35 Burst results for "Aurora"

OnePlus 9 Pro Phone Review

All About Android

07:36 min | 2 weeks ago

OnePlus 9 Pro Phone Review

"So there was some big Hardware news today. Maybe you heard of it. If you're fans of one plus then you probably saw that the company held a livestream this morning and then shortly after the embargoes lifted and reviews were aplenty the oneplus nine and the oneplus nine pro wrong article okay. Plus nine won't buzz nine pro on house this morning. That's does because i didn't put an article in there burks. Donald the worry about him Were announced this morning. You don't need to put an article in there. Because i have them there they are. That's right this right. Here is one plus nine in. I think they call it a matte. Black does a color. Although it's not very mad i was gonna ask. Does it have did you. Keep the protector on there. Because it looks real shiny to me is look mad at all. No it's not matt actually. It's very very shiny in fact both of these are very very shiny. So that's the nine and then a slightly larger nine pro like super glass. You know what i mean. It's like error basically But it's got a got a little kind of like haziness up the top that gets to completely cleared out the bottom but You know. I colors What's the other one is like a do. They call it an arctic green or something like that. I can't remember the name of the third color but it's kind of more similar to here. Hold on. I think i have a more similar to the oneplus. Eight pro this. I would call matt right like this is kind of like a hazy sort of not glassy reflective thing but just really disappointed by. I'm sorry i. I don't mean to be hard to please but i'm disappointed by the black and silver of it all like what is this is like some sort of ball where i'm like put on a fancy gown only wear like black or silver. Are i mean you still. You still have your color options. Vic the oneplus maper wave like whereas the vapor way. Where's the beautiful -til back sometimes. Save these things for later. You know how oneplus roles they come out with their colors in there and then a little bit later they come out with their special edition. Vapor waves now. They did last year. I'm just saying sometimes they do Bites What you will notice with the oneplus nine nine pro. If you look hard enough. And i don't know that i've got this on auto focus so i'm just gonna keep right here but Basically this little branding in the camera bump which says hostile blog. I saying that right And so basically oneplus has a has a partnership with hossa blonde. The camera company. That is a highly respected. Although we should definitely point out the fact that hasselblad was also the big camera partnership that motorola had for a moto. Maude that did not actually take very good pictures. So the question was once we started hearing kind of the news about oneplus and blah. Having a partnership. Is this a branding play. Or is the cameras hardware actually amazing here which is definitely the focus. That really seems to be the focus. This time around the oneplus eight year. You may remember at least eight pro. it it did well improving upping oneplus game when it came to the camera and it looks like with the nine. They're looking to do the same thing here. I've had these phones For about a week and a half now although. I've only really used the nine pro with any regularity. I haven't like lived with the oneplus nine Camera hardware is very similar between the two. But i've i've leaned into the camera on the nine pro. I'm actually doing a comparison for hands on tack. That will go live tomorrow between shots on the eight pro and shots on the nine pro to kinda show. You did one. Plus actually upgrade here But know feel free and show some shots. Hokey stay on this one for a second because this one kind of bothers me. This is the main rear facing camera. I don't know that anyone else would notice this. Because you don't know my daughter and my wife the way i do but their heads look stretched totally noticed that actually. It looks like your daughter's flat look like cardboard out to that. This was done with main camera. This was not the winding lens. I'm used to seeing that kind of tearing that smearing on wide angle shots. But not the main and i realized what it is because this was like within. The first couple of days of having the camera was like okay. What is that if all of my main shots are going to do. This is going to bug the heck out of me and realize what it is the main lens does not have optical image stabilization. And so if you are even moving your hand the slightest when you take these shots you end up with really Erotic images and that. I see that as a big bummer. Because it actually did kind of rear. Its ugly head to me multiple times. Where i thought i was still but it wasn't quite still enough then. I looked at the shot later. I was like okay. That's just a little too blurry for my liking. The actually end up getting better shots out of the uae than you do with the main But yeah i mean. I mean considering that it's a wide right so you get that wide effect but the i just enjoy the shots from the live more than i do the main and a lot of the shots that i took those very dark outsize store. That's that's frustrating. It out the person who uses that you know it's going to distort the images. They take that they want us to. I'm sorry usa. The angle has the optical image civilization. Yeah yeah the wide has optical image stabilization to my understanding. The main does not at main absolutely does not and yeah so i got arenas on on really yellow. Yeah maybe maybe fact. Check that for me. While i walk through a few these eligible here but yeah i know for a fact. The main does not. I'm pretty pretty confident. The why does. But i could be wrong That shot that you were just looking at that. Was low light. Low light in the back yard near dr not quite dark and it was fine like lobe light performance on some of my shots were were fine. Nothing like screaming amazing. You know what i mean. you know again low light. I don't know. I feel like that could be better right by. I don't know This those two shots are interesting because one is the rear. This is the front facing and it shows you the differences in color balanced detection between the two cameras There's just i don't know like a time and time again as i'm kind of going through and taking pictures and comparing and everything it's like the images like i'm really curious to compare between the eight pro and the nine pro because i haven't actually done the side by sides yet for tomorrow's review. I'm doing that After the show actually. But i'm really interested to compare. Because like i'm kind of guessing guessing without comparing at this point that images are relatively similar between the two and if so then what is the hasselblad partnership actually mean

Matt Burks Donald Trump Hossa Hasselblad Maude VIC Motorola UAE USA
Supercomputing: An exascale-sized challenge?

Technology Untangled

04:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Supercomputing: An exascale-sized challenge?

"Terms of supercomputing and high performance computing or. Hp see are one and the same but you hear hp being used more moldy days. There's a growing cool for the democratisation of supercomputers which historically has been tricky because supercomputers weren't really created just to do any old bit of computing. His jacob bama hp and engineering research scientists from hewlett packard enterprise the for supercomputers were invented to solve a very specific problem a hydrodynamics problem for simulating nuclear weapons. So during world war two there were there. Were trying to develop these nuclear weapons they had to do. What's called a numerical simulation. It's essentially a fluid dynamic simulation and so they needed to run that problem numerically through a computer and that's kind of alan turing and john. Von layman come came up with the architecture in sort of the algorithm for running numerical methods on these systems supercomputers have come a long way in a relatively short amount of time thanks to innovation in materials experimental architectures industry pioneers like seymour cray and ever increasing processing speeds but for the most part until very recently these machines have been the domain of scientists the prospects of solving some of the really hard problems that have plagued humanity forever. That's like in our sights now like we could like feasibly solve problems like cancer and all these crazy permutations on corona virus. And and any of these like really scary viruses. That are gonna come out okay listeners. So this is one of those that starts normal and gets a little complicated. I'm going to get a little bit. But i i really wants to get to the bottom of these powerful machines and i wanted to understand what makes a sweeping meters so well super so i could up bill. Manel vice president and general manager of high performance computing hewlett packard and surprise. A super computer is a lot of processors memory and a high speed interconnect time together. Supercomputing provides the the hardware infrastructure if you will to do parallel computing. Parallel computing is important. Because typically in a problem you'd wanna break up the problem across multiple processors or or multiple servers or nodes typically. What you do is break up. The data that's called data partitioning where little chunks are putting in each server on each processor and then worked on independently and then at the end. You bring it all together. This parallel computing is kind of a big deal. It's what makes sense a numeric. Who problems i deal for. Cb computers on what makes them special or different to the the santa my desk. It's mostly because they're optimized around solving scientific and engineering problems in terms of how they can partition data. How they can manipulate the data. How they can keep a certain amount of data in memory at one time. So you're not always moving data back and forth to drive or to network for example. Okay key point. Here is all about data. Starting from those initial fluid dynamics simulation these big machines have been used for all kinds of modeling from whether to weapons alongside their partners. Intel bill and his team are in the process of deploying a supercomputer could aurora one of the world's first x. scale computers at the us department of energy. What's exco well to answer that. I need to know that supercomputer speed is measured in floating point operations per second aka flops which are basically just the number of calculations it can do a second exit scale computers computer. That's able to do at least a billion billion floating point calculations per second so there's no single chip in the world. That can do that. So you've gotta bring together a lot of chips into one system that allow you to accomplish that. It's basically tend to the eighteenth. In terms of number of floating point operations.

HP Von Layman Seymour Cray Hewlett Packard Manel Alan Turing John Cancer Us Department Of Energy Intel Aurora
Expect lower speed limits on Aurora and other state-owned streets in Seattle

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:27 sec | 3 weeks ago

Expect lower speed limits on Aurora and other state-owned streets in Seattle

"Speed limits on Aurora Avenue, North Lake City Way and other state owned streets that run through Seattle or being lowered by five MPH cruise begin installing 150 knew and in some cases larger signs along state roadway Sunday, bringing the highest speed that drivers are permitted to travel in the city down to 40 MPH. With the exception of I five I 90 and highway 99 inside the tunnel. According to the Seattle Times. New Sign it. John Aurora is expected by mid

North Lake City Seattle The Seattle Times John Aurora
‘Elijah McClain should still be here today’; Aurora Fire Rescue, Aurora police respond to independent review

Big Al and JoJo

00:32 sec | Last month

‘Elijah McClain should still be here today’; Aurora Fire Rescue, Aurora police respond to independent review

"Are reacting to the independent review of the death of 23 year old Elijah McLean at the hands of police in 2019. Outside. Investigators say Aurora police did not have a legal basis to stop. Alija McClain did not have the legal authority to frisk him or use a choke hold on him and that paramedics did not properly evaluate him before giving him a powerful sedative. Today. Police chief Vanessa Wilson reacted to the report. The bottom line is Elijah MacLean should still be here today, a state grand jury and the U. S. Justice Department are investigating the case as well. Laura

Elijah Mclean Aurora Police Alija Mcclain Vanessa Wilson Elijah Maclean U. S. Justice Department Laura
Police, EMTs criticized in death of Elijah McClain

Democracy Now! Audio

01:03 min | Last month

Police, EMTs criticized in death of Elijah McClain

"In colorado and independent investigation into the police killing of twenty three year. Old elijah mclean has found aurora. Police officers did not have the legal basis to stop mclean or apprehend assaults him. The report published monday says mcclain's encounter with the police was violent and relentless struggle and that the limited video and audio available from the incident quote. Reveal mr mclean surrounded by officers all larger than he crying out in pain apologizing explaining himself and pleading with the officers unquote mclean was stopped by three police officers on aug twenty fourth two thousand nineteen as he was walking home from picking up a nice tea for his brother at the local convenience store. He was tackled by. Police placed a chokehold and was then injected with ketamine by paramedics. He died on august thirtieth after days on life support.

Elijah Mclean Mclean Mr Mclean Mcclain Aurora Colorado Local Convenience Store
How to Leverage Amazon to Grow Your Business in 2021

The Small Business Radio Show

08:19 min | 2 months ago

How to Leverage Amazon to Grow Your Business in 2021

"During the pandemic the use of amazon sword but so has small business owners selling their products on amazon. Here talk about how they can help. Your small business is carry kucic. Who is the of small business empowerment amazon. The small business powered team is focused on driving. The success of amazon's small business partners and works with teams across amazon deliver programs. Investments that support their growth carries a graduate of the university of florida's levin college of law where she earned a juris doctorate degree shows holds in history of english from covenant. College carry welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me very so i could ask you. How did you end up being a lawyer from studying history and english extensive amounts of reading and writing. The really is i. You know when. I was In actually in high school had an opportunity to participate in a youth leadership program That included a track on the judicial system. And i just kinda got hooked on on everything that was involved in of course. Reading and writing is a big part to sorta leaned into those superpowers. I guess so. How did you pass from being a j. d. lead you to amazon and out small business owners. The phone question I do. I've today describe myself as a recovering lawyer. A my favorite time. Yes you know the thing that was fun for me about practicing law was you. You get to spend all day identifying issues in solving problems and so i really From day one enjoyed solving ambiguous problems. Where you had to figure out the root cause of whatever issue or opportunity was in front of you and then inventor way to the solution and so that took me from practicing law Up through a variety of roles on the business side where i've gotten to solve increasingly problems. focused on solving challenges For usually for others which leads to my my role today which is very good to spend all day everyday focused on helping solve issues challenges and make the world a better place for small businesses. I think a lot of people carry don't realize how many small businesses actually work through the amazon channel. Tell us about that So amazon in the us alone on amazon works with more than two million independent partners. They come in all shapes and sizes celena stores. They operate delivery service businesses. They use tools trim. Aws a build alexa skills. They published books with kindle direct publishing so amazon supporting small medium. Sized businesses is a fundamental part of our work there. It's a core part of what we do everyday. An extension of our customer centric culture. Our success depends on their success and our global head. Carrie i was gonna say in our in our store worldwide. We have over a million independent businesses selling in the account for over half of all products sold. And we've seen their sales continue to outpace our retail so we know that customers value them in this election they bring in an incredible way. The amazing statistic that over half of everything purchased on amazon is sold through independent third parties. Small medium sized businesses. That it's not really amazon. Really is the amazon marketplace right absolutely. Yeah the outlive sewing partners. The independent businesses bring those products role and bringing such a wonderful and diverse array of products across all categories. That customers enjoy now. Even i know most of us were surprised by covid. Nineteen who would know that once in every one hundred years right what happen last year but was my biggest surprise is that when ordered some from amazon. It couldn't get here in two days. I thought would never ever happen. Carry tell us about the challenges. They're really amazon. Face in the small business partners did during the height of the covid nineteen crisis absolutely right kobe. Nineteen created many challenges for small businesses. We you know despite it. We were encouraged to see that sense and through that time. Small companies have continued to grow with amazon. You know twenty twenty the number of us long medium sized businesses that surpassed one million dollars sales grew by more than twenty percents and more than thirty seven hundred surpassed him in sales for the first time. Which is just a really great business milestone for any prisoners owner. I'm those businesses have created an estimated one point one million jobs which is phenomenal. It's such an important part. Is you know what keeps our communities going and so we've seen as customers of increasingly shopping online on the past year. The businesses were using e commerce. House channel have continued to sustain grow. I'm in our commitment to supporting them. And adopting for the future has has never been more steadfast done a number of things both continuing work. We've been doing for years and new things. We did in twenty twenty to continue supporting them through that journey. And i think that's really the key role. The amazon plays a lot of companies have got into e commerce for the first time during covid nineteen and like all right. I'm gonna go set up a store. But they no incomes and i think that is really the key of getting involved in the amazon marketplace. Because you already have so many people looking for products right there absolutely One of my favorite stories. I think one of my favorite projects from twenty twenty was last year redesigned prime date support small businesses and we committed more than one hundred million dollars to help their growth over the shopping event through the holiday season and that included holding our biggest small business promotion. Yeah so during that promotion customers. Purchase dollars and products from participating. Small business selling on amazon. Ten dollars credit to spend on prime day. It's on a two week. Lead up to prime day. Small businesses included in that promotion generated more than nine hundred million dollars. In sales on prime day independent third party sellers had their two biggest as ever surpassing three and a half billion in sales which is nearly sixty percent year over year increase and even more growth than our retail business and then it also came with stories like the story of lia foods actually a seller based north aurora forty minutes outside of chicago and she makes african inspired spices but The fun part about her story. It demonstrates the power of selling on amazon and an event like prime day to find those new customers over to help those new customers find you. She shared that coming out of advent not only has she almost doubled her single day sales but her daily started trending upwards with all that new customer acquisition those stories. We really enjoy seeing so those who've never really men sold their price to amazon. What kind of rain moments are there. And what is it in a cost to market on amazon. Yes so our public schedule. So if you if any seller or someone considering becoming a feller looks online at those public public information fees range from eight to fifteen percent depending on product type and for business selling amazon. Really do that as a marketing cost because of the access to that three hundred million customers that it creates and then beyond the monthly in referral fees. everything's optional so sellers choose. What's right for their business. We offer as i mentioned a variety of services in programs than in its pick. What's right for you right so if you want to lean into advertising their options for you could choose what suits for your business if you want to move away from fulfilling your on products create more bandwidth for yourself to do other things there options to leverage by amazon into leverage the customer service support that comes without. So it's it's very much a choose your own adventure but each business owner can select the right fit for them and what fits their

Amazon Levin College Of Law University Of Florida Carrie Lia Foods North Aurora United States Chicago
Igniting Your Feminine Fire with Aurora Farber

Inspiration and Spiritual Awakening from Live. Love. Engage. with Gloria Grace Rand

05:45 min | 2 months ago

Igniting Your Feminine Fire with Aurora Farber

"And welcome to live love engage. I am grace rand and today. We're gonna be talking about abundance. we're going to be talking about femininity. And more specifically feminine fire intuition all sorts of wonderful things with my guest today on the program who is aurora farber. So first off. Welcome you to live. Love engage aurora. Thank you so much. I'm delighted to be here. Connect with you to connect with your audience and to live love and engage absolutely will. We are delighted to have you. And this woman is she is accomplished. She's got a lot going for. So let me just share a little bit with you or with yes. You are listening watching to see a little bit more about her. She is a transformational coach. Intuitive guide writer speaker sacred space ceremonial list way finder magical muse and modern day priestess and her mission is to help women get unstuck by reclaiming and igniting their feminine fire that heart light within that integrates life giving power compassionate love and intuitive wisdom and these three feminine flames are the key to creating a life of passion pleasure purpose on the journey feminine leadership which is so important all women we are leaders in our own right but sometimes i think we don't always express that enough or maybe own net Which is why aurora. Please that women are works of art and every woman is a sacred vessel capable of miraculous creation into activate that creators shockey fire. We need to come back home to ourselves to our inner fire to are feminine. Fire so Actually you know what i we were. We were talking before we started the recording That i was going to go one way. But i'm thinking let's let's deal with the feminine fire right now and what Maybe a little bit. Explain a little bit up more out about that. And why women why it is so important really for women to reclaim and ignited. Yes i'd love you. I really loved your introduction and remembering those words that came through me that women are works of art. And if you think about a work of art vessel right piece of pottery. There needs to be that fire that place of animation where we come alive and so women are not only works of art but we have the ability to create we can create life. That is our shock d fire. that is It's our superpower for thousands of years women who rose into that knowing who shared their gifts their medicine gifts their inner wisdom their in tuition their ways of working the earth and with The body those things have been cut off for many women in its pass down through the lineage and so this and fire is nothing new but it is something that we are here to reignite and for me i love you know there's as i work with thirteen divine feminine archetypes in there. Two that come to me when i feel into. What does this mean to me. Well there's that creative shocked the fire of like the wild woman of the primal goddess dancing around the fire that howling to the moon that kind of fire right that that birt's life and creativity and as passionate and full of energy and then there's another fire and it's the fire of the goddess of compassion. That's the triple flame. That lives in the heart. it's the purple fire zip for me that is composed of these three flames power love and was dumb. And that's the fire. That is my mission to bring back to this world to reignite power love and wisdom well this wisdom we've had inside of us but many of a separate gotten or it's been stripped away in told that it's not valid of that. We were crazy or that we were all lunatics right so having inner knowing This love we are capable of sharing but for many women that that aspect of self love that flaine first needs to be ignited and then power. Well certainly we live in a different age and that is one of the beautiful things about the time now. We do have more power but the models of power that we have all the masculine models and so we've kind of come into our own. Feminism with like okay. Well i've got to put on my pant suit and you know just trying to follow the model of power that we've seen and yet these typical structures of the patriarchy especially this year this year during covid see structures are crumbling and we are beginning to see how they don't serve at least they don't serve all of us they may serve some of us but not all of us and so when you add that aspect of combining power with love like how can i add to the flame of love where i can use my power to serve all of us answer the guidance

Grace Rand Aurora Farber Aurora Shockey Birt
Modern Oracles and Astrology

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

05:03 min | 2 months ago

Modern Oracles and Astrology

"Welcome to kids myths and mystery signer host. Kit chrome with this podcast. I begin a month long examination of modern oracle's and their methods of divination last friday. I mentioned how not all forms of designation demand a psychic or even a sensitive one. Such form of discrimination astrology as common popular astrology is today is complex but as mentioned does not rely on the reader having psychic abilities instead relies heavily on planets and stars. Initially you might scoff at the idea of pulling any kind of prophecy from the heavenly bodies. But let's take a look at the history of astrology. Mayan astrology is a variation of mesoamerican astrology. One of the most forward thinking kinds of astrology of times. Mayan calendar's comprised of twenty day signs and thirteen galactic numbers. Making two hundred sixty day. Calendar year the mayan study of the moon planets milky way son was some of the most accurate pre telescope astronomy in the world. Mayan astrology goes back to around the fifth century bc. Then we have england stonehenge. Gerald hawkins work on stonehenge was first published in nature magazine in nineteen sixty three following analysis. He had carried out using a harvard. Smithsonian ibm computer. Hawkins found. Not one or two alignments but dozens. He had studied one hundred. Sixty five significant features at the monument and use the computer to check every alignment between them against every rising and setting point for the sun moon planets and bright stars the position say would have been in in fifteen hundred bc so has astrology around for a while no doubt but let's go back to present to find out how astrology works. Here's a simple answer. Astrology works on many levels at the simplest level. It is not unlike a complex clock the uses the motions of the planets in a similar way to the movement to the hands on the face of a clock. Now let's dig a little deeper. Astrology is the belief that the alignment of stars and planets affects every individual mu personality and environment depending on when he or she was born. Astrologers print horoscopes and newspapers that are personalized by birthday. These horoscopes make predictions in people's personal. Lives describe their personalities and give them advice. All according to the position of astronomical bodies a survey conducted by the national science foundation found that forty one percent of respondents to their poll. Believe that astrology is very scientific. This begs the question astronomical bodies affect our lives. Solar flares cost electro magnetic disturbances on earth. That can disrupt satellites and even caused blackouts. The position of the moon costs us ocean tides. If you're a fisherman that position of the moon can have a significant effect on your livelihood. The solar wind causes beautiful aurora and sunlight itself is the main source of energy for our planet. Still the question. How is strategy as a tool of divination astrology uses a set of rules about the relative positions and movements of heavenly bodies to generate predictions and explanations for events on earth and human personality traits. Some used astrology to generate very specific expectations. It could be verified against outcomes. What does science have to say about astrology. Simply that it's not scientific yet. Hundreds of thousands of people have been influenced by designation nation provided by astrologers millions across america. No there astra logical sign and read their horoscope in the newspaper. Daily get this j pierpoint morgan. One of the world's greatest fight answers was suspicious of accepting planetary advice but ended up applying astrology to all of his personal affairs. John adams famous second president of the united states refused to sign the declaration of independence until the exact moment planetary indications were most auspicious. And this will really get ya jay. Jacob stout jeff pierpoint morgan and seymour cromwell comprised a bracket of three successive presidents of the new york stock exchange who utilized astronaut. Advice implanted their operations. They scoffed at this. However upon the arrival of the wall street crash these men had been warned by their astrologers and thus averted disaster disci- support astrology is a form of give nation. No has astrology affected millions of individuals over the centuries the answer is a resounding yes

Gerald Hawkins Oracle Hawkins Harvard IBM England National Science Foundation Pierpoint Morgan Astra Jacob Stout Jeff Pierpoint Mor United States Seymour Cromwell John Adams JAY New York
Wisconsin pharmacist charged in attempt to ruin COVID-19 vaccine

Wisconsin's Afternoon News with John Mercure

00:22 sec | 2 months ago

Wisconsin pharmacist charged in attempt to ruin COVID-19 vaccine

"Former Aurora pharmacist accused of tampering with covert 19 vaccines is being formally charged this afternoon. Stephen Brandenburg of graft and is charged with attempted criminal damage to property. It's a misdemeanor. He's free on a $10,000 signature bond expected in court this afternoon. Brandenburg admitted to intentionally removing over 50 vials of the vaccine from refrigeration,

Stephen Brandenburg Aurora Brandenburg
Court rules blocks Seattle's efforts to create supervised heroin injection sites

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

01:26 min | 3 months ago

Court rules blocks Seattle's efforts to create supervised heroin injection sites

"Injection site for heroin users in Seattle suffers a setback because of an appeals court ruling in Philly King County Public Health greenlighted supervised injection sites three years ago, but an effort to find a fixed location like the ones of British Columbia failed. An effort to create mobile sites. Stalled plan now is not Tonto. Build standalone facilities instead, go with the drug users already go for help, like the Aurora Commons and let injections happen there under the supervision of a nurse. But Wednesday, the third Circuit Court of Appeals denied a Philadelphia nonprofits push to open up a fixed site. Thereby Seattle's plans are up in the air again. This is another wrinkle that we're gonna have to deal with the Justice Department, agreeing with the court's ruling injection sites violate the Federal Controlled Substances Act. That prohibits any person from knowingly and intentionally maintaining a place for the purpose of illegal drug use. The acting attorney general, saying injection sites are not the solution. But the court didn't go that far, saying Congress needs to change the federal drug laws for the sights to be legal. Seattle's city attorney responding as city struggled to respond to overdoses wrought by the opioid epidemic. The ruling is a disappointing one. But soon we'll have a Democratic president and a Democratic Congress, which could breathe new life into legalizing these sites. It violates federal law that was U. S attorney for Western Washington and Trump nominee Brian Moran two years ago, telling me he would stop any site in Seattle from opening Almost Matt

Philly King County Aurora Commons Seattle British Columbia Circuit Court Of Appeals Justice Department Philadelphia Congress Western Washington Brian Moran Donald Trump Matt
Colorado grand jury will investigate death of Elijah McClain

Broncos Country Tonight

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

Colorado grand jury will investigate death of Elijah McClain

"To move forward in the transition. And Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser says he's decided to open a grand jury investigation into the death of 23 year old Elijah McLean. The move gives the attorney general the ability to compel testimony and require production of documents and other relevant information. The claim died from cardiac arrest. After being stopped by Aurora police in August 2019. He was on his way home from a convenience store. He was reportedly restrained with a choke hold and paramedics sedated him with a large dose

Attorney General Phil Weiser Elijah Mclean Colorado Aurora Police Cardiac Arrest
Pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

America's First News

01:26 min | 3 months ago

Pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

"Pharmacist, meanwhile, convinced the world was crashing down, told police he tried to ruin hundreds of doses of Corona virus vaccine because he thought the shots would mutate People's DNAs to That, according to court documents released Monday, a detective riding in a probable cause statement that does Stephen Brandenburg is an admitted that conspiracy theorist. He appeared in court Monday. Law enforcement was alerted to this on December 30th by or hospital. Detect this. Other one really discussed this with one of their investigators who Ford them an email from the defendant where He gave a statement that he'd removed these miles from refrigeration. He done so in two occasions is intent on doing so was to render them inert because he'd formed this belief that they were unsafe. But the Arnie Method of creating these medications rendered them unsafe. Mr Brandenburg in order you released on a $10,000 signature bond. While you're subject to the terms and conditions of bail set by this court, you are not to, uh, work or be employed in any health care related function, including serving as a pharmacist. Also not to have any contact with Aurora. Or any of your Aurora co workers. Misinformation around the vaccines has surged online with false claims circulating on everything from ingredients toe possible side effects.

Stephen Brandenburg Mr Brandenburg Ford Aurora
Prosecutor: Wisconsin pharmacist thought vaccine was unsafe

90.3 KAZU Programming

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Prosecutor: Wisconsin pharmacist thought vaccine was unsafe

"Prosecutors has AH hospital pharmacist accused of destroying about 500 doses of a covert 19 vaccine, says the pharmacist. Thanks the vaccine is unsafe. Current block of member station W. U. W M reports on a court hearing held today. Police say Steven Brandenburg twice deliberately left 57 vials of the modern, A brand vaccine outside required refrigeration. At the Aurora Medical Center in Grafton, Wisconsin. Ozaki County district attorney Adam Garrel told an arraignment hearing that Brandenburg wanted the vaccine rendered inert. Because he performed this belief that they were unsafe, but they are any method of creating these medications were under them unsafe. Carol says there's probable cause to move ahead with a charge of attempted criminal damage to property. But he says the vials have to be tested before he can say the vaccine was destroyed or reduced in efficacy.

Steven Brandenburg Aurora Medical Center Ozaki County Adam Garrel Grafton Brandenburg Wisconsin Carol
Wisconsin pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

Wisconsin's Afternoon News with John Mercure

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Wisconsin pharmacist allegedly had false belief vaccine would change DNA

"About the motive behind a graft in pharmacist accused of ruining doses. Of Corona virus vaccine. Prosecutors say the pharmacist admitted to trying to destroy hundreds of doses of vaccine by leaving them out on refrigerated because he felt the medicine wasn't safe. The Journal Sentinel says the pharmacist has now been released from jail. However, this after prosecutor indicated he's not positive the vaccine was actually destroyed. Wrapped in police arrested the advocate Aurora health pharmacist last week following an investigation into the 57 spoiled vials of the more they're in a vaccine. He has yet to be formally charged. Eric

The Journal Sentinel Aurora Eric
Police investigate deliberate spoiling of 500 vaccine doses in Wisconsin

The Daily Beans

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Police investigate deliberate spoiling of 500 vaccine doses in Wisconsin

"There's an employee at a hospital outside. Milwaukee who deliberately spoiled more than five hundred doses of corona virus vaccine by removing fifty seven vials from a pharmacy refrigerator. This is according to hospital officials who announced this wednesday and local police said they are investigating the incident with the help of the fbi. Initiating the internal review on monday hospital officials said they were initially led to believe. The incident was caused by inadvertent error. The vials were removed. Friday and most were discarded on saturday with only a few still safe to administer a aurora medical center in grafton wisconsin Each file has enough for ten vaccinations but can sit at room temperature for only twelve hours two days later. The employees acknowledged having intentionally removed the vaccine refrigeration. That's to a statement that they made late wednesday. The employees motive is still unclear.

Milwaukee Aurora Medical Center FBI Grafton Wisconsin
West Lawn shooting: Person killed on Kilbourn, Chicago

John Williams

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

West Lawn shooting: Person killed on Kilbourn, Chicago

"Busy New Year's Eve for police. One man was killed, another wounded in a shooting Thursday night and West suburban Aurora. Police say the shooting happened at about 9 P.m. on the Farnsworth Avenue Bridge between Dearborn Avenue and Mountain Avenue. Two men suffered gunshot wounds. They were transported to a local hospital and rode to the 1300 lack of Dearborn Avenue before coming to a stop. Officers found them in a large group. Apparently both glamour transported to the hospital. One man pronounced dead at the hospital. No. One in custody in that case. And a police say a man was fatally shot Thursday night and West Line on the Southwest side and the skaters say at about 7 P.m.. The man was on the sidewalk and the 60 100 block of South Kilbourn when he was shot in the head and chest. He was pronounced dead at the scene area. One detectives are

Aurora West Line South Kilbourn
Wisconsin hospital worker arrested for spoiled vaccine doses

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

Wisconsin hospital worker arrested for spoiled vaccine doses

"A hospital worker in Wisconsin has been arrested accused of spoiling doses of the coronavirus vaccine the pharmacist is accused of removing hundreds of doses from refrigeration we became increasingly suspicious of the behavior of the individual in question Dr Jeff Barr at Aurora health care medical group says the pharmacist has been fired we're really not able to make any judgments on motive at this time that's something that I'm sure will be looked at by the authorities that are now handling the investigation demo during a vaccine is viable for twelve hours outside refrigeration workers used a vaccine to inoculate fifty seven people before discarding the rest Madura has clarified will be no harm or negative effect from having received the vaccines that were rendered ineffective people receive the spoiled doses are being closely monitored I'm a Donahue

Dr Jeff Barr Aurora Health Care Medical Gro Wisconsin
Employee intentionally removed COVID-19 vaccine from fridge, ruining more than 500 doses; FBI investigating

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Employee intentionally removed COVID-19 vaccine from fridge, ruining more than 500 doses; FBI investigating

"Investigating. That's after a Wisconsin hospital employee was accused of removing more than 50 vials of the modern, A covert 19 vaccine from refrigeration 500 doses. Thrown out. As a result. Dr. Jeff Barker is president of the Aurora health Care of Medical Group. He says the facility first believed it was inadvertent human error before becoming suspicious. The individual was suspended and after multiple interviews over the course of the week admitted yesterday to intentionally removing the vaccine from refrigeration. And Dr Bear says. In spite of all this, the facilities vaccination plan does remain on schedule.

Dr. Jeff Barker Aurora Health Care Of Medical Wisconsin Dr Bear
"aurora" Discussed on Profitable Passions

Profitable Passions

05:38 min | 5 months ago

"aurora" Discussed on Profitable Passions

"I'm Tammy Bragg and thank you for joining us on the profitable passions podcast. You'll hear real stories from real women exploring their passions and turning them into profits their share how they've got started off what they do how they do it and who they work with and they'll share some great insights that you can use to get started in your own business that you'll love. I know it's hard to figure out what you want to do and who you want to serve and as women it's hard to look at ourselves and say we're good at this or that and we totally under value are worth our skills and our talents in a lot of times we're just afraid to get started but we're divorced enemies. It's time to break those chains and get out there and just do it and if you need a boost of confidence a quick tip or amazing advice you come to the right place now, but let's find out how we can help you create your profitable passions business. I'm here with Aurora Gregory. She is a speaker pitch Mentor is she teaches speakers to create irresistible pitches that land stages off to marketing that matters as an eighth grader. Aurora was a finalist in a speech contest. She didn't win that that just might have been the start of her career as a communicator. She's the co-author of the book get picked tips tricks and tools for creating the irresistible speaker proposal Global Brands work with Aurora to get their message, right and create communication programs that connect with customers and develop marketing strategies that work. She has years of experience leading speaker Bureau programs and placed hundreds of speakers at local National and international conferences Aurora also coaches speakers on every aspect of the speaker life from topic development to presentation delivery when she's not dead. You'll likely find her hiking in the Foothills in her hometown or on the sofa watching Classic Movies. How are you today? I'm good Tammy. How are you? I'm good. So you you've got quite a resume here with with speech writing a book and and mentoring your client. I just I think that's really great. I was telling you before we started recording I get a little bit nervous about you know my speaking so so natural and so normal I get it too. So I'm very sympathetic to anybody else who struggles with it, but it's usually comes natural to you cuz you've started out at a pretty young age speaking you want to tell us a little bit about your story and how you kind of got into this and how it's evolved over the years. Absolutely. Well, I was always one of those things that you know, probably would have been described as a chatty Kathy always a very talkative girl, but when I was in the eighth grade, I was a I was a finalist in a speech contest that was happening in my community wage. And while I didn't win the contest, I think that was the moment that experience that taught me one the power of public speaking and how important it is to develop it. There was a certainly a lot of energy and interest in what I had to say and I learned the power of of telling a story. Well the speech that I used for my for that college just was about a man that that was the husband of a family friend and how we could learn things from the way that he lived his life. And so that experience I think really dead empty be of the resistance of public speaking not necessarily the fear because I actually remember the night of the finals. I was actually very nervous, but it but let me know that this is something that one I could do and that I could push forward. So as I went through my high school years and college and was always pretty comfortable getting up and talking about something as long as I was well prepared. And it also I think LED naturally to me, you know falling into a career around marketing and marketing Communications and you know, anything related to doing anything related to Talking Tom is going to be right up my alley. That's great and and you've helped a lot of of your marketing clients apparently over the years. Yes, and it's it's been it's really a wonderful thing to do. So, I've had a couple of different seasons of my career right out of college. I had a I worked for a public relations agency and then I had a corporate life where I worked in a 4 a.m. Had a corporate job and always doing communicating always helping what we call subject matter experts prepare for opportunities for them to present whether it was inside the organization maybe giving a big presentation to a senior leadership team or helping someone get ready for a media interview this season of my career. That's I guess lasted the log. Has been one where I've been I guess what we'd call an independent professional and I went out on my own and became a consultant and taking all of my skills and all of the things that I love to do the things I'm passionate about and bundling them together and offering them to clients. So for the last gosh twenty years. I have been in and out of helping Executives get ready for speaking engagements and in particular helping them pitch themselves as speakers to conferences events any place where there's an audience that they want to reach and perhaps convert into a customers or clients and it's worked that I love I love being able to help people feel confident and prepared when they go into a speaking opportunity.

Google Tammy Rome
"aurora" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

03:11 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"An OBGYN doctor at Aurora ladies thank you so much for sticking around with us have a person contracts covert nineteen and survives are they immune from giving it a second time not necessarily so what we do know is that people have been tested positive for weeks and months after having been positive for the first time and the question is whether that teaches virus that they're carrying verses they're getting it again and it's not expected that people are going to have long lived immunity from this like we don't have long lived immunity against other human coronaviruses were taking your tax at a five five six one six one six twenty years one that says I think my family and I have already had to cope with nineteen is it possible that I can have that check to find out if you're a symptomatic right now the answer is no because we don't have enough cash to do the nasal swab to look for it and we do not have an antibody test yet that would look to see if you've been exposed before but the hope is we'll have that in the near future Dr Graham do we know how long the virus can survive on surfaces a person might touch it buries per service it was the New England journal paper that came out and potentially talked about the difference between our paper versus cardboard versus plastic etcetera but what we should assume instead on any type of service that the prickly touched by multiple people it's best to clean it off before you touch it so I got a question from a colleague that asked about groceries when we get our groceries should we wipe them down when we get home is that would you would recommend on I don't believe in that I wouldn't go that far although some people do do it I think the CDC said rather than using chemical cluster just rinse them off with soap and water so that you don't get leaching into the product I guess that makes sense Dr winter let me ask you this question that you know it made headlines when New York City initially said no one would be allowed in the room with mothers during childbirth they sense reverse that very early on the reverse it how important is it for mother's death support when they're in the room during labor in addition to have all and having all the medical support that they need I think it's very important as we know labor and and birth normal national processing but they do take time and I think having someone there really helps women feel more comfortable in labor on their lot of unexpected portion to the process and things that can come up that one didn't anticipate and it's very important to have someone there during labor are there specific things Dr winter that moms and moms to be should be doing to stay safe yes they should be doing all the things that we're recommending for the general population hand washing is very very important good hand washing with soap and water for the twenty seconds in addition the social distancing is very important to help decrease the risk of contracting the Colbert nineteen we are talking during our W. T. M. J. cares a special town hall with Dr Mary Beth Graham an infectious disease doctor and doctor.

Aurora
"aurora" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"Have a British guy? They're GONNA it'll just make more sense than surly race and you had also being full speed. And if that's the fastest car you've ever driven being full speed at night in the asses with a light bar that's coming in and out freaking terrified now. If I went back I'd be like this car is super slow. Those have the the distance they throw. Light varies from here. But from here it's depends on you by hurdle was like crawling in front of you. You could see his rash in front of you. I was driving this old shitty thirty in this twenty four hour race and they put on these terrible Chinese whatever. The lights have ordered. It was so bad that went faster. Car would come up on me from behind. My car would cast its own shadow forward into lights a super super fund. So I know exactly what you're talking. I'm really upset really bad. Listen I had to get out of here because we just to two hours to. You've done a good show. Well thank you guys. Everybody go follow everyone. Who is listening to me rambling on and on about my fucking been there. You're young and you've been there on Shit and you're going to keep doing it gentlemen. Thank you for coming and that is our show this Mokhtar. Podcast is powered by shout. Engine get your own. Damn podcast at shout. Engine Dot Com. It's easy all you need is a microphone connection to the Internet and ideally something to say. See we'll be back on Thursday for the live folks with I think the entire band. Chevelle is coming into the studio so that she'll be interesting band named after a car. What could possibly go wrong see?.

"aurora" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

12:11 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"Twenty five hours with underhill with flying lizard the flying Lizard guys are defying the flying Lizard. Guys are it was. It was a good program The woman who was running it is named Aaron Vocal. She's like like two months ago. No now two years ago So I ran that car Again it was a good program good team so I think I got like actually a property of what it's supposed to feel like a good team seriatim And then I've run a McLaren because assured meal Those aren't bad. They aren't bad either. Yeah Been Really Lucky. I've also run one of the older Porsche Cayman so they came out with all sorts of new Leandro. Who's probably twenty beginning of two thousand eighteen? I think the Ah Now in this game four with Turner. That's that's the car is driving. Yeah Turner is a real good team too. I mean they've got a lot of a lot of wins and they've got always a competitive car and it's good i. I think I've been really. I've learned over the span of a couple years. How important it is to have like a good report with your team. People have this misconception. That racing is an individual sport. But you are like your job is to drive the car at. It's limit that other people have given you and you need to have the relationships with the people who are making sure that your car is good right. Not just for self serving reasons. Why because it's kind of weird to establish a dynamic of like. I don't know how to describe it. I guess like employee employer like the gentleman drivers racing. Where you just kind of fly in and then drive is looked at from. The outside is like an individual sport. But it's really a huge team effort from everyone who sets the car develop. The car thinks about how they can problem solve in the conditions. Change the track changes all that tiny stuff and then if driver can't go out and deliver what the engineers think that they should be able to deliver like then. It's almost the team you're being. You're leading the team to like the pitcher leading the team down because caught the ball hit the ball. Did everything else they can. Yeah absolutely well and it's also a community in a way that people wouldn't I think really expect for example. Jim Bell and Darren from From Flying Lizard so I ran one race with them. Who's a twenty five hour race has kind of intense? You a little bit but it was still. It was one single race an every single time. I see those guys at the racetrack. They're like Oh my God and they give me a huge hug. They asked me how I'm doing I ask them how they're doing. I get super excited when the flying Lizard Guy Succeed because I know everyone on their crew and I know Jim I know Darren. I'm like those guys totally deserve it and you will find that. I mean that's much more common than people would expect it to be like even when I'm not waiting like yeah but like you know those flying lizard guys like they really deserved it so I think you know doesn't staying less right but I do think that there's a lot of actual wholehearted support that people would not anticipate across competitors. Everyone knows how hard it is. I think you know if you've been there for more than five minutes like this is a hard thing that we're all trying to do. Yeah and you appreciate like when you watch them someone. When you're like a lot of money and time and intelligence and money and money put into that program but it's hard to raise money and it's hard to use it effectively on. It's hard to like. Make sure that you're in the right place at the right time. Any strategy move at any point can make or break you like. It's Racing has ninety nine percent lows right so when you watch the one exceed the amount of effort that has been put into that on the back. End is like inspiring. I think that's Probably a pretty good place to call it. That's very nice. So do everything from the people get into what we do feel. We go to the people That was I was I was just thinking because you're talking about a team by the way I just finished season two of drive to survive the Formula. One thing on Fox and at the end of the of the The last episode. I'm not going to give it away. But Lewis Hamilton wins the championship in Two Thousand. Nineteen case guys spoiler spoiler But there's a group picture. Oh yeah there's a group picture of the Mercedes team it's a fucking thousand people. It's a thousand people. They're implementing budget. They're they're implementing a budget cap in Faa Antoni Twenty. One is actually talking to my boyfriend. Brought this last night. Like how do we? We were debating the pros and cons of pretty much incentivizing teams to like fire people when it's such a closely knit community and if you're trying to balance the competitive aspect of like the Haas team right which has just say like two hundred. Is You versus Ferrari. Which could have at any given point like sixteen hundred? A lot of people are gonNA lose their jobs and is really an alternative. I don't I mean well I think they just WanNa they wanna have closer racing and I think they're trying to do and they need to because it's fucking boring to watch and and there is the gap seems to be growing between the rich the haves and the have not teams on You. See that in across every different type of racing right. I think that I mean the budgets in cheer saying in sports car racing have totally skyrocketed as well like the cost of running at Gd four-car in terms of the amount of sponsorship money after his every year is what it used to be to run. Gt Three car in like a full weather tech championship accountable years ago. Do you think that's just because people are raising their prices or is there some other driving force from technological standpoint the amount of development you need to put in just to make your car competitive from a social standpoint like shutting out in order to cut the car while well and part of what? The goal of four racing was was to decrease that right from a technological sample it was to decrease thought incentive to spend more money on development like a lot of eighty percent of the parts on the virtually for our stock the four and it's still a proper race car like there are a lot of different sub components. You can change But the amount that you can put on the car. Ten depend less on the manufacturer and more in this series so for example you can have tire sensors and SRO right now. I'm not sure I don't think you can in himself So there are all sorts of really weird restrictions telemetry you can't have telemetry and GD foreign himself. That's an attempt to cut down on the budget. but tree is hugely important when it comes to strategy calls in what weathertech right in the series about you allowed to use. Salima tree during testing and not racing or not at August. How would they even know? I don't know if they would theoretically know that I mean I think even I would also say that the quality of drivers and kind of hedging my phrasing here a little bit. I think that the the quantity of entrance because has gone more expensive has gone down as a direct result. The quality of driver like the average driver that you would find an institute for right now is absurdly high. And that's true across most kind of pro racing series in the prices so high it was high and you know at this point for example. Gsi MCI if you're like one second off one to two seconds off your back of the pack like you are not competitive at all and that's really telling because a few years ago again as you know there were like sixty s e cars street tuner for anyway. So it's called the category was called street. Tuner it was closer to stock cars. There is basically no technological regulation on it like you could theoretically developed cars as much as you want within the borders of those boundaries But the cost of the various entry was much lower. Like you could get on a budget team for much smaller round and the difference in driving ability was also huge guys at the front. Were like proper seasoned pros like Bill Berlin and the guys in the back where gentleman drivers hewer than funding pro racers so the the racing industry has gotten closer to the classic third-party Sponsorship Model. And I know we're seeing fewer and fewer gentleman drivers in the teams. And if you're going well if it's going to cost me three million dollars a year to run this team put to pros in there because fuck it. Yeah I think it also depends on They're significantly more like factory. Like properly battery backed programs and a lot of the drivers that have managed to stick it out in terms of like. They're bringing their personal funding to the table. Have just been racing for so long. They're actually extremely good like a gentleman driver. Boris said started out as a as just the gentleman driver and he's a beast. Yeah a lot of the guys I mean the people in MC whoever their own budget tend to be very quick still. And I'll end the people who bring their in recent budget who try it for a couple of races who are back the PAC ten to drop pretty quickly because it's really demoralizing. Money can buy a lot of practice. I mean racing is one of those things where you need ability but but you can. You can learn your way into the pack. Maybe not on the podium. You can and I think the barrier to like the gentleman driver in the back of the pack animals is time not money right and knots what Sarah tried to last year when they split up. You know they had the different. Gt four categories. So they had like pro-am would they basically tried to do was create a separate class for gentleman drivers who don't all the time in the world to like constantly test and develop themselves as a driver and the team and the car but still have the budget to spend? WanNa do this And there was a lot of controversy about like. Is this necessarily the right decision? Because racing's racing like don't you just want overall winners because that's what we should be doing? They're like Oh unite. People I understand I guess I understand. The argument is like a driver right. Like when I go out that would be. I guess the equivalent of me saying I want to be the fastest girl that means nothing. I don't care about being the fastest girl if I'm second and then there's a girl that's faster than me. I'm still second quickest. I'm also mad about with the amateur class thing like it if you are paying your own way into this industry if you're running in a pro racing series on a basic level despite what a lot of the pros complain about you two need to pass certain benchmarks in order to be able to compete. You can't walk onto someone who has literally never been in a race car and go into semi pro pro am style racing and if you pass the benchmark the benchmark to go out there and compete and you win in the amateur category in what is considered a pro racing series. That's pulling a lot of extra money into the sport and it's generating enthusiasm from people who could bring money into the sport who are like. This is really fun like. I'm on the podium spraying champagne and it's really easy if you are raising that money or if you have like a personal sponsor as a pro driver to be like well we don't care about this guys. They actually matter pretty significant about. I figured they were probably more important than most would let on. Yeah the guy or woman dot. Could you funded the whole team you pay for you? Pay Everybody's salary. Yeah Shit Right. You're the reason that people have jobs and the and those guys are frequently. Pavillon is but it's also like there. There's a source of a lot of the passion of the racing industry and also what really is a pro driver right like if you're racing in a pro series Like for example. What's that Kid's name and Formula? One that everyone always shits on ghastly kid Okay we either way. There's this there's this kid in formula raking can you also know. He's also giving pays his own the team. That not saying Now Carlos is either way Leclerc. No who I'm roasted on twitter later for the sorry. I'm a pro driver is the son of the telecom person but long story short right like he is..

Turner Darren Porsche Cayman underhill Aaron Vocal McLaren Faa Antoni Twenty Leandro Ferrari twitter Kid Lewis Hamilton Haas Fox Jim Bell PAC Jim I
"aurora" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

13:04 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"Which is the correct pronunciation will says fuck all that we're gonNA make a watch. That specifically for these athletic activities and their Duh oop. They're very cool. This is not a beautiful piece and analysis watch but they're also some of the kind of people have been my life. How did you hook that up? That hustler hooked up linked him. Got here really. You looked up with a company. That sells six-figure watches to sponsor your race car and Lincoln. I mean it's got lucky that they responded. I also think I happen to be reaching out to them at a point like from an authenticity standpoint. Right I actually do think that our brands align super well One of my favorite racing moments is so after I had signed a one year sponsorship so they don't What they tend to do which is again really telling about them as a company as a brand they sign a lot of multi deals and I had done a one year deal with them in two thousand eighteen I was still kind of getting to know the brand and I had dinner in New York City with the woman who runs communications for the US. Who was my main contact and Rashard And it's my first time meeting him and I kind of didn't know what to expect about a guy who is that successful. You know what I mean. And he asked me what he could do to advance the placement of women. You know women's place in the automotive industry and he was saying he was considering well. No it he. I mean he was a genuine question like you could tell he was actually wondering what I thought about it. And he said he was considering among many things. Implementing a role with Bisquick. You need to have a minimum of one woman on professional race teams. And I was like no. Don't do that. Why why would you not do that? Wouldn't that be a good thing? You have increased representation like you need to actually walk the walk when it comes to things like that. I said I agree. But you're going to end up with a lot of really underqualified. Pr managers like you. Can't you can't put teams in a situation where they feel like they're being forced to hire someone because they're going to hire people who should actually be there and then he was like okay so give me an alternative names like you need to run programs that create sustainable lottery systems for women within the industry that integrate into programs in a very authentic way like you can never force someone to hire a woman but if you actually run good sit right like if you place already qualified women in positions of success which there are a lot of very budget programs in the racing world that do not set people up for success from a driver's standpoint like women in places where they can succeed and they will and that's the test and when people see that the WanNa hire them and then those women actors role models organically for the next generation of girls who are looking at getting involved in this industry and I like it but the fact that he took my advice right like he's he's sponsoring me right now. He's running a racing team with an MP two in Europe with Cat Katherine Legge. Who's a good friend? She's awesome took that she's running that program. She's super quick and we had a conversation a few months ago About the kind of team choice and you know the program. They're running and they're not script like a lot of programs particularly female run programs. A female oriented programs are huge budget programs. Because they're marketing expenses. They're not proper motor sports. There was just a full was it. I'm sorry yeah. It was the story about like the the falling apart. Basically of the all female was it. I'm sorry was it. Nascar was the all-female team. It's like a lot of my good friends and I think It's really hard and scenarios like that because as a woman you're being given this opportunity to race and as a racecar driver not a woman you just WanNa go racing. So someone's giving you a car in the program and you're going to do it but at the same time it's really. I wouldn't blame any single driver for not being super selective in the programs that they're choosing because you need to go where the programs are and where the opportunities are but those opportunities a lot of times women existence spaces that are not actually well funded and aren't going to be competitive and it sets you up for the like for for reestablishing the tropes of like oh well. It's an all female team like. Do they wear their receipts while they're making searches right So I think the fact that he like listen to me from years ago and is he's running with a super competitive team. The guys at Cigna Tucker Amazing He has three competitive girls in the program Besides you So Tatiana Calderon and Sifarash. What are they about so Tatyana is a test driver for formula? One She is Zach. Was getting some Some imagery for US rush is I know less about her. I think she's a formula three driver. Alpha male Formula One team Interesting to see what they would they come up. I think the biggest thing for me. I think like drivers aside the fact that he is putting the budget forward to have them run with a quality team. Means the world to me like as someone who is a partner of the brand that has single-handedly my loyalty right along with other things along with the fact that they're a good brand along with the fact that like I think they Culturally are a good fit for me like they. Aren't you know they could be full of awesome? It's it's a controversial watch in a lot of ways because especially the the men's watches much more so than that one or big and in some cases quite garish looking controversial of their watch fairly mellow by their standards and and quite restrained. And you could even say tasteful. But they're you know the BUBBA Watson the big giant White One. I know I think they're cool. I really do and I if I had the cash I would rock one. Maybe you can hook me up on this kind of background. But you know some people think they're just like flashed for flashes sake but there's some real technological achievement in those absolutely. I mean I think that again the other thing that has sold me on them. I wasn't a huge watch aficionado before I started working with these guys. I started working with them because I had seen the watch on other drivers right because they sponsor a lot of Rubens Barrichello UNBELIEV. Does he not Rubin who Allerton Fernando Alonzo. Alain Prost has a cycling theme on. Yeah there's There's been sponsor they've expanded into a lot of different types of athletic groups which is really cool under sponsoring a lot of young female athletes. Which again bad ass rate. What do you know the reference number of your watch our am no? Oh you are not a good ambassador. That's the there's the Alain Prost one pull that up. The Alain Prost One's really funky because it has some type of cycling dominator in it to track distance. And I don't know how it works honestly and it's It's curve for how he wears his wrist while holding a bicycle. Handlebar Bent Up. Yeah I think appreciate swatches. Technologically dot is incredibly time consuming. It's burble someone who wears on every day But the amount of effort that goes into creating a watch that has a curved barrel like that or watch with no dominant complication. I mean there's real kind of craziness going especially Nidal roughly on the doll. The tennis player watches some points. Can you look up the weight of the Rafael Doll? Richard Richard Neal imply but they don one is meant for playing tennis. Which is one of the things. You're literally the the motion of swing a tennis. Racket or golf. Club is one of the things you're like never supposed to do in a in a in a watch and again that was one of their. That was one of their first partners and it was super controversial because people were like. Why would this guy to your point right? Ever choose to put extra weight on his arm and then he continued to win. Roy What is this what it's gotta be? It's it's an so by comparison. I have a carbon fiber and titanium G. shock which is the Lightest Watch? I have and it's twenty eight grams. So it's one ounce. Yeah what this this thing has got to be less than. That's probably a half. It might be half but it's it's ridiculous how light it is two two seven three. It's a it's a real interesting color. Combo are almost seven. I don't know why. Yeah 'cause you're not a good brand. Ms Shock Ten thousand Geez. That's so awesome. What a great. What a great Statistic to have if you meet the the people at for example Alexander meal so they both worked at the company to you. I think the two oldest ones They're like again. Don't necessarily have to be down to Earth. And they're so nice. I'm not just saying that I do not say that. About like a Lotta people who design and sell really expensive stuff on and the people who buy are not necessarily different and I also think it matters lot. That shark didn't like they didn't grow up with the brand. It's relatively recent So you know. I do empathize with them of innocence. Like they've been able to watch their father succeed a very similar way to be very different scale With two and the Clark. It's been a really cool watching. The club gets accessible. Because I watch my dad working out like two. Am and then. I'm like they're more people coming to the club. So you can you. Can you can wash it. And as someone who's growing up around that I think it's good to have role models. You see work hard and benefit from that success. Like it's it's very inspiring so hopefully a totally with empathize with them a lot on that and. I think that they have learned a lot of their work ethic from their dad. And it's just it's a good group and the watches are really cool. I mean I any time you can get sponsored by a product. That's not just going to support you but that also makes very high quality item that you can be proud to wear talk and I. I think I've tried to live by that and I again. I got really lucky. Thought like my first two sponsors kind of taught me unintentionally that like not all money comes in equal shades of green right. I I had to. I had to people who really believed in me and supported me and were mentors as well as people who are footing the bill And the fact that I had shared. Moas the first main sponsor that I started working with after Maude Space and Maud space was recently acquired. So I'm still in contact with guys but Maude Space. The company that used to sponsor me longer exists Note the non competes won't have to evadne exactly But I I get like I think I had people who knew what it took. I have people who know what it takes from kind of a time commitment standpoint and also from a development standpoint right. I think Even if you are. God's gift to racing it takes a lot of time to get used different types of cars. It takes a lot of time you know. What are you driving this year this year? I'M GONNA be I'm WM Four. Gt four enjoying it. Yeah I love it so you like driving. I actually really liked driving. I think part of what I like about it from Lake. A sales standpoint is driving. We'll Turner's car. Yea Oh fuck out of here. I didn't realize driving wills cars. Oh He's the Homey I yeah good for you talk goes for everybody yeah the TACO sites so I was running a girls with Dr Program at Daytona and the way that Iran is we wait until the track shuts down and then they get to go into the pits and see what it's like which is not inexperienced normally get to do unless you have a hot pass which are expensive as hell and you have to be over eighteen So these seven or eight year old girls get to kind of cruise you walk down the pits and see what's going on and they were like that light up sign. That says tacos. I was like Oh our team. Well prompted a conversation about like. What isn't this a professional sport? You guys take yourselves really seriously and I was like no so when asked if Race car drivers P in the IT inevitably came up because they were talking about like all of empty water bottles everywhere I was like. I don't really want to answer. So how is the driving? The the M four compared to The cars you you know. You're you're in before I really like so. I have had the opportunity now to drive trying to think I guess. Three or four differentiate four cars driven BMW. I drove the Audi at the.

Alain Prost One US tennis Maude Space Alain Prost hustler New York City Rashard Europe BUBBA Watson Katherine Legge Richard Richard Neal Lincoln Audi WanNa BMW Tatiana Calderon Rubens Barrichello UNBELIEV
"aurora" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"Shit Smack Talk. The reflex reaction time were no. I'm saying like if I'm saying like if he can do the same thing I can't consistently that means I feel like I should be able to my game and I think Also someone who is that respected and that kind of season as a driver. There's always a lot to learn from them on and off the racetrack right. How do they interact with fans? How do they carry themselves in kind of tense scenarios politically? Which are you know happened? Left and right at the race track How do you deal with kind of gray area situations from a strategy standpoint things like that so Go back to the first sponsor you said you were trying to get your first sponsor motor sports. So Maude Space. Dow Point sponsored the occasional maxine. Cup driver they were sponsoring the. Cj Wilson racing team cj rule back. Yeah so that and they. I can't remember the specific details of the program but they were sponsoring Patrick. Gallagher is a good friend So they had a few guys in that program and I met Charles Pac man and woman who I'm still super close with. They're awesome guys and they took a chance on me so I ran in twenty fifteen Amex five cub. My learning curve was incredibly steep. I went from. I did a couple of days of truck driving in a Miata that one single five minutes interactive SR three. And then I did Like a couple David Murray days and Miata Gary School and then I went traded five cup which is not a lot of spurious. Anyone who knows anything about annex knows that it is brutal aggressive yeah very experienced professional drivers pretty decent payouts and like kind of getting the operating cost is probably lower than compared within death at the end of every race. It's crazy the the number of weird stories that I have from Mexico cut from just like the closest raising I've ever experienced my entire life At the learning curve with Steve. Like the first couple of races I was like dead last right. I had no idea what I was doing The benchmark was like. Can you be safe and months is a good place to start but I was finishing the races really consistently I was getting faster consistently and the guys like you said low operating cost rate so compared to something like a the budget was relatively low the stakes you know the risk was relatively low and sponsoring someone like me And it worked. I was like mid pack. I did a partial season in two thousand fifteen so just like a couple of races. Same thing partial season in two thousand sixteen at that point I was like mid mid pack different pack and then they sponsored me and my first recent INSA in two thousand seventeen split. I mean. That's that's good man. That's that's that's a good way to get it going. It's a great way to get going and I also am very. I don't want to say lucky. I'm I'm very fortunate that I had someone who believed in me like that. And I think that that is the key factor with everyone. It might be a family member right like it might be a family member thinking that you can do this and cities. Where did they see you? How did they find you So my dad did I think a few X Five Cup races? Okay and then. He was running on the. Cj Wilson Racing Team. So I've also known CJ since. I was really not really little like probably nine or ten years old Good tasting cars. He has very good. Here's his SPEC is always really choice. Yeah Yeah Yeah. That's that's crazy man. 's Okay so your first you one race in certain 2017. Sorry I did. I did two races in two thousand sixteen taking a chance on me driving driving a porsche. Cayman not bad noser. Fun S. T. class which is unfortunately gone. Now that's one of the great clock was pretty close to stop class right stock also super competitive because again compared to relative to other operating costs with an IMSA. It was the cheapest thing that you could reasonably do And the cost increased exponentially year after year. But I mean at the point when I was running it. It was actually. It was somewhat reasonable So I did one Racer Watkins in two thousand sixteen. I remember actually actually puked before. I got into the car for the first time so scared. He's hung over hung over no Yeah but I got into the car for the first time I was terrified. I was like this is something that I have watched all of my role models doing like people who I wanted to be when I grew up. Where racing in Estienne Hamza And I qualified. I think like mid tobacco of the pack. It was super easy to drive completely exceeded my expectations. And then I drew from twenty four to. I think I pulled the car in an eighth or ninth place. Oh wow that sounds crazy but it was years into someone else believing in me and being like you can do this. That was the first time ever that I got out of a race car being like shit like I could. I could really do this. This is something like I need practice. But some things there right like this is actually something that I could pursue And then I did. When we're CERISE IN I wrote Atlanta in two thousand sixteen. We had weird gremlins with a car but we still managed to finish eleven or twelve and then two thousand seventeen. I ran a full season in car and we did really well. I finished as the top rookie in class. I mean to go To do your first em Serei start and like make a bunch of passes. I can imagine it'd be like Oh. Yeah this is GonNa be me like the next thing. Well it's not even. I'm going to be the next thing. It was just the realization that like this is. Maybe I'm not just messing round like I. I was so stressed all the time about like the stakes are extremely high in racing. Compared to school in the rest of your teenage life and being a teenager in general is not conducive. It doesn't inspire confidence right. Nothing about being a teenager inspires personal confidence so So I was constantly kind of. I was very doubtful of the fact that these other people were believing in me and spending what I viewed as insane amounts of money on me and I you know probably once every couple of weeks I was like should I be throwing in the towel with us like I love it. I think about it. Twenty four seven. I can't sleep because I'm thinking about the next time I'm racing but this is you know the stakes are high when you crash you. If people to answer to sponsors who need to pay to rebuild the car You have teammates who may not be able to drive the car and vice versa. When you do really well that high as you know is it's pretty unique and pretty addicting and everything else in life just gets boring. I've been watching the formula. One drive to survive season. Two on net flicks. These guys crashed their cars all the time they still have rides. I think you're okay. Yeah it's a different culture. Though like European racing versus American I do think the cars disposable in European racing more so than no I think the driving in general there tends to be less of a focus on actually statistically not that Formula One is cheap. It is not even remotely close to cheap but GT racing in. Europe is significantly cheaper than gt racing in the US. And I do think there is an element of like for example Gt for Europe The race series at parallels SRO. I'm pretty sure a budget that one of my friends got quoted for a full. Gt for series. There is like around. A third of the price really has nothing to do with the race series here. Not being able to control costs super efficiently. Well it has little to do with that It's travel budget opera. Like for example Our the courses just spread way further out in America compared to Europe and see if in their also more business models in Europe that are the for example at if you do like Viagra Villanueva Nurburgring. Those teams live their true. So drive the car up the road. You're not paying any transportation costs point You are paying to fly yourself out there but a lot of the things out of really really quickly from an cost standpoint in the US our transportation. I mean that's huge. People have no idea how expensive it is to like cart a car across the country. A staff like ten fifteen twenty people round the clock. So that's another thing is. You're pulling stuff in from what tends to be at least in most routine business models different parts of the country if you look at the average like travel Like if you have like a list of like January itineraries for different people on race teams. They're coming from all across the country. Guaranteed you have someone on the west coast guarantee of someone on the east coast. You tend to have people from Canada Germany people from Florida. You have people who are cross continentally right so it gets. I just use a hangover into uniforms. Tally and wisdom that the F. B. Racing trope.

US Cj Wilson Europe Wilson Racing Team F. B. Racing Maude Space Amex IMSA Estienne Hamza Patrick Gallagher Racer Watkins Mexico Charles Pac porsche David Murray Canada Steve
"aurora" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Skies above Finland a report in the Journal. Aga advances claims the unique features of the Junes are hoping scientists better understand a mysterious layer atmosphere Aurora and not time lot this place in the atmosphere neither polls they occur when high energy charged particles usually protons and electrons generated by geomagnetic storms from San Collide with the Earth's magnetic sphere and then guided by the pundits magnetic fields through the ionised fair orgin charged particles as these particles traveled down towards the North and south magnetic poles they collide with oxygen nitrogen atoms and molecules in the upper atmosphere causing them to excite and emit photons giving off a glow and producing colorful. Kurt light displays known as the northern southern lights the Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis. The colas being emitted depends on the paddock was being ionized. Reddish Brown glows a caused by the collision of Paddock Wood. Single oxygen atoms in the upper atmosphere usually above three hundred kilometers low down. A Green Hues created by single oxygen atoms data outages around one hundred kilometers the kaleidoscope tens of what is Shallow Bay when not jains mixed in with the Oxygen Aurora can also exhibit Blue Red Ribbon. Purple Glow in the Laura atmosphere caused by the expectation of molecular nitrogen below one hundred kilometers but unlike most Aurora lights which are oriented vertically like curtains. The junes appears thin. Ribbons of Green Lights arranged. Horizontally satellite fingers reaching towards the equator for hundreds of kilometres. The junes were discovered by amateur rural photographers Finland in two thousand eighteen. The study's lead author May Not Palmer. From the University of Helsinki suspects that June's visible manifestations of adulation of the known as atmospheric waves atmospheric waves undulations of air caused by the atmosphere having regions of different temperatures and density. Now if correct. This would be the first time. Scientists have actually been able to observe that it's very waves through the Aurora based on the images the authors think the Junes appear in a thin layer around one hundred kilometers about sea level and knowing the altitude tunes hopes. The research is determined the physics behind them. This is a region that's always been difficult to study because it's too high for balloons and to love the satellites. The atmosphere this altitude between route eighty one hundred twenty kilometres is sensitive to changes in energy from the sun and from a slower atmosphere and the energy fluctuations in this region can indirectly affect the victories of spacecraft. Palmer often colleagues suspected the Junes of visible manifestations of a kind of atmospheric wave called a meese ferrick bore Mississippi booze waves that propagate through the atmosphere like ripples spreading across a pool creating curls unfolds that Ben are really and spread out of a long distances by studying these June's physicists. Can better understand these types of waves and the paths of Earth's upper atmosphere where they occur? You'll see the space time still to come. A rare attires asteroid discovered and the crew of the International Space Station. Successfully complete refurbishment work on the Alpha magnetic spectrometer all that and much more still to come on space time astronomers have discovered array asteroid opening the sun inside the O. but Venus the asteroid cataloged is twenty twenty eight to belongs to a small classes space rocks known as tears which have orbits that full within the the earth the tiny body was discovered by Celtics Vicky transient facility at the Mount Palomar Observatory..

Aurora Finland Aurora Borealis Aurora Australis San Collide Paddock Wood Alpha magnetic International Space Station Aga Kurt light Shallow Bay Mount Palomar Observatory University of Helsinki Blue Red Ribbon Palmer Celtics Mississippi Ben the Journal
"aurora" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Emitted as ultraviolet light. When the Maven team I observed these Proton Aurora? They thought they were a relatively unusual occurrence. But that's because they weren't looking at the right time and places however after a closer look. They found that Proton Aurora were occurring far more often in day site southern Summer Observations Association's than initially expected in fact the authors found Proton Aurora in some fourteen percent of their day side observations and that increases the more than eighty eight percent of the time when only day side southern summer observations considered now by comparison Megan detected so called the few sorority on Mars in just a few percentage incentive orbits with favorable geometry and the other type of Aurora those discreet Aurora. We talked about the rarest. Still in the data set the correlation with southern southern summer provided a clue as to why the Proton Aurora. So comment and how. They could be used to track water loss during the southern summer on Mars. The Red Planet is also the nearer the sun in its orbit at its time when huge dust storms can occur some warming and dust activity appeared a coors probe on Roy by forcing water vape behind the atmosphere then solar extreme ultraviolet light breaks the warden components hydrogen and oxygen and the light hydrogen is weakly bound to mass asked by gravity and enhances the solar corona around the Red Planet Increasing Hydrogen Lhasa. The space more hydrogen in this Karuna makes interactions with the solar wind. Protons more common making pro Aurora more frequent and brighter. You're listening to space time coming up next. It's all systems. Go for the maiden flight of Europe's new Vegas rocket and later. Moscow says Russian space tourism is back on its flight. Plan all that and more still to come on space time European Space Agency says it will fly New Vegas lightweight launch loan system on a maiden flight slated for March the go-ahead follow successful hot firing tests.

Proton Aurora Summer Observations Associatio European Space Agency Aurora Europe coors Moscow Megan Roy
"aurora" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"Astronomers have discovered that a type of Moshen Aurora I identified by Nashes Maven even spacecraft in two thousand sixteen is actually the most common type of Aurora occurring on the Red Planet a report in the Journal. Geophysical Research Space Physics says this type type of event known as a Proton Aurora may be able to help scientists track water loss from the Martian atmosphere on Earth Aurora a commonly seen as colorful fool displays of light at night skies in the polar regions within known as the northern and southern lights the Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis however the Proton Aurora on mass happened during the day and they give off an ultraviolet light which is invisible to the human eye but detectable by the imaging ultraviolet spectograph geographic instrument aboard. NASA's Maven spacecraft. Mavens mission is to investigate how the Red Planet lost so much of that is fair in water transforming it from a warm warm wet world with a thick atmosphere that could have supported life to the cold inhospitable freeze dried desert. It is today now. Since President Aurora A- generated indirectly by the hydrogen derived from Mash and water. That's in the process of being lost into space. These Aurora could be used to help track ongoing mosh and water loss. The study's lead author Andrew Hughes from the embry riddle `Aeronautics University in Daytona Beach says the Maven Day together of multiple years is found that periods of increased raced atmospheric escape corresponding increases in Proton Aurora occurrence and intensity different phenomena produced different kinds of Aurora. However Ole Arroyo on earth and Mars a powered by solar activity whether it be explosions of high speed particles in the solar storms eruptions of gas magnetic fields tonight it's coronal mass ejections all gusts of the solar wind a stream of electrically charged plasma that blows continuously space at around one point six million kilometers aspera for example northern and southern lights? Here on earth happened to in violence. Solar activity disrupts Earth's magnetosphere causing hype philosophy electrons slamming into gas particles not side upper atmosphere making them glow and similar processes generate the Red Planet's discreet and diffuse aurorae two types Kuraray that were previously observed on the Mash nightside however proton row right Cohen Solar Wind Protons hydrogen atoms stripped of their electrons by intense eight interact with the upper atmosphere on the day side of miles as they approach mass. The protons coming in with the solar wind transformed into neutral atoms by stealing Ling electrons from hydrogen atoms in the Outer Ridge of the Martian hydrogen corona a huge cloud of hydrogen surrounding the planet. And Win those high speeding coming at him. Sit the atmosphere that's fair. Some of their energy is emitted as ultraviolet light. When the Maven team I observed these Proton Aurora? They thought they were a relatively unusual occurrence. But that's because they weren't looking at the right time.

Proton Aurora Aurora Borealis Red Planet Aurora Australis Geophysical Research Space Phy NASA Ole Arroyo President Daytona Beach embry riddle `Aeronautics Univ Outer Ridge Andrew Hughes Kuraray the Journal
"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

"At at its height in mid two thousand nine Google held just over thirty percent market share half that of their censored state-sponsored competitor editor by do most of their base were tech savvy democracy leaning already using circumvention technologies to get around the the great firewall before two thousand six the rest of China well they were fine with the status quo a survey conducted by Sina. waybill showed that four of every five Chinese citizens didn't think Google's departure from China would hurt the country's he's. It Industry Isaac now an expert on the Internet in China told CNN quote you have two categories of Internet users in China China. One strongly supports that Google is either staying here without censorship or pulling out of China to keep neutral and independent independent but another there may be ninety percent of Internet users in China. They don't care whether we will leaves or not and quote so if most Chinese people didn't feel strongly about Google or their pro-democracy stance even three you're four years in what was Google actually accomplishing in China. We know inherently that Google Dot C. N. was a profit making venture not immoral act what if they looked at the numbers the constant government pressure the cost associated with complying the negative press there were receiving worldwide for compromising on their supposed values and decided it didn't add up an incident like Aurora is the perfect cover away to go out defiantly fashioning bottom line decision as a immoral stance. Perhaps this is a cynical view. Perhaps with a story so expansive as this without all the evidence evidence we'd meet it really is up to you to decide what's real and what isn't what's true about the characters display and what's what's simply the posturing of powerful men with selfish intent before you make up your mind though let me finish the store more as we come to an end here we return to January twelfth of two thousand and ten did they it all began not not long after their initial announcement in an act of defiance all Google Dot C. N. queries where directed through their non censored Hongkong search engine Google Dot h k on March fifteenth all Google sites were placed behind China's great firewall and any attempt to use them would result in a DNS error. This effectively ended Google China by two thousand fifteen gene. The company retained a national market share below two percent and this is how it remained aclu least until last year when the intercept revealed a secret Google project to reestablish a fully censored version and of their search engine for use in China code-named dragonfly. The project began in spring two thousand seventeen accelerated traded in two thousand eighteen and was set for release in two thousand nine can only select employees were told about dragonfly and made to sign nondisclosure agreements over two years company executives including CEO Sundar Pichai met with high ranking ranking Chinese officials the new Google China would follow all the rules no pornography no teen in main square. No Oh George Orwell DEMO APP for Android was developed and submitted for approval by the government all behind closed doors when protests flared in response to the news of dragonfly employees and other protesters were quick to remind Google of their longtime unofficial slogan phrase coined in the Code of conduct ingrained into their mythos. The slogan is don't be evil and it was decided in the preface to Google's code of conduct in July two thousand nineteen Google terminated dragonfly dragonfly at least for now a year earlier in spring two thousand eighteen. It quietly removed the phrase. Don't be evil from the preface of its code of conduct. It's still there but now only mentioned in passing in the very last line of the a document..

Google China China China dragonfly CNN Sundar Pichai George Orwell editor Sina. Aurora CEO ninety percent thirty percent two percent four years two years
"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

"Firstly by do China's primary Internet Internet search provider had vested interest in seeing Google off even if by do head double Google's market share seventy eighty percent of China's eight hundred million Internet users is still quite a lot for a company new to the market without state backing backing from the beginning. What Google represented posed a direct threat to what by do has always been from the cable gate eight memo's quote the problem. The sensors were facing however was that Google's demand to deliver uncensored search result was was very difficult to spin as an attack on China and the entire episode had made Google more interesting and attractive two Chinese Internet users all of a sudden X. continued by do look like barring state owned enterprise wide in Google seems very attractive like the forbidden fruit and quote. It's possible that by do in order to reinstitute their monopoly conspired with the government to oust their largest rivals another cable gate memo referencing and American informant foment in the country reads quote. The agent learned that Polit- Bruce Standing Committee member X. was working actively with Chinese Internet Internet search giant by do against Google's interests in China and quote the day after Google's blockposts was released. UV Veep early morning bouquets of flowers were laid at the logo outside Google's quarters in Chingoka Science Park Beijing. Uh some of the flowers came with heartfelt notes quote. Thank you for holding values over prophets one rid google. The Mountains fountains can stop us and will get over the wall to find you said enough as Google's fans mourned the loss Google and Khloe is worried not just for their jobs but their safety some had already been interrogated by the government there was no stopping topping more interogations or even unlawful arrests and imprisonment meanwhile the government began a concentrated effort to drive an unsympathetic narrative from the leaked cable gates memo's quote the immediate strategy said seemed to be you to appeal to Chinese nationalism by accusing Google and the US government of working together to force China to accept Gordon Quote Western values and undermined China's rule of law and quote. It's unclear whether this was manufactured narrative. Tiv- or the real belief of fficials who assumed Google shared the same relationship with its home country as by do did it's Chinese newspapers claimed that Google's decision was mired in corporate failures and American a political interests state-sponsored People's Daily called the company are quote Unquote Spoilt Child and other wrote quote government government regulation is the international norm so google display is really just an expectation another said quote a lot of people welcomed come to us especially those web users who think Google is not an entirely commercial entity but is rather closely related to the government went as one person put it it calls itself commercial firm but he does always been the vanguard of an American political chess and quote Google's fight was about opening China to free information when the government pushed for censorship they pushed back by by shielding g mail and their other data storing applications from their Chinese business. They prevented government intrusion into private user user accounts. Even being in the country in the first place was a defying step towards freedom except most Chinese people people frankly didn't care.

Google China Chingoka Science Park Beijing Tiv Polit- Bruce US Khloe Gordon seventy eighty percent
"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

03:10 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

"In other words it could be that although the struggle over cultural shirow and political hegemony in China hangs over the story of Aurora like a dark shadow. It didn't drive. The actions of those was involved. It didn't drive google to enter China. It didn't drive China to push them out. As we saw it's probably also so part of a much larger business and or military espionage campaign and maybe even sort of personal vendetta by an angry polit buell member and even that is still not the whole picture what is tribal not much no really. I'm not asking you to go on an expedition to the Amazon forced looking for lost tribes. We're talking about cybersecurity here. In Waterfalls Industrial Security podcast Andrew Gender the industrial security at waterfall security the solutions and the well-known expert in the field of industrial security and Co host Nate Nelson senior producer of this podcast militias live talk to experts spirits and thinkers about the principles and practice of securing physical industrial operations ranging from wind farms and automobile manufacturers factors to railway switching systems and the following sound bite taken from a recent episode Rick Con. Vp of an industrial protection vendor mentioned the concept of tribal knowledge so what is tribal knowledge and why is it important for cybersecurity another thing. Rick Rick mentioned was tribal knowledge. Can you talk about why that's important. Yes so that's not a technical thing that sort of what's walking around inside people's heads you know tribal knowledge is knowledge. That's that's that's not been written down. It's great as long as people are around but if people retire if people are promoted into other divisions visions if they leave because they join another company you lose the knowledge in their heads and the knowledge can be very important to troubleshooting troubleshooting and even planning security for instance tribal knowledge might be this particular machine this Ip address where is it. It's it's in that room over there. It's in the third cabinet. It's the eighth machine up in the in the rack knowing things like why the exist. It's one thing to say I got a windows box with oh seven kinds of software on it with these versions. It's another thing to say and we put it there to do this. So that kind of knowledge that's in people's heads he called. Meta data data is important to capture into the database as well and makes the the the information in the database about software inversions much more valuable subscribe type two waterfalls industrial security podcast in all podcast listening apps both on Ios and Android then more about the podcasts at waterfall dash security dot com.

China Rick Rick Rick Con Aurora Amazon Nate Nelson buell Vp producer
"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

"And yet neither the US government nor Google or any of the other hacked companies would would outright named the Chinese government as their attackers in fact amid talks of human rights abuse and caps on freedom of information. The author of the instigating Google blog post went out of their way to praise the Chinese government. Take for instance this this paragraph quote we have taken the unusual step of sharing information about these attacks with broad audience not just because of the security and human rights implications of what we have an earth but also because this information goes to the heart of a much bigger bigger global debate about freedom of speech in the last two decades. China's economic reform programs and its citizens and trooper neural flare have lifted hundreds of millions of Chinese people out of poverty indeed. This great nation is at the heart of much watch economic progress and development in the world. Today and quote isn't that strange combination of sentences. It's like cutting a bully. I don't like that you punch me in the face but I love your technique. Just about everybody involved in Aurora era did this same tightrope act insinuating without blaming and so without any smoking gun evidence that's where things stood for awhile by late two thousand and ten as new evidence the case slow to a halt the story of Operation Aurora uh-huh fizzled out whatever was stolen was replaced. Whoever had stone it had gotten away with their crimes months passed and then beginning on November twenty eighth two thousand and ten hundreds of thousands of you s State Department cables obtained by Chelsea Manning then Bradley Manning were released through Julian assange wikileaks then published with names redacted for the public they suggested that the entire affair all thirty five hacks billions in damages images trade secrets and more originated with single high ranking politician who didn't like the result of his Google Search Quote Police Bureau Standing Committee member X. recently discovered that Google's worldwide site site is uncensored and he's capable of Chinese language searches and search results. X. allegedly entered his own name and and found results critical of him he also noticed the link from Google dot. CNN's homepage to Google Dot com which X. reportedly believes eaves is an quote unquote illegal site x asked three ministries note most likely Ministry of Industry and Information Asian Industry State Council Information Office and Public Security Bureau to write a report about Google and demand that the company company sees it's illegal activities which include linking to Google dotcom according two US State Department informants. This Chinese official frustrated that a negative search result about himself could so easily be reach through Google's Chinese site discussed how to censor with other members of the Communist Party representatives of the party told told Google to remove the link to its uncensored worldwide site from his Chinese homepage. Google refused to do so in response onto the Chinese forced three of the major state owned telecommunication entities to not do any further business with the company and initiated the first mass-scale international state sponsored cyber haste in history.

Google Chinese government US government State Department Ministry of Industry and Infor China Aurora Communist Party CNN Public Security Bureau eaves official Chelsea Manning Bradley Manning Julian assange two decades
"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

07:48 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

"News that Google was hacked would have been enough excitement for one day but it was another revelation relation later in the same block post that surprised everyone quote these attacks and these surveillance they have uncovered combined signed with the attempts over the past year to further limit three speech on the web have led us to conclude that we should review the visibility of art business operations in China and quote the Google Dot C. N. project a major step for the company. Just half a decade in the making now looked like it would be scrapped why such harsh and dramatic response the reason began to unravel only hours after Google's post went live when adobe revealed that they too had been breached soon came the the mudslide Lockheed Martin Yahu Symantec Northrop Grumman Dog Chemical Morgan Stanley in total thirty five of America's largest largest companies had been linked to the same attack so by this point two things were clear number one this was it's not just a Google problem number two. If this was big problem before now it was a big big big the problem a large scale cyber front had been conducted by significant power against elite American corporations and by all accounts counts. It succeeded what those hackers got their hands on was much more than Google had ever let on. It's difficult us to quantify just how vital source code is to a digital company for Google Yahoo Adobe. It's the bedrock for everything everything what's hard to believe with this. In Mind is how easy it was for Aurora's hackers to break into the source code databases aces over these ferry five major companies and McAfee white paper published three months after the attacks did not name which of the thirty I five companies. They investigated what they found was the widespread use of almost totally unsecured. SEM's source source code management systems in particular. Many of the companies indeed many of the top one thousand companies in America. We're using the same. SEM provided by California based company called Peer Force according to the report per force isn't necessarily thoroughly less secure than its competitors but that's only because the bar was so low the hose in performers sem were we're big and plentiful some where perhaps understandable consider developers who liked to work on their personal computers will often copy. I shared code work on it locally and then paste back their updated version. It's convenient to do so you can work from home this way or from a coffee shop but giving full access to source code databases to individuals whose computers may not be subject to the same scrutiny scrutiny as corporate databases typically are opens up new attack paths think of it like having a vault full of money and and giving the combination to everyone who works at the bank. Not every retailer will protect that information perfectly well so it's not smart for them. I'm all to have the same highest level access to that money. perforce default configuration did not protect against the untrained employee that meant that instead of having to break into the heart of all these major. American corporations the Aurora hackers could have achieved. Steve the same effect simply by spearfishing individual employees other holes in the perforce software or even less easily justified than that one any unauthenticated user could create an account without first needing password to entrench. Trent by default as system level process lending its users the highest level root privileges on host systems nowhere in V documentation for perforce for windows was there any indication running as root might be dangerous three it's stored all all of its data in clear text and communicated all data between end points in their servers without encryption so any packet sniffer or many in the middle attack will allow a hacker to read highly sensitive data source code user activity logging credentials as easily they could an article on Yahoo Dot com or they could intercept and modified in transit in total. McAfee identified died fourteen major categories of vulnerabilities in pay force. I could list them all but your car ride to work is only really so long with help from even just one or two of these many security holes. Chinese hackers were able to siphon off significant different proprietary code from those thirty five major companies. We don't actually know what's the talk or what the ended up using using it for but he possibilities are staggering they could have used it to copy what American companies owned for Chinese companies not use the military could've used state of the art technologies taken from companies such as Lockheed Martin and Northrop Grumman stolen software could have been examined to determine previously unknown zero day vulnerabilities useful targeting and users of such products in the future and on top of simply taking it the hackers also could have in theory modified existing code in order ordered to proactively create their own exploits in those companies software like a construction worker building their own secret back door to a bank fault. McAfee could not determine whether this actually occurred doing so would have required the affected companies to diligently cross-referenced referenced their existing code with Pre Aurora versions while accounting for older legitimate modifications made in the meantime and that that wasn't all another piece of evidence sent the FBI and Google into a months long battle what Google had failed to disclose from from the beginning is that they're hackers also managed to break into servers containing many years worth highly sensitive information on US surveillance targets American government officials who spoke to the Washington Post noted that this data would be useful fool to the Chinese military to determine which of their spies had been compromised. Dave Ach Smith senior director at Microsoft at the time I'm found the same motives sociology with his company's Hack.

Google McAfee America Northrop Grumman Aurora adobe Symantec Dave Ach Smith Lockheed Martin Washington Post Morgan Stanley China California American government FBI Microsoft US senior director Steve
"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

"Why would a company operating an the industrial pipeline. Have five different communication systems running to a pipe seems a bit excessive. Doesn't it not in the world of Industrials Cyber Security. It's not if you're listening to militias life. You're probably familiar with it security but whether you know about securing I mean nuclear power plants and other critical industrial facilities well. I've got just what you need the Industrial Security podcast hosted by Andrew Inter Inter vp of industrial security at waterfall security solutions and well known expert in the field and our very own nate Nelson senior producer of militias life. Here's Andrew Steak on the pipeline question. I've done a fair bit of work with pipeline companies over the years. I remember one company. uh-huh talked me about about their communications. I remember five levels of backups in their communication system. It was just crazy and the reason for all this this is that if you're dealing with an oil pipeline or a gas pipeline you've got flammable explosive contents in the pipeline and so there's a lot of regulations. There's laws about how you gotta manage the contents of the pipeline as I recall in some jurisdictions if you lose visibility into the operation of the pipeline you know let's say you lose communications. You can't see what a section of your pipeline is doing anymore. While now you're doing what's called flying being blind. You cannot see what's happening in a lot of jurisdictions by law you're you're able to fly the pipeline blind for for exactly thirty seconds and then by law you're required to shut it down within those thirty seconds you madly try all of your communications backups to try. Ryan restore communications so you can see the pipeline again and keep it running and if you can't by law you've got to lift the cage on the big red mushroom button and shut everything down subscribe to Waterfalls Industrial Security podcast in our podcast listening apps both on Ios android learn more about the podcast at what if all dash security dot COM.

Waterfalls Industrial Security Andrew Inter Inter Andrew Steak nate Nelson vp Ryan producer thirty seconds
"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

Malicious Life

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on Malicious Life

"The attack that began with that mouse-click was given a name Operation Aurora after a five path called Aurora in the mail whereas binary according to McAfee's Dmitri Perovic. This may be the name. The hackers occurs themselves. We're using describe attack. It's hardly the kind of scary name that you might associate with the massive events you'll soon hear about maybe it was named after the colors of the Google logo but who was that enemy Google is one of the world's most well organized and will defended companies. You'd have an easier time hacking into a small country maybe even the US government and depending on the branch something big had to be behind this the NSA FBI Google Microsoft McAfee and other companies and pins all took it upon themselves to investigate the security vulnerability discovered by Milan selling is type would call tell us after free use after free exploits are like buffer overflow exploits in that they're used to manipulate the process by which program Graham accesses. It's stored memory but they're most subtle in buffer overflows. The attacker breaks out of an allocated memory buffer for bike riding too much data into it in use after free exploits. The attacker looks for previously freed up space in memory three and substitutes its content with militias information. A good analogy for this technique is a museum haste Imagine your fief and you want to steal precious artifact from a museum. The premises are heavily got. It and the artifact is locked away every night. The only way to steal it is to do so in in the light of day. How can you steal priceless item. When at any minute you're liable to be seen well. Maybe you can replace the real real artifact with a fake. If you can do so without being spotted it could take hours days eight months for somebody to realize what's been done. The problem selling found with Internet explorer or was that under certain conditions when an object was removed or freed from memory. It's pointer the function that told the browser where it was located in memory didn't go away like a map of a museum even after you've stolen the precious artifact and replaced it with with a fake its location still shows up on the map and so nobody knows anything's wrong the malware in this case used harmless image file as a decoy and event object to do to Switcheroo just as soon as the image was loaded it was removed and overridden now. The memory space it wants took up was free for other use uploading mayor in reality. It's a bit more complicated than that. There's another step needed to prevent the browser from crashing when the militias code starts to run but that's the basic idea the payload the actual militias code was Trojan Dot Heidrick after downloading itself to a target computer heidrick establishes a connection with command and control server and this path of communication gives the mail whereas owner near full control over target computer to view edit and and create files gathering information useful to digging deeper into the network and Siphon out sensitive proprietary data on corporate servers. There's all this bunch was backed into a single militias link that link was sent out to a few specific targets individuals identified for who they were and what they had access to the link came in emails and instant messages which appeared to be sent from trusted contacts and so when hydraulic was first discovered investigators were able to sit for clues Joe Stewart of Secure Q. Works was one of those who examined the code and he found particularly suspect component it was a cyclic redundancy check or CRC. We are seat and error detection algorithm for stored and transferred data. CRC's are fairly common. I piss implemented lots lots of them when I was a developer but stuart had never seen this particular version before when he searched the web for other instances of the same CRC see he found a hit. Its source code was structurally identical to hydraulics and would give the same output for any input. It received saved. The interesting part wasn't the code though it was where the code came from it was first published in a white paper written ridden in simplified Mandarin. A quick Google search revealed that just about every instance of or reference to this particular. CRC was from Chinese source so in all likelihood only a mandarin speaker would even know about this particular CRC see Algorithms Existence Google in its blog claimed the attack originated in China but the mounting evidence did not implicate it anyone in particular it could have been the work of a well resource cybercrime ring and New York Times article published one month after the fact the described meeting of select security experts and NSA personnel arranged by a US defense contractor. The subject of the discussion discussion was to universities the mayor where traced back to it was hard to believe that students could have pulled off a major breach into the world's leading data company hard to understand why they'd want to who had the resources and ability to breach Google and who had reason to do it. It's been hot summer. Hasn't it usually during these months. I like to keep a window open to let in some fresh air.

Google CRC McAfee US Dmitri Perovic Milan Joe Stewart New York Times developer Graham China stuart eight months one month
"aurora" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

10:09 min | 1 year ago

"aurora" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an a._b._c. podcast. It's a wild ride getting from australia to antarctica you gotta cross the treacherous truce waters of the southern ocean there cyclonic winds and stomach churning waves the career up as high as twenty months then you hit the us us for the past thirty years the strain icebreaker ship aurora australis has been ferrying people to intact through those waters. It's australia's first and only the home built and home crude i- spreaker. She's not to miss if you're in hobart. She sits right next to salamanca place looking like a great big gigantic pantic orange children's toy but the aurora is a fine work of engineering. That's my one hundred and forty five voyages to the bottom of the planet. Sara laverick has forged on the aurora australis four times now. She's a marine biologist. She studied penguins seals and wiles. Sara even met her husband andrew on his second trip and that's when he decided that he turned out to have a strong family connection to the creation of the ship. The aurora australis is going to be retied next year and so sarah's written history of the begins ship the cuts its way all the way through to the polarize book is called through ice and fire the adventures science and people behind strategies famous uh spreaker high sierra this big orange ship that i've seen in in the docks that hobart when you went to see for the first on what did you think when you saw that great big thing i think i was just excited to say it. I kind of spent my late teens always wanting to go to antarctica talk to her when i was at school and so i knew about sheep and i knew what she did down in antarctica so to arrive in hobart about to start university and see that kind of come and go over the summer was pretty exciting. Has anyone ever given you reason why painted orange oh now. I'm assuming it's just what for visual purposes i think so i believe that's the reason a lot of the icebreaking ships working polar regions of painted either are injured. Ridley roy was painted. International orange design. Color is on the golden gate bridge in san francisco coast guard vessels use that kind of color as well. It's a very striking color against the ice and the water the call to go there in two thousand and three commission. You had gone to ship. I was part of a marine science voyage that was going down to her island and that was an integrated sort of predator predator prey ecosystem study so we there were people on heard island who were tracking the animal so the main predators there are first sales those penguins different couple of different species of penguins and albatross as well and they were putting satellite tags on all of these animals and then there were people on the ship which included may and we were looking at where these predators we're going. We're getting the satellite data from the trek is and we were also looking at what those animals might be eating when they'll going out to their foraging origin grounds and in doing that we kind of you know we work out who who's eating what win and trying to work out how the system down there works and also linking that to potential impacts from fisheries and things that were operating the area so you sil- out doing history very very peaceful and all that and then you hit the open seas mm-hmm we fitted by the chop there so i was pretty lucky sorry the enron quite especially down going down to hit island. The seats can get pretty lumpy in the bell rises and falls with big splash. I didn't get to seek. I don't know why for some reason on that sheep. I don't get too affected didn't say sickness but certainly a lot of people do do feel queasy sometimes but i'm lucky thirty five feel queasy i just go lay down and then i feel better when it's pitching and rolling around around loch that is it possible to sleep. I mean did these bang around. It is possible for some people to sleep not so much. I do tend to feel like you're gonna roll out of bed or roll up and down the bid to like so you know when the sheep pitches forward so the beds actually run sort of across most bids run across the ship so when when the ships sort of pitching up and down you feel you roll out at the side of you bid and then sometimes when you rolling heavily you kind of feel that you slide up and down you bunk so it really depends and what's going on at the time but it's it's very physical experience. Hence logic gilligan's island top hammocks keep economically spendable the pitching pitch enrolling wildly out wadley can the ship actually pitch and raw rolling. She can go over thirty degrees each direction so that's a long way so i've described it before it was like if you're on the bridge and obviously the breach of tends to roll more because higher pointed the ship so you can be on the bridge in this windows out the side and obviously around the front as well and when the sheep rolls heavily you can actually f- look down the water off one end of the bridge and you can be looking up towards the sky eh out the other so it's pretty incredible role from scientists side. You do have to hang on the ship. What does it look like. What's unborn. She's he's a creep when she's not a cruise. Ship is what i was going to say. She's a working ship so if you start sort of from the top there's the bridge which is the brains of the sheep. That's where you got lots of big windows running sort sort of three sides and sort of wrapping around the back a little bit <hes> that's where you know the captain and the officers drive the ship the helm and all that stuff is a lot of equipment up there. The next down down is the way the captain and voyage later and chief engineer and all the offices and engineer sleep that say cabins snick down. This old crews cabins the dick down below. That is the expeditionary cabinets at school dadek. I spent a lot of my time on this little kevin's down there so <hes> for scientists and people going south to the basis and then blur that is the <hes> restaurant area and galley and also the science science labs are on the deck and the wet labs and things like that and then below that there is the engine room at one end and the other is at the back end is a solar and g._m. Another way the husky bar needs to be so there's no pool most cinema off. They do have a big <hes> recreation room at the back of dick and they show you know usually usually someone will advertise on. We're gonna put up these. Maybe or the series is also really popular. Every night you watch an episode of some series or something so they have projected their seats and things on-deck check. There is kind of a senior esque atmosphere back hospice originally was a husky bars still on board the nice that still i think people still call it the husky but <hes> but now they've pulled the bar out now the allowed to serve alcohol elect on the sheep anymore so but they're still all the photos of the dogs lining the walls of that space basin. It's now the d._v._d. Library and the aurora shop say you can buy t shirts and souvenirs for your family and things in there and it's also a wreck space that people use for exercising or yoga or table tennis and consider the point of no that you don't want anyone getting drunk and moody on board a ship to talk to get a bit ugly. Nonetheless is did hot to get a strident to socialize onboard a ship without alcohol. Can you actually get them to do that. He can and i think this is in the early days. It was quite a transition. You know i'm from what people used to call the good old days or whatever it was just a different time i suppose <hes> i think people retreated i think for the first season also to their cabins abi it the inner people finding there's not so much of a social life insurance watching d._v._d.'s on their laptops because technology had changed over that time as well people could take computers to their own cabins and things but there were a lot of people like you know the every voyage usually has like some kind of social committee who will try and do social activities and though pretty determined him to to get people together so you'd have quiz nights or mock cocktail nights or other things and you do still get special occasion so safe for christmas or new year they do allow a small small amount of wine or something with dinner if you're on onboard for a special occasion like that but it's pretty regulated almost void just they do an icebox weight and that's a competitive process comes word. That is a very competitive process. It's usually you can be a fundraiser fundraiser. Usually the person that wins might donate their winnings to camp quality. You'll pot of the winnings or something like that but basically everyone who wants to debate will buy a time slot a day et timeslot so you peak when you think the first aspect will be saying but there's pretty strict rules around that so it's going to be like ninety degrees off the ship. It's going to be a certain size. It's going to invisible. You can't just sit on the writer so usually the captain's word is final on that one and sometimes it's a bit of a debate over what was actually the first iceberg or whatever but yes it's. It's quite a good part of that experience going down south especially for the first time. I want to see an iceberg flooding in the water for the first time amazing. I suppose oh so it's pretty incredible. Yukon your mind kind of boggles. I guess but it's pot is that that transition down to antarctica so you kind of have you gone through the southern ocean in an unusually felt some kind of fairly heavy weather at some point during the and then you might say bits of lumpy tiny little bits of lumpy is floating in the water since kind kinda your first sign. You're getting close that year. The iceberg is the big thing that tells you that you're in antarctica and saying that for the first time it pretty amazing and sometimes in an emotional experience for people when without fail every single voyage when you say that first iceberg that'd be people on the bridge taking photos o._b. People outside taking photos and it's a very special part of any voyage but especially that first time go south. How big do they get above the water. As big as a house is because a castle depends is on the iceberg so if you've got an iceberg that's broken off the glacier. Tongue can be miles long that some of them can be you know you you can get smaller chunks of ice. Acidic growl is and things so that this kind of degrees of scales of ice the ice that you see but an iceberg or i don't know i would classify something something as big as a house.

aurora australis hobart antarctica Sara laverick australia loch that salamanca golden gate bridge us enron Ridley roy Yukon san francisco gilligan chief engineer dick school dadek sarah