always find it kind of interesting and a it's a useful endeavor <hes> into to encounter folks like that simply because it it it sets up an opportunity to have a discourse in a friendly discourse course and <hes> and make people <hes> perhaps give them a sense of freedom to ask those same questions just as as you said at you know it's. Why aren't you writing it and <hes> and I think that's that's a really important question? I think that <hes> it's it's probably highly tinkered by our media..

New York City Aurora award W. L. E. T. T. Cancun Reuters Shawna keys Jules Verne Cain Carl Air Sea Canadian Science Fiction Fanta R. R. A. W. A. R. D. S. Dot Crook Canada Twenty twenty Dragon Con Compton Saint Bonaventure University United States
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

10:52 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"Welcome to another episode of the world shapers. I am your host. Well attend this program that I started because I am a section fantasy writer and I'm always fascinated <hes> talking to other science fiction fantasy easy riders about their creative process. I'm very pleased to announce that <hes> the world shapers podcast is shortlisted for an Aurora award this year. That's the Canadian Science Fiction Fantasy award similar to the hugos in the United States states. <hes> world-shapers is short-listed in best fan related work. If you are Canadian citizen or resident you can vote for the Aurora awards membership indicating Science Fiction Fantasy Association is only ten dollars and that allows you to vote and if you renew it next year you'll be able to nominate and vote again next year you can join the F._F._A.. And vote for the Auroras if you are Canadian by going to Prix Aurora awards dot I see a pre of course French P._R.. X. P. R. I. X.. Aurora awards dot C._A.. And you'll also get a very extensive collection of this year's shortlisted works Santa voters package so it's really a good deal and an opportunity to honor the best in Katie in science fiction and fantasy now my next novel is <hes> part of the world shapers series which is in fact where this podcast originally got its name from <hes> the first book was called World Shaper it came out last September from Daw books and it will be out in mass market paperback in August of this year followed by Master of the World Book to in the series which comes out in September in trade paperback audiobook and e Book. I am giving away and A._R._C._e.. And advanced reader copy of master of the world to one lucky listener to the podcast if you would like to enter to win that and you're listening to this before August first because is that's been cut it off so that it's still an advanced copy but whoever wins gets it before the actual release of the book if you'd like to Inter all you have to do is send me an email at ea will it e W I l L D._T.. At G MAIL DOT COM and I just put master of the World A. R. C. As the subject although if you just put master world I'll still know what it is. I will still enter you so again if you'd like to win an A._A._R._p.. Of Master of the world autographed of course all you have to do is send me that email at e Willett relit at gmail.com with master the World A. R. C. As the subject mind the whole world Shaker series. I should give a quick synopsis of that. It says set in a vast labyrinth of shaped worlds each of these worlds the shape of that world or lives within it. My main character is Shawna keys. She was living at a world that she thought was the only real there was. She didn't know she was the shape of the world she had somehow forgotten that little fact and then a mysterious stranger showed up and explained to her what was really going on and that had a terrible adversary was entering her world and was in the process of taking over and <hes> he succeeded in doing that but she stayed one step ahead of him and has fled into the next world as part of a quest together the knowledge of all these shaped worlds what's in to take them to the mysterious woman at the center of the Labyrinth AG- rare <hes> and to save all of the shaped worlds and elaborate as a whole from the adversary these that's what she's been told in the second book she finds herself in a world that was inspired by Jules Verne as you might have been able to tell from the title master of the World and I had great fun with that writing a steam punk adventure with submarines and airships and floating islands and and all of that publisher's weekly which gave World Shaper the first first book in this series starred review gave this one an excellent review as well says it offers thrills aplenty which is kind of what I was going for so I was. I was pleased to get that <hes> I review. That's enough about me. Let's get onto onto this. Week's guest Christopher Rocky. Oh Christopher Rocco is the author of the Sun Eater Space Opera Fantasy series from Daw books as well as the assistant industry being books where he co edited the military S._F.. Anthology Star destroyers destroyers as well as space pioneers collection of Golden Age reprints showcasing tales of human exploration. He's a graduate of North Carolina State University where in his words a penchant for self destructive decision baking 'cause to pursue do a bachelor's in English rhetoric with a minor in classics an avid student of history philosophy and religion Christopher has been writing since he was eight years old and sold his first book empire silence which is when will primarily be talking about on this podcast APP to twenty you too which since it just came out means. He's not much older than that. The Sun Eater series is is available from Golan's in the U._k.. and has been translated into French. German Christopher does in Raleigh North Carolina where he spends most of his time hunched over keyboard in writing cheat. Don't we all writing. He splits his time between his family procrastinating video games and his friends boxing gym. Welcome to the world shapers Christopher. Thanks for having the AM excited to be here. We met we're both authors I she no conflict of interest and all that and we actually met at <hes> San Jose last year world con- at the dinner I think was when I first met you I think so and then you very kindly showed me around the <hes> mall dealers. There's room doesn't quite cover it a dragon cod shopping yeah when I was down there last year so I appreciated that as well <hes> so it's great to have you on and I I have to confess. I have not finished empire silence silence but neither is my fiance so I can't throw stones at anybody but I'm well into it so when I get to do synopsis a little bit and I say no spoilers that will be for me as much as for sinners. I'll do my best so I always like to start these things off by going back into. I always say Mrs of time or the depths of time into the past <hes> to find out how you got interested first of all in science fiction fantasy and now you started writing it. You started early apparently at eight years old yeah yeah I think it was my dad's fault mostly because when I was really small we were Disney family and most Disney movies. I don't WanNa say are four girls but they are about princesses and when your three year old boy it's harder to to get into those necessarily although I was I was very fond of especially sleeping beauty 'cause there was a dragon and a sword fight and mutual but then I think I watched star worse for the first time when I was four or five and then immediately after we got through watching the first three movies to you know a week later and then two weeks later the save space it out I think I watched the original trilogy on loop because I wasn't allowed to watch very much. I was allowed T._v.. Land the Batman Cartoon from the ninety s with Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamill and then the Star Wars trilogy and so I watch those original movies obsessively and and I read a bunch of the books and of course the feminists came out and I was just young enough to think the phantom menace was awesome and it's actually it's fine. It's attack of the clones that's bed but <hes> I went from that through to WHO <hes> reading a bunch of Star Wars books the first book I ever bought was first tins on throng novel <hes> but then I found tolkien and Harry Potter of course came in I hit actually before Harry Potter was popular. I read it when I was was like five because I read very early. <hes> maybe even younger than that have checked with my mother and so all this was happening at once and then I hit Lord of the Rings Right Win the movies were starting to come out around two thousand. I tried watching the Pakshi version and terrified me and gave up <hes> and <hes> I tried reading the books instead but <hes> struggled with those bit more than the Star Wars books and Harry Potter and so I started writing because <hes> my friends we would play make I believe on the playground right <hes> and they were playing Dragon Ball Z which I of course had no idea what that was because I was not allowed to wash it and so when asked hey do you WanNa play Dragon Ball Z I said yes but can I be Batman and after two weeks of careful deliberation the other five year olds agreed that yes and so over the years going through grade school up to about third grade we would play make belief right at the on the playground and we we'd spun out and made our own character so batman eventually got a lightsaber and all these other you went to wizard school. I think it became very accomplished. That would improve Batman. I like Batman a lot so I hesitate to say that but I would definitely read that at Lisa lightsaber yet I he needs one. Everyone needs one really but <hes> I so I started writing down these adventures we had on the playground and then as my friends grope and discovered the football and social skills I sat on the edge of the parking lot with a notebook and would keep making stuff up and of course once I made it to fourth grade third grade me didn't know what he was talking about and I would throw everything out and start again and again and again and again and again until I finished a novel I think in Eighth Grade which one copy remains printed and it is in someone's lock box somewhere I don't remember and it is terrible and I kept I kept I'm doing this through high school and college mostly because you know Christopher Paolini gets a lot of you know but he wrote that book at fifteen and he was another Christopher and an Italian one not and I I was you know by God if he can do it. I can do it too. <hes> actually got to meet him at Dragon Con when I met you and thank him for that because I you know it's one of those things I always thought that you needed to be like forty to do when I was little and he sort of proved proved that wrong then and so I kept doing this until I eventually had something worth reading. Did you share that early writing with your friends and see how you know that you could tell stories that they enjoyed. Oh sure that. But <hes> I had a I have a few friends actually <hes> before we started the talk officially mentioned my two roommates by two roommates just moving out now actually in my first house but my roommates are two friends. I've been friends with since third grade I think and and and then in a couple of others <hes> I would we would always pass things back and forth we used to play you know like not exactly dungeons and dragons but some off brand R._p._G.'s.

World Shaper Christopher Aurora award Batman Harry Potter Canadian Science Fiction United States World A. Christopher Paolini Christopher Rocco Prix Aurora Christopher Rocky writer Aurora Jules Verne North Carolina State Universit Shawna keys Raleigh North Carolina X. P. R. Katie
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

15:34 min | 2 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"To the world shapers conversations with science fiction fantasy on loose. About the creative process. Your host, and this episode guest. Welcome to another episode of the world, shapers conversations sides, fiction and fantasy authors about the creative process. I am your host Edward Willett, and before we get started with today's great interview with air. Clint I have a couple of special things for this episode. First of all, I am very pleased and proud to announce that the world shapers has been shortlisted for a twenty nineteen Aurora award by the Canadian science fiction fantasy association. This is a fan voted on award similar to the Hugo awards in the United States, and the world shapers has been short-listed in the category of best fan related work. So very excited about that. The awards will be presented at Ken Kahn in auto in mid October. You can check out that convention. It can hyphen con dot org. And if you are in that area, it's a great convention..

Aurora award Edward Willett Ken Kahn Clint I United States
"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

The Worldshapers

07:48 min | 3 years ago

"aurora award" Discussed on The Worldshapers

"I. Wasn't sure if I was going to ever be published, you know, thirties already. And like I thought that I was getting too old for this sort of thing and. Emitted the book, tune agent, and he rejected it. And then, but he asked if I had anything else since I showed him one of my older books, and he rejected that too. But he said, look, you you've got a lot of potential, but it's clear that you're. Writing is self taught and you making a lot of amateur speaks. And he gave me a book on writing until meter read it and said, go back and take that that first book the painted man back then he's like that book and fix it. And then come back and so. At this point. I had like like a real legit agent represented that selling authors telling me like I had what it took if I would just get them focused. But at the time like I had a fulltime job in Times Square, New York City, and I lived out in Brooklyn. And so I had to our commute each day. Plus, my time at work, and and I also like at a love life and friends and everything else and didn't really have a lot of writing. And so I decided that I would give up my reading time on my morning afternoon commute and try and spend that time right? And so I bought a smartphone. This was like pre iphone bought a windows phone that had a very broken down version of Microsoft Word. And I broke the book into separate chapters, and I would get on the subway in the morning, and I would open up the chapter that I was working on put my headphones on and for forty five minutes to an hour. I would write on the way to work, and I do the same thing on the way home, and I would rate maybe three hundred three or four hundred words on the way to work in three hundred four hundred words on the way back and at night. I would think that back to my computer, and I would fix all the Typos from writing with my thumbs. And. And another couple hundred words, so I would average around thousand words day, and I did that for a year. I would say probably sixty percents of the warded man was written on the subway like that in that first year. Decent portion of desert. Well, after that, I got an office in third ready in the more, traditional fashion. But I still make sure that all of my mobile devices are writing capable of find out in about somewhere. And I wanna get them writing. I can do it pretty much anywhere. Yeah. I did a lot of writing out of phone as well ahead a little fold up bluetooth keyboard? So I could do proper typing on it. But I wrote a book called Marsa girl, which when the Aurora award in two thousand nine I largely wrote out in this little tiny fold up keyboard on my on my phones. So that was one reason that story when I when I first on interview with you long after the word and then came out about oh. I'm not the only one that rates on a phone. So. Could you remember that that writing is not something that that? Needs to be contained in a certain ritual, or in a certain place or the certain device. You can do it pretty much anywhere. Lots of people still like to write longhand. I can't do it myself. But I've talked to do that. I mean for me, I it's just the worry that like what if you need those pages, you know, what if you like Bill you drink on it? And they'll blur. Like what what if you what if the wind blows them away? What if you forget your bags somewhere, then everything's lost? And what if you can't reach your writing? Yeah. Yeah. And so that what worries me more than anything else? My daughter is writing awful, and she's writing it longhand in the notebook that she carries with her everywhere. And I live in care that one day. She's gonna lose that. No cat. Lose you know, a year of work more than a year at this point. But you know. Want to transfer all the by anxieties onto her. Once you haven't now because of the way you work with the very very detailed outline, I'm going to make a guess that there's not a lot of rewriting when you get to the end of the book. Is that fair? Do you actually have to a bit of pros retouching up? I don't wanna line say that I don't have to do rewriting. I don't I don't tend to write myself into a corner. I usually will write one book all the way through the end. And then turn it in to my agent, and my ender, and usually my coal do read to and then I do read myself, and and then all four of those people will deliver their own sort of added manuscripts. And I will go through the mall, simultaneously and make sort of a master edit copy that sort of breaks down. What I need to work on. And then I do one rewrite from beginning to end fix all of the problems on. There's a lot of rain to do. But it's usually like, oh, you you told instead of shown in the section or you leave here and shortcut to get to the interesting part. But you still have to go back and filling all of these details to make this make sense, or like, you know, this emotional encounter doesn't feel right characters might not have acted that way. Or like, so rare that I have to go out and and. Delete a whole section or teams something really significant with regards to the path of three, you know, I've never had changed the ending or. Something like that. But there are a lot of times where my writing was lazy because I was distracted or because I want do I was more excited to get different part. And I like jumped ahead or because I just was telling not showing in the first draft. They do that a lot in the first draft. So that's the second draft, though, we massively different in massively better, but structurally, it's mostly the same. But the but individual like every sentence has been touched improved. Usually I'll go through in take two to three words that it every sentence and two sentences out of every paragraph. You know, and so like I streamlined a lot I make things a lot tighter and occasionally I'll expand a little bit. If there was a scene missing. They need add in, but you all that in one path. And then usually that second draft is the final. Have you had the same editor for the entire series? No, actually, I'm on my third editor, which is someone frustrating. My first editor was. Laid off when Random House combined. They had multiple sections mtm prints, and they sort of combine them all into one into Ray. And so my editor was the casualty of that. And so then I was signed another editor, but she had been signed huge pile of novels from different authors.

editor Times Square Aurora award Brooklyn New York City Bill Ray forty five minutes one day