9 Burst results for "Augusta Savage"

"augusta savage" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

07:24 min | 3 months ago

"augusta savage" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Now, before we get Teo knew, um, our next news stories. I don't want to jump into This. So the NFL is saying Now I feel like I don't know. Or they're debating the idea of having the black national anthem along the national anthem, First of all the black national anthem. Is is a song, lift every voice and sing. There's been around for a very long time. And Problematically was first performed for a celebration of Abraham Lincoln, who was on Mount Rushmore. So there could always be there's always trouble working somewhere. It's a beautiful song, and I don't think it's a song that people anywhere would disagree with its interesting As I brought up about the I have a dream speech if people actually go and read it. There's an office there is a linking together of Destiny's not this. Let's throw out history thing that's going on right now. In the I have a dream, You know, it's a promise story. Note. The Constitution's a great document. He just forgot to include everybody. So the whole thing was, let's all get in on this, not let's throw away the document because we were disenfranchised from beginning but enfranchisement. Everybody should be covered under this. If you look at Dr King's speech, it's a lot more than I have a dream, which is really the rallying cry for the last part, you know, do a good speech maker. There's it's more about the Constitution was a promissory note. We've noticed. That there. We don't have enough funds in the account, and we're here to cash the check. That's really what the I have a dream speech theme is about and the so called black national anthem, which is lift every voice and sing. If you read it is the same kind of thing. It's not about. Let's throw away everything. It's about enfranchisement. We want to be a part of this. It ends with true to our god true to our native land. S o. I think it's a beautiful song. I don't think anybody that's not crazy. If they read the words to it would would would be against it in any way. It's of course, going to be controversial if it starts being juxtaposed with the national anthem, because that in and of itself says we're not one people and I think most People of good hearts want to become one nation. And just the concept that we have two national anthems in and of itself will be controversial. We'll see how people deal with that if it happens, But I will say this I agree with sports writer Jason Whitlock. Who says if the NFL plays if the NFL players stand for the black national anthem and then kneel for the Star Spangled Banner. It will be the worst thing to ever happen to the NFL in its entire history As Faras, the fan base goes inclusion. Is where we all need to be going. Ah, but it's this concept of well. Now we have to explore exclude other things that goes to the WHO song Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. That's not progress. Progress isn't that I get to turn this around and I get to be on the upper hand. Progress is inclusion and the new revolutionaries. I call them the neo mouse. May have their ideas about separation. Ah, but and they can say I disagree with the words of lift every voice and sing or they have the right to say, I disagree with Dr King's words. In what's known as the I have a Dream speech. What you can't do is coop to them and say That's part of this because it's not true. It's as far away from this this particular movement of Erasing history going to the year zero has nothing to do with Dr King has nothing to do with this song known as the Black national anthem and has everything to do with thousands well that thousands of years of way people acted but sense. Marx wrote it down. Ah was 18 60 or something that he wrote his stuff down s. Oh, it's been a bit over 100 years that we've had these Marxist ideals. I'm not telling you what you should believe. But I am telling you, the two plus two equals four and what revolutionaries are talking about now the fact that that has nothing to do with Dr King or this song known as the Black national anthem that's his true is two plus two equals four. Doesn't matter how old I am. What my races. Just objective mind could look at these two things and see there not the same. So you have If you are one of the neo mows the revolutionaries in the streets today, you intellectually it's America. Anybody could say whatever they want, for the most part, get away with it. But intellectually being sound being taken seriously, you cannot say say that we are co opting or in any way ah, part of what Dr King's dream Wass or ah I had the writer of What Of this song. Just a moment ago. I had it right in front of me because I wanted Teo Augusta Savage. No, no, that's a different person. You know, When I look for things on I have to read them. Ah, then it gets very, very difficult for me. But I'm gonna find it. James Weldon Johnson and his brother put the music to it. This was a dream of inclusion. The dream that I'm seeing from the streets today is more about exclusion. You can argue your point You could say Well, inclusion wasn't good enough and now I want to go in this more militant direction, But you should be forced to argue the point. You can't just put on somebody else's hat, act completely differently and say No, I'm the guy who wore the hat the first time around. All right, What's in the news? I can hear you typing away over there. Jared Yamamoto. Well, I was I was looking at that It was going to the history lesson there, Tio following along with you there, so I What page are we on? We are on page 40 test. It's gonna be an open book test. Why was there ever an open book test like this is the teacher just doesn't want to grade papers. Just open your books. How is that a test? I've never really quite understood. It's actually not as good as good like I feel like I was always excited about open book, Tess because I'm lazy, But I usually would spend more time searching for the answer that I kind of already knew was correct. And then I wouldn't be able to answer all the things maybe I would have gotten a better grade. Now you start questioning yourself, Whereas if you didn't have the book, you just got to go. But you think you know that point. We solved a lot of problems. Do you have an open before that? Did you have an open Mike? You wanted to get to before we get Teo got a couple of this during the Russia segment during a tech Tuesday. We talked about Dragon con it being canceled and our Tio lovely. Our lovely couple here they were talking beforehand and one of the open mic has noticed something that was going on during that segment. Whoever added that twitch subscribe..

Dr King Teo Augusta Savage NFL Tio Constitution writer Abraham Lincoln Mount Rushmore Problematically Jason Whitlock James Weldon Johnson Tess America Mike Marx Jared Yamamoto Russia Wass
"augusta savage" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:24 min | 8 months ago

"augusta savage" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Coming up on ask me another from Netflix's she's gotta have it we have actor it'll finish up there who almost skipped a crucial audition and I think it's going to be another thing that I don't want to go on and it's like director Spike Lee and I was like oh I should probably go then see cheese for a music parity game about different types of tasty Kurds from Switzerland used in France for sure Indians and crew and the long anticipated return of fact bag Kellogg's offered a free box of corn flakes to any housewife in New York who would do what they're doing the fear Eisenberg on NPR's ask me another at the answer to life's fun your questions but first the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Barbara Klein president trump and vice president pence gather their health team for a White House news conference last hour to common update the public after the nation's first death from the new coronavirus an individual in Seattle whose infection appears to have been community L. choir not linked to any known case vice president pence says new travel restrictions are being imposed for parts of South Korea and Italy most affected by the outbreak and restrictions on Iran will expand ran is also already under a travel ban but we are expanding existing travel restrictions to include any foreign national who has visited around within the last fourteen days president trump says he's also considering closing the U. S. border with Mexico the head of the centers for disease control and prevention Robert Redfield says the risk of the average American contracting the virus is still low and members of the public do not need to wear a mask president trump says none the less more than forty million masks are available and the government is working with the three M. company to produce thirty five million more a month the U. S. and the Taliban have signed a peace deal paving the way for all foreign troops to leave Afghanistan in fourteen months but it's Jennifer glass reports from Kabul it's a first step down an uncertain path the telephone according to Dealogic tree but it is conditions based and not all of the Taliban's obligations are clear a full withdrawal could take longer than the fourteen month spelled out in the document and troops could remain if not all conditions are filled the next step is intra Afghan talks to begin on March tenth the Taliban say they cannot start until five thousand Taliban prisoners are released the Afghan government says that has not been agreed but it will take part in US mediated talks about a possible release the government issued a joint declaration with the US and NATO confirming international support for Afghanistan as well as the government's support of a conditions based troop withdrawal for NPR news I'm Jennifer glass in Kabul voters in South Carolina are casting ballots in the state's democratic primary many of the candidates have already turned their attention to super Tuesday but Joe Biden and Tom styrofoam campaigning hard in the state NPR's Juana summers reports Steiner has spent more time in advertising money than any of them Tom sire greeted volunteers who were headed out to canvass for him in the hours before the polls close we have come all the way we can see the end of the race but you don't run to the end of the race you run right through the tape yeah yeah and that's what we're here today to close the deal he's been barnstorming the state with visits in television ads hoping to cut into former vice president Joe Biden's lead tonight I'll learn whether his investment will pay off with a win Juana summers NPR news this is NPR This Is WNYC in New York I'm lance lucky as you've been hearing president trump says a woman in Seattle has died from covert nineteen the first death in the U. S. from the new coronavirus meanwhile governor Andrew Cuomo says New York has received approval from the centers for disease control and prevention to conduct its own tests for the new virus CDC informed us today that our test is approved we can do our own testing that is a a big step forward the move is aimed at providing quicker turnarounds for test results at the press conference Cuomo said the state's test has been approved by the food and drug administration and the testing will begin immediately at Wadsworth lab near Albany there are no confirmed coping nineteen cases caused by the coronavirus in New York state the one person in New York City is currently being tested the Harlem Renaissance sculptor and civil rights activist Augusta savage was a leap year baby this is of course leap day and she was born February twenty ninth eighteen ninety two savages masterwork was a plaster sculpture for the nineteen thirty nine New York world's fair that resembled a large harp Jennifer the nasco is W. N. Y. C.'s culture editor it was amazing it was sixteen feet tall there were I. twelve African American chorus members with the strings of the harp kind of all lined up and kind of get smaller it looks just like a line going on forever and they're all kind of held in the hand of god savage did not receive financial backing to get the sculpture cast in bronze so it was destroyed at the end of the fair but new Yorkers can see a small replica of the piece known as lift every voice and sing at the New York Historical Society thirty five degrees now maybe a flurry this afternoon overnight around twenty four sunny and forty two tomorrow this is W. NYC at three oh six support for NPR comes from the ring foundation in support of NPR's continued mission to create a more informed public one challenged and invigorated by a deeper understanding of events ideas and cultures from NPR and W. NYC coming to you from the bell house in beautiful Brooklyn New York it's NPR's our puzzles word games and trivia ask me another I'm Jonathan cold now here's your host fear Eisenberg thank.

Netflix
"augusta savage" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:36 min | 8 months ago

"augusta savage" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Gwendolyn she was actually a few years older than Lawrence very beautiful woman and she had gone to Howard University but because of the depression had left on back to Harlem born in Bridgetown Barbados. Nineteen Thirteen Gwendolyn. Like Jacob became a foster child when she was seven years old. I think if you know a little bit about Jacob I think by the time he was thirteen or fourteen he. He and his mother didn't get along. He was a foster child when he went to Harlem so Gwynne was from her mother given to a family to come to the US because her mother thought that she could have a better life here so in a sense they were both orphans. Barbara Earl. Thomas is a Seattle based visual artists. She met the couple when she was a graduate student and when the couple grew old she became their caretaker. So when Gwen and Jacob finally got together they were very much on their own and I feel like people were older quicker. I mean this long childhood thing we have going on now. That's just you know that just wasn't happening you know in your fifteen years old and you're sixteen years old. You were making your way. Augusta savage also recognized. Lawrence's Talon once. You found out that he had dropped out of school to focus on painting. She made sure it wouldn't be in vain. Nineteen thirty seven thousand the officers on the project. They said I was too young but she. They advised Back next year I went back to all of Wasn't the anymore. She had not forgotten and she took me back. A sign me up. I was signed on the EASEL. The almost comically bureaucratic name easel division referred to the Group of artists who paint conventional canvas works for public throughout the city. A turning to six weeks and salary was a fabulous our at twenty. Three thousand aces. This was a major turning point. Lawrence's career here. Again is Patricia Hills. He was very involved with showing the history of African Americans in this country and also like to Saint Louis Latour in Haiti. Lawrence was twenty years ago. He was inspired to paint too sought lower from conversations. He overheard at the three. Oh six black. History had never been a major part of his formal education so he immediately immersed himself in research and it became clear that a single painting wouldn't do justice to the story he wanted to portray. I mean people don't know that that revolutionary history but the the Haitian army fought on the side of the US against the British during the revolutionary war. He wanted to bring out that history. Lawrence would choose a serial format and create work focusing on the mistreatment of patients by colonial farmers as well as low richer struggle to educate himself fight military occupation forces and achieve independence for his country completed in nineteen thirty eight. Lawrence's series the life of to Lower. -Ture consists of forty-one panels in many ways this series. What serve as a template for the more astonishing works yet to come. He was a historian as well as an artist and was very important to him to get his message and get the teachings of history across. So that's why he decided to do series so that he would have captions to each one of the pictures so that they were there almost like storyboards for a movie you know. In which you you know you go. From scene to scene and he weaves together in their rhythms really returning back to what? Elaine lock was calling artists to do in the nineteen twenties and thirties. Melanie Harby as a professor of Art History at Howard University nine that African legacy in using tools and strategies from that period to address our contemporary moment. So we see figurative representations of African Americans and powerful stances going back to New Negro Movement and Times revising African American representation. The fact that in the nineteenth century there was a whole visual program a by individuals like not only Richard Alan. The founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church the oldest African American denomination in the states but also individuals like Frederick Douglass. Either beat truth literally using their representation as a way of redefining identity. National Right so in some ways we can think about. Even what Jacob Lawrence grows to do right as a building on this kind of visual strategy of correcting misrepresentations histories of oppression. Laurence POWELL TO SALT. Literature series additional works depicting the lots of big years including Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman. But his most ambitious work was yet to come.

Jacob Lawrence Jacob Augusta savage Harlem African Methodist Episcopal Ch US Howard University Gwendolyn Frederick Douglass Laurence POWELL Gwynne graduate student Seattle Bridgetown Barbados Richard Alan Patricia Hills Thomas Harriet Tubman
"augusta savage" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

03:31 min | 11 months ago

"augusta savage" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"Because I think that is a big part of what resonates with so many people about this album both in the visual formats. And if you just listening to it is that it is unashamedly black and feels very specific but at the same aimed at has brought appeal. A lot of people think. Oh if it's if it's an album made from black one of you by a black person about black people that nobody else can listen. But I mean you've got accolades from Rolling Stone Pitchfork The New Yorker time and so many more who've come and said this is one of the best albums of the year. I mean they said that about your previous album as well but but it feels like it is connected with so many people because it's it's authentic was Houston a specific choice in that was choosing like your home. -lutely have what you think makes a real I THINK GROWING UP IN HOUSTON AND COMING BACK TO HOUSTON. I was able to find grounded. NECE and sort of all of the things that I might have thought were you know mundane are that. I didn't pay attention to an coming back and appreciate an architecture appreciating which never lost Never left me screw. Culture vacation between chop was and the way that we can't pay cars like all of that is innovation at the highest level of me So being able to just celebrate that and pay homage to all of those things that made me who I am today it it meant a lot to me. One thing you you are proud are really proud to speak about being a part of who you are. Today is a black woman and then you'll music. It is beautiful beautiful. How you express that how you speak with an four and about black women that is something that resonates with so many black women in a in a completely new way it was intentional? And you really drive it as a purpose in the album. Why did you feel that you needed to do it? That explicitly. You know some people be like I'm GONNA I'm GonNa bury the message like no. Here's like no this is truly truly me celebrating the black woman why I grew up in a half salon. My mom onto hair salon. I grew up with every type of black woman from Lois undocked. There's two teachers to the everyday black woman to decide. Shake to name it. These women were my aunties not they were my teachers. They were reflections of everything that I wanted to be as a woman. These women care for me. They nurtured me. They unapologetically with themselves themselves and they were my heroes and so I was really fortunate to be raised by a tribe of beautiful strong the nominal women and everything that I do. I try to center myself and my purpose in the things that I needed to see and be fed as a young and grow and so all of my work really Yunan making for ten fifteen years from now on the way that Augusta savage as a sculptor me being able to see that work and say hey I can do that too or even the way that CA- lease sort of you know really opened my eyes and her artistry a street ten fifteen years later now you have girls on instagram on the Internet paying homage when maybe they didn't fully understand at the time But you know I am a black woman so the work will always be through the lens of a black woman. I think we must have been. It definitely have created another masterpiece.

Houston Augusta savage Lois undocked CA
"augusta savage" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"augusta savage" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Area bites it's a net minutes now before five o'clock good morning edition from NPR news I'm no well king then I'm Steve Inskeep a mother's sent a message for her daughter killed in the two thousand seventeen terrorist attack in Manchester England and that message has been found in Italy NPR Sylvia Poggioli reports on the bottle that washed ashore after crossing some twenty five hundred miles of water a few days ago a man cleaning the coastal area in pool yet the heel of the Italian boot picked up a bottle floating along the rocky shore sealed with Cork and wax the bottle held a photograph of sorrel let Scott ski and the message written by her mother your absence is a pain in the heart that never leaves the moment you died my heart broke up into one piece is full of grief the other died with you sorrel was fourteen years old when she died in a suicide bomb attack in the Manchester arena after into Riana Grande concert on may twenty second two thousand seventeen the teenager along with her mother and grandmother had gone to the arena to pick up her little sister as the crowds were leaving the suicide bomber twenty two year old son and a baby detonated a device he kill sorrel and twenty one other people and injured more than a hundred including sorrels mother and grandmother Abedi was a Manchester native of Libyan descent believed by investigators to have been radicalized in Libya isis later claimed responsibility for what was one of Britain's deadliest terrorist attacks the sealed bottle was presumably tossed off the British coast thanks to winds and waves in the Atlantic Ocean it was buffeted southward along the French Spanish and Portuguese coast ocean currents then pushed eastward through the straits of Gibraltar in into the Mediterranean Sea before it washed ashore on the southeastern coast of Italy the bottle was brought to New Orleans so he keep the mayor of the nearest town motor channel the loca he wants to invite the list Kaski family to Italy so he can give them the bottle inside there's also a purple rubber bracelet with two hearts sorrels name and her date of birth Italian media report the mayor hopes the mother will toss the bottle back into the sea so that it can continue to wander across the world delivering its message of love and sorrow so you pull Julie NPR news this sculpture Augusta savage once said I was a leap year baby and it seems to me that I've been leaping ever since savage was a black woman from the Jim crow south she left to public attention during the Harlem Renaissance but she's not very well known today NPR special correspondent Susan Stamberg says an exhibition at the New York Historical Society will bring her new a claim this is the most famous work is called damage in two thousand two a small portrait bust by it does the savage was brought to antiques roadshow I think you might be surprised this is worth between fifteen and twenty thousand dollars.

twenty thousand dollars twenty two year fourteen years twenty second
"augusta savage" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:55 min | 1 year ago

"augusta savage" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"She gave away she gave away new family members to children of family members, some to school children who she thought they should have these falls somewhere soul. But but she did it because. It was the way she expressed her love, I think her love of children her love of our people, and they're just gorgeous. Jessica what's the value of the dolls? Do you think? Well, I was one of the things that we try to do in the exhibition is not just show painting and photography and sculpture. Although I love those mediums, but Kraft is also real craft and decorative arts so important in thinking about more inclusive or expansive model of art history. I think more personally how many of us have family members or loved ones who were makers, and who had perhaps an actual is d- dreams of of of being creative in whatever art form. They chose not to pursue in a more public way per se. So I think it's. Really touching that. We had the opportunity to highlight. Miss McRae as as a maker, not an and not just you know, other modes of her of her by her biography. Afford snow'll is also represented, and obviously this has been in the works for a long time. It's very press. She recently passed away tells more about her work. So when we think of Nolan associates, we think about modern, the modern office, the modern American office, and many of those many designers who had been associated with knoll like van der Rohe men, but so there, but Florence knoll was the was the co founder and principal designer of knoll. And so we had two of her conic chairs and a hairpin stool as well as a marble table to to honor her her presence in the history of of of design. Yeah. So we we were lucky to be able to to honor her before she knew of the exhibition was. Before she passed. So oh, I'm glad she knew about it. That's great. It's it's interesting the name of the exhibit. Obviously people remember, nevertheless, she persisted. It's something very modern my out of the headlines, and there's also a piece that references. Sandra bland men who died in custody in Texas. Why was it important to include a the name of the the exhibit is political and to include pieces, which were politically charged isn't the right word. But. Potent? Yeah. It's important not to shy away from from issues that matter, and I think there are a lot of people who who look at art, and and and only consider its beauty and not necessarily it's sort of politic more political implications in so Jennifer Packers paintings her name is the one that we're talking about. And it's a stunning. I'm sorry. It's a stunning. It's it's a stunning still life of a funerary bouquet and. It's striking. I remember when we were installing it. There were lots of New York bureaucrats doing double takes looking at it because it was so beautiful. But Jennifer Packer work deals with with grief. In addition to beauty and thinking about love and care and tenderness and she knew as an artist that she wanted to call attention to the story of Sandra bland, but understood her position is not necessarily knowing her. And so what does it mean to pay tribute to a life of someone who you who you didn't know, but still experience a kind of collective grief for and so that painting. And I'm just so proud that it can hang at Gracie mansion not only because of its beauty, but because of its it's it's strong message. This show is about empowerment and being unified. And you mentioned that this is a really good time to have a show like this because of me to and because of the anniversary of women getting the right to vote, but we saw with the women's March first lady that there's been some fracturing among this this movement to get women to be in positions of power and to be respected as a leader. And f for other women who are leaders. What can we do? So that the movement stays cohesive. I think this exhibit is a great example of showing how much much more we have much more in common than that. Which we think separates us mean? We have our by a woman who is a woman identifying artists lean we have art by Seattle. La de Leon. And of course, faith Ringgold women of all ages. Different. Different times in life. But the themes that Jessica described are really quite unifying that the women who whatever their background all have like the body as. As a unifying theme. Maryland Rosner birth Rosler Rosler work in the kitchen. I mean, there is no woman who cannot look at that piece that video and and and not identify with the message that she's sending I and a faith Ringgold the quilt. You know there. There's so much that that really unifies us as as as women as as humans, and I think art is as an important unifier. Important reference point for us. As we go about the go about trying to make progress in our society to stay focused on the unity. Yes. Say focused on the unity. Do you each have a piece, I know you have to go soon that you hope people take a extra beat to linger in front of a piece that you think like I want people to. I know it's hard. It's like saying your favorite. There are some pieces of work. Right. Think I just was your favorite child. Why did you have one? That you think would be really really like people to stop and maybe consider. Well, I one of the great things about about the opportunity to to work with the first lady for the installation is that we not only had the chance to work with you know, these are conic artists like McLean. Thomas and fluorine shut Heimer and Helen Frankenthal follower. All of whom you'll see on display, but artists who haven't had as much attention. But who are of equal importance. Like pearla daily on. She's a foot photographer who has recently had worked at El Barrio. And and she is she was born in Harlem, it's been a lot of time in the Bronx, documenting the aftermath of the Bronx. Fires and she has these two incredible photographs that our hope our listeners will get the chance to see the first of which is my playground, which is this gorgeous photograph of a young girl playing in rebel with these kind of charred buildings behind her. And the second is women going to work. That's a good one. It's it's yeah. That one's the one. That speaks to me when I when I walk away from it. So it's it's she's got this woman in stride, and she's striking and about business, and she's about to get on the train to to go to work. Yeah. That's great. I love those pieces. I I would say the piece that that. Actually brings me to tears is the one by Augusta savage the the harp. Such a magnificent piece was shown at the world's fair. And because there were no funds to cast it in bronze the way she would have liked. It was destroyed. To me. It's a terrific. I mean, just such a sad. Sad waste and. That just makes me think about appreciating what we have now appreciating the women, and and the work that they produce. Now thinking of it as precious and delightful and something to be saved and honored. I are we doing that? Are we giving them their due now? So that's something like that doesn't happen again. The name of the show is she persists. A century of women artists in New York. Nineteen nineteen to twenty nineteen first lady, Shirley McRae and Jessica Bill Brown. Thank you so much for spending some time with us. Thank you. Thank you. Ellison. We're a break. We're back with Bruce Schoenfeld from the New York Times he's written a piece for this weekend's times magazine about new and highly anticipated rules for betting.

Jessica Bill Brown Sandra bland New York Shirley McRae Kraft Bronx Florence knoll Ringgold Gracie mansion New York Times Jennifer Packers Jennifer Packer Seattle Bruce Schoenfeld Harlem Nolan associates La de Leon Ellison
"augusta savage" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:55 min | 1 year ago

"augusta savage" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"She gave away she gave away new family members to children of family members, some to school children who she thought they should have these falls somewhere soul. But but she did it because. It was the way she expressed her love, I think her love of children her love of our people, and they're just gorgeous. Jessica what's the artistic value of the dolls? Do you think? Well, so one of the things that we tried to do the exhibition is not just show painting and photography and sculpture. Although I love those mediums, but Kraft is also real craft and decorative arts so important in thinking about and more inclusive or expansive model of art history. I think more personally how many of us have family members or loved ones who were makers, and who had perhaps an actual is d- dreams of of of being creative in whatever art form. They chose not to pursue in a more public way per se. So I think it's really touching that. We had the opportunity to highlight. Miss McRae as as a maker not in not just you know, other modes of her of her by her biography. Afford, and is also represented, and obviously this has been in the works for a long time. It's very press. She recently passed away tells us more about her work. So when we think of Nolan associates, we think about modern, the modern office, the modern American office, and many of those many designers who had been associated with knoll like van der Rohe where men, but so there, but Florence knoll was the was the co founder and principal designer of knoll. And so we had two of her conic chairs and a hairpin stool as well as a marble table to to honor her her presence in the history of of of design. Yeah. So we were lucky to be able to to honor her before she knew of the exhibition about it. Before she passed. So oh, I'm glad she knew about it. That's great. It's it's interesting name of the exhibit. Obviously people. Remember, nevertheless, she persisted. It's something very modern my out of the headlines, and there's also a piece that references. Sandra blonde woman who died in custody in in Texas. Why was it important to include a the name of the the exhibit is political and to include pieces, which were politically charged isn't the right word. But. Potent? Yeah. It's important not to shy away from from issues that matter, and I think there are a lot of people who who look at art, and and and only consider its beauty and not necessarily it's sort of politic more political implications and so- Jennifer Packers paintings hair name is the one that we're talking about. And it's a stunning. I'm sorry. It's a stunning it's stunning still life of a funerary bouquet, and it's striking. I remember when we were installing it. There were lots of New York bureaucrats doing double takes looking at it because it was so beautiful. But Jennifer Packer work deals with with grief in in addition to beauty and thinking about love and care and tenderness and she knew as an artist that she wanted to call attention to the story of Sandra bland, but understood her position is not necessarily knowing her. And so what does it mean to pay tribute to a life of someone who you who you didn't know, but still experience a kind of collective grief for and so that painting. And I'm just so proud that it can hang at Gracie mansion not only because of its beauty, but because of its it's it's strong message. This show is a so much about empowerment and being unified. And you mentioned that this is a really good time to have a show like this because of me to and because of the anniversary of women gained the right to vote, but we saw with the women's March first lady that there's been some fracturing among this this movement to get women to be in positions of power and to be respected as a leader. And for other women who are leaders. What can we do? So that the movement stays cohesive. I think this exhibit is a great example of showing how there is much much more. We have much more in common than that. Which we think separates us mean? We have our by a woman who is a woman identifying artists tortellini we have art by get a LA de Leong. And of course, you know, faith, Ringgold women of all ages. Different. Different times in life. But the themes that Jessica described are really quite unifying that the women who never their background all have like the body as. As a unifying theme. Maryland, Rosner Rosler Rosler work in the kitchen. I mean, there is no woman who cannot look at that piece that video and and not identify with the message that she's sending I and faith Ringgold the quilt, you know there. There's so much that that really unifies us as as as women as as humans, and I think art is as an important unifier important reference point for us as we go about the go about trying to make progress in our society to stay focused on the unity. Yes. Say focused on the unity. Do you each have a piece I know you have to go soon that you hope people take a extra beat to linger in front of a piece. That you think like I want people to. I know it's hard. It's like saying your favorite some out, some pieces of work, right? I just want your favorite child. Why did he do that? That's why I only have one. That you think would you really you really like people to stop and maybe consider. Well, I one of the great things about about the opportunity to to work with the first lady for the installation, we not only had the chance to work with, you know, these iconic artists like McLean, Thomas and fluorine shut Heimer. And Helen Franken follower. All of whom you'll see on display, but artists who haven't had as much attention. But of are of equal importance like pearla daily on. She's a foot photographer who has recently had worked at El Barrio. And and she is she was born in Harlem, it's been a lot of time in the Bronx, documenting the aftermath of the Bronx. Fires and she has these two incredible photographs that our hope our listeners will get the chance to see. The first of which is my playground, which is this gorgeous photograph of a young girl playing in rebel with these kind of charred buildings behind her. And the second is women going to work. That's a good one. It's it's yeah. That one's the one. That speaks to me when I when I walk away from it. So it's it's she's got this woman in stride, and she's striking and about business, and she's about to get on the train to to go to work. Yeah. That's a great. I love those pieces. I I would say the piece that that actually brings me to tears is the one by Augusta savage the the harp. Such a magnificent piece was shown at the world's fair. And because there were no funds to cast it in bronze the way she would have liked. It was destroyed to me as a terrific. I mean, just a such a sad. Sad waste and. That just makes me think about appreciating what we have now appreciating the women, and and the work that they produce. Now thinking of it as precious and delightful and something to be saved and honored. I are we doing that? You know, are we giving them their due now? So that's something like that doesn't happen again. The name of the show is she persists. A century of women artists in New York. Nineteen nineteen to twenty nineteen first lady, Shirley McRae and Jessica Bill Brown. Thank you so much for spending some time with us. Thank you. Alison. Thank you. Ellison. We're and take a quick break. Move back with Bruce Schoenfeld from the New York Times, he's written a piece for this weekend's times magazine about new and highly anticipated rules for betting on.

Jessica Bill Brown New York Shirley McRae Sandra bland Kraft Bronx Rosner Rosler Rosler Florence knoll Ringgold Gracie mansion New York Times Jennifer Packers Jennifer Packer Maryland Bruce Schoenfeld van der Rohe Helen Franken Nolan associates Alison
"augusta savage" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

KQED Public Radio

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"augusta savage" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

"She seems have tried to go to the police didn't get any assistance from them gould when he was brought before the police for harassing other women was repeatedly led off well known writer like edmund wilson an e cummings and go to the police and testify on his behalf as character witnesses and get the charges dropped for much of the hype about the oral history of our time it turns out was the efforts of gold's white modern as writer friends to protect him from being arrested and being sent back to a mentor institution or being sent to jail and this really only one person who leaves behind a david ensure a trail that makes it possible to see what was really going on its this writer name alan branch who was a white man but goes on to become really an active in a civil rights movement and he knows gold to his wife and gold asks him to intervene with augusta savage and help bring them together so brand goes to talked augusta savages in nineteen thirty four and says you know when you know i'm good friends at joeckel is this great writer he really love you and i guess you guys had some kind of misunderstanding or something and i just hope you give him another chance initially heartbroken and savage his personal been making my life daily miserable an utter ugly miserable he never these reno he calls me he comes to my shows he makes me endless letters he wants to mary me there's a lot of information that there's been such a violence but brand writes this all out in letters to joseph mitchell in nineteen sixty four after joe cooled secret comes out and he says brand isn't tough a very successful writer and it's has spent mostly career as an excellent literary editor and he says you know i really love your piece joe gold seguin is beautiful pieces lighting tries we don't know wrong at the earliest he didn't exist are right in the longest parts of it were about augusta sent magician in ins actually quite a fascinating and skillful an important piece of writing you know when you put it past joe gold have destroyed on yeah what would eventually happen to chuckled right after are professes ego came out in the new yorker nineteen forty two gase after that really he had another break down and was committed to manhattan state hospital for the insane just like i just tells on that the colts a psychopath he manages to be released from the hospital after some time a some social services.

david writer alan branch augusta savage joeckel reno literary editor joe gold new yorker social services gould edmund wilson civil rights augusta joseph mitchell manhattan state hospital
"augusta savage" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

KQED Public Radio

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"augusta savage" Discussed on KQED Public Radio

"Which does distinguish and from a lot of other people he had one particular fixation which is his obsessed with the idea of sex between a white man and a block on them he was the genesis when his young life and had work for they jack's records office collecting pedigrees and document ing though skin color of native americans in the midwest and he was fascinated bye the degenerative effect of the darker races on the lighter ones but also on the i'm really rating a factor mean gould had a really complicated set of ideas about race because he was at the use of sus with racial mixture and it seems that his attentions to women were directed almost invariably at black women i presume he thought the whole idea of mixing rice's was a heart the idea i mean if he was the genesis and yet he himself was personally fixated on black women yes so he didn't need didn't wasn't unstable person so his ideas are not fixed nor anyone's ideas about this question him ticket early fixed in the nineteen teams and twenties and thirties he has a young person hasn't as the genesis was very of vehemently a poster racial mixing because it but it would interfere with racial a quality that in order for the races to become politically equal they needed to be racially distinct this is the sort of weird kind of inverted garbi a some in fact reversed an idea and in became move insistent that that the russia should next and then in particular this one black women should have sex with them and that if she didn't it was because she didn't believe in russia comedy he pursued this one black artist well known in and the harlem renaissance augusta savage and apparently i mean he basically stopped or for years yeah and this was really hard to reconstruct are cuddly because savage seems to have destroyed most of her own papers ended much of her own art and i think most of that has to do with her difficulties with joe gould such was the best no artist of the harlem renaissance at chooses sculpture she was a sort of social center for artis she also tot a lot of times artists over real legacy is actually in her students could like jacob lines in any case goal met her nineteen twenty three when she is getting a poetry reading with ranks news and blunder on bennett he you know they're city fell in love affair at first sight and from that day forward really never left her alone.

native americans rice russia bennett jack harlem augusta joe gould day forward