33 Burst results for "Auger"

Toro recalls snow blowers due to amputation hazard

Chicago's Afternoon News

00:29 sec | 8 months ago

Toro recalls snow blowers due to amputation hazard

"Snow blowers, the 2021 Power Macs. Snow throwers were sold at Home Depot, Ace Hardware and Toro authorized dealers nationwide. There have been reports the Auger may fail to disengage when the control lever is released, posing an amputation hazard. Girl has received five reports of incidents, but no injuries have been reported. Consumers are advised to admit it immediately stop using the recall tour of Power Macs. Snow thrower in contact a Toro authorized dealer for free repair. WGN sports

Ace Hardware Toro Home Depot WGN
Ethereum Prediction Markets with Joey Krug

Software Engineering Daily

04:52 min | 8 months ago

Ethereum Prediction Markets with Joey Krug

"Joey welcome the show. Thanks for having me. You are the founder of auger which is a decentralized prediction market. What is the function of a prediction market. Yes so a prediction market is basically a platform that lets people bet on or against real world events and by taking the odds of those bats you can basically get a forecast for how likely event is to actually happen and practical functionality. does that serve. Yeah so it does a couple of things one. Is that it for the people who are actually betting on the market. It lets them actually. Just make a straight bet if they're betting on something like a sporting event but it also lets people had risks so as an example which is a fairly real example. Say you're a person who wanted to hedge against the risk that taxes increase a new democratic congress. Well you could basically bet on the democrats and if they win you've hedged a little bit of whatever the tax changes you basically make more money if they win if they lose you. Don't get the tax hike but you also lose your bet. The other uses somebody who has just an opinion. They're not looking to hedge risk. They're looking to take risk on because they believe they know something about the world that someone else doesn't and prediction. Markets have a wide range of things you could bet on. It could be sporting event politics. You know whether it's based extra lunches there next rocket successfully really anything now in order to actually make those bets substantive and to make like if i wanted to make a significant hedge against the incoming tax policy makers i need a lot of liquidity to be able to place that bet against what are the challenges in a prediction market aggregating enough liquidity on either side of a trade. Yes so there's a bunch of challenges with it one is that prior to being blockchain based prediction markets most prediction markets were run and owned by a central company which means they tended to fragment the liquidity you might have a prediction market which focused on say new zealand might have another prediction market which focused on spain separate one for the uk and so on and so forth and so one problem is you had this to quitter fragmentation. the second issue is that just forming. The quality for new events is hard so if you look at something like the stock market it has you know these huge systems in firms and entities exist solely for providing liquidity and. There's a ton of different ways that they can hedge their risk but with a prediction market. You're betting over real-world events and not only that but if you're wrong you hold the risk in the wrong way. You could actually lose all your money. They example this is like you know. Take a presidential election if you bet on trump and trump loses you lose all the money that you bet on him and so for market maker. That's very risky. If you look at say like market making apple stock you know the the worst case scenario is that apple moves a little quickly and you end up holding too many or too few apple shares and you may be lose you know in a in a big move a number of percents though of prediction markets. You know something can swing from a ten percent chance to zero percent chance to one hundred percent chance in a matter of seconds or minutes and so that's what makes marketmaking getting liquidity very difficult before you started augured. There were a number of centralized prediction markets. What are the problems with centralized prediction markets. Yeah so if you look at the problems the centralize prediction markets. There's a couple. There's one problem that you know. Even when i got into the space. I thought it was just a problem in theory. I didn't think it would actually be a problem in practice but it turns out it is a problem in practice. Sometimes as well in that problem is because these things are real world events they have a resolution date some point where the event has to be paid out immediately clear winner in actually sometimes controversy over how it gets declared so that's one problem with a centralized one that in an e centralized system. You could have more community driven process for resolving market and pain out that sort of ensures more people are are happy with the result. So it's less arbitrary in that sense. The other kind of big issue with centralized ones is that they tend to be located in you know one or two jurisdictions or handful jurisdictions. Nobody's really created a global centralize prediction market mostly for the for the reason that the compliance cost of gain licensed in a one hundred eighty countries would just be too much overhead in in too much burden for anyone entity to do it.

Auger Joey Apple Congress New Zealand Spain Donald Trump UK
Hogger Is The Latest Character Coming To Heroes Of The Storm

The Business of Esports

06:04 min | 11 months ago

Hogger Is The Latest Character Coming To Heroes Of The Storm

"Kind just lead off with the biggest news story of possibly the year. Any sports okay. I thought last week you'll ever what i thought last week. It was the biggest ever. No this is it. We've had a lot of biggest weeks but this week may be the biggest of all because this week. Here's the storm. Got a new hero for the first time in like i can't even count. They literally just released new hero. There are people at blizzard. Still working on this game a parent apparantly. They literally they were like released official. Not some rogue employee's official. They started listening to the podcast. There like that kid. William really likes the store and we gotta give him a new hero and bam. They're literally like out of nowhere. You had no idea new hero. His name's hogger. He's a knoll he spins around. It's awesome so if you ask me how my week was. I think i just told you like leg world of warcraft harder. Well if warren bradshaw gary. Everyone's making jokes about like like his voice lines. Let me tell you how. I escaped storm wind. Keep you know how like harder is is one of. I would say if not the while hold on. I don't wanna go too far. It's i would argue top three memes ever okay. So leroy jenkins number one. Yup leroy jenkins is number. One number two is next ramos. Blood not like the play harder number two because harder river to. It's the first real like elite that you kill right. Yeah paul i. I know that and so it was like like the looking for group. Hogger is like you wanna mean at like level. Sixty in classic. Wow that's that's that's what you put out there right or you want or do you want to. You know you want to grief other players. You go and just cam poker. Because they're trying to kill him to finish whatever quest they've got and he just stand around the spine and one shot him. You know it's that hogger yes. It's that auger interesting You know nobody really knows. Like i mean these new heroes like they always seem overpowered at launch. You know i played him. I actually thought he was underpowered. But i think that has more to do with me being absolutely useless at the game despite playing it nonstop for six years so i felt like it just died off time when i played him but it doesn't matter at this point they could put a mouse mouse trap and a piece of cheese in the game and i would buy like i'd be like this is incredible when you actually have spent money on the game. Now oh my god. Yes so many like side like this new content. I bought the hair they released today by the are paul economic incentives. Like if i want them to keep releasing new heroes. I have to find out how. I still don't believe that. This is some official project at blizzard. I really believe it's. It's like two rogue employees that that that oxygen is paying behind under the table. Maybe maybe we should be quiet about. Maybe they've just survived because like nobody's notice there unlike closet somewhere somehow escaped eight. Hr shutdowns and it's like randy from what was it office space or whatever. The is just their house. We can keep developing. I it we hit. It has a very big user base. That game like it's not league level. It's clearly large enough for them to continue resources to some extent and look if they're shutting down starcraft that they're continuing to do lots as much as we mean about like. Oh la william. You're so weird to like that game like it added an audience. It's just not a huge audience but it's big enough that even a company like blizzard still invest something on it. So i mean i would assume on. Its own like i. I don't know how blizzard internally looks at projects right but do they. Are they sophisticated enough. I mean i'm sure they are but the question is do they break out sort of a pnl for each game. Right is simple enough to do that. Or is there so much intermingling of resources at the company eight possible. I cannot believe they do not have a pl specifically for that game at least on the revenue side cost side might be a little harder to attribute because you borrowed an artist here you re use an asset. Their pets like i. I have no doubt that the games are run as pretty strict individual. Pnl's with relatively high control that the must be profitable right to keep going. Yeah the the big question that kills things like this and organizations is hugh rationalizations right. This is why like coke and you know what is it. Clorox or old household price continuously cycle out brands. despite the fact that there are actually quite successful. Like if you. And i started one of those brands like this head. Skew rationalization is big driver of overall profitability. And big business says and that sort of what happened to starcraft right gut skew rationalized. Essentially i bet you for the investment on it it was still profitable. The question is could you put those dollars somewhere else and have a higher return. Could you put that management attention somewhere. And so i think it's interesting that the storm clearly. They're not scared to kind if they need to. They killed these sports scene right. It was dead until the cc l. But it is interesting that like you know they have. They don't skew so again. I think it speaks to. The game is a lot bigger than i think. People realize i mean. I just like to kid about it because it's a funny meam now. It's like our our top. Names are dumpster. Fire cures to the storm. What is lindsay's nickname. That's like our three or three like

Leroy Jenkins Blizzard Warren Bradshaw Ramos Gary William PNL Paul Randy Clorox Hugh Lindsay
"auger" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

Back From The Future Podcast

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"auger" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

"The brand new xbox that's coming out next month thirty, five dollars a month get you the brand new xbox, which is coming out, and then there's also a deal which is twenty five dollars a month which will get you the newest xbox one series and you can purchase those at Walmart game stop and other places I add to applaud. Microsoft this is pretty smart I wonder if Nintendo and Sony are got follow suit with something similar well-done. Microsoft. Yeah they've got great deals with his game pass ultimate I. Mean they want you to play anywhere it always mixed the xbox. Irrelevant because of the streaming option well-done Microsoft I'm impressed. My pick. This week is brought to you by humble bundle, and this is the AWS Azure Google and cloud security bundle brought to you by Cybersex. If you're like me and you work in it, then you are usually learn about something new to stay current and if you're like me, you're always on the lookout for the latest humble bundle and this week's bundle is right up my alley likely title said, this is all about cloud and bundle is all about cloud certifications which me and Dj are very strong on there are three different tiers, but I'm going to talk. About the fifteen dollar tear, which gives you everything it's going to give you fourteen books. All about aws is to give you, I S C squared, which is C. C. S. P. Certified Cloud Security Professional. We have a colleague who just took that test congratulations Andrew Del born for passing CCSB. Yes. CONGRATS. If you're into the Google cloud, will that in the bundle to with the official Google Cloud certified associate cloud engineer number four and five or both aws cloud cert- s-, and the cloud practitioner or the aws certified sis ops Ataman, and there are so many great books in this bundle. If you're a fan of competition, there's the. T cloud plus study guide that tests has just been refreshed and renewed in the COMTE cloud plus is vendor neutral..

aws Microsoft Google Walmart Nintendo Andrew Del Sony Dj engineer official C. C. S. P.
"auger" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

Back From The Future Podcast

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"auger" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

"I don't have any one particular DJ that stands out as particularly. Interesting there's it's oftentimes I mean you have to love cyber security because it's basically like you're playing a game that's like work because you're walking through a incident but you know it's it's pretty common where you say that there's some activity on an end point to to start the attack or start the incident, and then it depends on how masochistic the incident master is on where they want to take it from there. I will also point out that they've been working I. Think they've almost fully developed it, but they've been working on a competitive version of back doors and breaches. So the current model is one incident master and then players who are trying to uncover the incident competitive backdoor some breaches as you can imagine as one player versus another player, and you're basically defending from their attack while at the same time trying to attack them and build the sidewalk kill chain, which is the four pieces of the incident. I've actually will be doing a video a video on my youtube channel about the traditional incident. Master Don's dragons style back doors and breaches. If you're interested, you can check that out on the on my simply cyber video but and actually. In talks now with one of their people to actually do a competitive version, record, it clean it up and publish it my youtube channel it just I'm ill yet because they've been trying to refine the rules, it actually make it a fun game and not just something kind of silly. So we'll Jerrell. Thank you for joining us again this week can you tell us about any upcoming events you may have or how our listeners may learn more about you? Yeah, of course. Yeah, and thank you both for having me on as a guest. I really enjoyed it last week and. I appreciate the opportunity to come on again if folks want to connect with me or continue this conversation I'm always happy to do it. I love engaging people when it comes to cybersecurity linked in the professional social media platform I'm very active on that Gerald, Ozher, and if you type in simply cyber like two words, I should come up as the first result because that's the my youtube channel name and also my youtube channel I you know you can leave comments and watch content there but it's Gerald Luger simply cyber on there and we talked about it earlier but you are. Listening to this podcast in your trying to get into the cybersecurity field and just not sure what the right path is are the most high rate of success path..

youtube Gerald Luger Don Ozher
"auger" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

Back From The Future Podcast

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"auger" Discussed on Back From The Future Podcast

"A distant number two at. Twenty one point nine, three, percent Cisco Webex the grandfather of virtual meetings. Seventeen percent like I said zooms into an encryption very smart. It's GonNa keep them growing. They're gonNA do great things in the near future from what I can see if zoom continues to keep its encryption strong across the board, I, don't see any reason. It can grow to forty percent market share by the end of twenty twenty one. What do you think DJ? Personally I like this this news but I think we should tie up some loose ends. Last time we talked about zooms encryption efforts on this show they were quickly backtracking on statements made by their CEO Eric Von with said free users for sure we don't want to give them that because we also want to work together with the FBI with local law enforcement. In case, some people use zoom for bad purposes that was mid, June In episode nine at the time, they also said non paying users must provide a piece of identifying information to have the feature. Enable participants cannot join before the host participants must run the official zoom client plus browsers legacy zoom enabled devices NPS are disabled in one of these meetings. Well, all that changed as well. Now, all the free user has to do to authenticate to one of these meetings is precipitate in a one time. Verification process that will prompt the user for additional pieces of information such as verifying a phone number via text message. They also went on to say we're confident that by implementing risk based authentication in combination.

Cisco Eric Von FBI CEO official
Report: Algorithm question complicates TikTok sale

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Report: Algorithm question complicates TikTok sale

"Late last week China updated its export rules that might sound like a small thing but it could have a big impact on the tech industry. One of its changes focused on artificial intelligence technology including things like content recommendation algorithms. It just so happens that an advanced content recommendation algorithm is central to you GUSTA Tiktok. The Algorithm is a big reason why companies like Microsoft Oracle and others are so interested in buying the social media up the new rules from China could apply to any sale of TIKTOK US operations. So deal talks are in limbo and the impasse is raising the question what's TIKTOK WITHOUT ITS ALGORITHM Here to explain as a reporter. Aaron thanks for joining us. Things revved me. So what is it about tech talks algorithm that all these companies are interested in what is the do? It. Surfaces content you know I. It's. It's like any other sort of use suggest auger them. You you see on your facebook news feed or browsing instagram in the search function you know it's just it's just catering in tailoring content for you, but it's pretty remarkable the level of engagement that Tiktok as seen because of the algorithm and they they have they have different algorithms, free country tailored to different cultures and countries and. Regions and they have so many users engaged. They get so much data that they're able to really tune these algorithms for maximizing the kind of engagement they get, and so you know without it it's you know what is tiktok except a pretty basic video app it is really the core of the product. It is pretty essential and TIKTOK has a really big audience. Are they enough to keep some buyers interested on their own? Yes. So if the American companies were to buy, Tiktok with out the algorithm than what they get is is a pretty good video APP with a lot of users, and if the product doesn't work the same way, if it doesn't, it doesn't lead to that kind of crazy engagement they get now the algorithm powering it I think there's a real risk that this audience would leave the platform. Right. Now they've they've around one hundred, million monthly US users you know in these companies would have to develop their own out of the room but that would take quite a long time months possibly years and I think by then it'd be there'd be a big risk of these users leaving the platform, and of course, the stakes are pretty high. The trump administration has said that tiktok either has to sell the operations or face potential ban and. Talk is a lot less appealing to these companies without the algorithm and without its audience. So. Looking foward what's next for this deal? Yeah right now, it's kind of a above the company's heads. You know right now it's this sort of geopolitical tug of war between us and China both governments trying to weigh in on the deal and and decide what how this will be best for each country and the company's inside that country. So right now it's it's really kind of above them and it's waiting to see what the Chinese government will or will not allow to be sold and what? The trump administration deems appropriate insecure for Americans. So all these companies involved in this deal are any kind of wait and see mode in some ways. I mean. They're trying to negotiate these things but they really have to wait for these governments to decide what they'll allow to happen. Yeah and zooming out to that geopolitical level I as a huge engine behind development in right now, and it's the thing that's being restricted here by both the US and China. Why is that an and what could that mean for tech innovation the future? Well I. Think There's been certainly love commentary about the sort of Cold War, going on. In artificial intelligence is very central to that. Certainly, tiktok uses the artificial intelligence technique called deep learning to develop their algorithms are so the results in so much engagement and these same serve techniques a deep learning are being deployed and weapon system. So so whoever has access or the the ability to develop some the best says Systems here I think has a huge competitive advantage. So both sides are trying to keep a very close eye on who has access to that and how it's how it's deployed and and you know China doesn't want to give away the keys to the algorithm especially around Tiktok, which has been there really big global success. One of their first big global successes in the Texan

Tiktok China United States Microsoft Aaron Reporter Chinese Government
Tens of thousands of people rally against Lukashenko in Belarus

Monocle 24: The Globalist

12:15 min | 1 year ago

Tens of thousands of people rally against Lukashenko in Belarus

"Where Can Belarus President Turn Now? Thousands of people were back on the streets protesting this weekend still angry at what they believe was a rigged presidential election President Lukashenko who claimed as he returned to power with an eighty percent approval rate responded by flying over the protesters wearing riot gear with a rifle slung from his shoulder. Well, drained over is L. Editor of Belarus Anna Leasing at the University of Brain and I'm delighted to say she joins us on the line now Auger a very warm welcome to monocle twenty four. These absolutely bizarre scenes of President Lukashenko yesterday. Well. Yes. I was actually also quite as to see you know him banning public with a gun and also his fifteen year old son campaign him so to say so it's the definitely assigned for me that he he's kind of knocked children confidence in front of the people who through testing by his residence, and it's also not you know not that Jerry. Addict from me because the protest is peaceful, protesters will not trying to receive this residents in the state needs. said the wall spread the information that there was some attempt to seek the? Residency so it's quite an emotional psychological reaction from him. I would say and will. Nobody. that. So it's also very strong sign that there is now readiness of from from the official from the state site for any kind of luck that you know this new to build coordination committee by Dehaan Oscar and she team is is trying to do initiate and I think everybody most notably people. In Belarus itself have been absolutely taken aback by the brutality of the reaction by the the Lauren forces to the protesters and the fact that Alexander Lukashenko was was dressed up in riot gear suggests that he doesn't have anywhere to go other than a violent approach. Yes I would also I would also expects it. You know what targeted repressions and they're ready started last week and they continued this week. So what what would serve now is definitely not base wave of unprecedented repression that we. Saw Three days and nights after the elections but still there are targeted repressions and against. Most active people are also criminal case has been initiated against the newly built coordination committee and people. People are invited to some talks with KGB officials until also people actually also bill will try to strike there actually threatened. By the direction openness of the state owned enterprises that they would lose their jobs and so on. So observe already targeted pressure on people, but this wave is still not to the tide because you know. So what international reaction was so the state drives, you know just show from the one handed, it's not ready for the data from the one hand there is the rest of. You know not not to let this protests spread. Within the country how much do you think that's what the foreign observers of said about what's been happening in Belarus for the last couple of weeks is actually forming any decision made by Alexander Lukashenko at the moment. Well I think that it will quite an important aim has been achieved ready and that we actually we have understood that he's not legitimate within the society right within the boat society and I think also problem was that he really did not understand that. Shortly after the elections or before the elections so and. Actually. I think that the reaction was not is at least that. He and his circles really have the distended. Okay. He doesn't have any majority in society, but it has not led so far to his readiness for dialogue just in the all the way he kind of supports the security structures in internal, Misteri Ministry and actually he even gave you know about three hundred medals to those who are actually responsible of for for this incident violence. So he kinds of stresses that the security two structures military is. Actually the most important pillar his powerful for now for the moment, the Steve Kerr show is joining us now he's policy and advocacy. Directorate. Freedom from torture and author of St Spirit Steve. Welcome. Thanks for joining us. Hey On monocle twenty, four Olga a moment ago mentioned the fact that the secret police is still called the KGB I mean, what does that say about the level of influence at Russia's still has in terms of the way that Belarus's going and whether Russia just going to sit this out. Yes I mean I either it reflects influence of Russia, which is August is certainly, very great or it's just almost bizarre retro element to to better under Lukashenko. He doesn't mind thinking in those terms I think it is going to be. So Russia will certainly be an important factor and but at the same time Mosca really doesn't want to be. Getting, further involved in in a very direct since that's going to be difficult for Russia as well. So I think that Lucas. Is playing a very difficult game. If he was giving small confessions, I think he might have some a little bit more success in some homage to blunt things but so far at least the violence has had absolutely opposite effective people become more and more angry the fear obviously quite rightly the last Sunday was absolutely crucial. I would argue that the US huge threats of on ahead of Sunday hoping that people. Would back off and stay at home and actually it was a big rally than ever. So not particular face off. There's no question that Lukashenko loss what happens next we'll still see I'll steve has suggested that Sunday was a pivotal moment some people waiting for what is described as a tipping point when an event causes things to go one way or the other would you say that Sunday was part of that? Tipping Point. Demon this Sunday last Sunday. To Sunday. The Sunday. Just gone when tens of thousands of people came out onto the streets to set by a threat the first Sunday directly after the elections. Yes. I it just completely I mean people never any. Okay. What we're talking about batteries and Ballard who's says, Chris it's not the first Sunday that actions pulses side will have to admit that it also not to the extent that people actually being tortured eating the prisons will have also. took a beast fag, but it's for the first very time that such vast majority of people. So it with their own is is of their families or friends in stone. So you can imagine how many are nets were the strategy when they're where our seven seven thousand arrests. So it's it's quite a big part of the country said it's really I would agree it had an opposite effect and it's also for the first time that you know this special. GRANITZ or gas or a also rubber bullets on there were actually used against own population. It never existed in the history of Belarus in October election protests, people widget shocked and I think it was a shock from the both sides because the state net expected to such mass protest before also before three weeks before the elections would be solved by. About two to five or even six percent of local population came to to railways with Hannele. It's also unprecedented thing was kind of shock from both sides and of course, people people were also by this eighty percent because nobody really believes that anymore I mean. People also really did not quite believe that before I, would say people heading out some kind of feeling that president steelhead had a majority maybe not eighty percent maybe fifty five, maybe sixty but this feeling was there and this style with completely different. So quiet in Jersey, you know quite a big part even I think I would say the majority of people just didn't believe that he actually has any kind of fifty plus and that was the problem that we still have this eighty percents I think people would just. People were just humiliated by that of course, activate shortly afterwards by this unprecedented wave refreshing stave when we look to the further history of batteries, which is being written right now when considering what sort the former eastern bloc countries of have seen in the last three decades. When regime ends, it's generally quite a peaceful affair actually the deleted. is of removed from office. This is unlikely to happen here. Isn't it? Well, I mean, sometimes it has been an sometimes it hasn't been. So when I was a journalist working for the independent, I was the East Europe during the eighty nine revolutions and also join me the fall of Milosevic Milosevic in Serbia and cover dot and there a number of those leaders were ready to use very significant violence and what I'm fascinated by very moved by what was seeing with the courage. A better as protesters today is to see that they are defined vence in the same ways that work very effectively for example, in East Germany where people were threatened with extraordinary for someone particular day in Leipzig in. October nineteen eighty-nine the fact that so many people came out meant regime which had publicly declared its loyalty to force actually back down in Romania I very much. Hope it weren't turn into remain, but we do already see that there are splits within Belarus at the riot police remain loyal. The moment we've seen a number of police units splits off. We've seen a lot of establishment figures putting off in the same way as also does something happened in in Ukraine and the Orange Revolution, and once you see security forces a different security forces splitting away going like enough already as August said, I mean the eighty percent. Claim was was absurdly insulin and the degree of the virus even Grayson seen before and I think this is really interesting. It might end up in huge volumes but I think Lukashenka would lose very very badly that to happen I think it's a regional issue. How if you like bluntly how crazy you are Milosevic. For example, he survived on one occasion ninety seven by giving some concessions and then re clamping down and people just got tired and went back when you use real violence I think it's really difficult. It was a great book written by Richard couple the Polish off I was written about the Iranian revolution. Charlotte. Charlotte's but very much reflected his own country Poland which forty years ago. This month solidarity kind of a huge opposition movement didn't call itself opposition challenge the regime and unthinkable circumstances laying Brezhnev for the very reactionary Russian leader was still in power. They managed to become successful and he said the moment where people stand in front of eastern threatens violence, the pre curry signing backstops, and instead someone stands there and doesn't back down he said, this is where the revolution begins, and after that in effect is the exact the precipice. If you're to violence, you make people more angry if you start making concessions than people go. We have lost our fear and in a sense the certain moment difficult to prediction events but describable. There is no way back to the regime and it still seems a little bit early to say but I think it's very, very difficult to see how Lukashenko come back from this. If he steps back more gently than, of course, it will be peaceful. The protests have been fun tastic peaceful and very, very consciously so far the extended even cleaning up rubbish because I really vary consciously very civic. Minded. So he might just go off and disappear off to Russia for example, and as it will live happily ever after but he tries to bring out all of the guns. Then I think you know all bets are off but I don't think it was a good ending for him whichever way it goes Steve Crozier and Elga agenda over there. Thank you for joining us on monocle twenty four.

Belarus President Lukashenko Russia President Trump Chris It Steve Kerr Jerry St Spirit Steve Milosevic Milosevic KGB Editor United States Anna Leasing University Of Brain Auger Steve Crozier Misteri Ministry Dehaan Oscar
"auger" Discussed on Nopeville

Nopeville

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"auger" Discussed on Nopeville

"Yeah, they were saying we will learn your way. Look, what do you want us to do in? They're just. So since Jack was a leader of his clan, he didn't want his fate to be controlled by by the judge of the Canadian law right, so he wanted to take control of his own fate, and so he managed to escape, but hanged himself. Okay Yeah Michigan's incredibly sad, but I guess honorable. Maybe in the sense that he didn't want them. Hunting him to his tribe and troubling them. Yeah. He just took control of his own fate However, his brother was sentenced to life in prison for murder. And although the jury ruled him guilty of murder, they also recommended mercy on the count of the prisoners. Superstition, but the judge however stated that the law didn't permit him to exhibit mercy. And so he was sentenced to life in prison. A petitions were sent out to the Minister of Justice to pardon Joseph, and after the third attempt Joseph had been pardoned Fortunately, he had died. He died of consumption three days before he actually received word of the pardon. So. He still ended up dying in jail. Because tuberculosis, which again plays into European settlers introduced the disease. To the nation. Just as well as Someone go into another story from historian named Nathan Carlson. And he talked about the story, woman named Catherine Auger who he actually discovered in his research. He has distant relative ties to interesting. Interesting Yeah, and her husband Felix Auger so this was during a time that these social political landscape was rapidly changing so in eighteen nineties Felix Catherine welcomed in Anglican missionary into their lives named Reverend Charles Weaver. and. He came to build schools and churches and convert the native people to Christianity. As they did then in Nathan's research, he mentioned that there isn't really an explanation as to why they were so welcoming to this missionary, but it may be perhaps their extended family had also converted to Christianity recently, so they're just like. Yeah. Okay, we'll do, too. yeah, so there wasn't really like specifically why Katherine and feel excited to do this, but they did. During the whole conversion weaver had a distaste for indigenous peoples, religion ceremonies and one particular thing he sought to remove wasn't effigy. That was the stump of a poplar tree it was carved into the form of a head and shoulders, and was painted with red. And had three black horizontal stripes across the chest occur so very detailed, that was the effigy that was like put up in the effigy, was used in a ceremony where food gifts and full bags of animal fat, represented to it to appease the quote skeletons, which were said to be the evil spirits of people who had died of starvation, and the reason why the edgy was air was because if the people perform the ceremony. Ceremony regularly where they would present it with food, gifts and bags of animal fat than the spirits would supply adequate game, animals and food for the people to stock up on and survive through the harsh winters right so they wouldn't starve to exactly therefore not having to resort to cannibalism, and in effect turning into windy great bringing the window around exactly so they removed effigy..

Joseph Nathan Carlson murder Felix Auger weaver Felix Catherine Catherine Auger Michigan tuberculosis Jack Charles Weaver. Katherine
Understanding Unconscious Bias In The Brain

Short Wave

02:19 min | 1 year ago

Understanding Unconscious Bias In The Brain

"The human brain is a marvellous sponge that can process eleven million bits of information every second, but like a sponge it's leaky are conscious minds. The thoughts we are aware of can only handle forty to fifty bits of information, the second, which means that way more is entering our heads than we realize this much information coming at us, we consciously process all that information on a very rational logical manner. Otherwise we would be I'm going over every decision we make. Progress Auger Wall is a behavioral and data scientists in the UK and looks at this in her new book. So. What's the human brain to do? While progress says we sometimes take cognitive shortcuts help make those decisions easier shortcuts that can lead to implicit bias or as is sometimes called unconscious bias, which is what her books sway is all about these are some of the biases or prejudices that we carry within us, and we might think that we are really fair, minded and Galley -Tarian, but they often spring up on us when we least expected often via tired or distracted or Nari including of course. Course Racial bias progress gave me a short example from her own life raised in India. She came to the UK over twenty years ago and now lives with her husband and three kids in a beautiful seaside town. The Sandy beach is like ten minutes away, which is great for the dog Abud not very multicultural place at home running into others, bias is kind of an everyday experience especially since brexit up into a supermarket, Wiedeman recently told me Oh. This is now how we do things here. From member has been living in the UK for over twenty years. Biased really is all around. Yes, exactly. advertently quoted love actually which is an expert. About line. How many times have you washed? Love actually? Anyway. Today on the show Prageru Wall on what science has to say about unconscious bias where it comes from and how we can check our unconscious biases in the moment. I'm emily along and this is shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR.

Nari UK Auger Wall Prageru Wall Sandy Beach NPR India Wiedeman
Jimmie Johnson 1st NASCAR driver to test positive for virus

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Jimmie Johnson 1st NASCAR driver to test positive for virus

"NASCAR driver Jimmie Johnson likes to be first but when it comes to cope with nineteen that's not a good thing seven time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson becomes the first driver to announce that he's tested positive for the new coronavirus the forty four year old Johnson will have to miss out on this weekend's race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway it's supposed to be his final brickyard four hundred before he retires at the end of the season Hendrick motor sports as Johnson has no symptoms his wife did though and tested positive so he was tested and also found to have cope with nineteen Johnson says that his first priority is the health and safety of his loved ones and teammates Justin auger will replace Johnson in the number forty eight Chevrolet hi Jackie Quinn

Jimmie Johnson Indianapolis Motor Speedway Justin Auger Nascar Chevrolet Jackie Quinn
Jimmie Johnson 1st NASCAR driver to test positive for virus

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Jimmie Johnson 1st NASCAR driver to test positive for virus

"NASCAR driver Jimmie Johnson likes to be first but when it comes to cope with nineteen that's not a good thing seven time NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson becomes the first driver to announce that he's tested positive for the new coronavirus the forty four year old Johnson will have to miss out on this weekend's race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway it's supposed to be his final brickyard four hundred before he retires at the end of the season Hendrick motor sports as Johnson has no symptoms his wife did though and tested positive so he was tested and also found to have cope with nineteen Johnson says that his first priority is the health and safety of his loved ones and teammates Justin auger will replace Johnson in the number forty eight Chevrolet hi Jackie Quinn

Jimmie Johnson Indianapolis Motor Speedway Justin Auger Nascar Chevrolet Jackie Quinn
Michal Kempny named the Washington Capitals’ Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy nominee

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

Michal Kempny named the Washington Capitals’ Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy nominee

"NHL capitals defenseman Michal Kempny has been nominated by the team for this year's bill Masterson trophy going to the player who best exemplifies the qualities of perseverance sportsmanship and dedication to the game previous winners include then capitals goaltender chose a Theodore in twenty ten and former camps forty armory auger in twenty sixteen

Michal Kempny Theodore NHL Bill Masterson
Bob Iger steps down as CEO of Disney

The Frame

06:25 min | 1 year ago

Bob Iger steps down as CEO of Disney

"There's news today that Bob Eiger is stepping down immediately as CEO of the Walt Disney company to make room for his successor and that is Bob JPEG who runs Disney's theme parks division last year Argo announced that he would step down when his contract expires at the end of twenty twenty one he will remain at the company as executive chairman and according to a Disney press release will direct the company's creative endeavors joining me to discuss the Disney news is Ben Fritz is the west coast bureau chief of the Wall Street journal he's also the author of the book the big picture the fight for the future of movies so Bob Eiger has mentioned several times that he was going to leave his current position what are we to make of the timing right now it's tough to tell exactly why what why the sudden change after all these years about what you're saying he was gonna leave it at night and then on saying he was gonna leave and delaying he delayed his retirement numerous times over the past decade and he's you know less than a year and a half into it his latest three year contract so it's kind of surprising in its day but on the other hand like it's very I gear to sort of do it do it all in secret and then all of a sudden announced to the world and in an unexpected way so his successor Bob che pack runs Disney's biggest business that is theme parks and consumer products what are we to make of his selection and were there other people who might have been competing for the job certainly our or other people like I think the biggest contender currently at Disney's Kevin Mayer who's running their new screening effort you know that's led by Disney plus he's piece insert top strategy except for the company for a long time you know with Kate Kate back amongst the current crop of executives that is a bit of a safe choice right he's running he's running sort of the traditional businesses like theme parks obviously business most associated with Disney as opposed to remaining which is certainly the future of Disney and you know by all accounts he pick is a very smart guy and a very competent guy but certainly is not so different sort of had like the the Christmas season as much of the house of a great public speaker of this you know Bob Iger's let's talk a little bit about what Bob Iger has done at the Walt Disney company I'm gonna name before deals Pixar's seven point four billion Marvel for billion Lucasfilm for billion and last year the Whopper twenty first century fox seventy one point three billion those are all kind of content movie TV deals what kind of studio is Bob Eiger leaving behind before we talk about the rest of the company I really mean highway I think anybody would have to say is sort of the most successful and tightly run major entertainment company in in America today because he's very focused on franchises they were ahead of the rest of Hollywood and it pops into their business on franchises as you said a lot of that to acquisitions of Pixar and Marvel and Star Wars and franchises are busy sort of at the heart of the movie business these days in an auger was somewhat ahead of the curve in realizing you can just keep selling something Netflix is that Disney would have to launch its own streaming service to compete just like Disney plus is already out there and it's you know is is certainly ahead of what we're seeing from his competitors like HBO maxim peacock which are still to come I think I think later this year so you have to say he's always been for media executive pretty ahead of the curve and and been a leader is not just Disney plus as part of the fox deal they got a portion of who lived in they bought out the rest of the portion of Hulu from Comcast so what does Disney focused on now in terms of taking on Netflix with streaming they have Disney plus they have who is that where a lot of their money and attention is going right now absolutely I mean the future of Disney as an intern came distributor is Disney plus Hulu and ESPN plus right those are it's three major streaming services and traditional TV businesses being shrunk rapidly that's for Disney's putting all its efforts and a lot of films such as going there as well so that if that is the future of Disney but yet the one business they have it certainly not shrinking is the one that's cheapest and overseeing which is part of the consumer products right while all traditional entertainment is being disrupted people still love to go to theme parks and Disney theme parks are more successful than ever these days I want to buy the toys as well so that's sort of the more traditional side of the business that is not being transformed by digital technology I think you can make the argument that theme parks have what's known in business as a wide moat there not a lot of competitors to theme parks but there is something called the corona virus and there are problems that theme parks and cruise lines of which Disney has a cruise line are also facing pressure so what is that business look like going forward and what does it tell us about how Disney values theme parks that Bob Chapek will be running the whole company well listen I think in the short run it's not a great moment to be running theme parks in Shanghai and Hong Kong is Disney does and to have cruise ships so that businesses under pressure right now but I you know presuming I hope we do get the fire under control I think everybody within these businesses will continue to be successful if they have been and you know popped out to tech has by all accounts and done a very good job running those businesses and he generated a lot of profit for the people to the company if that's that you set up for a lot of the revenue and profits comments you know streaming is the future of streaming is a money losing business for now and I think you know with disappointment Disney's kind of saying yes stream is important part of our future but Disney is still a company that that it that it's hard to it's about the experiences people have in our theme parks Bob I will leave a great track record I think the Disney company is a very impressive guy in person a great public speaker there's been some speculation about him running for political office do you think that's potentially part of his future anything's possible right I think you know as he's publicly said that he toyed with the idea of running for president this year and he decided it wasn't right for him but he's you know very politically active Democrat I would not be surprised if he's hoping that you know if the next president is a Democrat that he might you know have some kind of a role in it in an administration I think that's something he would probably love to do it with fifteen profile very well well I'm gonna assume he's not jumping in this year it feels like we really don't need another billionaire and the rice then Fred's is the west coast bureau chief for the wallstreet journal band thanks so much for going

Bob Eiger CEO Walt Disney Company Argo Disney
StoneFlower3D Launches New Print Head 3.0 for Ceramic 3D Printing

3D Printing Today

05:31 min | 1 year ago

StoneFlower3D Launches New Print Head 3.0 for Ceramic 3D Printing

"Just saw this interesting thing on. Three D. printing industry. I talked to you about it. Because you're the guy that's played with paste extruders earn stuff like that? This looks like there's a there's a kit that's about to hit the market that they talk about in this article made by a company. It looks like it's somewhere in Europe. Germany I think Germany where they they have a ahead that you can attach to any three D. Printer that will That will extra that will pull things through a vacuum tube and force it down into easily replaceable. Plastic extruder nozzles it. It looks like something that wouldn't be that hard to actually use and implement yourself that you think about well actually the first generation of this is the this is the stone flower three D. S. Extruder that we're talking about the first generation of it was actually I don't know if it was fully described as open source. But they had plans of it that you could actually build your own was built out of Small plumbing parts what I like about this Is Unlike others that I've seen it. You can have the material in a separate container flow to the the extrusion feeder to the extruder. Oh the ones I've seen in the past usually these big plungers yet. It filled up. And you're flying all of your material around the printer yet now. The thing to remember is that the The reservoir that feeds the material has to be pressurized Dork. So so the this These extruders have a little screwdriver in them that that forces the the material through the nozzle but they're actually relying on pressurized reservoir to deliver the material to the extruder this has proven to be the best combinations of the best design overall for extracting most paced stuff because you the ability to start and stop and the ability to retract. Which you can do that with you. Know there's a we've we've gone over before on the show but there's a bunch of different ways to extract pastes. One of the easiest ones is the is a syringe extruder. But the problem. Is You know with a syringe. You're pushing down the SYRINGE building up pressure and then driving the material out and then to retract riding back up on that cylinder and there's a lot of material in there that you're moving while you're doing that so it's not as responsive as you know we're used to with retraction on like an F. Damn extruder you'll have to really slow right. You have to go really slow and you end up with a lot of A lot of overshoot and a lot of you know material squirting out places. You don't want it because you're not able to control it that well whereas when you have a very small volume of material in this this Augur Screw Auger drive system You're able to You know pressure it drive it out the nozzle and retract it with much much more nimbly than than you. Can you know with with a large volume of material while so what I like about it? That it's nice and decoupled from any system that you might bolted onto sure in which makes it much much more amenable to someone who just wants to experiment with it a sculptor. Who May want to say? Hey I want a head start. Start from this basic design in after it's put out all the spray it with water and manually change. It sounds like it's got some really good potential I would sure love to play with it. Yeah it's Cool. And and the thing is you've got You know a NEMA seventeen which is probably the same thing that your printer was running anyway. So you could disconnect the the Nima Seventeen for your F- damn extruder and somehow adapt this to attach to Rhino. Whatever movement system. You're using I would say using old printer because you know paste It gets pretty messy. Yeah I I would go with a mental style so it's open kind of an open design. It's not all over the place. Yeah but it. But it's it's it's nice that their newest version of it. You can see a lot of evolution has gone through and I'll be curious to see You know not only how well it works. How well it lasts because when you're You know excluding clay clay abrasive Who that's right so you know you're depending on the type of clay body or extracting different particle sizes and stuff but over long-term Claes. Pretty abrasive material The nozzles that they're actually using vary depending on. How large a a diameter you want on. Sometimes they're they're using Like You know the small small diameter I would say plumbing fittings. But they're really more for like medical applications to being and stuff but they're plastic Obviously you know Easily replaceable. Yes own so. I don't think that's going to be that big of a problem. It's the internal stuff it's it's it's the Auger that is the expensive part. And and the the meshing between you know the the clearances between the author and the and the chamber that it has to fit in those have to be very very tight with polymers. We're finding that it's that nozzle the orifice itself and the sides of the office. Where all the where happens? I and that's what breaks down. I right so it's not gonna be that big of a deal on this kind of an extruder for that area. So maybe it'll be okay. We'll

D. Printer Europe Nema Germany Nima Seventeen
Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

Jewish History Matters

10:11 min | 1 year ago

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

"Hope that you'll enjoy our conversation as we dive into the connection between scarlet work and the social justice issues of Israel and Palestine. A major major way in which history matters because through history we can better understand pressing issues of the day and as I think it'll come through clearly in our a conversation that as historians and experts we have something to contribute to these conversations to thanks for listening. I'm your hi Erin. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Jason Thank you. I'm really glad that you guys are here to talk about this book which I was really excited to see and to read through I wanna I wanNA start off by asking. What do you mean by Social Justice and Israel-palestine when you look at the title itself? What is the connection there? And why do you think that it's important to integrate. These two realms in the discussion of social justice on the one hand and the broad set of issues around Israel and Palestine part of our idea was that Israel Palestine conflict is taught as is an informational explanatory lands right through prescriptive questions in what happened in terms of what we mean. By a lens of social justice we we mean an inter our disciplinary perspective places concepts like rights justice and oppression at the forefront and that aims to Dick sexualize Israel-palestine Israel-palestine especially for those who think of this as some sort of Auger. That's been going on forever and we'll go on forever but it it's a conflict that will end. I just like the troubles in Northern Ireland and the horrific stuff in Rwanda in apartheid in South Africa and other conflicts in the world the people in Israel Palestinian or not onto logically different In terms of their humanness than other people conflict. That will end also our goal in terms of approaching this was social justice. Justice is this notion of introducing power to the conversation if we had only included voices of people with particular social identities and now other voices. I don't think that necessarily would have been just. But our attempt is to bring in a variety of voices and introduced concepts jobs related to power dynamics which is goes down the rabbit hole of privileged status access oppression etcetera so it also means bringing in the grassroots spotlighting hot-listing minority identities as rusty Israelis essay. Anat there's an essay on Bedouin. BS courses a grassroots in many ways a grassroots treats movement and really. Were trying to broaden the discussion from what is typically explanatory questions to more prescriptive questions saying what should happen in order for. Israeli people have Palestinian people in the region to experience a sense of justice and the social part is just that we wanted to flag that. It isn't simply a book about illegal intricacies. I have a little bit of a vested interest in the term because during the twenty eleven ten protests in Israel that started on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Levine. Is released were protesting high cost of living biceps cottage cheese of the price of housing. And they were talking in terms of social justice. Senate Clinical Lt and it became very clear early on that to maintain a broad based movement. It would be bracketing. The question of Palestinians and social justice in purely early economic terms. And we know that here when social justice movements more broadly progressive movement's about social justice thinking not only economically editor of racial justice ethnic justice religious justice justice for every individual and collective. And so we're really trying lick the conversation back towards saying how. How can Israel and the Palestinians live their lives and we as editors have a singular answer to that but we brought together scholars and activists that have very specific the the actors for that very important question and they're engaging with one another on that question? We just had the episode Rachel Harris where we talked about her book about teaching about Israel and Palestine. And there it's very clearly a book about pedagogy a book that is directed at professors teachers. Thinking about how they can teach about the subject and here you're dealing much much more conceptually much more about getting into the issues themselves as opposed to how we teach them when you think about a book like this. Who Do you see as the person who you want to pick it up what you want them to get out of it? I think we intended this book per use in classrooms where the Israel Palestinian dynamic is being taught whether it's Israeli Israeli Palestinian conflict glasser history class or the social dynamics of how Israelis and Palestinians relate with one another so it's really meant for students and the professors who teach awesome. We also seems to make it as readable as possible as accessible as possible to a wide audience. Who aren't necessarily subject specialists and to that end really took care to write very concise intro pieces to each of the eight conceptual chapters showing the reader? What's at stake? AAC each of these major debates. I have an essay that appears Rachel's Book as well in the essay that I wrote in her book is really a precursor to this project which I engaged with Aaron and really. It's a short essay about my own personal struggle of how I had been seeking to keep politics out of the classroom and had been even feeling a little bit frightened of students. What if they brought the a word? I would say appears the night before a particularly contentious topic topic where I was worried. That apartheid come. What do I do in my the the foil for the students do? I need to debate the students that they see the other side. Whatever the other side is depending on what perspective is student is raising and I realized it wasn't really very healthier constructive approach so I think what we really wanted to? The book was to enable a wave for politics it should be able to seep into the classroom in a way that doesn't put the professor on the hot seat but enables the professor to shepherd students through the debates enabling students succeed as many perspectives as they can in contrast to mirror. I was coming up this project from perhaps not in context given that was a precursor newark yet that stage but in any event for about ten years I was part of a not for profit educational organization where we worked with muscles views Israelis Palestinians and everything we did was co taught. CO-DEVELOPED CO design. So I ran the organization with the Muslim Palestinian woman are high school programs with Jews. Muslims awesome were run developed design fifty fifty by twos Muslims etcetera. And so I was coming at this project from a number of years back back so to speak from the vantage point that regardless of attempts by some people to engage in objectivity or neutrality perhaps closer to objectivity than they might otherwise present. Things that it's impossible. I think to teach each about things in the humanities frankly without offering perspectives. Even if you said all right. Here's our issue. And here's three vantage vantage points on the issue. Great probably ten others twenty thirty others so I was already at that place because that was is how I been socialized in. That's my experiences regardless. Yeah I mean I think that what you both have brought up really is a critical issue. You look at this book wishes to say as I read it and as I was thinking about it. It seems to me that the central issue that you're engaging with this fundamental idea and and the way I think about this is that even though this is a book with many authors many contributors are pushing this fundamental central thesis that the politics the issues should be a part of how we engage with Israel and Palestine scholars in a way that some people say I want to avoid the politics I want to avoid the touchy issues and try to achieve some kind of noble dream of objectivity of neutrality etc.. I think part of what. This book is arguing in this ties into to mirror. What you were saying in your essay and Rachel Harris Book as well you have to do with the idea about what is the role of the scholar and how we interact with these issues? Yeah to that. I would add one more specific thing especially in the case the way I've been teaching the courses in my field. Political Science and international relations and in many areas of social science. Generally professors tend to focus on. Why questions or we could call explanatory questions? So why did Israel extended extended olive branch to the PLO nineteen ninety-three. Why did Camp David Two thousand fail and instead of keeping prescriptive questions the questions what should be what shall be? Why should it be this way? Instead of keeping those questions that Bay we wanted to invite space for students to see how scholars activists make those prescriptive arguments particularly as the book has become available for use in my own courses finding consigning op. Ed Science for students to write much more frequently and I'm encouraging students to take the various topics that we covered in the course I which is really pretty united eight until present day and make a prescriptive argument should be. DSP Out Lodge should be various political parties depending on what case they're looking at encountered the US embrace a different view of Palestine within their platforms. I should trump have proved the the embassy to Jerusalem or not and make an argument that necessitates taking into account the arguments of another point of view and really taking those arguments seriously in making a good case whereas in some years I might have read a student paper like that. Oh this is too ideological. This is too opinionated. I no longer separate informed. Well argued opinion. That is derived from a scholarly understanding of the situation. I no longer divorce that argumentation from a more detached explanatory Brian Tori type of

Israel Palestine Professor Rachel Harris Erin Rachel United States Newark Anat Rwanda Senate Ed Science Editor Brian Tori Dick Sexualize Jerusalem BAY
Jonathan Pryce, 'The Two Popes'

Popcorn with Peter Travers

12:55 min | 1 year ago

Jonathan Pryce, 'The Two Popes'

"There's a movie now that you can see a Netflix. It's called the two popes and it stars my guest today. Jonathan Pryce and Anthony Living Hopkins. Playing guess what the title characters doing doing it brilliantly. So Jonathan Welcome Creek Pope Francis there. You are the big news now. About Pope Francis is his encounter with this woman in the crap out there where he sort of slapped her hand. Yeah Yeah have you been being asked this question now would I please slap really. Okay do I WANNA be grant. At the Golden Globes. There was a lot of Grabbing and pushing polling I was tempted to slap but I feel really sorry for him because people aren't seeing the whole whole sequence video where that particular woman grabbed him very yanked him yanked him and he's He's an Obama scientists bound to hurt. Well let's talk about the two popes in terms of the whole concept of you being offered this to play the The Argentinian Paul. Because we don't see him in the movie being the pope really walk up to that while Anthony Hopkins is playing Pope Benedict German. is you're an Argentinian to Welshman playing these. Yeah somebody must've said. That's that's what we need is to Welshman to do this time for Welsh. Pope was watching and watching. You play this. I kept thinking this other. Argentinian you play. which was one there? You are the dictator in a way. Pope can be a dictator but Pope Francis Go. You is the liberal reform. The one that wants to give them more compassionate look at the church. Did you have any trepidation about pilots. Just just just the usual about whether I wanted to do any of. Is that how you approach them. All Walk Negative. Say No no I thought uh I thought I'd be on a hiding to nothing representing this particular pope. But that didn't last very long. I read the script and won ten. You that Fernando Morella Morella was gonNA be directing it. I definitely wanted to do it and I think it was mainly to do with the fact that I'm not religious logistics. I was brought up in the Christian faith. I went to church until I was a teenager. but I found that this pope was the first pope who I thought was speaking to me and millions like me about issues that what. Mrs Narrowly to do the Church or organized religion but to do with politics and to do with speaking out up folding environment and about the economy about the injustice is the during the world so I he was someone for great empathy towards towards and help. That looked like him a bit and I walk like came definitely Even though you've got ten years on me you could sneak into the the Vatican may be busy and just an take over there and do what you would need to do there. Does that give you a feeling when your plane that that this was what I would do if I win. The pope shoes. I wouldn't be so presumptious to fix that but I'm glad he's doing what he's doing And obviously he's got. There's the whole church and Vatican side of things which he doesn't seem to be able to deal with those conquer but when you're constantly reading lots of stories about how he's disliked within the Vatican because he's a reformer and people don't want that change and I think that's that's why he became pope. He was be made pope in order to make these changes. Otherwise so why choose him because he was in the never been an odd uh-huh latin-american Pope and the film implies of that we don't necessarily know the truth. That benedict wanted Bagogwe uglier to be the next pope because he saw in him things that he could not even he couldn't do he saw in many ways his opposite didn't they and this is it. I didn't mention this in the introduction but benedict was a pope who retired. WHO said I'm not going to do it anymore? And so we have to popes who Are Alive in this world today and they're the clips at the end of the real popes in seeming tab. Having a really terrific time when I sold the first Kata film I was bit disturbed. They were showing the real popes at the end of the phone. Because I thought it would invalidate everything. We've been doing for the previous to house. But what you see in these two men is a is a the committee this just a welcoming the way they they greet each other with great affection and you can see the respect. They have for each other and far from taking away from our performances it they it enhances. It gives an element of truth to what we were doing. It's a really terrific script. Ns Two popes one of these two guys talking to each other which sometimes scares people when they go to the movies. I want that but yet a mirage as a director makes this movie move. You've so beautiful to gorgeous thing to look at. It's also sometimes. Polaris that's going on. Did you all know that that was what was going to happen before he did it. No no what's what's wonderful about. The film is that it It's such a surprise for audiences once don't you don't you. You gotta get them in there and then once they're in that It's a surprise Because it's it's much funnier than I ever expected. And and the audience expect and I think the way we made the film there was no. We didn't have many preconceptions. I don't remember ever talking onto Tony. I'm going to be like this. And he said I'm going to be like this and finance and I want you to do this. That and the whole process was really organic bound because we have the the strength of that script bit underneath his you know holding us up and when I saw it and the way Fernando put it together other because he says his work starts in the editing room he lets us do what we want and encourages us to go certain ways but when I they do what they want to that yeah good directors do that they let you think your your your coming up with the Serving quietly feed and things in your ear they let you think it's your idea So when I saw it I didn't know it was going to be so funny. Rondo humorous. I mean that first scene of your character trying to book his own plane reservations on the fault. Yeah probably apparently did that. That's what he did but it's the post game I saw with a big audience was telluride. And because you I don't know what to expect and that moment the right at the beginning of the phone web the audience laughs as one. The huge wave of laughter. You can feel the audiences sir. I sent me sat by a few. And they're going to enjoy this and the you can feel the audience sitting back and saying this. This is going to be okay you can. It's like Yep okay you know bring it on make happen and yet it also doesn't avoid the controversies that exist within the church. Now the whole thing with the problem priests they're predators that are there and also their histories. Can you talk a little about his history. Go Yeah it back in the seventies in terms of Argentina. It's all mostly. It's all in the film and we didn't shy away from it. The way were applauded and thanked thanked by the people people in Bonus Iris. When they sold the film we had a screening because they that fear was this is going to be a whitewash elma? Crossover Haggi Auger fear Goglia. Because he is still seen as a divisive character in Argentina because of his perceived involvement involvement with the cardinals. I've found on Youtube footage of him being interrogated by or question by his peers fellow cardinals about his involvement with the colonels. And you see a very different man the man you see smiling on the balcony. And he's made pope he's he's he's very doer he's quite angry. I think he's impatient. He's drumming his fingers on the table. And I put that image together with talking to a Jesuit priest and bonus. Who worked with him? I who said they didn't like him. He was Very always stays. Ah Stay by himself. He didn't mix I he was he never smiled. I'm when they saw him on the balcony. This smiling pope. They didn't recognize him because he was smiling. Didn't person yeah. But then you do get the other side of him where he is in the film you see him Saying mass and the kind of the slum township areas and and the other side's members very popular so it's not a a a bio-pic it's not a huggy overview of this man. It's a it's a Watson Study of him and I think we've been fair to him because we all respect him and admire him And we had a screening in Rome three or four weeks ago were members of the Vatican Cambridge theory and They said they liked liked. That enjoyed it And a particular Cardinal WHO's a friend? WHO's a friend of Love Benedict and of Francis He'd liked the phone very much. Fernando the director said. Do you think we were too hard on the church. And he said you went hot enough woo but he also said that he thought France would like the film and he wanted the DVD to take them to show him the film. I love so That review see that. Yeah well what do starts right. Yeah that'd be good and also from France's family in Argentina. Fernando got an email to say that they'd seen it. They enjoyed the film and they liked. What we've done Representing their uncle. That was that was really nice. Colon uncle Uncle Horace to two years. How were you and Anthony Hopkins together? You know. You haven't made anything or done anything before. Really WE'VE BEEN ON A. We're both on the recording of under milk. Wood the Dylan Thomas Poem that was produced by George Martin. Twenty seven years ago the Beatles producer and Tony was first voice. I was second voice and you come twenty seven years later. We're in Rome and the coal sheet has You know you're rated as the importance in the film. The number and I was number one and Tony was number two so it was my revenge after twenty seven audit your greet each other even morning with morning number one number two. It went on from there but we. It's interesting the what happens to the two men in the film is reflected. Did what happened to Tony. And I because you know in the film you see two men sort of sniffing around each other like a pair of dogs like where each other Eh Wary of Tony but I was. I was I I'm an aura of Tony Hopkins. I'm a great admirer of his. So I'm not played late into those early scenes and as you see the pope's relationship growing so my friendship with Tony grew and It is the equivalent of both of us. All of US tangoing together by the end of it. That's a good way to put out.

Pope Francis Tony Hopkins Fernando Morella Morella Benedict Anthony Living Hopkins Argentina Netflix Rome Jonathan Pryce Barack Obama Director Golden Globes Cardinals Dylan Thomas United States MRS Youtube George Martin Polaris Rondo
Disney Heiress Speaks Out About Income Inequality In 'New Yorker' Interview

NPR's Business Story of the Day

06:53 min | 1 year ago

Disney Heiress Speaks Out About Income Inequality In 'New Yorker' Interview

"What does it inheritance and a last name enable you to do Abigail? Disney has thought a lot about that. You probably recognize her last name. She's the granddaughter of Roy. o Oh Disney who co-founded the Disney company with his younger brother. Walt and Abigail says her net worth is around one hundred and forty million dollars but in a new profile in the New Yorker her magazine out today. She describes herself as an uncomfortable heiress. She's Linter name to a group of millionaires who are speaking out against rising income inequality pretty Sheila Kaul had car wrote that profile for the New Yorker and she started by telling us about a story from Abigail Disney's Childhood Abigail had very fond memories of her her grandfather. Roy Disney who co founded the company and. She said that he used to take her to the theme park when she was a child. This was a cherished memory but that they could just march to the front of any line of any ride or attraction. They wanted to go on. And of course all of the other families attending the park were standing there baking in the sun waiting their turn and she said that she felt really bad an awkward and when she pointed this out to her grandfather he said well I worked so hard all these years building this company specifically so I could do it so I could take you to the front of the line. What was the moment that she decided she was going to go from being just a shareholder? who wasn't really active in the company who wasn't particularly politically active to being someone who is going to start saying things like Disney needs to pay its employees more? What was her turning point? She was always Much more politically liberal than the rest of her family but there was a moment in two thousand eighteen when a worker at one of the Disney properties in California reached out out to her through a facebook message and told her that you know the union representing workers at the theme park had been fighting with management over a new contract act. They had been trying to negotiate a fifteen dollar minimum wage. And he said well. We're not getting any traction with the company. Can you help us. She then flew out to Anaheim and and met with a group of Disney workers. And some of these workers told her really upsetting stories about people who said that they were sleeping in their cars ars. They had become homeless. She eventually ended up making some public statements about how she felt that it was wrong for a company that was making billions of dollars in profit. And whose brand was centered around the idea of happiness and joy and family togetherness was paying so little to its workers that they were not really able to live stable middle class lives. How how did the Disney Company feel about her coming out and being critical of the company in that way the company was not happy at all about this Disney management pointed out that they feel that they take care of their workers? They provide a lot of educational opportunities and opportunities for advancement to their workers Although Bob Auger the CEO of Disney had been paid around sixty six million dollars that year which seems Lincoln Astronomical sum so they were quite outraged and of course they have their point about how many of these workers are biased or that the union has its point of view. It's trying to push. I think that Abigail feels really bad about this but she also sees her role is creating a sort of public pressure on them to reconsider some of their policies Abigail Disney belongs to group called the patriotic millionaires. This this is an interesting bunch. Who are they in? What do they want the patriotic? Millionaires is a group of wealthy Americans who are concerned about doc wealth and income inequality and who are so concerned about it that they have decided to band together and lobby for the kinds of economic policies. That you do not normally see members of that economic group lobbying for such as raising estate taxes raising taxes on the wealthy and on corporations raising Zing minimum wages and we should note that the name patriotic millionaires is not symbolic it is not a metaphor are millionaires. You have to be earning at least a million billion dollars in income or have a net worth of five million dollars to be eligible to join. The group has around two hundred ISH members. There are many more millionare's then that in the United States I guess that tells you something about the popularity or lack thereof of this group. Well I think the title of the group is a little controversial insert. Saddam were there people who find the name a little and sensational Little Garish a little tacky perhaps now the founder of the group acknowledges is that the name is a little Flashy and it makes a lot of people uncomfortable but she feels that that's exactly what gives the group its powered rich. People calling themselves patriotic millionaires just catches people's attention and they end up generating a lot of sort of free press coverage which is how they get their message out. There is a a final really interesting theme running through your story which is about what happens if the system is we. Now live it this system where we have this. Great inequality breaks down on some of the patriotic millionaires. At least one told you they're worried about a revolution like you know the working class rises is is up in the streets and we see protests like we saw in Chile or even worse based on the research you've done are we looking in the United States of America do do we need to worry about a class. War the historians and experts. I spoke to about this all pretty much agreed. We are unlikely to see a mass social uprising. They all acknowledged that inequality is it a historic sort of alarming level. But they said that the government is simply too powerful awful. I is too easy. Through technology and other means to control citizens serve the population is simply too varied and spread out. They did say however that we could continue moving in a direction that we perhaps as Americans do not want to move in where you end up with a small group of very wealthy people living in gated estates. It's having to invest in personal security. Crime could go up kidnappings and when we do see that in other countries and one historian a particular told me you you know what could happen is rich. People could be limited in their ability to enjoy their wealth they they would barely be able to leave their homes without you know a an armed guard at their side and many of the patriotic millionaires. Said this to me as well. They said this is self interest. I do not wanna live in a country like that. Do you think in the end that Abigail Disney would say that she is self interested. I think she would. She derives a lot of personal pleasure and satisfaction from this political work. That she does and she's the first to acknowledge that it makes incredibly happy and it gives her life meaning and if at the same time she can help push the country in a better direction you know she would argue. Why not why not? She'll local had car writer for the New Yorker. Thank you so much for joining us. It was great to be here thank you.

Abigail Disney Disney Roy Disney United States Sheila Kaul Linter Anaheim Walt California Facebook Roy. O Chile Bob Auger Saddam Writer CEO Founder America
"auger" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"auger" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Hello you lovely words. Thank you for joining me. Yes I am taking a risk and I am recording a fifth episode in a row. I can't believe it today. Is Is December twenty first and you know what that is. It is the winter solstice. I hope you know about it but if you don't It's the shortest this day of the year after today. Everything looks up. We get more and more light every day until June twenty first ish and then it goes the other direction but now things are going to start looking up. Don't you hate it when you leave work and it's like four pm or whenever leave work and it's dark already. A that is the worst worst. Okay the first word for this episode is Auger effect capital a U. G. E. R. Second Word E. F. F. E. C. T.. This this is a noun from nineteen twenty eight a process in which an atom has been ionized through the mission of electron with energy in the X ray arrange undergoes a transition in which a second electron is emitted rather than an X. Ray photon called also auger process and this is from appear via Auger Agir maybe he died in nineteen ninety eight nineteen ninety three and he was a French physicist yet his name is probably we are. I don't know what that scripture was. So we are going to move onto auger electron or maybe Agir Electron Oh actually really. OJ OJ. That's how it's pronounced because it says that okay so that was Oj a effect and this is OJ electron. This is a noun from nineteen thirty nine and electron emitted from an atom in the OJ OJ. Ajay effect and next is OJ electron spectroscopy. I know this words. Just say get it out of your mouth all J. Electron spectroscopy. This is a noun from nineteen seventy an instrumental method for determining the chemical composition of a material surface by means of analysis of the energies of OJ electrons emitted from the surface called also OJ spectroscopy. That is not in the dictionary. Next we have the WORD OUGHT A U G H T. It is the I form. It is a Perron Pronoun. I guess that's says P. R. O. N. It is from before the twelfth century number. One we have these synonym anything number. Two synonyms are all and everything as in four ought eyecare also is in for ought we know no So basically means like we know everything I care about everything and I will throw out my own two cents if you throw when n at the beginning that means not Which is one word for zero So it basically just means nothing. So we'll we'll get to that and IT'LL I. I expect it to be the opposite of this one. This is from old English I wit eight W. H. T. which is from a A which means ever plus wit which means creature Or thing creature or thing so basically it it means Everything everything ever every creature or thing and there's more at the words I a.. Y. E. and white W. I G. H. T.. Now now we have the second form of art. It is an adverb from the thirteenth century. It is archaic and it means The synonym is at all now. We have the third form of ought it is a noun ferrum eighteen. Seventy two one we have these synonyms zero and Cypher. C. I I. P. H. E. R.. Or would it be sicker. I Dunno number two is Archaic Synonyms are non entity and nothing So it is interesting We'll get to the Animal Gina. Minute number three is plural. So what's the first decade of a century. And but yeah I guess now that I think about it ought I have heard as zero not think also zero but let's look at the etymology because it says it is an alternative of the word not an A. U. G. H. T. and it says resulting from false division of a not so I guess in the evolution of that word it just somehow got turned into ought but I can't wait to get to the word not and find out what that says. Okay next. We have Ajit Ajit a U G. I Thi this is is a noun from eighteen. o four one a usually black or dark green mineral that consists of luminous pyroxene and is found especially Ashley in rocks number two. We have these synonym pyroxene or pyrrhic. Seen One of those Let's see autistic is an an adjective and it says this is from Latin auditees or audits odd odd auditees something that means a precious stone and that is from the Greek auditees not is now we have augment. It is the I form. It is a verb for rum of the Fourteenth Century transitive definitions is our first one to make greater more nerve numerous larger or more intense as in the impact of the report was augmented augmented by. Its timing weird. Examples people number two to add and augment to number three we just have the synonym supplement. As in augmented her income. Now we have the transitive definition which says to become augmented. You'd finally we have a synonym for all. It is the word increase augment her spelled with an E. R. or an are is a noun and the etymology says it's from Latin Augmentin which means to increase from Algeria which means to increase. And there's more at the word EEK e. k. e.. Now we have these second form of augment it is actually the so the emphasis is different. It this one is augment the other one was augment. This is a noun from sixteen seventy one a vowel prefixed or a lengthening of the initial vowel to mark pass time especially in Greek and Sanskrit verbs. Could you please give me an example. No okay thanks now we have augmentation. This is a noun from the fourteenth century. One a the act or process of augmenting. One be the state of being augmented number. Two something that augments synonym is addition. Now we have augmented give. It is the I form. It is an adjective from the a fifteenth century one able to augment two indicating large size and sometimes awkwardness or unattractiveness. And and it is used in Used of words and fixes and compared to the word diminutive now we have the second form of augmented entity of it is a noun from eighteen o four and augmented word or affects and I need to figure out where we are going to end this episode. We're going to do there. Were coming up. We're coming up. It's coming up to the end. Where did we leave off? We left off there now. We have to go to the word augmented. This is an adjective from the fifteenth century. In italics it says of a musical interval. So that's what we're talking about. The definition made one half half-step greater than major or perfect as an augmented fifth. Okay so in music the Let's see how can I describe this quickly. A normal fifth would be a C. and a g Those would be two of the white keys on a piano. The Sea he is the one to the left of the two black keys and the G. is basically four steps up so they are five five have notes away from each other essentially maybe And so when you augment it you take the the fifth and you raise it up a half step so you would take it to a g sharp also called a flat. Does that confuse. You probably saw an augmented fifth. I think is a C.. And a g she's sharp Or an augmented see augmented fifth. That's what that would be okay. Moving on to augmented Matrix. This is a noun from from eighteen. Sixty one a matrix whose elements are the coefficients of a set of simultaneous linear equations with the constant terms of the equations entered in in and in an added column and finally for this episode. We have augmented reality This is something that has gotten a huge huge in the last couple of years and I don't think it's going away Definitely not going away not at least for a long time until something better comes along. This is is a noun from nineteen. ninety-three have a tickle in my throat it is an enhanced version of reality created by the use of technology to overlay digital information on an image of something being viewed through a device as a smartphone camera. Also the technology used to create augmentation reality and my two cents is that it is abbreviated as a are and I actually just saw video today where I think Google has In their phones or some of their phones they now have the ability to create depth information. Because I think their phones have multiple cameras and so they can tell how far away things are Which is very cool for augmented reality? Because that means the thing that they put in there for instance The one of the examples they showed was a cat a digital cap walking around Your living room say and it now knows where the catch should go. Oh and if something is in front of it it knows to put the thing like a chair in front of the cat. It can do that on the fly. It's crazy Also they showed pictures or showed examples of like Josh so many different things like things rain literally rain and It the rain looking like it's landing on the right spot Given the distance away from you it was super fascinating aided so I will maybe pick that as the word of the episode. Let's see Yeah let's pick augmented reality as the word of the episode. It's it's very cool. I I have have back and forth feelings about it Technology algae in general so. That's it thank you very much for listening. I hope you have enjoyed your winter solstice. Hey if you're on the other side of the world if you're in the southern hemisphere like Australia and New Zealand This is the longest day of the year for us. So sorry it's just GonNa go downhill from there But I hope if you're enjoying your warm weather you idiots. I want your warm weather all right thank you and goodbye..

Oj Agir Electron Oh J. Electron spectroscopy Auger Agir Auger Ajit Ajit E. F. F. E. C. T ferrum P. H. E. R P. R. O. Google W. H. T. Y. E. Josh Australia physicist A. U. G. H. T. E. R. Ashley
"auger" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"auger" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Lastly for this episode. We have the word Auger a U. G. E. R.. This is a noun from before the twelfth century. This is an old one folks very very very old any of various well not as old as Jian but anyway any of various tools or devices with a helical shaft aft- or part that are used for boring holes as in wood or moving loose material as snow the etymology says says this is from Middle English. It is an alternative Resulting from false division of a naugler. Na Uga are so it's from the word Naga which is from the old English Knafo Gar which is akin to the old high English Nabu Jair. You're not Juror which means Auger From old English now fu which means nave Gar from Gar which means spear and there's more at the words nave or Gore. We have a picture of three types of augurs Let's see number one weight. The number one to screw three two. Okay so I guess number one is just a regular Auger. It's just a looks like a screw basically number two well number two actually says screw So that also looks like a screw. It looks like the The spy really part is sort of tighter together. What's that called? I can't remember but number two actually has a hand wooden hand a handle on the end of it And then number three it says tapering pod so this one. It's a little bit different. The bottom has a cone And then the top. There's some sort of handle I don't know that one looks different than the others. Let's let's find a picture and put it on instagram. And the we are going to pick a word of the episode There was one that jumped out at me and now I can't remember what it was I can't remember I need to keep on talking. How are you doing? Did you have a good day. Are you enjoying winter Hope it's not to bed where you are. Currently we have no snow in the Chicago area and the weather actually isn't too bad. It's in the forties today upper forties even and now. I'm getting distracted on talking about the weather. And not even not even looking for a word of the episode let us pick out feature sane as the word of the episode because now I will say to you thank you very much for listening and I'll feature sane..

Auger Jian Chicago Gore
"auger" Discussed on The Dictionary

The Dictionary

11:28 min | 1 year ago

"auger" Discussed on The Dictionary

"Hello words welcome to another episode of the dictionary. This is my fourth episode being recorded in a row Which is normally what I do but I may actually record a couple more after this We'll see how my voice holds up because my my work week. This week is kind of Funky and I'm not not exactly sure when I'll be able to record so I'm just trying to get ahead as possible. What is today? Today is December twentieth. That's it let's talk about some words words audiotape. That is our first word. It is one word. It is spelled. A. U. D. I o.. T. a. p. e. this is a noun from nineteen fifty one eight tape recording of sound. Next we have audio visual all one word and if you remember from the previous episode the prefix audio audio in this case means auditory and dot dot dot so audio. Visual is an adjective from nineteen o two one designed to aid in learning or teaching by making use of both hearing and sight number two of or relating to both hearing and Dan site. As I've mentioned I work in basically the AV field audio visual field And so this is definitely something that is part of my day to day life. Just a the stuff in general next. We have audio visuals. It is plural. It is a noun own from nineteen forty eight audio visual teaching materials as film strips accompanied by recordings. I grew up in the analog luggage In the eighties and we It wasn't as easy to play film strips and movies and things like that in school And so oh you kids today. You Watch stuff on your phone IPADS and screens at school or home But we had literal films we would watch sixteen millimeter films. uh-huh sometimes they were film strips that were just basically like a slide. Show on film and the thing. Would you'd have to turn the thing anyway. The film strips just reminded me of that next we have audit a U. D.. I t.. This is the first form of two. It is a noun from the fifteenth century. One one eight a formal examination of an organization's or individual's accounts or financial situation One beat the final report sort of an audit to a methodical examination and review. This is from Latin dittus which means act of hearing And that is from the verb Audi array which doesn't tell me what that means. Now we have the second form of audit it is a transitive verb from the fifteenth century. One and to perform an audit of or four as in audit the books also as in audit the company. Most this companies don't like it when they get audited but it is I think fairly standard procedure number two to attend a course without working for or expecting to retrieve receive formal credit. I don't really have time in my days to do this but I have actually thought a lot about Auditing College College courses. Because I'm at the point in my life where I realize there's a lot to learn Part of the reason why I'm doing this podcast and I kind of wanted just know as much as I can Dan. I don't need a grade. I don't necessarily want to take the tests but I just want to learn this stuff the information but again I don't really have the time for that. Audit ability is a noun. auditable is an adjective and auditee is a noun. And they don't say auditorium. which would be the one doing the auditing but I suspect Yup that is coming up so now we have the word audition? This is a noun from fifteen ninety. Nine one the power our or sense of hearing to the Act of hearing especially a critical hearing as in an audition of new recordings and three a trial performance to appraise and entertainers merits yes. Let's praise your merits. I don't know All right now. We have the second form of audition. Other forms are auditioned and audition Nin. This is a verb from nineteen thirty. One I are transitive. transitive to test Yeah there's just one transitive and just one in transitive to test or try out especially in an in addition well. Yeah that's the that's the word audition and then the transitive means to give a trial performance. This is something that I've actually been thinking a lot about recently because I have been wanting to get into the acting world I I did a little acting eighteen in high school in such Specifically I would love to do voice over acting like cartoon characters and stuff like that but I think I'm at a point where I finally understand and acting well enough that maybe I could do a decent job at it so I should go on auditions but again I don't have the time. Where's the time who's he's got the time to do all this stuff Yeah anyway next is auditor. That's the word I t's before this is a noun from the fourteenth century. One a person authorized to examine and verify accounts to one who hears or listens especially one who is a member of an audience. Silence three a person who audits of course of study for a person who hears as a court case in the capacity of Judge Asia. Next we have auditorium. This is a noun from sixteen forty and it can be paralysed as auditoriums is or auditory. Won The part of a public building where an audience sits number to a room hall or building used for public gatherings this is a Latin word and it literally means lecture room next we have auditory. This is the first form of two. It is a noun from the fourteenth century. One is archaic and we have these synonym audience. Number Two is also archaic. And we have these synonym auditorium next. We have the second form of auditory. It is an adjective from fifteen seventy eight of relating relating to or experienced through hearing as in Auditory Stimuli Auditory Auditorium is an adverb next. We have auditory nerve to separate words. It is a noun from seventeen thirteen and I just realized I didn't bring my water down so if I had That would have helped my voice Auditory nerve Let's see either. Yeah that's what I left off on either. The eighth pair of cranial nerves connecting the inner ear. With the brain and transmitting transmitting impulses concerned with hearing and balance. And then it tells me to see the ear illustration I don't know if you've ever had An Ear What do you call it? An ear thing An ear ache a an ear infection But you you can can lose your balance if some things are messed up in your ear and the auditory nerve is related to that next. We have auditory tube. Google this is a noun. It's also two words from circa seventeen o five and we just have the synonym use station. Tube that is spelled E. The U. S. T. A. C. H. A. N. now we have audit trail two words this is a noun from nineteen eighteen fifty four a record of a sequence of events as actions performed by a computer from which a history may be constructed the audit trail. It's like a paper trail the made by the auditor. Basically now we have what looks to be a German word. Yep It's German and it is pronounced out cloud room. I'll something like that. It is spelled capital A. U. F. K. L. A. aid and the A has an all-out r. U. N. G. This is a noun from nineteen forty two and we have the number two definition for the word enlightenment. Eighteen Mint is OFF CLARIN OFF CLARITIN. Is that a common enough word in English Specifically American English that it has its own entry in the dictionary. Okay next we have another German word. outfitter sane I know that one A U. F. Next Word Capital D. Capital W. I. E. D. E. The R. S. E. H. E. N.. This is an interjection from eighteen. Forty five used to express farewell I'll features retain Is German it literally means on scene again. So basically I'll see you again in my dreams in your dreams teams if you're lucky. Not if I see you I now we have a U G all lower case. This is an abbreviation for augmented. Give now we have a U G again With the capital. A It is an abbreviation for the word or the month August. It's both a word and a month. Now we have have Let's see Algerian Odgen. Capital A. U. G. E. A. N.. This is an adjective from excuse me sixteen seventy-six extremely formidable or formidable or difficult and occasionally distasteful as in and a task. I was not familiar with this. Let's look at the algae so we can learn together. This is from a Latin algae. AU G. E. A. S.. which is the king of Ellis which is from the Greek which was from the legend that his stable left left neglected for thirty years was finally cleaned by Hercules? I remember reading the story when I was a freshman in high school many years ago. God was that twenty five years ago. I think so Yes I vaguely. Remember that story next. We have Algerian stabile. All this is a noun from sixteen twenty to a condition or place marked by great accumulation of filth or corruption You you could look at the weird Al Song it's getting rotten year which is a parody and You could call that an algae and stable. She thrown a clip. Maybe Governor D- And.

Auditory Stimuli Auditory Audi auditor Audi A. U. D. Dan Google Judge Asia AU G. E. A. S.. Ellis A. U. F. K. L. A. U. G. E. A. S. T. A. C. H. A. N. E. D. E. The R. S. E. H. E. N
"auger" Discussed on The BBQ Central Show

The BBQ Central Show

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"auger" Discussed on The BBQ Central Show

"Which helps us create an atmosphere where pushes degrees down into the bottom of the unit which continues to give us authentically. Greg grow food but the flavor is our bars creaked at even even this of heat across the The cooking rates which is something that no matter if you put a stake on one side or another. You're getting that beautiful CERMAC. So it's it's packed with a heck of a lot of power a heck of a lot of performance that people people really haven't seen in a pellet grill so as we start to break this particular cooker down too you'd mentioned You know small handful of things that are kind of different One of the things that I saw that was a little out of the ordinary. Compared to some of the other cookers is the would we call in an inverted auger system so you have a short a short vertical auger system that sits almost directly in the centre of the unit in the hopper is in the back which the hoppers about twenty two pounds of the fuel which is pretty nice so he can fit over bag of twenty pound bag of pellets in the back. But because it's a short vertical down in the hot pot you have opportunity for the girl that heat up faster so instead of us having a longer Auger. It's a shorter Auger which allows us to get up to six hundred degrees in about ten to fifteen minutes. which is is something? You haven't seen anywhere else. It also allows for us to have less problems with jamming of cooked over eight hundred dollars on mine and I'm not had one jam which is a pretty impressive thing. So I'm I'm not saying you won't have any jams but I'm saying. The chances of that happening are slim and none the back flashes. You're not going to see because of the way that the girl is set up and the other great.

Auger Greg
'Sontag: Her Life and Work' by Benjamin Moser

Bookworm

11:15 min | 2 years ago

'Sontag: Her Life and Work' by Benjamin Moser

"Today I'm very pleased to have as my guest the very brilliant Benjamin Moser who is the author of two biographies of Women Writers The I was a biography of Cou- reese the specter which did a good deal of bringing the Specter a writer who spent a good majority of for life in Brazil to the attention of American readers and the second is the biography of Susan's son tag her life and work which has been a controversial book as if a biography could be controversial but nevertheless this is the way it seems now what do you think of the controversy that seems to have surrounded this book well I think a book about Susan Santa that wasn't controversial would not be a book about Susan's contact I think she's somebody who elicited very heavy very visceral and sometimes violent opinions all through her life and I don't really see this controversial this book I see it more as just I hope it's something starting a conversation about an author that I think is more essential than ever Monsanto was always associated with fashion she was associated with with photography associated with being on the cover of Vanity Fair and the only possible American intellectual who could have been on the cover of Vanity Fair I think the real writers that we actually care about are the ones who go on after their deaths and who have these chances to be reevaluated I can remember the first time I read Susan Sonntags First Book which was against interpret Tation can you remember the first time he read against interpretation yes I can't because I actually hadn't read it until I started working on this book really I know I had read the Auger fi stuff mainly and then I had read essays from against interpretation I think I hadn't read the whole book I'd read notes on Camp I'd read the title essay I'd read some of the film essays but what was really exciting about going back to read it now is that you see a world you see this time which is quite again it feels contemporary but it's all most sixty years old you know against interpretation but you get this whole Panorama of culture and ideas that feels very adding to me I have to tell you it was the first of her books that I read I was astonished by it because Some of the enormity of range of what she's read I mean just when she makes a list of the books that she thinks of you think Oh my you'd already read that in the early sixties choose only in her early thirties to thirty when that book came out before it became fashionable to avert Arto Susan cared about our toll and in fact you know she seems to no that the time she's living in as opposed to the time she died in was a time when p do new things I- slivered out some quotes from Susan let's hear Susan people want to be moved on is a writer want to move people I was very moved cried even a couple of passes that I was riding this one line that made me laugh grimly where I wanna say I say but I don't feel it's me the book says it was a time when knowledge was fashionable Philistinism was unfashionable and I wrote that line with a great deal of Glee and grimness has a time we live in as a time in which knowledge is unfashionable Philipson as it was very fashionable I'm talking to Benjamin Moser son tags biographer that what you just heard was the very first time I sat face to face with Susan from our first conversation and You considered deeply the subject of knowledge and Philistinism and Susan's almost desire to attack the Philistines can you talk to me that I think it's really funny I think it's one of the great American questions I think we're living in a time when Philistinism seems triumphant we don't have to name names but I think we all know who I'm talking about and I think that there's a kind of feeling that we're always being engulfed by the gold escalator and the the all the things in her lifetime worse symbolic of Middle Brow Ism whether it was life magazine in the book of the month club or elevator music all these kind of things Santiago always stood for the opposite of all that crap now you seem to think she becomes as she lives longer and longer harder and harder on the people around her tell me what you mean tell me what that means a lot of it might have had to do the fact that she was physically ill a lot of her life when she was forty two she got stage four breast cancer and it almost killed her and she was subjected to this very gruesome horrifying treatment that did end up saving her life and that's nineteen in seventy five to seventy eight so she's in her mid forties by then and it seemed to me that something did change in her where she got more impatient she got more intolerant of certain people but I think that it's something that's interesting to try to understand what happens but then AH dwell on it too much because what I'm really interested in in Santiago and what I think makes her relevant is her writing and her ideas I think that what we're talking about is a person who wrote in the introduction to against interpretation that we need an erotics of art not a her renewed ix of art and she writes about her fondness for the supremes which at that time you take some on won't take any number of someone's whether it's Irving Hauer Saul bellow they're not listening to the supremes they find it be quite a surprise that a highly thought of intellectual is talking about the supremes by the end of her life she's not talking about the supreme sending more and she's not talking about neurotic criticism no well I think it's very important again to think about how old a lot of this is this is again it's almost it's more than fifty years ago in that time and in that year that was really shocking and it's absolutely really hilarious to see the reactions that she got because the thing about the supreme it's not like she wrote about this frame she said something about how she likes the supremes in one line nobody it followed her the whole life but you point down very well and intelligently and correctly in this book the Cultural Conservatives awesome is has very little to do with political conservatism. Well this is another idea that I think has been forgotten sondheim comes out of a world where out of me education where what she means a small C. conservatism is starting off with Plato and Aristotle and going up to Dante and Shakespeare through the great modern poets and that love that syllabus that Canon that became extremely unfashionable and now I think we're in a world where people aren't reacting against Beethoven you know they don't even know who Beethoven is Dante Shakespeare and so both the people who wanted to modernize that and expand it for example to feminist African American authors those people lost out just as much as the people who wanted it closed for political reasons from the right wing and what happens in that song tag is very perceptive about time and time again it said it all lose out to money it always is out to consumerism and so what happens is you know famous a great painting becomes an expensive painting a great song becomes a song that gets a lot of play on the radio a lot of clicks on the Internet and that's the thing we're in now come talking once again to Benjamin Moser Susan Sonntags biographer in a book from Echo called Sawa tag do you think that you're writing a biography of Susan or in addition a biography of her times well I think both the book is called Sante her life and work and those are two things that are complementary but I'd really there's a lot I'd like people to remember that people don't remember people don't member for example that it was quite common for women to write their husbands books as happened to attack yes fascinated yeah I had no idea will I didn't either I've inhabited this world of the great female intellectuals having done Clarissa Specter before and then Sante it's a world that generation of my grandparents grandmother's generation that I'm familiar with and so about three months ago this piece came out in the Guardian announcing that I had discovered that Sante had actually written the book upon which her husband's career was based book called for the mind with moralist and this piece went viral everybody was talking wrote me and they said are you kidding this happen to everybody nobody wire people so surprised and the reason they're surprise is that I think feminism has made so many gains is that people have forgotten what it was like so when you're talking about a history of her life and times when she applied she's got Souza's very brilliant student and she comes into the World king world and she applies for a job at a magazine and her friend a male friend says well the fact that you're a woman is a real problem but we're going to try to help them get over that and that was a totally normal thing to say to a woman at that time now you would get sued and you know rightly so a lot of the ideas that we think are able in in our culture whether you think about the position of African Americans do you think about the position of women are homosexuals or all these things they've changed really radically and one of the things I think a book like the biographies and Sonic can do is trace the evolution of these ideas so that's the part that I find fascinating because sometimes she's ahead of things and somehow she's behind wind and sometimes she's struggling to understand new ideas as they come into the world it's a fascinating

Specter Benjamin Moser Writer Sondheim COU Three Months Fifty Years Sixty Years
"auger" Discussed on The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"auger" Discussed on The Tiny Meat Gang Podcast

"But, but you know, inverted like, I I open to I was like is this this reverse correct Alina as I've anytime we've gone to like, Nordstrom, or whatever I've always like looks look at these slides and said man one day, I'd love to have those like they're so stupid to own the most like non justifiable thing to buy their just ridiculous. I've said that for at least a year year, year and a half. And you know, I I was totally like don't give me a lot of shit. And she always winds up getting me too fucking much last year. She got me fucking three thousand dollar laptop fresh off away off I want you to know. I want you to be productive. No the ended up saving me this year. So then I'm like, all right? I don't need a laptop don't give anything crazy. If I give me pair, socks cool. But I just want to give you give whatever so open see this box. And I'm like that better not be them. And I opened it and sure enough I'm like, oh my fucking God. Yeah. Then this that he is. I mean is dubs to like get fucking to get that as a gift. Yeah. 'cause and you're like don't really feel guilty sort of feel guilty. He spent the money. Yes. Why is designer shit? So good at doing that you walk into a store, and you're like, these are so absurd. I want the absurd amount of money. It's so stupid. It's so stupid. But I want them. So I think that's what it is. Is there? So ridiculous. I see the most re fucking stupidest Gucci shoes. So dumb so dumb looking at want these. So dumps looking like flicking iced out Healy's. And you're like, yeah. Yeah. I won't those. I mean has Gooch as Lindsay auger Gucci or anyone done that yet the Healy because they ain't got. Yeah. The definitely show. Yeah. Everyone's going to be pissed crocs. They did. Right. Yeah. Blend. See Kerak over Horrocks Caracas. Yeah. Yeah. That's a flex right there. But this is also kind of a flex. Yeah. We'll bre this to me is like now, I don't have to time my shoes ever. That's true. Actually, these are actually lace thing is the pro the lace issue is gone. This is actually probably all I'm going to. I'm going to get my value out of these things probably not wearing shoes for a long time. It's just going only slides even on tour going to be on stage. Just with these. Now, we talked about what we're gonna wear on tour. We talked about a lot of different things. We're gonna wear on tour. We're pump man we're a phone with this. Yeah. A lot of fun. I'm so excited. I'm pumped. Yeah. I'm really pumped even even writing some good shit. And I fought man. I I like I want everyone to have a good time. And I I would love to do this. Year, man. I I don't know. Oh, yeah. We definitely should. Yeah. Definitely should live comedies weren't said. I felt like such a dad today. I'm like, I'm a pack a sandwich that say this little brought a sandwich in a ziplock bag. I'm checking my watch. I'm like like going through fucking calendar. Notifications like packing my sandwich. I'm like damn. It's all over man. It's over I'm already a dad. I don't even have kids. I'm already a dad. I went the other way, I got Gucci slides. I got joggers on. Yeah. I got the stupid shit. You got borderline came in here. Like, I was good dad. Just got done fucking killing some pussy, dude. With it podcast. You're letting a blunt hell, yeah. Did. You're speaking to drama. We got this call. Oh shit of thirty damn. I won't be five minutes. I can keep going. No. That's not. No, nobody deal..

Alina Kerak Nordstrom Lindsay auger Gucci Horrocks Caracas Healy Gooch three thousand dollar five minutes one day
"auger" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"auger" Discussed on Unchained

"That's how I that's how I genuinely view them. I think that's unlikely to change. But I'm even reluctant to say that because if I tell you I own these five other assets. Well, what if I change my mind the next day? So a might accuse me of saying that I own those assets as of an investment recommendation. So I don't want to be in that awkward ethical dilemma of do I serve my busters or do. I serve kind of the people. I told this to. So the the the answer in this case is just kind of being quiet. We're getting close to the end of twenty eighteen what trends or events. Do you expect happen happening? Crypto in two thousand nineteen. Of real real change of topic. See well, actually, so you can make this answer about anything you want. But I've had to jettison so many questions while you were chatting that one thing. I would like you maybe to touch on is why it is that you think games is one of the first areas in which crypto could take off if he could include that. Yeah. I'll touch on both. So I think let's see on the bullish side. I think one theme will be in Suzhou, adoption, it just won't be a a line in the sand. It won't be sudden it's going to be gradual. And I think it'll game steam over the course of the next year. Another theme, I think will be the first first hints of real use cases outside of kind of the the store value. Bitcoin type use cases. Meaning the first steps the first usage of decentralized applications at a meaningful scale, so right now, there's a lot of decentral obligations some of which work like auger that just don't have active usage in meaningful sense. And that's the Scourging like it was almost better when we had we didn't have depths because we hope the prom. Is adapt launches and it works and no one wants to use it that's kind of the worst scenario. Right. Because what are we hoping for? So I and there's a lot. There's been a lot of obstacles to adoption. There's been scale ability poor user, interfaces, consumer education and marketing, there's a lot of elements of this. But on very optimistic that in twenty nineteen we'll see the first minor killer depths. I think they're likely to come in gambling gaming or something like remittances, I'm not sure it might be monetization, social media networks. It's likely to be things that aren't world changing. But that are simple and.

Suzhou auger
"auger" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"auger" Discussed on Venture Stories

"It's very possible to create a plasma trial chain with no, whether the authority tender moment or some other type of consensus in which you're getting really high throughput in a kind of friction Lewis user experience where you're not waiting for transactions to be cleared on the vision. I think over time we're, we're certainly in. I have competence in, you know, all the different initiatives that are happening with kind of a theory him two point, oh scaling. And I think it's, you know, a commendable research effort, but I don't think you necessarily need that to be shipped in order for performance applications to be live on a theory. That's interesting. We at the central and we actually stay channels for our initial land auction back end of two thousand seventeen and every day I'm seeing a little bit more progress on layer two stuff to make it easier for dubs to bologna. I think. There aren't really a lot of easy ways for dubs to do it unless they were already really familiar with the space in comfortable experimenting, but that's changing. I think it's changing by the day in like right before very is like, you know, I think I was listening to Joey from auger talk on lower shins pot counts about how they had briefly looked at layer two to to implement some of their smart contracts, and they realize like which is even know where to start, and that's perfectly understandable. But I think over time with more of these frameworks being developed in other people really Gok enough, you ideas, it's going to be easy for anyone to come in and not have domain specific knowledge about, you know, exiting layer to fraud proofs or anything like that. They can just write code in their normal language and how these frameworks kind of help them get over the last mile. And I think once that happens. We're gonna see some really compelling in fast performance use cases for discentralising. Do you guys think we need them though? Like from an investor's perspective, you guys want if you're bullish Aeneas than you want to appreciate price. Does that these depend on, you know, some critical massive apps that require high throughput or is it possible for those two number at the rim? And you guys still to be right, I think it so you know, the theorem layer one can only process so many trends per socket. So if there is a critical mass of decentralized applications that are all working at layer two, and then you know they're doing settlement transactions on layer one at some point. You're still going to reach this point where you need scale ability on the base layer. So I, I do think that at some point it's going to be necessary, but I don't think it is the pressing. Issue that that many people just to clarify, I'm not talking about, you know, a solving some scale ability issues for him. I'm talking about adoption of apps built on top of theory and some critical mass of users using these apps. I think there's there's a lot of hindering about the current state of daily active users for apps built on a theory right now. I'm just curious about. They're like your thesis around theory depends on some huge wave of mass market users onto theorem apps or whether you think that's like a nice to have for your thesis. I think it's, I think it's absolutely necessary. I think a big part of the draw is at least a good part of the investment pieces is utility driving user adoption. And from that user doctrine kind of drives the store value our narrative..

bologna Lewis fraud Joey auger
"auger" Discussed on Back To Work

Back To Work

03:47 min | 3 years ago

"auger" Discussed on Back To Work

"Nothing had happened, which is disconcerting because now you've got to deal with the drain a liquid, which that's really unusual. Yeah, yeah. No, that's scary to get rid of drain of. That's also very unusual. Yes. I've never seen that happen between is my quarter of last resort. I I'll do baking soda and vinegar for. Yeah, we tried that didn't do anything. And I tried. I tried using the one of those stoop cheap, stupid plastic. Like things and I didn't have an. Sink auger at this point and yes, so I went out got one. And that also I'll get to that a minute. So I had to then remove the drain. Oh, and I thought, you know, as a last resort, like I don't really want to use a plunger and a sink, but I- I scooped out as much of the drain owes I could and I use a plunger didn't do anything. So I realize there's something like really clogged up down here like this is not a minor clog. This is something bigger. So I hope this isn't as horrible as I think it's going to be because what I'm imagining is really great. I'm imagining moldy water from the air conditioning. Yeah, it's worse. It's worse than that. So yeah. So I Dan, I win and and got this auger thing. So I go down underneath the sink, take out the p trap and and and put this metal auger thing down in there, and I'm spinning it around spinning around. But the problem is because of the way the the pipe came out from the wall underneath the sink. I couldn't tell for sure if the auger was going up the pipe or down the pipe, and I assumed it was going up the pipe because I couldn't nothing seemed to be releasing anything. Nothing seemed to be coming out and and it wasn't clearing up anything I had do multiple times. And of course to test that you'd get a reconnect everything and try it again and fills up again. And then you gotta get the water out again and with buckets it's an awful. So. Finally, as a last resort. I okay. Now, problem number two. My wife says, Dan, you need to come in look at this, and so she points out the window looking over our backyard where we have a little concrete patio and a concrete patio has like water on it, and it hadn't rained or anything. And it's like a thousand degrees. So it's fresh water, and I look at it and she's a waters coming out from somewhere like, okay, she's like, I think the water heater which is in our attic, which is not as weird as it sounds amazing. Well, no, I take that back. It is weird, but it's common here in Texas, so and we hate it. And so this water heater, she's I'm positive that the water heater has burst and it's draining and it's leaky on. It's coming up. I'm like, okay, fine. So I, I go out anxious to tearing about it. Oh trick. Yeah, it was very angst. So I go outside and I look and there's yes, there's a big pile pool water and it's dripping down and I look up. And up over it, which is this is I found out later this is a way they do it. They do this to code. This is the reason for this. There is a little tube coming out of the. Eve underneath the roof, and that tube is dripping water out onto the ground. Oh, past the window. And the reason that they put it there in front of a window is so that you can see it. They want you to be able to see that were there's water coming out so you don't miss it because it's an indication of a problem. So I go up into the attic now. I have to say, I don't mind roaches roaches I, I'm fine with. I don't want them around. I want them around. I don't want them around. I mean, but if they're, they're, they're, they're like, it's not a big deal. I'm not afraid of roaches. You don't take it as a judgment? No, no, because it's not an indictment indictment of your life. We have tree roaches there in great abundance, Texas, and they fly. But I'm fine..

Dan Texas thousand degrees
"auger" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"auger" Discussed on Venture Stories

"We are talking on july seven auger launch is what joey joy knife yep awesome it's been a long road for you is few years tell us a bit about flossy behind auger and a little bit about history formation of the company and team shirts i mean the philosophy behind it is basically if you look at bitcoin became crushed segment cigna basically just become a digital version of gold in wasn't really be used for anything beyond people just speculating on it and so the idea behind basically what she actually could disrupt finance kind of like the high in reginal con ethos of his tack in so if you look at the financial system today there's basically three problems one is that not really global so sure trading say apple stock the odds of someone from china's on the other side trades is basically zero other promise that it's free expensing heading on what your trading integrate papers like the cost of financial intermediation dot how fees for financial transactions overpass thirty forty years is actually on up compared to pass in the last ten of peace or prominent usa solve is creating new financial markets today is very very typical it's it's kind of tribute to very wealthy primarily institutions in causing many millions of dollars to do it and the idea behind auger is to create a platform where people can pretty cheaply create new financial markets who'll how did you get started from bento now yes we we started working on it in late two thousand fourteen back damn we were looked at building on coin down in basely abandoning that because the smart contracts analogy that on just really wasn't basically nonexistent then soviet we started working with cerium started writing in this language programming held serpent just of like no one uses anymore and in fifteen i'll be racing money with the coming campaign race it off five million dollars in a cleanser and then in sixteen released beta version twenty seventeen we actually had arrived the entire code base has found bunch of our abilities in his programming language serpent rewrote it into different language paul solidity inap after that our earliest iterating on the ui so launch a couple of days let super excited amongst the one of the driving foster offers to make it easier and cheaper for really anybody to create a market can you help mcdonagh but more tangible is the the other market they mentioned was the us trader trading with somebody in china during the stock but that's not really the focus of yet auger itself you know we don't really have a specific focus for people will use it for it's really designing kind of genera platform in on it.

auger china cerium apple basely mcdonagh us five million dollars thirty forty years
"auger" Discussed on The Starters

The Starters

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"auger" Discussed on The Starters

"Doco alumni so the live okay three and four three five john smith yoga seventy that's great photo of in a hot tub the last one also had forty two points in two thousand seven and was notorious having traded with the same player a couple of times played for the raptors marcus bang marcus banks job all right well this is built the end of our twitter show here we gotta get ready for the show tonight by the way or been fantastic fans have been great that have been showing up for the live shows we have had on joinville mauve auger and the last night we had on harry giles and all three of them the personality on these guys hopefully guest tonight lottery pick and then one more show on tuesday where would it be on that game as well as i said spurs blazers on tuesday on mba tv it's the first game of the day so before pm eastern one pm pacific we'll see if leak it somehow talked to referee maybe you'll be refereeing a game tomorrow while we're calling the so joey crooked c somewhere maybe on tv desk so we had the poll will ever get the referee nba summer league game sixty percent yes no even fan we got suggestions though on what we should do when we're calling on tuesday window says just because i gave you gotta make lille call esp on the spot walk it and you think it's happened hug so yeah you gotta call speaking of lock it in brian swain sets capacities a i sports broadcast to include droughts hilarie life trump when we talk about at some point we'll drop them all and below says leash start reading tweeted the week shot outs after the third quarter commercial break we will have enough time talent the real question that everyone has been asking us what do we do if there's a wedgie what you want to run on the court we've got one we've got one allow on yet in the league with all right all right that's enough well the guy who shoots it interesting all right so thanks to join us live here for the twitter show show listening to the podcast later we'll see tonight after the last game of summer league on mba tv and then again on tuesday and then we're done we're on a little bit acacia but we got the drop off podcasts come in as well those are always fun thanks so much for joining us and remember this could be the last time you see a student twitter show could be banned after tomorrow's game brickley or.

harry giles blazers raptors twitter spurs joey nba brian swain sixty percent
"auger" Discussed on The Starters

The Starters

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"auger" Discussed on The Starters

"Doco alumni so the live okay three and four three five john smith yoga seventy that's great photo of in a hot tub the last one also had forty two points in two thousand seven and was notorious having traded with the same player a couple of times played for the raptors marcus bang marcus banks job all right well this is built the end of our twitter show here we gotta get ready for the show tonight by the way or been fantastic fans have been great that have been showing up for the live shows we have had on joinville mauve auger and the last night we had on harry giles and all three of them the personality on these guys hopefully guest tonight lottery pick and then one more show on tuesday where would it be on that game as well as i said spurs blazers on tuesday on mba tv it's the first game of the day so before pm eastern one pm pacific we'll see if leak it somehow talked to referee maybe you'll be refereeing a game tomorrow while we're calling the so joey crooked c somewhere maybe on tv desk so we had the poll will ever get the referee nba summer league game sixty percent yes no even fan we got suggestions though on what we should do when we're calling on tuesday window says just because i gave you gotta make lille call esp on the spot walk it and you think it's happened hug so yeah you gotta call speaking of lock it in brian swain sets capacities a i sports broadcast to include droughts hilarie life trump when we talk about at some point we'll drop them all and below says leash start reading tweeted the week shot outs after the third quarter commercial break we will have enough time talent the real question that everyone has been asking us what do we do if there's a wedgie what you want to run on the court we've got one we've got one allow on yet in the league with all right all right that's enough well the guy who shoots it interesting all right so thanks to join us live here for the twitter show show listening to the podcast later we'll see tonight after the last game of summer league on mba tv and then again on tuesday and then we're done we're on a little bit acacia but we got the drop off podcasts come in as well those are always fun thanks so much for joining us and remember this could be the last time you see a student twitter show could be banned after tomorrow's game brickley or.

harry giles blazers raptors twitter spurs joey nba brian swain sixty percent
"auger" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"auger" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Source along the shortest path that's essential here it sends out limbs to find food and when it finds us food source it spreads over it secretes digestive enzymes and has its meal when he doesn't yeah yeah it's pretty it's pretty great so essentially the blob right and when it doesn't find food than the limb dies in her treats back so in this it creates a network for transporting nutrients and chemicals for interstellar communication and the method allows them to perform such feats and this is generally an unit is in lab environments such feats as solving amaze like a straight up maze that you would put a mouse in as well as when presented with a miniaturized earth environment they can they can recreate some of the great trade routes of the world some of the great highway systems they can model cancer growth let me go to a little detail about the the silk road thing and this is this gets into exactly what we're talking earlier about a an algorithm attempting to to plot a course and having to hit all those stuff the salesman problem that we were discussing earlier all right okay so back in two twenty twelve computer scientists andrei outta manzke from the university of the west of england he took a globe okay and you can do this at home probably i guess if you had access to the materials he took a globe and he coded it with auger all right this is of course is the stuff in a petri dish that you know bacteria grows eat me yeah and then he in what he did is he remove the auger from the areas over the ocean so it's just covering the continents and the the land at this point okay and then he placed oath flakes at the locations of twenty four different major cities on the globe so that's a food source okay right then he introduced the slime mold all right and did this thirty different times and each time the slime mold conquered the world in a slightly different way establishing trade routes.

england auger salesman
Ben Carson points to wife on $31,000 HUD dining set purchase

Atlanta's Morning News

01:21 min | 3 years ago

Ben Carson points to wife on $31,000 HUD dining set purchase

"The bill would provide in gwinnett county sandra parrish wsb senate majority leader mitch mcconnell says he has confidence in special counsel bob muller in the russia investigation will go wherever the facts lead him and i think he will have great credibility with the american people says he agrees with the president's lawyers than muller should be allowed to finish the job while the one attorney claims the justice department is out to get the president president trump calls russia's president vladimir putin in order to congratulate him on this really house spokeswoman sarah sanders says the president did not bring up russia suspected poisoning of an ex by in britain or moscow's us election interference auger megani report senator john mccain late in and mr trump on twitter saying presidents shouldn't congratulate dictators on winning sham elections secretary ben carson claims he had nothing to do with the purchase of a thirty one thousand dollar dining room set for his office he says he left it to his wife to pick it out if anybody knew my wife they realized how ridiculous this he's supposed frugal person in the world he says he stopped the order once he found out the price wsb's jamie dupree says carson admitted to lawmakers he's been slow to learn the ways of washington wsb news time five forty nine next update on morning drive traffic includes look at i five seventy five in less than two minutes the only fiveday forecast on it letter radio accurate and dependable on news ninety five five.

Jamie Dupree Washington Ben Carson Secretary Mr Trump Senator United States Special Counsel Senate Sandra Parrish Gwinnett County Mitch Mcconnell WSB Twitter John Mccain Moscow Britain Sarah Sanders Vladimir Putin
"auger" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

01:39 min | 5 years ago

"auger" Discussed on EconTalk

"If they need spends been well timed focusing on demand side and by the demand side obviously i mean the the consumption if you like say the the people to with another people are actually take trunk's that is the also the business and wished the drunk so actually can seemed i think there's some evidence that have gotten spend a bit more time and money trying to dissuade people from tighten the substance is giving them out the by sometimes need and you know and the stade de sometimes need as well to not take them more effective than just trying to intercept i'm on my way it's such a bizarre thing actually when you're stop think about the way to win when you said it the way you said it it it just certain charge you know the aaron should sure stop people from wanting to do this and it does raise a question which from going to push to the side i have i wanna mention at that one could question auger but is involved in this at all but let's stick with the question of africa's see and effectiveness and i wanna come back to the demand side because i think it's been it's very interesting almost stick but the effort is he of the supply side part it seems logical what we're going to do says the government the government officials is we're going to destroy these plants and that's going to do too sentimental should be less of it to start with because there's their destroyed some but and the second thing introduce it should raised the price mention discourage people but you point out to both closer shockingly are per surprisingly ineffectiveness why well you're right is a bit of our jokes here i mean that the police in warren drugs has been a failure that it's not entirely right in some ways actually government.

aaron auger africa warren